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Sample records for acid-binding protein genes

  1. Associations of heart and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein gene expression with intramuscular fat content in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens, F.; Verburg, F.J.; Moerkerk, van H.T.; Engel, B.; Buist, W.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Pas, te M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Intramuscular fat content is a major determinant of meat quality in pigs. Previously, polymorphisms in the adipocyte and heart fatty acid-binding protein genes, A-FABP and H-FABP, have been significantly associated with genetic variation of intramuscular fat content in a Duroc pig population.

  2. Associations of heart and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein gene expression with intramuscular fat content in pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens, F.; Verburg, F.J.; Moerkerk, H.T.B. van; Engel, B.; Buist, W.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Pas, M.F. te

    2001-01-01

    Intramuscular fat content is a major determinant of meat quality in pigs. Previously, polymorphisms in the adipocyte and heart fatty acid-binding protein genes, A-FABP and H-FABP, have been significantly associated with genetic variation of intramuscular fat content in a Duroc pig population.

  3. Localization of the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene relative to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated breakpoint on human chromosome 15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); H. de Leeuw (H.); E.J. Dekker (Erik Jan); J.M. Rijks (Jolianne); N. Spurr (N.); A.M. Ledbetter (Andrew M.); E. Kootwijk (E.); M.J. Vaessen (Marie-Josée)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA human genomic fragment comprising the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene was isolated. By using a panel of somatic cell hybrids, this gene could be assigned to human chromosome 15. Subsequently, a possible involvement of the CRABP gene in translocation (15;17)

  4. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jett, Marti

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that there is a distinct pattern of fatty acid binding protein (FAEP) expression in prostate cancer vs normal cells and that finding has be confirmed in patient samples of biopsy specimens...

  5. The effect of adipocyte and heart fatty acid-binding protein genes on intramuscular fat and backfat content in Meishan crossbred pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens, F.; Koning, de D.J.; Harders, F.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Veerkamp, R.L.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Pas, te M.F.W.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of genetic variation in porcine adipocyte and heart fatty acid-binding protein genes, A-FABP and H-FABP, respectively, on intramuscular fat (IMF) content and backfat thickness (BFT) were examined in F2 crossbreds of Meishan and Western pigs. The involvement of each FABP gene in IMF accretion

  6. Cloning and characterization of the fatty acid-binding protein gene from the protoscolex of Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hua-Ming; Xie, Yue; Fu, Yan; Yang, Ying-Dong; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xi; Lai, Wei-Ming; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-05-01

    Taenia multiceps (Cestoda: Taeniidae), a worldwide cestode parasite, is emerging as an important helminthic zoonosis due to serious or fatal central nervous system disease commonly known as coenurosis in domestic and wild ruminants including humans. Herein, a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) gene was identified from transcriptomic data in T. multiceps. This gene, which contains a complete coding sequence, was amplified by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding protein, which was named TmFABP, had a molecular weight of 14 kDa, and subsequently was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was purified on Ni-NTA beads (Bio-Rad). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analyses showed that the purified recombinant protein caused immunogenicity. Immunohistochemical studies showed that TmFABP was expressed at the tegumental level in the protoscolices and in the cells between the body wall and parenchyma layer of the cestode. In sections from gravid proglottids, intense staining was detected in the uterus and eggs. Based on this, TmFABP could be switched on during differentiation of germinative layers to protoscoleces and from metacestodes to adult worms. Taken together, our results already reported for T. multiceps suggest the possibility of TmFABP developing a vaccine to control and prevent coenurosis.

  7. Fatty acid-binding protein genes of the ancient, air-breathing, ray-finned fish, spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Fontenot, Quenton; Farrara, Allyse; Wright, Jonathan M

    2018-03-01

    With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, the genomic sequence of many disparate species has led to the relatively new discipline of genomics, the study of genome structure, function and evolution. Much work has been focused on the role of whole genome duplications (WGD) in the architecture of extant vertebrate genomes, particularly those of teleost fishes which underwent a WGD early in the teleost radiation >230 million years ago (mya). Our past work has focused on the fate of duplicated copies of a multigene family coding for the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes in the teleost fishes. To define the evolutionary processes that determined the fate of duplicated genes and generated the structure of extant fish genomes, however, requires comparative genomic analysis with a fish lineage that diverged before the teleost WGD, such as the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), an ancient, air-breathing, ray-finned fish. Here, we describe the genomic organization, chromosomal location and tissue-specific expression of a subfamily of the iLBP genes that code for fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps) in spotted gar. Based on this work, we have defined the minimum suite of fabp genes prior to their duplication in the teleost lineages ~230-400 mya. Spotted gar, therefore, serves as an appropriate outgroup, or ancestral/ancient fish, that did not undergo the teleost-specific WGD. As such, analyses of the spatio-temporal regulation of spotted gar genes provides a foundation to determine whether the duplicated fabp genes have been retained in teleost genomes owing to either sub- or neofunctionalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) gene is regulated by HNF-4α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapper, Maja; Boehme, Mike; Nitz, Inke; Doering, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The cytosolic human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) is proposed to be involved in intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of hFABP2 by the endodermal hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α), involved in regulation of genes of fatty acid metabolism and differentiation. Electromobility shift assays demonstrated that HNF-4α binds at position -324 to -336 within the hFABP2 promoter. Mutation of this HNF-4 binding site abolished the luciferase reporter activity of hFABP2 in postconfluent Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, this mutation reduced the activation of the hFABP2 promoter by HNF-4α by about 50%. Thus, binding element at position -336/-324 essentially determines the transcriptional activity of promoter and may be important in control of hFABP2 expression by dietary lipids and differentiation. Studying genotype interactions of hFABP2 and HNF-4α, that are both candidate genes for diabetes type 2, may be a powerful approach

  9. The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) gene is regulated by HNF-4{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapper, Maja [Molecular Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Boehme, Mike [Molecular Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Nitz, Inke [Molecular Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Doering, Frank [Molecular Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2007-04-27

    The cytosolic human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) is proposed to be involved in intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of hFABP2 by the endodermal hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}), involved in regulation of genes of fatty acid metabolism and differentiation. Electromobility shift assays demonstrated that HNF-4{alpha} binds at position -324 to -336 within the hFABP2 promoter. Mutation of this HNF-4 binding site abolished the luciferase reporter activity of hFABP2 in postconfluent Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, this mutation reduced the activation of the hFABP2 promoter by HNF-4{alpha} by about 50%. Thus, binding element at position -336/-324 essentially determines the transcriptional activity of promoter and may be important in control of hFABP2 expression by dietary lipids and differentiation. Studying genotype interactions of hFABP2 and HNF-4{alpha}, that are both candidate genes for diabetes type 2, may be a powerful approach.

  10. The cancer-promoting gene fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is epigenetically regulated during human prostate carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Koichiro; Kinameri, Ayumi; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Senga, Shogo; Ke, Youqiang; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2016-02-15

    FABPs (fatty-acid-binding proteins) are a family of low-molecular-mass intracellular lipid-binding proteins consisting of ten isoforms. FABPs are involved in binding and storing hydrophobic ligands such as long-chain fatty acids, as well as transporting these ligands to the appropriate compartments in the cell. FABP5 is overexpressed in multiple types of tumours. Furthermore, up-regulation of FABP5 is strongly associated with poor survival in triple-negative breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the specific up-regulation of the FABP5 gene in these cancers remain poorly characterized. In the present study, we determined that FABP5 has a typical CpG island around its promoter region. The DNA methylation status of the CpG island in the FABP5 promoter of benign prostate cells (PNT2), prostate cancer cells (PC-3, DU-145, 22Rv1 and LNCaP) and human normal or tumour tissue was assessed by bisulfite sequencing analysis, and then confirmed by COBRA (combined bisulfite restriction analysis) and qAMP (quantitative analysis of DNA methylation using real-time PCR). These results demonstrated that overexpression of FABP5 in prostate cancer cells can be attributed to hypomethylation of the CpG island in its promoter region, along with up-regulation of the direct trans-acting factors Sp1 (specificity protein 1) and c-Myc. Together, these mechanisms result in the transcriptional activation of FABP5 expression during human prostate carcinogenesis. Importantly, silencing of Sp1, c-Myc or FABP5 expression led to a significant decrease in cell proliferation, indicating that up-regulation of FABP5 expression by Sp1 and c-Myc is critical for the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 gene encodes a protein that contains potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding and a putative nucleotide binding sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.S.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (USA)); Weber, S. (Kodak Research Park, Rochester, NY (USA))

    1988-07-25

    The RAD18 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV damaged DNA. The authors have isolated the RAD18 gene, determined its nucleotide sequence and examined if deletion mutations of this gene show different or more pronounced phenotypic effects than the previously described point mutations. The RAD18 gene open reading frame encodes a protein of 487 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 55,512. The RAD18 protein contains three potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding, and a putative nucleotide binding sequence that is present in many proteins that bind and hydrolyze ATP. The DNA binding and nucleotide binding activities could enable the RAD18 protein to bind damaged sites in the template DNA with high affinity. Alternatively, or in addition, RAD18 protein may be a transcriptional regulator. The RAD18 deletion mutation resembles the previously described point mutations in its effects on viability, DNA repair, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation.

  12. PURA, the gene encoding Pur-alpha, member of an ancient nucleic acid-binding protein family with mammalian neurological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2018-02-15

    The PURA gene encodes Pur-alpha, a 322 amino acid protein with repeated nucleic acid binding domains that are highly conserved from bacteria through humans. PUR genes with a single copy of this domain have been detected so far in spirochetes and bacteroides. Lower eukaryotes possess one copy of the PUR gene, whereas chordates possess 1 to 4 PUR family members. Human PUR genes encode Pur-alpha (Pura), Pur-beta (Purb) and two forms of Pur-gamma (Purg). Pur-alpha is a protein that binds specific DNA and RNA sequence elements. Human PURA, located at chromosome band 5q31, is under complex control of three promoters. The entire protein coding sequence of PURA is contiguous within a single exon. Several studies have found that overexpression or microinjection of Pura inhibits anchorage-independent growth of oncogenically transformed cells and blocks proliferation at either G1-S or G2-M checkpoints. Effects on the cell cycle may be mediated by interaction of Pura with cellular proteins including Cyclin/Cdk complexes and the Rb tumor suppressor protein. PURA knockout mice die shortly after birth with effects on brain and hematopoietic development. In humans environmentally induced heterozygous deletions of PURA have been implicated in forms of myelodysplastic syndrome and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia. Pura plays a role in AIDS through association with the HIV-1 protein, Tat. In the brain Tat and Pura association in glial cells activates transcription and replication of JC polyomavirus, the agent causing the demyelination disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Tat and Pura also act to stimulate replication of the HIV-1 RNA genome. In neurons Pura accompanies mRNA transcripts to sites of translation in dendrites. Microdeletions in the PURA locus have been implicated in several neurological disorders. De novo PURA mutations have been related to a spectrum of phenotypes indicating a potential PURA syndrome. The nucleic acid, G-rich Pura binding

  13. Molecular cloning and tissue expression of the fatty acid-binding protein (Es-FABP gene in female Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis

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    He Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs, small cytosolic proteins that function in the uptake and utilization of fatty acids, have been extensively studied in higher vertebrates while invertebrates have received little attention despite similar nutritional requirements during periods of reproductive activity. Results Therefore, a cDNA encoding Eriocheir sinensis FABP (Es-FABP was cloned based upon EST analysis of a hepatopancreas cDNA library. The full length cDNA was 750 bp and encoded a 131 aa polypeptide that was highly homologous to related genes reported in shrimp. The 9108 bp Es-FABP gene contained four exons that were interrupted by three introns, a genomic organization common among FABP multigene family members in vertebrates. Gene expression analysis, as determined by RT-PCR, revealed the presence of Es-FABP transcripts in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, ovary, gills, muscle, thoracic ganglia, heart, and intestine, but not stomach or eyestalk. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Es-FABP expression in ovary, hemocytes, and hepatopancreas was dependent on the status of ovarian development, with peak expression observed in January. Conclusions Evidence provided in the present report supports a role of Es-FABP in lipid transport during the period of rapid ovarian growth in E. sinensis, and indirectly confirms the participation of the hepatopancreas, ovary, and hemocytes in lipid nutrient absorption and utilization processes.

  14. Differential transcriptional modulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by dietary fatty acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio: evidence for subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization of duplicated genes

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    Denovan-Wright Eileen M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation (DDC model, subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization have been proposed as important processes driving the retention of duplicated genes in the genome. These processes are thought to occur by gain or loss of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. We tested the DDC model by determining the transcriptional induction of fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps genes by dietary fatty acids (FAs in zebrafish. We chose zebrafish for this study for two reasons: extensive bioinformatics resources are available for zebrafish at zfin.org and zebrafish contains many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication event that occurred early in the ray-finned fish lineage approximately 230-400 million years ago. Adult zebrafish were fed diets containing either fish oil (12% lipid, rich in highly unsaturated fatty acid, sunflower oil (12% lipid, rich in linoleic acid, linseed oil (12% lipid, rich in linolenic acid, or low fat (4% lipid, low fat diet for 10 weeks. FA profiles and the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in intestine, liver, muscle and brain of zebrafish were determined. Result FA profiles assayed by gas chromatography differed in the intestine, brain, muscle and liver depending on diet. The steady-state level of mRNA for three sets of duplicated genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, and fabp11a/fabp11b, was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. In brain, the steady-state level of fabp7b mRNAs was induced in fish fed the linoleic acid-rich diet; in intestine, the transcript level of fabp1b.1 and fabp7b were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich diet; in liver, the level of fabp7a mRNAs was elevated in fish fed the low fat diet; and in muscle, the level of fabp7a and fabp11a mRNAs were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich or the low fat diets. In all cases

  15. Fatty-acid binding protein 4 gene variants and childhood obesity: potential implications for insulin sensitivity and CRP levels

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    Bhattacharjee Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Obesity increases the risk for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in both adults and children. FABP4 is a member of the intracellular lipid-binding protein family that is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue, and plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to measure FABP4 plasma levels, assess FABP4 allelic variants, and explore potential associations with fasting glucose and insulin levels in young school-age children with and without obesity. Methods A total of 309 consecutive children ages 5-7 years were recruited. Children were divided based on BMI z score into Obese (OB; BMI z score >1.65 and non-obese (NOB. Fasting plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, hsCRP, and FABP4 levels were measured. HOMA was used as correlate of insulin sensitivity. Four SNPs of the human FABP4 gene (rs1051231, rs2303519, rs16909233 and rs1054135, corresponding to several critical regions of the encoding FABP4 gene sequence were genotyped. Results Compared to NOB, circulating FABP4 levels were increased in OB, as were LDL, hsCRP and HOMA. FABP4 levels correlated with BMI, and also contributed to the variance of HOMA and hsCRP, but not serum lipids. The frequency of rs1054135 allelic variant was increased in OB, and was associated with increased FABP4 levels, while the presence of rs16909233 variant allele, although similar in OB and NOB, was associated with increased HOMA values. Conclusions Childhood obesity is associated with higher FABP4 levels that may promote cardiometabolic risk. The presence of selective SNPs in the FABP4 gene may account for increased risk for insulin resistance or systemic inflammation in the context of obesity.

  16. Association of fatty acid-binding protein 2 and fat mass and obesity-associated gene polymorphism with primary open-angle glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Shania; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Chandra, Anu; Singh, Luxmi; Mahdi, Farzana

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was carried out to investigate the association of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene polymorphism with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) cases and controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study includes 122 POAG cases and 112 controls. FABP2 and FTO gene polymorphisms in cases and controls were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. RESULTS: The mean ages were 49.88 ± 12.34 and 53.74 ± 11.87 years in POAG cases and control groups, respectively. The FABP2 gene AA, AT, TT genotype frequencies were 12.90%, 62.40%, 24.80% in POAG cases and 20.60%, 64.70%, 14.70% in healthy controls, respectively. The frequencies of A and T allele in POAG cases were 44.06% and 55.94% as compared to 52.94% and 47.06% in the controls. The FTO gene AA, AT, TT genotype frequencies were 2.00%, 79.20%, 18.80% in cases and 0%, 75.50%, 24.50% in healthy controls, respectively. The frequencies of A and T allele in POAG cases were 41.58% and 58.42% as compared to 37.75% and 62.25% in the controls. No significant difference in the frequencies of FABP2 and FTO genotype was found between POAG cases and controls. CONCLUSION: We could not identify the possible association of FABP2 and FTO gene polymorphism with POAG; however, further studies with larger sample size in different population are require to clarify the role of FABP2 and FTO genes in susceptibility to POAG. PMID:29034152

  17. Variability in the leptin, leptin receptor and heart fatty acid binding protein genes in relationship with meat quality traits in pigs

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    Renata Mikolášová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The leptin (LEP-HinfI, leptin receptor (LEPR-HpaII and heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP-HinfI genes and their genotypes combination (LEP-HinfI *LEPR-HpaII were tested for associations with the pH1, pH24, myoglobin content (mg/100 g, intramuscular fat content (% and remission (%. The genotypes were determined in Large White, Landrace and Duroc breeds (n = 106, 56 and 4, respectively. The allele frequencies were: LEP-HinfI: C = 0.133 T = 0.867; LEPR-HpaII: A = 0.331 B = 0.669; H-FABP-HinfI: H = 0.745 h = 0.255. The populations of breeds were in the genetic equilibrium according to the χ2 test in the tested loci. The combinations of LEP-HinfI and LEPR-HpaII were significantly associated with the pH24 and remission. The H-FABP-HinfI locus was significantly associated with intramuscular fat content.

  18. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

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    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A radial glia gene marker, fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, is involved in proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma cells.

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    Antonella De Rosa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is among the most deadly cancers. A number of studies suggest that a fraction of tumor cells with stem cell features (Glioma Stem-like Cells, GSC might be responsible for GBM recurrence and aggressiveness. GSC similarly to normal neural stem cells, can form neurospheres (NS in vitro, and seem to mirror the genetic features of the original tumor better than glioma cells growing adherently in the presence of serum. Using cDNA microarray analysis we identified a number of relevant genes for glioma biology that are differentially expressed in adherent cells and neurospheres derived from the same tumor. Fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7 was identified as one of the most highly expressed genes in NS compared to their adherent counterpart. We found that down-regulation of FABP7 expression in NS by small interfering RNAs significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. We also evaluated the potential involvement of FABP7 in response to radiotherapy, as this treatment may cause increased tumor infiltration. Migration of irradiated NS was associated to increased expression of FABP7. In agreement with this, in vivo reduced tumorigenicity of GBM cells with down-regulated expression of FABP7 was associated to decreased expression of the migration marker doublecortin. Notably, we observed that PPAR antagonists affect FABP7 expression and decrease the migration capability of NS after irradiation. As a whole, the data emphasize the role of FABP7 expression in GBM migration and provide translational hints on the timing of treatment with anti-FABP7 agents like PPAR antagonists during GBM evolution.

  20. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken

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    Yong Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC. A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC, 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC, and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176 and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145. The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035 was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time.

  1. Tissue-specific differential induction of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by the peroxisome proliferator, clofibrate, in zebrafish (Danio rerio

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    Venkatachalam Ananda B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Force, Lynch and Conery proposed the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC model in which partitioning of ancestral functions (subfunctionalization and acquisition of novel functions (neofunctionalization were the two primary mechanisms for the retention of duplicated genes. The DDC model was tested by analyzing the transcriptional induction of the duplicated fatty acid-binding protein (fabp genes by clofibrate in zebrafish. Clofibrate is a specific ligand of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR; it activates PPAR which then binds to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE to induce the transcriptional initiation of genes primarily involved in lipid homeostasis. Zebrafish was chosen as our model organism as it has many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD event that occurred ~230-400 million years ago in the teleost fish lineage. We assayed the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA transcripts in liver, intestine, muscle, brain and heart for four sets of duplicated fabp genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, fabp10a/fabp10b and fabp11a/fabp11b in zebrafish fed different concentrations of clofibrate. Result Electron microscopy showed an increase in the number of peroxisomes and mitochondria in liver and heart, respectively, in zebrafish fed clofibrate. Clofibrate also increased the steady-state level of acox1 mRNA and hnRNA transcripts in different tissues, a gene with a functional PPRE. These results demonstrate that zebrafish is responsive to clofibrate, unlike some other fishes. The levels of fabp mRNA and hnRNA transcripts for the four sets of duplicated fabp genes was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. The level of hnRNA coded by a gene is an indirect estimate of the rate of transcriptional initiation of that gene. Clofibrate increased the steady-state level of fabp mRNAs and hn

  2. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

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    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Value of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: heart-type fatty acid-binding protein, acute coronary syndrome, biomarker. ... is essential to prevent major complications and death. Routinely used biomarkers such ..... fatty acid binding proteins: their function and physiological sig-.

  4. Expression of a fatty acid-binding protein in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, H.

    1991-06-01

    The unicellular eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transformed with a plasmid containing a cDNA fragment encoding bovine heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP C ) under the control of the inducible yeast GAL10 promoter, expressed FABP during growth on galactose. The maximum level of immunoreactive FABP, identical in size and isoelectric point to native protein, was reached after approximately 16 hours of induction. In contrast, transcription of the gene was induced within half an hour. Both, protein and mRNA were unstable and degraded within 1 h after repression of transcription. Analysis of subcellular fractions showed that FABP was exclusively associated with the cytosol. FABP expressed in yeast cells was functional as was demonstrated by its capacity to bind long chain fatty acids in an in vitro assay. Growth of all transformants on galactose as the carbon source showed no phenotype at temperatures up to 37 deg C, but the growth of FABP-expressing cells at 37 deg C was significantly retarded. Among the biochemical effects of FABP expression on lipid metabolism is a marked reduction of chain elongation and desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-palmitic acid. This effect is most pronounced in triacylglycerols and phospholipids when cells grow at 30 deg C and 37 deg C, respectively. In an in vitro assay determining the desaturation of palmitoyl CoA by microsomal membranes cytosol with or without exo- or endogenous FABP showed the same stimulation of the reaction. The desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-stearic acid, the pattern of unlabelled fatty acids (saturated vs. unsaturated) and the distribution of exogenously added radioactive fatty acids (palmitic, stearic or oleic acid) among lipid classes was not significantly affected. Using high concentrations (1 mM) the uptake of fatty acids was first stimulated and then inhibited when FABP was expressed. (author)

  5. The Ala54Thr Polymorphism of the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2 Gene Modulates HDL Cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. Salto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The alanine to threonine amino acid substitution at codon 54 (Ala54Thr of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (FABP2 has been associated with elevated levels of insulin and blood glucose as well as with dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of this FABP2 polymorphism in Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D in the context of a three-month intervention to determine if the polymorphism differentially modulates selected clinical outcomes. For this study, we genotyped 43 participant samples and performed post-hoc outcome analysis of the profile changes in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid panel and body composition, stratified by the Ala54Thr polymorphism. Our results show that the Thr54 allele carriers (those who were heterozygous or homozygous for the threonine-encoding allele had lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels at baseline compared to the Ala54 homozygotes (those who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele. Both groups made clinically important improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic control as a response to the intervention. Whereas the Ala54 homozygotes decreased HDL cholesterol in the context of an overall total cholesterol decrease, Thr54 allele carriers increased HDL cholesterol as part of an overall total cholesterol decrease. We conclude that the Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 modulates HDL cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with T2D and that Thr54 allele carriers may be responsive in interventions that include dietary changes.

  6. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Choromańska

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA, and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum. So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first identified or where they can be found in the greatest concentration. The most important FABPs were isolated from the liver (L-FABP, heart (H-FABP, intestine (I-FABP, brain (B-FABP, epidermis (E-FABP and adipocytes (A-FABP. Determination of H-FABP is used in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction, and L-FABP in kidney lesions of different etiologies. It is postulated that FABPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Elevated levels of A-FABP have been found in the pericardial fat tissue and were associated with cardiac dysfunction in obese people. A rise in A-FABP has been observed in patients with type II diabetes. I-FABP is known as a marker of cell damage in the small intestine. Increased concentration of B-FABP has been associated with human brain tumors such as glioblastoma and astrocytoma, as well as with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other disorders of cognitive function. The aim of this work was to present current data on the clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins.

  7. The primary structure of fatty-acid-binding protein from nurse shark liver. Structural and evolutionary relationship to the mammalian fatty-acid-binding protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medzihradszky, K F; Gibson, B W; Kaur, S; Yu, Z H; Medzihradszky, D; Burlingame, A L; Bass, N M

    1992-02-01

    The primary structure of a fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) was determined by high-performance tandem mass spectrometry (employing multichannel array detection) and Edman degradation. Shark liver FABP consists of 132 amino acids with an acetylated N-terminal valine. The chemical molecular mass of the intact protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Mr = 15124 +/- 2.5) was in good agreement with that calculated from the amino acid sequence (Mr = 15121.3). The amino acid sequence of shark liver FABP displays significantly greater similarity to the FABP expressed in mammalian heart, peripheral nerve myelin and adipose tissue (61-53% sequence similarity) than to the FABP expressed in mammalian liver (22% similarity). Phylogenetic trees derived from the comparison of the shark liver FABP amino acid sequence with the members of the mammalian fatty-acid/retinoid-binding protein gene family indicate the initial divergence of an ancestral gene into two major subfamilies: one comprising the genes for mammalian liver FABP and gastrotropin, the other comprising the genes for mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins I and II, cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP, heart FABP and shark liver FABP, the latter having diverged from the ancestral gene that ultimately gave rise to the present day mammalian heart-FABP, adipocyte FABP and myelin P2 protein sequences. The sequence for intestinal FABP from the rat could be assigned to either subfamily, depending on the approach used for phylogenetic tree construction, but clearly diverged at a relatively early evolutionary time point. Indeed, sequences proximately ancestral or closely related to mammalian intestinal FABP, liver FABP, gastrotropin and the retinoid-binding group of proteins appear to have arisen prior to the divergence of shark liver FABP and should therefore also be present in elasmobranchs

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and a Novel Mammary Derived Growth Inhibitor Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG in Suppression of Mammary Tumor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yiliang

    2001-01-01

    We have previously identified and characterized a novel tumor growth inhibitor and a fatty acid binding protein in human mammary gland and named it as Mammary derived growth inhibitor Related Gene MRG...

  9. Two novel Mesocestoides vogae fatty acid binding proteins--functional and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Canclini, Lucía; Corvo, Ileana; Esteves, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    This work describes two new fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) identified in the parasite platyhelminth Mesocestoides vogae (syn. corti). The corresponding polypeptide chains share 62% identical residues and overall 90% similarity according to CLUSTALX default conditions. Compared with Cestoda FABPs, these proteins share the highest similarity score with the Taenia solium protein. M. vogae FABPs are also phylogenetically related to the FABP3/FABP4 mammalian FABP subfamilies. The native proteins were purified by chromatographical procedures, and apparent molecular mass and isoelectric point were determined. Immunolocalization studies determined the localization of the expression of these proteins in the larval form of the parasite. The genomic exon-intron organization of both genes is also reported, and supports new insights on intron evolution. Consensus motifs involved in splicing were identified.

  10. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Gruber

    Full Text Available We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp., two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II. We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  11. Common variants of the liver fatty acid binding protein gene influence the risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance in Spanish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Mansego

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: The main objective was to evaluate the association between SNPs and haplotypes of the FABP1-4 genes and type 2 diabetes, as well as its interaction with fat intake, in one general Spanish population. The association was replicated in a second population in which HOMA index was also evaluated. METHODS: 1217 unrelated individuals were selected from a population-based study [Hortega study: 605 women; mean age 54 y; 7.8% with type 2 diabetes]. The replication population included 805 subjects from Segovia, a neighboring region of Spain (446 females; mean age 52 y; 10.3% with type 2 diabetes. DM2 mellitus was defined in a similar way in both studies. Fifteen SNPs previously associated with metabolic traits or with potential influence in the gene expression within the FABP1-4 genes were genotyped with SNPlex and tested. Age, sex and BMI were used as covariates in the logistic regression model. RESULTS: One polymorphism (rs2197076 and two haplotypes of the FABP-1 showed a strong association with the risk of DM2 in the original population. This association was further confirmed in the second population as well as in the pooled sample. None of the other analyzed variants in FABP2, FABP3 and FABP4 genes were associated. There was not a formal interaction between rs2197076 and fat intake. A significant association between the rs2197076 and the haplotypes of the FABP1 and HOMA-IR was also present in the replication population. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports the role of common variants of the FABP-1 gene in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians.

  12. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) genes polymorphism with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Tasleem; Fatima, Jalees; Ahmed, Faisal; Abbas, Shania; Zaidi, Zeashan Haider; Singh, Seema; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is growing in an epidemic manner across the world with an expected doubling of the incidence to millions of affected individuals in the last decades. At present, adequate data are not available regarding the ACE and FABP2 polymorphisms and their susceptibility with T2DM cases in the North Indian population. Thus we conceived the need for further study of ACE (I/D) and FABP2 (Ala54Thr) genes polymorphism and its susceptibility to T2DM in the North Indian population. In this study, a total of 300 subjects (including 190 T2DM cases and 110 controls) participated. ACE and FABP2 gene polymorphisms in the cases and controls were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of ACE I/I, I/D and D/D genotypes in T2DM cases and controls were 28.73%, 55.17%, 16.09% and 13.63%, 57.95%, 28.40%, respectively. The frequencies of FABP2 Ala54Ala, Ala54Thr and Thr54Thr in T2DM cases were 18.39%, 66.66%, 14.94% and 22.72%, 61.36%, 15.90% in controls, respectively. ACE I/I genotype was significantly more frequent in cases as compared to controls (p = 0.003, χ(2) = 9.13). It appears that the ACE I/I genotype frequency was significantly higher in the T2DM cases as compared to the controls. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...

  14. Identification of nucleic acid binding sites on translin-associated factor X (TRAX protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Deep Gupta

    Full Text Available Translin and TRAX proteins play roles in very important cellular processes such as DNA recombination, spatial and temporal expression of mRNA, and in siRNA processing. Translin forms a homomeric nucleic acid binding complex and binds to ssDNA and RNA. However, a mutant translin construct that forms homomeric complex lacking nucleic acid binding activity is able to form fully active heteromeric translin-TRAX complex when co-expressed with TRAX. A substantial progress has been made in identifying translin sites that mediate its binding activity, while TRAX was thought not to bind DNA or RNA on its own. We here for the first time demonstrate nucleic acid binding to TRAX by crosslinking radiolabeled ssDNA to heteromeric translin-TRAX complex using UV-laser. The TRAX and translin, photochemically crosslinked with ssDNA, were individually detected on SDS-PAGE. We mutated two motifs in TRAX and translin, designated B2 and B3, to help define the nucleic acid binding sites in the TRAX sequence. The most pronounced effect was observed in the mutants of B3 motif that impaired nucleic acid binding activity of the heteromeric complexes. We suggest that both translin and TRAX are binding competent and contribute to the nucleic acid binding activity.

  15. Identification of Nucleic Acid Binding Sites on Translin-Associated Factor X (TRAX) Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay

    2012-01-01

    Translin and TRAX proteins play roles in very important cellular processes such as DNA recombination, spatial and temporal expression of mRNA, and in siRNA processing. Translin forms a homomeric nucleic acid binding complex and binds to ssDNA and RNA. However, a mutant translin construct that forms homomeric complex lacking nucleic acid binding activity is able to form fully active heteromeric translin-TRAX complex when co-expressed with TRAX. A substantial progress has been made in identifying translin sites that mediate its binding activity, while TRAX was thought not to bind DNA or RNA on its own. We here for the first time demonstrate nucleic acid binding to TRAX by crosslinking radiolabeled ssDNA to heteromeric translin-TRAX complex using UV-laser. The TRAX and translin, photochemically crosslinked with ssDNA, were individually detected on SDS-PAGE. We mutated two motifs in TRAX and translin, designated B2 and B3, to help define the nucleic acid binding sites in the TRAX sequence. The most pronounced effect was observed in the mutants of B3 motif that impaired nucleic acid binding activity of the heteromeric complexes. We suggest that both translin and TRAX are binding competent and contribute to the nucleic acid binding activity. PMID:22427937

  16. New insights into structure and function of the different types of fatty acid-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Augusta Wilhelmina

    2002-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. They may also modulate the effect of fatty acids on various metabolic enzymes and receptors and on cellular

  17. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) concentrations increase following intestinal ischemia in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niewold, T.A.; Meinen, M.; Meulen, van der J.

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is an intracellular epithelial protein in the intestinal mucosa of many animals. IFABP appears in the circulation following epithelial damage, and in humans, is proven to be a parameter for damage to the mucosa. In this paper, an ELISA test designed for

  18. Urinary excretion of fatty acid-binding proteins in idiopathic membranous nephropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, J.M.; Deegens, J.K.J.; Steenbergen, E.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is suggested that proteinuria contributes to progressive renal failure by inducing tubular cell injury. The site of injury is unknown. Most studies have used markers of proximal tubular cell damage. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carrier proteins with different

  19. Tsetse salivary gland proteins 1 and 2 are high affinity nucleic acid binding proteins with residual nuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Caljon

    Full Text Available Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2 display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with K(D values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents.

  20. Early Diagnosis of Intestinal Ischemia Using Urinary and Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuijls, Geertje; van Wijck, Kim; Grootjans, Joep; Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Heineman, Erik; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Buurman, Wim A.; Poeze, Martijn

    Objective: This study aims at improving diagnosis of intestinal ischemia, by measuring plasma and urinary fatty acid binding protein (FABP) levels. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients suspected of intestinal ischemia were included and blood and urine were sampled at time of suspicion. Plasma and

  1. Lack of upregulation of epidermal fatty acid binding protein in dithranol induced irritation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kucharekova, M.; Vissers, W.H.P.M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Valk, P.G.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The exact role of epidermal fatty acid binding protein (E-FABP) in skin is unknown. A restoration of the barrier function may be associated with an upregulation of E-FABP. Moreover, E-FABP is upregulated in a variety of cells in response to oxidative stress. A recent observation that dithranol

  2. Circulating adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, juvenile obesity, and metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Patryn, Eliza; Bednarz-Misa, Iwona; Mierzchala, Magdalena; Hotowy, Katarzyna; Czapinska, Elzbieta; Kustrzeba-Wojcicka, Irena; Gamian, Andrzej; Noczynska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) links obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) and might be targeted in future therapies. Its utility as a MetS biomarker has been suggested in adults but has not been examined in children/adolescents. Our objectives were to identify metabolic parameters

  3. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Bottasso Arias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs: intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs’ expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa.

  4. Characterization of fatty acid binding by the P2 myelin protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudaitis, P.G.; Weise, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, significant sequence homology has been found between the P2 protein of peripheral myelin and intracellular retinoid- and fatty acid-binding proteins. They have found that salt extracts of bovine intradural nerve roots contain the P2 basic protein in association with free fatty acid. Preliminary results from quantitative analyses showed a ratio of 0.4-1.1 fatty acid (mainly oleate and palmitate) per P2 molecule. P2/ligand interactions were partially characterized using ( 3 H)-oleate in gel permeation assays and binding studies using lipidex to separated bound and free fatty acid. Methyloleate was found to displace ( 3 H)-oleate from P2, indicating that ligand binding interactions are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. On the other hand, myristic acid and retinol did not inhibit the binding of oleate to the protein, results consistent with a decided affinity for long chain fatty acids but not for the retinoids. The binding between P2 and oleic acid showed an apparent Kd in the micromolar range, a value comparable to those found for other fatty acid-binding proteins. From these results they conclude that P2 shares not only structural homology with certain fatty acid binding proteins but also an ability to bind long chain fatty acids. Although the significance of these similarities is not yet clear, they may, by analogy, expect P2 to have a role in PNS lipid metabolism

  5. Fatty acid-binding protein in liver and small intestine of the preruminant calf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cytosol obtained from differential centrifugation of homogenates from liver and small intestine mucosa was incubated with 1-[ 14 C] oleic acid or 1-[ 14 C] palmitic acid and filtered through Sephadex G-75. Elution profiles for both tissues showed radioactivity in two main peaks, the first corresponding to binding of fatty acid to high molecular weight proteins and the second to a protein fraction with a molecular weight of approximately 12,000 daltons. The low molecular weight fraction had high fatty acid-binding activity, which was greater for oleic than palmitic acid. The findings demonstrate the presence of fatty acid-binding protein in liver and intestinal mucosa of the preruminant calf

  6. Towards an understanding of Mesocestoides vogae fatty acid binding proteins' roles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Alvite

    Full Text Available Two fatty acid binding proteins, MvFABPa and MvFABPb were identified in the parasite Mesocestoides vogae (Platyhelmithes, Cestoda. Fatty acid binding proteins are small intracellular proteins whose members exhibit great diversity. Proteins of this family have been identified in many organisms, of which Platyhelminthes are among the most primitive. These proteins have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo synthesis of fatty acids is absent. Fatty acids should be captured from the media needing an efficient transport system to uptake and distribute these molecules. While HLBPs could be involved in the shuttle of fatty acids to the surrounding host tissues and convey them into the parasite, FABPs could be responsible for the intracellular trafficking. In an effort to understand the role of MvFABPs in fatty acid transport of M. vogae larvae, we analysed the intracellular localization of both MvFABPs and the co-localization with in vivo uptake of fatty acid analogue BODIPY FL C16. Immunohistochemical studies on larvae sections using specific antibodies, showed a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution of each protein with some expression in nuclei and mitochondria. MvFABPs distribution was confirmed by mass spectrometry identification from 2D-electrophoresis of larvae subcellular fractions. This work is the first report showing intracellular distribution of MvFABPs as well as the co-localization of these proteins with the BODIPY FL C16 incorporated from the media. Our results suggest that fatty acid binding proteins could target fatty acids to cellular compartments including nuclei. In this sense, M. vogae FABPs could participate in several cellular processes fulfilling most of the functions attributed to vertebrate's counterparts.

  7. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3 is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Tsukahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3, also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs. Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA. We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus.

  8. Urine liver fatty acid binding protein and chronic kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Bendtsen, Mette D; Birn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , regarding progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a prospective study design a cohort of 74 stage 3-4 CKD patients (age 61 ± 13 years) were included. Glomerular filtration ratio (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA-clearance), 24-hour ambulatory BP, 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UAC) and urinary L......Excretion of the tubular protein liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is a potential novel biomarker of renal dysfunction. We examined whether urine L-FABP excretion adds prognostic information to the well-established risk markers, blood pressure (BP), albumin excretion and baseline GFR...

  9. An amino acid substitution in the human intestinal fatty acid binding protein is associated with increased fatty acid binding, increased fat oxidation, and insulin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Baier, L J; Sacchettini, J C; Knowler, W C; Eads, J; Paolisso, G; Tataranni, P A; Mochizuki, H; Bennett, P H; Bogardus, C; Prochazka, M

    1995-01-01

    The intestinal fatty acid binding protein locus (FABP2) was investigated as a possible genetic factor in determining insulin action in the Pima Indian population. A polymorphism at codon 54 of FABP2 was identified that results in an alanine-encoding allele (frequency 0.71) and a threonine-encoding allele (frequency 0.29). Pimas who were homozygous or heterozygous for the threonine-encoding allele were found to have a higher mean fasting plasma insulin concentration, a lower mean insulin-stimu...

  10. Fatty acid binding protein 4 deficiency protects against oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Saint-Geniez

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is a leading cause of blindness in children worldwide due to increasing survival rates of premature infants. Initial suppression, followed by increased production of the retinal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF expression are key events that trigger the pathological neovascularization in ROP. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in a subset of endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a pro-angiogenic function in cultured endothelial cells and in airway microvasculature, but whether it plays a role in modulation of retinal angiogenesis is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 deficiency could ameliorate pathological retinal vascularization and investigated this hypothesis using a well-characterized mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. We found that FABP4 was not expressed in retinal vessels, but was present in resident macrophages/microglial cells and endothelial cells of the hyaloid vasculature in the immature retina. While FABP4 expression was not required for normal development of retinal vessels, FABP4 expression was upregulated and localized to neovascular tufts in OIR. FABP4-/- mice demonstrated a significant decrease in neovessel formation as well as a significant improvement in physiological revascularization of the avascular retinal tissues. These alterations in retinal vasculature were accompanied by reduced endothelial cell proliferation, but no effect on apoptosis or macrophage/microglia recruitment. FABP4-/- OIR samples demonstrated decreased expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, such as Placental Growth Factor, and angiopoietin 2. Collectively, our findings suggest FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic retinal angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies.

  11. Interaction between cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II and histone hypoacetylation in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2008-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a rare but serious malignancy. Since a reduction in the level of retinoic acid receptor beta 2 (RARbeta2) expression in cancer cells due in part to histone hypoacetylation which is controlled by histone deacetylase (HD), the study on the interaction between cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins II (CRABP II), which is proposed to have its potential influence on retinoic acid (RA) response, and HD can be useful. Comparing to CARBP II and HD, the CARBP II-HD poses the ...

  12. Cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins: subjects and tools in metabolic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binas, B. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are major targets for specific binding of fatty acids in vivo. They constitute a widely expressed family of genetically related, small cytosolic proteins which very likely mediate intracellular transport of free long chain fatty acids. Genetic inhibition of FABP expression in vivo should therefore provide a useful tool to investigate and engineer fatty acid metabolism. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fettsaeurebindungsproteine (FABPs) sind wichtige Bindungsstellen fuer Fettsaeuren in vivo; sie bilden eine breit exprimierte Familie genetisch verwandter kleiner Zytosoleiweisse, die sehr wahrscheinlich den intrazellulaeren Transport unveresterter langkettiger Fettsaeuren vermitteln. Die genetische Hemmung der FABP-Expanssion in vivo bietet sich deshalb als Werkzeug zur Erforschung und gezielten Veraenderung des Fettsaeurestoffwechsels an. (orig.)

  13. One-step purification of rat heart-type fatty acid-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, F. G.; Specht, B.; van der Vusse, G. J.; Börchers, T.; Glatz, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is a member of a family of 14-15 kDa lipid binding proteins which are believed to enhance intracellular transport of lipids by facilitating their cytoplasmic diffusion. To obtain sufficient amounts of protein for in vitro studies, we expressed rat

  14. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengli; Luecke, Christian; Baier, Leslie J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Hamilton, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel β-strands which form two nearly orthogonal β-sheets of five strands each, and two short α-helices that connect the β-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two β-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand

  15. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  16. Interaction between cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II and histone hypoacetylation in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma is a rare but serious malignancy. Since a reduction in the level of retinoic acid receptor beta 2 (RARbeta2 expression in cancer cells due in part to histone hypoacetylation which is controlled by histone deacetylase (HD, the study on the interaction between cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins II (CRABP II, which is proposed to have its potential influence on retinoic acid (RA response, and HD can be useful. Comparing to CARBP II and HD, the CARBP II-HD poses the same function and biological process as HD. This can confirm that HD has a significant suppressive effect on the expression of CARBP II. Therefore, reduction in the level of RARbeta2 expression in cancer cells can be expected and this can lead to failure in treatment of renal cell carcinoma with RA. The author hereby purpose that additional HD inhibitor should be added into the regiment of RA to increase the effectiveness of treatment.

  17. Exogenous fatty acid binding protein 4 promotes human prostate cancer cell progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Hisanori; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Oha, Mina; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found that obesity is associated with malignant grade and mortality in prostate cancer. Several adipokines have been implicated as putative mediating factors between obesity and prostate cancer. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), a member of the cytoplasmic fatty acid binding protein multigene family, was recently identified as a novel adipokine. Although FABP4 is released from adipocytes and mean circulating concentrations of FABP4 are linked with obesity, effects of exogenous FABP4 on prostate cancer progression are unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of exogenous FABP4 on human prostate cancer cell progression. FABP4 treatment promoted serum-induced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro. Furthermore, oleic acid promoted prostate cancer cell invasion only if FABP4 was present in the medium. These promoting effects were reduced by FABP4 inhibitor, which inhibits FABP4 binding to fatty acids. Immunostaining for FABP4 showed that exogenous FABP4 was taken up into DU145 cells in three-dimensional culture. In mice, treatment with FABP4 inhibitor reduced the subcutaneous growth and lung metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of apoptotic cells, positive for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, was increased in subcutaneous tumors of FABP4 inhibitor-treated mice, as compared with control mice. These results suggest that exogenous FABP4 might promote human prostate cancer cell progression by binding with fatty acids. Additionally, exogenous FABP4 activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, independently of binding to fatty acids. Thus, FABP4 might be a key molecule to understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity-prostate cancer progression link. © 2014 UICC.

  18. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  19. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  20. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Enhancing the Expression of Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Li; Peng, Xian-E; Zhu, Yi-Bing; Yan, Xiao-Li; Chen, Wan-Nan; Lin, Xu

    2016-02-15

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated as a potential trigger of hepatic steatosis although molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis still remain elusive. Our prior work has revealed that the expression level of liver fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was elevated in HBV-producing hepatoma cells. In this study, the effects of HBV X protein (HBx) mediated FABP1 regulation on hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanism were determined. mRNA and protein levels of FABP1 were measured by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting. HBx-mediated FABP1 regulation was evaluated by luciferase assay, coimmunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Hepatic lipid accumulation was measured by using Oil-Red-O staining and the triglyceride level. It was found that expression of FABP1 was increased in HBV-producing hepatoma cells, the sera of HBV-infected patients, and the sera and liver tissues of HBV-transgenic mice. Ectopic overexpression of HBx resulted in upregulation of FABP1 in HBx-expressing hepatoma cells, whereas HBx abolishment reduced FABP1 expression. Mechanistically, HBx activated the FABP1 promoter in an HNF3β-, C/EBPα-, and PPARα-dependent manner, in which HBx increased the gene expression of HNF3β and physically interacted with C/EBPα and PPARα. On the other hand, knockdown of FABP1 remarkably blocked lipid accumulation both in long-chain free fatty acids treated HBx-expressing HepG2 cells and in a high-fat diet-fed HBx-transgenic mice. Therefore, FABP1 is a key driver gene in HBx-induced hepatic lipid accumulation via regulation of HNF3β, C/EBPα, and PPARα. FABP1 may represent a novel target for treatment of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies has indicated that chronic HBV infection is associated with hepatic steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HBV

  1. Recent insights into the biological functions of liver fatty acid binding protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, GuQi; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; de Lemos, Andrew; Burczynski, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Over four decades have passed since liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP)1 was first isolated. There are few protein families for which most of the complete tertiary structures, binding properties, and tissue occurrences are described in such detail and yet new functions are being uncovered for this protein. FABP1 is known to be critical for fatty acid uptake and intracellular transport and also has an important role in regulating lipid metabolism and cellular signaling pathways. FABP1 is an important endogenous cytoprotectant, minimizing hepatocyte oxidative damage and interfering with ischemia-reperfusion and other hepatic injuries. The protein may be targeted for metabolic activation through the cross-talk among many transcriptional factors and their activating ligands. Deficiency or malfunction of FABP1 has been reported in several diseases. FABP1 also influences cell proliferation during liver regeneration and may be considered as a prognostic factor for hepatic surgery. FABP1 binds and modulates the action of many molecules such as fatty acids, heme, and other metalloporphyrins. The ability to bind heme is another cytoprotective property and one that deserves closer investigation. The role of FABP1 in substrate availability and in protection from oxidative stress suggests that FABP1 plays a pivotal role during intracellular bacterial/viral infections by reducing inflammation and the adverse effects of starvation (energy deficiency). PMID:26443794

  2. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  3. Bedside Heart Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein (H-FABP): Is an Early Predictive Marker of Cardiac Syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonmez, B. M.; Yilmaz, F.; Durdu, T.; Hakbilir, O.; Ongar, M.; Ozturk, D.; Altinbilek, E.; Kavalci, C.; Turhan, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein in diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients presenting with syncope or presyncope. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between September 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, and comprised patients aged over 18 years who presented with syncope or presyncope. Patients presenting to emergency department within 4 hours of syncope or presyncope underwent a bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein test measurement. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis, Results: Of the 100 patients evaluated, 22(22 percent) were diagnosed with cardiac syncope. Of them, 13(59.1 percent) patients had a positive and 9(40.9 percent) had a negative heart-type fatty acid binding protein result. Consequently, the test result was 12.64 times more positive in patients with cardiac syncope compared to those without. Conclusions: Bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein, particularly at early phase of myocardial injury, reduces diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainity of cardiac origin in syncope patients. (author)

  4. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts progression to nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Elkjaer; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hovind, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (u-LFABP) is a marker of tubulointerstitial inflammation and has been shown to be increased in patients with type 1 diabetes and is further increased in patients who progress to micro- and macroalbuminuria. Our aim was to evaluate u-LFABP as a predictor...... of progression to micro- and macroalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes....

  5. Noninvasive measurement of fecal calprotectin and serum amyloid A combined with intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reisinger, K.W.; Zee, D.C. van der; Brouwers, H.A.A.; Kramer, B.W.; Heurn, L.W.E. van; Buurman, W.A.; Derikx, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prevalent in premature infants, remains challenging. Enterocyte damage in NEC can be assessed by intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. Numerous markers of inflammation are known,

  6. Modulation of intestinal and liver fatty acid-binding proteins in Caco-2 cells by lipids, hormones and cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; Delvin, E.; Yotov, W.; Garofalo, C.; Bendayan, M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Levy, E.

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (I- and L-FABP) are thought to play a role in enterocyte fatty acid (FA) trafficking. Their modulation by cell differentiation and various potential effectors was investigated in the human Caco-2 cell line. With the acquisition of enterocytic

  7. Brain-specific fatty acid-binding protein is elevated in serum of patients with dementia-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.; de Vente, J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vreeling, F.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Pelsers, M.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers in accessible matrices, such as blood, for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and heart-type FABP in patients with dementia-involving diseases.

  8. Fatty Acid binding protein 4 is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sverre; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Tuva B

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) has been shown to play an important role in macrophage cholesterol trafficking and associated inflammation. To further elucidate the role of FABP4 in atherogenesis in humans, we examined the regulation of FABP4 in carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke....

  9. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts progression to nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Elkjaer; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hovind, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (u-LFABP) is a marker of tubulointerstitial inflammation and has been shown to be increased in patients with type 1 diabetes and is further increased in patients who progress to micro- and macroalbuminuria. Our aim was to evaluate u-LFABP as a predictor...

  10. Fatty acid binding proteins have the potential to channel dietary fatty acids into enterocyte nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Adriana; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Canclini, Lucia; Silvarrey, Maria Cecilia; André, Michèle; Babin, Patrick J

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins, including fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) 1 and 2, are highly expressed in tissues involved in the active lipid metabolism. A zebrafish model was used to demonstrate differential expression levels of fabp1b.1, fabp1b.2, and fabp2 transcripts in liver, anterior intestine, and brain. Transcription levels of fabp1b.1 and fabp2 in the anterior intestine were upregulated after feeding and modulated according to diet formulation. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy immunodetection with gold particles localized these FABPs in the microvilli, cytosol, and nuclei of most enterocytes in the anterior intestinal mucosa. Nuclear localization was mostly in the interchromatin space outside the condensed chromatin clusters. Native PAGE binding assay of BODIPY-FL-labeled FAs demonstrated binding of BODIPY-FLC(12) but not BODIPY-FLC(5) to recombinant Fabp1b.1 and Fabp2. The binding of BODIPY-FLC(12) to Fabp1b.1 was fully displaced by oleic acid. In vivo experiments demonstrated, for the first time, that intestinal absorption of dietary BODIPY-FLC(12) was followed by colocalization of the labeled FA with Fabp1b and Fabp2 in the nuclei. These data suggest that dietary FAs complexed with FABPs are able to reach the enterocyte nucleus with the potential to modulate nuclear activity. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Nucleic acid-binding properties of the RRM-containing protein RDM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamimes, Samia; Bourgeon, Dominique; Stasiak, Alicja Z.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Van Dyck, Eric

    2006-01-01

    RDM1 (RAD52 Motif 1) is a vertebrate protein involved in the cellular response to the anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In addition to an RNA recognition motif, RDM1 contains a small amino acid motif, named RD motif, which it shares with the recombination and repair protein, RAD52. RDM1 binds to single- and double-stranded DNA, and recognizes DNA distortions induced by cisplatin adducts in vitro. Here, we have performed an in-depth analysis of the nucleic acid-binding properties of RDM1 using gel-shift assays and electron microscopy. We show that RDM1 possesses acidic pH-dependent DNA-binding activity and that it binds RNA as well as DNA, and we present evidence from competition gel-shift experiments that RDM1 may be capable of discrimination between the two nucleic acids. Based on reported studies of RAD52, we have generated an RDM1 variant mutated in its RD motif. We find that the L 119 GF → AAA mutation affects the mode of RDM1 binding to single-stranded DNA

  12. Serum heart type fatty acid binding protein levels are not changed in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Mustafa; Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Ginis, Zeynep; Ucan, Bekir; Sayki, Muyesser; Tutal, Esra; Cakal, Erman; Kuşkonmaz, Serife M; Öztürk, Mehmet A; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2016-09-01

    Heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) is a small protein and released into the circulation when myocardial damage has occurred. Previous studies have demonstrated that H-FABP is closely associated with cardiac and some endocrinologic disorders including prediabetes, metabolic syndrome, and acromegaly. Hyperthyroism is a well-known disorder associated with cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the effect of hyperthyrodism on H-FABP levels. Forty six patients with hyperthyroidism with no known history of coronary artery disease and 40 healthy controls are involved in the study. Serum H-FABP levels are measured using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between serum H-FABP levels of patients with hyperthyroidism and controls (871±66 pg/mL, and 816±66 pg/mL, respectively P=0.56). There was no significant correlation between H-FABP, free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in patients and controls. Serum H-FABP levels are not altered in patients with hyperthyroidism.

  13. Fatty-acid binding proteins modulate sleep and enhance long-term memory consolidation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Gerstner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be important for memory consolidation, since sleep deprivation has been shown to interfere with memory processing. However, the effects of augmenting sleep on memory formation are not well known, and testing the role of sleep in memory enhancement has been limited to pharmacological and behavioral approaches. Here we test the effect of overexpressing the brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7 on sleep and long-term memory (LTM formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies carrying the murine Fabp7 or the Drosophila homologue dFabp had reduced baseline sleep but normal LTM, while Fabp induction produced increases in both net sleep and LTM. We also define a post-training consolidation "window" that is sufficient for the observed Fabp-mediated memory enhancement. Since Fabp overexpression increases consolidated daytime sleep bouts, these data support a role for longer naps in improving memory and provide a novel role for lipid-binding proteins in regulating memory consolidation concurrently with changes in behavioral state.

  14. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  15. Exploring and Expanding the Fatty-Acid-Binding Protein Superfamily in Fasciola Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M; Wilkinson, Toby J; Mackintosh, Neil; Jahndel, Veronika; Paterson, Steve; McVeigh, Paul; Abbas Abidi, Syed M; Saifullah, Khalid; Raman, Muthusamy; Ravikumar, Gopalakrishnan; LaCourse, James; Maule, Aaron; Brophy, Peter M

    2016-09-02

    The liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica infect livestock worldwide and threaten food security with climate change and problematic control measures spreading disease. Fascioliasis is also a foodborne disease with up to 17 million humans infected. In the absence of vaccines, treatment depends on triclabendazole (TCBZ), and overuse has led to widespread resistance, compromising future TCBZ control. Reductionist biology from many laboratories has predicted new therapeutic targets. To this end, the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) superfamily has proposed multifunctional roles, including functions intersecting vaccine and drug therapy, such as immune modulation and anthelmintic sequestration. Research is hindered by a lack of understanding of the full FABP superfamily complement. Although discovery studies predicted FABPs as promising vaccine candidates, it is unclear if uncharacterized FABPs are more relevant for vaccine formulations. We have coupled genome, transcriptome, and EST data mining with proteomics and phylogenetics to reveal a liver fluke FABP superfamily of seven clades: previously identified clades I-III and newly identified clades IV-VII. All new clade FABPs were analyzed using bioinformatics and cloned from both liver flukes. The extended FABP data set will provide new study tools to research the role of FABPs in parasite biology and as therapy targets.

  16. The establishment and primary application of specific fatty acid binding protein radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guangtao; Zhang Kai; Xue Hui; Hao Xiuhua; Wang Luhuan

    2004-01-01

    A highly specific and highly sensitive radioimmunoassay method for fatty acid binding protein (FABP) in human serum was developed. The highly effective antibody againist FABP was obtained by immunizing rabbits with human recombined FABP. The FABP was labeled with 125 I by chloramines-T methods and purified by the Sephadex-G25 column. Te reaction between antigen and antibody was carried out by one step balance method and incubated in 4 degree for 24 hours, then binding and free antigen were separated by PR reagent. The detection range of this method is f rom 5 to 405 ng/mL; the lowest detection level is 9 ng/mL. CV's within batch and between batch were less than 6.4% and 8.5% respectively. The serum FABP concentration of healthy persons is 15.68 ± 2.91 ng/mL (n=45), that of ICU patients is 72.08 ± 32.64 ng/mL (n=46) and that of cardiopathy patients is 78.95 ± 24.83 ng/mL (n=73). It suggest that this method is stable, simple, specific and highly sensitive. It is suitable for testing FABP in human serum. (authors)

  17. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel keratinocyte protein (psoriasis-associated fatty acid-binding protein [PA-FABP]) that is highly up-regulated in psoriatic skin and that shares similarity to fatty acid-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1992-01-01

    termed PA-FABP (psoriasis-associated fatty acid-binding protein). The deduced sequence predicted a protein with molecular weight of 15,164 daltons and a calculated pI of 6.96, values that are close to those recorded in the keratinocyte 2D gel protein database. The protein comigrated with PA-FABP...... as determined by 2D gel analysis of [35S]-methionine-labeled proteins expressed by transformed human amnion (AMA) cells transfected with clone 1592 using the vaccinia virus expression system and reacted with a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against 2D gel purified PA-FABP. Structural analysis of the amino...... acid sequence revealed 48%, 52%, and 56% identity to known low-molecular-weight fatty acid-binding proteins belonging to the FABP family. Northern blot analysis showed that PA-FABP mRNA is indeed highly up-regulated in psoriatic keratinocytes. The transcript is present in human cell lines of epithelial...

  19. Isolation and characterization of fatty acid binding protein in the liver of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, N M; Manning, J A; Luer, C A

    1991-01-01

    1. A 14.5 kDa fatty acid binding protein was isolated from the liver of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. 2. Purified shark liver FABP (pI = 5.4) bound oleic acid at a single site with an affinity similar to that of mammalian FABP. 3. The apparent size, pI and amino acid composition of shark liver FABP indicate a close structural relationship between this protein and mammalian heart FABP.

  20. Clinical significance of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein at various stages of nephropathy

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    V Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study was to evaluate the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (u-LFABP pg/mg urine creatinine ratio at different stages of diabetic nephropathy and to see its correlation with other clinical parameters in South Indian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A total of 65 (M: F; 42:23 T2DM subjects were divided into three groups, and were compared with 13 (M: F; 3:10 nondiabetic controls. The study groups were as follows: normoalbuminuric (n = 22, microalbuminuric (n = 22 and macroalbuminuric (n = 21. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was calculated using Cockcroft and Gault formula. u-LFABP levels in spot urine samples were measured with a solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. This study showed that u-LFABP levels were undetectable in healthy controls and was very low in the normoalbuminuric subjects. Elevated levels of u-LFABP are evident from the microalbuminuric stage indicating tubular damage. The levels of u-LFABP increased gradually with declining renal function. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval for normoalbuminuria was 0.65 (0.47-0.97, microalbuminuria was 0.99 (0.55-1.97 and macroalbuminuria was 5.16 (1.8-14.5, (P = 0.005. In conclusion, u-LFABP levels were elevated in patients with reduced eGFR and showed a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure and protein to creatinine ratio in the total study subjects.

  1. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The sialic acid binding activity of the S protein facilitates infection by porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus

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    Enjuanes Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV has a sialic acid binding activity that is believed to be important for enteropathogenicity, but that has so far appeared to be dispensable for infection of cultured cells. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of sialic acid binding for the infection of cultured cells under unfavorable conditions, and comparison of TGEV strains and mutants, as well as the avian coronavirus IBV concerning their dependence on the sialic acid binding activity. Methods The infectivity of different viruses was analyzed by a plaque assay after adsorption times of 5, 20, and 60 min. Prior to infection, cultured cells were either treated with neuraminidase to deplete sialic acids from the cell surface, or mock-treated. In a second approach, pre-treatment of the virus with porcine intestinal mucin was performed, followed by the plaque assay after a 5 min adsorption time. A student's t-test was used to verify the significance of the results. Results Desialylation of cells only had a minor effect on the infection by TGEV strain Purdue 46 when an adsorption period of 60 min was allowed for initiation of infection. However, when the adsorption time was reduced to 5 min the infectivity on desialylated cells decreased by more than 60%. A TGEV PUR46 mutant (HAD3 deficient in sialic acid binding showed a 77% lower titer than the parental virus after a 5 min adsorption time. After an adsorption time of 60 min the titer of HAD3 was 58% lower than that of TGEV PUR46. Another TGEV strain, TGEV Miller, and IBV Beaudette showed a reduction in infectivity after neuraminidase treatment of the cultured cells irrespective of the virion adsorption time. Conclusions Our results suggest that the sialic acid binding activity facilitates the infection by TGEV under unfavorable environmental conditions. The dependence on the sialic acid binding activity for an efficient infection differs in the analyzed TGEV strains.

  3. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

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    Panayotis eThanos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, have shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working / recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0 mg/kg, 20.0 mg/kg, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26 or vehicle during a conditioned placed preference (CPP paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests (open field, novel object recognition (NOR, and social interaction (SI and novelty (SN paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce conditioned placed preference or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose, and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested.

  4. Usefulness of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in predicting strangulated small bowel obstruction.

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    Hirotada Kittaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP is considered to be useful diagnostic markers of small bowel ischemia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate whether the serum I-FABP level is a predictive marker of strangulation in patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO. METHODS: A total of 37 patients diagnosed with SBO were included in this study. The serum I-FABP levels were retrospectively compared between the patients with strangulation and those with simple obstruction, and cut-off values for the diagnosis of strangulation were calculated using a receiver operating characteristic curve. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with strangulated SBO. The serum I-FABP levels were significantly higher in the patients with strangulation compared with those observed in the patients with simple obstruction (18.5 vs. 1.6 ng/ml p<0.001. Using a cut-off value of 6.5 ng/ml, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 71.4%, 93.8%, 93.8% and 71.4%, respectively. An I-FABP level greater than 6.5 ng/ml was found to be the only independent significant factor for a higher likelihood of strangulated SBO (P =  0.02; odds ratio: 19.826; 95% confidence interval: 2.1560 - 488.300. CONCLUSIONS: The I-FABP level is a useful marker for discriminating between strangulated SBO and simple SBO in patients with SBO.

  5. Relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein

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    ZHOU Xiaoli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and serum level of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP. MethodsA total of 160 patients who underwent physical examination in the Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University from July to November 2010 were included in our study. These subjects were divided into two groups according to the diagnostic criteria for NAFLD formulated by the Chinese Medical Association: control group (n=71 and NAFLD group (n=89. The two groups were compared with respect to general condition, body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, AFABP, serum insulin, and other serological indices. The relationship of serum AFABP with NAFLD and other metabolic parameters was analyzed using the Spearman linear correlation coefficient. Comparison of measurement data was made by t test and rank sum test; comparison of enumeration data was made by chi-square test. ResultsThere were more males than females in the NAFLD group. Compared with the control group, the NAFLD group had higher BMI and levels of blood glucose, triglyceride (TG, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and uric acid and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL level; in addition, the NAFLD group had significantly higher serum AFABP and insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The Spearman correlation analysis showed that serum AFABP was positively correlated with NAFLD, BMI, HOMA-IR, serum insulin, blood glucose, TG, ALT, AST, and uric acid but negatively correlated with HDL. After adjustment for sex, age, and BMI, serum AFABP was positively correlated with NAFLD, HOMA-IR, serum insulin, blood glucose, TG, ALT, and uric acid, but had no significant correlation with HDL and AST. ConclusionSerum AFABP is closely associated with NAFLD and may be an independent plasma marker of this disease. AFABP plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  6. Liver fatty acid binding protein is the mitosis-associated polypeptide target of a carcinogen in rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassuk, J.A.; Tsichlis, P.N.; Sorof, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes in normal rat liver were found previously to contain a cytoplasmic 14,000-dalton polypeptide (p14) that is associated with mitosis and is the principal early covalent target of activated metabolites of the carcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene). The level of immunohistochemically detected p14 was low when growth activity of hepatocytes was low, was markedly elevated during mitosis in normal and regenerating livers, but was very high throughout interphase during proliferation of hyperplastic and malignant hepatocytes induced in rat liver by a carcinogen (N-2-fluorenylacetamide or 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene). The authors report here that p14 is the liver fatty acid binding protein. The nucleotide sequence of p14 cDNA clones, isolated by screening a rat liver cDNA library in bacteriophage λgt11 using p14 antiserum, was completely identical to part of the sequence reported for liver fatty acid binding protein. Furthermore, the two proteins shared the following properties: size of mRNA, amino acid composition, molecular size according to NaDodSO 4 gel electrophoresis, and electrophoretic mobilities in a Triton X-100/acetic acid/urea gel. The two polypeptides bound oleic acid similarly. Finally, identical elevations of cytoplasmic immunostain were detected specifically in mitotic hepatocytes with either antiserum. The collected findings are suggestive that liver fatty acid binding protein may carry ligands that promote hepatocyte division and may transport certain activated chemical carcinogens

  7. Heart type fatty acid binding protein response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir Evrim; Ozbek Mustafa; Sahin Mustafa; Cakal Erman; Gungunes Askin; Ginis Zeynep; Demirci Taner; Delibasi Tuncay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP) has been found to be predictive for myocardial ischemia.Wet ested whether HFABP is the predictor for CVD in PCOS patients, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods This was a prospective, cross sectional controlled study conducted in a training and research hospital.The study population consisted of 46 reproductiv...

  8. Development of a radioiodinated triazolopyrimidine probe for nuclear medical imaging of fatty acid binding protein 4.

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    Kantaro Nishigori

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 is the most well-characterized FABP isoform. FABP4 regulates inflammatory pathways in adipocytes and macrophages and is involved in both inflammatory diseases and tumor formation. FABP4 expression was recently reported for glioblastoma, where it may participate in disease malignancy. While FABP4 is a potential molecular imaging target, with the exception of a tritium labeled probe there are no reports of other nuclear imaging probes that target this protein. Here we designed and synthesized a nuclear imaging probe, [123I]TAP1, and evaluated its potential as a FABP4 targeting probe in in vitro and in vivo assays. We focused on the unique structure of a triazolopyrimidine scaffold that lacks a carboxylic acid to design the TAP1 probe that can undergo facilitated delivery across cell membranes. The affinity of synthesized TAP1 was measured using FABP4 and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid. [125I]TAP1 was synthesized by iododestannylation of a precursor, followed by affinity and selectivity measurements using immobilized FABPs. Biodistributions in normal and C6 glioblastoma-bearing mice were evaluated, and excised tumors were subjected to autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. TAP1 and [125I]TAP1 showed high affinity for FABP4 (Ki = 44.5±9.8 nM, Kd = 69.1±12.3 nM. The FABP4 binding affinity of [125I]TAP1 was 11.5- and 35.5-fold higher than for FABP3 and FABP5, respectively. In an in vivo study [125I]TAP1 displayed high stability against deiodination and degradation, and moderate radioactivity accumulation in C6 tumors (1.37±0.24% dose/g 3 hr after injection. The radioactivity distribution profile in tumors partially corresponded to the FABP4 positive area and was also affected by perfusion. The results indicate that [125I]TAP1 could detect FABP4 in vitro and partly in vivo. As such, [125I]TAP1 is a promising lead compound for further refinement for use in in vivo FABP4 imaging.

  9. Useable diffraction data from a multiple microdomain-containing crystal of Ascaris suum As-p18 fatty-acid-binding protein using a microfocus beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Griffiths, Kate; Roe, Andrew J.; Cooper, Alan; Smith, Brian O.; Córsico, Betina; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2012-01-01

    As-p18, an unusual fatty-acid-binding protein from a parasitic nematode, was expressed in bacteria, purified and crystallized. The use of a microfocus beamline was essential for data collection. As-p18 is a fatty-acid-binding protein from the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Although it exhibits sequence similarity to mammalian intracellular fatty-acid-binding proteins, it contains features that are unique to nematodes. Crystals were obtained, but initial diffraction data analysis revealed that they were composed of a number of ‘microdomains’. Interpretable data could only be collected using a microfocus beamline with a beam size of 12 × 8 µm

  10. Genetic effects of sterol regulatory element binding proteins and fatty acid-binding protein4 on the fatty acid composition of Korean cattle (Hanwoo

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    Dong-Yep Oh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study identifies single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP or gene combinations that affect the flavor and quality of Korean cattle (Hanwoo by using the SNP Harvester method. Methods Four economic traits (oleic acid [C18:1], saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and marbling score were adjusted for environmental factors in order to focus solely on genetic effects. The SNP Harvester method was used to investigate gene combinations (two-way gene interactions associated with these economic traits. Further, a multifactor dimensionality reduction method was used to identify superior genotypes in gene combinations. Results Table 3 to 4 show the analysis results for differences between superior genotypes and others for selected major gene combinations using the multifactor dimensionality reduction method. Environmental factors were adjusted for in order to evaluate only the genetic effect. Table 5 shows the adjustment effect by comparing the accuracy before and after correction in two-way gene interactions. Conclusion The g.3977-325 T>C and (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C combinations of fatty acid-binding protein4 were the superior gene, and the superior genotype combinations across all economic traits were the CC genotype at g.3977-325 T>C and the AACC, GACC, GGCC genotypes of (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C.

  11. Urinary excretion of fatty acid-binding protein 4 is associated with albuminuria and renal dysfunction.

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    Yusuke Okazaki

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4/A-FABP/aP2 is expressed in not only adipocytes and macrophages but also peritubular capillaries in the normal kidney. We recently demonstrated that ectopic expression of FABP4, but not FABP1 known as liver FABP (L-FABP, in the glomerulus is associated with progression of proteinuria and renal dysfunction. However, urinary excretion of FABP4 has not been investigated.Subjects who participated in the Tanno-Sobetsu Study, a study with a population-based cohort design, in 2011 (n = 392, male/female: 166/226 were enrolled. Urinary FABP4 (U-FABP4 and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR were measured. Change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was followed up one year later.In 93 (23.7% of the 392 subjects, U-FABP4 level was below the sensitivity of the assay. Subjects with undetectable U-FABP4 were younger and had lower UACR and higher eGFR levels than subjects with measurable U-FABP4. U-FABP4 level was positively correlated with age, systolic blood pressure and levels of serum FABP4 (S-FABP4, triglycerides, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, urinary FABP1 (U-FABP1 and UACR (r = 0.360, p<0.001. Age, S-FABP4, U-FABP1 and UACR were independent predictors of U-FABP4. On the other hand, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c and U-FABP4 were independently correlated with UACR. Reduction in eGFR after one year was significantly larger in a group with the highest tertile of baseline U-FABP4 than a group with the lowest tertile.Urinary FABP4 level is independently correlated with level of albuminuria and possibly predicts yearly decline of eGFR. U-FABP4 would be a novel biomarker of glomerular damage.

  12. Factor VII and protein C are phosphatidic acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Smith, Stephanie A; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Morrissey, James H

    2013-08-20

    Seven proteins in the human blood clotting cascade bind, via their GLA (γ-carboxyglutamate-rich) domains, to membranes containing exposed phosphatidylserine (PS), although with membrane binding affinities that vary by 3 orders of magnitude. Here we employed nanodiscs of defined phospholipid composition to quantify the phospholipid binding specificities of these seven clotting proteins. All bound preferentially to nanobilayers in which PS headgroups contained l-serine versus d-serine. Surprisingly, however, nanobilayers containing phosphatidic acid (PA) bound substantially more of two of these proteins, factor VIIa and activated protein C, than did equivalent bilayers containing PS. Consistent with this finding, liposomes containing PA supported higher proteolytic activity by factor VIIa and activated protein C toward their natural substrates (factors X and Va, respectively) than did PS-containing liposomes. Moreover, treating activated human platelets with phospholipase D enhanced the rates of factor X activation by factor VIIa in the presence of soluble tissue factor. We hypothesize that factor VII and protein C bind preferentially to the monoester phosphate of PA because of its accessibility and higher negative charge compared with the diester phosphates of most other phospholipids. We further found that phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, which contains a monoester phosphate attached to its myo-inositol headgroup, also supported enhanced enzymatic activity of factor VIIa and activated protein C. We conclude that factor VII and protein C bind preferentially to monoester phosphates, which may have implications for the function of these proteases in vivo.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel keratinocyte protein (psoriasis-associated fatty acid-binding protein [PA-FABP]) that is highly up-regulated in psoriatic skin and that shares similarity to fatty acid-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1992-01-01

    termed PA-FABP (psoriasis-associated fatty acid-binding protein). The deduced sequence predicted a protein with molecular weight of 15,164 daltons and a calculated pI of 6.96, values that are close to those recorded in the keratinocyte 2D gel protein database. The protein comigrated with PA......-FABP as determined by 2D gel analysis of [35S]-methionine-labeled proteins expressed by transformed human amnion (AMA) cells transfected with clone 1592 using the vaccinia virus expression system and reacted with a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against 2D gel purified PA-FABP. Structural analysis of the amino...... with epidermal growth factor (EGF), pituitary extract, and 10% fetal calf serum] revealed a strong up-regulation of PA-FABP, psoriasin, calgranulins A and B, and a few other proteins that are highly expressed in psoriatic skin. The levels of these proteins exceeded by far those observed in non-cultured normal...

  14. Uncoupling of Obesity from Insulin Resistance Through a Targeted Mutation in aP2, the Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Distel, Robert J.; Ellis, Ramsey; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1996-11-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytoplasmic proteins that are expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and bind to fatty acids such as oleic and retinoic acid. Mice with a null mutation in aP2, the gene encoding the adipocyte FABP, were developmentally and metabolically normal. The aP2-deficient mice developed dietary obesity but, unlike control mice, they did not develop insulin resistance or diabetes. Also unlike their obese wild-type counterparts, obese aP2-/- animals failed to express in adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a molecule implicated in obesity-related insulin resistance. These results indicate that aP2 is central to the pathway that links obesity to insulin resistance, possibly by linking fatty acid metabolism to expression of TNF-α.

  15. Heart type fatty acid binding protein response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Evrim; Ozbek, Mustafa; Sahin, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Gungunes, Askin; Ginis, Zeynep; Demirci, Taner; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2012-12-18

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP) has been found to be predictive for myocardial ischemia.Wet ested whether HFABP is the predictor for CVD in PCOS patients, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This was a prospective, cross sectional controlled study conducted in a training and research hospital.The study population consisted of 46 reproductive-age PCOS women and 28 control subjects. We evaluated anthropometric and metabolic parameters, carotid intima media thickness and HFABP levels in both PCOS patients and control group. Mean fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, free testosterone, total testosterone, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) levels were significantly higher in PCOS patients. Although HFABP levels were higher in PCOS patients, the difference did not reach statistically significant in early age groups. After adjustment for age and body mass index, HFABP level was positive correlated with hsCRP, free testosterone levels, CIMT and HOMA-IR. Heart type free fatty acid binding protein appeared to have an important role in metabolic response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant, hyperandrogenemic PCOS patients.

  16. Heart type fatty acid binding protein response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cakir Evrim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS have higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Heart type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP has been found to be predictive for myocardial ischemia.Wet ested whether HFABP is the predictor for CVD in PCOS patients, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods This was a prospective, cross sectional controlled study conducted in a training and research hospital.The study population consisted of 46 reproductive-age PCOS women and 28 control subjects. We evaluated anthropometric and metabolic parameters, carotid intima media thickness and HFABP levels in both PCOS patients and control group. Results Mean fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, free testosterone, total testosterone, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT levels were significantly higher in PCOS patients. Although HFABP levels were higher in PCOS patients, the difference did not reach statistically significant in early age groups. After adjustment for age and body mass index, HFABP level was positive correlated with hsCRP, free testosterone levels, CIMT and HOMA-IR. Conclusions Heart type free fatty acid binding protein appeared to have an important role in metabolic response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant, hyperandrogenemic PCOS patients.

  17. Structural and binding properties of two paralogous fatty acid binding proteins of Taenia solium metacestode.

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    Seon-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatty acid (FA binding proteins (FABPs of helminths are implicated in acquisition and utilization of host-derived hydrophobic substances, as well as in signaling and cellular interactions. We previously demonstrated that secretory hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs of Taenia solium metacestode (TsM, a causative agent of neurocysticercosis (NC, shuttle FAs in the surrounding host tissues and inwardly transport the FAs across the parasite syncytial membrane. However, the protein molecules responsible for the intracellular trafficking and assimilation of FAs have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated two novel TsMFABP genes (TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2, which encoded 133- and 136-amino acid polypeptides with predicted molecular masses of 14.3 and 14.8 kDa, respectively. They shared 45% sequence identity with each other and 15-95% with other related-members. Homology modeling demonstrated a characteristic β-barrel composed of 10 anti-parallel β-strands and two α-helices. TsMFABP2 harbored two additional loops between β-strands two and three, and β-strands six and seven, respectively. TsMFABP1 was secreted into cyst fluid and surrounding environments, whereas TsMFABP2 was intracellularly confined. Partially purified native proteins migrated to 15 kDa with different isoelectric points of 9.2 (TsMFABP1 and 8.4 (TsMFABP2. Both native and recombinant proteins bound to 11-([5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl]aminoundecannoic acid, dansyl-DL-α-amino-caprylic acid, cis-parinaric acid and retinol, which were competitively inhibited by oleic acid. TsMFABP1 exhibited high affinity toward FA analogs. TsMFABPs showed weak binding activity to retinol, but TsMFABP2 showed relatively high affinity. Isolation of two distinct genes from an individual genome strongly suggested their paralogous nature. Abundant expression of TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2 in the canal region of worm matched well with the histological distributions

  18. Direct interaction between EgFABP1, a fatty acid binding protein from Echinococcus granulosus, and phospholipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Porfido

    Full Text Available Growth and maintenance of hydatid cysts produced by Echinococcus granulosus have a high requirement for host lipids for biosynthetic processes, membrane building and possibly cellular and developmental signalling. This requires a high degree of lipid trafficking facilitated by lipid transporter proteins. Members of the fatty acid binding protein (FABP family have been identified in Echinococcus granulosus, one of which, EgFABP1 is expressed at the tegumental level in the protoscoleces, but it has also been described in both hydatid cyst fluid and secretions of protoscoleces. In spite of a considerable amount of structural and biophysical information on the FABPs in general, their specific functions remain mysterious.We have investigated the way in which EgFABP1 may interact with membranes using a variety of fluorescence-based techniques and artificial small unilamellar vesicles. We first found that bacterial recombinant EgFABP1 is loaded with fatty acids from the synthesising bacteria, and that fatty acid binding increases its resistance to proteinases, possibly due to subtle conformational changes induced on EgFABP1. By manipulating the composition of lipid vesicles and the ionic environment, we found that EgFABP1 interacts with membranes in a direct contact, collisional, manner to exchange ligand, involving both ionic and hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, we observed that the protein can compete with cytochrome c for association with the surface of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs.This work constitutes a first approach to the understanding of protein-membrane interactions of EgFABP1. The results suggest that this protein may be actively involved in the exchange and transport of fatty acids between different membranes and cellular compartments within the parasite.

  19. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXRα[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA. PMID:22223860

  20. Regulation of hepatic level of fatty-acid-binding protein by hormones and clofibric acid in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S; Kawashima, Y; Hirose, A; Kozuka, H

    1994-01-01

    Regulation of the hepatic level of fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) by hormones and p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (clofibric acid) was studied. The hepatic level of FABP, measured as the oleic acid-binding capacity of the cytosolic FABP fraction, was decreased in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. The level of FABP was markedly increased in adrenalectomized rats, and the elevation was prevented by the administration of dexamethasone. Hypothyroidism decreased the level of FABP and hyperthyroidism increased it. A high correlation between the incorporation of [14C]oleic acid in vivo into hepatic triacylglycerol and the level of FABP was found for normal, diabetic and adrenalectomized rats. The level of FABP was increased by administration of clofibric acid to rats in any altered hormonal states, as was microsomal 1-acylglycerophosphocholine (1-acyl-GPC) acyltransferase, a peroxisome-proliferator-responsive parameter. These results suggest that the hepatic level of FABP is under regulation by multiple hormones and that clofibric acid induces FABP and 1-acyl-GPC acyltransferase by a mechanism which may be distinct from that by which hormones regulate the level of FABP. PMID:8110197

  1. Nucleic acid binding properties and intermediates of HCV core protein multimerization in Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta-Rivero, Nelson; Rodriguez, Armando; Musacchio, Alexis; Falcon, Viviana; Suarez, Viana M.; Chavez, Liudmila; Morales-Grillo, Juan; Duenas-Carrera, Santiago

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the in vivo assembly pathway or structure of the hepatitis C virus nucleocapsid. In this work the intermediates of HCcAg multimerization in Pichia pastoris cells and the nucleic acid binding properties of structured nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) were studied. Extensive cross-linking was observed for HCcAg after glutaraldehyde treatment. Data suggest that HCcAg exists in dimeric forms probably representing P21-P21, P21-P23, and P23-P23 dimers. In addition, the presence of HCcAg species that might represent trimers and multimers was observed. After sucrose equilibrium density gradient purification and nuclease digestion, NLPs were shown to contain both RNA and DNA molecules. Finally, the analysis by electron microscopy indicated that native NLPs were resistant to nuclease treatment. These results indicated that HCcAg assembles through dimers, trimers, and multimers' intermediates into capsids in P. pastoris cells. Assembly of NLPs in its natural environment might confer stability to these particles by adopting a compact structure

  2. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  3. Interaction of LY171883 and other peroxisome proliferators with fatty-acid-binding protein isolated from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, J R; Eacho, P I

    1991-01-01

    Fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) is a 14 kDa protein found in hepatic cytosol which binds and transports fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands throughout the cell. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether LY171883, a leukotriene D4 antagonist, and other peroxisome proliferators bind to FABP and displace an endogenous fatty acid. [3H]Oleic acid was used to monitor the elution of FABP during chromatographic purification. [14C]LY171883 had a similar elution profile when substituted in the purification, indicating a common interaction with FABP. LY171883 and its structural analogue, LY189585, as well as the hypolipidaemic peroxisome proliferators clofibric acid, ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and WY14,643, displaced [3H]oleic acid binding to FABP. Analogues of LY171883 that do not induce peroxisome proliferation only weakly displaced oleate binding. [3H]Ly171883 bound directly to FABP with a Kd of 10.8 microM, compared with a Kd of 0.96 microM for [3H]oleate. LY171883 binding was inhibited by LY189585, clofibric acid, ciprofibrate and bezafibrate. These findings demonstrate that peroxisome proliferators, presumably due to their structural similarity to fatty acids, are able to bind to FABP and displace an endogenous ligand from its binding site. Interaction of peroxisome proliferators with FABP may be involved in perturbations of fatty acid metabolism caused by these agents as well as in the development of the pleiotropic response of peroxisome proliferation. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1747111

  4. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S.; Wada, H.; Horio, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP PM ) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP PM have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP PM reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of [ 3 H]oleate but not that of [ 35 S]sulfobromophthalein or [ 14 C]taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP PM can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP PM and mGOT are closely related

  5. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA)); Wada, H.; Horio, Y. (Univ. of Osaka (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP{sub PM}) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP{sub PM} have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP{sub PM} reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of ({sup 3}H)oleate but not that of ({sup 35}S)sulfobromophthalein or ({sup 14}C)taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP{sub PM} can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP{sub PM} and mGOT are closely related.

  6. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels in Necrotizing Enterocolitis correlate with extent of necrotic bowel: results from a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, F.H.; Hulscher, J.B.; Schurink, M.; Timmer, A.; Kooi, E.M.; Bos, A.F; Bruggink, J.L.; Kasper, D.C.; Pones, M.; Benkoe, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) is considered as a specific marker for enterocyte damage in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma and urinary I-FABP levels with the extent of macroscopic intestinal

  7. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza; Perlmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPARβ/δ signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPARβ/δ and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  8. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Perlmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.perlmann@licr.ki.se [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-12-25

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPAR{beta}/{delta} signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPAR{beta}/{delta} and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  9. Fatty acid binding proteins have the potential to channel dietary fatty acids into enterocyte nuclei[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Adriana; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Canclini, Lucia; Silvarrey, Maria Cecilia; André, Michèle; Babin, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins, including fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) 1 and 2, are highly expressed in tissues involved in the active lipid metabolism. A zebrafish model was used to demonstrate differential expression levels of fabp1b.1, fabp1b.2, and fabp2 transcripts in liver, anterior intestine, and brain. Transcription levels of fabp1b.1 and fabp2 in the anterior intestine were upregulated after feeding and modulated according to diet formulation. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy immunodetection with gold particles localized these FABPs in the microvilli, cytosol, and nuclei of most enterocytes in the anterior intestinal mucosa. Nuclear localization was mostly in the interchromatin space outside the condensed chromatin clusters. Native PAGE binding assay of BODIPY-FL-labeled FAs demonstrated binding of BODIPY-FLC12 but not BODIPY-FLC5 to recombinant Fabp1b.1 and Fabp2. The binding of BODIPY-FLC12 to Fabp1b.1 was fully displaced by oleic acid. In vivo experiments demonstrated, for the first time, that intestinal absorption of dietary BODIPY-FLC12 was followed by colocalization of the labeled FA with Fabp1b and Fabp2 in the nuclei. These data suggest that dietary FAs complexed with FABPs are able to reach the enterocyte nucleus with the potential to modulate nuclear activity. PMID:26658423

  10. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein is an early marker of myocardial damage after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannessi, Daniela; Piacenti, Marcello; Maltinti, Maristella; Rossi, Andrea; Di Cecco, Pietro; Startari, Umberto; Cabiati, Manuela; Panchetti, Luca; Del Ry, Silvia; Morales, Maria-Aurora

    2010-10-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of arrhythmias induces myocardial damage and release of biomarkers. This study aimed to assess the kinetics of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP), a cytosolic protein released after myocardial injury incurred by both atrial and ventricular RF ablation, compared to other markers of myocardial injury. h-FABP, cTnI, CK-MB(mass) and myoglobin were evaluated in 30 patients with atrial or ventricular tachyarrhythmias before, immediately after and at 3, 6 and 24h after the procedure. h-FABP increased immediately after the procedure in all subjects (6.6 ± 1.2 μg/L vs 2.7 ± 0.3, pvalues of time for mean power of RF application in both the entire patient cohort and in ventricular ablations. h-FABP may be an early parameter for monitoring RF-induced lesions and the site of ablation was relevant for biomarker increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High Serum Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Chuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP is a key mediator of obesity-related metabolic syndrome (MetS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between A-FABP concentration and MetS in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients. Fasting blood samples were obtained from 165 type 2 DM volunteers. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Among 165 DM patients, 113 patients (68.5% had MetS. Diabetic persons who had MetS had significantly higher A-FABP levels (P<0.001 than those without MetS. Female DM persons had higher A-FABP level than man (P<0.001. No statistically significant differences in A-FABP levels were found in use of statin, fibrate, or antidiabetic drugs. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that body fat mass (P<0.001, logarithmically transformed creatinine (log-creatinine; P<0.001, female DM patients (P<0.001, and logarithmically transformed high sensitive C-reactive protein (log-hs-CRP; P=0.013 were positively correlated, while albumin (P=0.004 and glomerular filtration rate (GFR; P=0.043 were negatively correlated with serum A-FABP levels in type 2 DM patients. In this study, higher serum A-FABP level was positively associated with MetS in type 2 DM patients.

  12. Proteomic analysis of the intestinal adaptation response reveals altered expression of fatty acid binding proteins following massive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew N; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Wilson, Guineva; Taylor, Russell G; Rainczuk, Adam; Meehan, Katie L; Sourial, Magdy; Fuller, Peter J; Stanton, Peter G; Robertson, David M; Bines, Julie E

    2010-03-05

    Intestinal adaptation in response to the loss of the small intestine is essential to restore enteral autonomy in patients who have undergone massive small bowel resection (MSBR). In a proportion of patients, intestinal function is not restored, resulting in chronic intestinal failure (IF). Early referral of such patients for transplant provides the best prognosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain elusive and there is currently no convenient marker to predict whether patients will develop IF. We have investigated the adaptation response in a well-characterized porcine model of intestinal adaptation. 2D DIGE analysis of ileal epithelium from piglets recovering from massive small bowel resection (MSBR) identified over 60 proteins that changed specifically in MSBR animals relative to nonoperational or sham-operated controls. Three fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP, FABP-6, and I-FABP) showed changes in MSBR animals. The expression changes and localization of each FABP were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis. FABP expression changes in MSBR animals occurred concurrently with altered triglyceride and bile acid metabolism as well as weight gain. The observed FABP expression changes in the ileal epithelium occur as part of the intestinal adaptation response and could provide a clinically useful marker to evaluate adaptation following MSBR.

  13. Elevation of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein after cardiac catheterization related to cardiovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamijo-Ikemori A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atsuko Kamijo-Ikemori,1,3 Nobuyuki Hashimoto,2 Takeshi Sugaya,1 Katsuomi Matsui,1 Mikako Hisamichi,1 Yugo Shibagaki,1 Fumihiko Miyake,2 Kenjiro Kimura1 1Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, 2Department of Cardiology, 3Department of Anatomy, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan Purpose: Contrast medium (CM induces tubular hypoxia via endothelial damage due to direct cytotoxicity or viscosity. Urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP increases along with tubular hypoxia and may be a detector of systemic circulation injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of detecting increases in urinary L-FABP levels due to administration of CM, as a prognostic biomarker for cardiovascular disease in patients without occurrence of CM-induced nephropathy undergoing cardiac catheterization procedure (CCP. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal analyses of the relationship between urinary L-FABP levels and occurrence of cardiovascular events were performed (n=29. Urinary L-FABP was measured by ELISA before CCP, and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after CCP. Results: Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher at 12 hours (P<0.05 and 24 hours (P<0.005 after CCP compared with before CCP, only in the patients with occurrence of cardiovascular events (n=17, but not in those without cardiovascular events (n=12. The parameter with the largest area under the curve (0.816 for predicting the occurrence of cardiovascular events was the change in urinary L-FABP at 24 hours after CCP. The difference in urinary L-FABP levels (ΔL-FABP ≥11.0 µg/g creatinine between before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP was a risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.27–19.13; P=0.021. Conclusion: Measurement of urinary L-FABP before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP in patients with mild to moderate renal dysfunction may be an important indicator for risk

  14. Structural analysis of site-directed mutants of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II addresses the relationship between structural integrity and ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaezeslami, Soheila; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H.

    2008-01-01

    A water network stabilizes the structure of cellular retionic acid binding protein II. The structural integrity of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII) has been investigated using the crystal structures of CRABPII mutants. The overall fold was well maintained by these CRABPII mutants, each of which carried multiple different mutations. A water-mediated network is found to be present across the large binding cavity, extending from Arg111 deep inside the cavity to the α2 helix at its entrance. This chain of interactions acts as a ‘pillar’ that maintains the integrity of the protein. The disruption of the water network upon loss of Arg111 leads to decreased structural integrity of the protein. A water-mediated network can be re-established by introducing the hydrophilic Glu121 inside the cavity, which results in a rigid protein with the α2 helix adopting an altered conformation compared with wild-type CRABPII

  15. Localization of hyaluronan with a hyaluronan-specific hyaluronic acid binding protein in the placenta in pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejevic, D; Neudeck, H; Graf, R; Müller, T; Dietl, J

    2001-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a high molecular weight polysaccharide, is a major component of connective tissue and is thus present in the extracellular matrix of most tissues. Increased serum concentrations have been reported in association with pre-eclampsia and liver malfunction, amongst other disorders. We have performed histochemical investigations with a HA-specific hyaluronic acid binding protein in placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies and from patients with pre-eclampsia. Staining for HA was found in the stroma and blood vessel walls of stem villi in all the placentas investigated. The syncytiotrophoblast and cytotrophoblast cells usually remained unstained. In addition, reactivity for HA was found within and on the surface of intervillous and perivillous fibrinoid deposits. Since fibrinoid deposits are increased in pre-eclampsia, our findings suggest that the increased HA serum concentrations in cases of pre-eclampsia could result from the stroma of the infarcted villi and from the fibrinoid deposits. HA may reach the maternal blood through fibrinoid gaps. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Immunodiagnostic monoclonal antibody-based sandwich ELISA of fasciolosis by detection of Fasciola gigantica circulating fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Chawengkirttikul, Runglawan; Sobhon, Prasert

    2016-09-01

    Up to now, parasitological diagnosis of fasciolosis is often unreliable and possesses low sensitivity. Hence, the detection of circulating parasite antigens is thought to be a better alternative for diagnosis of fasciolosis, as it reflects the real parasite burden. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against recombinant Fasciola gigantica fatty acid binding protein (rFgFABP) has been produced. As well, a reliable sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sandwich ELISA) has been developed for the detection of circulating FABP in the sera of mice experimentally and cattle naturally infected with F. gigantica. MoAb 3A3 and biotinylated rabbit anti-recombinant FABP antibody were selected due to their high reactivities and specificities. The lower detection limit of sandwich ELISA was 5 pg mL-1, and no cross-reaction with other parasite antigens was observed. This assay could detect F. gigantica infection from day 1 post infection. In experimental mice, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this assay were 93·3, 100 and 98·2%, while in natural cattle they were 96·7, 100 and 99·1%. Hence, this sandwich ELISA method showed high efficiencies and precisions for diagnosis of fasciolosis by F. gigantica.

  17. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-03

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Local sequence information in cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I: specific residue roles in beta-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Kenneth S; Gierasch, Lila M

    2003-01-01

    We have recently shown that two of the beta-turns (III and IV) in the ten-stranded, beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (CRABP I), are favored in short peptide fragments, arguing that they are encoded by local interactions (K. S. Rotondi and L. M. Gierasch, Biochemistry, 2003, Vol. 42, pp. 7976-7985). In this paper we examine these turns in greater detail to dissect the specific local interactions responsible for their observed native conformational biases. Conformations of peptides corresponding to the turn III and IV fragments were examined under conditions designed to selectively disrupt stabilizing interactions, using pH variation, chaotrope addition, or mutagenesis to probe specific side-chain influences. We find that steric constraints imposed by excluded volume effects between near neighbor residues (i,i+2), favorable polar (i,i+2) interactions, and steric permissiveness of glycines are the principal factors accounting for the observed native bias in these turns. Longer-range stabilizing interactions across the beta-turns do not appear to play a significant role in turn stability in these short peptides, in contrast to their importance in hairpins. Additionally, our data add to a growing number of examples of the 3:5 type I turn with a beta-bulge as a class of turns with high propensity to form locally defined structure. Current work is directed at the interplay between the local sequence information in the turns and more long-range influences in the mechanism of folding of this predominantly beta-sheet protein. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Lipid Transport through the Fetoplacental Barrier by the Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins in Pregnant Women with Herpes Virus Infection in the third Trimester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Lucenko, PhD, ScD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the transport of the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs from the lacunar blood through the syncytiotrophoblast of the placental villi to the fetal cord blood via a saturable protein-mediated mechanism by the heart-type fatty acid-binding proteins (H-FABPs has been examined. Exacerbation of the herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 in the third trimester of gestation reduces the delivery of the fatty acid-binding proteins to the syncytiotrophoblast. During exacerbation of the HSV-1 infection, the selective transfer of the LCPUFAs across the syncytiotrophoblast basal plasma membrane into the fetal cord blood was observed. The supply of anti-inflammatory ω-3 PUFAs was reduced; however, the inflow of inflammatory arachidonic acid and other ω-6 PUFAs into the fetal blood was increased.

  20. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two intestinal fatty-acid binding proteins in the presence of 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguerre, Aisha; Wielens, Jerome; Parker, Michael W.; Porter, Christopher J. H.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid binding proteins from human and rat have been crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid. Diffraction data for the crystals were collected to 1.8 Å resolution (human) and 1.6 Å resolution (rat). Fatty-acid binding proteins (FABPs) are abundantly expressed proteins that bind a range of lipophilic molecules. They have been implicated in the import and intracellular distribution of their ligands and have been linked with metabolic and inflammatory responses in the cells in which they are expressed. Despite their high sequence identity, human intestinal FABP (hIFABP) and rat intestinal FABP (rIFABP) bind some ligands with different affinities. In order to address the structural basis of this differential binding, diffraction-quality crystals have been obtained of hIFABP and rIFABP in complex with the fluorescent fatty-acid analogue 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid

  1. Protein-membrane interaction and fatty acid transfer from intestinal fatty acid-binding protein to membranes. Support for a multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Laborde, Lisandro; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2006-05-19

    Fatty acid transfer from intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (IFABP) to phospholipid membranes occurs during protein-membrane collisions. Electrostatic interactions involving the alpha-helical "portal" region of the protein have been shown to be of great importance. In the present study, the role of specific lysine residues in the alpha-helical region of IFABP was directly examined. A series of point mutants in rat IFABP was engineered in which the lysine positive charges in this domain were eliminated or reversed. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, we analyzed the rates and mechanism of fatty acid transfer from wild type and mutant proteins to acceptor membranes. Most of the alpha-helical domain mutants showed slower absolute fatty acid transfer rates to zwitterionic membranes, with substitution of one of the lysines of the alpha2 helix, Lys27, resulting in a particularly dramatic decrease in the fatty acid transfer rate. Sensitivity to negatively charged phospholipid membranes was also reduced, with charge reversal mutants in the alpha2 helix the most affected. The results support the hypothesis that the portal region undergoes a conformational change during protein-membrane interaction, which leads to release of the bound fatty acid to the membrane and that the alpha2 segment is of particular importance in the establishment of charge-charge interactions between IFABP and membranes. Cross-linking experiments with a phospholipid-photoactivable reagent underscored the importance of charge-charge interactions, showing that the physical interaction between wild-type intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and phospholipid membranes is enhanced by electrostatic interactions. Protein-membrane interactions were also found to be enhanced by the presence of ligand, suggesting different collisional complex structures for holo- and apo-IFABP.

  2. Structure of the human-heart fatty-acid-binding protein 3 in complex with the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Mika; Sugiyama, Shigeru, E-mail: sugiyama@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishida, Hanako; Niiyama, Mayumi [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Toshiaki [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Satoshi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagaw 226-8501 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of human-heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein in complex with anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate was solved at 2.15 Å resolution revealing the detailed binding mechanism of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3), which is a cytosolic protein abundantly found in cardiomyocytes, plays a role in trafficking fatty acids throughout cellular compartments by reversibly binding intracellular fatty acids with relatively high affinity. The fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) is extensively utilized for examining the interaction of ligands with fatty-acid-binding proteins. The X-ray structure of FABP3 was determined in the presence of ANS and revealed the detailed ANS-binding mechanism. Furthermore, four water molecules were clearly identified in the binding cavity. Through these water molecules, the bound ANS molecule forms indirect hydrogen-bond interactions with FABP3. The adipocyte-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP4) exhibits 67% sequence identity with FABP3 and its crystal structure is almost the same as that of FABP3. However, FABP4 can bind with a higher affinity to ANS than FABP3. To understand the difference in their ligand specificities, a structural comparison was performed between FABP3–ANS and FABP4–ANS complexes. The result revealed that the orientation of ANS binding to FABP3 is completely opposite to that of ANS binding to FABP4, and the substitution of valine in FABP4 to leucine in FABP3 may result in greater steric hindrance between the side-chain of Leu115 and the aniline ring of ANS.

  3. Structure of the human-heart fatty-acid-binding protein 3 in complex with the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Mika; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishida, Hanako; Niiyama, Mayumi; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Toshiaki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of human-heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein in complex with anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate was solved at 2.15 Å resolution revealing the detailed binding mechanism of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3), which is a cytosolic protein abundantly found in cardiomyocytes, plays a role in trafficking fatty acids throughout cellular compartments by reversibly binding intracellular fatty acids with relatively high affinity. The fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) is extensively utilized for examining the interaction of ligands with fatty-acid-binding proteins. The X-ray structure of FABP3 was determined in the presence of ANS and revealed the detailed ANS-binding mechanism. Furthermore, four water molecules were clearly identified in the binding cavity. Through these water molecules, the bound ANS molecule forms indirect hydrogen-bond interactions with FABP3. The adipocyte-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP4) exhibits 67% sequence identity with FABP3 and its crystal structure is almost the same as that of FABP3. However, FABP4 can bind with a higher affinity to ANS than FABP3. To understand the difference in their ligand specificities, a structural comparison was performed between FABP3–ANS and FABP4–ANS complexes. The result revealed that the orientation of ANS binding to FABP3 is completely opposite to that of ANS binding to FABP4, and the substitution of valine in FABP4 to leucine in FABP3 may result in greater steric hindrance between the side-chain of Leu115 and the aniline ring of ANS

  4. Fatty Acid binding protein 4 is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Holm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 has been shown to play an important role in macrophage cholesterol trafficking and associated inflammation. To further elucidate the role of FABP4 in atherogenesis in humans, we examined the regulation of FABP4 in carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. METHODS: We examined plasma FABP4 levels in asymptomatic (n = 28 and symptomatic (n = 31 patients with carotid atherosclerosis, as well as in 202 subjects with acute ischemic stroke. In a subgroup of patients we also analysed the expression of FABP4 within the atherosclerotic lesion. In addition, we investigated the ability of different stimuli with relevance to atherosclerosis to regulate FABP4 expression in monocytes/macrophages. RESULTS: FABP4 levels were higher in patients with carotid atherosclerosis, both systemically and within the atherosclerotic lesion, with particular high mRNA levels in carotid plaques from patients with the most recent symptoms. Immunostaining of carotid plaques localized FABP4 to macrophages, while activated platelets and oxidized LDL were potent stimuli for FABP4 expression in monocytes/macrophages in vitro. When measured at the time of acute ischemic stroke, high plasma levels of FABP4 were significantly associated with total and cardiovascular mortality during follow-up, although we did not find that addition of FABP4 to the fully adjusted multivariate model had an effect on the prognostic discrimination for all-cause mortality as assessed by c-statistics. CONCLUSIONS: FABP4 is linked to atherogenesis, plaque instability and adverse outcome in patients with carotid atherosclerosis and acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  6. Binding of acyl CoA by fatty acid binding protein and the effect on fatty acid activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrier, R.E.; Manson, C.R.; Brecher, P.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of purified rat liver and heart fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) to bind oleoyl CoA and modulate acyl CoA synthesis by microsomal membranes was investigated. Using binding assays employing either Lipidex 1000 or multilamellar liposomes to sequester unbound ligand, rat liver but not rat heart FABP was shown to bind radiolabeled acyl CoA. Binding studies suggest that liver FABP has a single binding site for acyl CoA which is separate from the two binding sites for fatty acids. Experiments were then performed to determine how binding may influence acyl CoA metabolism by liver microsomes or heart sarcoplasmic reticulum. Using liposomes as fatty acid donors, liver FABP stimulated acyl CoA production whereas heart FABP did not stimulate production over control values. 14 C-Fatty acid-FABP complexes were prepared, incubated with membranes and acyl CoA synthetase activity was determined. Up to 70% of the fatty acid could be converted to acyl CoA in the presence of liver FABP but in the presence of heart FABP, only 45% of the fatty acid was converted. The amount of product formed was not changed by additional membrane, enzyme cofactor, or incubation time. Liver but not heart FABP bound the acyl CoA formed and removed it from the membranes. These studies suggest that liver FABP can increase the amount of acyl CoA by binding this ligand thereby removing it from the membrane and possibly aiding transport within the cell

  7. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jun [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Shen, Ying H., E-mail: hyshen@bcm.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  8. Serum liver fatty acid binding protein levels correlate positively with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver fatty acid-binding protein (FABP1 plays an inconclusive role in adiposity. We investigated the association of serum FABP1 levels with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young people under 30 years old. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional analysis including 200 obese and 172 normal-weight subjects matched for age and sex, anthropometric measurements were performed and serum FABP1 and biochemical characteristics were measured. Insulin resistance was determined by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and by the insulin sensitivity index (S(i derived from Bergman's minimal model. FABP1 levels in obese subjects were significantly higher than those in normal-weight subjects (p<0.001 and the significance remained after adjustment for age, gender, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (p<0.001. Serum FABP1 levels were significantly correlated with many metabolic-related parameters, with BMI and triglycerides as the independent determinants. FABP1 levels remained an independent risk factor of insulin resistance assessed by binary S(i (OR = 1.868 per SD unit, 95% CI [1.035-3.373], p = 0.038 after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, serum triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol,. FABP1 levels were also elevated with an increasing number of components of the metabolic syndrome (p for trend <0.001. Multiple regression modeling for the MetS and its components demonstrated that hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol were significantly correlated to serum FABP1 levels. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Serum FABP1 correlates positively with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young adults. Our data supports the fact that FABP1 might be an important mediator participating in fatty acid metabolism and energy balance.

  9. Human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein as an early diagnostic marker of doxorubicin cardiac toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. ElGhandour

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cardiotoxicity following treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL may lead to late onset cardiomyopathy. So, early prediction of toxicity can lead to prevention of heart failure in these patients. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of H-FABP as an early diagnostic marker of anthracycline-induced cardiac toxicity together with brain natriuretic peptide (BNP as an indication of ventricular dysfunction in such patients. Our study was conducted on 40 NHL patients who received 6 cycles of a doxorubicin containing chemotherapy protocol (CHOP, not exceeding the total allowed dose of doxorubicin (500 mg/m2. Ten healthy controls were included in our study. Human heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP was assessed 24 hours after the first cycle of CHOP. Plasma levels of BNP were estimated both before starting chemotherapy and after the last cycle of CHOP. Resting echocardiography was also performed before and at the end of chemotherapy cycles. The ejection fraction (EF of 8 of our patients decreased below 50% at the end of the sixth cycle. Elevated levels of both H-FABP and BNP were found in all patients wth EF below 50% and both markers showed a positive correlation with each other. We concluded that H-FABP may serve as a reliable early marker for prediction of cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin. Thus, in patients with elevated H-FABP, alternative treatment modalities with no cardiac toxicity may be considered in order to prevent subsequent heart failure in these patients.

  10. Binding of acyl CoA by fatty acid binding protein and the effect on fatty acid activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrier, R.E.; Manson, C.R.; Brecher, P.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of purified rat liver and heart fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) to bind oleoyl CoA and modulate acyl CoA synthesis by microsomal membranes was investigated. Using binding assays employing either Lipidex 1000 or multilamellar liposomes to sequester unbound ligand, rat liver but not rat heart FABP was shown to bind radiolabeled acyl CoA. Binding studies suggest that liver FABP has a single binding site for acyl CoA which is separate from the two binding sites for fatty acids. Experiments were then performed to determine how binding may influence acyl CoA metabolism by liver microsomes or heart sarcoplasmic reticulum. Using liposomes as fatty acid donors, liver FABP stimulated acyl CoA production whereas heart FABP did not stimulate production over control values. /sup 14/C-Fatty acid-FABP complexes were prepared, incubated with membranes and acyl CoA synthetase activity was determined. Up to 70% of the fatty acid could be converted to acyl CoA in the presence of liver FABP but in the presence of heart FABP, only 45% of the fatty acid was converted. The amount of product formed was not changed by additional membrane, enzyme cofactor, or incubation time. Liver but not heart FABP bound the acyl CoA formed and removed it from the membranes. These studies suggest that liver FABP can increase the amount of acyl CoA by binding this ligand thereby removing it from the membrane and possibly aiding transport within the cell.

  11. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein Ala54Thr polymorphism is associated with peripheral atherosclerosis combined with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Salma A; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Ghattas, Maivel H; Mesbah, Noha M; Mehanna, Eman T

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) is expressed in enterocytes and binds saturated and unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. The FABP2 Ala54Thr polymorphism has been reported to effect lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between this polymorphism and peripheral atherosclerosis combined with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in an Egyptian population. The study was performed on 100 T2DM patients with peripheral atherosclerosis and 100 control subjects. The Ala54Thr polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, whereas serum FABP2 levels were determined using ELISA. Fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c, lipid profile, body mass index (BMI) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) were determined. There was a higher frequency of the Thr54 allele among the patient group (P = 0.002). In Ala54/Thr54 heterozygotes and carriers of the rare Thr54/Thr54 genotype, there were significant increases in BMI and FABP2. Those with the Thr54/Thr54 genotype had significantly decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations; in addition, those with the Thr54/Thr54 genotype had significantly higher SBP and DBP than subjects with the Ala54/Ala54 and Ala54/Thr54 genotypes. There was a positive correlation between FABP2 levels and BMI, SBP and DBP, and a negative correlation with HDL-C. The Thr54 allele of the FABP2 Ala54Thr polymorphism was associated with an increased incidence of peripheral atherosclerosis combined with T2DM in the population studied. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Identification of the SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism for Fatty Acid Composition Associated with Beef Flavor-related FABP4 (Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 in Korean Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-yep Oh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relationship between unsaturated fatty acids influencing beef flavor and four types of SNPs (c.280A>G, c.388G>A, c.408G>C and c.456A>G located at exon 2, 3 and 4 of the FABP4 gene, which is a fatty acid binding protein 4 in Korean cattle (n = 513. When analyzing the relationship between single genotype, fatty acids and carcass trait, individuals of GG, GG, CC and GG genotypes that are homozygotes, had a higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and marbling scores than other genotypes (p<0.05. Then, haplotype block showed strong significant relationships not only with unsaturated fatty acids (54.73%, but also with marbling scores (5.82 in ht1×ht1 group (p<0.05. This ht1×ht1 group showed significant differences with unsaturated fatty acids and marbling scores that affected beef flavor in Korean cattle. Therefore, it can be inferred that the ht1×ht1 types might be valuable new markers for use in the improvement of Korean cattle.

  13. Lack of association between the fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) polymorphism with obesity and insulin resistance in two aboriginal populations from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bravo, F; Fuentes, M; Angel, B; Sanchez, H; Carrasco, E; Santos, J L; Lera, L; Albala, C

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) Ala54Thr genetic polymorphism and to evaluate its association with obesity and insulin resistance in Chilean aboriginal populations. A sample of 96 urban Aymara and 111 urban Mapuche subjects aged 20-80 years were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Glucose, insulin and lipid profile were measured in fasting plasma samples. Insulin resistance was estimated through the HOMA-IR model. FABP2 Ala54Thr genotypes were determined by PCR followed by RFLP analysis. The allele frequency of Thr54 variant was estimated as 18.2% in Aymara subjects, which is one of the lowest reported to date. The corresponding frequency in Mapuche subjects was 31.9% (pMapuche group: OR=2.37, 95% CI 1.319-4.277, p=0.004) It is unlikely that Ala54Thr polymorphism of the FABP2 gene plays a relevant role in obesity and insulin resistance in Chilean ethnic groups.

  14. Protection against Schistosoma mansoni infection using a Fasciola hepatica-derived fatty acid binding protein from different delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Belén; López-Abán, Julio; Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; del Olmo, Esther; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Muro, Antonio

    2016-04-18

    Schistosomiasis is a water-borne disease afflicting over 261 million people in many areas of the developing countries with high morbidity and mortality. The control relies mainly on treatment with praziquantel. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) have demonstrated high levels of immune-protection against trematode infections. This study reports the immunoprotection induced by cross-reacting Fasciola hepatica FABP, native (nFh12) and recombinantly expressed using two different expression systems Escherichia coli (rFh15) and baculovirus (rFh15b) against Schistosoma mansoni infection. BALB/c mice were vaccinated with native nFh12 or recombinant rFh15 and rFh15 FABP from F. hepatica formulated in adjuvant adaptation (ADAD) system with natural or chemical synthesised immunomodulators (PAL and AA0029) and then challenged with 150 cercariae of S. mansoni. Parasite burden, hepatic lesions and antibody response were studied in vaccination trials. Furthermore differences between rFh15 and rFh15b immunological responses (cytokine production, splenocyte population and antibody levels) were studied. Vaccination with nFh12 induced significant reductions in worm burden (83%), eggs in tissues (82-92%) and hepatic lesions (85%) compared to infected controls using PAL. Vaccination with rFh15 showed lower total worm burden (56-64%), eggs in the liver (21-61%), eggs in the gut (30-77%) and hepatic damage (67-69%) using PAL and AA0029 as immunomodulators. In contrast, mice vaccinated with rFh15b showed only reductions in eggs trapped in the liver and intestine (53 and 60%, respectively), and hepatic lesions (45%). We observed a significant rise in TNFα, IL-6, IL-2, IL-4 and high antibody response (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgM and IgE) in mice immunised with either rFh15 or rFh15b. Moreover, mice immunised with rFh15b showed an increase in IFNγ and a decrease in B220 cells compared to untreated mice, and less production of IgG1 and IgM than in mice immunised by rFh15. Higher level of

  15. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 predicts gestational hypertension and preeclampsia in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boya Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4 has been proposed to be a potential predictive factor of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia (GH/PE because of its integrating metabolic and inflammatory responses. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM are more likely to develop both GH/PE, than the normal population. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between plasma FABP4 in the second trimester of pregnancy and the risk of GH/PE in women with GDM.This was a nested case-control study conducted within a large on-going prospective cohort study conducted at Peking University First Hospital. A total of 1344 women, who were diagnosed with GDM, according to a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, participated in the GDM One-Day Clinic at Peking University First Hospital from February 24, 2016 to February 9, 2017. Of the 748 GDM women who agreed to the blood sample collection, 637 were followed until their delivery. The cases included GDM patients who developed gestational hypertension or preeclampsia (GDM-GH/PE group, n = 41. Another 41 matched GDM women without major complications were selected as the control group (GDM group.The incidence of GH/PE was 6.44% and 3.30% for preeclampsia. The level of the second trimester plasma FABP4 in the GDM-GH/PE group was significantly higher than the GDM group (17.53±11.35 vs. 12.79±6.04 ng/ml, P = 0.020. The AUC ROC for the second trimester plasma FABP4 predicted GH/PE in the GDM patients alone was 0.647 (95%CI 0.529-0.766. Multivariate analysis showed that the elevated second trimester FABP4 level was independently associated with GH/PE in the GDM patients (OR 1.136 [95% CI 1.003-1.286], P = 0.045.Increased second trimester plasma FABP4 independently predicted GH/PE in GDM patients.

  16. [Expression and significance of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein in placenta, serum and umbilical cord blood in preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the change of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (FABP4) in maternal serum and umbilical cord blood and FABP4 mRNA placental expression in patients with preeclampsia (PE). A total of 60 women with PE and 60 normal pregnant women as control participated in this study.All are admitted to Fujian Maternity and Children Health Hospital for delivery from December 2008 to October 2009. Patients with PE were divided into early-onset group (n = 30, presented at ≤ 34 weeks of gestation) and late-onset group (n = 30, presented at > 34 weeks of gestation), with 30 normal pregnant women as early control group (≤ 34 weeks of gestation) and 30 as late control group (> 34 weeks of gestation). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect FABP4, fasting serum glucose, fasting insulin (FINS) in maternal serum and FABP4 in umbilical cord blood. Real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to detect placental FABP4 mRNA expression. Furthermore, clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded, such as body mass index (BMI), systolic pressure (SP), diastolic pressure (DP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 24 hours urine protein in pregnant women and neonatal weight. (1) Maternal serum FABP4 was (176 ± 9) ng/L in early-onset PE group and (170 ± 9) ng/L in late-onset PE group, significantly elevated as compared to (81 ± 13) ng/L in early control group and (94 ± 15) ng/L in late control group. (2) Mean maternal FINS, homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistence index (HOMA-IR) were significantly elevated in the early-onset PE group and late-onset PE group as compared to control groups, respectively. (3) Mean placental FABP4 mRNA expression were significantly elevated in the early-onset PE group and late-onset PE group as compared to late control

  17. Ala54Thr fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2 polymorphism in recurrent depression: associations with fatty acid concentrations and waist circumference.

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    Roel J T Mocking

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatty acid (FA-alterations may mediate the mutual association between Major Depressive Disorder (MDD and cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, etiology of observed FA-alterations in MDD and CVD remains largely unclear. An interesting candidate may be a mutation in the fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2-gene, because it regulates dietary FA-uptake. Therefore, we aimed to test the hypotheses that in MDD-patients the FABP2 Ala54Thr-polymorphism would be (I more prevalent than in sex- and age-matched controls, (II associated with observed alterations in FA-metabolism, and (III associated with CVD-risk factor waist circumference. METHODS: We measured concentrations of 29 different erythrocyte FAs, FABP2-genotype, and waist circumference in recurrent MDD-patients and matched never-depressed controls. RESULTS: FABP2-genotype distribution did not significantly differ between the 137 MDD-patients and 73 matched controls. However, patients with the Ala54Thr-polymorphism had (I higher concentrations of especially eicosadienoic acid (C20:2ω6; P=.009 and other 20-carbon FAs, and associated (II lower waist circumference (P=.019. In addition, FABP2-genotype effects on waist circumference in patients seemed (I mediated by its effect on C20:2ω6, and (II different from controls. CONCLUSIONS: Although Ala54Thr-polymorphism distribution was not associated with recurrent MDD, our results indicate that FABP2 may play a role in the explanation of observed FA-alterations in MDD. For Ala54Thr-polymorphism patients, potentially adaptive conversion of increased bioavailable dietary precursors into eicosadienoic acid instead of arachidonic acid might be related to a low waist circumference. Because this is the first investigation of these associations, replication is warranted, preferably by nutrigenetic studies applying lipidomics and detailed dietary assessment.

  18. ω-3 and ω-6 Fatty Acids Modulate Conventional and Atypical Protein Kinase C Activities in a Brain Fatty Acid Binding Protein Dependent Manner in Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Marwa E. Elsherbiny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly infiltrative brain cancer with a dismal prognosis. High levels of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP are associated with increased migration/infiltration in GBM cells, with a high ratio of arachidonic acid (AA to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA driving B-FABP-mediated migration. Since several protein kinase Cs (PKCs are overexpressed in GBM and linked to migration, we explored a possible relationship between B-FABP and levels/activity of different PKCs, as a function of AA and DHA supplementation. We report that ectopic expression of B-FABP in U87 cells alters the levels of several PKCs, particularly PKCζ. Upon analysis of PKCζ RNA levels in a panel of GBM cell lines and patient-derived GBM neurospheres, we observed a trend towards moderate positive correlation (r = 0.624, p = 0.054 between B-FABP and PKCζ RNA levels. Analysis of PKC activity in U87 GBM cells revealed decreased typical PKC activity (23.4% in B-FABP-expressing cells compared with nonexpressing cells, with no difference in novel and atypical PKC activities. AA and DHA modulated both conventional and atypical PKC activities in a B-FABP-dependent manner, but had no effect on novel PKC activity. These results suggest that conventional and atypical PKCs are potential downstream effectors of B-FABP/fatty acid-mediated alterations in GBM growth properties.

  19. Role of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 2 Ala54Thr Genotype on Weight Loss and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after a High-Protein/Low-Carbohydrate versus a Standard Hypocaloric Diet during 9 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Izaola, Olatz; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Primo, David; Romero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    It has been found that the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 2 gene mRNA is under dietary control. The polymorphism Ala54Thr of this protein was associated with high insulin resistance. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of Thr54 polymorphism on metabolic response, weight loss and serum adipokine levels secondary to high-protein/low-carbohydrate vs. standard hypocaloric diets during 9 months. A population of 193 obese subjects was analyzed in a randomized trial. A nutritional evaluation was performed at the beginning and at the end of a 9-month period in which subjects received 1 of 2 diets (diet HP: high-protein/low-carbohydrate vs. diet S: standard diet). With both diets and in both genotype groups, body mass index, weight, fat mass, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and leptin levels decreased. With both diets and only in wild genotype (diet HP vs. diet S), glucose (-6.2 ± 2.1 vs. -4.9 ± 2.0 mg/dl; p diet HP than HS. With both diets and only in the wild genotype, total cholesterol and LDL-total cholesterol levels decreased. Carriers of Thr54 allele have a different metabolic response after weight loss than wild type non-A carriers obese, with a lack of decrease of LDL-cholesterol, glucose, insulin levels and HOMA-R. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Can Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP Be A Marker in the Diagnosis of Abdominal Pathology?

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    Ozlem UZUN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: Biochemical markers play an important role in the early diagnosis of abdominal pain. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of intestinal type fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP in patients with abdominal pathology. Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed at the University Hospital Emergency Department. Serum I-FABP levels of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain were measured at time of admission and were compared with those of healthy individuals. Results: The mean I-FABP level of the 171 patients enrolled in this study was 170.1±543.4 pg/ml, while that of a healthy control group was 61.4±47.4 pg/ml. Although I-FABP levels were higher in the patient group, this difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. However, I-FABP levels of patients with mesenteric ischemia and intra-abdominal mass were significantly higher than those of healthy individuals (p≤0.05. Conclusions: I-FABP levels that are evaluated at time of admission in patients presenting with abdominal pain to the emergency department are significantly higher in patients with mesenteric ischemia and intra-abdominal mass than are those of healthy individuals. ÖZET: Amaç: Biyokimyasal belirteçler karın ağrısının sebebinin erken tanısında oldukça önemlidir. Bu çalışmada FABP'nin intestinal tipinin (I-FABP abdominal patolojisi olan hastaların ayırıcı tanısındaki değeri araştırıldı. Gereç ve Yöntem: Mevcut çalışma üniversite hastanesi acil servisinde ileriye yönelik tanımlayıcı olarak çalışma gerçekleştirildi. Karın ağrısı şikayeti ile acil servise başvuran hastalarda başvuru anında alınan serum örneklerinden I-FABP değerlerine bakıldı. Bulgular sağlıklı gönüllülerdeki düzeyler ile karşılaştırıldı. Bulgular: Kayıtlı 171 hastada ölçülen ortalama I-FABP seviyesi 170.1±543.4 pg/ml olarak belirlendi. Sağlıklı gönüllülerde I-FABP seviyesi 61

  1. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a Northern European family population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Kent, Jack W; Lee, Adam; Cerjak, Diana; Ali, Omar; Diasio, Robert; Olivier, Michael; Blangero, John; Carless, Melanie A; Kissebah, Ahmed H

    2013-03-19

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (pmetabolism (βWHR=-0.72; βLDL-c=-0.53) while positively correlated with plasma adiponectin (β=0.24). Further, we show that differential methylation of FABP3 affects binding activity with

  2. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E associate with host T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue BmTRN-1 to influence protein synthesis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Eiji; Muto, Sayaka; Ijiri, Hiroshi; Mori, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Previous reports have indicated that the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E are expressed during the early stage of infection and that the BRO family likely supports the regulation of mRNA; however, no study has directly examined the function of BRO family proteins in virus-permissive cells. Here, we show that BRO-B and BRO-E associate with cellular T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue (BmTRN-1), a translational regulator, and other cellular translation-related proteins in silkworm cells during viral infection. We created BM-N cells that expressed BRO-B/E to study molecular interactions between BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E and how they influenced protein synthesis. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that BmTRN-1 was localized in cytoplasmic foci during BmNPV infection. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed that BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E were colocalized in the amorphous conspicuous cytoplasmic foci. Reporter gene studies revealed that co-expression of BRO-B/E synergistically led to a significant decrease in protein synthesis from a designed transcript carrying the 5'untranslated region of a cellular mRNA with no significant change of transcript abundance. Additionally, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of BmTRN-1 resulted in a marked inhibition of the ability of BRO-B/E to regulate the transcript. These results suggested that the association of BmTRN-1 with BRO-B/E is responsible for the inhibitory regulation of certain mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level and add an additional mechanism for how baculoviruses control protein synthesis during infection.

  3. Cloning and tissue distribution of rat hear fatty acid binding protein mRNA: identical forms in heart and skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claffey, K.P.; Herrera, V.L.; Brecher, P.; Ruiz-Opazo, N.

    1987-01-01

    A fatty acid binding protein (FABP) as been identified and characterized in rat heart, but the function and regulation of this protein are unclear. In this study the cDNA for rat heart FABP was cloned from a λ gt11 library. Sequencing of the cDNA showed an open reading frame coding for a protein with 133 amino acids and a calculated size of 14,776 daltons. Several differences were found between the sequence determined from the cDNA and that reported previously by protein sequencing techniques. Northern blot analysis using rat heart FABP cDNA as a probe established the presence of an abundant mRNA in rat heart about 0.85 kilobases in length. This mRNA was detected, but was not abundant, in fetal heart tissue. Tissue distribution studies showed a similar mRNA species in red, but not white, skeletal muscle. In general, the mRNA tissue distribution was similar to that of the protein detected by Western immunoblot analysis, suggesting that heart FABP expression may be regulated at the transcriptional level. S1 nuclease mapping studies confirmed that the mRNA hybridized to rat heart FABP cDNA was identical in heart and red skeletal muscle throughout the entire open reading frame. The structural differences between heart FABP and other members of this multigene family may be related to the functional requirements of oxidative muscle for fatty acids as a fuel source

  4. Cloning and tissue distribution of rat hear fatty acid binding protein mRNA: identical forms in heart and skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claffey, K.P.; Herrera, V.L.; Brecher, P.; Ruiz-Opazo, N.

    1987-12-01

    A fatty acid binding protein (FABP) as been identified and characterized in rat heart, but the function and regulation of this protein are unclear. In this study the cDNA for rat heart FABP was cloned from a lambda gt11 library. Sequencing of the cDNA showed an open reading frame coding for a protein with 133 amino acids and a calculated size of 14,776 daltons. Several differences were found between the sequence determined from the cDNA and that reported previously by protein sequencing techniques. Northern blot analysis using rat heart FABP cDNA as a probe established the presence of an abundant mRNA in rat heart about 0.85 kilobases in length. This mRNA was detected, but was not abundant, in fetal heart tissue. Tissue distribution studies showed a similar mRNA species in red, but not white, skeletal muscle. In general, the mRNA tissue distribution was similar to that of the protein detected by Western immunoblot analysis, suggesting that heart FABP expression may be regulated at the transcriptional level. S1 nuclease mapping studies confirmed that the mRNA hybridized to rat heart FABP cDNA was identical in heart and red skeletal muscle throughout the entire open reading frame. The structural differences between heart FABP and other members of this multigene family may be related to the functional requirements of oxidative muscle for fatty acids as a fuel source.

  5. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori blood-group antigen-binding adhesion 2 and sialic acid binding adhesion genes among dyspeptic patients in Tabriz, Iran

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    Leila Yousefi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this research was to analyze blood-group antigen-binding adhesion (babA2 and sialic acid binding adhesion (sabA genotypes status in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori isolates and their relationship with clinical outcomes. Methods: Gastric biopsy specimens were homogenized and placed in Brucella agar medium supplemented with 5% sheep blood and 3 antibiotics and were cultured at 37 °C under microaerophilic conditions and incubated for 4-7 days. H. pylori was identified by typical morphology, gram-staining and urease tests, and babA2 and sabA genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: From a total of 100 H. pylori isolates; babA2 and sabA genes were detected in 23.0 and 26.4%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between these genes and clinical outcomes (P < 0.050. Conclusion: We found that the babA2 status was not related to clinical outcomes in Tabriz, Iran. However, sabA was a promoting determinant for disease, and multivariate analysis disclosed sabA to be an independent marker of non-ulcer diseases in our subjects.

  6. X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) modified with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellberg, Kristina; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Banaszak, Leonard J.; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Bernlohr, David A. (UMM)

    2012-07-11

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) have been characterized as facilitating the intracellular solubilization and transport of long-chain fatty acyl carboxylates via noncovalent interactions. More recent work has shown that the adipocyte FABP is also covalently modified in vivo on Cys117 with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a bioactive aldehyde linked to oxidative stress and inflammation. To evaluate 4-HNE binding and modification, the crystal structures of adipocyte FABP covalently and noncovalently bound to 4-HNE have been solved to 1.9 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. While the 4-HNE in the noncovalently modified protein is coordinated similarly to a carboxylate of a fatty acid, the covalent form show a novel coordination through a water molecule at the polar end of the lipid. Other defining features between the two structures with 4-HNE and previously solved structures of the protein include a peptide flip between residues Ala36 and Lys37 and the rotation of the side chain of Phe57 into its closed conformation. Representing the first structure of an endogenous target protein covalently modified by 4-HNE, these results define a new class of in vivo ligands for FABPs and extend their physiological substrates to include bioactive aldehydes.

  7. Cytoprotective role of the fatty acid binding protein 4 against oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

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    Kazuaki Kajimoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4, one of the most abundant proteins in adipocytes, has been reported to have a proinflammatory function in macrophages. However, the physiological role of FABP4, which is constitutively expressed in adipocytes, has not been fully elucidated. Previously, we demonstrated that FABP4 was involved in the regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of FABP4 silencing on the oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and 8-nitro-cyclic GMP levels were significantly elevated in the differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA against Fabp4, although the intracellular levels or enzyme activities of antioxidants including reduced glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione S-transferase A4 (GSTA4 were not altered. An in vitro evaluation using the recombinant protein revealed that FABP4 itself functions as a scavenger protein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. FABP4-knockdown resulted in a significant lowering of cell viability of 3T3-L1 adipocytes against H2O2 treatment. Moreover, four kinds of markers related to the ER stress response including the endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1 (Ern1, the signal sequence receptor α (Ssr1, the ORM1-like 3 (Ormdl3, and the spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s, were all elevated as the result of the knockdown of FABP4. Consequently, FABP4 might have a new role as an antioxidant protein against H2O2 and contribute to cytoprotection against oxidative and ER stress in adipocytes.

  8. Detection of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP) using piezoresistive polymer microcantilevers functionalized by a dry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Dilip Kumar; Prasad, Abhinav; Vinchurkar, Madhuri; Gandhi, Sahir; Prabhakar, Deepika; Mukherji, Soumyo; Rao, V. Ramgopal

    2018-03-01

    Piezoresistive microcantilever-based sensor platform is being used for the last two decades due to their low cost, rapid response and label-free detection system. In this work, we are reporting a microfabricated piezoresistive SU-8/carbon black (polymer cantilever)-based sensor platform for the detection of a clinically important early-stage cardiac marker, i.e., fatty acid-binding protein. It is a most preferred cardiac marker for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The embodiment of the sensor is a SU-8 microcantilever chip with an integrated nanoparticle composite (carbon black) as a piezoresistor for on-chip electrical transduction. Prior to improving the sensing and susceptibility towards the specific target biomolecule (i.e., h-FABP), the fabricated SU-8 polymer cantilevers were subjected to tailored functionalization. This includes the use of an in-house dry method of hot wire chemical vapour deposition technique to graft amine groups onto the SU-8 surface. The surface-modified microcantilevers were further integrated with a polydimethylsiloxane liquid flow cell and connected externally with an electrical read-out system. Immobilization of the antibody corresponding to the marker protein on the microcantilever surface and subsequent recording of the signal generated upon the antibody-antigen interaction were carried out inside the liquid flow cell. Using our optimized immobilization protocol with this experimental set-up, we were successfully able to detect h-FABP concentration as low as 100 ng/ml.

  9. Dynamics of Linker Residues Modulate the Nucleic Acid Binding Properties of the HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Zinc Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity. PMID:25029439

  10. Loss of sialic acid binding domain redirects protein σ1 to enhance M cell-directed vaccination.

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    Dagmara Zlotkowska

    Full Text Available Ovalbumin (OVA genetically fused to protein sigma 1 (pσ1 results in tolerance to both OVA and pσ1. Pσ1 binds in a multi-step fashion, involving both protein- and carbohydrate-based receptors. To assess the relative pσ1 components responsible for inducing tolerance and the importance of its sialic binding domain (SABD for immunization, modified OVA-pσ1, termed OVA-pσ1(short, was deleted of its SABD, but with its M cell targeting moiety intact, and was found to be immunostimulatory and enhanced CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell proliferation. When used to nasally immunize mice given with and without cholera toxin (CT adjuvant, elevated SIgA and serum IgG responses were induced, and OVA-pσ1(s was more efficient for immunization than native OVA+CT. The immune antibodies (Abs were derived from elevated Ab-forming cells in the upper respiratory tissues and submaxillary glands and were supported by mixed Th cell responses. Thus, these studies show that pσ1(s can be fused to vaccines to effectively elicit improved SIgA responses.

  11. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fatty acids bind tightly to the N-terminal domain of angiopoietin-like protein 4 and modulate its interaction with lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robal, Terje; Larsson, Mikael; Martin, Miina; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2012-08-24

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4), a potent regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism, binds to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) through its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (ccd-Angptl4) inducing dissociation of the dimeric enzyme to inactive monomers. In this study, we demonstrate that fatty acids reduce the inactivation of LPL by Angptl4. This was the case both with ccd-Angptl4 and full-length Angptl4, and the effect was seen in human plasma or in the presence of albumin. The effect decreased in the sequence oleic acid > palmitic acid > myristic acid > linoleic acid > linolenic acid. Surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence, and chromatography measurements revealed that fatty acids bind with high affinity to ccd-Angptl4. The interactions were characterized by fast association and slow dissociation rates, indicating formation of stable complexes. The highest affinity for ccd-Angptl4 was detected for oleic acid with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The K(d) values for palmitic and myristic acid were in the nanomolar range. Linoleic and linolenic acid bound with much lower affinity. On binding of fatty acids, ccd-Angptl4 underwent conformational changes resulting in a decreased helical content, weakened structural stability, dissociation of oligomers, and altered fluorescence properties of the Trp-38 residue that is located close to the putative LPL-binding region. Based on these results, we propose that fatty acids play an important role in modulating the effects of Angptl4.

  13. Diagnostic potential of Fasciola gigantica-derived 14.5 kDa fatty acid binding protein in the immunodiagnosis of bubaline fascioliasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, G; Bauomy, I R; Hemyeda, Z M; Diab, T M; Sakran, T F

    2013-06-01

    The 14.5 kDa fatty acid binding protein (FABP) was isolated from the crude extract of adult Fasciola gigantica worms. Polyclonal anti-FABP IgG was generated in rabbits immunized with prepared FABP antigen. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to detect coproantigen in stools and circulating Fasciola antigen (CA) in sera of 126 water buffaloes by using purified and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-FABP IgG. Sandwich ELISA sensitivity was 96.97% and 94.95%; while specificity was 94.12% and 82.35% for coproantigen and CA detection, respectively. However, sensitivity and specificity of the Kato-Katz technique was 73.74% and 100%, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of sandwich ELISA was 96.55% and 93.1% for coproantigen and CA detection, respectively. In contrast, the diagnostic efficacy of the Kato-Katz technique was 77.59%. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the purified 14.5 kDa FABP provides a more suitable antigen for immunodiagnosis of early and current bubaline fascioliasis by using sandwich ELISA.

  14. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

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    Marwa E. Elsherbiny

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Arachidonic (AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7, a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains.

  15. Distinct roles of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein in non-diabetic patients with anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiko Imai

    Full Text Available Various stresses including ischemia are known to up-regulate renal L-FABP gene expression and increase the urinary excretion of L-FABP. In diabetic patients with anemia, the urinary excretion of L-FABP is significantly increased. We studied the clinical significance of urinary L-FABP and its relationship with anemia in non-diabetic patients.A total of 156 patients were studied in this retrospective cross-sectional analysis. The associations between anemia and urinary L-FABP levels, and the predictors of urinary L-FABP levels in non-diabetic patients were evaluated.Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia compared to those in patients without anemia. Similarly, the urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with albuminuria compared to those in patients without albuminuria. Urinary L-FABP levels correlated with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios, estimated glomerular filtration rates, body mass index, and hemoglobin levels. Multivariate linear regression analysis determined that hemoglobin levels (β = -0.249, P = 0.001 and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (β = 0.349, P < 0.001 were significant predictors of urinary L-FABP levels.Urinary L-FABP is strongly associated with anemia in non-diabetic patients.

  16. Expression pattern and developmental behaviour of cellular nucleic acid-binding protein (CNBP) during folliculogenesis and oogenesis in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Xia; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2005-08-15

    In vertebrates, folliculogeneis establishes an intricate system for somatic cell-oocyte interaction, and ultimately leads to the acquisition of their respective competences. Although the formation process and corresponding interactions are strikingly similar in diverse organisms, knowledge of genes and signaling pathways involved in follicle formation is very incomplete and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain enigmatic. CNBP has been identified for more than ten years, and the highest level of CNBP transcripts has been observed in adult zebrafish ovary, but little is known about its functional significance during folliculogeneis and oogenesis. In this study, we clone CNBP cDNA from gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio), and demonstrate its predominant expression in gibel carp ovary and testis not only by RT-PCR but also by Western blot. Its full-length cDNA is 1402 bp, and has an ORF of 489 nt for encoding a peptide of 163 aa. And its complete amino acid sequence shared 68.5%-96.8% identity with CNBPs from other vertebrates. Based on the expression characterization, we further analyze its expression pattern and developmental behaviour during folliculogeneis and oogenesis. Following these studies, we reveal an unexpected discovery that the CagCNBP is associated with follicular cells and oocytes, and significant distribution changes have occurred in degenerating and regenerating follicles. More interestingly, the CagCNBP is more highly expressed in some clusters of interconnected cells within ovarian cysts, no matter whether the cell clusters are formed from the original primordial germ cells or from the newly formed cells from follicular cells that invaded into the atretic oocytes. It is the first time to reveal CNBP relevance to folliculogeneis and oogenesis. Moreover, a similar stage-specific and cell-specific expression pattern has also been observed in the gibel carp testis. Therefore, further studies on CNBP expression pattern and developmental

  17. A Personal Retrospective: Elevating Anandamide (AEA) by Targeting Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) and the Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Dale G

    2016-01-01

    This perspective was adapted from a Career Achievement Award talk given at the International Cannabinoid Research Society Symposium in Bukovina, Poland on June 27, 2016. As a biochemist working in the neurosciences, I was always fascinated with neurotransmitter inactivation. In 1993 we identified an enzyme activity that breaks down anandamide. We called the enzyme anandamide amidase, now called FAAH. We and other laboratories developed FAAH inhibitors that were useful reagents that also proved to have beneficial physiological effects and until recently, new generations of inhibitors were in clinical trials. Nearly all neurotransmitters are water soluble and as such, require a transmembrane protein transporter to pass through the lipid membrane for inactivation inside the cell. However, using model systems, we and others have shown that this is unnecessary for anandamide, an uncharged hydrophobic molecule that readily diffuses across the cellular membrane. Interestingly, its uptake is driven by the concentration gradient resulting from its breakdown mainly by FAAH localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. We identified the FABPs as intracellular carriers that "solubilize" anandamide, transporting anandamide to FAAH. Compounds that bind to FABPs block AEA breakdown, raising its level. The cannabinoids (THC and CBD) also were discovered to bind FABPs and this may be one of the mechanisms by which CBD works in childhood epilepsy, raising anandamide levels. Targeting FABPs may be advantageous since they have some tissue specificity and do not require reactive serine hydrolase inhibitors, as does FAAH, with potential for off-target reactions. At the International Cannabis Research Society Symposium in 1992, Raphe Mechoulam revealed that his laboratory isolated an endogenous lipid molecule that binds to the CB1 receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) and this became the milestone paper published in December of that year describing anandamide (AEA, Devane et al., 1992). As to

  18. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P; Kumar, Anil Tr; Devi, Anandavalli N; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)(+) (spermatogonia), GFRα(-)/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)(+) (meiotic), and GFRα(-)/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)(+) (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein

  19. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) alleviates osteoarthritis induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chiu, K Y; Chan, B P M; Li, T; Wen, C; Xu, A; Yan, C H

    2018-06-01

    Adipokines play roles in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a novel adipokine that is closely associated with obesity and metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to discover the potential role of FABP4 in OA. Seventy-two FABP4 knockout mice (KO) in C57BL/6N background and wild-type littermates (WT) (male, 6-week-old) were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% calorie) or standard diet (STD, 11.6% calorie) for 3 months, 6 months and 9 months (n = 6 each). In the parallel study, forty-eight 6-week-old male WT mice were fed with HFD or STD, and simultaneously treated with daily oral gavage of selective FABP4 inhibitor BMS309403 (15 mg/kg/d) or vehicle for 4 months and 6 months (n = 6 each). Serum FABP4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration was quantified. Histological assessment of knee OA and micro-CT analysis of subchondral bone were performed. HFD induced obesity in mice. After 3 months and 6 months of HFD, KO mice showed alleviated cartilage degradation and synovitis, with significantly lower COMP, modified Mankin OA score, and MMP-13/ADAMTS4 expression. After 6 months and 9 months of HFD, KO mice showed less osteophyte formation and subchondral bone sclerosis. Chronic treatment of BMS309403 for 4 months and 6 months significantly alleviated cartilage degradation, but had no effects on the subchondral bone. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of FABP4 did not have significant effects on lean mice fed with STD. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of FABP4 alleviates OA induced by HFD in mice. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Label-Free LC-MS Profiling of Skeletal Muscle Reveals Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Candidate Biomarker of Aerobic Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulezwan A. Malik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis provides robust comparative analysis of skeletal muscle, but this technique is laborious and limited by its inability to resolve all proteins. In contrast, orthogonal separation by SDS-PAGE and reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC coupled to mass spectrometry (MS affords deep mining of the muscle proteome, but differential analysis between samples is challenging due to the greater level of fractionation and the complexities of quantifying proteins based on the abundances of their tryptic peptides. Here we report simple, semi-automated and time efficient (i.e., 3 h per sample proteome profiling of skeletal muscle by 1-dimensional RPLC electrospray ionisation tandem MS. Solei were analysed from rats (n = 5, in each group bred as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively that exhibited a 6.4-fold difference (1,625 ± 112 m vs. 252 ± 43 m, p < 0.0001 in running capacity during a standardized treadmill test. Soluble muscle proteins were extracted, digested with trypsin and individual biological replicates (50 ng of tryptic peptides subjected to LC-MS profiling. Proteins were identified by triplicate LC-MS/MS analysis of a pooled sample of each biological replicate. Differential expression profiling was performed on relative abundances (RA of parent ions, which spanned three orders of magnitude. In total, 207 proteins were analysed, which encompassed almost all enzymes of the major metabolic pathways in skeletal muscle. The most abundant protein detected was type I myosin heavy chain (RA = 5,843 ± 897 and the least abundant protein detected was heat shock 70 kDa protein (RA = 2 ± 0.5. Sixteen proteins were significantly (p < 0.05 more abundant in HCR muscle and hierarchal clustering of the profiling data highlighted two protein subgroups, which encompassed proteins associated with either the respiratory chain or fatty acid oxidation. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (FABPH was 1

  1. Uptake of oleate by isolated rat adipocytes is mediated by a 40-kDa plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein closely related to that in liver and gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwieterman, W.; Sorrentino, D.; Potter, B.J.; Rand, J.; Kiang, C.L.; Stump, D.; Berk, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    A portion of the hepatocellular uptake of nonesterified long-chain fatty acids is mediated by a specific 40-kDa plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein, which has also been isolated from the gut. To investigate whether a similar transport process exists in other tissues with high transmembrane fatty acid fluxes, initial rates (V/sub O/) of [ 3 H]-oleate uptake into isolated rat adipocytes were studied as a function of the concentration of unbound [ 3 H]oleate in the medium. V/sub O/ reached a maximum as the concentration of unbound oleate was increased and was significantly inhibited both by phloretin and by prior incubation of the cells with Pronase. A rabbit antibody to the rat liver plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein inhibited adipocyte fatty acid uptake by up to 63% in dose-dependent fashion. Inhibition was noncompetitive; at an immunoglobulin concentration of 250 μg/ml V/sub max/ was reduced from 2480 /plus minus/ 160 to 1870 /plus minus/ 80 pmol/min per 5 /times/ 10 4 adipocytes, with no change in K/sub m/. A basic kDa adipocyte plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein, isolated from crude adipocyte plasma membrane fractions, reacted strongly in both agar gel diffusion and electrophoretic blots with the antibody raised against the corresponding hepatic plasma membrane protein. These data indicate that the uptake of oleate by rat adipocytes is mediated by a 40-kDa plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein closely related to that in liver and gut

  2. Total body fat, abdominal fat, body fat distribution and surrogate markers for health related to adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (FABP4) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, Magnus; Danielson, Anton; Karlsson, Magnus K; Wollmer, Per; Andersen, Lars B; Thorsson, Ola

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess possible relationships between adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (FABP4) and total body fat (TBF), abdominal fat, body fat distribution, aerobic fitness, blood pressure, cardiac dimensions and the increase in body fat over 2 years in a community sample of children. A cross-sectional study was used in a community sample of 170 (92 boys and 78 girls) children aged 8-11 years. TBF and abdominal fat (AFM) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). TBF was also expressed as percentage of total body mass (BF%), and body fat distribution was calculated as AFM/TBF. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2PEAK) was assessed by indirect calorimetry during a maximal exercise test and scaled to body mass. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) were measured. Echocardiography was performed. Left atrial (LA) size was measured, and left ventricular mass (LVM) was calculated. A follow-up DXA scan was available in 152 children (84 boys and 68 girls). Frozen serum samples were analyzed for FABP4. Partial correlations, with adjustment for sex, between FABP4 vs. ln TBF, ln BF%, ln AFM, AFM/TBF and VO2PEAK were (r=0.69, 0.68, 0.69, 0.49 and -0.39, pfat or change in fat distribution were not correlated.) Conclusions: Findings from this community-based cohort of young children show that increased body fat and abdominal fat, more abdominal body fat distribution, low fitness, more LVM and increased LA, increased SBP and PP were all associated with increased levels of FABP4. Increase in TBF and abdominal fat over 2 years were also associated with increased levels of FABP4.

  3. Association of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein with cardiovascular risk factors and all-cause mortality in the general population: the Takahata study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Otaki

    Full Text Available Despite many recent advances in medicine, preventing the development of cardiovascular diseases remains a challenge. Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP is a marker of ongoing myocardial damage and has been reported to be a useful indicator for future cardiovascular events. However, it remains to be determined whether H-FABP can predict all-cause and cardiovascular deaths in the general population.This longitudinal cohort study included 3,503 subjects who participated in a community-based health checkup with a 7-year follow-up. Serum H-FABP was measured in registered subjects. The results demonstrated that higher H-FABP levels were associated with increasing numbers of cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. There were 158 deaths during the follow-up period, including 50 cardiovascular deaths. Deceased subjects had higher H-FABP levels compared to surviving subjects. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that H-FABP is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular deaths after adjustments for confounding factors. Subjects were divided into four quartiles according to H-FABP level, and Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the highest H-FABP quartile was associated with the greatest risks for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths. Net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index were significantly increased by addition of H-FABP to cardiovascular risk factors.H-FABP level was increased in association with greater numbers of cardiovascular risk factors and was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths. H-FABP could be a useful indicator for the early identification of high-risk subjects in the general population.

  4. The influence of feeding linoleic, gamma-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acid rich oils on rat brain tumor fatty acids composition and fatty acid binding protein 7 mRNA expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi Khosro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies indicate that gamma linolenic acid (GLA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA may inhibit glioma cells growth but effects of oral consumption of these fatty acids on brain tumor fatty acid composition have not been determined in vivo. Methods GLA oil (GLAO; 72% GLA, DHA oil (DHAO; 73% DHA were fed to adult wistar rats (1 mL/rat/day starting one week prior to C6 glioma cells implantation and continued for two weeks after implantation. Control group were fed same amount of high linoleic acid safflower oil (74–77% linoleic acid. Fatty acid composition of tumor samples was determined in a set of 8–12 animals in each group and serum fatty acid in 6 animals per each group. Gene expression of tumor fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ and retinoid × receptor-α (RXR-α were determined in a set of 18 animals per group. Results DHAO feeding increased EPA of brain tumors and decreased ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids. Serum levels of EPA were also increased in DHAO group. A similar trend in serum and tumor levels of DHA were observed in DHAO group but it did not achieve statistical significance. GLAO increased serum concentration of GLA but had no significant effect on tumor GLA or dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA concentrations. Gene expression of FABP7 was up-regulated in tumors of DHAO group but no other significant effects were observed on EGFR, PPAR-γ or RXR-α expression, and expression of these genes in tumors of GLAO were not different from SFO group. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of DHA containing oil could be an effective way to increase levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in brain tumors and this increase may be mediated partly by up-regulation of FABP7 expression.

  5. External validation of heart-type fatty acid binding protein, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin, and electrocardiography as rule-out for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hise, Christopher B; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Parsonage, William; Than, Martin; Young, Joanna; Cullen, Louise

    2018-02-01

    To externally validate a clinical decision rule incorporating heart fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), high-sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn) and electrocardiogram (ECG) for the detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on presentation to the Emergency Department. We also investigated whether this clinical decision rule improved identification of AMI over algorithms incorporating hs-cTn and ECG only. This study included data from 789 patients from the Brisbane ADAPT cohort and 441 patients from the Christchurch TIMI RCT cohort. The primary outcome was index AMI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the algorithms. 1230 patients were recruited, including 112 (9.1%) with AMI. The algorithm including h-FABP and hs-cTnT had 100% sensitivity and 32.4% specificity. The algorithm utilising h-FABP and hs-cTnI had similar sensitivity (99.1%) and higher specificity (43.4%). The hs-cTnI and hs-cTnT algorithms without h-FABP both had a sensitivity of 98.2%; a result that was not significantly different from either algorithm incorporating h-FABP. Specificity was higher for the hs-cTnI algorithm (68.1%) compared to the hs-cTnT algorithm (33.0%). The specificity of the algorithm incorporating hs-cTnI alone was also significantly higher than both of the algorithms incorporating h-FABP (p<0.01). For patients presenting to the Emergency Department with chest pain, an algorithm incorporating h-FABP, hs-cTn and ECG has high accuracy and can rule out up to 40% of patients. An algorithm incorporating only hs-cTn and ECG has similar sensitivity and may rule out a higher proportion of patients. Each of the algorithms can be used to safely identify patients as low risk for AMI on presentation to the Emergency Department. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) as an early diagnostic biomarker in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vupputuri, Anjith; Sekhar, Saritha; Krishnan, Sajitha; Venugopal, K; Natarajan, K U

    2015-01-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is an emerging biomarker, which was found to be sensitive for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We prospectively investigated the usefulness of H-FABP determination for the evaluation of acute chest pain in patients arriving at the emergency department. Fifty-four patients presenting with acute ischemic chest pain were evaluated. H-FABP was estimated at admission using latex-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay. Serial cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB) determination, ischemia workup with stress testing, and/or coronary angiogram (CAG) were performed according to standard protocols. The sensitivity and specificity of H-FABP was 89.7% and 68%, for cTnI it was 62.1% and 100%, and for CK-MB it was 44.8% and 92%, respectively for diagnosis of AMI. The sensitivity of H-FABP was found to be far superior to initial cTnI and CK-MB, for those seen within 6h (100% vs. 46.1%, 33% respectively). On further evaluation of patients with positive H-FABP and negative cTnI, 71.4% of the patients had significant lesion on CAG, indicating ischemic cause of H-FABP elevation. Six patients with normal cTnI and CK-MB with high H-FABP had ST elevation on subsequent ECGs and were taken for primary angioplasty. H-FABP is a highly sensitive biomarker for the early diagnosis of AMI. H-FABP as early marker and cTnI as late marker would be the ideal combination to cover the complete diagnostic window for AMI. Detection of myocardial injury by H-FABP may also be applied in patients with unstable angina. H-FABP can also be used as a marker for early detection of STEMI before the ECG changes become apparent. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Point-of-care heart-type fatty acid binding protein versus high-sensitivity troponin T testing in emergency patients at high risk for acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellens, Sebastiaan; Verbrugge, Frederik H; Vanmechelen, Maxime; Grieten, Lars; Van Lierde, Johan; Dens, Joseph; Vrolix, Mathias; Vandervoort, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    High-sensitivity cardiac troponin testing is used to detect myocardial damage in patients with acute chest pain. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) may be an alternative, available as point-of-care test. Patients (n=203) referred by general practitioners for suspected acute coronary syndrome or presenting with typical chest pain and one major cardiovascular risk factor at the emergency department were prospectively included in a single-centre cohort study. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-TnT) and point-of-care H-FABP testing were concomitantly performed at admission and after 6h. Maximal hs-TnT levels above the 99th percentile were observed in 152 patients (75%) with 127 (63%) fulfilling criteria for myocardial infarction. Upon admission, hs-TnT and H-FABP were associated with an area under the curve (95% CI) of 0.83 (0.77-0.89) and 0.79 (0.73-0.85), respectively, to predict myocardial infarction, which increased to 0.93 (0.90-0.97) and 0.88 (0.84-0.93), respectively, after 6h. The diagnostic accuracy for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was somewhat lower with an area under the curve (95% CI) of 0.80 (0.72-0.87), 0.90 (0.84-0.96), 0.73 (0.64-0.81) and 0.77 (0.67-0.86), respectively. When assessment was performed within 3h of chest pain onset, diagnostic accuracy of H-FABP versus hs-TnT was similar. Each standard deviation increase in admission H-FABP was associated with a 68% relative risk increase of all-cause mortality (p-value=0.027) during 666 ± 155 days of follow-up. Point-of-care H-FABP testing has lower diagnostic accuracy compared with hs-TnT assessment in patients with high pre-test acute coronary syndrome probability, but might be of interest when assessment is possible early after chest pain onset. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  8. The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision rule: validation with a new automated assay for heart-type fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body, Richard; Burrows, Gillian; Carley, Simon; Lewis, Philip S

    2015-10-01

    The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision rule may enable acute coronary syndromes to be immediately 'ruled in' or 'ruled out' in the emergency department. The rule incorporates heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP) and high sensitivity troponin T levels. The rule was previously validated using a semiautomated h-FABP assay that was not practical for clinical implementation. We aimed to validate the rule with an automated h-FABP assay that could be used clinically. In this prospective diagnostic cohort study we included patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected cardiac chest pain. Serum drawn on arrival was tested for h-FABP using an automated immunoturbidimetric assay (Randox) and high sensitivity troponin T (Roche). The primary outcome, a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), was adjudicated based on 12 h troponin testing. A secondary outcome, major adverse cardiac events (MACE; death, AMI, revascularisation or new coronary stenosis), was determined at 30 days. Of the 456 patients included, 78 (17.1%) had AMI and 97 (21.3%) developed MACE. Using the automated h-FABP assay, the MACS rule had the same C-statistic for MACE as the original rule (0.91; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.92). 18.9% of patients were identified as 'very low risk' and thus eligible for immediate discharge with no missed AMIs and a 2.3% incidence of MACE (n=2, both coronary stenoses). 11.1% of patients were classed as 'high-risk' and had a 92.0% incidence of MACE. Our findings validate the performance of a refined MACS rule incorporating an automated h-FABP assay, facilitating use in clinical settings. The effectiveness of this refined rule should be verified in an interventional trial prior to implementation. UK CRN 8376. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Effect of fatty acid-binding protein 2 Ala54Thr genotype on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors after a high-polyunsaturated fat diet in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel; Aller, Rocio; Izaola, Olatz; Sagrado, Manuel Gonzalez; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Conde, Rosa; Primo, David

    2012-12-01

    It has been found that the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 2 messenger RNA is under dietary control. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of Thr54 polymorphism in the FABP2 gene on weight loss and secondarily in cardiovascular risk factors and serum adipokine after an enriched polyunsaturated fat hypocaloric diet in obese patients. A sample of 111 obese patients was analyzed. The enriched polyunsaturated fat hypocaloric diet during 3 months' intervention consisted of 1459 kcal, 45.7% carbohydrates, 34.4% lipids, and 19.9% proteins. The distribution of fats was as follows: 21.8% saturated fats, 55.5% monounsaturated fats, and 22.7% polyunsaturated fats. Level of significance was P fat mass (-3.1 ± 3.5 kg), and waist circumference (-3.3 ± 2.1 cm) decreased. In carriers of the Thr54 allele, body mass index (-1.9 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)), weight (- 4.7 ± 1.4 kg), and waist circumference (-3.9 ± 3.7 cm) decreased. These changes were significantly higher in the carriers of the Thr54 allele than noncarriers. Only in the carriers of Thr54 allele, total cholesterol levels (-11.4 ± 20.6 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (-5.4 ± 10.6 mg/dL), insulin (-2.6 ± 3.4 MUI/L), and the level of homeostasis model assessment for insulin sensitivity (-0.9 ± 1.7 U) decreased. Carriers of Thr54 allele have a better metabolic response than obese carriers with Ala54Ala genotype, with a decrease of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, insulin levels, leptin levels, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin sensitivity.

  10. Analysis of long-chain fatty acid binding activity in vesicles of the outer membrane generated from Escherchia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli transports long-chain fatty acids across the dual membrane by a high affinity, saturable, energy-dependent process. The fadL gene codes for an outer membrane protein which appears to act specifically as a long-chain fatty acid binding protein when fatty acid utilization is blocked by mutation. In an effort to understand the function of the fadL gene product, FLP, membranes have been isolated from fadL + and fadL - strains following osmotic lysis. Following isolation, total membranes were separated into inner and outer membrane fractions and assayed for long-chain fatty acid binding activity. Outer membrane vesicles were incubated 2-5 min at 37 0 C with 3 H oleate (C/sub 18:1/), cooled to 0 0 C, and centrifuged through a Lipidex 100 column for 3 min to remove the unbound fatty acid. The level of fatty acid binding was quantitated by scintillation counting of the eluate. Outer membrane vesicles generated from a fadL + strain bind 325 pmol fatty acid/mg protein whereas vesicles generated for a mutant strain bind 175 pmol fatty acid/mg protein. These data suggest that FLP acts at least as a long-chain fatty acid binding protein on the surface of the cell

  11. Suspected acute coronary syndrome in the emergency room: Limited added value of heart type fatty acid binding protein point of care or ELISA tests: The FAME-ER (Fatty Acid binding protein in Myocardial infarction Evaluation in the Emergency Room) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Ingrid Em; Dekker, Marieke S; Hoes, Arno W; Zuithoff, Nicolaas Pa; Verheggen, Peter Whm; de Vrey, Evelyn A; Wildbergh, Thierry X; Timmers, Leo; de Kleijn, Dominique Pv; Glatz, Jan Fc; Mosterd, Arend

    2016-08-01

    Timely recognition of acute coronary syndrome remains a challenge as many biomarkers, including troponin, remain negative in the first hours following the onset of chest pain. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), a cardiac biomarker with potential value immediately post symptom onset. Prospective monocentre diagnostic accuracy study of H-FABP bedside point of care (CardioDetect®) and ELISA tests in acute coronary syndrome suspected patients presenting within 24 hours of symptom onset to the emergency department, in addition to clinical findings, electrocardiography and the currently recommended biomarker high sensitivity troponin-T (hs-cTnT). The final diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome was adjudicated by two independent cardiologists, blinded to H-FABP results. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 149 (32.9%) of 453 unselected patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (56% men, mean age 62.6 years). Negative predictive values were similar for H-FABP point of care and ELISA tests (79% vs. 78% respectively), but inferior to initial hs-cTnT (negative predictive value 86%). The addition of H-FABP point of care results to hs-cTnT increased the negative predictive value to 89%. In a multivariable logistic regression model, H-FABP point of care and ELISA tests yielded relevant diagnostic information in addition to clinical findings and ECG (likelihood ratio test pacute coronary syndrome presenting to the emergency department, H-FABP testing improves diagnostic accuracy in addition to clinical findings and electrocardiography. H-FABP, however, has no additional diagnostic value when hs-cTnT measurements are also available. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  13. [Effects of Electroacupunctrue Combined with Dietary Control on Peroxisome Proliferator-activa- ted Receptor-α, and Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein Levels in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tang, Cheng-lin; Tian, Yuan; Yuan, Hai-zhou; Yang, Hui; Tang, Nian-zhen; Gao, Rui-qi; Cao, Jing

    2015-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupunctrue (EA) intervention or EA combined with dietary control on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) levels in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rats, so as to reveal its mechanism underlying improvement of NAFLD. Sixty SD male rats were randomly divided into common diet (control) group (n = 10) and high-fat diet group (n = 45). The NAFLD model was established by feeding the animals with high-fat forage (HFF, including cholesterol, sodium cholate, propylthiouracil, sucrose, lard and common forage) for 5 weeks. Forty NAFLD rats were then randomized into model, EA + HFF, low-fat forage (LFF) and EA+ LFF groups (n = 10 rats in each group). EA (4 Hz/20 Hz, 3 mA) was applied to ipsilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36),"Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) and "Taichong" (LR 3) for 20 min, once daily for 4 weeks. The pathologic changes of the hepatic tissue were detected by H. E. staining. Serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents were determined by using enzymatic methods, serum free fat acids (FFA) content was detected by colorimetry. The expression levels of PPAR-α and L-FABP protein and gene of the liver tissue were determined by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. H. E. staining showed that the hepatocytes presented moderate or severe bullous adipose degeneration in rats of the model group, vesicular steatosis in the EA + HFF and LFF groups, turned to almost normal but with small amount of lipid droplets in the EA + LFF group. The contents of serum TC, TG and FFA were significantly higher in the model group than in the control group (P < 0.05), and were obviously decreased in the EA + HFF, LFF and EA + LFF groups in comparison with the model group (P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, hepatic PPAR-α protein and mRNA were markedly down-regulated in the model group, and hepatic L-FABP protein and mRNA considerably up-regulated in the model group (P < 0

  14. Identification of okadaic acid binding protein 2 in reconstituted sponge cell clusters from Halichondria okadai and its contribution to the detoxification of okadaic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoki, Keiichi; Okada, Kayo; Kohama, Mami; Matsuura, Hiroki; Saito, Kaori; Cho, Yuko; Nishitani, Goh; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Tachibana, Kazuo; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2015-12-15

    Okadaic acid (OA) and OA binding protein 2 (OABP2) were previously isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. Because the amino acid sequence of OABP2 is completely different from that of protein phosphatase 2A, a well-known target of OA, we have been investigating the production and function of OABP2. In the present study, we hypothesized that OABP2 plays a role in the detoxification of OA in H. okadai and that the OA concentrations are in proportional to the OABP2 concentrations in the sponge specimens. Based on the OA concentrations and the OABP2 concentrations in the sponge specimens collected in various places and in different seasons, however, we could not determine a positive correlation between OA and OABP2. We then attempted to determine distribution of OA and OABP2 in the sponge specimen. When the mixture of dissociated sponge cells and symbiotic species were separated with various pore-sized nylon meshes, most of the OA and OABP2 was detected from the same 0-10 μm fraction. Next, when sponge cell clusters were prepared from a mixture of dissociated sponge cells and symbiotic species in the presence of penicillin and streptomycin, we identified the 18S rDNA of H. okadai and the gene of OABP2 in the analysis of genomic DNA but could not detect OA by LC-MS/MS. We thus concluded that the sponge cells express OABP2, and that OA was not apparently present in the sponge cells but could be colocalized with OABP2 in the sponge cells at a concentration less than the limit of detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rosuvastatin Decreases Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP), but Does Not Alter Zonulin or Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP) Levels, in HIV-Infected Subjects on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburg, Nicholas T; Boucher, Morgan; Sattar, Abdus; Kulkarni, Manjusha; Labbato, Danielle; Kinley, Bruce I; McComsey, Grace A

    2016-01-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) barrier integrity and subsequent microbial translocation may contribute to immune activation in HIV infection. We have reported that rosuvastatin improved several markers of immune activation in HIV+ participants, but the effect of statin treatment on markers of GI barrier dysfunction is unknown. SATURN-HIV is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effect of rosuvastatin (10mg/daily) on markers of cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and immune activation in ART-treated patients. Gut-barrier integrity was assessed by the surrogate markers intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a marker of enterocyte death, and zonulin-1, a marker of gut epithelial cell function. Levels of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) were measured as a marker of microbial translocation. Rosuvastatin significantly reduced levels of I-FABP during the treatment period compared to the placebo. There was no effect of rosuvastatin treatment on levels of zonulin or LBP. Baseline levels of LBP were directly related to several markers of immune activation in samples from all participants, including soluble CD163, IP-10, VCAM-1, TNFR-II, and the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR. Many of these relationships, however, were not seen in the statin arm alone at baseline or over time, as inflammatory markers often decreased and LBP levels were unchanged. Forty-eight weeks of rosuvastatin treatment reduced levels of I-FABP, but did not affect levels of zonulin or LBP. The reduction in levels of inflammatory markers that we have reported with rosuvastatin treatment is likely mediated through other mechanisms not related to gut integrity or microbial translocation.

  16. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the human brain-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) in its apo form and the holo forms binding to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeemig, Jesper S; Jørgensen, Mathilde L; Hansen, Mikka S

    2009-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid.......In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid....

  17. Label-Free LC-MS Profiling of Skeletal Muscle Reveals Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Candidate Biomarker of Aerobic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Zulezwan Ab; Cobley, James N; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L; Edwards, Ben J; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Burniston, Jatin G

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis provides robust comparative analysis of skeletal muscle, but this technique is laborious and limited by its inability to resolve all proteins. In contrast, orthogonal separation by SDS-PAGE and reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) affords deep mining of the muscle proteome, but differential analysis between samples is challenging due to the greater level of fractionation and the complexities of quantifying proteins based on the abundances of their tryptic peptides. Here we report simple, semi-automated and time efficient ( i.e ., 3 h per sample) proteome profiling of skeletal muscle by 1-dimensional RPLC electrospray ionisation tandem MS. Solei were analysed from rats (n = 5, in each group) bred as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively) that exhibited a 6.4-fold difference (1,625 ± 112 m vs . 252 ± 43 m, p ions, which spanned three orders of magnitude. In total, 207 proteins were analysed, which encompassed almost all enzymes of the major metabolic pathways in skeletal muscle. The most abundant protein detected was type I myosin heavy chain (RA = 5,843 ± 897) and the least abundant protein detected was heat shock 70 kDa protein (RA = 2 ± 0.5). Sixteen proteins were significantly ( p ion (551.21 m/z ) of the doubly-charged peptide SLGVGFATR (454.19 m/z ) of residues 23-31 of FABPH. SRM was conducted on technical replicates of each biological sample and exhibited a coefficient of variation of 20%. The abundance of FABPH measured by SRM was 2.84-fold greater ( p = 0.0095) in HCR muscle. In addition, SRM of FABPH was performed in vastus lateralis samples of young and elderly humans with different habitual activity levels (collected during a previous study) finding FABPH abundance was 2.23-fold greater ( p = 0.0396) in endurance-trained individuals regardless of differences in age. In summary, our findings in HCR/LCR rats provide protein-level confirmation for

  18. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may......-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  19. Members of a novel protein family containing microneme adhesive repeat domains act as sialic acid-binding lectins during host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-15

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for alpha2-3- over alpha2-6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to alpha2-9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6'sulfo-sialyl Lewis(x) might have implications for tissue tropism.

  20. A Personal Retrospective: Elevating Anandamide (AEA by Targeting Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH and the Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Deutsch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This perspective was adapted from a Career Achievement Award talk given at the International Cannabinoid Research Society Symposium in Bukovina, Poland on June 27, 2016. As a biochemist working in the neurosciences, I was always fascinated with neurotransmitter inactivation. In 1993 we identified an enzyme activity that breaks down anandamide. We called the enzyme anandamide amidase, now called FAAH. We and other laboratories developed FAAH inhibitors that were useful reagents that also proved to have beneficial physiological effects and, until recently, new generations of inhibitors were in clinical trials. Nearly all neurotransmitters are water soluble and, as such, require a transmembrane protein transporter to pass through the lipid membrane for inactivation inside the cell. However, using model systems, we and others have shown that this is unnecessary for anandamide, an uncharged hydrophobic molecule that readily diffuses across the cellular membrane. Interestingly, its uptake is driven by the concentration gradient resulting from its breakdown mainly by FAAH localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. We identified the FABPs as intracellular carriers that solubilize anandamide, transporting anandamide to FAAH. Compounds that bind to FABPs block AEA breakdown, raising its level. The cannabinoids (THC and CBD also were discovered to bind FABPs and this may be one of the mechanisms by which CBD works in childhood epilepsy, raising anandamide levels. Targeting FABPs may be advantageous since they have some tissue specificity and do not require reactive serine hydrolase inhibitors, as does FAAH, with potential for off-target reactions.

  1. The mAb against adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2E4 attenuates the inflammation in the mouse model of high-fat diet-induced obesity via toll-like receptor 4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaoliang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Wang; Lv, Xiaobo; Wang, Min; Yin, Hongping

    2015-03-05

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) plays an important role in fatty acid-mediated processes and related metabolic and inflammatory responses. In this study, we prepared a novel monoclonal antibody against A-FABP, designated 2E4. Our data showed that 2E4 specifically binded to the recombinant A-FABP and native A-FABP of mice adipose tissue. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of 2E4 on metabolic and inflammatory responses in C57BL/6J obese mice fed on a high fat diet. 2E4 administration improved glucose response in high-fat-diet induced obese mice. The 2E4 treated groups exhibited lower free fatty acids, cholesterol, and triglycerides in a concentration-dependent manner. These changes were accompanied by down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, including tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and interleukin-6. Meanwhile, our data demonstrated that 2E4 significantly decreased the mRNA and protein levels of A-FABP in adipose tissue of mice. Further experiments showed that 2E4 notably suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα and jun-N-terminal kinase through toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. Taken together, 2E4 is an effective monoclonal antibody against A-FABP, which attenuated the inflammatory responses induced in the high-fat-diet mice. These findings may provide scientific insight into the treatment of chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Critical Role of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and 5 (FABP4/5) in the Systemic Response to Fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A. A.; Iso, Tatsuya; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Obokata, Masaru; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Goto, Kosaku; Hishiki, Takako; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Matsui, Hiroki; Sano, Motoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Osamu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Masami; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Suematsu, Makoto; YoshitoTsushima; Endo, Keigo; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    During prolonged fasting, fatty acid (FA) released from adipose tissue is a major energy source for peripheral tissues, including the heart, skeletal muscle and liver. We recently showed that FA binding protein 4 (FABP4) and FABP5, which are abundantly expressed in adipocytes and macrophages, are prominently expressed in capillary endothelial cells in the heart and skeletal muscle. In addition, mice deficient for both FABP4 and FABP5 (FABP4/5 DKO mice) exhibited defective uptake of FA with compensatory up-regulation of glucose consumption in these tissues during fasting. Here we showed that deletion of FABP4/5 resulted in a marked perturbation of metabolism in response to prolonged fasting, including hyperketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic steatosis. Blood glucose levels were reduced, whereas the levels of non-esterified FA (NEFA) and ketone bodies were markedly increased during fasting. In addition, the uptake of the 125I-BMIPP FA analogue in the DKO livers was markedly increased after fasting. Consistent with an increased influx of NEFA into the liver, DKO mice showed marked hepatic steatosis after a 48-hr fast. Although gluconeogenesis was observed shortly after fasting, the substrates for gluconeogenesis were reduced during prolonged fasting, resulting in insufficient gluconeogenesis and enhanced hypoglycemia. These metabolic responses to prolonged fasting in DKO mice were readily reversed by re-feeding. Taken together, these data strongly suggested that a maladaptive response to fasting in DKO mice occurred as a result of an increased influx of NEFA into the liver and pronounced hypoglycemia. Together with our previous study, the metabolic consequence found in the present study is likely to be attributed to an impairment of FA uptake in the heart and skeletal muscle. Thus, our data provided evidence that peripheral uptake of FA via capillary endothelial FABP4/5 is crucial for systemic metabolism and may establish FABP4/5 as potentially novel targets for the

  3. Cardiometabolic risk markers, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aFABP) and the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüher, Susann; Käpplinger, Jakob; Herget, Sabine; Reichardt, Sandra; Böttcher, Yvonne; Grimm, Andrea; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Petroff, David

    2017-03-01

    The impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as well as the association between the adipocyte fatty binding protein (aFABP) and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight adolescents was investigated. Twenty-eight adolescents (13-18years; BMI≥90th percentile according to German reference values) were offered HIIT twice weekly for 6months. At baseline and after program completion, anthropometric, clinical and metabolic characteristics were assessed and a fasting blood sample was obtained. Leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and aFABP were measured using commercially available kits. DNA methylation at RALBP1 was assessed using pyrosequencing. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation and linear models were calculated. Mean age at start of the program was 15.5±1.4years (53.5% females) and 20/28 (71%) provided follow-up data. At baseline, aFABP was correlated with BMI-SDS (0.48 [0.13,0.72]; p=0.0095), waist-to-height-ratio (0.63 [0.33,0.81], p=0.00036) and body fat content (0.55 [0.21, 0.77]; p=0.0031). Certain markers of metabolic risk were significantly correlated with aFABP (HOMA-IR 0.52 [0.19, 0.75], p=0.0044; γGT 0.48 [0.13, 0.73], p=0.0091; uric acid 0.46 [0.11, 0.71] p=0.013; HDL-C -0.39 [-0.66, -0.01] p=0.043; triglycerides 0.38 [0.01, 0.66], p=0.047). With the exception of triglycerides, these associations vanished after adjusting for BMI-SDS. aFABP did not depend on sex, age or pubertal stage in obese adolescents. After the HIIT program, small but significant reductions were observed in waist-to-height-ratio, (0.013 [0.0025, 0.024]; p=0.023), skin-fold based body fat content (2.0% [0.6, 3.5]; p=0.011), and standard deviation score of systolic blood pressure (0.69 [0.26 to 1.1]; p=0.0036). No changes were observed in adipokines or epigenetic markers following the program. HIIT may have beneficial effects on body composition and cardiometabolic health in overweight adolescents. Like in adults, aFABP seems to be associated with markers of metabolic

  4. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) in prostate, bladder and kidney cancer cell lines and the use of IL-FABP as survival predictor in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tölle, Angelika; Suhail, Saba; Jung, Monika; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) play an important role in carcinogenesis. Modified FABP expression patterns were described for prostate, bladder and for renal cell carcinoma. Studies on metabolic relationships and interactions in permanent cell lines allow a deeper insight into molecular processes. The aim of this study is therefore a systematic overview on mRNA and protein expressions of seven FABPs in frequently used urological cell lines. Nine cell lines of renal carcinomas, seven of urinary bladder carcinomas, and five of prostate carcinomas were investigated. Quantitative RT-qPCR and western blotting were used to determine different FABPs. In addition, 46 paired cancerous and noncancerous tissue samples from nephrectomy specimen with renal cell carcinomas were investigated regarding the ileum FABP mRNA expression level and associated with survival outcome. General characteristics of all urological carcinoma cell lines were the expression of E-and IL-FABP on mRNA and protein level, while the expressions differed between the cell lines. The protein expression was not always congruent with the mRNA expression. Renal cell carcinoma cell lines showed expressions of L-, H- and B-FABP mRNA in addition to the general FABP expression in five out of the eight investigated cell lines. In bladder cancer cell lines, we additionally found the expression of A-FABP mRNA in six cell lines, while H-FABP was present only in three cell lines. In prostate cancer cell lines, a strong reduction of A- and E- FABP mRNA was observed. The expression of B-FABP mRNA and protein was observed only in the 22 RV-1 cells. IL-FABP mRNA was over-expressed in renal tumour tissue. The IL-FABP ratio was identified as an independent indicator of survival outcome. Distinctly different FABP expression patterns were observed not only between the cell lines derived from the three cancer types, but also between the cell lines from the same cancer. The FABP patterns in the cell lines do not always

  5. Verification of an immunoturbidimetric assay for heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) on a clinical chemistry platform and establishment of the upper reference limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Molin, Simona; Cappellini, Fabrizio; Falbo, Rosanna; Signorini, Stefano; Brambilla, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is an early biomarker of cardiac injury. Randox Laboratories developed an immunoturbidimetric H-FABP assay for non-proprietary automated clinical chemistry analysers that could be useful in the emergency department. We verified the analytical performances claimed by Randox Laboratories on Roche Cobas 6000 clinical chemistry platform in use in our laboratory, and we defined our own 99th percentile upper reference limit for H-FABP. For the verification of method performances, we used pools of spared patient samples from routine and two levels of quality control material, while samples for the reference value study were collected from 545 blood donors. Following CLSI guidelines we verified limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), repeatability and within-laboratory precision, trueness, linearity, and the stability of H-FABP in EDTA over 24h. The LOQ (3.19 μg/L) was verified with a CV% of 10.4. The precision was verified for the low (mean 5.88 μg/L, CV=6.7%), the medium (mean 45.28 μg/L, CV=3.0%), and the high concentration (mean 88.81 μg/L, CV=4.0%). The trueness was verified as well as the linearity over the indicated measurement interval of 0.747-120 μg/L. The H-FABP in EDTA samples is stable throughout 24h both at room temperature and at 4 °C. The H-FABP 99th percentile upper reference limit for all subjects (3.60 μg/L, 95% CI 3.51-3.77) is more appropriate than gender-specific ones that are not statistically different. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein as a marker for intra-abdominal pressure-related complications in patients admitted to the intensive care unit; study protocol for a prospective cohort study (I-Fabulous study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Steven G; Van Waes, Oscar J F; Van der Hoven, Ben; Ali, Samir; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Pickkers, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2015-01-16

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have detrimental effects on all organ systems and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Intra-bladder measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is currently the gold standard. However, IAH is not always indicative of intestinal ischemia, which is an early and rapidly developing complication. Sensitive biomarkers for intestinal ischemia are needed to be able to intervene before damage becomes irreversible. Gut wall integrity loss, including epithelial cell disruption and tight junctions breakdown, is an early event in intestinal damage. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP) is excreted in urine and blood specifically from damaged intestinal epithelial cells. Claudin-3 is a specific protein which is excreted in urine following disruption of intercellular tight junctions. This study aims to investigate if I-FABP and Claudin-3 can be used as a diagnostic tool for identifying patients at risk for IAP-related complications. In a multicenter, prospective cohort study 200 adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit with at least two risk factors for IAH as defined by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS) will be included. Patients in whom an intra-bladder IAP measurement is contra-indicated or impossible and patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that may affect I-FABP levels will be excluded. The IAP will be measured using an intra-bladder technique. During the subsequent 72 hours, the IAP measurement will be repeated every six hours. At these time points, a urine and serum sample will be collected for measurement of I-FABP and Claudin-3 levels. Clinical outcome of patients during their stay at the intensive care unit will be monitored using the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Successful completion of this trial will provide evidence on the eventual

  7. СHARACTERISTICS OF THE HEART FATTY ACID-BINDING PROTEIN, INTERLEUKIN-6 AND INTERLEUKIN-8 AS ALTERNATIVE MARKERS OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY PROGRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Ryzhikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the levels of the heart fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP, interleukin6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8, in diabetic nephropathy (DN in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Material and methods. We examined 87 patients aged 18 to 54 with T1DM within the study group. 30 patients with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed with normoalbuminuria, 29 patients – with microalbuminuria and 28 patients – with proteinuria. The control group consisted of 24 healthy donor aged 22 to 29. The comparison group included 22 patients aged 20 to 42 with verified diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension (AH without carbohydrate metabolism disorders. The daily urinary albumin excretion was determined by immunoturbidimetric technique. 30 patients with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed with normoalbuminuria, 29 patients – with microalbuminuria and 28 patients with proteinuria.Calculation of glomerular filtration rate was performed according to the Hoek formula with the use of cystatinС serum concentrations. Contents of h-FABP, IL-6 and cystatin C in serum and h-FABP, IL-8 inurine were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Analysis of the h-FABP content in serum showed that the concentration of this marker in individuals with T1DM was higher than in patients of the control group and the comparison group. Analysis of the h-FABP content in the urine revealed that individuals with essential hypertension showed an increased level of h-FABP while patients with T1DM demonstrated the highest concentration of h-FABP. The concentration of IL-6 inindividuals with T1DM and in individuals with AH significantly exceeded the control values. The contents of h-FABP and IL-6 inserum and h-FABP and IL-8 inurine increased with the progression of DN and reached maximum in individuals of the proteinuria subgroup. At the same time, the levels of h-FABP and IL-8 inthe urine of patients in the microalbuminuria (MAU subgroup were

  8. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  9. Nucleic acid binding and other biomedical properties of artificial oligolysines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roviello GN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni N Roviello,1 Caterina Vicidomini,1 Vincenzo Costanzo,1 Valentina Roviello2 1CNR Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Via Mezzocannone site and Headquarters, 2Centro Regionale di Competenza (CRdC Tecnologie, Via Nuova Agnano, Napoli, Italy Abstract: In the present study, we report the interaction of an artificial oligolysine (referred to as AOL realized in our laboratory with targets of biomedical importance. These included polyinosinic acid (poly rI and its complex with polycytidylic acid (poly I:C, RNAs with well-known interferon-inducing ability, and double-stranded (ds DNA. The ability of the peptide to bind both single-stranded poly rI and ds poly I:C RNAs emerged from our circular dichroism (CD and ultraviolet (UV studies. In addition, we found that AOL forms complexes with dsDNA, as shown by spectroscopic binding assays and UV thermal denaturation experiments. These findings are encouraging for the possible use of AOL in biomedicine for nucleic acid targeting and oligonucleotide condensation, with the latter being a key step preceding their clinical application. Moreover, we tested the ability of AOL to bind to proteins, using serum albumin as a model protein. We demonstrated the oligolysine–protein binding by CD experiments which suggested that AOL, positively charged under physiological conditions, binds to the protein regions rich in anionic residues. Finally, the morphology characterization of the solid oligolysine, performed by scanning electron microscopy, showed different crystal forms including cubic-shaped crystals confirming the high purity of AOL. Keywords: nucleic acid binding, polyinosinic acid, double-stranded nucleic acids, oligolysine, circular dichroism

  10. Comparative study of the fatty acid binding process of a new FABP from Cherax quadricarinatus by fluorescence intensity, lifetime and anisotropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayao Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are small cytosolic proteins, largely distributed in invertebrates and vertebrates, which accomplish uptake and intracellular transport of hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. Although long chain fatty acids play multiple crucial roles in cellular functions (structural, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, the precise functions of FABPs, especially those of invertebrate species, remain elusive. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel FABP family member, Cq-FABP, from the hepatopancreas of red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. We report the characterization of fatty acid-binding affinity of Cq-FABP by four different competitive fluorescence-based assays. In the two first approaches, the fluorescent probe 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS, a binder of internal cavities of protein, was used either by directly monitoring its fluorescence emission or by monitoring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring between the single tryptophan residue of Cq-FABP and ANS. The third and the fourth approaches were based on the measurement of the fluorescence emission intensity of the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid probe or the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of a fluorescently labeled fatty acid (BODIPY-C16, respectively. The four methodologies displayed consistent equilibrium constants for a given fatty acid but were not equivalent in terms of analysis. Indeed, the two first methods were complicated by the existence of non specific binding modes of ANS while BODIPY-C16 and cis-parinaric acid specifically targeted the fatty acid binding site. We found a relationship between the affinity and the length of the carbon chain, with the highest affinity obtained for the shortest fatty acid, suggesting that steric effects primarily influence the interaction of fatty acids in the binding cavity of Cq-FABP. Moreover, our results show that the binding affinities

  11. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LB; Birkelund, Svend; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may......-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel...

  12. Protein Annotation from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Cao D.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precis...

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1 protein and its relationship to nucleolar RNA-binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, A Y; Clark, M W; Gilbert, M; Oehm, A; Campbell, J L

    1987-01-01

    To better define the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1, an abundant single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the SSB1 gene and compared it with those of other proteins of known function. The amino acid sequence contains 293 amino acid residues and has an Mr of 32,853. There are several stretches of sequence characteristic of other eucaryotic single-stranded nucleic acid-binding proteins. At the amino terminus, residues 39 to 54 are highly ...

  14. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walchli John

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. Results In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38α, viral polymerase (HCV NS5B, and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. Conclusion The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  15. Protein annotation from protein interaction networks and Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cao D; Gardiner, Katheleen J; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precision and 60% recall versus 45% and 26% for Majority and 24% and 61% for χ²-statistics, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  17. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...... bp in the region coding for the active protein. Northern analysis showed lung-specific expression of three different isoforms of the SFTPB transcript. The expression level for the SFTPB gene is low in 50 days-old fetus and it increases during lung development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain...

  18. Ubiquitin--conserved protein or selfish gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catic, André; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2005-11-01

    The posttranslational modifier ubiquitin is encoded by a multigene family containing three primary members, which yield the precursor protein polyubiquitin and two ubiquitin moieties, Ub(L40) and Ub(S27), that are fused to the ribosomal proteins L40 and S27, respectively. The gene encoding polyubiquitin is highly conserved and, until now, those encoding Ub(L40) and Ub(S27) have been generally considered to be equally invariant. The evolution of the ribosomal ubiquitin moieties is, however, proving to be more dynamic. It seems that the genes encoding Ub(L40) and Ub(S27) are actively maintained by homologous recombination with the invariant polyubiquitin locus. Failure to recombine leads to deterioration of the sequence of the ribosomal ubiquitin moieties in several phyla, although this deterioration is evidently constrained by the structural requirements of the ubiquitin fold. Only a few amino acids in ubiquitin are vital for its function, and we propose that conservation of all three ubiquitin genes is driven not only by functional properties of the ubiquitin protein, but also by the propensity of the polyubiquitin locus to act as a 'selfish gene'.

  19. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. L. Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX, encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/ containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and

  20. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire E L; Poulter, James A; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX , encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  1. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  2. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  3. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  4. [HMGA proteins and their genes as a potential neoplastic biomarkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerczak, Ewa; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    HMGA proteins and their genes are described in this article. HMGA proteins reveal ability to bind DNA in AT-rich regions, which are characteristic for gene promoter sequences. This interaction lead to gene silencing or their overexpression. In normal tissue HMGA proteins level is low or even undetectable. During embriogenesis their level is increasing. High HMGA proteins level is characteristic for tumor phenotype of spontaneous and experimental malignant neoplasms. High HMGA proteins expression correlate with bad prognostic factors and with metastases formation. HMGA genes expression can be used as a marker of tumor progression. Present studies connected with tumor gene therapy based on HMGA proteins sythesis inhibition by the use of viral vectors containing gene encoding these proteins in antisence orientation, as well as a new potential anticancer drugs acting as crosslinkers between DNA and HMGA proteins suggest their usefulness as a targets in cancer therapy.

  5. Analysis of gene and protein name synonyms in Entrez Gene and UniProtKB resources

    KAUST Repository

    Arkasosy, Basil

    2013-01-01

    be ambiguous, referring in some cases to more than one gene or one protein, or in others, to both genes and proteins at the same time. Public biological databases give a very useful insight about genes and proteins information, including their names

  6. RBscore&NBench: a high-level web server for nucleic acid binding residues prediction with a large-scale benchmarking database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2016-07-08

    RBscore&NBench combines a web server, RBscore and a database, NBench. RBscore predicts RNA-/DNA-binding residues in proteins and visualizes the prediction scores and features on protein structures. The scoring scheme of RBscore directly links feature values to nucleic acid binding probabilities and illustrates the nucleic acid binding energy funnel on the protein surface. To avoid dataset, binding site definition and assessment metric biases, we compared RBscore with 18 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets, which demonstrated the high and stable accuracy of RBscore. A comprehensive comparison led us to develop a benchmark database named NBench. The web server is available on: http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rbscorenbench/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jia; Sun, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder) by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  8. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus .... diet or by topical application on food substrates as .... has very high similarity (99.74%) at DNA level with.

  9. Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

    Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

  10. Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1-anilino-8-naphtharene sulphonic acid; diabetes, dissociation constant; fatty acids binding; fluorescence displacement ... thought to play an important role in the complications of ..... concentration of serum fatty acid level in type 2 diabetes,.

  11. Regulation of human protein S gene (PROS1) transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Cornelia de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the transcriptional regulation of the gene for anticoagulant plasma Protein S, PROS1. Protein S is a cofactor for Protein C in the Protein C anticoagulant pathway. The coagulation cascade is negatively regulated by this pathway through inactivation of

  12. Current approach to male infertility treatment: sperm selection procedure based on hyaluronic acid binding ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zobova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection into an oocyte is widely used throughout the world in assisted reproductive technologies programs in the presence of male infertility factor. However, this approach can allow selection of a single sperm, which is carrying different types of pathologies. Minimizing of any potential risks, entailing the occurrence of abnormalities in the embryos development (apoptosis, fragmentation of embryos, alterations in gene expression, aneuploidies is a very important condition for reducing the potential negative consequences resulting the manipulation with gametes. Processes that could be influenced by the embryologist must be fulfilled in safe and physiological way as much as it is possible. Data of numerous publications reporting about the positive effects of using the technology of sperm selection by hyaluronic acid binding, let make a conclusion about the high prospects of this approach in the treatment of male infertility by methods of in vitro fertilization. The selection of sperm with improved characteristics, which determine the maturity and genetic integrity, provides an opportunity to improve the parameters of pre-implantation embryogenesis, having thus a positive effect on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  13. Measurements of the acid-binding capacity of ingredients used in pig diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Peadar G

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Some feed ingredients bind more acid in the stomach than others and for this reason may be best omitted from pig starter foods if gastric acidity is to be promoted. The objective of this study was to measure the acid-binding capacity (ABC of ingredients commonly used in pig starter foods. Ingredients were categorised as follows: (i milk products (n = 6, (ii cereals (n = 10, (iii root and pulp products (n = 5, (iv vegetable proteins (n = 11, (v meat and fish meal (n = 2, (vi medication (n = 3, (vii amino acids (n = 4, (viii minerals (n = 16, (ix acid salts (n = 4, (x acids (n = 10. A 0.5 g sample of food was suspended in 50 ml distilled de-ionised water with continuous stirring. This suspension was titrated with 0.1 mol/L HCl or 0.1 mol/L NaOH so that approximately 10 additions of titrant was required to reach pH 3.0. The pH readings after each addition were recorded following equilibration for three minutes. ABC was calculated as the amount of acid in milliequivalents (meq required to lower the pH of 1 kg food to (a pH 4.0 (ABC-4 and (b pH 3.0 (ABC-3. Categories of food had significantly different (P

  14. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is an estrogen induced egg yolk and white protein. Eggs from hens which have a splice mutation in RCP gene fail to hatch, indicating an absolute requirement of RCP for the transport of riboflavin to the oocyte. In order to understand the mechanism of regulation of this gene by ...

  15. Hyaluronic acid binding ability of human sperm reflects cellular maturity and fertilizing potential: selection of sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszar, Gabor; Ozkavukcu, Sinan; Jakab, Attila; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Sati, G Leyla; Cayli, Sevil

    2006-06-01

    The current concepts of sperm biochemical markers and the central role of the HspA2 chaperone protein, a measure of sperm cellular maturity and fertilizing potential, are reviewed. Because HspA2 is a component of the synaptonemal complex, low HspA2 levels and increased frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies are related in diminished maturity sperm. We also suggest a relationship between HspA2 expression in elongating spermatids and events of late spermiogenesis, such as cytoplasmic extrusion and plasma membrane remodeling that aid the formation of the zona pellucida binding and hyaluronic acid binding sites. The presence of hyaluronic acid receptor on the plasma membrane of mature sperm, coupled with hyaluronic acid coated glass or plastic surfaces, facilitates testing of sperm function and selection of single mature sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The frequencies of sperm with chromosomal disomy are reduced approximately fourfold to fivefold in hyaluronic acid selected sperm compared with semen sperm, comparable to the increase in such abnormalities in intracytoplasmic sperm injection offspring. Hyaluronic acid binding also excludes immature sperm with cytoplasmic extrusion, persistent histones, and DNA chain breaks. Hyaluronic acid mediated sperm selection is a novel technique that is comparable to sperm zona pellucida binding. Hyaluronic acid selected sperm will also alleviate the risks related to intracytoplasmic sperm injection fertilization with sperm of diminished maturity that currently cause worldwide concern.

  16. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan N.; Bergendahl, L. Therese; Marsh, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization. PMID:26804901

  17. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  18. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  19. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  20. Automatically identifying gene/protein terms in MEDLINE abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Hatzivassiloglou, Vasileios; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Wilbur, W John

    2002-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) techniques are used to extract information automatically from computer-readable literature. In biology, the identification of terms corresponding to biological substances (e.g., genes and proteins) is a necessary step that precedes the application of other NLP systems that extract biological information (e.g., protein-protein interactions, gene regulation events, and biochemical pathways). We have developed GPmarkup (for "gene/protein-full name mark up"), a software system that automatically identifies gene/protein terms (i.e., symbols or full names) in MEDLINE abstracts. As a part of marking up process, we also generated automatically a knowledge source of paired gene/protein symbols and full names (e.g., LARD for lymphocyte associated receptor of death) from MEDLINE. We found that many of the pairs in our knowledge source do not appear in the current GenBank database. Therefore our methods may also be used for automatic lexicon generation. GPmarkup has 73% recall and 93% precision in identifying and marking up gene/protein terms in MEDLINE abstracts. A random sample of gene/protein symbols and full names and a sample set of marked up abstracts can be viewed at http://www.cpmc.columbia.edu/homepages/yuh9001/GPmarkup/. Contact. hy52@columbia.edu. Voice: 212-939-7028; fax: 212-666-0140.

  1. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  2. Genes2Networks: connecting lists of gene symbols using mammalian protein interactions databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma'ayan Avi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, mammalian protein-protein interaction network databases have been developed. The interactions in these databases are either extracted manually from low-throughput experimental biomedical research literature, extracted automatically from literature using techniques such as natural language processing (NLP, generated experimentally using high-throughput methods such as yeast-2-hybrid screens, or interactions are predicted using an assortment of computational approaches. Genes or proteins identified as significantly changing in proteomic experiments, or identified as susceptibility disease genes in genomic studies, can be placed in the context of protein interaction networks in order to assign these genes and proteins to pathways and protein complexes. Results Genes2Networks is a software system that integrates the content of ten mammalian interaction network datasets. Filtering techniques to prune low-confidence interactions were implemented. Genes2Networks is delivered as a web-based service using AJAX. The system can be used to extract relevant subnetworks created from "seed" lists of human Entrez gene symbols. The output includes a dynamic linkable three color web-based network map, with a statistical analysis report that identifies significant intermediate nodes used to connect the seed list. Conclusion Genes2Networks is powerful web-based software that can help experimental biologists to interpret lists of genes and proteins such as those commonly produced through genomic and proteomic experiments, as well as lists of genes and proteins associated with disease processes. This system can be used to find relationships between genes and proteins from seed lists, and predict additional genes or proteins that may play key roles in common pathways or protein complexes.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1 protein and its relationship to nucleolar RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, A Y; Clark, M W; Gilbert, M; Oehm, A; Campbell, J L

    1987-08-01

    To better define the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1, an abundant single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the SSB1 gene and compared it with those of other proteins of known function. The amino acid sequence contains 293 amino acid residues and has an Mr of 32,853. There are several stretches of sequence characteristic of other eucaryotic single-stranded nucleic acid-binding proteins. At the amino terminus, residues 39 to 54 are highly homologous to a peptide in calf thymus UP1 and UP2 and a human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Residues 125 to 162 constitute a fivefold tandem repeat of the sequence RGGFRG, the composition of which suggests a nucleic acid-binding site. Near the C terminus, residues 233 to 245 are homologous to several RNA-binding proteins. Of 18 C-terminal residues, 10 are acidic, a characteristic of the procaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and eucaryotic DNA- and RNA-binding proteins. In addition, examination of the subcellular distribution of SSB1 by immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that SSB1 is a nuclear protein, predominantly located in the nucleolus. Sequence homologies and the nucleolar localization make it likely that SSB1 functions in RNA metabolism in vivo, although an additional role in DNA metabolism cannot be excluded.

  4. De novo origin of human protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA-seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes.

  5. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  6. Gene expression of fatty acid transport and binding proteins in the blood-brain barrier and the cerebral cortex of the rat: differences across development and with different DHA brain status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélerin, Hélène; Jouin, Mélanie; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen C; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Specific mechanisms for maintaining docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in brain cells but also transporting DHA from the blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are not agreed upon. Our main objective was therefore to evaluate the level of gene expression of fatty acid transport and fatty acid binding proteins in the cerebral cortex and at the BBB level during the perinatal period of active brain DHA accretion, at weaning, and until the adult age. We measured by real time RT-PCR the mRNA expression of different isoforms of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) and the fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 in cerebral cortex and isolated microvessels at embryonic day 18 (E18) and postnatal days 14, 21 and 60 (P14, P21 and P60, respectively) in rats receiving different n-3 PUFA dietary supplies (control, totally deficient or DHA-supplemented). In control rats, all the genes were expressed at the BBB level (P14 to P60), the mRNA levels of FABP5 and ACSL3 having the highest values. Age-dependent differences included a systematic decrease in the mRNA expressions between P14-P21 and P60 (2 to 3-fold), with FABP7 mRNA abundance being the most affected (10-fold). In the cerebral cortex, mRNA levels varied differently since FATP4, ACSL3 and ACSL6 and the three FABPs genes were highly expressed. There were no significant differences in the expression of the 10 genes studied in n-3 deficient or DHA-supplemented rats despite significant differences in their brain DHA content, suggesting that brain DHA uptake from the blood does not necessarily require specific transporters within cerebral endothelial cells and could, under these experimental conditions, be a simple passive diffusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  8. Gene, protein, and network of male sterility in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Peng, Xiaojue; Ji, Yanxiao; Yang, Pingfang; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well-exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male-sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes and prot...

  9. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  10. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    have concluded that newly-born genes are products of nonstop frames (NSF) ... research to determine tertiary structures of proteins such ... the present earth, is favourable for new genes to arise, if ..... NGG) in the universal genetic code table, cannot satisfy ..... which has been proposed to explain the development of life on.

  11. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns that e...... in the nucleolus....

  12. Testing of disease-resistance of pokeweed antiviral protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation of pokeweed antiviral protein gene (PAP) into plants was shown to improve plant resistance to several viruses or fungi pathogens with no much negative effect on plant growth. The non-virulent defective PAP inhibits only the virus but does not interfere with the host. A non-virulent defective PAP gene ...

  13. Ranking candidate disease genes from gene expression and protein interaction: a Katz-centrality based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Many diseases have complex genetic causes, where a set of alleles can affect the propensity of getting the disease. The identification of such disease genes is important to understand the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of pathogenesis, improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and aid in drug discovery. Current genetic studies typically identify chromosomal regions associated specific diseases. But picking out an unknown disease gene from hundreds of candidates located on the same genomic interval is still challenging. In this study, we propose an approach to prioritize candidate genes by integrating data of gene expression level, protein-protein interaction strength and known disease genes. Our method is based only on two, simple, biologically motivated assumptions--that a gene is a good disease-gene candidate if it is differentially expressed in cases and controls, or that it is close to other disease-gene candidates in its protein interaction network. We tested our method on 40 diseases in 58 gene expression datasets of the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database. On these datasets our method is able to predict unknown disease genes as well as identifying pleiotropic genes involved in the physiological cellular processes of many diseases. Our study not only provides an effective algorithm for prioritizing candidate disease genes but is also a way to discover phenotypic interdependency, cooccurrence and shared pathophysiology between different disorders.

  14. Computational characteristics of valproic acid binding to histone deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Zeid, Laila A.; El-Mowafy, Abdalla M.; Eikel, D.; Nau, H.; El-Mazar, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the anticpileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) has also demonstrated efficacy in the management of cancer and bipolar disorders. These actions are largely mediated by inhibition of the HDAC enzyme/induction of certain genes. Relative to other HDAC inhibitors such as trichostatin-A (TSA), VPA offers higher selectivity on cancer cells with virtually no detrimental effects on normal cells. The molecular underpinnings of these biological profiles for VPA remain undefined. We currently propose for an attempt to identify differences in the binding of VPA and TSA to HDAC. In this paper, conformational changes and energy calculations have derived. VPA had to accomplish conformational changes in its structure for best accommodation at the HDAC binding site. Energy computations showed that VPA has a lower binding affinitythan TSA (-53.80 vs. -66.30 Kcal/mol). These findings demonstrate that VPA binding to HDAC confers catalytic, conformational and computational characteristics that are distinct from those of TSA. These findings of VPA are consistent with a moderate inhibition of HDAC, a low toxicity on normal cells, and a higher selectivity on cancer cells than TSA. Accordingly, these newly identified binding properties of VPA can state a framework strategy for the rational design of VPA-related anticancer drugs with superior cytodifferentiating-and/or safety-profiles. (author)

  15. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html

  16. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronow Bruce J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN analyses. Results For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method are applied to prioritize disease candidate genes in a training-test schema. Using a list of known disease-related genes from our earlier study as a training set ("seeds", and the rest of the known genes as a test list, we perform large-scale cross validation to rank the candidate genes and also evaluate and compare the performance of our approach. Under appropriate settings – for example, a back probability of 0.3 for PageRank with Priors and HITS with Priors, and step size 6 for K-Step Markov method – the three methods achieved a comparable AUC value, suggesting a similar performance. Conclusion Even though network-based methods are generally not as effective as integrated functional annotation-based methods for disease candidate gene prioritization, in a one-to-one comparison, PPIN-based candidate gene prioritization performs better than all other gene features or annotations. Additionally, we demonstrate that methods used for studying both social and Web networks can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization.

  17. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  18. Identification and cloning of two insecticidal protein genes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely applied type of microbial pesticide due to its high specificity and environmental safety. The activity of Bt is largely attributed to the insecticidal crystal protein encoded by the cry genes. Different insecticidal crystal proteins of Bt have different bioactivity against distinct agricultural ...

  19. Analysis of gene and protein name synonyms in Entrez Gene and UniProtKB resources

    KAUST Repository

    Arkasosy, Basil

    2013-05-11

    Ambiguity in texts is a well-known problem: words can carry several meanings, and hence, can be read and interpreted differently. This is also true in the biological literature; names of biological concepts, such as genes and proteins, might be ambiguous, referring in some cases to more than one gene or one protein, or in others, to both genes and proteins at the same time. Public biological databases give a very useful insight about genes and proteins information, including their names. In this study, we made a thorough analysis of the nomenclatures of genes and proteins in two data sources and for six different species. We developed an automated process that parses, extracts, processes and stores information available in two major biological databases: Entrez Gene and UniProtKB. We analysed gene and protein synonyms, their types, frequencies, and the ambiguities within a species, in between data sources and cross-species. We found that at least 40% of the cross-species ambiguities are caused by names that are already ambiguous within the species. Our study shows that from the six species we analysed (Homo Sapiens, Mus Musculus, Arabidopsis Thaliana, Oryza Sativa, Bacillus Subtilis and Pseudomonas Fluorescens), rice (Oriza Sativa) has the best naming model in Entrez Gene database, with low ambiguities between data sources and cross-species.

  20. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  1. Ribosomal protein gene knockdown causes developmental defects in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamayo Uechi

    Full Text Available The ribosomal proteins (RPs form the majority of cellular proteins and are mandatory for cellular growth. RP genes have been linked, either directly or indirectly, to various diseases in humans. Mutations in RP genes are also associated with tissue-specific phenotypes, suggesting a possible role in organ development during early embryogenesis. However, it is not yet known how mutations in a particular RP gene result in specific cellular changes, or how RP genes might contribute to human diseases. The development of animal models with defects in RP genes will be essential for studying these questions. In this study, we knocked down 21 RP genes in zebrafish by using morpholino antisense oligos to inhibit their translation. Of these 21, knockdown of 19 RPs resulted in the development of morphants with obvious deformities. Although mutations in RP genes, like other housekeeping genes, would be expected to result in nonspecific developmental defects with widespread phenotypes, we found that knockdown of some RP genes resulted in phenotypes specific to each gene, with varying degrees of abnormality in the brain, body trunk, eyes, and ears at about 25 hours post fertilization. We focused further on the organogenesis of the brain. Each knocked-down gene that affected the morphogenesis of the brain produced a different pattern of abnormality. Among the 7 RP genes whose knockdown produced severe brain phenotypes, 3 human orthologs are located within chromosomal regions that have been linked to brain-associated diseases, suggesting a possible involvement of RP genes in brain or neurological diseases. The RP gene knockdown system developed in this study could be a powerful tool for studying the roles of ribosomes in human diseases.

  2. Using the 2A Protein Coexpression System: Multicistronic 2A Vectors Expressing Gene(s) of Interest and Reporter Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Garry A; Ryan, Martin D

    2018-01-01

    To date, a huge range of different proteins-many with cotranslational and posttranslational subcellular localization signals-have been coexpressed together with various reporter proteins in vitro and in vivo using 2A peptides. The pros and cons of 2A co-expression technology are considered below, followed by a simple example of a "how to" protocol to concatenate multiple genes of interest, together with a reporter gene, into a single gene linked via 2As for easy identification or selection of transduced cells.

  3. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  4. Differentially expressed genes in iron-induced prion protein conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Eun-hee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP C ) to the protease-resistant isoform is the key event in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, including transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Increased iron in prion-related disease has been observed due to the prion protein-ferritin complex. Additionally, the accumulation and conversion of recombinant PrP (rPrP) is specifically derived from Fe(III) but not Fe(II). Fe(III)-mediated PK-resistant PrP (PrP res ) conversion occurs within a complex cellular environment rather than via direct contact between rPrP and Fe(III). In this study, differentially expressed genes correlated with prion degeneration by Fe(III) were identified using Affymetrix microarrays. Following Fe(III) treatment, 97 genes were differentially expressed, including 85 upregulated genes and 12 downregulated genes (≥1.5-fold change in expression). However, Fe(II) treatment produced moderate alterations in gene expression without inducing dramatic alterations in gene expression profiles. Moreover, functional grouping of identified genes indicated that the differentially regulated genes were highly associated with cell growth, cell maintenance, and intra- and extracellular transport. These findings showed that Fe(III) may influence the expression of genes involved in PrP folding by redox mechanisms. The identification of genes with altered expression patterns in neural cells may provide insights into PrP conversion mechanisms during the development and progression of prion-related diseases. - Highlights: • Differential genes correlated with prion degeneration by Fe(III) were identified. • Genes were identified in cell proliferation and intra- and extracellular transport. • In PrP degeneration, redox related genes were suggested. • Cbr2, Rsad2, Slc40a1, Amph and Mvd were expressed significantly.

  5. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  6. Zinc(II) and the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauss, P.; Krassa, K.B.; McPheeters, D.S.; Nelson, M.A.; Gold, L.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA binding domain of the gene 32 protein of the bacteriophage T4 contains a single zinc-finger sequence. The gene 32 protein is an extensively studied member of a class of proteins that bind relatively nonspecifically to single-stranded DNA. The authors have sequenced and characterized mutations in gene 32 whose defective proteins are activated by increasing the Zn(II) concentration in the growth medium. The results identify a role for the gene 32 protein in activation of T4 late transcription. Several eukaryotic proteins with zinc fingers participate in activation of transcription, and the gene 32 protein of T4 should provide a simple, well-characterized system in which genetics can be utilized to study the role of a zinc finger in nucleic acid binding and gene expression

  7. Use of galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2018-04-03

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  8. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  9. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  10. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  11. Study on Fusion Protein and Its gene in Baculovirus Specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemr, W.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Baculoviruses are subdivided into two groups depending on the type of budded virus envelop fusion protein; group I utilized gp64 which include the most of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), group II utilized F protein which include the remnants of NPVs and all Granuloviruses (GVs). Recent studies reported the viral F protein coding gene as a host cellular sourced gene and may evolutionary acquired from the host genome referring to phylogeny analysis of fusion proteins. Thus, it was deduced that F protein coding gene is species- specific nucleotide sequence related to the type of the specific host and if virus could infect an unexpected host, the resulted virus may encode a vary F gene. In this regard, the present study utilized the mentioned properties of F gene in an attempt to produce a model of specific and more economic wider range granulovirus bio- pesticide able to infect both Spodoptera littoralis and Phthorimaea operculella larvae. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis were performed on six members of group II baculovirus, novel universal PCR primers were manually designed from the conserved regions in the alignment graph, targeted to amplify species- specific sequence entire F gene open reading frame (ORF) which is useful in molecular identification of baculovirus in unknown samples. So, the PCR product of SpliGV used to prepare a specific probe for the F gene of this type of virus. Results reflected that it is possible to infect S. littoralis larvae by PhopGV if injected into larval haemocoel, the resulted virus of this infection showed by using DNA hybridization technique to be encode to F gene homologous with the F gene of Spli GV, which is revealed that the resulted virus acquired this F gene sequence from the host genome after infection. Consequently, these results may infer that if genetic aberrations occur in the host genome, this may affect in baculoviral infectivity. So, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma radiation at

  12. Selfish DNA in protein-coding genes of Rickettsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, H; Audic, S; Barbe, V; Artiguenave, F; Fournier, P E; Raoult, D; Claverie, J M

    2000-10-13

    Rickettsia conorii, the aetiological agent of Mediterranean spotted fever, is an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. Preliminary analyses of the nearly complete genome sequence of R. conorii have revealed 44 occurrences of a previously undescribed palindromic repeat (150 base pairs long) throughout the genome. Unexpectedly, this repeat was found inserted in-frame within 19 different R. conorii open reading frames likely to encode functional proteins. We found the same repeat in proteins of other Rickettsia species. The finding of a mobile element inserted in many unrelated genes suggests the potential role of selfish DNA in the creation of new protein sequences.

  13. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  14. Challenges in biotechnology at LLNL: from genes to proteins; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albala, J S

    1999-01-01

    This effort has undertaken the task of developing a link between the genomics, DNA repair and structural biology efforts within the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. Through the advent of the I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression) Consortium, a world-wide effort to catalog the largest public collection of genes, accepted and maintained within BBRP, it is now possible to systematically express the protein complement of these to further elucidate novel gene function and structure. The work has ensued in four phases, outlined as follows: (1) Gene and System selection; (2) Protein expression and purification; (3) Structural analysis; and (4) biological integration. Proteins to be expressed have been those of high programmatic interest. This includes, in particular, proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity, particularly those involved in the repair of DNA damage, including ERCC1, ERCC4, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC9, HEX1, APN1, p53, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51. Full-length cDNA cognates of selected genes were isolated, and cloned into baculovirus-based expression vectors. The baculoviral expression system for protein over-expression is now well-established in the Albala laboratory. Procedures have been successfully optimized for full-length cDNA clining into expression vectors for protein expression from recombinant constructs. This includes the reagents, cell lines, techniques necessary for expression of recombinant baculoviral constructs in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The laboratory has also generated a high-throughput baculoviral expression paradigm for large scale expression and purification of human recombinant proteins amenable to automation

  15. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against ...

  16. Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X from Pakistan. Arshad Jamal, Idrees Ahmad Nasir, Bushra Tabassum, Muhammad Tariq, Abdul Munim Farooq, Zahida Qamar, Mohsin Ahmad Khan, Nadeem Ahmad, Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider, M. Arshad Javed, Tayyab Husnain ...

  17. Do prion protein gene polymorphisms induce apoptosis in non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in prion protein coding gene, Prnp, greatly affect susceptibility to prion diseases in mammals. Here, the coding region of Prnp was screened for polymorphisms in redeared turtle, Trachemys scripta. Four polymorphisms, L203V, N205I, ...

  18. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. → Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. → Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D 3 and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  19. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu, E-mail: hiruma.yoshiharu.hy@daiichisankyo.co.jp [Biological Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo 134-8630 (Japan); Hirai, Takehiro [Translational Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology Department, Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo 134-8630 (Japan); Tsuda, Eisuke [Biological Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo 134-8630 (Japan)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  20. Gene, protein and network of male sterility in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang eKun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes and proteins related to cytoplasmic male sterility, photoperiod sensitive male sterility, self-incompatibility and other types of microspores deterioration have been characterized through genetics or proteomics. Especially the latter, offers us a powerful and high throughput approach to discern the novel proteins involving in male-sterile pathways which may help us to breed artificial male-sterile system. This represents an alternative tool to meet the critical challenge of further development of hybrid rice. In this paper, we reviewed the recent developments in our understanding of male sterility in rice hybrid production across gene, protein and integrated network levels, and also, present a perspective on the engineering of male sterile lines for hybrid rice production.

  1. SITEX 2.0: Projections of protein functional sites on eukaryotic genes. Extension with orthologous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Irina V; Demenkov, Pavel S; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2017-04-01

    Functional sites define the diversity of protein functions and are the central object of research of the structural and functional organization of proteins. The mechanisms underlying protein functional sites emergence and their variability during evolution are distinguished by duplication, shuffling, insertion and deletion of the exons in genes. The study of the correlation between a site structure and exon structure serves as the basis for the in-depth understanding of sites organization. In this regard, the development of programming resources that allow the realization of the mutual projection of exon structure of genes and primary and tertiary structures of encoded proteins is still the actual problem. Previously, we developed the SitEx system that provides information about protein and gene sequences with mapped exon borders and protein functional sites amino acid positions. The database included information on proteins with known 3D structure. However, data with respect to orthologs was not available. Therefore, we added the projection of sites positions to the exon structures of orthologs in SitEx 2.0. We implemented a search through database using site conservation variability and site discontinuity through exon structure. Inclusion of the information on orthologs allowed to expand the possibilities of SitEx usage for solving problems regarding the analysis of the structural and functional organization of proteins. Database URL: http://www-bionet.sscc.ru/sitex/ .

  2. Discovering disease-associated genes in weighted protein-protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Cai, Meng; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-04-01

    Although there have been many network-based attempts to discover disease-associated genes, most of them have not taken edge weight - which quantifies their relative strength - into consideration. We use connection weights in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to locate disease-related genes. We analyze the topological properties of both weighted and unweighted PPI networks and design an improved random forest classifier to distinguish disease genes from non-disease genes. We use a cross-validation test to confirm that weighted networks are better able to discover disease-associated genes than unweighted networks, which indicates that including link weight in the analysis of network properties provides a better model of complex genotype-phenotype associations.

  3. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  4. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Urano-Tashiro

    Full Text Available Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2 of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N or Arg365 to Asn (R365N substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins.

  5. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  6. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs.

  7. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  8. A new essential protein discovery method based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of essential proteins is always a challenging task since it requires experimental approaches that are time-consuming and laborious. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which have produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting proteins' essentialities from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. However, the network topology-based centrality measures are very sensitive to the robustness of network. Therefore, a new robust essential protein discovery method would be of great value. Results In this paper, we propose a new centrality measure, named PeC, based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data. The performance of PeC is validated based on the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results show that the predicted precision of PeC clearly exceeds that of the other fifteen previously proposed centrality measures: Degree Centrality (DC, Betweenness Centrality (BC, Closeness Centrality (CC, Subgraph Centrality (SC, Eigenvector Centrality (EC, Information Centrality (IC, Bottle Neck (BN, Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC, Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC, Sum of ECC (SoECC, Range-Limited Centrality (RL, L-index (LI, Leader Rank (LR, Normalized α-Centrality (NC, and Moduland-Centrality (MC. Especially, the improvement of PeC over the classic centrality measures (BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN is more than 50% when predicting no more than 500 proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the integration of protein-protein interaction network and gene expression data can help improve the precision of predicting essential proteins. The new centrality measure, PeC, is an effective essential protein discovery method.

  9. Prediction of the Ebola Virus Infection Related Human Genes Using Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html.

  11. Inference of gene-phenotype associations via protein-protein interaction and orthology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwen Wang

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental goals of genetics is to understand gene functions and their associated phenotypes. To achieve this goal, in this study we developed a computational algorithm that uses orthology and protein-protein interaction information to infer gene-phenotype associations for multiple species. Furthermore, we developed a web server that provides genome-wide phenotype inference for six species: fly, human, mouse, worm, yeast, and zebrafish. We evaluated our inference method by comparing the inferred results with known gene-phenotype associations. The high Area Under the Curve values suggest a significant performance of our method. By applying our method to two human representative diseases, Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer, we demonstrated that our method is able to identify related Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The web server can be used to infer functions and putative phenotypes of a gene along with the candidate genes of a phenotype, and thus aids in disease candidate gene discovery. Our web server is available at http://jjwanglab.org/PhenoPPIOrth.

  12. Cloning and expression of a small heat shock protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cDNA sequence of this gene is 920 bp in size (GenBank: HM132040) and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 636 bp, which was predicted to encode a protein with 211 amino acid residues. The phylogenetic tree showed that CaHSP24 was quite similar to mitochondrial sHSPs from other plants but was distantly ...

  13. Functional modules by relating protein interaction networks and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Mewes, H W

    2003-11-01

    Genes and proteins are organized on the basis of their particular mutual relations or according to their interactions in cellular and genetic networks. These include metabolic or signaling pathways and protein interaction, regulatory or co-expression networks. Integrating the information from the different types of networks may lead to the notion of a functional network and functional modules. To find these modules, we propose a new technique which is based on collective, multi-body correlations in a genetic network. We calculated the correlation strength of a group of genes (e.g. in the co-expression network) which were identified as members of a module in a different network (e.g. in the protein interaction network) and estimated the probability that this correlation strength was found by chance. Groups of genes with a significant correlation strength in different networks have a high probability that they perform the same function. Here, we propose evaluating the multi-body correlations by applying the superparamagnetic approach. We compare our method to the presently applied mean Pearson correlations and show that our method is more sensitive in revealing functional relationships.

  14. Radioresistance related genes screened by protein-protein interaction network analysis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaodong; Guo Ya; Qu Song; Li Ling; Huang Shiting; Li Danrong; Zhang Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover radioresistance associated molecular biomarkers and its mechanism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by protein-protein interaction network analysis. Methods: Whole genome expression microarray was applied to screen out differentially expressed genes in two cell lines CNE-2R and CNE-2 with different radiosensitivity. Four differentially expressed genes were randomly selected for further verification by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis with self-designed primers. The common differentially expressed genes from two experiments were analyzed with the SNOW online database in order to find out the central node related to the biomarkers of nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance. The expression of STAT1 in CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells was measured by Western blot. Results: Compared with CNE-2 cells, 374 genes in CNE-2R cells were differentially expressed while 197 genes showed significant differences. Four randomly selected differentially expressed genes were verified by RT-PCR and had same change trend in consistent with the results of chip assay. Analysis with the SNOW database demonstrated that those 197 genes could form a complicated interaction network where STAT1 and JUN might be two key nodes. Indeed, the STAT1-α expression in CNE-2R was higher than that in CNE-2 (t=4.96, P<0.05). Conclusions: The key nodes of STAT1 and JUN may be the molecular biomarkers leading to radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and STAT1-α might have close relationship with radioresistance. (authors)

  15. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement.

  19. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

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    Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications.

  20. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  1. pGenN, a Gene Normalization Tool for Plant Genes and Proteins in Scientific Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruoyao; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Lee, Jung-Youn; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatically detecting gene/protein names in the literature and connecting them to databases records, also known as gene normalization, provides a means to structure the information buried in free-text literature. Gene normalization is critical for improving the coverage of annotation in the databases, and is an essential component of many text mining systems and database curation pipelines. Methods In this manuscript, we describe a gene normalization system specifically tailored for plant species, called pGenN (pivot-based Gene Normalization). The system consists of three steps: dictionary-based gene mention detection, species assignment, and intra species normalization. We have developed new heuristics to improve each of these phases. Results We evaluated the performance of pGenN on an in-house expertly annotated corpus consisting of 104 plant relevant abstracts. Our system achieved an F-value of 88.9% (Precision 90.9% and Recall 87.2%) on this corpus, outperforming state-of-art systems presented in BioCreative III. We have processed over 440,000 plant-related Medline abstracts using pGenN. The gene normalization results are stored in a local database for direct query from the pGenN web interface (proteininformationresource.org/pgenn/). The annotated literature corpus is also publicly available through the PIR text mining portal (proteininformationresource.org/iprolink/). PMID:26258475

  2. Topology of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Valentina; Weichert, Rachel M; Makishima, Tomoko; Griffith, Andrew J

    2010-10-05

    Mutations of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) cause hearing loss in humans and mice. TMC1 is the founding member of a family of genes encoding proteins of unknown function that are predicted to contain multiple transmembrane domains. The goal of our study was to define the topology of mouse TMC1 expressed heterologously in tissue culture cells. TMC1 was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of five tissue culture cell lines that we tested. We used anti-TMC1 and anti-HA antibodies to probe the topologic orientation of three native epitopes and seven HA epitope tags along full-length TMC1 after selective or complete permeabilization of transfected cells with digitonin or Triton X-100, respectively. TMC1 was present within the ER as an integral membrane protein containing six transmembrane domains and cytosolic N- and C-termini. There is a large cytoplasmic loop, between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains, with two highly conserved hydrophobic regions that might associate with or penetrate, but do not span, the plasma membrane. Our study is the first to demonstrate that TMC1 is a transmembrane protein. The topologic organization revealed by this study shares some features with that of the shaker-TRP superfamily of ion channels.

  3. False positive reduction in protein-protein interaction predictions using gene ontology annotations

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    Lin Yen-Han

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many crucial cellular operations such as metabolism, signalling, and regulations are based on protein-protein interactions. However, the lack of robust protein-protein interaction information is a challenge. One reason for the lack of solid protein-protein interaction information is poor agreement between experimental findings and computational sets that, in turn, comes from huge false positive predictions in computational approaches. Reduction of false positive predictions and enhancing true positive fraction of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction datasets based on highly confident experimental results has not been adequately investigated. Results Gene Ontology (GO annotations were used to reduce false positive protein-protein interactions (PPI pairs resulting from computational predictions. Using experimentally obtained PPI pairs as a training dataset, eight top-ranking keywords were extracted from GO molecular function annotations. The sensitivity of these keywords is 64.21% in the yeast experimental dataset and 80.83% in the worm experimental dataset. The specificities, a measure of recovery power, of these keywords applied to four predicted PPI datasets for each studied organisms, are 48.32% and 46.49% (by average of four datasets in yeast and worm, respectively. Based on eight top-ranking keywords and co-localization of interacting proteins a set of two knowledge rules were deduced and applied to remove false positive protein pairs. The 'strength', a measure of improvement provided by the rules was defined based on the signal-to-noise ratio and implemented to measure the applicability of knowledge rules applying to the predicted PPI datasets. Depending on the employed PPI-predicting methods, the strength varies between two and ten-fold of randomly removing protein pairs from the datasets. Conclusion Gene Ontology annotations along with the deduced knowledge rules could be implemented to partially

  4. Gene expression analysis of FABP4 in gastric cancer

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    Abdulkarim Yasin Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Gastric cancer has high incidence and mortality rate in several countries and is still one of the most frequent and lethal disease. In this study, we aimed to determine diagnostic markers in gastric cancer by molecular techniques; include mRNA expression analysis of FABP4 gene. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 gene encodes the fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes. The protein encoded by FABP4 are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. It is thought that FABPs roles include fatty acid uptake, transport, and metabolism. Material and Methods: Total RNA were extracted from paired tumor and normal tissues of 47 gastric cancer. The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was measured employing semi- quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR. Results: The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was significantly decreased (down- regulated. Conclusion: Down-regulation of FABP4 gene seems to occur at the initial steps of gastric cancer development. In order to confirm the relationship between the gastric tumor and FABP4 gene, further analysis like immunohistochemistry and epigenetc techniques are necessary. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 248-252

  5. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    networks have been identified, including scale free distribution of the vertex degree, network motifs, and modularity, to name a few. These studies of network organization require the network to be as complete as possible, which given the limitations of experimental techniques is not currently the case. Therefore, experimental procedures for detecting biomolecular interactions should be complemented by computational approaches. The paper by Lees et al provides a review of computational methods, integrating multiple independent sources of data to infer physical and functional protein-protein interaction networks. One of the important aspects of protein interactions that should be accounted for in the prediction of protein interaction networks is that many proteins are composed of distinct domains. Protein domains may mediate protein interactions while proteins and their interaction networks may gain complexity through gene duplication and expansion of existing domain architectures via domain rearrangements. The latter mechanisms have been explored in detail in the paper by Cohen-Gihon et al. Protein-protein interactions are not the only component of the cell's interactome. Regulation of cell activity can be achieved at the level of transcription and involve a transcription factor—DNA binding which typically requires recognition of a specific DNA sequence motif. Chip-Chip and the more recent Chip-Seq technologies allow in vivo identification of DNA binding sites and, together with novel in vitro approaches, provide data necessary for deciphering the corresponding binding motifs. Such information, complemented by structures of protein-DNA complexes and knowledge of the differences in binding sites among homologs, opens the door to constructing predictive binding models. The paper by Persikov and Singh provides an example of such a model in the Cys2His2 zinc finger family. Recent studies have indicated that the presence of such binding motifs is, however, neither necessary

  6. Human amyloid beta protein gene locus: HaeIII RFLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J E; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P A; Fuller, F; Cordell, B; Frossard, P M [California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA); Tinklenberg, J R; Davies, H D; Eng, L F; Yesavage, J A [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (USA)

    1988-07-25

    A 2.2 kb EcoRI-EcoRI fragment from the 5{prime} end of the human amyloid beta protein cDNA was isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library and subcloned into pGEM3. HaeIII (GGCC) detects 6 invariant bands at 0.5 kb, 1.0 kb, 1.1 kb, 1.3 kb, 1.4 kb and 1.6 kb and a two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.9 kb or 2.1 kb. Its frequency was studied in 50 North Americans. Human amyloid beta protein gene mapped to the long arm of chromosome 21 (21q11.2-21q21) by Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was observed in two families (15 individuals).

  7. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions Prediction Based on Iterative Clique Extension with Gene Ontology Filtering

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    Lei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cliques (maximal complete subnets in protein-protein interaction (PPI network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  9. A repetitive DNA element regulates expression of the Helicobacter pylori sialic acid binding adhesin by a rheostat-like mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Åberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During persistent infection, optimal expression of bacterial factors is required to match the ever-changing host environment. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a large set of simple sequence repeats (SSR, which constitute contingency loci. Through a slipped strand mispairing mechanism, the SSRs generate heterogeneous populations that facilitate adaptation. Here, we present a model that explains, in molecular terms, how an intergenically located T-tract, via slipped strand mispairing, operates with a rheostat-like function, to fine-tune activity of the promoter that drives expression of the sialic acid binding adhesin, SabA. Using T-tract variants, in an isogenic strain background, we show that the length of the T-tract generates multiphasic output from the sabA promoter. Consequently, this alters the H. pylori binding to sialyl-Lewis x receptors on gastric mucosa. Fragment length analysis of post-infection isolated clones shows that the T-tract length is a highly variable feature in H. pylori. This mirrors the host-pathogen interplay, where the bacterium generates a set of clones from which the best-fit phenotypes are selected in the host. In silico and functional in vitro analyzes revealed that the length of the T-tract affects the local DNA structure and thereby binding of the RNA polymerase, through shifting of the axial alignment between the core promoter and UP-like elements. We identified additional genes in H. pylori, with T- or A-tracts positioned similar to that of sabA, and show that variations in the tract length likewise acted as rheostats to modulate cognate promoter output. Thus, we propose that this generally applicable mechanism, mediated by promoter-proximal SSRs, provides an alternative mechanism for transcriptional regulation in bacteria, such as H. pylori, which possesses a limited repertoire of classical trans-acting regulatory factors.

  10. Motif analysis unveils the possible co-regulation of chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jun; Daniell, Henry; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts play critical roles in land plant cells. Despite their importance and the availability of at least 200 sequenced chloroplast genomes, the number of known DNA regulatory sequences in chloroplast genomes are limited. In this paper, we designed computational methods to systematically study putative DNA regulatory sequences in intergenic regions near chloroplast genes in seven plant species and in promoter sequences of nuclear genes in Arabidopsis and rice. We found that -35/-10 elements alone cannot explain the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. We also concluded that there are unlikely motifs shared by intergenic sequences of most of chloroplast genes, indicating that these genes are regulated differently. Finally and surprisingly, we found five conserved motifs, each of which occurs in no more than six chloroplast intergenic sequences, are significantly shared by promoters of nuclear-genes encoding chloroplast proteins. By integrating information from gene function annotation, protein subcellular localization analyses, protein-protein interaction data, and gene expression data, we further showed support of the functionality of these conserved motifs. Our study implies the existence of unknown nuclear-encoded transcription factors that regulate both chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast protein, which sheds light on the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes.

  11. Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids Bind to the Tetramer Interface of SAMHD1 and Prevent Formation of the Catalytic Homotetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Kyle J; Bumpus, Namandjé N; Stivers, James T

    2016-11-08

    Sterile alpha motif and HD domain protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a unique enzyme that plays important roles in nucleic acid metabolism, viral restriction, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Although much attention has been focused on its dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity in viral restriction and disease, SAMHD1 also binds to single-stranded RNA and DNA. Here we utilize a UV cross-linking method using 5-bromodeoxyuridine-substituted oligonucleotides coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify the binding site for single-stranded nucleic acids (ssNAs) on SAMHD1. Mapping cross-linked amino acids on the surface of existing crystal structures demonstrated that the ssNA binding site lies largely along the dimer-dimer interface, sterically blocking the formation of the homotetramer required for dNTPase activity. Surprisingly, the disordered C-terminus of SAMHD1 (residues 583-626) was also implicated in ssNA binding. An interaction between this region and ssNA was confirmed in binding studies using the purified SAMHD1 583-626 peptide. Despite a recent report that SAMHD1 possesses polyribonucleotide phosphorylase activity, we did not detect any such activity in the presence of inorganic phosphate, indicating that nucleic acid binding is unrelated to this proposed activity. These data suggest an antagonistic regulatory mechanism in which the mutually exclusive oligomeric state requirements for ssNA binding and dNTP hydrolase activity modulate these two functions of SAMHD1 within the cell.

  12. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Shin Liang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES. Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively.

  13. Secretion Trap Tagging of Secreted and Membrane-Spanning Proteins Using Arabidopsis Gene Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Juana M. Arroyo; Cristina Yordan; W. Richard McCombie; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Secreted and membrane-spanning proteins play fundamental roles in plant development but pose challenges for genetic identification and characterization. We describe a "secretion trap" screen for gene trap insertions in genes encoding proteins routed through the secretory pathway. The gene trap transposon encodes a ß-glucuronidase reporter enzyme...

  14. Breeding bread wheat cultivars for high protein content by transfer of protein genes from Triticum dicoccoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, A.; Gerechter-Amitai, Z.K.; Blum, A.; Rubenthaler, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Triticum dicoccoides sel. G-25, a selection of wild emmer with a protein content of 20.5% and a kernel weight of 31.5 mg, was used as the donor of protein genes. Since this selection is highly resistant to stripe rust, the object of the crossing programme was to transfer this resistance, together with the high protein potential, to durum and bread wheat cultivars susceptible to the disease. In the tetraploid lines obtained from the T. dicoccoides/T. durum cross, the protein values ranged from 17 to 22%. These lines had resistance to stripe rust from the wild emmer and to stem rust from the durum. After two further crosses between these tetraploid lines and T. aestivum cultivars, several lines were selected which combined good yield, high protein level and resistance to rust diseases. These lines attained protein levels of 14 to 19% in the whole grain and 14 to 17% in the flour, combined with yields of 4.5 to 6.0 t/ha. They had also inherited resistance to stem rust, and in some instances also to leaf rust, from the cultivated wheat parental lines. (author)

  15. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network

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    Chen Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN. Methods In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs’ GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. Results We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Conclusions Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable

  16. Ebolavirus Database: Gene and Protein Information Resource for Ebolaviruses

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    Rayapadi G. Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is a life-threatening haemorrhagic fever in humans. Even though there are many reports on EVD, the protein precursor functions and virulent factors of ebolaviruses remain poorly understood. Comparative analyses of Ebolavirus genomes will help in the identification of these important features. This prompted us to develop the Ebolavirus Database (EDB and we have provided links to various tools that will aid researchers to locate important regions in both the genomes and proteomes of Ebolavirus. The genomic analyses of ebolaviruses will provide important clues for locating the essential and core functional genes. The aim of EDB is to act as an integrated resource for ebolaviruses and we strongly believe that the database will be a useful tool for clinicians, microbiologists, health care workers, and bioscience researchers.

  17. Orthogonal Cas9 proteins for RNA-guided gene regulation and editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Esvelt, Kevin; Mali, Prashant

    2017-03-07

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including use of multiple orthogonal Cas9 proteins to simultaneously and independently regulate corresponding genes or simultaneously and independently edit corresponding genes.

  18. Chinese medicine protein and peptide in gene and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinglu; Yin, Zifei; Zhang, Daniel; Srivastava, Arun; Ling, Chen

    2018-06-11

    The success of gene and cell therapy in clinic during the past two decades as well as our expanding ability to manipulate these biomaterials are leading to new therapeutic options for a wide range of inherited and acquired diseases. Combining conventional therapies with this emerging field is a promising strategy to treat those previously-thought untreatable diseases. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has evolved for thousands of years in China and still plays an important role in human health. As part of the active ingredients of TCM, proteins and peptides have attracted long-term enthusiasm of researchers. More recently, they have been utilized in gene and cell therapy, resulting in promising novel strategies to treat both cancer and non-cancer diseases. This manuscript presents a critical review on this field, accompanied with perspectives on the challenges and new directions for future research in this emerging frontier. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Cyclin B1 Destruction Box-Mediated Protein Instability: The Enhanced Sensitivity of Fluorescent-Protein-Based Reporter Gene System

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    Chao-Hsun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periodic expression and destruction of several cyclins are the most important steps for the exact regulation of cell cycle. Cyclins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system during cell cycle. Besides, a short sequence near the N-terminal of cyclin B called the destruction box (D-box; CDB is also required. Fluorescent-protein-based reporter gene system is insensitive to analysis because of the overly stable fluorescent proteins. Therefore, in this study, we use human CDB fused with both enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at C-terminus and red fluorescent protein (RFP, DsRed at N-terminus in the transfected human melanoma cells to examine the effects of CDB on different fluorescent proteins. Our results indicated that CDB-fused fluorescent protein can be used to examine the slight gene regulations in the reporter gene system and have the potential to be the system for screening of functional compounds in the future.

  20. Annotating activation/inhibition relationships to protein-protein interactions using gene ontology relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Soorin; Yu, Hasun; Jang, Dongjin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-04-11

    Signaling pathways can be reconstructed by identifying 'effect types' (i.e. activation/inhibition) of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Effect types are composed of 'directions' (i.e. upstream/downstream) and 'signs' (i.e. positive/negative), thereby requiring directions as well as signs of PPIs to predict signaling events from PPI networks. Here, we propose a computational method for systemically annotating effect types to PPIs using relations between functional information of proteins. We used regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in Gene Ontology (GO) to predict directions and signs of PPIs. These relations indicate both directions and signs between GO terms so that we can project directions and signs between relevant GO terms to PPIs. Independent test results showed that our method is effective for predicting both directions and signs of PPIs. Moreover, our method outperformed a previous GO-based method that did not consider the relations between GO terms. We annotated effect types to human PPIs and validated several highly confident effect types against literature. The annotated human PPIs are available in Additional file 2 to aid signaling pathway reconstruction and network biology research. We annotated effect types to PPIs by using regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in GO. We demonstrated that those relations are effective for predicting not only signs, but also directions of PPIs. The usefulness of those relations suggests their potential applications to other types of interactions such as protein-DNA interactions.

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of Genes Encoding PHD-Finger Protein in Tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayat, S.; Cheng, Z.; Chen, X.

    2016-01-01

    The PHD-finger proteins are conserved in eukaryotic organisms and are involved in a variety of important functions in different biological processes in plants. However, the function of PHD fingers are poorly known in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In current study, we identified 45 putative genes coding Phd finger protein in tomato distributed on 11 chromosomes except for chromosome 8. Some of the genes encode other conserved key domains besides Phd-finger. Phylogenetic analysis of these 45 proteins resulted in seven clusters. Most Phd finger proteins were predicted to PML body location. These PHD-finger genes displayed differential expression either in various organs, at different development stages and under stresses in tomato. Our study provides the first systematic analysis of PHD-finger genes and proteins in tomato. This preliminary study provides a very useful reference information for Phd-finger proteins in tomato. They will be helpful for cloning and functional study of tomato PHD-finger genes. (author)

  2. Discovery of rare protein-coding genes in model methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhirendra; Mondal, Anupam Kumar; Yadav, Amit Kumar; Dash, Debasis

    2014-12-01

    Proteogenomics involves the use of MS to refine annotation of protein-coding genes and discover genes in a genome. We carried out comprehensive proteogenomic analysis of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (ME-AM1) from publicly available proteomics data with a motive to improve annotation for methylotrophs; organisms capable of surviving in reduced carbon compounds such as methanol. Besides identifying 2482(50%) proteins, 29 new genes were discovered and 66 annotated gene models were revised in ME-AM1 genome. One such novel gene is identified with 75 peptides, lacks homolog in other methylobacteria but has glycosyl transferase and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein domains, indicating its potential role in outer membrane synthesis. Many novel genes are present only in ME-AM1 among methylobacteria. Distant homologs of these genes in unrelated taxonomic classes and low GC-content of few genes suggest lateral gene transfer as a potential mode of their origin. Annotations of methylotrophy related genes were also improved by the discovery of a short gene in methylotrophy gene island and redefining a gene important for pyrroquinoline quinone synthesis, essential for methylotrophy. The combined use of proteogenomics and rigorous bioinformatics analysis greatly enhanced the annotation of protein-coding genes in model methylotroph ME-AM1 genome. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins in Medicago truncatula A17 Inoculated Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCIA KUSUMAWATI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Subtilisin-like serine protease (MtSBT, serine carboxypeptidase (MtSCP, MtN5, non-specific lipid transfer protein (MtnsLTP, early nodulin2-like protein (MtENOD2-like, FAD-binding domain containing protein (MtFAD-BP1, and rhicadhesin receptor protein (MtRHRE1 were among 34 proteins found in the supernatant of M. truncatula 2HA and sickle cell suspension cultures. This study investigated the expression of genes encoding those proteins in roots and developing nodules. Two methods were used: quantitative real time RT-PCR and gene expression analysis (with promoter:GUS fusion in roots. Those proteins are predicted as secreted proteins which is indirectly supported by the findings that promoter:GUS fusions of six of the seven genes encoding secreted proteins were strongly expressed in the vascular bundle of transgenic hairy roots. All six genes have expressed in 14-day old nodule. The expression levels of the selected seven genes were quantified in Sinorhizobium-inoculated and control plants using quantitative real time RT-PCR. In conclusion, among seven genes encoding secreted proteins analyzed, the expression level of only one gene, MtN5, was up-regulated significantly in inoculated root segments compared to controls. The expression of MtSBT1, MtSCP1, MtnsLTP, MtFAD-BP1, MtRHRE1 and MtN5 were higher in root tip than in other tissues examined.

  4. General theory for integrated analysis of growth, gene, and protein expression in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Pabst, Breana; Klapper, Isaac; Stewart, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    A theory for analysis and prediction of spatial and temporal patterns of gene and protein expression within microbial biofilms is derived. The theory integrates phenomena of solute reaction and diffusion, microbial growth, mRNA or protein synthesis, biomass advection, and gene transcript or protein turnover. Case studies illustrate the capacity of the theory to simulate heterogeneous spatial patterns and predict microbial activities in biofilms that are qualitatively different from those of planktonic cells. Specific scenarios analyzed include an inducible GFP or fluorescent protein reporter, a denitrification gene repressed by oxygen, an acid stress response gene, and a quorum sensing circuit. It is shown that the patterns of activity revealed by inducible stable fluorescent proteins or reporter unstable proteins overestimate the region of activity. This is due to advective spreading and finite protein turnover rates. In the cases of a gene induced by either limitation for a metabolic substrate or accumulation of a metabolic product, maximal expression is predicted in an internal stratum of the biofilm. A quorum sensing system that includes an oxygen-responsive negative regulator exhibits behavior that is distinct from any stage of a batch planktonic culture. Though here the analyses have been limited to simultaneous interactions of up to two substrates and two genes, the framework applies to arbitrarily large networks of genes and metabolites. Extension of reaction-diffusion modeling in biofilms to the analysis of individual genes and gene networks is an important advance that dovetails with the growing toolkit of molecular and genetic experimental techniques.

  5. Molecular characterization of the porcine surfactant, pulmonary-associated protein C gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, S.; Nygård, A.B.; Jensen, H.E.

    2006-01-01

    The surfactant, pulmonary-associated protein C (SFTPC) is a peptide secreted by the alveolar type II pneumocytes of the lung. We have characterized the porcine SFTPC gene at genomic, transcriptional, and protein levels. The porcine SFTPC is a single-copy gene on pig chromosome 14. Two transcripts...

  6. Polymorphisms in the prion protein gene and in the doppel gene increase susceptibility for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Croes (Esther); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); T.A.M. Rademaker (Tessa); J. Vergeer-Drop (Jeannette); B. Dermaut (Bart); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); D.P.W.M. Wientjens (Dorothee); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prion protein gene (PRNP) plays a central role in the origin of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), but there is growing interest in other polymorphisms that may be involved in CJD. Polymorphisms upstream of PRNP that may modulate the prion protein production as well as polymorphisms in

  7. A dual origin of the Xist gene from a protein-coding gene and a set of transposable elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeny A Elisaphenko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available X-chromosome inactivation, which occurs in female eutherian mammals is controlled by a complex X-linked locus termed the X-inactivation center (XIC. Previously it was proposed that genes of the XIC evolved, at least in part, as a result of pseudogenization of protein-coding genes. In this study we show that the key XIC gene Xist, which displays fragmentary homology to a protein-coding gene Lnx3, emerged de novo in early eutherians by integration of mobile elements which gave rise to simple tandem repeats. The Xist gene promoter region and four out of ten exons found in eutherians retain homology to exons of the Lnx3 gene. The remaining six Xist exons including those with simple tandem repeats detectable in their structure have similarity to different transposable elements. Integration of mobile elements into Xist accompanies the overall evolution of the gene and presumably continues in contemporary eutherian species. Additionally we showed that the combination of remnants of protein-coding sequences and mobile elements is not unique to the Xist gene and is found in other XIC genes producing non-coding nuclear RNA.

  8. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...... have molecularly cloned and characterized the ACBP/DBI gene family in rat. The rat ACBP/DBI gene family comprises one expressed gene and four processed pseudogenes of which one was shown to exist in two allelic forms. The expressed gene is organized into four exons and three introns...

  9. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  10. The Mycobacterium leprae antigen 85 complex gene family: identification of the genes for the 85A, 85C, and related MPT51 proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Bekelie, S.; Osland, A.; Wieles, B.; Janson, A. A.; Thole, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The genes for two novel members (designated 85A and 85C) of the Mycobacterium leprae antigen 85 complex family of proteins and the gene for the closely related M. leprae MPT51 protein were isolated. The complete DNA sequence of the M. leprae 85C gene and partial sequences of the 85A and MPT51 genes

  11. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  12. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT

  13. Prioritizing orphan proteins for further study using phylogenomics and gene expression profiles in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Eriko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptomyces coelicolor, a model organism of antibiotic producing bacteria, has one of the largest genomes of the bacterial kingdom, including 7825 predicted protein coding genes. A large number of these genes, nearly 34%, are functionally orphan (hypothetical proteins with unknown function. However, in gene expression time course data, many of these functionally orphan genes show interesting expression patterns. Results In this paper, we analyzed all functionally orphan genes of Streptomyces coelicolor and identified a list of "high priority" orphans by combining gene expression analysis and additional phylogenetic information (i.e. the level of evolutionary conservation of each protein. Conclusions The prioritized orphan genes are promising candidates to be examined experimentally in the lab for further characterization of their function.

  14. Arabidopsis mRNA polyadenylation machinery: comprehensive analysis of protein-protein interactions and gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Min

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyadenylation of mRNA is one of the critical processing steps during expression of almost all eukaryotic genes. It is tightly integrated with transcription, particularly its termination, as well as other RNA processing events, i.e. capping and splicing. The poly(A tail protects the mRNA from unregulated degradation, and it is required for nuclear export and translation initiation. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that the polyadenylation process is also involved in the regulation of gene expression. The polyadenylation process requires two components, the cis-elements on the mRNA and a group of protein factors that recognize the cis-elements and produce the poly(A tail. Here we report a comprehensive pairwise protein-protein interaction mapping and gene expression profiling of the mRNA polyadenylation protein machinery in Arabidopsis. Results By protein sequence homology search using human and yeast polyadenylation factors, we identified 28 proteins that may be components of Arabidopsis polyadenylation machinery. To elucidate the protein network and their functions, we first tested their protein-protein interaction profiles. Out of 320 pair-wise protein-protein interaction assays done using the yeast two-hybrid system, 56 (~17% showed positive interactions. 15 of these interactions were further tested, and all were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and/or in vitro co-purification. These interactions organize into three distinct hubs involving the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors. These hubs are centered around AtCPSF100, AtCLPS, and AtFIPS. The first two are similar to complexes seen in mammals, while the third one stands out as unique to plants. When comparing the gene expression profiles extracted from publicly available microarray datasets, some of the polyadenylation related genes showed tissue-specific expression, suggestive of potential different polyadenylation complex configurations. Conclusion An

  15. Identification of stress responsive genes by studying specific relationships between mRNA and protein abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Shimpei; Yahara, Koji

    2018-03-01

    Protein expression is regulated by the production and degradation of mRNAs and proteins but the specifics of their relationship are controversial. Although technological advances have enabled genome-wide and time-series surveys of mRNA and protein abundance, recent studies have shown paradoxical results, with most statistical analyses being limited to linear correlation, or analysis of variance applied separately to mRNA and protein datasets. Here, using recently analyzed genome-wide time-series data, we have developed a statistical analysis framework for identifying which types of genes or biological gene groups have significant correlation between mRNA and protein abundance after accounting for potential time delays. Our framework stratifies all genes in terms of the extent of time delay, conducts gene clustering in each stratum, and performs a non-parametric statistical test of the correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in a gene cluster. Consequently, we revealed stronger correlations than previously reported between mRNA and protein abundance in two metabolic pathways. Moreover, we identified a pair of stress responsive genes ( ADC17 and KIN1 ) that showed a highly similar time series of mRNA and protein abundance. Furthermore, we confirmed robustness of the analysis framework by applying it to another genome-wide time-series data and identifying a cytoskeleton-related gene cluster (keratin 18, keratin 17, and mitotic spindle positioning) that shows similar correlation. The significant correlation and highly similar changes of mRNA and protein abundance suggests a concerted role of these genes in cellular stress response, which we consider provides an answer to the question of the specific relationships between mRNA and protein in a cell. In addition, our framework for studying the relationship between mRNAs and proteins in a cell will provide a basis for studying specific relationships between mRNA and protein abundance after accounting for potential

  16. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Antonia M; Jekat, Stephan B; Zielonka, Sascia; Müller, Boje; Neumann, Ulla; Rüping, Boris; Twyman, Richard M; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2012-07-10

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family originally was delimited to genes encoding structural components of forisomes, which are specialized crystalloid phloem proteins found solely in the Fabaceae. More recently, SEO genes discovered in various non-Fabaceae plants were proposed to encode the common phloem proteins (P-proteins) that plug sieve plates after wounding. We carried out a comprehensive characterization of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SEO genes (NtSEO). Reporter genes controlled by the NtSEO promoters were expressed specifically in immature sieve elements, and GFP-SEO fusion proteins formed parietal agglomerates in intact sieve elements as well as sieve plate plugs after wounding. NtSEO proteins with and without fluorescent protein tags formed agglomerates similar in structure to native P-protein bodies when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and the analysis of these protein complexes by electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural features resembling those of native P-proteins. NtSEO-RNA interference lines were essentially devoid of P-protein structures and lost photoassimilates more rapidly after injury than control plants, thus confirming the role of P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore provide direct evidence that SEO genes in tobacco encode P-protein subunits that affect translocation. We also found that peptides recently identified in fascicular phloem P-protein plugs from squash (Cucurbita maxima) represent cucurbit members of the SEO family. Our results therefore suggest a common evolutionary origin for P-proteins found in the sieve elements of all dicotyledonous plants and demonstrate the exceptional status of extrafascicular P-proteins in cucurbits.

  17. Simulating evolution of protein complexes through gene duplication and co-option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Loren; Nelesen, Serita; VanAndel, Ethan; Lamine, James; VandeHaar, Peter

    2016-06-21

    We present a model of the evolution of protein complexes with novel functions through gene duplication, mutation, and co-option. Under a wide variety of input parameters, digital organisms evolve complexes of 2-5 bound proteins which have novel functions but whose component proteins are not independently functional. Evolution of complexes with novel functions happens more quickly as gene duplication rates increase, point mutation rates increase, protein complex functional probability increases, protein complex functional strength increases, and protein family size decreases. Evolution of complexity is inhibited when the metabolic costs of making proteins exceeds the fitness gain of having functional proteins, or when point mutation rates get so large the functional proteins undergo deleterious mutations faster than new functional complexes can evolve. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Downregulation of ATM Gene and Protein Expression in Canine Mammary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo-Ferreira, T M M; Bueno, R C; Terra, E M; Avante, M L; Tinucci-Costa, M; Carvalho, M; Cassali, G D; Linde, S D; Rogatto, S R; Laufer-Amorim, R

    2016-11-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a protein associated with DNA damage repair and maintenance of genomic integrity. In women, ATM transcript and protein downregulation have been reported in sporadic breast carcinomas, and the absence of ATM protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate ATM gene and protein expression in canine mammary tumors and their association with clinical outcome. ATM gene and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in normal mammary gland samples (n = 10), benign mammary tumors (n = 11), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 19), and metastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 11). Lower ATM transcript levels were detected in benign mammary tumors and carcinomas compared with normal mammary glands (P = .011). Similarly, lower ATM protein expression was observed in benign tumors (P = .0003), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (P ATM gene or protein levels were detected among benign tumors and nonmetastatic and metastatic mammary carcinomas (P > .05). The levels of ATM gene or protein expression were not significantly associated with clinical and pathological features or with survival. Similar to human breast cancer, the data in this study suggest that ATM gene and protein downregulation is involved in canine mammary gland tumorigenesis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Gene-specific correlation of RNA and protein levels in human cells and tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, Fredrik; Danielsson, Frida; Hallström, Björn M.

    2016-01-01

    An important issue for molecular biology is to establish whether transcript levels of a given gene can be used as proxies for the corresponding protein levels. Here, we have developed a targeted proteomics approach for a set of human non-secreted proteins based on parallel reaction monitoring...... to measure, at steady-state conditions, absolute protein copy numbers across human tissues and cell lines and compared these levels with the corresponding mRNA levels using transcriptomics. The study shows that the transcript and protein levels do not correlate well unless a gene-specific RNA-to-protein (RTP...

  20. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  1. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins.......Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...

  2. From genes to protein mechanics on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Marcus; Ott, Wolfgang; Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Verdorfer, Tobias; Pippig, Diana A; Nash, Michael A; Gaub, Hermann E

    2014-11-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy enables mechanical testing of individual proteins, but low experimental throughput limits the ability to screen constructs in parallel. We describe a microfluidic platform for on-chip expression, covalent surface attachment and measurement of single-molecule protein mechanical properties. A dockerin tag on each protein molecule allowed us to perform thousands of pulling cycles using a single cohesin-modified cantilever. The ability to synthesize and mechanically probe protein libraries enables high-throughput mechanical phenotyping.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of protein expression related genes of Pichia pastoris under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qi

    Full Text Available The physiological responses and transcription profiling of Pichia pastoris GS115 to simulated microgravity (SMG were substantially changed compared with normal gravity (NG control. We previously reported that the recombinant P. pastoris grew faster under SMG than NG during methanol induction phase and the efficiencies of recombinant enzyme production and secretion were enhanced under SMG, which was considered as the consequence of changed transcriptional levels of some key genes. In this work, transcriptiome profiling of P. pastoris cultured under SMG and NG conditions at exponential and stationary phases were determined using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. Four categories of 141 genes function as methanol utilization, protein chaperone, RNA polymerase and protein transportation or secretion classified according to Gene Ontology (GO were chosen to be analyzed on the basis of NGS results. And 80 significantly changed genes were weighted and estimated by Cluster 3.0. It was found that most genes of methanol metabolism (85% of 20 genes and protein transportation or secretion (82.2% of 45 genes were significantly up-regulated under SMG. Furthermore the quantity and fold change of up-regulated genes in exponential phase of each category were higher than those of stationary phase. The results indicate that the up-regulated genes of methanol metabolism and protein transportation or secretion mainly contribute to enhanced production and secretion of the recombinant protein under SMG.

  4. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    roles in the process have been identified through transcriptomics. The assignment of function to these genes has been enabled in combination with gene deletion studies. In this work, 14 genes known to play a role in protein secretion in filamentous fungi were overexpressed in Aspergillus nidulans....... The background strain was a fluorescent reporter secreting mRFP. The overall effect of the overexpressions could thus be easily monitored through fluorescence measurements, while the effects on physiology were determined in batch cultivations and surface growth studies. Results: Fourteen protein secretion...... pathway related genes were overexpressed with a tet-ON promoter in the RFP-secreting reporter strain and macromorphology, physiology and protein secretion were monitored when the secretory genes were induced. Overexpression of several of the chosen genes was shown to cause anomalies on growth, micro...

  5. Revisiting the missing protein-coding gene catalog of the domestic dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galibert Francis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among mammals for which there is a high sequence coverage, the whole genome assembly of the dog is unique in that it predicts a low number of protein-coding genes, ~19,000, compared to the over 20,000 reported for other mammalian species. Of particular interest are the more than 400 of genes annotated in primates and rodent genomes, but missing in dog. Results Using over 14,000 orthologous genes between human, chimpanzee, mouse rat and dog, we built multiple pairwise synteny maps to infer short orthologous intervals that were targeted for characterizing the canine missing genes. Based on gene prediction and a functionality test using the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitution rates (dN/dS, we provide compelling structural and functional evidence for the identification of 232 new protein-coding genes in the canine genome and 69 gene losses, characterized as undetected gene or pseudogenes. Gene loss phyletic pattern analysis using ten species from chicken to human allowed us to characterize 28 canine-specific gene losses that have functional orthologs continuously from chicken or marsupials through human, and 10 genes that arose specifically in the evolutionary lineage leading to rodent and primates. Conclusion This study demonstrates the central role of comparative genomics for refining gene catalogs and exploring the evolutionary history of gene repertoires, particularly as applied for the characterization of species-specific gene gains and losses.

  6. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have further presented the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis of the origin of life as well as a hypothesis of protein production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions termed as GNC-, SNS- and GC-NSF(a)-0th order ...

  7. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

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    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  8. Comparative analysis of the prion protein gene sequences in African lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-De; Pang, Wan-Yong; Zhao, De-Ming

    2006-10-01

    The prion protein gene of African lion (Panthera Leo) was first cloned and polymorphisms screened. The results suggest that the prion protein gene of eight African lions is highly homogenous. The amino acid sequences of the prion protein (PrP) of all samples tested were identical. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (C42T, C81A, C420T, T600C) in the prion protein gene (Prnp) of African lion were found, but no amino acid substitutions. Sequence analysis showed that the higher homology is observed to felis catus AF003087 (96.7%) and to sheep number M31313.1 (96.2%) Genbank accessed. With respect to all the mammalian prion protein sequences compared, the African lion prion protein sequence has three amino acid substitutions. The homology might in turn affect the potential intermolecular interactions critical for cross species transmission of prion disease.

  9. A positive feedback-based gene circuit to increase the production of a membrane protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennis Robert B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins are an important class of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes, and are a promising target in pharmaceutical development. However, membrane proteins are often difficult to produce in large quantities for the purpose of crystallographic or biochemical analyses. Results In this paper, we demonstrate that synthetic gene circuits designed specifically to overexpress certain genes can be applied to manipulate the expression kinetics of a model membrane protein, cytochrome bd quinol oxidase in E. coli, resulting in increased expression rates. The synthetic circuit involved is an engineered, autoinducer-independent variant of the lux operon activator LuxR from V. fischeri in an autoregulatory, positive feedback configuration. Conclusions Our proof-of-concept experiments indicate a statistically significant increase in the rate of production of the bd oxidase membrane protein. Synthetic gene networks provide a feasible solution for the problem of membrane protein production.

  10. Topological and organizational properties of the products of house-keeping and tissue-specific genes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsien; Liu, Wei-Chung; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2009-03-11

    Human cells of various tissue types differ greatly in morphology despite having the same set of genetic information. Some genes are expressed in all cell types to perform house-keeping functions, while some are selectively expressed to perform tissue-specific functions. In this study, we wished to elucidate how proteins encoded by human house-keeping genes and tissue-specific genes are organized in human protein-protein interaction networks. We constructed protein-protein interaction networks for different tissue types using two gene expression datasets and one protein-protein interaction database. We then calculated three network indices of topological importance, the degree, closeness, and betweenness centralities, to measure the network position of proteins encoded by house-keeping and tissue-specific genes, and quantified their local connectivity structure. Compared to a random selection of proteins, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to have a greater number of directly interacting neighbors and occupy network positions in several shortest paths of interaction between protein pairs, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins did not. In addition, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to connect with other house-keeping gene-encoded proteins in all tissue types, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins also tended to connect with other tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins, but only in approximately half of the tissue types examined. Our analysis showed that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tend to occupy important network positions, while those encoded by tissue-specific genes do not. The biological implications of our findings were discussed and we proposed a hypothesis regarding how cells organize their protein tools in protein-protein interaction networks. Our results led us to speculate that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins might form a core in human protein-protein interaction networks, while clusters of tissue-specific gene

  11. Functional redundancy and/or ongoing pseudogenization among F-box protein genes expressed in Arabidopsis male gametophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Sobia; Durandet, Monique; Vesa, Simona; Pereira, Serge; Guerche, Philippe; Bonhomme, Sandrine

    2014-06-01

    F-box protein genes family is one of the largest gene families in plants, with almost 700 predicted genes in the model plant Arabidopsis. F-box proteins are key components of the ubiquitin proteasome system that allows targeted protein degradation. Transcriptome analyses indicate that half of these F-box protein genes are found expressed in microspore and/or pollen, i.e., during male gametogenesis. To assess the role of F-box protein genes during this crucial developmental step, we selected 34 F-box protein genes recorded as highly and specifically expressed in pollen and isolated corresponding insertion mutants. We checked the expression level of each selected gene by RT-PCR and confirmed pollen expression for 25 genes, but specific expression for only 10 of the 34 F-box protein genes. In addition, we tested the expression level of selected F-box protein genes in 24 mutant lines and showed that 11 of them were null mutants. Transmission analysis of the mutations to the progeny showed that none of the single mutations was gametophytic lethal. These unaffected transmission efficiencies suggested leaky mutations or functional redundancy among F-box protein genes. Cytological observation of the gametophytes in the mutants confirmed these results. Combinations of mutations in F-box protein genes from the same subfamily did not lead to transmission defect either, further highlighting functional redundancy and/or a high proportion of pseudogenes among these F-box protein genes.

  12. The presence of two S-layer-protein-encoding genes is conserved among species related to Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Pot, B.; Kersters, K.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the type strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus possesses two S-protein-encoding genes, one of which is silent, on a chromosomal segment of 6 kb. The S-protein-encoding gene in the expression site can be exchanged for the silent S-protein-encoding gene by inversion of this

  13. Fast and simple protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families from microbiome sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H; Tappu, Rewati; Bazinet, Adam L; Xie, Chao; Cummings, Michael P; Nieselt, Kay; Williams, Rohan

    2017-01-25

    Microbiome sequencing projects typically collect tens of millions of short reads per sample. Depending on the goals of the project, the short reads can either be subjected to direct sequence analysis or be assembled into longer contigs. The assembly of whole genomes from metagenomic sequencing reads is a very difficult problem. However, for some questions, only specific genes of interest need to be assembled. This is then a gene-centric assembly where the goal is to assemble reads into contigs for a family of orthologous genes. We present a new method for performing gene-centric assembly, called protein-alignment-guided assembly, and provide an implementation in our metagenome analysis tool MEGAN. Genes are assembled on the fly, based on the alignment of all reads against a protein reference database such as NCBI-nr. Specifically, the user selects a gene family based on a classification such as KEGG and all reads binned to that gene family are assembled. Using published synthetic community metagenome sequencing reads and a set of 41 gene families, we show that the performance of this approach compares favorably with that of full-featured assemblers and that of a recently published HMM-based gene-centric assembler, both in terms of the number of reference genes detected and of the percentage of reference sequence covered. Protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families complements whole-metagenome assembly in a new and very useful way.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspX/EsxS Fusion Protein: Gene Cloning, Protein Expression, and Purification in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Yousefi-Avarvand, Arshid; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Meshkat, Zahra; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Aryan, Ehsan; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clone, express, and purify a novel multidomain fusion protein of Micobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in a prokaryotic system. An hspX/esxS gene construct was synthesized and ligated into a pGH plasmid, E. coli TOP10 cells were transformed, and the vector was purified. The vector containing the construct and pET-21b (+) plasmid were digested with the same enzymes and the construct was ligated into pET-21b (+). The accuracy of cloning was confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. E. coli BL21 cells were transformed with the pET-21b (+)/hspX/esxS expression vector and protein expression was evaluated. Finally, the expressed fusion protein was purified on a Ni-IDA column and verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The hspX/esxS gene construct was inserted into pET-21b (+) and recombinant protein expression was induced with IPTG in E. coli BL21 cells. Various concentrations of IPTG were tested to determine the optimum concentration for expression induction. The recombinant protein was expressed in insoluble inclusion bodies. Three molar guanidine HCl was used to solubilize the insoluble protein. An HspX/EsxS Mtb fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. After immunological analysis, the HspX/EsxS fusion protein might be an anti-tuberculosis vaccine candidate in future clinical trial studies.

  15. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yonglun; Blechingberg, Jenny; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders D; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-11-14

    FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins.

  16. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  17. Expression of circadian clock genes and proteins in urothelial cancer is related to cancer-associated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litlekalsoy, Jorunn; Rostad, Kari; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Hostmark, Jens G.; Laerum, Ole Didrik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate invasive and metastatic potential of urothelial cancer by investigating differential expression of various clock genes/proteins participating in the 24 h circadian rhythms and to compare these gene expressions with transcription of other cancer-associated genes. Twenty seven paired samples of tumour and benign tissue collected from patients who underwent cystectomy were analysed and compared to 15 samples of normal bladder tissue taken from patients who underwent cystoscopy for benign prostate hyperplasia (unrelated donors). Immunohistochemical analyses were made for clock and clock-related proteins. In addition, the gene-expression levels of 22 genes (clock genes, casein kinases, oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cytokeratins) were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Considerable up- or down-regulation and altered cellular distribution of different clock proteins, a reduction of casein kinase1A1 (CSNK1A1) and increase of casein kinase alpha 1 E (CSNK1E) were found. The pattern was significantly correlated with simultaneous up-regulation of stimulatory tumour markers, and a down-regulation of several suppressor genes. The pattern was mainly seen in aneuploid high-grade cancers. Considerable alterations were also found in the neighbouring bladder mucosa. The close correlation between altered expression of various clock genes and common tumour markers in urothelial cancer indicates that disturbed function in the cellular clock work may be an important additional mechanism contributing to cancer progression and malignant behaviour. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2580-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  20. Comparison of protein coding gene contents of the fungal phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvas, Mikko; Kivioja, Teemu; Mitchell, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomycotina are slightly better characterised and predicted to encode mainly enzymes. The genes specific to Saccharomycotina are enriched in transcription and mitochondrion related functions. Especially mitochondrial ribosomal proteins seem to have diverged from those of Pezizomycotina. In addition, we...

  1. Modifier Genes for Mouse Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein alpha (vibrator) That Bypass Juvenile Lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Concepcion, Dorothy; Johannes, Frank; Lo, Yuan Hung; Yao, Jay; Fong, Jerry; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) mediate lipid signaling and membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding PITP alpha in mice result in a range of dosage-sensitive phenotypes, including neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and

  2. Molecular comparison of the structural proteins encoding gene clusters of two related Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasala, A; Dupont, L; Baumann, M; Ritzenthaler, P; Alatossava, T

    1993-01-01

    Virulent phage LL-H and temperate phage mv4 are two related bacteriophages of Lactobacillus delbrueckii. The gene clusters encoding structural proteins of these two phages have been sequenced and further analyzed. Six open reading frames (ORF-1 to ORF-6) were detected. Protein sequencing and Western immunoblotting experiments confirmed that ORF-3 (g34) encoded the main capsid protein Gp34. The presence of a putative late promoter in front of the phage LL-H g34 gene was suggested by primer extension experiments. Comparative sequence analysis between phage LL-H and phage mv4 revealed striking similarities in the structure and organization of this gene cluster, suggesting that the genes encoding phage structural proteins belong to a highly conservative module. Images PMID:8497043

  3. Polymorphisms of the prion protein gene Arabi sheep breed in Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Novin

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Key words: Prion protein gene (Prnp), polymorphisms, susceptibility, scrapie. INTRODUCTION. Scrapie is an invariably fatal .... consists of a DNA denaturation step (5 min at 95°C), followed by 30 amplification cycles ...

  4. TMPyP4 porphyrin distorts RNA G-quadruplex structures of the disease-associated r(GGGGCC)n repeat of the C9orf72 gene and blocks interaction of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamiri, Bita; Reddy, Kaalak; Macgregor, Robert B; Pearson, Christopher E

    2014-02-21

    Certain DNA and RNA sequences can form G-quadruplexes, which can affect genetic instability, promoter activity, RNA splicing, RNA stability, and neurite mRNA localization. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia can be caused by expansion of a (GGGGCC)n repeat in the C9orf72 gene. Mutant r(GGGGCC)n- and r(GGCCCC)n-containing transcripts aggregate in nuclear foci, possibly sequestering repeat-binding proteins such as ASF/SF2 and hnRNPA1, suggesting a toxic RNA pathogenesis, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Furthermore, the C9orf72 repeat RNA was recently demonstrated to undergo the noncanonical repeat-associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation) into pathologic dipeptide repeats in patient brains, a process that is thought to depend upon RNA structure. We previously demonstrated that the r(GGGGCC)n RNA forms repeat tract length-dependent G-quadruplex structures that bind the ASF/SF2 protein. Here we show that the cationic porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (TMPyP4)), which can bind some G-quadruplex-forming sequences, can bind and distort the G-quadruplex formed by r(GGGGCC)8, and this ablates the interaction of either hnRNPA1 or ASF/SF2 with the repeat. These findings provide proof of concept that nucleic acid binding small molecules, such as TMPyP4, can distort the secondary structure of the C9orf72 repeat, which may beneficially disrupt protein interactions, which may ablate either protein sequestration and/or RAN translation into potentially toxic dipeptides. Disruption of secondary structure formation of the C9orf72 RNA repeats may be a viable therapeutic avenue, as well as a means to test the role of RNA structure upon RAN translation.

  5. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions .... using random numbers by a computer, to confirm whether main chains of ...... world on the origin of life by the pseudo-replication of. [GADV]-proteins in the absence of ...

  6. Rapid evolution of the sequences and gene repertoires of secreted proteins in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Nogueira

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted to the extracellular environment or to the periphery of the cell envelope, the secretome, play essential roles in foraging, antagonistic and mutualistic interactions. We hypothesize that arms races, genetic conflicts and varying selective pressures should lead to the rapid change of sequences and gene repertoires of the secretome. The analysis of 42 bacterial pan-genomes shows that secreted, and especially extracellular proteins, are predominantly encoded in the accessory genome, i.e. among genes not ubiquitous within the clade. Genes encoding outer membrane proteins might engage more frequently in intra-chromosomal gene conversion because they are more often in multi-genic families. The gene sequences encoding the secretome evolve faster than the rest of the genome and in particular at non-synonymous positions. Cell wall proteins in Firmicutes evolve particularly fast when compared with outer membrane proteins of Proteobacteria. Virulence factors are over-represented in the secretome, notably in outer membrane proteins, but cell localization explains more of the variance in substitution rates and gene repertoires than sequence homology to known virulence factors. Accordingly, the repertoires and sequences of the genes encoding the secretome change fast in the clades of obligatory and facultative pathogens and also in the clades of mutualists and free-living bacteria. Our study shows that cell localization shapes genome evolution. In agreement with our hypothesis, the repertoires and the sequences of genes encoding secreted proteins evolve fast. The particularly rapid change of extracellular proteins suggests that these public goods are key players in bacterial adaptation.

  7. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgart, Vlad; Jia, Tao; Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression

  8. Cloning an artificial gene encoding angiostatic anginex: From designed peptide to functional recombinant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandwijk, Ricardo J.M.G.E.; Nesmelova, Irina; Dings, Ruud P.M.; Mayo, Kevin H.; Thijssen, Victor L.J.L.; Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2005-01-01

    Anginex, a designed peptide 33-mer, is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor and anti-tumor agent in vivo. Anginex functions by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration leading to detachment and apoptosis of activated EC's. To better understand tumor endothelium targeting properties of anginex and enable its use in gene therapy, we constructed an artificial gene encoding the biologically exogenous peptide and produced the protein recombinantly in Pichia pastoris. Mass spectrometry shows recombinant anginex to be a dimer and circular dichroism shows the recombinant protein folds with β-strand structure like the synthetic peptide. Moreover, like parent anginex, the recombinant protein is active at inhibiting EC growth and migration, as well as inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. This study demonstrated that it is possible to produce a functionally active protein version of a rationally designed peptide, using an artificial gene and the recombinant protein approach

  9. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  10. Improvement of heterologous protein production in Aspergillus oryzae by RNA interference with alpha-amylase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Takashi; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2009-11-01

    Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 has three alpha-amylase genes (amyA, amyB, and amyC), and secretes alpha-amylase abundantly. However, large amounts of endogenous secretory proteins such as alpha-amylase can compete with heterologous protein in the secretory pathway and decrease its production yields. In this study, we examined the effects of suppression of alpha-amylase on heterologous protein production in A. oryzae, using the bovine chymosin (CHY) as a reporter heterologous protein. The three alpha-amylase genes in A. oryzae have nearly identical DNA sequences from those promoters to the coding regions. Hence we performed silencing of alpha-amylase genes by RNA interference (RNAi) in the A. oryzae CHY producing strain. The silenced strains exhibited a reduction in alpha-amylase activity and an increase in CHY production in the culture medium. This result suggests that suppression of alpha-amylase is effective in heterologous protein production in A. oryzae.

  11. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene Variation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR BRILLIANT

    showed Gst value as 0.013 while gene flow estimates using sequence data information revealed, Delta St ... information that will help in better understanding the relatedness in the functions of the .... differentiated enough across these species.

  12. The first report of prion-related protein gene (PRNT) polymorphisms in goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Byung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Prion protein is encoded by the prion protein gene (PRNP). Polymorphisms of several members of the prion gene family have shown association with prion diseases in several species. Recent studies on a novel member of the prion gene family in rams have shown that prion-related protein gene (PRNT) has a linkage with codon 26 of prion-like protein (PRND). In a previous study, codon 26 polymorphism of PRND has shown connection with PRNP haplotype which is strongly associated with scrapie vulnerability. In addition, the genotype of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 26 of PRND is related to fertilisation capacity. These findings necessitate studies on the SNP of PRNT gene which is connected with PRND. In goat, several polymorphism studies have been performed for PRNP, PRND, and shadow of prion protein gene (SPRN). However, polymorphism on PRNT has not been reported. Hence, the objective of this study was to determine the genotype and allelic distribution of SNPs of PRNT in 238 Korean native goats and compare PRNT DNA sequences between Korean native goats and several ruminant species. A total of five SNPs, including PRNT c.-114G > T, PRNT c.-58A > G in the upstream of PRNT gene, PRNT c.71C > T (p.Ala24Val) and PRNT c.102G > A in the open reading frame (ORF) and c.321C > T in the downstream of PRNT gene, were found in this study. All five SNPs of caprine PRNT gene in Korean native goat are in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with a D' value of 1.0. Interestingly, comparative sequence analysis of the PRNT gene revealed five mismatches between DNA sequences of Korean native goats and those of goats deposited in the GenBank. Korean native black goats also showed 5 mismatches in PRNT ORF with cattle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic research of the PRNT gene in goat.

  13. Characterisation of silent and active genes for a variable large protein of Borrelia recurrentis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scragg Ian G

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the characterisation of the variable large protein (vlp gene expressed by clinical isolate A1 of Borrelia recurrentis; the agent of the life-threatening disease louse-borne relapsing fever. Methods The major vlp protein of this isolate was characterised and a DNA probe created. Use of this together with standard molecular methods was used to determine the location of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene in both this and other isolates. Results This isolate was found to carry silent and expressed copies of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene on plasmids of 54 kbp and 24 kbp respectively, whereas a different isolate, A17, had only the silent vlp1B. recurrentis A17 on a 54 kbp plasmid. Silent and expressed vlp1 have identical mature protein coding regions but have different 5' regions, both containing different potential lipoprotein leader sequences. Only one form of vlp1 is transcribed in the A1 isolate of B. recurrentis, yet both 5' upstream sequences of this vlp1 gene possess features of bacterial promoters. Conclusion Taken together these results suggest that antigenic variation in B. recurrentis may result from recombination of variable large and small protein genes at the junction between lipoprotein leader sequence and mature protein coding region. However, this hypothetical model needs to be validated by further identification of expressed and silent variant protein genes in other B. recurrentis isolates.

  14. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  15. Exploring Alternative Radiolabeling Strategies for Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-Like Lectin 9 Peptide: [68Ga]Ga- and [18F]AlF-NOTA-Siglec-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Moisio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid residues 283–297 from sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9 form a cyclic peptide ligand targeting vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1. VAP-1 is associated with the transfer of leukocytes from blood to tissues upon inflammation. Therefore, analogs of Siglec-9 peptide are good candidates for visualizing inflammation non-invasively using positron emission tomography (PET. Gallium-68-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA-conjugated Siglec-9 has been evaluated extensively for this purpose. Here, we explored two alternative strategies for radiolabeling Siglec-9 peptide using a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-triacetic acid (NOTA-chelator to bind [68Ga]Ga or [18F]AlF. The radioligands were evaluated by in vivo PET imaging and ex vivo γ-counting of turpentine-induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Both tracers showed clear accumulation in the inflamed tissues. The whole-body biodistribution patterns of the tracers were similar.

  16. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  17. A Protein Disulfide Isomerase Gene Fusion Expression System That Increases the Extracellular Productivity of Bacillus brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajino, Tsutomu; Ohto, Chikara; Muramatsu, Masayoshi; Obata, Shusei; Udaka, Shigezo; Yamada, Yukio; Takahashi, Haruo

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system. PMID:10653729

  18. Novel reference genes for quantifying transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli to protein overexpression by quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Ruiyang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate interpretation of quantitative PCR (qPCR data requires normalization using constitutively expressed reference genes. Ribosomal RNA is often used as a reference gene for transcriptional studies in E. coli. However, the choice of reliable reference genes has not been systematically validated. The objective of this study is to identify a set of reliable reference genes for transcription analysis in recombinant protein over-expression studies in E. coli. Results In this study, the meta-analysis of 240 sets of single-channel Affymetrix microarray data representing over-expressions of 63 distinct recombinant proteins in various E. coli strains identified twenty candidate reference genes that were stably expressed across all conditions. The expression of these twenty genes and two commonly used reference genes, rrsA encoding ribosomal RNA 16S and ihfB, was quantified by qPCR in E. coli cells over-expressing four genes of the 1-Deoxy-D-Xylulose 5-Phosphate pathway. From these results, two independent statistical algorithms identified three novel reference genes cysG, hcaT, and idnT but not rrsA and ihfB as highly invariant in two E. coli strains, across different growth temperatures and induction conditions. Transcriptomic data normalized by the geometric average of these three genes demonstrated that genes of the lycopene synthetic pathway maintained steady expression upon enzyme overexpression. In contrast, the use of rrsA or ihfB as reference genes led to the mis-interpretation that lycopene pathway genes were regulated during enzyme over-expression. Conclusion This study identified cysG/hcaT/idnT to be reliable novel reference genes for transcription analysis in recombinant protein producing E. coli.

  19. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes in liver and muscle of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Øivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Gracey, Andrew Y; Chang, Celia; Qin, Shizhen; Pertea, Geo; Quackenbush, John; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Boyer, Bert B; Barnes, Brian M

    2009-04-10

    We conducted a large-scale gene expression screen using the 3,200 cDNA probe microarray developed specifically for Ursus americanus to detect expression differences in liver and skeletal muscle that occur during winter hibernation compared with animals sampled during summer. The expression of 12 genes, including RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3), that are mostly involved in protein biosynthesis, was induced during hibernation in both liver and muscle. The Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment analysis consistently showed a highly significant enrichment of the protein biosynthesis category by overexpressed genes in both liver and skeletal muscle during hibernation. Coordinated induction in transcriptional level of genes involved in protein biosynthesis is a distinctive feature of the transcriptome in hibernating black bears. This finding implies induction of translation and suggests an adaptive mechanism that contributes to a unique ability to reduce muscle atrophy over prolonged periods of immobility during hibernation. Comparing expression profiles in bears to small mammalian hibernators shows a general trend during hibernation of transcriptional changes that include induction of genes involved in lipid metabolism and carbohydrate synthesis as well as depression of genes involved in the urea cycle and detoxification function in liver.

  20. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  1. MetaGO: Predicting Gene Ontology of Non-homologous Proteins Through Low-Resolution Protein Structure Prediction and Protein-Protein Network Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengxin; Zheng, Wei; Freddolino, Peter L; Zhang, Yang

    2018-03-10

    Homology-based transferal remains the major approach to computational protein function annotations, but it becomes increasingly unreliable when the sequence identity between query and template decreases below 30%. We propose a novel pipeline, MetaGO, to deduce Gene Ontology attributes of proteins by combining sequence homology-based annotation with low-resolution structure prediction and comparison, and partner's homology-based protein-protein network mapping. The pipeline was tested on a large-scale set of 1000 non-redundant proteins from the CAFA3 experiment. Under the stringent benchmark conditions where templates with >30% sequence identity to the query are excluded, MetaGO achieves average F-measures of 0.487, 0.408, and 0.598, for Molecular Function, Biological Process, and Cellular Component, respectively, which are significantly higher than those achieved by other state-of-the-art function annotations methods. Detailed data analysis shows that the major advantage of the MetaGO lies in the new functional homolog detections from partner's homology-based network mapping and structure-based local and global structure alignments, the confidence scores of which can be optimally combined through logistic regression. These data demonstrate the power of using a hybrid model incorporating protein structure and interaction networks to deduce new functional insights beyond traditional sequence homology-based referrals, especially for proteins that lack homologous function templates. The MetaGO pipeline is available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/MetaGO/. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Hypolipidemic effect of dietary pea proteins: Impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, Elena; Parolini, Cinzia; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Brambilla, Stefano; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2010-05-01

    Controversial data on the lipid-lowering effect of dietary pea proteins have been provided and the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible hypolipidemic activity of a pea protein isolate and to determine whether pea proteins could affect the hepatic lipid metabolism through regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Rats were fed Nath's hypercholesterolemic diets for 28 days, the protein sources being casein or a pea protein isolate from Pisum sativum. After 14 and 28 days of dietary treatment, rats fed pea proteins had markedly lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels than rats fed casein (pPea protein-fed rats displayed higher hepatic mRNA levels of LDL receptor versus those fed casein (ppea protein-fed rats than in rats fed casein (ppea proteins in rats. Moreover, pea proteins appear to affect cellular lipid homeostasis by upregulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol uptake and by downregulating fatty acid synthesis genes.

  3. Identification and analysis of YELLOW protein family genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yong-Zhu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major royal jelly proteins/yellow (MRJP/YELLOW family possesses several physiological and chemical functions in the development of Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster. Each protein of the family has a conserved domain named MRJP. However, there is no report of MRJP/YELLOW family proteins in the Lepidoptera. Results Using the YELLOW protein sequence in Drosophila melanogaster to BLAST silkworm EST database, we found a gene family composed of seven members with a conserved MRJP domain each and named it YELLOW protein family of Bombyx mori. We completed the cDNA sequences with RACE method. The protein of each member possesses a MRJP domain and a putative cleavable signal peptide consisting of a hydrophobic sequence. In view of genetic evolution, the whole Bm YELLOW protein family composes a monophyletic group, which is distinctly separate from Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera. We then showed the tissue expression profiles of Bm YELLOW protein family genes by RT-PCR. Conclusion A Bombyx mori YELLOW protein family is found to be composed of at least seven members. The low homogeneity and unique pattern of gene expression by each member among the family ensure us to prophesy that the members of Bm YELLOW protein family would play some important physiological functions in silkworm development.

  4. CC1, a novel crenarchaeal DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Schwarz-Linek, Uli; Botting, Catherine H; Hensel, Reinhard; Siebers, Bettina; White, Malcolm F

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of the related crenarchaea Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Thermoproteus tenax lack any obvious gene encoding a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). SSBs are essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair and are found in all other genomes across the three domains of life. These two archaeal genomes also have only one identifiable gene encoding a chromatin protein (the Alba protein), while most other archaea have at least two different abundant chromatin proteins. We performed a biochemical screen for novel nucleic acid binding proteins present in cell extracts of T. tenax. An assay for proteins capable of binding to a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide resulted in identification of three proteins. The first protein, Alba, has been shown previously to bind single-stranded DNA as well as duplex DNA. The two other proteins, which we designated CC1 (for crenarchaeal chromatin protein 1), are very closely related to one another, and homologs are restricted to the P. aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix genomes. CC1 is a 6-kDa, monomeric, basic protein that is expressed at a high level in T. tenax. This protein binds single- and double-stranded DNAs with similar affinities. These properties are consistent with a role for CC1 as a crenarchaeal chromatin protein.

  5. Maternal low protein diet and postnatal high fat diet increases adipose imprinted gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal and postnatal diet can alter Igf2 gene expression and DNA methylation. To test whether maternal low protein and postnatal high fat (HF) diet result in alteration in Igf2 expression and obesity, we fed obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats 8% (LP) or 20% (NP) protein for 3 wk prior to breeding and...

  6. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome fromtransposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG bindingdomain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind tomethylated ...

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis contains a protein similar to the Legionella pneumophila mip gene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Birkelund, Svend; Fey, SJ

    1991-01-01

    A 27kDa Chlamydia trachomatis L2 protein was characterized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein was shown to be located in the membrane of reticulate bodies as well as elementary bodies. Its synthesis could be detected from 10 hours post-infe...... potentiator (mip) gene of Legionella pneumophila....

  8. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalcacioglu, R.; Marks, H.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Oers, van M.M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an

  9. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Codon usage and expression level of human mitochondrial 13 protein coding genes across six continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Supriyo; Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Deka, Himangshu; Mazumder, Gulshana Akthar; Barbhuiya, Riazul Ahmed; Barbhuiya, Masuk Ahmed; Devi, Warepam Jesmi

    2017-12-02

    The study of codon usage coupled with phylogenetic analysis is an important tool to understand the genetic and evolutionary relationship of a gene. The 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria are involved in electron transport chain for the generation of energy currency (ATP). However, no work has yet been reported on the codon usage of the mitochondrial protein coding genes across six continents. To understand the patterns of codon usage in mitochondrial genes across six different continents, we used bioinformatic analyses to analyze the protein coding genes. The codon usage bias was low as revealed from high ENC value. Correlation between codon usage and GC3 suggested that all the codons ending with G/C were positively correlated with GC3 but vice versa for A/T ending codons with the exception of ND4L and ND5 genes. Neutrality plot revealed that for the genes ATP6, COI, COIII, CYB, ND4 and ND4L, natural selection might have played a major role while mutation pressure might have played a dominant role in the codon usage bias of ATP8, COII, ND1, ND2, ND3, ND5 and ND6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that evolutionary relationships in each of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria were different across six continents and further suggested that geographical distance was an important factor for the origin and evolution of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  12. Study of recombinant proteins derived from Ser-2 gene of Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    STAŠKOVÁ, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Four different variants of recombinant proteins derived from Bombyx mori Ser-2 gene were expressed in bacteria. The ability of these proteins to coat hydrofobic surfaces and to support growth of various types of adherent cells in vitro were examined. It was shown that these proteins support cell adhesion and proliferation, and could be used as coating agents to realize surfaces suitable for growth of vertebrate and insect cells.

  13. Molecular characterization of a phloem-specific gene encoding the filament protein, phloem protein 1 (PP1), from Cucurbita maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A M; Jacobsen, K R; Bostwick, D E; Dannenhoffer, J M; Skaggs, M I; Thompson, G A

    1997-07-01

    Sieve elements in the phloem of most angiosperms contain proteinaceous filaments and aggregates called P-protein. In the genus Cucurbita, these filaments are composed of two major proteins: PP1, the phloem filament protein, and PP2, the phloem lactin. The gene encoding the phloem filament protein in pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) has been isolated and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the reconstructed gene gPP1 revealed a continuous 2430 bp protein coding sequence, with no introns, encoding an 809 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced polypeptide had characteristics of PP1 and contained a 15 amino acid sequence determined by N-terminal peptide sequence analysis of PP1. The sequence of PP1 was highly repetitive with four 200 amino acid sequence domains containing structural motifs in common with cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Expression of the PP1 gene was detected in roots, hypocotyls, cotyledons, stems, and leaves of pumpkin plants. PP1 and its mRNA accumulated in pumpkin hypocotyls during the period of rapid hypocotyl elongation after which mRNA levels declined, while protein levels remained elevated. PP1 was immunolocalized in slime plugs and P-protein bodies in sieve elements of the phloem. Occasionally, PP1 was detected in companion cells. PP1 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization in companion cells at early stages of vascular differentiation. The developmental accumulation and localization of PP1 and its mRNA paralleled the phloem lactin, further suggesting an interaction between these phloem-specific proteins.

  14. Identification of stress responsive genes by studying specific relationships between mRNA and protein abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Morimoto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein expression is regulated by the production and degradation of mRNAs and proteins but the specifics of their relationship are controversial. Although technological advances have enabled genome-wide and time-series surveys of mRNA and protein abundance, recent studies have shown paradoxical results, with most statistical analyses being limited to linear correlation, or analysis of variance applied separately to mRNA and protein datasets. Here, using recently analyzed genome-wide time-series data, we have developed a statistical analysis framework for identifying which types of genes or biological gene groups have significant correlation between mRNA and protein abundance after accounting for potential time delays. Our framework stratifies all genes in terms of the extent of time delay, conducts gene clustering in each stratum, and performs a non-parametric statistical test of the correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in a gene cluster. Consequently, we revealed stronger correlations than previously reported between mRNA and protein abundance in two metabolic pathways. Moreover, we identified a pair of stress responsive genes (ADC17 and KIN1 that showed a highly similar time series of mRNA and protein abundance. Furthermore, we confirmed robustness of the analysis framework by applying it to another genome-wide time-series data and identifying a cytoskeleton-related gene cluster (keratin 18, keratin 17, and mitotic spindle positioning that shows similar correlation. The significant correlation and highly similar changes of mRNA and protein abundance suggests a concerted role of these genes in cellular stress response, which we consider provides an answer to the question of the specific relationships between mRNA and protein in a cell. In addition, our framework for studying the relationship between mRNAs and proteins in a cell will provide a basis for studying specific relationships between mRNA and protein abundance after

  15. Improving heterologous protein secretion at aerobic conditions by activating hypoxia-induced genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lifang; Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Zihe

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is important for normal aerobic metabolism, as well as for protein production where it is needed for oxidative protein folding. However, several studies have reported that anaerobic conditions seem to be more favorable in terms of recombinant protein production. We were interested in incre......Oxygen is important for normal aerobic metabolism, as well as for protein production where it is needed for oxidative protein folding. However, several studies have reported that anaerobic conditions seem to be more favorable in terms of recombinant protein production. We were interested...... in increasing recombinant protein production under aerobic conditions so we focused on Rox1p regulation. Rox1p is a transcriptional regulator, which in oxidative conditions represses genes induced in hypoxia. We deleted ROX1 and studied the effects on the production of recombinant proteins in Saccharomyces...

  16. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Marks, Hendrik; Vlak, Just M.; Demirbag, Zihni; Oers, Monique M. van

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an immediate-early gene and confirmed that the major capsid protein (MCP) is a late gene. Transcription of DNApol initiated 35 nt upstream and that of MCP 14 nt upstream of the translational start site. In a luciferase reporter gene assay both promoters were active only when cells were infected with CIV. For DNApol sequences between position -27 and -6, relative to the transcriptional start site, were essential for promoter activity. Furthermore, mutation of a G within the sequence TTGTTTT located just upstream of the DNApol transcription initiation site reduced the promoter activity by 25%. Sequences crucial for MCP promoter activity are located between positions -53 and -29

  17. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...... gene contains several consensus C/EBP binding sites, only one of these sites appears to be functional. DNase I cleavage inhibition patterns (footprinting) of the ob gene promoter revealed that recombinant C/EBP alpha, as well as a nuclear factor present in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes...... to a consensus C/EBP binding site at nucleotides -55 to -47 generated a specific protein-oligonucleotide complex that was supershifted by antibody against C/EBP alpha. Probes corresponding to two upstream consensus C/EBP binding sites failed to generate protein-oligonucleotide complexes. Cotransfection of a C...

  18. Identification of a STOP1-like protein in Eucalyptus that regulates transcription of Al tolerance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Kihara-Doi, Tomonori; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Kawazu, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Iuchi, Satoshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Tolerance to soil acidity is an important trait for eucalyptus clones that are introduced to commercial forestry plantations in pacific Asian countries, where acidic soil is dominant in many locations. A conserved transcription factor regulating aluminum (Al) and proton (H⁺) tolerance in land-plant species, STOP1 (SENSITIVE TOPROTON RHIZOTOXICITY 1)-like protein, was isolated by polymerase chain reaction-based cloning, and then suppressed by RNA interference in hairy roots produced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Eucalyptus STOP1-like protein complemented proton tolerance in an Arabidopsis thaliana stop1-mutant, and localized to the nucleus in a transient assay of a green fluorescent protein fusion protein expressed in tobacco leaves by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Genes encoding a citrate transporting MULTIDRUGS AND TOXIC COMPOUND EXTRUSION protein and an orthologue of ALUMINUM SENSITIVE 3 were suppressed in transgenic hairy roots in which the STOP1 orthologue was knocked down. In summary, we identified a series of genes for Al-tolerance in eucalyptus, including a gene for STOP1-like protein and the Al-tolerance genes it regulates. These genes may be useful for molecular breeding and genomic selection of elite clones to introduce into acid soil regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Yeast prion architecture explains how proteins can be genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, Reed

    2013-03-01

    Prions (infectious proteins) transmit information without an accompanying DNA or RNA. Most yeast prions are self-propagating amyloids that inactivate a normally functional protein. A single protein can become any of several prion variants, with different manifestations due to different amyloid structures. We showed that the yeast prion amyloids of Ure2p, Sup35p and Rnq1p are folded in-register parallel beta sheets using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling experiments, mass-per-filament-length measurements, and filament diameter measurements. The extent of beta sheet structure, measured by chemical shifts in solid-state NMR and acquired protease-resistance on amyloid formation, combined with the measured filament diameters, imply that the beta sheets must be folded along the long axis of the filament. We speculate that prion variants of a single protein sequence differ in the location of these folds. Favorable interactions between identical side chains must hold these structures in-register. The same interactions must guide an unstructured monomer joining the end of a filament to assume the same conformation as molecules already in the filament, with the turns at the same locations. In this way, a protein can template its own conformation, in analogy to the ability of a DNA molecule to template its sequence by specific base-pairing. Bldg. 8, Room 225, NIH, 8 Center Drive MSC 0830, Bethesda, MD 20892-0830, wickner@helix.nih.gov, 301-496-3452

  20. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by topological similarity between disease and protein diffusion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Qin, Yufang; Liu, Taigang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    Identification of gene-phenotype relationships is a fundamental challenge in human health clinic. Based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar phenotypes tend to correlate with each other in the protein-protein interaction network, a lot of network-based approaches were proposed based on different underlying models. A recent comparative study showed that diffusion-based methods achieve the state-of-the-art predictive performance. In this paper, a new diffusion-based method was proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Diffusion profile of a disease was defined as the stationary distribution of candidate genes given a random walk with restart where similarities between phenotypes are incorporated. Then, candidate disease genes are prioritized by comparing their diffusion profiles with that of the disease. Finally, the effectiveness of our method was demonstrated through the leave-one-out cross-validation against control genes from artificial linkage intervals and randomly chosen genes. Comparative study showed that our method achieves improved performance compared to some classical diffusion-based methods. To further illustrate our method, we used our algorithm to predict new causing genes of 16 multifactorial diseases including Prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease, and the top predictions were in good consistent with literature reports. Our study indicates that integration of multiple information sources, especially the phenotype similarity profile data, and introduction of global similarity measure between disease and gene diffusion profiles are helpful for prioritizing candidate disease genes. Programs and data are available upon request.

  1. Gene Unprediction with Spurio: A tool to identify spurious protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höps, Wolfram; Jeffryes, Matt; Bateman, Alex

    2018-01-01

    We now have access to the sequences of tens of millions of proteins. These protein sequences are essential for modern molecular biology and computational biology. The vast majority of protein sequences are derived from gene prediction tools and have no experimental supporting evidence for their translation.  Despite the increasing accuracy of gene prediction tools there likely exists a large number of spurious protein predictions in the sequence databases.  We have developed the Spurio tool to help identify spurious protein predictions in prokaryotes.  Spurio searches the query protein sequence against a prokaryotic nucleotide database using tblastn and identifies homologous sequences. The tblastn matches are used to score the query sequence's likelihood of being a spurious protein prediction using a Gaussian process model. The most informative feature is the appearance of stop codons within the presumed translation of homologous DNA sequences. Benchmarking shows that the Spurio tool is able to distinguish spurious from true proteins. However, transposon proteins are prone to be predicted as spurious because of the frequency of degraded homologs found in the DNA sequence databases. Our initial experiments suggest that less than 1% of the proteins in the UniProtKB sequence database are likely to be spurious and that Spurio is able to identify over 60 times more spurious proteins than the AntiFam resource. The Spurio software and source code is available under an MIT license at the following URL: https://bitbucket.org/bateman-group/spurio.

  2. Mutations of 3c and spike protein genes correlate with the occurrence of feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank-Wolf, Barbara Regina; Stallkamp, Iris; Wiese, Svenja; Moritz, Andreas; Tekes, Gergely; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    The genes encoding accessory proteins 3a, 3b, 3c, 7a and 7b, the S2 domain of the spike (S) protein gene and the membrane (M) protein gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) samples were amplified, cloned and sequenced. For this faeces and/or ascites samples from 19 cats suffering from feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) as well as from 20 FECV-infected healthy cats were used. Sequence comparisons revealed that 3c genes of animals with FIP were heavily affected by nucleotide deletions and point mutations compared to animals infected with FECV; these alterations resulted either in early termination or destruction of the translation initiation codon. Two ascites-derived samples of cats with FIP which displayed no alterations of ORF3c harboured mutations in the S2 domain of the S protein gene which resulted in amino acid exchanges or deletions. Moreover, changes in 3c were often accompanied by mutations in S2. In contrast, in samples obtained from faeces of healthy cats, the ORF3c was never affected by such mutations. Similarly ORF3c from faecal samples of the cats with FIP was mostly intact and showed only in a few cases the same mutations found in the respective ascites samples. The genes encoding 3a, 3b, 7a and 7b displayed no mutations linked to the feline coronavirus (FCoV) biotype. The M protein gene was found to be conserved between FECV and FIPV samples. Our findings suggest that mutations of 3c and spike protein genes correlate with the occurrence of FIP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellulolytic (cel) genes of Clostridium thermocellum F7 and the proteins encoded by them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piruzyan, E.S.; Mogutov, M.A.; Velikodvorskaya, G.A.; Pushkarskaya, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study is concerned with genes cell, ce12, and ce13 encoding the endoglucanase of the cellulolytic complex of the anaerobic thermophilic Clostridium thermocellum F7 bacteria, these genes having been closed by us earlier. The authors present the characteristics of proteins synthesized by the cel genes in the minicell system of the strain Escherichia coli K-12 X925. The molecular weights of the proteins encoded by genes cell, ce12, and ce13 are 30,000, 45,000, and 50,000 dalton, respectively. The study of the homology of the cloned section of the C. thermocellum DNA containing the endoglucanase genes, using Southern's blot-hybridization method, did not reveal their physical linkage in the genome. The authors detected a plasmid with a size of about 30 kb in the cells of the C. thermocellum F7 strain investigated

  4. Genepleio software for effective estimation of gene pleiotropy from protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhai; Chen, Dandan; Zhao, Ming; Zou, Yangyun; Zeng, Yanwu; Gu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Though pleiotropy, which refers to the phenomenon of a gene affecting multiple traits, has long played a central role in genetics, development, and evolution, estimation of the number of pleiotropy components remains a hard mission to accomplish. In this paper, we report a newly developed software package, Genepleio, to estimate the effective gene pleiotropy from phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences. Since this estimate can be interpreted as the minimum pleiotropy of a gene, it is used to play a role of reference for many empirical pleiotropy measures. This work would facilitate our understanding of how gene pleiotropy affects the pattern of genotype-phenotype map and the consequence of organismal evolution.

  5. Identification of novel type 1 diabetes candidate genes by integrating genome-wide association data, protein-protein interactions, and human pancreatic islet gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Regine; Brorsson, Caroline; Palleja, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated with dis......-cells. Our results provide novel insight to the mechanisms behind type 1 diabetes pathogenesis and, thus, may provide the basis for the design of novel treatment strategies.......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated...... with disease, and they do not typically inform the broader context in which the disease genes operate. Here, we integrated type 1 diabetes GWAS data with protein-protein interactions to construct biological networks of relevance for disease. A total of 17 networks were identified. To prioritize...

  6. Prion Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Native Goat Breeds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    In these diseases, a neuronal glycoprotein known as prion protein PrPC ... sheep or goats in Turkey, but the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) does not .... Turkish goat breeds was approximately 6.3%, which is a low starting point for ...

  7. Ethylene-induced senescence-related gene expression requires protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, K.A.; Raghothama, K.G.; Woodson, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of inhibiting protein synthesis on the ethylene-induced expression of 3 carnation senescence-related genes, pSR5, pSR8, and pSR12. Treatment of preclimacteric carnation petal discs with 1μg/ml of cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic protein synthesis inhibitor, for 3h inhibited protein synthesis by >80% as quantitated by the incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein. Pre-treatment of petal discs with cycloheximide prevented ethylene-induced SR transcript accumulation. Cycloheximide treatment of petal discs held in air did not result in increased levels of SR mRNA. These results indicate that ethylene does not interact with pre-formed factors but rather that the activation of SR gene expression by ethylene is mediated by labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Experiments are currently underway to determine if cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level

  8. FOLATE CYCLE GENE POLYMORPHISM AND ENDOGENOUS PEPTIDES IN CHILDREN WITH COW’S MILK PROTEIN ALLERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shumatova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate cycle gene polymorphisms and the levels of endogenous antimicrobial peptides and proteins in the blood and coprofiltrates were studied in 45 children aged 3 to 12 months with cow’s milk protein allergy. The polymorphic variants of the MTHFR, MTRR, and MTR genes were shown to be considered as a risk factor for the development of allergy. There was a significant increase in the levels of zonulin, β-defensin 2, transthyretin, and eosinophil cationic protein in the coprofiltrates and in those of eotaxin, fatty acidbinding proteins, and membrane permeability-increasing protein in the serum (p<0.05. The finding can improve the diagnosis of the disease for a predictive purpose for the evaluation of the efficiency of performed therapy.

  9. Dynamic changes in protein functional linkage networks revealed by integration with gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada R Hegde

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Response of cells to changing environmental conditions is governed by the dynamics of intricate biomolecular interactions. It may be reasonable to assume, proteins being the dominant macromolecules that carry out routine cellular functions, that understanding the dynamics of protein:protein interactions might yield useful insights into the cellular responses. The large-scale protein interaction data sets are, however, unable to capture the changes in the profile of protein:protein interactions. In order to understand how these interactions change dynamically, we have constructed conditional protein linkages for Escherichia coli by integrating functional linkages and gene expression information. As a case study, we have chosen to analyze UV exposure in wild-type and SOS deficient E. coli at 20 minutes post irradiation. The conditional networks exhibit similar topological properties. Although the global topological properties of the networks are similar, many subtle local changes are observed, which are suggestive of the cellular response to the perturbations. Some such changes correspond to differences in the path lengths among the nodes of carbohydrate metabolism correlating with its loss in efficiency in the UV treated cells. Similarly, expression of hubs under unique conditions reflects the importance of these genes. Various centrality measures applied to the networks indicate increased importance for replication, repair, and other stress proteins for the cells under UV treatment, as anticipated. We thus propose a novel approach for studying an organism at the systems level by integrating genome-wide functional linkages and the gene expression data.

  10. Gene divergence of homeologous regions associated with a major seed protein content QTL in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji eLestari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding several modes of duplication contributing on the present genome structure is getting an attention because it could be related to numerous agronomically important traits. Since soybean serves as a rich protein source for animal feeds and human consumption, breeding efforts in soybean have been directed toward enhancing seed protein content. The publicly available soybean sequences and its genomically featured elements facilitate comprehending of quantitative trait loci (QTL for seed protein content in concordance with homeologous regions in soybean genome. Although parts of chromosome (Chr 20 and Chr 10 showed synteny, QTLs for seed protein content present only on Chr 20. Using comparative analysis of gene contents in recently duplicated genomic regions harboring QTL for protein/oil content on Chrs 20 and 10, a total of 27 genes are present in duplicated regions of both chromosomes. Notably, 4 tandem duplicates of the putative homeobox protein 22 (HB22 are present only on Chr 20 and this Medicago truncatula homolog expressed in endosperm at seed filling stage. These tandem duplicates could contribute on the protein/oil QTL of Chr 20. Our study suggests that non-shared gene contents within the duplicated genomic regions might lead to absence/presence of QTL related to protein/oil content.

  11. One, Two, Three: Polycomb Proteins Hit All Dimensions of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania del Prete

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins contribute to the formation and maintenance of a specific repressive chromatin state that prevents the expression of genes in a particular space and time. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs consist of several PcG proteins with specific regulatory or catalytic properties. PRCs are recruited to thousands of target genes, and various recruitment factors, including DNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are involved in the targeting. PcG proteins contribute to a multitude of biological processes by altering chromatin features at different scales. PcG proteins mediate both biochemical modifications of histone tails and biophysical modifications (e.g., chromatin fiber compaction and three-dimensional (3D chromatin conformation. Here, we review the role of PcG proteins in nuclear architecture, describing their impact on the structure of the chromatin fiber, on chromatin interactions, and on the spatial organization of the genome in nuclei. Although little is known about the role of plant PcG proteins in nuclear organization, much is known in the animal field, and we highlight similarities and differences in the roles of PcG proteins in 3D gene regulation in plants and animals.

  12. Chemical-modification studies of a unique sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail Achatina fulica. Involvement of tryptophan and histidine residues in biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S; Mandal, C; Allen, A K

    1988-01-01

    A unique sialic acid-binding lectin, achatininH (ATNH) was purified in single step from the haemolymph of the snail Achatina fulica by affinity chromatography on sheep submaxillary-gland mucin coupled to Sepharose 4B. The homogeneity was checked by alkaline gel electrophoresis, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. Amino acid analysis showed that the lectin has a fairly high content of acidic amino acid residues (22% of the total). About 1.3% of the residues are half-cystine. The glycoprotein contains 21% carbohydrate. The unusually high content of xylose (6%) and fucose (2.7%) in this snail lectin is quite interesting. The protein was subjected to various chemical modifications in order to detect the amino acid residues and carbohydrate residues present in its binding sites. Modification of tyrosine and arginine residues did not affect the binding activity of ATNH; however, modification of tryptophan and histidine residues led to a complete loss of its biological activity. A marked decrease in the fluorescence emission was found as the tryptophan residues of ATNH were modified. The c.d. data showed the presence of an identical type of conformation in the native and modified agglutinin. The modification of lysine and carboxy residues partially diminished the biological activity. The activity was completely lost after a beta-elimination reaction, indicating that the sugars are O-glycosidically linked to the glycoprotein's protein moiety. This result confirms that the carbohydrate moiety also plays an important role in the agglutination property of this lectin. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3140796

  13. Dietary soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression changes in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shangxin; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Li, Mengjie; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xinglian; Muller, Michael; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a comprehensive comparison of the effects of soy and meat proteins given at the recommended level on physiological markers of metabolic syndrome and the hepatic transcriptome. Male rats were fed semi-synthetic diets for 1 wk that differed only regarding protein source, with casein serving as reference. Body weight gain and adipose tissue mass were significantly reduced by soy but not meat proteins. The insulin resistance index was improved by soy, and to a lesser extent by meat proteins. Liver triacylglycerol contents were reduced by both protein sources, which coincided with increased plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. Both soy and meat proteins changed plasma amino acid patterns. The expression of 1571 and 1369 genes were altered by soy and meat proteins respectively. Functional classification revealed that lipid, energy and amino acid metabolic pathways, as well as insulin signaling pathways were regulated differently by soy and meat proteins. Several transcriptional regulators, including NFE2L2, ATF4, Srebf1 and Rictor were identified as potential key upstream regulators. These results suggest that soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression responses in rats and provide novel evidence and suggestions for the health effects of different protein sources in human diets. PMID:26857845

  14. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  15. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3. The innate immunity of the host, typified by interferon (IFN), is a major antiviral defense. IFN inhibits virus growth by inducing a large number of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, several of which have been shown to have specific antiviral functions. Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) is major pathogen of children, and no reliable vaccine or specific antiviral against it currently exists. In this article, we report several ISG proteins that strongly inhibit PIV3 growth, the use of which may allow a better antiviral regimen targeting PIV3. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  16. Proteogenomics of rare taxonomic phyla: A prospective treasure trove of protein coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhirendra; Mondal, Anupam Kumar; Kutum, Rintu; Dash, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable innovations in sequencing technologies have resulted in a torrent of microbial genome sequencing projects. However, the prokaryotic genomes sequenced so far are unequally distributed along their phylogenetic tree; few phyla contain the majority, the rest only a few representatives. Accurate genome annotation lags far behind genome sequencing. While automated computational prediction, aided by comparative genomics, remains a popular choice for genome annotation, substantial fraction of these annotations are erroneous. Proteogenomics utilizes protein level experimental observations to annotate protein coding genes on a genome wide scale. Benefits of proteogenomics include discovery and correction of gene annotations regardless of their phylogenetic conservation. This not only allows detection of common, conserved proteins but also the discovery of protein products of rare genes that may be horizontally transferred or taxonomy specific. Chances of encountering such genes are more in rare phyla that comprise a small number of complete genome sequences. We collated all bacterial and archaeal proteogenomic studies carried out to date and reviewed them in the context of genome sequencing projects. Here, we present a comprehensive list of microbial proteogenomic studies, their taxonomic distribution, and also urge for targeted proteogenomics of underexplored taxa to build an extensive reference of protein coding genes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The bromodomain protein LEX-1 acts with TAM-1 to modulate gene expression in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Rong-Jeng; Armstrong, Kristin R; Wang, Xiaodong; Chamberlin, Helen M

    2007-11-01

    In many organisms, repetitive DNA serves as a trigger for gene silencing. However, some gene expression is observed from repetitive genomic regions such as heterochromatin, suggesting mechanisms exist to modulate the silencing effects. From a genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified mutations in two genes important for expression of repetitive sequences: lex-1 and tam-1. Here we show that lex-1 encodes a protein containing an ATPase domain and a bromodomain. LEX-1 is similar to the yeast Yta7 protein, which maintains boundaries between silenced and active chromatin. tam-1 has previously been shown to encode a RING finger/B-box protein that modulates gene expression from repetitive DNA. We find that lex-1, like tam-1, acts as a class B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) gene. However, since lex-1 and tam-1 mutants have normal P granule localization, it suggests they act through a mechanism distinct from other class B synMuvs. We observe intragenic (interallelic) complementation with lex-1 and a genetic interaction between lex-1 and tam-1, data consistent with the idea that the gene products function in the same biological process, perhaps as part of a protein complex. We propose that LEX-1 and TAM-1 function together to influence chromatin structure and to promote expression from repetitive sequences.

  18. Prioritization of candidate genes for cattle reproductive traits, based on protein-protein interactions, gene expression, and text-mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulsegge, Ina; Woelders, Henri; Smits, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is of significant economic importance in dairy cattle. Improved understanding of mechanisms that control estrous behavior and other reproduction traits could help in developing strategies to improve and/or monitor these traits. The objective of this study was to predict and rank gene...

  19. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  20. Overexpression Analysis of emv2 gene coding for Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Vigna radiata (Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are speculated to protect against water stress deficit in plants. An over expression system for mungbean late embryogenesis abundant protein, emv2 was constructed in a pET29a vector, designated pET-emv2 which is responsible for higher expression under the transcriptional/translational control of T7/lac promoter incorporated in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3.Induction protocol was optimized for pET recombinants harboring the target gene. Overexpressed EMV2 protein was purified to homogeneity and the protein profile monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  1. The Heat Shock Protein 26 Gene is Required for Ethanol Tolerance in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awoyemi A. Awofala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress plays an important role in drug- and addiction-related behaviours. However, the mechanisms underlying these behavioural responses are still poorly understood. In the light of recent reports that show consistent regulation of many genes encoding stress proteins including heat shock proteins following ethanol exposure in Drosophila , it was hypothesised that transition to alcohol dependence may involve the dysregulation of the circuits that mediate behavioural responses to stressors. Thus, behavioural genetic methodologies were used to investigate the role of the Drosophila hsp26 gene, a small heat shock protein coding gene which is induced in response to various stresses, in the development of rapid tolerance to ethanol sedation. Rapid tolerance was quantified as the percentage difference in the mean sedation times between the second and first ethanol exposure. Two independently isolated P-element mutations near the hsp26 gene eliminated the capacity for tolerance. In addition, RNAi-mediated functional knockdown of hsp26 expression in the glial cells and the whole nervous system also caused a defect in tolerance development. The rapid tolerance phenotype of the hsp26 mutants was rescued by the expression of the wild-type hsp26 gene in the nervous system. None of these manipulations of the hsp26 gene caused changes in the rate of ethanol absorption. Hsp26 genes are evolutionary conserved, thus the role of hsp26 in ethanol tolerance may present a new direction for research into alcohol dependency.

  2. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  3. Gene identification and protein classification in microbial metagenomic sequence data via incremental clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and study of proteins from metagenomic datasets can shed light on the roles and interactions of the source organisms in their communities. However, metagenomic datasets are characterized by the presence of organisms with varying GC composition, codon usage biases etc., and consequently gene identification is challenging. The vast amount of sequence data also requires faster protein family classification tools. Results We present a computational improvement to a sequence clustering approach that we developed previously to identify and classify protein coding genes in large microbial metagenomic datasets. The clustering approach can be used to identify protein coding genes in prokaryotes, viruses, and intron-less eukaryotes. The computational improvement is based on an incremental clustering method that does not require the expensive all-against-all compute that was required by the original approach, while still preserving the remote homology detection capabilities. We present evaluations of the clustering approach in protein-coding gene identification and classification, and also present the results of updating the protein clusters from our previous work with recent genomic and metagenomic sequences. The clustering results are available via CAMERA, (http://camera.calit2.net. Conclusion The clustering paradigm is shown to be a very useful tool in the analysis of microbial metagenomic data. The incremental clustering method is shown to be much faster than the original approach in identifying genes, grouping sequences into existing protein families, and also identifying novel families that have multiple members in a metagenomic dataset. These clusters provide a basis for further studies of protein families.

  4. Annotating gene sets by mining large literature collections with protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Yu, Michael Ku; Zheng, Fan; Huang, Edward W; Han, Jiawei; Peng, Jian; Ideker, Trey

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of patient genomes and transcriptomes routinely recognizes new gene sets associated with human disease. Here we present an integrative natural language processing system which infers common functions for a gene set through automatic mining of the scientific literature with biological networks. This system links genes with associated literature phrases and combines these links with protein interactions in a single heterogeneous network. Multiscale functional annotations are inferred based on network distances between phrases and genes and then visualized as an ontology of biological concepts. To evaluate this system, we predict functions for gene sets representing known pathways and find that our approach achieves substantial improvement over the conventional text-mining baseline method. Moreover, our system discovers novel annotations for gene sets or pathways without previously known functions. Two case studies demonstrate how the system is used in discovery of new cancer-related pathways with ontological annotations.

  5. Sex- and Tissue-Specific Expression Profiles of Odorant Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes in Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bradysia odoriphaga is an agricultural pest insect affecting the production of Chinese chive and other liliaceous vegetables in China, and it is significantly attracted by sex pheromones and the volatiles derived from host plants. Despite verification of this chemosensory behavior, however, it is still unknown how B. odoriphaga recognizes these volatile compounds on the molecular level. Many of odorant binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs play crucial roles in olfactory perception. Here, we identified 49 OBP and 5 CSP genes from the antennae and body transcriptomes of female and male adults of B. odoriphaga, respectively. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis among Dipteran OBPs and CSPs were analyzed. The sex- and tissue-specific expression profiles of 54 putative chemosensory genes among different tissues were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. qRT-PCR analysis results suggested that 22 OBP and 3 CSP genes were enriched in the antennae, indicating they might be essential for detection of general odorants and pheromones. Among these antennae-enriched genes, nine OBPs (BodoOBP2/4/6/8/12/13/20/28/33 were enriched in the male antennae and may play crucial roles in the detection of sex pheromones. Moreover, some OBP and CSP genes were enriched in non-antennae tissues, such as in the legs (BodoOBP3/9/19/21/34/35/38/39/45 and BodoCSP1, wings (BodoOBP17/30/32/37/44, abdomens and thoraxes (BodoOBP29/36, and heads (BodoOBP14/23/31 and BodoCSP2, suggesting that these genes might be involved in olfactory, gustatory, or other physiological processes. Our findings provide a starting point to facilitate functional research of these chemosensory genes in B. odoriphaga at the molecular level.

  6. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvas Mikko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR. We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR.

  7. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  9. Comparison of different cationized proteins as biomaterials for nanoparticle-based ocular gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Giovanni K; Párraga, Jenny E; Seijo, Begoña; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Cationized polymers have been proposed as transfection agents for gene therapy. The present work aims to improve the understanding of the potential use of different cationized proteins (atelocollagen, albumin and gelatin) as nanoparticle components and to investigate the possibility of modulating the physicochemical properties of the resulting nanoparticle carriers by selecting specific protein characteristics in an attempt to improve current ocular gene-delivery approaches. The toxicity profiles, as well as internalization and transfection efficiency, of the developed nanoparticles can be modulated by modifying the molecular weight of the selected protein and the amine used for cationization. The most promising systems are nanoparticles based on intermediate molecular weight gelatin cationized with the endogenous amine spermine, which exhibit an adequate toxicological profile, as well as effective association and protection of pDNA or siRNA molecules, thereby resulting in higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than the other studied formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A sight on protein-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatin, Sara; Jelvehgari, Mitra; Maleki-Dizaj, Solmaz; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric nanomaterials have extensively been applied for the preparation of targeted and controlled release drug/gene delivery systems. However, problems involved in the formulation of synthetic polymers such as using of the toxic solvents and surfactants have limited their desirable applications. In this regard, natural biomolecules including proteins and polysaccharide are suitable alternatives due to their safety. According to literature, protein-based nanoparticles possess many advantages for drug and gene delivery such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and ability to functionalize with targeting ligands. This review provides a general sight on the application of biodegradable protein-based nanoparticles in drug/gene delivery based on their origins. Their unique physicochemical properties that help them to be formulated as pharmaceutical carriers are also discussed.

  11. A random set scoring model for prioritization of disease candidate genes using protein complexes and data-mining of GeneRIF, OMIM and PubMed records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Li; Edwards, Stefan M.; Thomsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    from PubMed abstracts, OMIM, and GeneRIF records. We also investigated the validity of several vocabulary filters and different likelihood thresholds for predicted protein-protein interactions in terms of their effect on the network-based gene-prioritization approach, which relies on text...

  12. Urinary Intestinal Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Can Distinguish Necrotizing Enterocolitis from Sepsis in Early Stage of the Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufal, Štěpán; Kokešová, A.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Šnajdauf, J.; Rygl, A.; Kverka, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), s. 5727312 ISSN 2314-8861 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13483 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : GESTATIONAL-AGE * PRETERM INFANTS * MULTICENTER Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.276, year: 2016

  13. Urinary Intestinal Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Can Distinguish Necrotizing Enterocolitis from Sepsis in Early Stage of the Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufal, Š.; Kokešová, A.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H.; Šnajdauf, J.; Rýgl, M.; Kverka, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), s. 5727312 ISSN 2314-8861 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : gestational-age * preterm infants * multicenter Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 3.276, year: 2016

  14. Development of a displacement immunoassay for human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein in plasma : the basic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, D; Pelsers, MMAL; Korf, J; Hermens, WT; Glatz, JFC

    2003-01-01

    To risk-stratify patients with chest pain who are admitted to emergency rooms and for whom initial evaluation is not conclusive, the use of cardiac markers has become a standard procedure. A recently introduced early plasma marker for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the 14.5-kDa cytoplasmic

  15. Biosensors : basic features and application for fatty acid-binding protein, an early plasma marker of myocardial injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, D; McNeil, CA; Renneberg, R; Korf, J; Hermens, WT; Glatz, JFC

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors, especially immunosensors, are of great value for use in a clinical setting, since these are based on antigen-antibody reactions which are highly sensitive and specific. Furthermore, it becomes more and more important to measure specific compounds in biological matrices, such as blood or

  16. Nucleic acid-binding glycoproteins which solubilize nucleic acids in dilute acid: re-examination of the Ustilago maydis glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.; Champ, D.R.; Young, J.L.; Grant, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Holloman reported the isolation from Ustilago maydis of a glycoprotein which prevented the precipitation of nucleic acids in cold 5% trichloroacetic acid. Two glycoprotein fractions from U. maydis with this nucleic acid-solubilizing activity were isolated in our laboratory using improved purification procedures. The activity was not due to nuclease contamination. The glycoproteins are distinguished by: their ability to bind to concanavalin A-Sepharose; their differential binding to double- and single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, and to ribonucleic acid; their molecular weights (46,000 and 69,000); and the relative amounts present in growing versus nongrowing cells. Both fractions required sulfhydryl-reducing conditions for optimal yields, specific activity, and stability. Nucleic acid binding was cooperative, the minimum number of glycoproteins required to make a native T7 DNA molecule soluble in dilute acid being estimated at 2 and 15, respectively.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L37 is encoded by duplicate genes that are differentially expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, J; Santangelo, G M

    1994-06-01

    A duplicate copy of the RPL37A gene (encoding ribosomal protein L37) was cloned and sequenced. The coding region of RPL37B is very similar to that of RPL37A, with only one conservative amino-acid difference. However, the intron and flanking sequences of the two genes are extremely dissimilar. Disruption experiments indicate that the two loci are not functionally equivalent: disruption of RPL37B was insignificant, but disruption of RPL37A severely impaired the growth rate of the cell. When both RPL37 loci are disrupted, the cell is unable to grow at all, indicating that rpL37 is an essential protein. The functional disparity between the two RPL37 loci could be explained by differential gene expression. The results of two experiments support this idea: gene fusion of RPL37A to a reporter gene resulted in six-fold higher mRNA levels than was generated by the same reporter gene fused to RPL37B, and a modest increase in gene dosage of RPL37B overcame the lack of a functional RPL37A gene.

  18. Mitochondrial genome evolution in Alismatales: Size reduction and extensive loss of ribosomal protein genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Cuenca, Argelia; Zervas, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    The order Alismatales is a hotspot for evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes characterized by remarkable differences in genome size, substitution rates, RNA editing, retrotranscription, gene loss and intron loss. Here we have sequenced the complete mitogenomes of Zostera marina and Stratiotes...... aloides, which together with previously sequenced mitogenomes from Butomus and Spirodela, provide new evolutionary evidence of genome size reduction, gene loss and transfer to the nucleus. The Zostera mitogenome includes a large portion of DNA transferred from the plastome, yet it is the smallest known...... mitogenome from a non-parasitic plant. Using a broad sample of the Alismatales, the evolutionary history of ribosomal protein gene loss is analyzed. In Zostera almost all ribosomal protein genes are lost from the mitogenome, but only some can be found in the nucleus....

  19. Nucleic Acid Binding by Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus CA Promotes Virus Assembly and Genome Packaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Füzik, T.; Píchalová, R.; Schur, F. K. M.; Strohalmová, Karolína; Křížová, Ivana; Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Briggs, J. A. G.; Ulbrich, P.; Ruml, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 9 (2016), s. 4593-4603 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15326S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : M-PMV * virus assembly * capsid protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.663, year: 2016

  20. Promoter Analysis Reveals Globally Differential Regulation of Human Long Non-Coding RNA and Protein-Coding Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted

  1. Alterations in gene expression in mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice lacking Niemann-Pick type C1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Maulik

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer's disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP-derived β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet, Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and

  2. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  3. Roles of Solvent Accessibility and Gene Expression in Modeling Protein Sequence Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kuangyu Wang; Shuhui Yu; Xiang Ji; Clemens Lakner; Alexander Griffing; Jeffrey L. Thorne

    2015-01-01

    Models of protein evolution tend to ignore functional constraints, although structural constraints are sometimes incorporated. Here we propose a probabilistic framework for codon substitution that evaluates joint effects of relative solvent accessibility (RSA), a structural constraint; and gene expression, a functional constraint. First, we explore the relationship between RSA and codon usage at the genomic scale as well as at the individual gene scale. Motivated by these results, we construc...

  4. Usher syndrome: animal models, retinal function of Usher proteins, and prospects for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a deafness-blindness disorder. The blindness occurs from a progressive retinal degeneration that begins after deafness and after the retina has developed. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome have been identified, with mutations in any one of six different genes giving rise to type 1, in any one of three different genes to type 2, and in one identified gene causing Usher type 3. Mutant mice for most of the genes have been studied; while they have clear inner ear defects, retinal phenotypes are relatively mild and have been difficult to characterize. The retinal functions of the Usher proteins are still largely unknown. Protein binding studies have suggested many interactions among the proteins, and a model of interaction among all the proteins in the photoreceptor synapse has been proposed. However this model is not supported by localization data from some laboratories, or the indication of any synaptic phenotype in mutant mice. An earlier suggestion, based on patient pathologies, of Usher protein function in the photoreceptor cilium continues to gain support from immunolocalization and mutant mouse studies, which are consistent with Usher protein interaction in the photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region. So far, the most characterized Usher protein is myosin VIIa. It is present in the apical RPE and photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region, where it is required for organelle transport and clearance of opsin from the connecting cilium, respectively. Usher syndrome is amenable to gene replacement therapy, but also has some specific challenges. Progress in this treatment approach has been achieved by correction of mutant phenotypes in Myo7a-null mouse retinas, following lentiviral delivery of MYO7A. PMID:17936325

  5. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  6. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  7. Gene delivery to skeletal muscle results in sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P D; Podsakoff, G M; Chen, X; McQuiston, S A; Colosi, P C; Matelis, L A; Kurtzman, G J; Byrne, B J

    1996-11-26

    Somatic gene therapy has been proposed as a means to achieve systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, there is limited evidence that current methods of gene delivery can practically achieve this goal. In this study, we demonstrate that, following a single intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector containing the beta-galactosidase (AAV-lacZ) gene into adult BALB/c mice, protein expression was detected in myofibers for at least 32 weeks. A single intramuscular administration of an AAV vector containing a gene for human erythropoietin (AAV-Epo) into mice resulted in dose-dependent secretion of erythropoietin and corresponding increases in red blood cell production that persisted for up to 40 weeks. Primary human myotubes transduced in vitro with the AAV-Epo vector also showed dose-dependent production of Epo. These results demonstrate that rAAV vectors are able to transduce skeletal muscle and are capable of achieving sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein following a single intramuscular administration. Gene therapy using AAV vectors may provide a practical strategy for the treatment of inherited and acquired protein deficiencies.

  8. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  9. CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins regulate expression of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L K; Johnson, P F; McAllister, J M; Strauss, J F

    1999-09-10

    Two putative CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) response elements were identified in the proximal promoter of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene, which encodes a key protein-regulating steroid hormone synthesis. Expression of C/EBPalpha and -beta increased StAR promoter activity in COS-1 and HepG2 cells. Cotransfection of C/EBPalpha or -beta and steroidogenic factor 1, a transcription factor required for cAMP regulation of StAR expression, into COS-1 augmented 8-bromoadenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP)-stimulated promoter activity. When the putative C/EBP response elements were mutated, individually or together, a pronounced decline in basal StAR promoter activity in human granulosa-lutein cells resulted, but the fold stimulation of promoter activity by 8-Br-cAMP was unaffected. Recombinant C/EBPalpha and -beta bound to the two identified sequences but not the mutated elements. Human granulosa-lutein cell nuclear extracts also bound these elements but not the mutated sequences. An antibody to C/EBPbeta, but not C/EBPalpha, supershifted the nuclear protein complex associated with the more distal element. The complex formed by nuclear extracts with the proximal element was not supershifted by either antibody. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta in human granulosa-lutein cell nuclear extracts. C/EBPbeta levels were up-regulated 3-fold by 8-Br-cAMP treatment. Our studies demonstrate a role for C/EBPbeta as well as yet to be identified proteins, which can bind to C/EBP response elements, in the regulation of StAR gene expression and suggest a mechanism by which C/EBPbeta participates in the cAMP regulation of StAR gene transcription.

  10. Rapid bursts of androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene duplication occurred independently in diverse mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Heger, Andreas; Blakley, Tyler D; Munclinger, Pavel; Ponting, Chris P; Karn, Robert C

    2008-02-12

    The draft mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence revealed an unexpected proliferation of gene duplicates encoding a family of secretoglobin proteins including the androgen-binding protein (ABP) alpha, beta and gamma subunits. Further investigation of 14 alpha-like (Abpa) and 13 beta- or gamma-like (Abpbg) undisrupted gene sequences revealed a rich diversity of developmental stage-, sex- and tissue-specific expression. Despite these studies, our understanding of the evolution of this gene family remains incomplete. Questions arise from imperfections in the initial mouse genome assembly and a dearth of information about the gene family structure in other rodents and mammals. Here, we interrogate the latest 'finished' mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence assembly to show that the Abp gene repertoire is, in fact, twice as large as reported previously, with 30 Abpa and 34 Abpbg genes and pseudogenes. All of these have arisen since the last common ancestor with rat (Rattus norvegicus). We then demonstrate, by sequencing homologs from species within the Mus genus, that this burst of gene duplication occurred very recently, within the past seven million years. Finally, we survey Abp orthologs in genomes from across the mammalian clade and show that bursts of Abp gene duplications are not specific to the murid rodents; they also occurred recently in the lagomorph (rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus) and ruminant (cattle, Bos taurus) lineages, although not in other mammalian taxa. We conclude that Abp genes have undergone repeated bursts of gene duplication and adaptive sequence diversification driven by these genes' participation in chemosensation and/or sexual identification.

  11. Regulation of dsr genes encoding proteins responsible for the oxidation of stored sulfur in Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Frauke; Dobler, Nadine; Dahl, Christiane

    2010-03-01

    Sulfur globules are formed as obligatory intermediates during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in many environmentally important photo- and chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It is well established that the so-called Dsr proteins are essential for the oxidation of zero-valent sulfur accumulated in the globules; however, hardly anything is known about the regulation of dsr gene expression. Here, we present a closer look at the regulation of the dsr genes in the phototrophic sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. The dsr genes are expressed in a reduced sulfur compound-dependent manner and neither sulfite, the product of the reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB, nor the alternative electron donor malate inhibit the gene expression. Moreover, we show the oxidation of sulfur to sulfite to be the rate-limiting step in the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate as sulfate production starts concomitantly with the upregulation of the expression of the dsr genes. Real-time RT-PCR experiments suggest that the genes dsrC and dsrS are additionally expressed from secondary internal promoters, pointing to a special function of the encoded proteins. Earlier structural analyses indicated the presence of a helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like motif in DsrC. We therefore assessed the DNA-binding capability of the protein and provide evidence for a possible regulatory function of DsrC.

  12. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  14. Prediction of essential proteins based on subcellular localization and gene expression correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yetian; Tang, Xiwei; Hu, Xiaohua; Wu, Wei; Ping, Qing

    2017-12-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the survival and development process of living organisms. To understand the functional mechanisms of essential proteins, which can be applied to the analysis of disease and design of drugs, it is important to identify essential proteins from a set of proteins first. As traditional experimental methods designed to test out essential proteins are usually expensive and laborious, computational methods, which utilize biological and topological features of proteins, have attracted more attention in recent years. Protein-protein interaction networks, together with other biological data, have been explored to improve the performance of essential protein prediction. The proposed method SCP is evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets and compared with five other methods. The results show that our method SCP outperforms the other five methods in terms of accuracy of essential protein prediction. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm named SCP, which combines the ranking by a modified PageRank algorithm based on subcellular compartments information, with the ranking by Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) calculated from gene expression data. Experiments show that subcellular localization information is promising in boosting essential protein prediction.

  15. Changes in protein synthetic activity in early Drosophila embryos mutant for the segmentation gene Krueppel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedian, V.; Summers, M.C.; Kauffman, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have identified early embryo proteins related to the segmentation gene Krueppel by [35S]methionine pulse labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein synthesis differences shared by homozygous embryos of two Krueppel alleles when compared to heterozygous and wild-type embryos are reported. The study was extended to syncytial blastoderm stages by pulse labelling and gel analysis of single embryos, using Krueppel-specific proteins from gastrula stages as molecular markers for identifying homozygous Krueppel embryos. Localized expression of interesting proteins was examined in embryo fragments. The earliest differences detected at nuclear migration stages showed unregulated synthesis in mutant embryos of two proteins that have stage specific synthesis in normal embryos. At the cellular blastoderm stage one protein was not synthesized and two proteins showed apparent shifts in isoelectric point in mutant embryos. Differences observed in older embryos included additional proteins with shifted isoelectric points and a number of qualitative and quantitative changes in protein synthesis. Five of the proteins with altered rates of synthesis in mutant embryos showed localized synthesis in normal embryos. The early effects observed are consistent with the hypothesis that the Krueppel product can be a negative or positive regulator of expression of other loci, while blastoderm and gastrula stage shifts in isoelectric point indicate that a secondary effect of Krueppel function may involve post-translational modification of proteins

  16. PTEN gene and phosphorylation of Akt protein expression in the LPS-induced lung fibroblast

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    Mao-lin HUANG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate PTEN gene expression and the Akt phosphorylation of protein expression in the LPS-induced lung fibroblast, to initially reveal the relation between PTEN gene and the Akt phosphorylated proteins to LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation mechanism. Methods: BrdU experiments was performed to evaluate the LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation,  RT-PCR and Western Blot analysis were used to analyze the PTEN gene expression and Western blot was performed to analyze Akt phosphorylated protein expression. Results: PTEN mRNA level of the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05 with LPS simulation for 24h and 72h , and there were no significant difference between the experimental group and control group the experimental group and control group (P>0.05 . PTEN protein expression levels of the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05 , at 72h, and PTEN mRNA levels had no significant differences between these of the experimental and control group at 6h,12h and 24h(p>0.05. Phosphorylation Akt protein level (relative to total Akt protein was significantly higer than the control group (P<0.05 at 24h and 72h, and phosphorylation Akt protein levels had no significant differences between these of the experimental and control group at 6h and 12h (P>0.05 .Conclusion: PTEN gene and phosphorylation Akt protein involve in LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation signal transduction pathway.

  17. A dual-specificity isoform of the protein kinase inhibitor PKI produced by alternate gene splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyadarsini; Walsh, Donal A

    2002-03-15

    We have previously shown that the protein kinase inhibitor beta (PKIbeta) form of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor exists in multiple isoforms, some of which are specific inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, whereas others also inhibit the cGMP-dependent enzyme [Kumar, Van Patten and Walsh (1997), J. Biol. Chem. 272, 20011-20020]. We have now demonstrated that the switch from a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-specific inhibitor to one with dual specificity arises as a consequence of alternate gene splicing. We have confirmed using bacterially produced pure protein that a single inhibitor species has dual specificity for both PKA and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), inhibiting each with very high and closely similar inhibitory potencies. The gene splicing converted a protein with 70 amino acids into one of 109 amino acids, and did not change the inhibitory potency to PKA, but changed it from a protein that had no detectable PKG inhibitory activity to one that now inhibited PKG in the nanomolar range.

  18. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L. seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renouard Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies.

  19. SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression from transcription to RNA processing to translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Pingping; Han, Joonhee; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-07-10

    SR proteins have been studied extensively as a family of RNA-binding proteins that participate in both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing in mammalian cells. However, SR proteins were first discovered as factors that interact with transcriptionally active chromatin. Recent studies have now uncovered properties that connect these once apparently disparate functions, showing that a subset of SR proteins seem to bind directly to the histone 3 tail, play an active role in transcriptional elongation, and colocalize with genes that are engaged in specific intra- and interchromosome interactions for coordinated regulation of gene expression in the nucleus. These transcription-related activities are also coupled with a further expansion of putative functions of specific SR protein family members in RNA metabolism downstream of mRNA splicing, from RNA export to stability control to translation. These findings, therefore, highlight the broader roles of SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression and provide mechanistic insights into their contributions to genome stability and proper cell-cycle progression in higher eukaryotic cells.

  20. A high-fat diet and the threonine-encoding allele (Thr54) polymorphism of fatty acid–binding protein 2 reduce plasma triglyceride–rich lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Thr54 allele of the fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) DNA polymorphism is associated with increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and insulin resistance. We investigated whether the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein response to diets of varied fat content is affected by the fatty acid binding pr...

  1. Natural selection in avian protein-coding genes expressed in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Erik; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Brandström, Mikael; Zwahlén, Martin; Clayton, David F; Ellegren, Hans

    2008-06-01

    The evolution of birds from theropod dinosaurs took place approximately 150 million years ago, and was associated with a number of specific adaptations that are still evident among extant birds, including feathers, song and extravagant secondary sexual characteristics. Knowledge about the molecular evolutionary background to such adaptations is lacking. Here, we analyse the evolution of > 5000 protein-coding gene sequences expressed in zebra finch brain by comparison to orthologous sequences in chicken. Mean d(N)/d(S) is 0.085 and genes with their maximal expression in the eye and central nervous system have the lowest mean d(N)/d(S) value, while those expressed in digestive and reproductive tissues exhibit the highest. We find that fast-evolving genes (those which have higher than expected rate of nonsynonymous substitution, indicative of adaptive evolution) are enriched for biological functions such as fertilization, muscle contraction, defence response, response to stress, wounding and endogenous stimulus, and cell death. After alignment to mammalian orthologues, we identify a catalogue of 228 genes that show a significantly higher rate of protein evolution in the two bird lineages than in mammals. These accelerated bird genes, representing candidates for avian-specific adaptations, include genes implicated in vocal learning and other cognitive processes. Moreover, colouration genes evolve faster in birds than in mammals, which may have been driven by sexual selection for extravagant plumage characteristics.

  2. Molecular evolution of the Paramyxoviridae and Rhabdoviridae multiple-protein-encoding P gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, I K; Sutter, B A; McClure, M A

    2000-01-01

    Presented here is an analysis of the molecular evolutionary dynamics of the P gene among 76 representative sequences of the Paramyxoviridae and Rhabdoviridae RNA virus families. In a number of Paramyxoviridae taxa, as well as in vesicular stomatitis viruses of the Rhabdoviridae, the P gene encodes multiple proteins from a single genomic RNA sequence. These products include the phosphoprotein (P), as well as the C and V proteins. The complexity of the P gene makes it an intriguing locus to study from an evolutionary perspective. Amino acid sequence alignments of the proteins encoded at the P and N loci were used in independent phylogenetic reconstructions of the Paramyxoviridae and Rhabdoviridae families. P-gene-coding capacities were mapped onto the Paramyxoviridae phylogeny, and the most parsimonious path of multiple-coding-capacity evolution was determined. Levels of amino acid variation for Paramyxoviridae and Rhabdoviridae P-gene-encoded products were also analyzed. Proteins encoded in overlapping reading frames from the same nucleotides have different levels of amino acid variation. The nucleotide architecture that underlies the amino acid variation was determined in order to evaluate the role of selection in the evolution of the P gene overlapping reading frames. In every case, the evolution of one of the proteins encoded in the overlapping reading frames has been constrained by negative selection while the other has evolved more rapidly. The integrity of the overlapping reading frame that represents a derived state is generally maintained at the expense of the ancestral reading frame encoded by the same nucleotides. The evolution of such multicoding sequences is likely a response by RNA viruses to selective pressure to maximize genomic information content while maintaining small genome size. The ability to evolve such a complex genomic strategy is intimately related to the dynamics of the viral quasispecies, which allow enhanced exploration of the adaptive

  3. Computer analysis of protein functional sites projection on exon structure of genes in Metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Irina V; Demenkov, Pavel S; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    Study of the relationship between the structural and functional organization of proteins and their coding genes is necessary for an understanding of the evolution of molecular systems and can provide new knowledge for many applications for designing proteins with improved medical and biological properties. It is well known that the functional properties of proteins are determined by their functional sites. Functional sites are usually represented by a small number of amino acid residues that are distantly located from each other in the amino acid sequence. They are highly conserved within their functional group and vary significantly in structure between such groups. According to this facts analysis of the general properties of the structural organization of the functional sites at the protein level and, at the level of exon-intron structure of the coding gene is still an actual problem. One approach to this analysis is the projection of amino acid residue positions of the functional sites along with the exon boundaries to the gene structure. In this paper, we examined the discontinuity of the functional sites in the exon-intron structure of genes and the distribution of lengths and phases of the functional site encoding exons in vertebrate genes. We have shown that the DNA fragments coding the functional sites were in the same exons, or in close exons. The observed tendency to cluster the exons that code functional sites which could be considered as the unit of protein evolution. We studied the characteristics of the structure of the exon boundaries that code, and do not code, functional sites in 11 Metazoa species. This is accompanied by a reduced frequency of intercodon gaps (phase 0) in exons encoding the amino acid residue functional site, which may be evidence of the existence of evolutionary limitations to the exon shuffling. These results characterize the features of the coding exon-intron structure that affect the functionality of the encoded protein and

  4. Determination of Six Transmembrane Protein of Prostate 2 Gene Expression and Intracellular Localization in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora İrer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between the RNA and protein expression profile of six transmembrane protein of prostate 2 (STAMP2 gene and androgen and the intracellular localization of STAMP2. Materials and Methods: RNA and protein were obtained from androgen treated lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP cells, untreated LNCaP cells, DU145 cells with no androgen receptor, and STAMP2 transfected COS-7 cells. The expression profile of STAMP2 gene and the effect of androgenes on the expression was shown in RNA and protein levels by using Northern and Western blotting methods. In addition, intracellular localization of the naturally synthesized STAMP2 protein and the transfected STAMP2 protein in COS-7 cells after androgen administration in both LNCaP cells was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: We found that the RNA and protein expression of STAMP2 gene in LNCaP cells are regulated by androgenes, the power of expression is increased with the duration of androgen treatment and there is no STAMP2 expression in DU145 cells which has no androgen receptor. As a result of the immunofluorescence microscopy study we observed that STAMP2 protein was localized at golgi complex and cell membrane. Conclusion: In conclusion, we have demonstrated that STAMP2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the prostate cancer and in the androgen-dependent androgen-independent staging of prostate cancer. In addition, STAMP2 protein, which is localized in the intracellular golgi complex and cell membrane, may be a new target molecule for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Changes in HSP gene and protein expression in natural scrapie with brain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) perform cytoprotective functions such as apoptosis regulation and inflammatory response control. These proteins can also be secreted to the extracellular medium, acting as inflammatory mediators, and their chaperone activity permits correct folding of proteins and avoids the aggregation of anomalous isoforms. Several studies have proposed the implication of Hsp in prion diseases. We analysed the gene expression and protein distribution of different members of the Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 families in the central nervous system of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Different expression profiles were observed in the areas analysed. Whereas changes in transcript levels were not observed in the cerebellum or medulla oblongata, a significant decrease in HSP27 and HSP90 was detected in the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, HSP73 was over-expressed in diencephalons of scrapie animals. Western blotting did not reveal significant differences in Hsp90 and Hsp70 protein expression between scrapie and control animals. Expression rates identified by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions using stepwise regression. Changes in Hsp gene and protein expression were associated with prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis rather than with apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemistry revealed intense Hsp70 and Hsp90 immunolabelling in Purkinje cells of scrapie sheep. In contrast, controls displayed little or no staining in these cells. The observed differences in gene expression and protein distribution suggest that the heat shock proteins analysed play a role in the natural form of the disease. PMID:21314976

  6. Changes in HSP gene and protein expression in natural scrapie with brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heat shock proteins (Hsp perform cytoprotective functions such as apoptosis regulation and inflammatory response control. These proteins can also be secreted to the extracellular medium, acting as inflammatory mediators, and their chaperone activity permits correct folding of proteins and avoids the aggregation of anomalous isoforms. Several studies have proposed the implication of Hsp in prion diseases. We analysed the gene expression and protein distribution of different members of the Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 families in the central nervous system of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Different expression profiles were observed in the areas analysed. Whereas changes in transcript levels were not observed in the cerebellum or medulla oblongata, a significant decrease in HSP27 and HSP90 was detected in the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, HSP73 was over-expressed in diencephalons of scrapie animals. Western blotting did not reveal significant differences in Hsp90 and Hsp70 protein expression between scrapie and control animals. Expression rates identified by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions using stepwise regression. Changes in Hsp gene and protein expression were associated with prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis rather than with apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemistry revealed intense Hsp70 and Hsp90 immunolabelling in Purkinje cells of scrapie sheep. In contrast, controls displayed little or no staining in these cells. The observed differences in gene expression and protein distribution suggest that the heat shock proteins analysed play a role in the natural form of the disease.

  7. Mapping of the mouse actin capping protein {alpha} subunit genes and pseudogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.C.; Korshunova, Y.O.; Cooper, J.A. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Capping protein (CP), a heterodimer of {alpha} and {beta} subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three {alpha} isoforms ({alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3) produced from different genes, whereas lower organisms have only one gene and one isoform. We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the a subunits of mouse CP and found three {alpha}1 genes, two of which are pseudogenes, and a single gene for both {alpha}2 and {alpha}3. Their chromosomal locations were identified by interspecies backcross mapping. The {alpha}1 gene (Cappa1) mapped to Chromosome 3 between D3Mit11 and D3Mit13. The {alpha}1 pseudogenes (Cappa1-ps1 and Cappa1-ps2) mapped to Chromosomes 1 and 9, respectively. The {alpha}2 gene (Cappa2) mapped to Chromosome 6 near Ptn. The {alpha}3 gene (Cappa3) also mapped to Chromosome 6, approximately 68 cM distal from Cappa2 near Kras2. One mouse mutation, de, maps in the vicinity of the {alpha}1 gene. No known mouse mutations map to regions near the {alpha}2 or {alpha}3 genes. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The mitochondrial gene encoding ribosomal protein S12 has been translocated to the nuclear genome in Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, L; Brennicke, A; Schuster, W

    1992-01-01

    The Oenothera mitochondrial genome contains only a gene fragment for ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), while other plants encode a functional gene in the mitochondrion. The complete Oenothera rps12 gene is located in the nucleus. The transit sequence necessary to target this protein to the mitochondrion is encoded by a 5'-extension of the open reading frame. Comparison of the amino acid sequence encoded by the nuclear gene with the polypeptides encoded by edited mitochondrial cDNA and genomic sequences of other plants suggests that gene transfer between mitochondrion and nucleus started from edited mitochondrial RNA molecules. Mechanisms and requirements of gene transfer and activation are discussed. Images PMID:1454526

  9. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  10. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino a...

  11. Duplication of the IGFBP-2 gene in teleost fish: protein structure and functionality conservation and gene expression divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 is a secreted protein that binds and regulates IGF actions in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and aging. Elevated expression of IGFBP-2 is often associated with progression of many types of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and characterization of two IGFBP-2 genes in zebrafish and four other teleost fish. Comparative genomics and structural analyses suggest that they are co-orthologs of the human IGFBP-2 gene. Biochemical assays show that both zebrafish igfbp-2a and -2b encode secreted proteins that bind IGFs. These two genes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. During embryogenesis, IGFBP-2a mRNA is initially detected in the lens, then in the brain boundary vasculature, and subsequently becomes highly expressed in the liver. In the adult stage, liver has the highest levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA, followed by the brain. Low levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA were detected in muscle and in the gonad in male adults only. IGFBP-2b mRNA is detected initially in all tissues at low levels, but later becomes abundant in the liver. In adult males, IGFBP-2b mRNA is only detected in the liver. In adult females, it is also found in the gut, kidney, ovary, and muscle. To gain insights into how the IGFBP-2 genes may have evolved through partitioning of ancestral functions, functional and mechanistic studies were carried out. Expression of zebrafish IGFBP-2a and -2b caused significant decreases in the growth and developmental rates and their effects are comparable to that of human IGFBP-2. IGFBP-2 mutants with altered IGF binding-, RGD-, and heparin-binding sites were generated and their actions examined. While mutating the RGD and heparin binding sites had little effect, altering the IGF binding site abolished its biological activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that IGFBP-2 is a conserved regulatory protein and it inhibits

  12. Identification and Expression Profiling of the BTB Domain-Containing Protein Gene Family in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Daojun Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The BTB domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif. In this study, we identified 56 BTB domain-containing protein genes in the silkworm, in addition to 46 in the honey bee, 55 in the red flour beetle, and 53 in the monarch butterfly. Silkworm BTB protein genes were classified into nine subfamilies according to their domain architecture, and most of them could be mapped on the different chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that silkworm BTB protein genes may have undergone a duplication event in three subfamilies: BTB-BACK-Kelch, BTB-BACK-PHR, and BTB-FLYWCH. Comparative analysis demonstrated that the orthologs of each of 13 BTB protein genes present a rigorous orthologous relationship in the silkworm and other surveyed insects, indicating conserved functions of these genes during insect evolution. Furthermore, several silkworm BTB protein genes exhibited sex-specific expression in larval tissues or at different stages during metamorphosis. These findings not only contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of insect BTB protein gene families but also provide a basis for further investigation of the functions of BTB protein genes in the silkworm.

  13. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  14. Characteristic differences between the promoters of intron-containing and intronless ribosomal protein genes in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vingron Martin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than two thirds of the highly expressed ribosomal protein (RP genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain introns, which is in sharp contrast to the genome-wide five percent intron-containing genes. It is well established that introns carry regulatory sequences and that the transcription of RP genes is extensively and coordinately regulated. Here we test the hypotheses that introns are innately associated with heavily transcribed genes and that introns of RP genes contribute regulatory TF binding sequences. Moreover, we investigate whether promoter features are significantly different between intron-containing and intronless RP genes. Results We find that directly measured transcription rates tend to be lower for intron-containing compared to intronless RP genes. We do not observe any specifically enriched sequence motifs in the introns of RP genes other than those of the branch point and the two splice sites. Comparing the promoters of intron-containing and intronless RP genes, we detect differences in number and position of Rap1-binding and IFHL motifs. Moreover, the analysis of the length distribution and the folding free energies suggest that, at least in a sub-population of RP genes, the 5' untranslated sequences are optimized for regulatory function. Conclusion Our results argue against the direct involvement of introns in the regulation of transcription of highly expressed genes. Moreover, systematic differences in motif distributions suggest that RP transcription factors may act differently on intron-containing and intronless gene promoters. Thus, our findings contribute to the decoding of the RP promoter architecture and may fuel the discussion on the evolution of introns.

  15. Inheritance-mode specific pathogenicity prioritization (ISPP) for human protein coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jacob Shujui; Kwan, Johnny S H; Pan, Zhicheng; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercè; Sham, Pak Chung; Li, Miaoxin

    2016-10-15

    Exome sequencing studies have facilitated the detection of causal genetic variants in yet-unsolved Mendelian diseases. However, the identification of disease causal genes among a list of candidates in an exome sequencing study is still not fully settled, and it is often difficult to prioritize candidate genes for follow-up studies. The inheritance mode provides crucial information for understanding Mendelian diseases, but none of the existing gene prioritization tools fully utilize this information. We examined the characteristics of Mendelian disease genes under different inheritance modes. The results suggest that Mendelian disease genes with autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance mode are more haploinsufficiency and de novo mutation sensitive, whereas those autosomal recessive (AR) genes have significantly more non-synonymous variants and regulatory transcript isoforms. In addition, the X-linked (XL) Mendelian disease genes have fewer non-synonymous and synonymous variants. As a result, we derived a new scoring system for prioritizing candidate genes for Mendelian diseases according to the inheritance mode. Our scoring system assigned to each annotated protein-coding gene (N = 18 859) three pathogenic scores according to the inheritance mode (AD, AR and XL). This inheritance mode-specific framework achieved higher accuracy (area under curve  = 0.84) in XL mode. The inheritance-mode specific pathogenicity prioritization (ISPP) outperformed other well-known methods including Haploinsufficiency, Recessive, Network centrality, Genic Intolerance, Gene Damage Index and Gene Constraint scores. This systematic study suggests that genes manifesting disease inheritance modes tend to have unique characteristics. ISPP is included in KGGSeq v1.0 (http://grass.cgs.hku.hk/limx/kggseq/), and source code is available from (https://github.com/jacobhsu35/ISPP.git). mxli@hku.hkSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author

  16. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among prot...

  17. High CpG island methylation ofp16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    employed to detect CpG island methylation in p16 promoter region and ... of Fallot;p16 gene;p16 protein;CpG islands;Methylation;Promoter regions ..... Our findings that p16 has a role in heart development is ... Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 15, 75-84. .... phenotype in colorectal cancer using a large population-based sample.

  18. High CpG island methylation ofp16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    :Tetralogy of Fallot;p16 gene;p16 protein;CpG islands;Methylation;Promoter regions ... of congenital heart disease, as well as the exclusion of previous history of ..... malignant progression of oral epithelial dysplasia: a prospective cohort study.

  19. Surfactant protein D multimerization and gene polymorphism in COPD and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakih, Dalia; Akiki, Zeina; Junker, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: A structural single nucleotide polymorphism rs721917 in the surfactant protein D (SP-D) gene, known as Met11Thr, was reported to influence the circulating levels and degree of multimerization of SP-D and was associated with both COPD and atopy in asthma. Moreover, diseas...

  20. A new mutation in the prion protein gene: A patient with dementia and white matter changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Harten, B.; Van Gool, W.A.; Van Langen, I.M.; Deekman, J.M.; Meijerink, P.H.S.; Weinstein, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical characteristics, MRI abnormalities, and molecular findings in a patient with a novel variant of a two-octarepeat insertion mutation in the prion protein gene. This patient presented with moderately progressive dementia of presenile onset and gait ataxia. MRI showed

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of Lettuce big-vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, T; Ishikawa, K; Koganezawa, H

    2001-06-01

    A sequence of 1425 nt was established that included the complete coat protein (CP) gene of Lettuce big-vein virus (LBVV). The LBVV CP gene encodes a 397 amino acid protein with a predicted M(r) of 44486. Antisera raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to N-terminal or C-terminal parts of the LBVV CP reacted in Western blot analysis with a protein with an M(r) of about 48000. RNA extracted from purified particles of LBVV by using proteinase K, SDS and phenol migrated in gels as two single-stranded RNA species of approximately 7.3 kb (ss-1) and 6.6 kb (ss-2). After denaturation by heat and annealing at room temperature, the RNA migrated as four species, ss-1, ss-2 and two additional double-stranded RNAs (ds-1 and ds-2). The Northern blot hybridization analysis using riboprobes from a full-length clone of the LBVV CP gene indicated that ss-2 has a negative-sense nature and contains the LBVV CP gene. Moreover, ds-2 is a double-stranded form of ss-2. Database searches showed that the LBVV CP most resembled the nucleocapsid proteins of rhabdoviruses. These results indicate that it would be appropriate to classify LBVV as a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus rather than as a double-stranded RNA virus.

  2. Identification of prion protein gene polymorphisms in goats from Italian scrapie outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Bossers, A.; Priem, J.; Riina, M.V.; Peletto, S.; Mazza, M.; Casalone, C.; Forloni, G.; Ru, G.; Caramelli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Susceptibility to scrapie in sheep is influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein (PrP) gene, whereas no strong association between genetics and scrapie has yet been determined in goats due to the limited number of studies on these animals. In this case¿control study on 177 goats from six

  3. Identification of evolutionarily invariant sequences in the protein C gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, C. A.; Bertina, R. M.; Reitsma, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies on human protein C gene expression have revealed the presence of three transcription factor binding sites in close proximity to the transcription start site. Binding sites for the liver-enriched hepatocyte nuclear factors 1 and 3 (HNF-1 and HNF-3, respectively) are located immediately

  4. Erratum Associations of POU1F1 gene polymorphisms and protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associations of POU1F1 gene polymorphisms and protein structure changes with growth traits and blood metabolites in two Iranian sheep breeds. Mostafa Sadeghi, Ali Jalil-Sarghale and Mohammed Moradi-Shahrbabak. J. Genet. 93, 831–835. The erratum published in the March 2015 issue to this article did not point out ...

  5. Polymorphisms of the prion protein gene Arabi sheep breed in Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovine scrapie is a neurodegenerative disease caused by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (Prnp); especially the amino acid residue alterations at codons 136, 154, and 174, in sheep have been found to be associated with susceptibility to scrapie disease. We studied Prnp polymorphisms in local sheep of ...

  6. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Swain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs. RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers.

  7. Piper betle Induced Cytoprotective Genes and Proteins via the Nrf2/ARE Pathway in Aging Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliahmat, Nor Syahida; Abdul Sani, Nur Fathiah; Wan Hasan, Wan Nuraini; Makpol, Suzana; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the underlying antioxidant mechanism of aqueous extract of Piper betle (PB) in aging rats. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/ARE pathway involving phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes plays an important role in the antioxidant system by reducing electrophiles and reactive oxygen species through induction of phase II enzymes and proteins. Genes and proteins of phase II detoxifying antioxidant enzymes were analyzed by QuantiGenePlex 2.0 Assay and Western blot analysis. PB significantly induced genes and proteins of phase II and antioxidant enzymes, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1, and catalase in aging mice (p < 0.05). The expression of these enzymes were stimulated via translocation of Nrf2 into the nucleus, indicating the involvement of ARE, a cis-acting motif located in the promoter region of nearly all phase II genes. PB was testified for the first time to induce cytoprotective genes through the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, thus unraveling the antioxidant mechanism of PB during the aging process. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Dual localized mitochondrial and nuclear proteins as gene expression regulators in plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eGiegé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria heavily depend on the coordinated expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes because some of their most significant activities are held by multi-sub