WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid volumizing filler

  1. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  2. Advances and Refinement in Hyaluronic Acid Facial Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher R; Kordestani, Reza; Small, Kevin H; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-08-01

    Fillers temporarily augment deflated or ptotic facial compartments to restore a youthful appearance. Hyaluronic acids predominate the fillers market because of their focal volumization, duration of effect, low incidence of adverse reactions, and reversibility. Being able to properly perform these in-office procedures will ensure safety for patients and provide aesthetically optimal results. This communication provides the senior author's (R.J.R.) stepwise approach to facial aging and deflation with soft-tissue injectable fillers. PMID:27465184

  3. Injectable Filler Techniques for Facial Rejuvenation, Volumization, and Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple fillers are available: various hyaluronic acid products, calcium hydroxylapatite, and a few others that are biocompatible with good duration and a variety of mechanical properties allowing intradermal, subdermal, and supraperiosteal injection. Facial features can be reshaped with great control using these fillers. Aging changes, including facial volume loss, can be well-corrected. These treatments have become a mainstay of rejuvenation in the early facial aging patient. Injection technique is critical to obtaining excellent results. Threading, fanning, cross-hatching, bleb, and pillar techniques must be mastered. Technical execution can only measure up to, but not exceed, the quality of the aesthetic analysis. PMID:26505544

  4. Efficacy and safety of a hyaluronic acid filler in subjects treated for correction of midface volume deficiency: a 24 month study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callan P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter Callan,1 Greg J Goodman,2 Ian Carlisle,3 Steven Liew,4 Peter Muzikants,5 Terrence Scamp,6 Michael B Halstead,7 John D Rogers71Peter Callan Plastic Surgery, Geelong, VIC, 2Dermatology Institute of Victoria, South Yarra, VIC, 3Erase Skin Rejuvenation Specialists, Malvern, VIC, 4Shape Clinic and Medispa, Darlinghurst, NSW, 5Ada Cosmetic Medicine, Glebe, NSW, 6Esteem Beauty and Day Spa, Main Beach, QLD, 7Allergan Medical Affairs, Gordon, ACT, AustraliaBackground: Hyaluronic acid (HA fillers are an established intervention for correcting facial volume deficiency. Few studies have evaluated treatment outcomes for longer than 6 months. The purpose of this study was to determine the durability of an HA filler in the correction of midface volume deficiency over 24 months, as independently evaluated by physician investigators and subjects.Methods: Subjects received treatment with Juvéderm™ Voluma™ to the malar area, based on the investigators' determination of baseline severity and aesthetic goals. The treatment was administered in one or two sessions over an initial 4-week period. Supplementary treatment was permissible at week 78, based on protocol-defined criteria. A clinically meaningful response was predefined as at least a one-point improvement on the MidFace Volume Deficit Scale (MFVDS and on the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS.Results: Of the 103 subjects enrolled, 84% had moderate or significant volume deficiency at baseline. At the first post-treatment evaluation (week 8, 96% were documented to be MFVDS responders, with 98% and 100% graded as GAIS responders when assessed by the subjects and investigators, respectively. At week 78, 81.7% of subjects were still MFVDS responders, with 73.2% and 78.1% being GAIS responders, respectively. Seventy-two subjects completed the 24-month study, of whom 45 did not receive supplementary Voluma™ at week 78. Forty-three of the 45 (95.6% subjects were MFVDS responders, with 82.2% and 91

  5. Hyaluronic acid gel fillers in the management of facial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredric S Brandt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fredric S Brandt1, Alex Cazzaniga21Private Practice in Coral Gables, Florida, USA and Manhattan, NY, USA, and Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, Florida, USAAbstract: Time affects facial aging by producing cellular and anatomical changes resulting in the consequential loss of soft tissue volume. With the advent of new technologies, the physician has the opportunity of addressing these changes with the utilization of dermal fillers. Hyaluronic acid (HA dermal fillers are the most popular, non-permanent injectable materials available to physicians today for the correction of soft tissue defects of the face. This material provides an effective, non invasive, non surgical alternative for correction of the contour defects of the face due to its enormous ability to bind water and easiness of implantation. HA dermal fillers are safe and effective. The baby-boomer generation, and their desire of turning back the clock while enjoying an active lifestyle, has expanded the popularity of these fillers. In the US, there are currently eight HA dermal fillers approved for commercialization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. This article reviews the innate properties of FDA-approved HA fillers and provides an insight on future HA products and their utilization for the management of the aging face.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, aging face, dermal filler, wrinkles, Restylane, Perlane, Juvéderm

  6. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients. PMID:26505539

  7. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  8. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD; Harushi Mori, MD; Harunosuke Kato, MD; Kentaro Doi, MD; Shinichiro Kuno, MD; Kahori Kinoshita, MD; Akira Kunimatsu, MD; Kuni Ohtomo, MD, PhD; Kotaro Yoshimura, MD

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers have become the most popular tool for wrinkle treatment and volumization, although HA is generally absorbed within 6–12 months and requires repeated treatments to maintain the effects. Methods: HA was injected onto the bone for volumization with a small 30-gauge needle to examine the long-lasting effects. Of the 63 Japanese patients with 97 treated sites followed up more than 12 months, 51 had HA injections for cosmetic purposes and 12 were treated ...

  9. ACID-BASE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMERS AND FILLERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; CHEN Fute; HUANG Yuanfu; ZHOU Qingli

    1987-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography(IGC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were applied to determining the relative acid-base strength of polymers and coupling agents. The acid-base characteristics of fillers such as CaCO3 could be altered by treatment with different coupling agents. It was shown that some mechanical properties of filled polymers were obviously associated with acid-base interactions between polymers and fillers.

  10. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Fonteles, Lívia Arcanjo; Lagalhard, Cecília Schubert Xavier; Fucci-da-Costa, Ana Paula Cercal

    2013-01-01

    Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost volume and attenuating grooves and wrinkles, they ensure a more youthful appearance and certain functional recovery of facial aesthetics. The authors review some of the main physicochemical characteristics of these dermal fillers, highlighting the product line St...

  11. Key importance of compression properties in the biophysical characteristics of hyaluronic acid soft-tissue fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavard Molliard, Samuel; Albert, Séverine; Mondon, Karine

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) soft-tissue fillers are the most popular degradable injectable products used for correcting skin depressions and restoring facial volume loss. From a rheological perspective, HA fillers are commonly characterised through their viscoelastic properties under shear-stress. However, despite the continuous mechanical pressure that the skin applies on the fillers, compression properties in static and dynamic modes are rarely considered. In this article, three different rheological tests (shear-stress test and compression tests in static and dynamic mode) were carried out on nine CE-marked cross-linked HA fillers. Corresponding shear-stress (G', tanδ) and compression (E', tanδc, normal force FN) parameters were measured. We show here that the tested products behave differently under shear-stress and under compression even though they are used for the same indications. G' showed the expected influence on the tissue volumising capacity, and the same influence was also observed for the compression parameters E'. In conclusion, HA soft-tissue fillers exhibit widely different biophysical characteristics and many variables contribute to their overall performance. The elastic modulus G' is not the only critical parameter to consider amongst the rheological properties: the compression parameters E' and FN also provide key information, which should be taken into account for a better prediction of clinical outcomes, especially for predicting the volumising capacity and probably the ability to stimulate collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27093589

  12. MODIFICATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER USING SODIUM SILICATE/ZINC CHLORIDE BASED MODIFIERS TO IMPROVE ACID-RESISTANCE AND USE OF THE MODIFIED FILLER IN PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the acid-resistant property of papermaking grade precipitated calcium carbonate filler and to obtain modified filler in powder form, sodium silicate/zinc chloride based modifiers were used in filler modification, and the use of modified filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was also preliminarily investigated. Under the preliminarily optimized experimental conditions, when sodium silicate, zinc chloride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and phosphoric acid with dosages of 10 wt%, 3 wt%, 1 wt% and 0.2 wt%, respectively, were used as modifiers, and when the temperature, aging time, and PCC concentration during the filler modification process was 70 oC, 7 h and 9.1 wt%, respectively, the acid-resistant property of filler was significantly improved after modification, as evaluated using alum consumption and pH methods. The use of modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler prepared under the optimized conditions provided considerably more brightness and light scattering improvement in comparison to unmodified filler, and filler modification was found to have only negligible influence on tensile and burst strength of the paper, air permeability of the paper, and retention performance of the filler. Surface analysis of the modified filler using XPS and SEM confirmed the occurring of surface encapsulation and modification of precipitated calcium carbonate filler when the relevant modifiers were used in filler modification. The encapsulating effect of modifiers on filler was thought to be favorable to improvement in acid-resistant property, and optical properties of the filled paper.

  13. Perpendicular Strut Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Deep Wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Takanobu; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-11-01

    Although various injection techniques of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler for facial rejuvenation have been developed, correction of deep wrinkles/grooves, such as the nasolabial fold (NLF), with intradermal or subdermal injections remains difficult. We tested the intradermal HA injection method to place multiple HA struts by (1) inserting a small needle perpendicularly to the wrinkle and (2) injecting HA as intradermal struts with the skin fully stretched by the practitioner's fingers. The results of both NLFs in 10 patients suggest that this technique improves NLFs and maintain the effects more consistently than conventional techniques, although the effects of both methods were almost lost after 6 months. Selective and/or combined application of this technique may enhance the current approach to facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. PMID:26893992

  14. Soft tissue augmentation - Use of hyaluronic acid as dermal filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue augmentation has revolutionized the treatment of the aging face. It is a technique in which a substance is injected under the skin. The concept of utilizing materials for soft tissue augmentation actually began around 1950 with the use of fluid silicone. Today we have a large armamentarium of implant materials to delay the tell tale signs of aging. Filling has replaced conventional surgery in facial rejuvenation. In this article, the emphasis will be on hyaluronic acid as this substance is easily available in India and ranks among the most widely used dermal fillers.

  15. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos-e-Silva M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost volume and attenuating grooves and wrinkles, they ensure a more youthful appearance and certain functional recovery of facial aesthetics. The authors review some of the main physicochemical characteristics of these dermal fillers, highlighting the product line Stylage®, the manufacture of which includes mannitol.Keywords: fillers, hyaluronic acid, mannitol, facial aging, wrinkles, stylage®

  16. 3D photography in the objective analysis of volume augmentation including fat augmentation and dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jason D; Glasgold, Robert A; Glasgold, Mark J

    2011-11-01

    The authors present quantitative and objective 3D data from their studies showing long-term results with facial volume augmentation. The first study analyzes fat grafting of the midface and the second study presents augmentation of the tear trough with hyaluronic filler. Surgeons using 3D quantitative analysis can learn the duration of results and the optimal amount to inject, as well as showing patients results that are not demonstrable with standard, 2D photography. PMID:22004863

  17. Treatment of glabella skin necrosis following injection of hyaluronic acid filler using platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boo Kyoung; Kang, In Jung; Jeong, Ki Heon; Shin, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers have been widely used for soft-tissue augmentation. However, there can be various complications following HA filler injection. Skin necrosis is rare but one of the most disastrous side effects that, if not treated promptly and effectively, can result in permanent and potentially disfiguring scarring. Thus, early proper management is important. Herein we report a patient who experienced tissue necrosis of the glabellar area after receiving filler injections that was successfully treated using platelet-rich plasma and provide full follow-up clinical photographs. PMID:26052808

  18. Severe Acute Local Reactions to a Hyaluronic Acid-derived Dermal Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Dyke, Susan Van; Hays, Geoffrey P.; Caglia, Anthony E.; Caglia, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Injectable fillers are normally well tolerated by patients with little or no adverse effects. The most common side effects include swelling, redness, bruising, and pain at the injection site. This report describes three cases in which patients injected with a hyaluronic acid-derived injectable filler that is premixed with lidocaine developed adverse reactions including persistent swelling, pain, and nodule formation. Two of the three patients' abscesses were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic...

  19. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Adri D; Prager, Welf; Rubin, Mark G; Moretti, Ernesto A; Nikolis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material. Objective The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero® fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation. Methods A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero® fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume) and equivalent products (Esthélis®, Mesolis®, Fortélis®, Modélis®). Results This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero® Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118) and Restylane® (at 4 weeks, n=40), and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero® Intense than with Perlane® (at 2 weeks, n=20). With Belotero® Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1–6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8–12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero® Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging), Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach), and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients). The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were temporary. There were no reports of Tyndall effect, nodules, granulomas, or tissue necrosis. Conclusion Clinical evidence indicates sustainable esthetic effects, good safety profile, and long-term tolerability of the Belotero® fillers, particularly Belotero® Basic/Balance and Intense. PMID:27660479

  20. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Adri D; Prager, Welf; Rubin, Mark G; Moretti, Ernesto A; Nikolis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material. Objective The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero® fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation. Methods A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero® fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume) and equivalent products (Esthélis®, Mesolis®, Fortélis®, Modélis®). Results This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero® Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118) and Restylane® (at 4 weeks, n=40), and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero® Intense than with Perlane® (at 2 weeks, n=20). With Belotero® Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1–6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8–12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero® Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging), Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach), and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients). The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were temporary. There were no reports of Tyndall effect, nodules, granulomas, or tissue necrosis. Conclusion Clinical evidence indicates sustainable esthetic effects, good safety profile, and long-term tolerability of the Belotero® fillers, particularly Belotero® Basic/Balance and Intense.

  1. Glans Penis Augmentation Using Hyaluronic Acid Gel as an Injectable Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Tae Il; Kim, Je Jong

    2015-01-01

    Glans penis augmentation (GPA) has received little attention from experts despite the existence of a subset of patients who may be dissatisfied with a small glans or poor tumescence of the glans during erection. Recently, GPA using an injectable filler or implantation of a graft or filler has been developed. Despite a demanding injection technique and inevitable uneven undulation of the glandular surface, GPA using injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is a novel and useful therapy and an effective and safe procedure for soft tissue enhancement. For long-term presence of implants, timed supplementation can be used similar to that for fascial plasty. In complications such as mucosal necrosis of the glans penis, most cases occur from the use of non-HA gel or an unpurified form and misunderstanding of the management protocol for immediate side effects. Currently, GPA using injectable HA gel is not recommended in the International Society for Sexual Medicine guideline due to possible sensory loss. In a 5-year long-term follow-up of GPA by subcutaneous injection of HA gel, the residual volume of implants decreased by 15% of the maximal glandular circumference, but was still effective for alleviating the hypersensitivity of the glans penis in premature ejaculation patients. For efficacy in premature ejaculation, selection of appropriate candidates is the most important factor for success. GPA does not harm erectile function and is less invasive and irreversible compared to dorsal neurectomy. To refine the procedure, more interest and well-designed studies are required for the establishment of the procedure. PMID:26331121

  2. Tracking and Increasing Viability of Topically Injected Fibroblasts Suspended in Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hi-Jin; Namgoong, Sik; Rhee, Sung-Mi; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    A new injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue consisting of a mixture of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler and cultured human fibroblasts have been developed by the authors. To establish this method as a standard treatment, a further study was required to determine whether the injected fibroblasts could stay at the injected place or move to other sites. In addition, effective strategies were needed to increase viability of the injected fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to track the injected fibroblasts and to determine the effect of adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) or vitamin C on the viability of fibroblasts.Human fibroblasts labeled with fluorescence dye were suspended in HA filler and injected into 4 sites on the back of nude mice. The injected bioimplants consisted of one of the 4 followings: HA filler without cells (HA group), fibroblasts suspended in HA filler (HA + FB group), PGE1-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + PGE1 group), and vitamin C-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + VC group). At 4 weeks after injection, locations and intensities of the fluorescence signals were evaluated using a live imaging system.The fluorescence signals of the fibroblast-containing groups were visible only at the injected sites without dispersing to other sites. The HA +FB + PGE1 group showed a significantly higher fluorescence signal than the HA + FB and the HA + FB +VC groups (P FB and HA + FB +VC groups (P = 0.69).The results of the current study collectively suggest that injected fibroblasts suspended in HA filler stay at the injected place without moving to other sites. In addition, PGE1 treatment may increase the remaining rhodamine B isothiocynanate dye at the injected site of the human dermal fibroblasts.

  3. Effect of different carbon fillers and dopant acids on electrical properties of polyaniline nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Johny Jelmy; S Ramakrishnan; Murali Rangarajan; Nikhil K Kothurkar

    2013-02-01

    Electrically conducting nanocomposites of polyaniline (PANI) with carbon-based fillers have evinced considerable interest for various applications such as rechargeable batteries, microelectronics, sensors, electrochromic displays and light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The nature of both the carbon filler and the dopant acid can significantly influence the conductivity of these nanocomposites. This paper describes the effects of carbon fillers like carbon black (CB), graphite (GR) and muti-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and of dopant acids like methane sulfonic acid (MSA), camphor sulfonic acid (CSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on the electrical conductivity of PANI. The morphological, structural and electrical properties of neat PANI and carbon–PANI nanocomposites were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), UV–Vis spectroscopy and the four-point probe technique, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were also conducted for different PANI composites. The results show that PANI and carbon–PANI composites with organic acid dopants show good thermal stability and higher electrical conductivity than those with inorganic acid dopants. Also, carbon–PANI composites generally show higher electrical conductivity than neat PANI, with highest conductivities for PANI–CNT composites. Thus, in essence, PANI–CNT composites prepared using organic acid dopants are most suitable for conducting applications.

  4. POLY(LACTIC ACID) GREEN COMPOSITES USING OILSEED COPRODUCTS AS FILLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly(lactic acid), PLA, is a biodegradable polymer made from renewable resources with similar mechanical properties to polypropylene. PLA is more expensive than petroleum-based plastics, and the use of low-cost fillers as extenders is desirable. Agricultural co-products of the alternative oilseed ...

  5. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  6. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens ...

  7. Wrinkle Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rays and may obscure underlying features. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA): PLLA is a biodegradable, biocompatible man-made ... when considering soft tissue fillers that contain hyaluronic acid material derived from bacteria fermentation). You have joint, tendon, or vascular disease ...

  8. Hyaluronic acid gel fillers in the management of facial aging

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Fredric S; Alex Cazzaniga

    2008-01-01

    Fredric S Brandt1, Alex Cazzaniga21Private Practice in Coral Gables, Florida, USA and Manhattan, NY, USA, and Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, Florida, USAAbstract: Time affects facial aging by producing cellular and anatomical changes resulting in the consequential loss of soft tissue volume. With the advent of new technologies, the physician has the opportunity of addressing these changes with the utilization of dermal fil...

  9. The Efficacy, Longevity, and Safety of Combined Radiofrequency Treatment and Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Skin Rejuvenation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyuk; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Young; Park, Won-Seok; Bae, Il-Hong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers and radiofrequency (RF) devices have been made in the context of skin rejuvenation and cosmetic surgery. Moreover, combination regimens with both techniques are currently being developed. Objective The present study was designed to examine the clinical and histologic effects of a new needle that incorporates an RF device for HA injections. Methods A new intradermal needle RF device (INNOfill; Pacific Pharma, Korea) was assessed in the...

  10. Barrier Properties of Polylactic Acid in Cellulose Based Packages Using Montmorillonite as Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Sánchez Aldana; Eduardo Duarte Villa; Miguel De Dios Hernández; Guillermo González Sánchez; Quintín Rascón Cruz; Sergio Flores Gallardo; Hilda Piñon Castillo; Lourdes Ballinas Casarrubias

    2014-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and montmorillonite (CB) as filler were studied as coatings for cellulose based packages. Amorphous (AM) and semi crystalline (SC) PLA were used at different concentrations according to a 2 × 6 × 3 full factorial experimental design. CB loading was three concentrations and coating was performed by casting. Contact angle (CA), water vapor (WVP) and grease permeabilities were measured for each resultant package and were compared to commercial materials (Glassine Paper, Gre...

  11. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E John, Richard D Price

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hannah E John, Richard D PriceDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Cambridge, UKAbstract: Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the overall trend remains upward. Although popular television programs espouse the benefits of surgery, it is nonsurgical procedures that account, numerically, for the majority of procedures performed; in the USA, there was a 48% growth from 2000 to 2008 in nonsurgical treatments undertaken by women, and 64% in men and while the average surgeon might perform 60 blepharoplasty operations in 2007, (she would also undertake 375 botulinum injections, and almost 200 filler injections of varying sorts. Clearly there is enthusiasm for nonsurgical treatments, and this trend appears to be rising. With this in mind, we present an overview of the commonest filler injection material, hyaluronic acid. We present the mechanism of action, the purported risks and benefits, and briefly discuss technique.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, filler injection, nonsurgical procedures, technique

  12. Effect of film thickness and filler properties on sulphuric acid permeation in various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valix, M; Mineyama, H; Chen, C; Cheung, W H; Shi, J; Bustamante, H

    2011-01-01

    The performance of various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings was compared by measuring their sulphuric acid diffusivity. Apparent diffusivities, which were measured gravimetrically, were found to be dependent on coating tortuosity. In composite materials like epoxy mortars, the tortuosity was determined by filler properties and polymer alignment. Tortuosity was found to depend on the filler size, their dispersion, filler aspect ratio and concentration. The order and greater alignment of polymer aggregates, which characterises thinner coatings effects higher tortuosity and thus lower permeabilities. The result is that sulphuric acid diffusivities were observed to increase with coating thickness, which challenges the notion that greater coating thicknesses provide greater protection or environmental barrier. The effect of film thickness and filler properties observed in this study has significant implications to the current selection of coatings and sewer protection.

  13. Hydrophobic silica nanoparticles as reinforcing filler for poly (lactic acid polymer matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilić Branka M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of poly (lactic acid (PLA and its nanocomposites, with silica nanoparticles (SiO2, as filler were investigated. Neat PLA films and PLA films with different percentage of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 wt. % were prepared by solution casting method. Several tools were used to characterize the influence of different silica content on crystalline behavior, and thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of PLA/SiO2 nanocomposites. Results from scanning electron microscope (SEM showed that the nanocomposite preparation and selection of specific hydrophobic spherical nano filler provide a good dispersion of the silica nanoparticles in the PLA matrix. Addition of silica nanoparticles improved mechanical properties, the most significant improvement being observed for lowest silica content (0.2wt.%. Barrier properties were improved for all measured gases at all loadings of silica nanoparticles. The degree of crystallinity for PLA slightly increased by adding 0.2 and 0.5 wt. % of nano filler. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46001

  14. Carbon Microparticles from Organosolv Lignin as Filler for Conducting Poly(Lactic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janea Köhnke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon microparticles were produced from organosolv lignin at 2000 °C under argon atmosphere following oxidative thermostabilisation at 250 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electro-conductivity measurements revealed that the obtained particles were electrically conductive and were composed of large graphitic domains. Poly(lactic acid filled with various amounts of lignin-derived microparticles showed higher tensile stiffness increasing with particle load, whereas strength and extensibility decreased. Electric conductivity was measured at filler loads equal to and greater than 25% w/w.

  15. Duration of wrinkle correction following repeat treatment with Juvéderm hyaluronic acid fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stacy R.; Jones, Derek; Thomas, Jane A.; Murphy, Diane K.; Beddingfield, Frederick C.

    2010-01-01

    Many patients elect to have repeat treatments with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers to maintain wrinkle correction, but the clinical performance of these products after repeat treatments has not been formally assessed. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Juvéderm injectable gel (Juvéderm Ultra, Juvéderm Ultra Plus, and Juvéderm 30) through 1 year after repeat treatment of nasolabial folds (NLFs) that were previously treated with Juvéderm or Zyplast 6–9 month...

  16. Clinical performance of a dermal filler containing natural glycolic Acid and a polylactic Acid polymer: results of a clinical trial in human immunodeficiency virus subjects with facial lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Jorge M; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-02-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.(1-3) Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  17. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer: Results of a Clinical Trial in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Subjects with Facial Lipoatrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tagle, Jorge M.; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in t...

  18. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Hannah E; Price, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the overall trend remains upward. Although popular television programs espouse the benefits of surgery, it is nonsurgical procedures that account, numerically, for the majority of procedures performed; in the USA, there was a 48% growth from 2000 to 2008 in nonsurgical treatments undertaken by women, and 64% in men and while the average surgeon might perform 60 blepharoplasty operations in 2007, (s)he would also undertake 375 botulinum injections, and almost 200 filler injections of varying sorts. Clearly there is enthusiasm for nonsurgical treatments, and this trend appears to be rising. With this in mind, we present an overview of the commonest filler injection material, hyaluronic acid. We present the mechanism of action, the purported risks and benefits, and briefly discuss technique. PMID:19936165

  19. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Y F; Ip, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  20. An Open-Label Uncontrolled, Multicenter Study for the Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of the Dermal Filler Princess VOLUME in the Treatment of Nasolabial Folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Kopera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dermal filler Princess VOLUME is a highly cross-linked, viscoelastic hyaluronic acid injectable gel implant used for aesthetic treatment. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Princess VOLUME in the treatment of nasolabial folds, an open-label uncontrolled, multicenter study was conducted. Forty-eight subjects were recruited who had moderate to deep wrinkles, according to the Modified Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale (MFWS. Subjects received Princess VOLUME in both nasolabial folds at Day 0. Nasolabial fold severity was evaluated at 30, 90, 180, and 270 days after treatment, using the MFWS and the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS. Adverse events and treatment site reactions were recorded. Among the 48 subjects, 93.8% were female with a median age of 52 years. There were significant improvements (P<0.0001 in the MFWS scores at 30, 180, and 270 days after treatment compared with those at baseline, with a mean decrease of 1.484 (±0.408, 1.309 (±0.373, and 1.223 (±0.401, respectively; hence the primary endpoint was achieved and clinical efficacy demonstrated. Princess VOLUME was well tolerated, and most adverse events were injection site reactions of mild to moderate severity. Subject satisfaction (97.9%, subject recommendation of the treatment (93.6%, and investigators GAIS scores (97.9% improvement were high.

  1. Barrier Properties of Polylactic Acid in Cellulose Based Packages Using Montmorillonite as Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sánchez Aldana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polylactic acid (PLA and montmorillonite (CB as filler were studied as coatings for cellulose based packages. Amorphous (AM and semi crystalline (SC PLA were used at different concentrations according to a 2 × 6 × 3 full factorial experimental design. CB loading was three concentrations and coating was performed by casting. Contact angle (CA, water vapor (WVP and grease permeabilities were measured for each resultant package and were compared to commercial materials (Glassine Paper, Grease Proof Papers 1 and 2 produced commercially. Significant differences were found and the main factors were the type and concentration of PLA. The best values were: for grease penetration, +1800 s; WVP from 161.36 to 237.8 g·µm·kPa−1·m−2·d−1 and CA from 69° to 73° for PLA–AM 0.5% and CB variable. These parameters are comparable to commercial packages used in the food industry. DSC revealed three different thermal events for PLA–SC and just Tg for PLA–AM. Crystallinity was also verified, obtaining a ΔHcrys of 3.7 J·g−1 for PLA–SC and 14 J·g−1 for PLA–SC–BC, evidencing clay interaction as a crystal nucleating agent. Differences found were explained on terms of the properties measured, where structural and chemical arrays of the coatings play a fundamental role for the barrier properties.

  2. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva M; Fonteles LA; Lagalhard CSX; Fucci-da-Costa APC

    2013-01-01

    Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement of lost ...

  3. STYLAGE®: a range of hyaluronic acid dermal fillers containing mannitol. Physical properties and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, Lívia Arcanjo Fonteles, Cecília Schubert Xavier Lagalhard, Ana Paula Cercal Fucci-da-CostaSector of Dermatology, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Dermatological procedures which are considered as being minimally invasive, such as those using injectable fillers based on hyaluronic acid, revolutionized aging treatment, especially of the face. By promoting the replacement ...

  4. Delayed immune mediated adverse effects to hyaluronic acid fillers: report of five cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ora Bitterman-Deutsch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA fillers in cosmetic medicine have been considered relatively safe, though fillers used in European countries and throughout the world are not necessarily approved by the Food and Drug Administration. As their use continues to expand worldwide, physicians in a wide range of medical specialties are authorized to perform HA injections, including general medicine practitioners and even dentists. An increasing number of reports have appeared regarding side effects to these products. It is now known that reactions to Hyaluronic acid are related not only to technical faults of the injections, but also to immune responses, including delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions. Herein, we describe five cases treated by a variety of treatment modalities, all with delayed reactions to different brands of hyaluronic acid fillers. As there is currently no standardization of treatment options of adverse effects, these cases accentuate the debate regarding the approach to the individual patient and the possible need for pre-testing in patients with an atopic tendency.

  5. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Semipermanent volumizing effects can be achieved by HA injection if the target area has an underlying bony floor. Periosteal stem cells may be activated by HA injection and may contribute to persistent volumizing effects. This treatment may be a much less invasive alternative to fat or bone grafting.

  6. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Edwards

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal fillers in the fields of dermatology and cosmetic facial surgery. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers have a low overall incidence of long term side effects, occasional adverse outcomes, ranging from chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory reactions to classic foreign body-type granulomatous reactions have been documented. These long-term adverse events are reviewed.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, Restylane®, Hylaform®, injectable dermal filler, foreign body reaction, granuloma

  7. Effect of an acid filler on hydrolysis and biodegradation of poly-lactic acid (PLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzino, Valentina; Speranza, Vito; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers is certainly an excellent strategy to solve many of the problems related to the disposal of the traditional polymers, whose accumulation in the environment is harmful and damaging. In order to optimize the use of biodegradable polymers, it is very important to understand and control the transformation processes, the structures and the morphologies resulting from the process conditions used to produce the articles and, not least, the biodegradation. The latter is strictly dependent on the just mentioned variables. The poly-lactic acid, PLA, is a biodegradable polymer. Many studies have been carried out on the degradation process of this polymer. In the course of this work we performed degradation tests on the PLA, with a specific D-isomer content, having amorphous structure, and in particular of biodegradation and hydrolysis. An acid chemical, fumaric acid, was added to PLA with the objective of controlling the rate of hydrolysis and of biodegradation. The hydrolysis process was followed, as function of time, by means of different techniques: pH variation, variation of weight of samples and variation of crystallinity degree and glass transition temperature using DSC analysis. The samples were also analyzed in terms of biodegradability by means of a homemade respirometer apparatus, in controlled composting conditions.

  8. Brighter eyes: combined upper cheek and tear trough augmentation: a systematic approach utilizing two complementary hyaluronic acid fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Rebecca; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Park, Kelly; Sato, Mauricio; Dubina, Meghan; Alam, Murad

    2012-09-01

    Non-surgical rejuvenation of the periorbital-cheek complex can be effectively and safely accomplished using a combination of two hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers with distinct viscosities. We present a series of 21 patients with mild to moderate tear trough deformities who were treated with concomitant injection of two dermal fillers (Restylane® and Perlane®). Procedural technique entailed micro-depot injections of the finer viscosity HA into the sub-muscular plane along the orbital rim followed by manual massage. Secondly, injections of the thicker, more firm HA were placed in the sub-muscular and/or deep dermal spaces in the upper malar and lateral zygomatic areas and in the medial aspect of the temporal fossa. On average 0.5 mL Restylane and 0.5 mL Perlane were used per side. Statistically significant improvement in modified Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale scores was seen at 20 weeks. Overall improvement in modified Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale scores occurred in 20 out of 21 patients. Mean patient satisfaction scores increased by 2 grades relative to baseline. Patients' self-reported overall mean improvement was 2.23, indicating moderate (26% to 50%) to good (51% to 75%) improvement. Side effects were limited to transient bruising and swelling. No patients required dissolution of injectant with hyaluronidase. Overall, this combination filler procedure was found to produce both statistically significant and clinically apparent improvement and was associated with an extremely high degree of patient satisfaction. PMID:23135653

  9. A prospective, open-label, multicenter, observational, postmarket study of the use of a 15 mg/mL hyaluronic acid dermal filler in the lips

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp-Dormston, Wolfgang G; Hilton, Said; Nathan, Myooran

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based injectable fillers three-dimensionally restore the natural contours of the lips and perioral area, thereby reducing some signs of aging lips. To evaluate the short-term aesthetic impact of treatment with the HA dermal filler Juvéderm® VOLBELLA® with Lidocaine, formulated utilizing VYCROSS™ technology, for enhancement or correction of asymmetry of the lips, evaluated using a patient-centric approach. Sixty-two subjects were enrolled in this study, conducted at two si...

  10. Shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reparation technique on restorations with broken or damaged porcelain which are still attached with the teeth are difficult, because it is very hard to remove the porcelain restoration without damaging it, and it needs a long time. Various ways have been developed to repair the broken porcelain, one of them is the use of composite resin as the material for the restoration of fractured porcelain. Repairing porcelain inside the mouth without removing the restoration of the damaged porcelain using light cured composite resins material seems to be an advantageous option because it is relatively simple, has low risks, good esthetically and cheap. Purpose: The objective of this study was to find out the difference of shear bond strength in porcelain reparation using nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching by using Autograph measuring device. Methods: Twenty pieces of the porcelain samples devided into 2 groups. Group I: etching process using 9% hydrofluoric acid, and group II : without etching process. Result: The data was analyzed using t test in a p value of 0.0001 (p≤0.05, which means there is a significant different of shear bond strength between treated group I and II. The biggest shear bond strength was in treatment group I. Conclusion: The use of 9% hydrofluoric acid on the surface of porcelain can increase the shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin.

  11. Safety and persistence of non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid fillers for nasolabial folds correction in 30 Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehnaz Z Arsiwala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of nasolabial creases through minimally invasive procedures is increasingly being sought by patients. Injecting non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid filler is a highly effective method to achieve an optimal and persistent cosmetic result. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy, persistence and safety of Restylane and Perlane (Q-Med, Sweden for correction of nasolabial folds in Indian patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty Indian patients with mild, moderate and severe nasolabial folds (based on Wrinkle Assessment Scale were recruited in the study after informed consent for correction of their folds with Restylane or Perlane or both. Injections were administered in a single sitting after global assessment of the patient′s face using Wrinkle assessment scale (WAS.Optimal filling was performed by using appropriate techniques and its safety and efficacy assessed independently by the investigator as well as by patients at immediately, 3, 6 and 9 months post-procedure. Any adverse reactions were noted. Results: Twenty two females and 8 males (age range 45-55 years, mean age 52 years were recruited in the study. An optimum cosmetic correction was obtained in all patients. The efficacy increased with time and was greatest at 3 months after the treatment. Grade 2 improvement was maintained at 9 months in mild and moderate folds, and grade 3 improvement for severe folds. Minor post injection side effects like erythema at puncture site, needle marks and bruising were seen. Conclusion: Restylane and Perlane are safe and effective dermal fillers for correction of nasolabial creases and offer immediate effect.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of a Hyaluronic Acid Filler to Correct Aesthetically Detracting or Deficient Features of the Asian Nose: A Prospective, Open-Label, Long-Term Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Steven; Scamp, Terrence; de Maio, Mauricio; Halstead, Michael; Johnston, Nicole; Silberberg, Michael; Rogers, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest among patients and plastic surgeons for alternatives to rhinoplasty, a common surgical procedure performed in Asia. Objectives To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and longevity of a hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose. Methods Twenty-nine carefully screened Asian patients had their noses corrected with the study filler (Juvéderm VOLUMA [Allergan plc, Dublin, Ireland] with lidocaine injectable gel), reflecting individualized treatment goals and utilizing a standardized injection procedure, and were followed for over 12 months. Results A clinically meaningful correction (≥1 grade improvement on the Assessment of Aesthetic Improvement Scale) was achieved in 27 (93.1%) patients at the first follow-up visit. This was maintained in 28 (96.6%) patients at the final visit, based on the independent assessments of a central non-injecting physician and the patients. At this final visit, 23 (79.3%) patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the study filler and 25 (86.2%) would recommend it to others. In this small series of patients, there were no serious adverse events (AEs), with all treatment-related AEs being mild to moderate, transient injection site reactions, unrelated to the study filler. Conclusions Using specific eligibility criteria, individualized treatment goals, and a standardized injection procedure, the study filler corrected aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose, with the therapeutic effects lasting for over 12 months, consistent with a high degree of patient satisfaction. This study supports the safety and efficacy of this HA filler for specific nose augmentation procedures in selected Asian patients. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:27301371

  13. Application of novel catalytic-ceramic-filler in a coupled system for long-chain dicarboxylic acids manufacturing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Fan, Chunzhen; He, Shengbing; Dai, Bibo; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Gao, Lei

    2016-02-01

    To gain systematic technology for long-chain dicarboxylic acids (LDCA) manufacturing wastewater treatment, catalytic micro-electrolysis (CME) coupling with adsorption-biodegradation sludge (AB) process was studied. Firstly, novel catalytic-ceramic-filler was prepared from scrap iron, clay and copper sulfate solution and packed in the CME reactor. To remove residual n-alkane and LDCA, the CME reactor was utilized for LDCA wastewater pretreatment. The results revealed that about 94% of n-alkane, 98% of LDCA and 84% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed by the aerated CME reactor at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.0 h. In this process, catalysis from Cu and montmorillonites played an important role in improving the contaminants removal. Secondly, to remove residual COD in the wastewater, AB process was designed for the secondary biological treatment, about 90% of the influent COD could be removed by biosorption, bio-flocculation and biodegradation effects. Finally, the effluent COD (about 150 mg L(-1)) discharged from the coupled CME-AB system met the requirement of the national discharged standard (COD ≤ 300 mg L(-1)). All of these results suggest that the coupled CME-AB system is a promising technology due to its high-efficient performance, and has the potential to be applied for the real LDCA wastewater treatment. PMID:26619310

  14. EFFECT OF MINERAL FILLERS ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND MELTING BEHAVIOR OF POLY(LACTID ACID)/MINERAL FILLER COMPOSITES%聚乳酸/矿物填料复合材料的示差扫描量热研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国享; 张鑫; 李炳健; 赵彩霞; 李锦春

    2012-01-01

    A series of poly ( lactid acid) ( PLA )/mineral filler composites have been prepared by melt blending. Crystallization and melting behaviors of PLA composites containing calcium carbonate ( CaCO3) , montmorillonite (MMT) and attapulgite (AT) have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) , respectively. The results exhibited that MMT and AT did not obviously influence the slow-cooling crystallization of PLA, whereas CaCO3 effectively facilitated the crystallization of PLA in this process. The crystallization enthalpy (△Hc) increased with increasing the content of CaCO3 at a cooling rate of 2. 5 K/min. Moreover, the type and content of the fillers played an important role in the cold crystallization and melting remarkably. Low-content mineral fillers would promote the nucleation in the cold crystallization of PLA, among which MMT was the best effective. Meanwhile, different mineral fillers with relatively high contents would affect the crystal structures of PLA, yielding various types of DSC curves.%通过熔融共混法制备了一系列聚乳酸( PLA)/矿物填料复合材料.采用示差扫描量热(DSC)研究了含有碳酸钙( CaCO3)、蒙脱土(MMT)和凹凸棒土(AT)的聚乳酸复合材料在不同热历程中的结晶和熔融行为.研究发现,MMT和AT对PLA的慢速降温结晶无明显影响,而碳酸钙在慢速降温过程中能够有效促进PLA结晶;在2.5 K/min的降温速率下,结晶热焓随碳酸钙含量增加而增加;填料种类和含量会对复合材料升温过程的冷结晶和熔融产生较大影响,低含量矿物填料主要对PLA的冷结晶起成核作用,其中MMT成核效果最好.较高含量下不同填料会对PLA晶体形态产生影响,从而得到多样的DSC曲线变化.

  15. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal f...

  16. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Paul C.; John E Fantasia

    2007-01-01

    Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia21Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal f...

  17. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  18. Intraoral approach: A newer technique for filler injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chytra V Anand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Filler injections are the most common aesthetic procedures used for volume correction. Various techniques have been described in the use of fillers. This article reviews the available literature on a new technique using the intraoral approach for injection of fillers.

  19. Clinical comparison between two hyaluronic acid-derived fillers in the treatment of nasolabial folds in Chinese subjects: BioHyalux versus Restylane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Sun, Nan; Xu, Yue; Liu, Huixian; Zhong, Shaomin; Chen, Liyang; Li, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid fillers are used to improve the appearance of nasolabial folds (NLF). This study aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and durability of a new hyaluronic acid gel (BioHyalux) versus Restylane for the correction of NLF. This was a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial involving 88 subjects with moderate to severe NLF. Subjects were randomized to BioHyalux and Restylane on either sides of the NLF. NLF was assessed before and right after injection, and at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months. Patients were followed up for 13-15 months to evaluate the durability and long-term safety. A clinically meaningful response was predefined as at least one-point improvement on the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale, which is a five-point scale. At 6 months, the response rate of BioHyalux was not inferior to that of Restylane (P  0.05) at all time points. At 6 months, 100 % reported improvements on both side; at 13-15 months, 60 % of subjects reported improvements with BioHyalux versus 64 % with Restylane. Adverse events were transient and predominantly mild or moderate in severity including injection site swelling, pain, itching, bruising, and tenderness. BioHyalux had reliable safety and tolerance, and could be an effective injectable filler for correcting NLF. PMID:26924549

  20. [Rhinoplasty and dermal fillers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallut, Y; Nguyen, P S

    2014-12-01

    The use of fillers for camouflage after surgical rhinoplasty or during medical rhinoplasty process represent an attractive technique which allows to avoid or to delay surgical time often dreaded by the patients. This technique apparently quite simple, must be applied carefully in order to avoid possible complications that can sometimes be very serious. Through their seven years of experience, the authors have selected absorbable type of products: hyaluronic acid or calcium hydroxylapatite, both approved by ANSM. Preference is given to microcannulas (27G) over needles and injection techniques through multiple tunnels fitted with small fragmented boluses. Due to possible Tyndall effect and skin necrosis risk, a one-shot injection with a lot of product should be avoided. Calcium hydroxyapaptite is preferred for the dorsum area while hyaluronic acid is recommended for the tip. The authors also relate the major encountered complications and describe the appropriated treatments. Nevertheless the strict application of the described technique represents the best way to prevent adverse complications.

  1. A Randomized, Evaluator-Blinded, Split-Face Comparison Study of the Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Mannitol Containing Monophasic Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler for the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Nasolabial Folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Wook; Moon, Ik Jun; Yun, Woo Jin; Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Sang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background Mannitol containing monophasic filler with higher crosslinking has not been well studied for moderate and severe nasolabial fold (NLF) correction. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of a novel mannitol containing hyaluronic acid (HA) filler (HA-G) with biphasic HA filler (HA-P) for moderate and severe NLF correction. Methods Thirteen subjects with symmetric moderate to severe NLF received HA-G (in one NLF) and HA-P (in other NLF) and were evaluated for 24 weeks. Results At both 12 and 24 weeks, the mean improvement in Genzyme 6-point grading scale from baseline was significantly greater in the side of face that was treated with HA-G than HA-P (1.96±0.91 vs. 1.54±0.73 at week 12; p=0.044, 1.88±0.78 vs. 1.3±0.79 at week 24; p=0.027, respectively). At 12 weeks, the mean Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale score was 2.92±0.93 for HA-G and 2.31±0.95 for HA-P (p=0.008). Both fillers were well tolerated. Conclusion The HA filler HA-G provides better efficacy and similar local tolerability compared with HA-P in 6 months following treatment for moderate and severe NLF. PMID:27274627

  2. Facial rejuvenation with fillers: The dual plane technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Salti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial aging is characterized by skin changes, sagging and volume loss. Volume is frequently addressed with reabsorbable fillers like hyaluronic acid gels. Materials and Methods: From an anatomical point of view, the deep and superficial fat compartments evolve differently with aging in a rather predictable manner. Volume can therefore be restored following a technique based on restoring first the deep volumes and there after the superficial volumes. We called this strategy "dual plane". A series of 147 consecutive patients have been treated with fillers using the dual plane technique in the last five years. Results: An average of 4.25 session per patient has been carried out for a total of 625 treatment sessions. The average total amount of products used has been 12 ml per patient with an average amount per session of 3.75 ml. We had few and limited adverse events with this technique. Conclusion: The dual plane technique is an injection technique based on anatomical logics. Different types of products can be used according to the plane of injection and their rheology in order to obtain a natural result and few side effects.

  3. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  4. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Tapioca Starch by Plasticizers, Inorganic Fillers and Agrowaste-Based Fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Azwar; Minna Hakkarainen

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tapioca starch-based films were tuned by different additives and additive combinations. The additives included plasticizers (glycerol, sorbitol, and citric acid), inorganic fillers (halloysite and kaolin), and agrowaste-based fillers (milled wood flour and rice bran). In addition, new biobased additives were prepared from wood flour and rice bran through liquefaction reaction. Through different additive combinations, starch-based materials with significant differences...

  5. FILLER ENGINEERING FOR PAPERMAKING: COMPARISION WITH FIBER ENGINEERING AND SOME IMPORTANT RESEARCH TOPICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibers and fillers are important raw materials for the preparation of paper products. Similar to fiber engineering, filler engineering for papermaking has become an active research area. There are similarities as well as differences between engineering involving each of these classes of materials. There are differences in such aspects as the nature of materials to be engineered, applicable engineering methods, and engineerablity of the material surfaces. The co-development of fiber engineering and filler engineering can potentially provide many benefits to the papermaking industry. For filler engineering, the relevant research topics broadly can include fibrous filler engineering, hollow/porous filler engineering, acid-stabilization of calcium carbonate fillers, surface encapsulation of naturally occurring polymers or their derivatives, preflocculation, precoagulation, cationic modification, filler/size hybrid formation, organic filler engineering, using combinations of different types of available fillers, multilayer deposition modification, modification with polymer latexes or dispersants, physical modification, mechanical modification, surface functionalization, fines-filler composite/hybrids or fiber-filler composite/ hybrid formation, in-situ polymerization modification, surface grafting, physical treatment in the presence of polymeric additives, filler precipitation, and core-shell composite filler engineering.

  6. Standard guidelines for the use of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used fillers vary greatly in their sources, efficacy duration and site of deposition; detailed knowledge of these properties is essential for administering them. Indications for fillers include facial lines (wrinkles, folds, lip enhancement, facial deformities, depressed scars, periocular melanoses, sunken eyes, dermatological diseases-angular cheilitis, scleroderma, AIDS lipoatrophy, earlobe plumping, earring ptosis, hand, neck, dιcolletι rejuvenation. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may use fillers after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during postgraduation or at any workshop dedicated to the subject of fillers. The physicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the area designated to receive an injection of fillers and the aesthetic principles involved. They should also have a thorough knowledge of the chemical nature of the material of the filler, its longevity, injection techniques, and any possible side effects. Facility: Fillers can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the filler should be discussed with the patient. Patients should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. Detailed consent forms need to be completed by the patients. A consent form should include the type of filler, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be carried out. Choice of the filler depends on the site, type of defect, results needed, and the physician′s experience. Injection technique and volume depend on the filler and the physician′s preference, as outlined in these guidelines.

  7. Peculiarities of Shape Recovery in Polymer Composites with Compacting Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Beloshenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of the shape memory effect development in composites based on the epoxy polymer and various fillers, such as thermoexpanded graphite, aerosils, metallized graphite, and basalt flakes, have been investigated. It has been determined that straining followed by the shape recovery of composites is accompanied by changes in their volume. Extent and character of the changes depend on the ability of fillers to compaction under pressure, deformation scheme, adsorption ability of the filler. It is shown that the combined deformation consisting of compression and stretching of specimens in different sequence gives structural states for which the longitudinal strain-transverse strain ratio can take zero, positive, or negative values.

  8. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  9. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing

  10. Research progress of composite fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan ZHAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using composite filler is a very potential way to braze dissimilar material, especially braze metals with ceramics. The composite filler which is added varieties of high temperature alloy, carbon fiber and ceramic particles has a suitable coefficient of thermal expansion. The application of composite filler can release the residual stress caused by mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient in the brazing joints and improve the overall performance significantly. According to the traditional classification method of composite materials, the composite filler is divided into micron-reinforced composite filler and nano-reinforced composite filler, of which the feature and research status are discussed in this text. According to the influence of different size reinforced phases on microstructure and mechanical property of the brazing joints, nano-reinforced composite filler has more uniform and better structure compared with micron-reinforced composite filler, and higher joint strengh can be obtained by using it. However, the reinforced mechanism is still an open question, and will become the key area of the future research work.

  11. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. G. Loomis (INEEL); A. P. Zdinak (MSE); M. A. Ewanic (MSE); J. J. Jessmore (INEEL)

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity

  12. Numerical Investigation of T-joints with 3D Four Directional Braided Composite Fillers Under Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-kang; Liu, Zhen-guo; Hu, Long; Wang, Yi-bo; Lei, Bing; Huang, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Numerical studied on T-joints with three-dimensional four directional (3D4D) braided composite fillers was presented in this article. Compared with conventional unidirectional prepreg fillers, the 3D braided composite fillers have excellent ability to prevent crack from penetrating trigone fillers, which constantly occurred in the conventional fillers. Meanwhile, the 3D braided composite fillers had higher fiber volume fraction and eliminated the fiber folding problem in unidirectional prepreg fillers. The braiding technology and mechanical performance of 3D4D braided fillers were studied. The numerical model of carbon fiber T-joints with 3D4D braided composite fillers was built by finite element analysis software. The damage formation, extension and failing process of T-joints with 3D4D braided fillers under tensile load were investigated. Further investigation was extended to the effect of 3D4D braided fillers with different braiding angles on mechanical behavior of the T-joints. The study results revealed that the filling area was the weakest part of the T-joints where the damage first appeared and the crack then rapidly spread to the glue film around the filling area and the interface between over-laminate and soleplate. The 3D4D braided fillers were undamaged and the braiding angle change induced a little effect on the bearing capacity of T-joints.

  13. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  14. Lower Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, André; Humphrey, Shannon; Weinkle, Susan; Yee, G Jackie; Remington, B Kent; Lorenc, Z Paul; Yoelin, Steve; Waldorf, Heidi A; Azizzadeh, Babak; Butterwick, Kimberly J; de Maio, Mauricio; Sadick, Neil; Trevidic, Patrick; Criollo-Lamilla, Gisella; Garcia, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The use of injectable fillers enables facial sculpting through treatment of volume depletion and modeling of facial contours. Injectable fillers are among the most frequently performed minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.However, treatment of the lower third of the face can be challenging and requires expertise in facial anatomy. In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the lower third of the face, highlighting danger zones. In addition, the authors describe their preferred approach and detailed technique used in the treatment of each specific area, namely the jawline, prejowl sulcus, melomental folds, and lips. PMID:26441104

  15. The influence of monomeric resin and filler characteristics on the performance of experimental resin-based composites (RBCs) derived from a commercial formulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hahnel, Sebastian

    2012-04-01

    To explore experimental RBCs derived from a successful commercially available RBC (Grandio) to investigate resin monomer blend and filler parameters (volume fraction, density and diameter) on RBC performance.

  16. Injectable Cartilage Shaving: An Autologous and Long Lasting Filler Material for Correction of Minor Contour Deformities in Rhinoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Manafi, Ali; Hamedi, Zahra Sadat; Manafi, Amir; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Rajaee, Ahmadreza; Manafi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Filler materials are gaining popularity in nonsurgical rhinoplasty the major advantages are the ability to camouflage the surface deformities, and also the soft and malleable consistency; while the major drawback of the safe fillers such as hyaluronic acid is short durability. In this study, we evaluated the injectable cartilage shaving as an autologous filler material for correction of minor contour deformities in rhinoplasty. METHODS Injectable cartilage shaving was used for corr...

  17. Fillers in dermatology: from past to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-11-01

    Injectable fillers were introduced in dermatology as a method for reconstructing facial deformities and restoring the aging face. Although fillers have become a popular option among cosmetic patients, clinical experience has shown that fillers must be used with caution, as complications can occur. This article provides a brief review of the history of filler agents currently available for soft tissue augmentation. Although no single filler is ideal for all patients, indications, and situations, residents should be aware of the properties and characteristics that make each product unique. PMID:26682563

  18. Host Tissue Interaction, Fate, and Risks of Degradable and Nondegradable Gel Fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    with particulated fillers, polyacrylamide gel and silicone oil. However, these complications differ in nature and depend on the filler type used. METHODS AND MATERIALS This overview presents the different gel filler types, how they interact with host tissue, and what can go wrong. The results and conclusion......-bindings to the polymer in order to obtain a more dense molecular structure, which will prolong degradation and filling effect of the gel. Other gel fillers contain particles of organic (poly-lactic acid) or inorganic (calcium hydroxylapatite) material, which have been used in human tissue for other purposes (degradable...... suture material and bone cement, respectively). The permanent fillers (silicone oil and polyacrylamide gel) have been used for many years, silicone mainly in the US and polyacrylamide gel in most countries outside the US and Canada. OBJECTIVE Complications occur, and they appear to be more frequent...

  19. Filler content influence on the positron annihilation response in an epoxy resin composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Tandil (Argentina); Somoza, A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Dept. de Materiales, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubiolo, G. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Marzocca, A. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consolati, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata

    2001-07-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and mechanical properties tests were used to study the influence of the filler content on the epoxy resin DGEBA. Using a mechanical model recently developed by the authors of the present work, and the values of the long lifetime component it is possible to evaluate correctly the internal stresses introduced in the epoxy lattice for the filler. Additional information obtained from the analysis of the short-lived lifetime component is also presented. Specifically, in the case of the matrix charged with metallic particles, an interesting correlation between the associated intensity to this component and the filler volume fraction is shown. (orig.)

  20. Solid Midfacial Implants: When Fillers Are Not Enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Karan; Binder, William

    2016-10-01

    The aging process results in volumetric changes on multiple levels of the face including the skin, soft tissue, and underlying facial skeleton. Malar and mandibular augmentation with facial fillers and alloplastic implants are two treatment options used to achieve the goal of volume enhancement. Noninvasive modalities have become increasingly popular due to the availability of office-based options that require a limited understanding of facial aesthetics, a basic grasp of the mechanisms behind the aging process, and no level of surgical expertise or training. It is important, however, to understand the limitations and appropriate use of each technique, surgical and nonsurgical, either as a sole modality or in conjunction with each other to attain optimal aesthetic results. Although minimally invasive soft-tissue augmentation procedures such as fillers offer midface treatment options, alloplastic implants provide a stable support platform or scaffolding for skeletal and soft-tissue augmentation that fillers alone cannot often provide. A multilevel understanding of facial aesthetics must include the facial skeletal architecture and foundation that it provides for proper soft-tissue draping and contour. Alloplastic implants remain the standard for skeletal augmentation and remain the mainstay when fillers are not sufficient for midface augmentation. PMID:27680519

  1. Effects of Al2O3-Particulate-Contained Composite Filler Materials on the Shear Strength of Alumina Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    All2O3/Al2O3 joints were brazed with a new kind of filler materials, which were formed by adding Al2O3 particulates into Ag-Cu-Ti active filler metal. The results showed that the material parameters (the Ti content, Al2O3 particulate volume fraction) of the composite filler materials affected the shear strength of brazed joints. When the Ti content was 2 wt pct in the filler metal, the shear strength of brazing joints decreased with the increasing the volume ratio of Al2O3 particulate. When the Ti content was 3 wt pct in the filler metal, the shear strength of joints increased from 93.75 MPa(Al2O3p 0 vol. pct) to 135.32 MPa(Al2O3p 15 vol. pct).

  2. Skin fillers%皮肤填充剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵华; 李恒进

    2010-01-01

    Now, more and more people choose skin fillers to rejuvenate aging face, which contributes to the increase in variety of skin fillers. Up to now, United States Food and Drug Administration has approved human collagen, bovine collagen, hyaluronic acid, poly-L-lactic acid and calcium hydroxyapatite as skin fillers for age-related facial wrinkles and fat atrophy. These fillers have different indications, advantages,disadvantages and durability, but they are far from ideal. Doctors should consider the specific condition of patients before selecting the optimal fillers to product satisfactory cosmetic results.%现在越来越多求美者选择皮肤填充剂来修复面部老化,这使得市面上皮肤填充剂种类日益增多.到目前为止,美国食品药品管理局批准人胶原、牛胶原、透明质酸、左旋聚乳酸、钙羟磷灰石作为皮肤填充剂用于恢复年龄相关性面部皱纹及脂肪萎缩.这些皮肤填充剂具有各自不同的适应证、优缺点和维持时间,但这些填充剂仍不是最理想的皮肤填充剂.临床医师应结合求美者的具体情况加以考虑,选择适合的填充剂以达到满意的美容效果.

  3. Increase of the filler content by using a silica-coated PCC filler

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenço, A.F.; Gamelas, J.A.F.; Ferreira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of filler content in paper without significantly sacrificing the paper mechanical resistances is of high interest for papermakers. In this work, precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) modified with silica was used as filler for papermaking. Handsheets based on a eucalyptus kraft pulp furnish with different amounts of the modified filler, ranging from 16 to 40%, were produced. For similar levels of filler content it was found that the strength properties of the handsheets produce...

  4. Hybrid Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Colloidal Gels are Injectable Fillers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qun; Gu, Zhen; Jamal, Syed; Detamore, Michael S.; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    Injectable bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to treat bone defects. Current bone fillers may benefit from improvements in dynamic properties such as shear thinning during injection and recovery of material stiffness after placement. Negatively charged inorganic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled with positively charged organic poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs to create a cohesive colloidal gel. This material is ...

  5. Effect of Geopolymer filler in Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) Pipe for Piping Application: Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus Abu Hashim, Mohammad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali, Che; Hussin, Kamarudin; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The present work is aimed to carry out the effect of geopolymer material which is fly ash as filler in the glass reinforced epoxy pipe on the micro structure of fly ash geopolymer, compression properties, and bulk density using the filament winding method. Conventional glass reinforced epoxy pipes has its own disadvantages such as high corrosion resistance at acidic environment and low strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymer is a type of amorphous alumino-silicate and can be synthesized by geopolymerization process. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is fly ash with 4 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of the raw material fly ash and fly ash based-geopolymer surface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the additions of fly ash at the beginning with 10 wt% are showing higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without fly ash geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these series of samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples fly ash based-geopolymer filler are higher as compared to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with fly ash geopolymer filler continues to decline when added to 20 wt% - 40 wt% of geopolymer filler loading. The results showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  6. Filler for solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an existent filler for solidifying radioactive wastes, fine powders generated upon pulverizing concrete waste materials and recovering coarse aggregates and fine aggregates are used as substitutes for a portion of cements and/or at least a portion of sands. Namely, the concrete waste materials are crushed by a crusher, and sieved to recover grains having a grain size of not less than 5mm as regenerated aggregate materials. Further, grains having a grain size of not more than 5mm are selectively collected as fine aggregate materials. Since a large quantity of fine powders and mortar are contained in the fine aggregate materials, they are cleaned by a recovering device. In this case, grains having a grain size of about 0.3mm are separately recovered as fine powders. Since the fine powders are porous and have good water retainability, fillers for radioactive wastes highly flowable and having excellent material-solidifying resistance can be obtained by using the fine powders. Further, they can also contribute with a view point of recycling of sources. (T.M.)

  7. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  8. Filler functionality in edible solid foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sman, R G M

    2016-05-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. But, we show that much can be learned about that from the field of synthetic polymeric foams with (nano)fillers. For edible brittle foams the enhancement of mechanical strength by filler ingredients is less relevant compared to the additional functionalities such as 1) the promotion of bubble nucleation and 2) cell opening-which are much more relevant for the snack texture. The survey of particulate ingredients added to snack formulations shows that they cannot be viewed as inert fillers, because of their strong hygroscopic properties. Hence, these fillers will compete with starch for water, and that will modify the glass transition and boiling point, which are important factors for snack expansion. Filler properties can be modified via extrusion, but it is better if that processing step is decoupled from the subsequent processing steps as mixing and expansion. Several filler ingredients are also added because of their nutritional value, but can have adverse effect on snack expansion. These adverse effects can be reduced if the increase of nutritional value is decoupled from other filler functionality via compartmentalization using micropellets. PMID:27067462

  9. Adverse reactions to injectable soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, Luis; Requena, Celia; Christensen, Lise;

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, injections with filler agents are often used for wrinkle-treatment and soft tissue augmentation by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the ideal filler has not yet been discovered and all of them may induce adverse reactions. Quickly biodegradable or resorbable...

  10. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    at 28 days from about 35 MPa down to about 13 MPa. The cementing efficiency factor of the chalk filler was found to be in the range 0.21 - 0.42. The chalk filler performed equally well with a grey and a white cement; the latter opens the possibility to produce white SCC more cost effectively....

  11. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  12. FILLERS AND THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon footprint reduction is a global concern. For the papermaking industry, strategically effective measures of carbon footprint reduction can include many aspects such as energy efficiency improvement, use of renewable carbon-neutral energy, practicing of sustainable forestry, and development of an integrated forest products biorefinery. Filler addition in papermaking can save substantial amounts of pulp fibers, and reduce energy consumption, which can surely contribute to reduction in paper’s carbon footprint. However, the negative effect of filler addition on paper recycling, and the energy consumption associated with the production, processing, and treatment of fillers, will contribute to the carbon footprint. On balance, it can be considered that filler addition in reasonable amounts is likely to lower the paper’s carbon footprint. Certain research work is still needed to better understand the relationship between filler addition and the carbon footprint of papermaking.

  13. Electro-mechanical properties of hydrogel composites with micro- and nano-cellulose fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Mohamed Shahid U.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Lakshmana Rao, C.

    2015-09-01

    Stimuli responsive cross-linked hydrogels are of great interest for applications in diverse fields such as sensors and biomaterials. In this study, we investigate polymer composites filled with cellulose fillers. The celluloses used in making the composites were a microcrystalline cellulose of commercial grade and cellulose nano-whiskers obtained through acid hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. The filler concentration was varied and corresponding physical, mechanical and electro-mechanical characterization was carried out. The electro-mechanical properties were determined using a quasi-static method. The fillers not only enhance the mechanical properties of the composite by providing better reinforcement but also provide a quantitative electric potential in the composite. The measurements reveal that the polymer composites prepared from two different cellulose fillers possess a quantitative electric potential which can be utilized in biomedical applications. It is argued that the mechanism behind the quantitative electric potential in the composites is due to streaming potentials arising due to electrical double layer formation.

  14. Injectable carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels for soft tissue filler applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Devika M; Gold, Gittel T; Taub, Peter J; Nicoll, Steven B

    2014-12-01

    Disease, trauma and aging all lead to deficits in soft tissue. As a result, there is a need to develop materials that safely and effectively restore areas of deficiency. While autogenous fat is the current gold standard, hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are commonly used. However, the animal and bacterial origin of HA-based materials can induce adverse reactions in patients. With the aim of developing a safer and more affordable alternative, this study characterized the properties of a plant-derived, injectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soft tissue filler. Specifically, methacrylated CMC was synthesized and crosslinked to form stable hydrogels at varying macromer concentrations (2-4% w/v) using an ammonium persulfate and ascorbic acid redox initiation system. The equilibrium Young's modulus was shown to vary with macromer concentration (ranging from ∼2 to 9.25kPa), comparable to values of native soft tissue and current surgical fillers. The swelling properties were similarly affected by macromer concentration, with 4% gels exhibiting the lowest swelling ratio and mesh size, and highest crosslinking density. Rheological analysis was performed to determine gelation onset and completion, and was measured to be within the ISO standard for injectable materials. In addition, hydrolytic degradation of these gels was sensitive to macromer concentration, while selective removal using enzymatic treatment was also demonstrated. Moreover, favorable cytocompatibility of the CMC hydrogels was exhibited by co-culture with human dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the tunability of redox-crosslinked CMC hydrogels by varying fabrication parameters, making them a versatile platform for soft tissue filler applications. PMID:25152355

  15. Effects of Al2O3 Particulates on the Thickness of Reaction Layer of Al2O3 Joints Brazed with Al2O3-Particulate-Contained Composite Filler Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo YANG; Jingwei WU; Hongyuan FANG

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the rate-controlling process for the interfacial layer growth of brazing joints brazed with activecomposite filler materials, the thickness of brazing joints brazed with conventional active filler metal and activecomposite filler materials with different volume fraction of Al2O3 particulate was studied. The experimental resultsindicate although there are Al2O3 particulates added into active filler metals, the time dependence of interfacial layergrowth is t2 as described by Fickian law for the joints brazed with conventional active filler metal. It also shows thatthe key factor affecting the interfacial layer growth is the volume fraction of alumina in the composite filler materialcompared with the titanium weight fraction in the filler material.

  16. Effect of intraarticular osmic acid on synovial membrane volume and inflammation, determined by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P;

    1995-01-01

    The changes in MR-determined synovial membrane volume, early synovial enhancement, and cartilage and bone erosions after osmic acid knee synovectomy were studied. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees with persistent arthritis was performed before and 1 month after...... treatment. The synovial membrane volume was significantly reduced (median -52%) in all 9 patients brought into clinical remission (p < 0.01), while no significant change was found in patients with clinical relapse. The early synovial enhancement was not significantly changed. MRI revealed progressive...

  17. Dermal fillers in aesthetics: an overview of adverse events and treatment approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funt D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available David Funt,1 Tatjana Pavicic21Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The ever-expanding range of dermal filler products for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation is of benefit for patients and physicians, but as indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications will likely also increase.Objective: To describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide structured and clear guidance on their treatment and avoidance.Methods: Reports of dermal filler complications in the medical literature were reviewed and, based on the publications retrieved and the authors' extensive experience, recommendations for avoiding and managing complications are provided.Results: Different dermal fillers have widely varying properties, associated risks, and injection requirements. All dermal fillers have the potential to cause complications. Most are related to volume and technique, though some are associated with the material itself. The majority of adverse reactions are mild and transient, such as bruising and trauma-related edema. Serious adverse events are rare, and most are avoidable with proper planning and technique.Conclusion: For optimum outcomes, aesthetic physicians should have a detailed understanding of facial anatomy; the individual characteristics of available fillers; their indications, contraindications, benefits, and drawbacks; and ways to prevent and avoid potential complications.Keywords: aesthetic medicine, complications

  18. Computational study of filler microstructure and effective property relations in dielectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu U.; Tan, Daniel Q.

    2011-05-01

    Phase field modeling and computer simulation is employed to study the relations between filler microstructures and effective properties of dielectric composites. The model solves electrostatic equations in terms of polarization vector field in reciprocal space using a fast Fourier transform technique and parallel computing algorithm. Composites composed of linear constituent phases of different dielectric constants are considered. Interphase boundary conditions are automatically taken into account without explicitly tracking interphase interfaces in the composites. Various factors associated with filler microstructures are systematically investigated, including dielectric constant mismatch between fillers and matrix, particle size, shape, orientation, volume fraction, and spatial arrangement as well as directional alignment. Heterogeneous distributions of polarization, charge density, and local electric field are calculated for each composite microstructure, based on which effective dielectric constant and dielectric anisotropy of the composites are determined. It is found that electrostatic interactions among high-dielectric-constant fillers embedded in low-dielectric-constant matrix play critical roles in determining the composite properties, which sensitively depend on filler arrangement and, especially, directional alignment into fibrous microstructures (chains). Such microstructurally engineered composites, whose fillers are not randomly dispersed, exhibit strong dielectric anisotropy despite all constituent components being isotropic.

  19. Al2O3/Al2O3 Joint Brazed with Al2O3-particulate-contained Composite Ag-Cu-Ti Filler Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo YANG; Hongyuan FANG; Xin WAN

    2005-01-01

    Microstructure and interfacial reactions of Al2O3 joints brazed with Al2O3-particulate-contained composite Ag-Cu-Ti filler material were researched by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microscopy analysis (EPMA),energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The interfacial reaction layer thickness of joints brazed with conventional active filler metal and active composite filler materials with different volume fraction of Al2O3 particulate was also studied. The experimental results indicated although there were Al2O3 particulates added into active filler metals, the time dependence of interfacial layer growth of joints brazed with active composite filler material is t1/2 as described by Fickian law as the joints brazed with conventional active filler metal.

  20. Relative acidic compartment volume as a lysosomal storage disorder–associated biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Speak, Anneliese O; Wallom, Kerri L.; Al Eisa, Nada; Smith, David A.; Hendriksz, Christian J.; Simmons, Louise; Lachmann, Robin H.; Cousins, Alison; Hartung, Ralf; Mengel, Eugen; Runz, Heiko; Beck, Michael; Amraoui, Yasmina; Imrie, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) occur at a frequency of 1 in every 5,000 live births and are a common cause of pediatric neurodegenerative disease. The relatively small number of patients with LSDs and lack of validated biomarkers are substantial challenges for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated the use of a commercially available fluorescent probe, Lysotracker, that can be used to measure the relative acidic compartment volume of circulating B cells as a potentially universal bioma...

  1. Effect of electromagnetic Stirring on the Element Distribution in Laser Beam Welding of Aluminium with Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, M.; Tang, Z.; Vollertsen, F.

    Additional external electromagnetic fields are used in laser beam welding of aluminium with silicon containing filler wire to manipulate the flow of the liquid metal due to induced volume forces and hence to modify the element distribution. Aiming for a better understanding of the fluid-dynamic processes inside the meld pool, a CFD model has been implemented to simulate the melt flow. In this paper, simulation results on the resulting element distribution of filler wire material under a coaxial magnetic field with different frequencies is compared to experimental results for the same parameters. It is shown that in both cases the concentration of alloying elements of the filler material has a spatial periodicity. From the CFD model it can be concluded that the change of the distribution of the filler material results from a modulation of the melt flow due to the periodic induced electromagnetic volume forces.

  2. Effects of PMMA and Cross-Linked Dextran Filler for Soft Tissue Augmentation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Soyun; Lee, So-Hyoun; Shim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Se Eun; Kang, Seong Soo; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted for evaluation of the ability to maintain efficacy and biocompatibility of cross-linked dextran in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (DiHM) and cross-linked dextran mixed with PMMA in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (PDiHM), compared with hyaluronic acid (HA) filler. Saline and HA solution was administered in the negative and positive control groups, and DiHM and PDiHM were administered in the test groups (n = 10 in each group). The site of cranial subcutaneous injection was the mid-point of the interpupillary line, and the site of intraoral submucosal injection was the ridge crest 2 mm below the cervical line of the mandibular left incisor. Before and immediately after filler injection, intraoral photos and lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for analysis and comparison of the effect of the filler on the injection sites. The filler injected areas were converted into sequential size changes (%) of the baseline. Histomorphologic examination was performed after 12 weeks. The smallest value in the filler injected area was observed during the experimental period in the normal saline group (p filler materials with injection system provide an excellent alternative surgical method for use in oral and craniofacial fields. PMID:26633376

  3. 7 CFR 58.710 - Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL... on side wall. The filler valves and head shall be kept in good repair and capable of...

  4. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  5. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  6. Metaanalysis of filler materials in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Yáñez Sánchez, Ángela; Leco Berrocal, María Isabel; Martínez González, José María

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the success and failure, apical sealing and biocompatibility of silver amalgam, IRM®, SuperEBA® and MTA as retrograde filler materials. A metaanalysis was made of filler materials in periapical surgery, evaluating a total of 30 articles published in recent years. Percentage success with silver amalgam was 76.5% and slightly inferior to that afforded by IRM®. Performance in turn increased considerably when the materials used were SuperEBA® or MTA. As regards margina...

  7. Waste-Wood-Derived Fillers for Plastics

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brent; Clemons, Craig M.; Stark, Nicole; Schneider, James P.

    1996-01-01

    Filled thermoplastic composites are stiffer, stronger, and more dimensionally stable than their unfilled counterparts. Such thermoplastics are usually provided to the end-user as a precompounded, pelletized feedstock. Typical reinforcing fillers are inorganic materials like talc or fiberglass, but materials derived from waste wood, such as wood flour and recycled paper fiber, are also effective as fillers. The goal of this project was to generate commercial interest in using waste-wood–paper-...

  8. Effect of filler content on mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of particulate biphasic calcium phosphate--polylactide composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleach, N C; Nazhat, S N; Tanner, K E; Kellomäki, M; Törmälä, P

    2002-04-01

    A bioabsorbable self-reinforced polylactide/biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) composite is being developed for fracture fixation plates. One manufacturing route is to produce preimpregnated sheets by pulling polylactide (PLA) fibres through a suspension of BCP filler in a PLA solution and compression moulding the prepreg to the desired shape. To aid understanding of the process, interactions between the matrix and filler were investigated. Composite films containing 0-0.25 volume fraction filler, produced by solvent casting, were analysed using SEM, tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Homogeneous films could be made, although some particle agglomeration was seen at higher filler volume fractions. As the filler content increased, the failure strain decreased due to a reduction in the amount of ductile polymer present and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased because of agglomeration and void formation at higher filler content. The matrix glass transition temperature increased due to polymer chain adsorption and immobilization onto the BCP particles. Complex damping mechanisms, such as particle-particle agglomeration, may exist at the higher BCP volume fractions. PMID:11922463

  9. The Effect of Particle Size of Wollastonite Filler on Thermal Performance of Intumescent Fire Retardant Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent Fire retardant coatings (IFRC’s are one of the simplest ways to protect substrates exposed to fire. In this study, Wollastonite (W filler of two different particle sizes were used to determine the fire performance of intumescent fire retardant coating. The basic ingredients of the coating were ammonium poly-phosphate (APP as acid source, expandable graphite (EG as carbon source, melamine (MEL as blowing agent in epoxy binder, boric acid as additive and hardener as curing agent. A series of coating formulations were developed by using different weight percentages of both sized Wollastonite fillers. The coated steel substrate samples were tested for fire performance using Bunsen burner and char expansion was measured using furnace fire test. A Comparison of the coatings thermal performance was determined. Wollastonite containing filler particle size 10 μm showed better thermal performance than formulations containing filler’s particle size 44 μm.

  10. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol at various temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M L Parmar; R K Awasthi; M K Guleria

    2004-01-01

    Partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid have been determined in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight of ethanol) at different temperatures and acid concentrations from the solution density measurements. The data have been evaluated by using Masson equation and the obtained parameters have been interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The partial molar volumes vary with temperature as a power series of temperature. Structure making/breaking capacities of the organic acids have been inferred from the sign of [2$\\phi^{0}_{v}$/2], i.e. secondderivative of partial molar volume with respect to temperature at constant pressure. Both the organic acids behave as structure breakers in water and water + ethanol.

  11. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  12. In situ measurement of reaction volume and calculation of pH of weak acid buffer solutions under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Stephen K; Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2011-05-26

    Direct measurements of reaction volume, so far, have been limited to atmospheric pressure. This study describes a method for in situ reaction volume measurements under pressure using a variable volume piezometer. Reaction volumes for protonic ionization of weak acid buffering agents (MES, citric acid, sulfanilic acid, and phosphoric acid) were measured in situ under pressure up to 400 MPa at 25 °C. The methodology involved initial separation of buffering agents within the piezometer using gelatin capsules. Under pressure, the volume of the reactants was measured at 25 °C, and the contents were heated to 40 °C to dissolve the gelatin and allow the reaction to occur, and cooled to 25 °C, where the volume of products was measured. Reaction volumes were used to calculate pH of the buffer solutions as a function of pressure. The results show that the measured reaction volumes as well as the calculated pH values generally quite agree with their respective theoretically predicted values up to 100 MPa. The results of this study highlight the need for a comprehensive theory to describe the pressure behavior of ionization reactions in realistic systems especially at higher pressures. PMID:21542618

  13. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  14. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nikhil Gupta; Balraj Singh Brar; Eyassu Woldesenbet

    2001-04-01

    Flyash is incorporated in glass fibre reinforced epoxies to study their response to the filler addition. Low cost of flyash can reduce the overall cost of the component. Only very low volume fractions of filler are investigated in the present study. To obtain further clarification of the observed phenomenon, another abundantly available low cost material, calcium carbonate is incorporated in one set of the specimens. Compressive strength of the material is found to decrease, whereas steep increase in impact strength is observed by introduction of very small quantity of fillers. Specimens containing calcium carbonate are tested for impact properties only. Effect of specimen aspect ratio on the compressive strength values is also studied by testing specimens of three different aspect ratios. Scanning electron microscopic observations are taken to develop a better understanding of the phenomena taking place in the material system at microscopic level.

  15. The effect of wood filler behaviour on structure and fracture of polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dziadur

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of wood filler additions on the microstructure, fractographic features and cracking mechanism of low density polyethylene (LPDE.Design/methodology/approach: For the tests, waste polyethylene from industrial and common films and Lignocel CB 120 wood fibers have been used. Three types of compositions (composites with 10, 20 and 30% of wood flour have been prepared for the tests. To evaluate the role of used filler conducted it’s quantitative analysis by linear method. Parameters like volume fraction of the filler, the number particles of wood flour per surface area and mean wood fiber diameter, were determinated.Findings: The results of microscopic observations of the etched sections and fractures obtained at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature indicate good matching between the filler particles and the structure of basic polymer, due mainly to bonding of the individual lamellae in spherulites. The reinforced polymer reveals a cracking micromechanism which is called crazing.Research limitations/implications: The further research are required to solve the problem of the filler contrast.Practical implications: From practical point of view, this research can be used to project composites (wood flour – polyethylene.Originality/value: Originality of this work is the fact that stereological measurements shown usefulness this method to estimate filler’s influence of forming microstructure and properties of the investigated composite.

  16. A Numerical Study on Electrical Percolation of Polymer-Matrix Composites with Hybrid Fillers of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical percolation of polymer-matrix composites (PMCs containing hybrid fillers of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and carbon black (CB is estimated by studying the connection possibility of the fillers using Monte Carlo simulation. The 3D simulation model of CB-CNT hybrid filler is established, in which CNTs are modeled by slender capped cylinders and CB groups are modeled by hypothetical spheres with interspaces because CB particles are always agglomerated. The observation on the effects of CB and CNT volume fractions and dimensions on the electrical percolation threshold of hybrid filled composites is then carried out. It is found that the composite electrical percolation threshold can be reduced by increasing CNT aspect ratio, as well as increasing the diameter ratio of CB groups to CNTs. And adding CB into CNT composites can decrease the CNT volume needed to convert the composite conductivity, especially when the CNT volume fraction is close to the threshold of PMCs with only CNT filler. Different from previous linear assumption, the nonlinear relation between CB and CNT volume fractions at composite percolation threshold is revealed, which is consistent with the synergistic effect observed in experiments. Based on the nonlinear relation, the estimating equation for the electrical percolation threshold of the PMCs containing CB-CNT hybrid fillers is established.

  17. Understanding, Avoiding, and Managing Severe Filler Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzany, Berthold; DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Any injectable filler may elicit moderate-to-severe adverse events, ranging from nodules to abscesses to vascular occlusion. Fortunately, severe adverse events are uncommon for the majority of fillers currently on the market. Because these are rare events, it is difficult to identify the relevant risk factors and to design the most efficacious treatment strategies. Poor aesthetic outcomes are far more common than severe adverse events. These in contrast should be easily avoidable by ensuring that colleagues receive proper training and follow best practices. PMID:26441099

  18. Phosphogypsum Utilization Part III: as Adhesive Filler and Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to make use of phosphogypsum (PG) waste material, which is produced in phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizer manufactures. A number of wood adhesive formulations based on polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) polymer and phosphogypsum as a filler have been prepared, using different percentages of phusphogypsum, ranging between 5~20 wt pct. The prepared formulations wore tested for adhesion strength and compared with both natural and pure gypsum fillers. The results indicate that PG improves the adhesion strenth when 5 wt pct added, and that may be due to filling the porous surface of wood with the fine particles of PG, as well as coating the particles of the filler (PG) with PVAc units. Also, a number of formulations based on urea-formaldehyde polymer have been prepared using phosphogypsum as an active filler in the ratio of 40~75 wt pct to prepare composite materials used for some decoration purposes and construction. Mechanical, physical, and thermal properties of these formulations were studied. Also, the activation energy was calculated. The results indicate that PG without acid hardener can be used for preparation of composite materials based on urea-formaldehyde between 40~63.64 wt pct for construction purposes in the humid atmosphere, while between 63.64~75 wt pct for decoration purposes. The improvement of the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composite material may be attributed to the simultaneous hydration hardening action of phosphogypsum and the presence of 0.8% P2O5. These effects act as an active hardener for urea-formaldehyde resin and accelerate the cross-linking and network formation reinforced by the fine dusty inorganic particles of PG. The advantage of this method is to prepare composite material gypsum-urea-formaldehyde, which achieves the utilization of large amount of PG, reducing the price of the main product phosphate, minimizing the pollution and producing new materials which possess high thermal

  19. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Chol Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal properties. The combination of conductive filler with carbon fiber in asphalt mixture was evaluated. Also, rheological properties of modified asphalt binders with conductive fillers were measured using dynamic shear rheometer and bending beam rheometer at grade-specific temperatures. Based on rheological testing, the conductive fillers improve rutting resistance and decrease thermal cracking resistance. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon black improve the thermal properties of asphalt mixes and the combined conductive fillers are more effective than the single filler.

  20. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  1. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fund...

  2. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  3. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption on macroporous resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, George R.; Suffet, I.H.; Malaiyandi, Murugan

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption on synthetic macroporous resins, such as the Amberlite XAD series and Duolite A-7, is routinely used to isolate and concentrate organic acids from forge volumes of water. Samples as large as 24,500 L have been processed on site by using these resins. Two established extraction schemes using XAD-8 and Duolite A-7 resins are described. The choice of the appropriate resin and extraction scheme is dependent on the organic solutes of interest. The factors that affect resin performance, selectivity, and capacity for a particular solute are solution pH, resin surface area and pore size, and resin composition. The logistical problems of sample handling, filtration, and preservation are also discussed.

  4. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O. Hwan; Gyeong Oh, Yu; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Gak Kim, Byoung; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-12-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)-1, which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis-Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally.

  5. Influence of solution volume on the dissolution rate of silicon dioxide in hydrofluoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsev, Boris; Gelman, Danny; Komissarov, Ilia; Epshtein, Alon; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data and modeling of the dissolution of various Si/SiO2 thermal coatings in different volumes of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are reported. The rates of SiO2 -film dissolution, measured by means of various electrochemical techniques, and alteration in HF activity depend on the thickness of the film coating. Despite the small volumes (0.6-1.2 mL) of the HF solution, an effect of SiO2 -coating thickness on the dissolution rate was detected. To explain alterations detected in HF activity after SiO2 dissolution, spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FTIR) of the chemical composition of the solutions were conducted. This is associated with a modification in the chemical composition of the HF solution, which results in either the formation of an oxidized species in solution or the precipitation of dissolution products. HF2 (-) accumulation in the HF solution, owing to SiO2 dissolution was identified as the source of the chemical alteration.

  6. A Review of the Effect of Injected Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Volume on Reflux Correction Following Endoscopic Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Dave

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature suggests that multiple variables affect vesicoureteric reflux (VUR resolution rates following dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA injection. This article reviews the evidence pertaining to the effect of injected Dx/HA volume on success rates following endoscopic correction. Lack of prospective studies which use injected volume as a continuous variable coupled with a nonstandardized injection technique and endpoint hinders the ability to reach a definite conclusion.

  7. Chemical interaction of polyethylene matrix with vegetable fillers in biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantyukhov, Petr; Monakhova, Tatiana; Popov, Anatoly; Zykova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the diffusion of low molecular weight components from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites. In order to identify the diffusible substances a model experiment used where the hexadecane acted as a model of polyethylene. It was determined that polyphenolic compounds and chlorophyll penetrate from vegetable fillers to hexadecane to the maximum extent. There was found a correlation between the amount of polyphenolic compounds diffusible from the fillers to hexadecane and thermal oxidation kinetics of real biocomposites based on polyethylene and vegetable fillers. Thus, it has been assumed the diffusion of polyphenols and chlorophyll from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites.

  8. Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acids). PEMs with frozen-in free volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, Morton [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Early work with rigid rod aromatic polyelectrolytes implied that steric hindrance in packing of the rigid rods left unoccupied volumes that could absorb and hold water molecules strongly. We called this “frozen in free volume). It is illustrated and contrasted with the packing of flexible backbone polyelectrolytes (Reference 5 of this report). This was quantified for poly(biphenylene disulfonic acid) (PBDSA) and poly(phenylene disulfonic acid) (PPDSA). We found that PPDSA held three water molecules per acid group down to 11% relative humidity (RH) and had very high conductivity even at these low RHs. (Reference 1 of report.) The frozen-in free volume was calculated to be equivalent to a λ of 3.5. The work reported below concentrated on studying these polymers and their copolymers with biphenylene disulfonic acid. As expected, the polyelectrolytes are water soluble. Several approaches towards making water stable films were studied. Grafting alkyl benzene substituents on sulfonic acid groups had worked for PBPDSA (1) so it was tried with PPDSA and a 20%/80% copolymer of BPDSA and PDSA (B20P80). T-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl benzene were grafted. Good films could be made. Water absorption and conductivity were studied as a function of RH and temperature (Reference 2). When less than 20% of the sulfonic acid groups were grafted, conductivity was much higher than that of Nafion NR212 at all RHs. At low graft levels, conductivity was ten times higher. Mechanical properties and swelling were acceptable below 90% RH. However, all the films were unstable in water and slowly disintegrated. The proposed explanation was that the molecules formed nano-aggregates in solution held together by hydrophobic bonding. Their cast films disintegrated when placed in water since hydrophobic bonding between the nano-aggregates was poor. We then shifted to crosslinking as a method to produce water stable films (References 3 and 4). Biphenyl could easily be reacted with the polymer

  9. Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acids). PEMs with frozen-in free volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, Morton [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Early work with rigid rod aromatic polyelectrolytes implied that steric hindrance in packing of the rigid rods left unoccupied volumes that could absorb and hold water molecules strongly. We called this “frozen in free volume). It is illustrated and contrasted with the packing of flexible backbone polyelectrolytes (Reference 5 of this report). This was quantified for poly(biphenylene disulfonic acid) (PBDSA) and poly(phenylene disulfonic acid) (PPDSA). We found that PPDSA held three water molecules per acid group down to 11% relative humidity (RH) and had very high conductivity even at these low RHs. (Reference 1 of report.) The frozen-in free volume was calculated to be equivalent to a λ of 3.5. The work reported below concentrated on studying these polymers and their copolymers with biphenylene disulfonic acid. As expected, the polyelectrolytes are water soluble. Several approaches towards making water stable films were studied. Grafting alkyl benzene substituents on sulfonic acid groups had worked for PBPDSA (1) so it was tried with PPDSA and a 20%/80% copolymer of BPDSA and PDSA (B20P80). T-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl benzene were grafted. Good films could be made. Water absorption and conductivity were studied as a function of RH and temperature (Reference 2). When less than 20% of the sulfonic acid groups were grafted, conductivity was much higher than that of Nafion NR212 at all RHs. At low graft levels, conductivity was ten times higher. Mechanical properties and swelling were acceptable below 90% RH. However, all the films were unstable in water and slowly disintegrated. The proposed explanation was that the molecules formed nano-aggregates in solution held together by hydrophobic bonding. Their cast films disintegrated when placed in water since hydrophobic bonding between the nano-aggregates was poor. We then shifted to crosslinking as a method to produce water stable films (References 3 and 4). Biphenyl could easily be reacted with the polymer

  10. Effects of PMMA and Cross-Linked Dextran Filler for Soft Tissue Augmentation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for evaluation of the ability to maintain efficacy and biocompatibility of cross-linked dextran in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (DiHM and cross-linked dextran mixed with PMMA in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (PDiHM, compared with hyaluronic acid (HA filler. Saline and HA solution was administered in the negative and positive control groups, and DiHM and PDiHM were administered in the test groups (n = 10 in each group. The site of cranial subcutaneous injection was the mid-point of the interpupillary line, and the site of intraoral submucosal injection was the ridge crest 2 mm below the cervical line of the mandibular left incisor. Before and immediately after filler injection, intraoral photos and lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken for analysis and comparison of the effect of the filler on the injection sites. The filler injected areas were converted into sequential size changes (% of the baseline. Histomorphologic examination was performed after 12 weeks. The smallest value in the filler injected area was observed during the experimental period in the normal saline group (p < 0.001, which was almost absorbed at 4 weeks (7.19% ± 12.72%. The HA group exhibited a steady decrease in sequential size and showed a lower value than the DiHM and PDiHM groups (saline < HA < DHiM, PDHiM, p < 0.001. DiHM and PDiHM tended to increase for the first 4 weeks and later decreased until 12 weeks. In this study on DiHM and PDiHM, there was no histological abnormality in cranial skin and oral mucosa. DiHM and PDiHM filler materials with injection system provide an excellent alternative surgical method for use in oral and craniofacial fields.

  11. Effect of filler geometry on interfacial friction damping in polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, J; Joshi, A; Schadler, L; Kane, R S; Koratkar, N A

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube polycarbonate and C60 polycarbonate nanocomposites were fabricated using a solution mixing method. The composite loss modulus was characterized by application of dynamic (sinusoidal) load to the nanocomposite and the pure polymer samples. For a loading of 1 weight %, the single-walled nanotube fillers generated more than a 250% increase in loss modulus compared to the baseline (pure) polycarbonate. Even though the surface area to volume ratio and surface chemistry of C60 is similar to that for nanotubes, we report no significant increase in the energy dissipation for the 1% weight C60 nanoparticle composite compared to the pure polymer. We explain these observations by comparing qualitatively, the active sliding area (considering both normal and shear stresses) for a representative volume element of the nanotube and the nanoparticle composites. These results highlight the important role played by the filler geometry in controlling energy dissipation in nanocomposite materials. PMID:17450944

  12. Composite Fillers and their Influence on Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Milan; Kalenda, Petr; Honner, Milan; Vacíková, Petra

    The research work presented in this paper shows influence of filler composition in inorganic composite on its emissivity. Development of system which will provide a very high emissivity (0.90 - 0.99) within a short wavelength range is the intention of our project. Active ingredients (Chromium Oxide, Iron powder, Kaolin, Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Boron Nitride and Aluminum Nitride) were built in matrix of the composite. Furrier Transform Infra- Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy method was applied for measurement of spectral emissivity. Block hot plate was used for heating samples in relative emissivity measurement and laser beam in absolute emissivity measurement. These tests demonstrated that filler composition is able to influence emissive properties in range of short IR wavelength (1.5-4.0 μm) within 0.7 - 1.5 times (against the reference). Also influence of content of active ingredient in ceramic matrix on emissivity was measured. Content of active ingredients had no significant effect on emissivity.

  13. Effect of Fibers and Filler Types on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed K. Rejeb* , Majid Kh . N. Ayad A. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete, by using three types of filler (silica fume, clinker powder & lime stone powder, and two types of fibers (steel & glass fibers with volume fractions of (0.5% and (0.1% respectively. For each type of fillers, the fresh properties are measured by using Slump test, J- ring and V- funnel, while hardened properties include the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength. The results show that adding fibers to the self-compacting concrete (SCC well reduces the workability and improves the hardened properties. Also, the study concluded that better workability is obtained by using (lime stone, silica fume and clinker powder as fillers, respectively. While the higher hardened properties are gained by using silica fume were rather than those of other types of fillers 

  14. Lip Augmentation Dermal Filler Reactions, Histopathologic Features

    OpenAIRE

    Eversole, Roy; Tran, Khahn; Hansen, Doyle; Campbell, John

    2013-01-01

    Instances of perioral and labial foreign body reactions to a variety of injectable dermal fillers were selected from the oral and maxillofacial pathology and dermatopathology archives at Pacific Pathology Laboratory of San Diego with the objective being to engender a compilation of histopathologic characteristics that allow the pathologist to identify the inciting materials. All cases of foreign body reactions located in the lips and perioral regions were reviewed by four pathologists, retain...

  15. FILLERS AND THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF PAPERMAKING

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Shen; Zhanqian Song; Xueren Qian; Wenxia Liu; Fei Yang

    2010-01-01

    Carbon footprint reduction is a global concern. For the papermaking industry, strategically effective measures of carbon footprint reduction can include many aspects such as energy efficiency improvement, use of renewable carbon-neutral energy, practicing of sustainable forestry, and development of an integrated forest products biorefinery. Filler addition in papermaking can save substantial amounts of pulp fibers, and reduce energy consumption, which can surely contribute to reduction in pap...

  16. POLYMER FILLER INTERACTIONS IN POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) FILLED WITH GLASS-BEADS - EFFECT OF GRAFTED POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FOLKERSMA, R; CHALLA, G; SCHOUTEN, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion between filler and matrix has been studied using a model system composed of glass bead filled poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). Stress-strain and volume-strain tests and scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion is improved by grafting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), which is known to

  17. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortsman, X.; Wortsman, J.; Orlandi, C.;

    2012-01-01

    Background While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect...... cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated...... with the presence of those agents. Methods We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Results Fillers...

  18. Filler metals for containers holding irradiated fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the procedures being considered for the disposal of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) irradiated fuel bundles is to place the bundles in containers, fill the containers with metal, and place them underground. This investigation deals with the selection of the filler metal with particular reference to the reaction rate with, and bonding of the filler metal to, the fuel sheathing (Zircaloy 4) and potential container materials. Lead, zinc, and aluminium alloys were examined as potential filler metals. (U.K.)

  19. Effects of Ammi visnaga (Bisnaga) Extract on the Volume and Acidity of Stimulated Gastric Secretion in Fasting Rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of extract of Ammi visnaga on volume and acidity of stimulated gastric secretion in rabbits and also its safety on liver and kidney function. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Pharmacology Department, Saidu Medical College, Swat, in the years 2008-9. Methodology: Thirty rabbits weighing 1 - 1.5 kg were divided into groups A, B and C each having 10 animals. After fasting for 48 hours, pylorus of animals of group A and B was ligated. Group A was administered Carbachol and group B was given extracts of Ammi visnaga followed by Carbachol after 15 minutes intraperitoneally. After 4 hours, stomach contents were measured for volume and then centrifuged and estimated for acidity. The extract was also administered to group C animals for 45 days to observe its effects on liver and kidney function. Results: In group B, reduction in volume, free and total acidity of gastric juice was highly significant when the mean values were compared with group A. In group C, mean values of liver and kidney function test compared with pre-treated values, were found statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Ammi visnaga extract can be used effectively and safely in the treatment of hyper acidity conditions and peptic ulcer after evaluation of its effects in human being. (author)

  20. Phenolic rigid organic filler/isotactic polypropylene composites. I. Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongming QI; Lei YANG; Minghua WU; Heming LIN; Kohhei NITTA

    2008-01-01

    A novel phenolic rigid organic filler (KT) was melt-mixed with an isotactic polypropylene (iPP) to pre-pare a series of PP/KT composites,with or without maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP)/as compatili-zer.The evolution of filler morphology during melt-mix-ing and melt-pressure processes was monitored by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and polarized optical microscope (POM).The influences of shear force,pressure time,filler content and MAPP concentration on the final filler dispersion were studied.We found that this rigid organic filler readily melted and dispersed homoge-nously into the iPP matrix through a fission-fusion pro-cess during the melt-mixing process.Thus a balanced dispersion,which was closely related to shear force and MAPP concentration,can be achieved.During the melt-pressure process,parts of the filler particles combined gradually through a coalescence process.However,the incorporation of MAPP can effectively inhibit the tend-ency to coalesce and refine the filler particles sizes into nanoscale.Thus,a series of PP/KT composites with con-trollable filler particles size and narrow size distribution can be obtained just by adjusting process conditions and MAPP concentration.In addition,due to the in-situ formation mechanism,the filler phase possessed a typical solid true-spherical shape.

  1. New Filler Material for Reference Free Part Encapsulation Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-zhi; YANG Jian-guo; ZHOU Hu

    2002-01-01

    Reference free part encapsulation (RFPE) is a nontraditional universal fixturing technique. In this paper,new filler material-a lower melting point alloy for RFPE technique is introduced. Based on experiment, the shrinlkage and expansion rate, the effect of filler on workpiece drift and the effect of filler thickness on cutting distortion are studied. The alloy has a good mechanical and physical performance and the need of RFPE fixturing can be perfectly satisfied. The result shows that if the formula and process parameters of filler material are properly selected, it can obviously improve the quality of the workpiece, enhance the machining efficiency and reduce the manufacturing cost.

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  4. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  5. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways. PMID:27550050

  6. Effect of Fillers on E-Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Deshpande

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an investigation was carried out on E-glass fiber/jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites filled with varying concentrations of bone and coconut shell powder. The composites were fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, flexural strength, inter laminar shear strength (ILSS, tensile modulus, impact strength and hardness of the fabricated composites were tested. The test results of these were compared with unfilled HFRP composites. From the results it was found that the mechanical properties of the composites increased with the increase in filler content. Composites filled with 15% volume coconut shell powder exhibited maximum flexural strength, inter laminar shear strength (ILSS, tensile modulus and hardness. Maximum impact strength was achieved by addition of filler (15% Vol. of bone powder.

  7. Surface chemistry and effects on bone regeneration of a novel biomimetic synthetic bone filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Marco; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Sartori, Maria; Ferrari, Andrea; Parrilli, Annapaola; Bollati, Daniele; Baena, Ruggero Rodriguez Y; Cassinelli, Clara; Fini, Milena

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents results of physico-chemical and biological investigations of a surface-engineered synthetic bone filler. Surface analysis confirms that the ceramic phosphate granules present a collagen nanolayer to the surrounding environment. Cell cultures tests show that, in agreement with literature reports, surface-immobilized collagen molecular cues can stimulate progression along the osteogenic pathway of undifferentiated human mesenchymal cells. Finally, in vivo test in a rabbit model of critical bone defects shows statistically significant increase of bone volume and mineral apposition rate between the biomimetic bone filler and collagen-free control. All together, obtained data confirm that biomolecular surface engineering can upgrade the properties of implant device, by promoting more specific and targeted implant-host cells interactions.

  8. Evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of composite polymers by considering the filler size distribution law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorin HOLOTESCU; Floriana D.STOIAN

    2009-01-01

    We present an empirical model for the effective thermal conductivity(ETC)of a polymer composite that includes dependency on the filler size distribution-chosen as the Rosin-Rammler distribution.The ETC is determined based on certain hypotheses that connect the behavior of a real composite matefial A.to that of a model composite material B,filled with mono-dimensional filler.The application of these hypotheses to the Maxwell model for ETC is presented.The validation of the new model and its characteristic equation was carried out using experimental data from the reference.The comparison showed that by using the size distribution law a very good fit between the equation of the new model(the size distribution model for the ETC)and the reference experimental results is obtained,even for high volume fractions,up to about 50%.

  9. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  10. High filler concrete using fly ash: Chloride penetration and microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.G.; Leegwater, G.A.; Visser, J.H.M.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most high filler concrete studies are based on relatively high contents of powder (cement + filler) (>400 kg m-3). This paper aims to increase the total fly ash content relative to the clinker content, while simultaneously minimizing the total powder content in the concrete to values lower than 300

  11. Selecting fillers on emotional appearance improves lineup identification accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowe, Heather D; Klatt, Thimna; Colloff, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    Mock witnesses sometimes report using criminal stereotypes to identify a face from a lineup, a tendency known as criminal face bias. Faces are perceived as criminal-looking if they appear angry. We tested whether matching the emotional appearance of the fillers to an angry suspect can reduce criminal face bias. In Study 1, mock witnesses (n = 226) viewed lineups in which the suspect had an angry, happy, or neutral expression, and we varied whether the fillers matched the expression. An additional group of participants (n = 59) rated the faces on criminal and emotional appearance. As predicted, mock witnesses tended to identify suspects who appeared angrier and more criminal-looking than the fillers. This tendency was reduced when the lineup fillers matched the emotional appearance of the suspect. Study 2 extended the results, testing whether the emotional appearance of the suspect and fillers affects recognition memory. Participants (n = 1,983) studied faces and took a lineup test in which the emotional appearance of the target and fillers was varied between subjects. Discrimination accuracy was enhanced when the fillers matched an angry target's emotional appearance. We conclude that lineup member emotional appearance plays a critical role in the psychology of lineup identification. The fillers should match an angry suspect's emotional appearance to improve lineup identification accuracy.

  12. High filler concrete using fly ash. Chloride penetration and microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.G.; Leegwater, G.A.; Visser, J.H.M.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most high filler concrete studies are based on relatively high contents of powder (cement + filler) (>400 kg m-3). This paper aims to increase the total fly ash content relative to the clinker content, while simultaneously minimizing the total powder content in the concrete to values lower than 300

  13. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Dušica R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking strength of the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with 1.5% stearic acid using wet process, are higher for 2.8% and 5.2%, respectively, compared to the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with the same amount of acid used in the dry process. The tensile strength difference between the mixtures increases with the increase of the concentration of used stearic acid up to 3%. The strength of PVC mixture with the calcite modified by wet process is 3.1% higher compared to the mixture containing calcite modified by dry process. The results showed that the bonding strength between calcite and the adsorbed organic component affected tensile strength, tensile elongation and breaking strength of the PVC mixtures. The best filler was obtained by wet modification using 1.5% stearic acid solution that provided the formation of a stearate monolayer chemisorbed on calcite. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet process using 1.5% stearic acid solution exhibited the best mechanical properties. This calcite was completely hydrophobic with dominant chemically adsorbed surfactant, which means that stearate chemisorbed on calcite provided stronger interaction in the calcite-stearic acid-PVC system.

  14. The Application of Fillers in Cosmetic Injections%注射填充材料的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱加恩(综述); 李青峰(审校)

    2015-01-01

    注射美容已有百余年的历史,目前注射材料和技术发生了极大的变化,透明质酸等众多新型注射填充材料已获得广泛使用。本文对历年来被应用的各类软组织填充材料进行综述。%[Summary] Cosmetic injections have a history of over one hundred years. Nowadays, many new fillers such as hyaluronic acid are widely used. With the development of science and technology, fillers and injection technologies are undergoing rapid improvement. In this paper, various soft tissue fillers and related study progress were reviewed.

  15. Study on mechanism behind of tissue necrosis following injection of hyaluronic acid filler%透明质酸注射后组织坏死机制的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄明欢; 宋建星; 杜振峰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of tissue necrosis following injection of hyaluronic acid. Methods Twenty New Zealand white rabbits (40 ears) were used to establish ear complex tissue flap models with blood supply only from the central pair of artery and vein by ligating the anterior pair and other branches. Then the animal models were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group A, B and C were injected with 0. 2 ml hyaluronic acid into the periphery of the root portion of the central artery, central vein and central artery, respectively! Group D received cutting and ligation of the central artery (control group). The visual findings, microcirculation changes, skin temperature and percutaneous oxygen saturation were examined at 1, 7, and 14 days after injection. The animals were sacrificed on the 14th day and the ears were studied pathologically. Results All the groups showed different degrees of tissue ischemia. In Group A and D the skin temperature and oxygen saturation were not significantly different before and after injection of hyaluronic acid. The skin temperature and oxygen saturation were decreased one day after injection in Group B, and they gradually increased thereafter (P<0. 05). All the ears in Group A, B and D survived. The skin temperature and oxygen saturation in Group C were significantly decreased after injection of hyaluronic acid (P < 0. 05), and all the ears in Group C developed skin ulceration and necrosis after 7 days. Conclusion Injection of hyaluronic acid into the artery can cause obstruction of distal arterioles and microcirculation disorder, which might be the main cause of skin tissue necrosis.%目的 探讨透明质酸注射治疗后发生组织坏死的机制.方法 采用新西兰白兔20只(40只兔耳),结扎耳郭前动静脉和其他旁支动静脉,制成以耳中央动脉、静脉为主要血供的兔耳复合组织瓣模型.把兔耳组织瓣模型随机分为A、B、C、D组.A、B、C组分别将透明质酸0.2 ml注射入

  16. EFFECT OF RICE HUSKS AS FILLER IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hardinnawirda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rice husk-filled polyester composites were produced with rice husks (RH as the filler and unsaturated polyester resin (UPR as the matrix. Several percentages of filler loadings were used (10, 15, 20 and 25 wt % in order to gain insights into the effect of filler content on the mechanical properties and water intake of the composites. The tensile strength of the RH-filled UPR composites was found to decrease as the filler loading increased; however, as it reached 25 wt %, the strength showed a moderate increase. The Young’s modulus showed a remarkable increase for 15 wt % of RH but decreased as the RH percentage increased further to 25 wt %. A water absorption test was conducted and the results showed that the composites absorb more water as the percentage weight of RH increased, which is attributed to the ability of the RH filler to absorb water.

  17. Managing complications of fillers: Rare and not-so-rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart Haneke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted.

  18. Effect of Natural Fillers on Mechanical Properties of GFRP Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Dhawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs have replaced conventional engineering materials in many areas, especially in the field of automobiles and household applications. With the increasing demand, various modifications are being incorporated in the conventional FRPs for specific applications in order to reduce costs and achieve the quality standards. The present research endeavor is an attempt to study the effect of natural fillers on the mechanical characteristics of FRPs. Rice husk, wheat husk, and coconut coir have been used as natural fillers in glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs. In order to study the effect of matrix on the properties of GFRPs, polyester and epoxy resins have been used. It has been found that natural fillers provide better results in polyester-based composites. Amongst the natural fillers, in general, the composites with coconut coir have better mechanical properties as compared to the other fillers in glass/epoxy composites.

  19. Managing Complications of Fillers: Rare and Not-So-Rare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneke, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted. PMID:26865784

  20. Study of the Mechanical and Morphology Properties of Recycled HDPE Composite Using Rice Husk Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ying Tong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WPCs are being used in a large number of applications in the automotive, construction, electronic, and aerospace industries. There are an increasing number of research studies and developments in WPC technology involving rice husk as fillers. This study investigated the effects of different compositions of rice husk (RH filler on the mechanical and morphological properties of recycled HDPE (rHDPE composite. The composites were prepared with five different loading contents of RH fibers (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt% using the twin screw extrusion method. Maleic acid polyethylene (MAPE was added as a coupling agent. Results showed that tensile and flexural properties improved with increasing RH loading. However, the impact strength of the composites decreased as the RH loading increased. SEM micrographs revealed good interfacial bonding between the fiber and polymer matrix.

  1. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization. PMID:24372898

  2. Clinical observation of large-gel-particle hyaluronic acid injectable fillers for rhinoplasty%大颗粒透明质酸钠凝胶注射隆鼻的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄焕民; 付杰; 邱晓东; 宫昔愿

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨大颗粒透明质酸钠凝胶(hyaluronic acid,HA)用于注射隆鼻的临床效果.方法:整理笔者所在医院2013年8月-2014年6月应用大颗粒透明质酸钠凝胶注射隆鼻63例,分析术后即刻、术后3个月、6个月及9个月时患者满意度及并发症情况.结果:术后即刻患者满意度评分为4.8,术后3个月、6个月、9个月随访满意度为:4.5、4.2、3.6.术后描述胀疼(10例)、注射点瘀斑(4例),均在注射后1~2周内自行缓解.注射物明显吸收时间平均为术后27.2周.结论:大颗粒HA注射隆鼻效果满意,外形维持时间延长,并发症无增加,是值得推广的非手术隆鼻方法之一.

  3. Adverse reactions to injectable fillers for cosmetic purposes%注射填充美容的不良反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文翔; 李咏; 蒋献

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,there has been a rapid progress in dermal fillers for multiple cosmetic purposes.Dermal fillers can increase facial volume to create a younger-looking appearance.Although dermal fillers are generally regarded as safe soft-tissue fillers,all of them may cause potential adverse reactions.Most adverse reactions are related to injection techniques,and some are associated with the filler itself.Different filler materials have different properties with different risks and requirements for different injection techniques.Hence,suitable materials and proper injection techniques should be cautiously selected at clinics.%近年来用于多种美容用途的皮肤填充剂发展迅速,注射填充技术可以增加面部容量,达到年轻化的外观.虽然普遍认为,皮肤填充剂是一种安全的软组织填充物,但所有填充剂均有可能引起不良反应.大多数不良反应的发生与注射技术有关,也有部分和产品本身有关.不同注射材料的特性、相关注射风险以及注射要求均不同,临床上应选择合适的材料并进行正确的注射.

  4. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  5. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required

  6. Mechanical properties of epoxy/coconut shell filler particle composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the tensile and flexural properties of composites made from coconut shell filler particles and epoxy resin. The tensile and flexural tests of composites based on coconut shell filler particles at three different filler contents viz., 5%, 0% and 15%were carried out using universal tensile testing machine according to ASTM D 3039/D M-95a and ASTM D790-90 tensile respectively and their results were presented. Experimental results showed that tensile and flexural properties of the composites increased with the increase of the filler particle content. The composite materials demonstrate somewhat linear behavior and sharp structure for tensile and slight nonlinear behavior and sharp fracture of flexural testing. The relation between stress and percentage of filler for tensile and flexural tests were found to b linear with correlation factors of 0.9929 and 0.9973 respectively. Concerning the relation between the modulus and percentage of filler for tensile and flexural tests, it was found to be a quadratic relation with the same correlation factor approximated to 1. The same behavior was observed for the strain versus percentage of filler tensile and flexural tests, with the same correlation factor. (author)

  7. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Shenyong, E-mail: s_y_liang@126.com; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y–M–O and TiC), submicron particles (Y–M–O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  8. Research on Alkaline Filler Flame-Retarded Asphalt Pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shuguang; ZHANG Houji; WANG Jiaolan

    2006-01-01

    Used as flame retardant of tunnel asphalt pavement, organic bromides produce a large amount of poisons and smoke in construction and flame retardation stage. The alkaline filler was found to replace mineral filler, and the flame-retarded asphalt mixtures were produced. Experimental results show that these asphalt mixtures are smoke restrained; the performances and construction technology of asphalt pavement are not influenced; also the alkaline filler is of low-price. So this kind of flame-retarded asphalt mixtures is suitable for tunnel pavement.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of polymer matrix composite material with combination of ZnO filler and nata de coco fiber as a candidate of semiconductor material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Asep Handaya; Anindita, Hana Nabila

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of semiconductor composite using acrylic matrix filled with ZnO and nata de coco fiber has been conducted in this research. The purpose of this research is to obtain semiconductor composite material that has a good mechanical strength and thermal resistance. In situ polymerization method is used in this research and the composites are ready to be characterized after 12 hours. The main parameter that is characterized is the electric conductivity of the composite. Additional parameters are also characterized such as composite's elastic modulus and glass transition temperature. The composites that has been made in this research can be classified as semiconductor material because the conductivity is in the range of 10-8-103 S/cm. In general the addition of ZnO and nata de coco filler can increase the conductivity of the composite. The highest semiconductor characteristic in acrylic/ZnO composite is obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 3.4 x 10-7 S/cm. Similar with acrylic/ZnO composite, in acrylic/nata de coco fiber composite the highest semiconductor characteristic is also obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 1.15 x 10-7 S/cm. Combination of 20% volume of ZnO, 10% volume of nata de coco, and 70% volume of acrylic resulting in composite with electric conductivity of 1.92 x 10-7 S/cm. In addition, combination of ZnO and nata de coco fiber as filler in composite can also improve the characteristic of composite where composite with 20% volume of ZnO filler and 10% volume of nata de coco fiber resulting in composite with elastic modulus of 1.79 GPa and glass transition temperature of 175.73°C which is higher than those in acrylic/ZnO composite.

  10. Study of apparent molal volume and viscosity of mutual citric acid and disodium hydrogen orthophosphate aqueous systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Man Singh

    2006-05-01

    Fundamental properties, density () and viscosity (), of citric acid (CA) and disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (DSP) at various strengths were obtained at different temperatures. The and values were used to determine apparent molal volumes and viscosity of systems. The , and values were regressed against molality for ρ0, 0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$f, the limiting constants at infinite dilution ( → 0) forionic and molecular interactions. The ρ0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$f of aq. acids are higher than those of aq. DSP and the viscosity of DSP is higher than that of aq. CA. Examination of ρ0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$ functions indicates that mutual compositions of CA and DSP counterbalance concentration and temperature effects on pH in bioprocesses.

  11. Shrinkage reduction of dental composites by addition of expandable zirconia filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Sørensen, Bent F.;

    2011-01-01

    A problem with dental resin composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which makes the filling loosen from the tooth or induces crack formation. We have developed an expandable metastable tetragonal zirconia filler, which upon reaction with water, is able to counter the polymer shrinkage....... The shrinkage of the composite was calculated from density measurements using Archimedes method. The rate of the phase transformation in resin was measured by determining the volume fraction of monoclinic zirconia (vm). The composite had a vm of 0.5 after 8 h of water storage. The overall shrinkage...

  12. Do you know where your fillers go? An ultrastructural investigation of the lips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vent J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Vent,1 Florian Lefarth,2 Thomas Massing,3 Wolfgang Angerstein2 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Heidelberg Medical Center at Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; 2Department of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, University of Düsseldorf Medical Center, Düsseldorf, Germany; 3Research Laboratory for Medical Acoustics and Audiology, Department of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, University of Düsseldorf Medical Center, Düsseldorf, Germany Aim: To investigate the exact location and position of hyaluronic acid fillers in the perioral region by ultrasound and optical coherence tomography. Introduction: To date, there are few in vivo investigations in humans on the exact positioning of injectable hyaluronic acid fillers, and severe complications such as hematoma and thromboembolism are rarely addressed. Materials and methods: There were nine female patients investigated in this pilot study. All of them were periorally injected with hyaluronic acid. The exact product, amount, and locations, as well as the injection techniques, were recorded and compared. Before, immediately after, and 18 days after injection, photo documentation as well as high-resolution ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography of the lip surface were performed. Results: Minor bruising occurred, which resolved within 7 to 9 days. On day 18, no more hemorrhage could be detected. Injected material distributed well in the tissue, and no embolism or thrombosis occurred. However, the injected material came close (up to 1 mm to important structures such as blood vessels. Lip wrinkles improved, and the lip surface was smoother and more even. Conclusion: Hyaluronic acid injections can improve aesthetics and reduce fine wrinkles of the lips. In the patients investigated in this study, compression of structures such as vessels and nerve fibers did not occur, nor did any severe complications result from injection. However, one must be aware of serious

  13. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norshamira, A., E-mail: myra.arshad@gmail.com; Mariatti, M., E-mail: mariatti@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  14. Use of Cellulose-Containing Fillers in Composites with Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna LAKA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The composites, containing recycled polypropylene and fillers, obtained from different lignocellulosics by the thermocatalytic destruction method, were investigated. Birch sawdust, newsprint wastes, cotton residues and wood bleached sulphate pulp were used as raw materials for obtaining fillers. The indices of mechanical properties (tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, deformation at break, shear modulus, toughness, twisting moment of the composites' samples were determined. It has been found that the obtained composites have relatively good mechanical properties. Better results were obtained, using fillers from sawdust and wood pulp. After treating the fillers with rapeseed oil, their water vapour sorption and water retention value (WRV decreased. In this case, the strength of the composites was higher.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.484

  15. Surface modification of nanosilica fillers for the preparation of silica/epoxy nanocomposites: Površinska modifikacija nanodelcev silicijevega dioksida za pripravo nanokompozitov SiO spodaj 2-epoksi:

    OpenAIRE

    Conradi, Marjetka; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Zorko, Milena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the preparation of the epoxy resin Epikote 828LVEL reinforced with nanosilica. Epoxy composites containing 130-nm spherical silica nanoparticles were prepared at a fixed volume fraction (phi = 0.5 %). To prevent agglomeration the silica fillers were initially pre-treated with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A. Due to the low content of silica fillers their inclusion in the matrix was confirmed by the increased roughness of the fracture surface compared to the smooth su...

  16. Identification and Complications of Cosmetic Fillers: Sonography First.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, Ximena

    2015-07-01

    Cosmetic fillers are frequently used these days for enhancing beauty and to treat wrinkles or sagging skin. However, information on the history of injections may be difficult to obtain, and there is a growing number of reports on complications with these agents. In contrast to other imaging techniques, sonography has been successfully used for detecting and identifying common types of cosmetic fillers and has become the first-line imaging modality to deal with these exogenous components. PMID:26112618

  17. Dental Procedures: Is it a Risk Factor for Injectable Dermal Fillers?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramzi, Abbas Al; Kassim, Maysoun; George, Joju V.; Amin, Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Dental procedures done in the vicinity of dermal fillers may result in complications of the dermal fillers such as infections which may mimic a dental infection. These infections of dermal fillers must be differentiated from facial cellulitis or from dental infection as treatment for infection from dermal fillers may be prolonged with repeated use of antibiotics, incision and drainage or removal of the filler material itself. Dental surgeons need to be aware of this potential risk in order to...

  18. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  19. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  20. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Nano Filler Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnia Noor Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on mechanical and morphological properties of unsaturated polyester (UP reinforced with two different types of filler which is nano size clay Cloisite 30B (C30B and Carbon Black (CB. Samples were fabricated via hand lay-up and open molding technique. Percentages of Cloisite 30B & Carbon Black (CB used vary from 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt%. The mechanical properties were evaluated by impact, flexural and hardness testing. Result shows that the mechanical strength of C30B was better compare to CB filled composite. The combination of UP with C30B helps to improve the properties due to the high surface area of nanosize filler in the matrix. The result shows that increasing of filler content had increased mechanical properties of composites. Optimum percentage represent good mechanical properties are 4% for both fillers. SEM images showed that rough surface image indicate to agglomeration of filler in the matrix for CB sample and smooth surface image on C30B sample indicate to homogenous blending between filler and matrix polyester. SEM images proved that mechanical properties result indicate that C30B polyester composite is a good reinforcement compare to CB polyester composite.

  1. Reinforced Positive Filler Paste For Lead/Acid Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dean B.; Rippel, Wally E.

    1991-01-01

    Lead-coated glass fibers extend battery life. Mixture of lead-coated glass fibers and positive paste form pellets of active material between grid wires of positive battery electrode. Fibers contribute to charge capacity, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stability of electrode.

  2. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E;

    2012-01-01

    Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...... have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA...

  3. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement. PMID:27261726

  4. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  5. Waste oyster shell as a kind of active filler to treat the combined wastewater at an estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongbing; Huang, Gu; Fu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Daocai; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Bo; Fan, Liangqian; Chen, Fenghui; Sun, Xiubo

    2013-10-01

    Estuaries have been described as one of the most difficult environments on Earth. It is difficult to know how to treat the combined wastewater in tidal rivers at the estuary, where the situation is very different from ordinary fresh water rivers. Waste oyster shell was used as the active filler in this study in a bio-contact oxidation tank to treat the combined wastewater at the Fengtang Tidal River. With a middle-experimental scale of 360 m3/day, the average removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH3-N, TP and TSS was 80.05%, 85.02%, 86.59%, 50.58% and 85.32%, respectively, in this bio-contact oxidation process. The living microbes in the biofilms on the waste oyster shell in this bio-contact oxidation tank, which were mainly composed of zoogloea, protozoa and micro-metazoa species, revealed that waste oyster shell as the filler was suitable material for combined wastewater degradation. This treatment method using waste oyster shell as active filler was then applied in a mangrove demonstration area for water quality improvement near the experiment area, with a treatment volume of 5 x 10(3) m3/day. Another project was also successfully applied in a constructed wetland, with a wastewater treatment volume of 1 x 10(3) m3/day. This technology is therefore feasible and can easily be applied on a larger scale. PMID:24494491

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  7. Comparative study of filler influence on polylactide photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bocchini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polylactide (PLA based nanocomposites of organically modified montmorillonite and micro-talc based microcomposites were prepared with different compositions and were UV-light irradiated under artificial accelerated conditions representative of solar irradiation. The chemical modifications resulting from photo-oxidation were followed by infrared (IR and ultraviolet (UV-visible spectroscopies. The infrared analysis of PLA photooxidation shows the formation of a band at 1847 cm–1 due to the formation of anhydrides. The filler addition provokes an increase of anhydride formation rate dependent on filler nature, amount and dispersion degree on the matrix. The main factors that influence oxidation rate are the total extension of polymer/filler interfacial area and the presence of transition metal impurities of clays.

  8. Influence of anodization parameters on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide formed in mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tzung-Ta; Chang, Yao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The growth of anodic alumina oxide was conducted in the mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids. The influence of anodizing voltage, electrolyte temperature, and concentration of phosphoric and oxalic acids on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide has been investigated. Either anodizing parameter is chosen to its full extent of range that allows the anodization process to be conducted without electric breakdown and to explore the highest possible volume expansion factor. The volume expansion factors were found to vary between 1.25 and 1.9 depending on the anodizing parameters. The variation is explained in connection with electric field, ion transport number, temperature effect, concentration, and activity of acids. The formation of anodic porous alumina at anodizing voltage 160 V in 1.1 M phosphoric acid mixed with 0.14 M oxalic acid at 2 °C showed the peak volume expansion factor of 1.9 and the corresponding moderate growth rate of 168 nm/min.

  9. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  10. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C

  11. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M., E-mail: engr.ziamustafa@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  12. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing use of injectable fillers has been increasing the occurrence of disfiguring anaerobic infection or granulomas. This study presents two types of laser-assisted evacuation of filler material and inflammatory and necrotic tissue that were used to treat disfiguring facial...... an 808-nm diode laser using intralesional laser technique. The latter melted and liquefied the organic and synthetic components of the granulomas, facilitating subsequent evacuation. Both lasers had an easily controllable thin laser beam, which enabled the physician to control tissue damage and minimize...

  13. Partial molar volume and partial molar compressibility of four homologous {alpha}-amino acids in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K., E-mail: krpal25@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Government College of Engg., Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamilnadu (India); Edwin Gladson, S., E-mail: aseg_win@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, St. Xavier' s Catholic College of Engg., Chunkankadai 629 003, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: Partial molar volume indicates strong solute-cosolute interaction in the NaF solution. Partial molar compressibility results compliment partial molar volume results. Hydration number proves that sodium fluoride has dehydration effect on amino acids. Interactions between sodium fluoride and (NH{sub 3}{sup +},COO{sup -}) group of amino acid are stronger. - Abstract: Density and ultrasonic speed of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine) in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions {l_brace}(0.1 to 0.5) M{r_brace} have been measured at T = (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. Apparent molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}), partial molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer volumes ({Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}) and hydration number (n{sub H}) are evaluated using density data. Adiabatic compressibility ({beta}{sub s}), change ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}), and relative change in compressibility ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}/{beta}{sub 0}), apparent molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}), partial molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer compressibility ({Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), and hydration number (n{sub H}) have been calculated using ultrasonic speed data. The linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},{Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} and {Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids have been used utilised to calculate the contribution of charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} group and other alkyl chain of the amino acids. The analysis shows that the ion-ion interactions are much stronger than ion-hydrophobic interactions over the entire concentration range of sodium fluoride. It is observed that sodium fluoride has a strong dehydration effect on amino acids.

  14. Effect of Waste Derived Fillers on the Properties of Biodegradable Polylactide Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Vīksne, A; Rence, L; Gulbe, K; Bērziņa, R; Vancoviča, I

    2009-01-01

    Use of natural fillers of different origin (hemp and flax shivers, Tetra Pak carton cellulose fibers, cotton fibers) as low cost fillers of PLA to produce composites with mechanical properties comparable with similar PP composites

  15. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper.

  16. Improving Filler Dispersion And Physical Properties Of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/ Silica Compound By Using Dual fillers And Coupling Agent In Mixing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of Green Tyre concept, in the early 90s, the use of silica as reinforcing fillers has spread and grown worldwide. The general advantages of silica as reinforcing filler over carbon black filler are better rolling resistance by achieving at least equal wet traction while tread wear should not be adversely affected. In general, high filler loading in ENR attributes poor dispersion and lack of adhesion to the rubber matrix which in turn affect the processability and physical properties of the rubber compounds. In this work, effect of dual fillers (silica and carbon black) and coupling agent in ENR/ silica compound was studied respectively. The mixing was done in a Banbury® BR 1600 internal mixer and the filler dispersion and physical properties were analysed. The carbon black filler was varied from 5 phr to 20 phr, where the total filler was fixed at 60 phr for truck tyre tread compound. The coupling agent was mixed in the mixing at two different stages which is first stage and finalizing stage of mixing. The rheological properties test was conducted by using Mooney Viscometer. The hardness, abrasion and tensile strength for physical properties evaluation were also conducted in this study. In addition, the filler dispersion property was determined by using disperGraderTM. The results showed that some of ENR/silica compound properties such as tensile, hardness, filler dispersion and abrasion resistance were slightly improved as compared to control compound. (author)

  17. Effect of mineral filler type on autogenous shrinkage of self-compacting concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Craeye, Bart; De Schutter, Geert; Desmet, Bram; Vantomme, John; Heirman, Gert; Vandewalle, Lucie; Cizer, Özlem; AGGOUN, S.; E. H. Kadri

    2010-01-01

    Based on an experimental programme, including autogenous shrinkage tests on concrete, ultrasonic monitoring of fresh concrete, and mercury intrusion porosimetry, the influence of the filler type on the autogenous shrinkage of self-compacting concrete has been investigated. The onset of percolating structure formation (time zero) is influenced by the filler type due to a possible accelerating effect of the filler on the cement hydration. Limestone filler accelerates the hydration process, and ...

  18. Design and fabrication of a miniaturization micro volume auto titrator coupled with electrochemical end-point detector for the determination of acidity of some fruit juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinya Masawat

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturization micro volume auto titrator coupled with electrochemical end-point detector was designed and fabricated for the determination of acidity of some Thai citrus fruit juices collected in the northern area of Thailand. The method was based on on-line potentiometric titration of the acid contents with sodium hydroxide. Conditions such as volume of fruit juice sample, volume and concentration of potassium chloride used as supporting electrolyte and flow rate of titrant were optimized by using univariate optimization. A sample throughput of 83 samples h-1 at 0.28 mL/min was achieved with satisfactory results. The results obtained by the proposed method agreed with those obtained by using the standard classical titration method.

  19. Multipass Narrow Gap of Heavy Gauge Steel with Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markushov, Y.; Evtihiev, N.; Grezev, N.; Murzakov, M.

    This article describes method of heavy gauge welding using laser radiation as beam source of energy. The article contains the results of single-pass laser-arc welding and multipass laser welding with filler wire; highlight benefits and drawbacks of each welding method. The results obtained were compared with the traditional methods of welding of the same thickness.

  20. Impact of fillers on dissolution kinetic of fenofibrate dry foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Sprunk, Angela; Kleinebudde, Peter; Page, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Dry foam technology reveals the opportunity to improve the dissolution behavior of poorly soluble drugs tending to agglomeration due to micronization. In this study, the impact of fillers on the manufacturability, the properties of dry foams and granules as well as the dissolution kinetics of dry foam tablets was investigated using fenofibrate as a model compound. Different maltodextrins and dried glucose syrups, a maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex, isomalt and a 1:1 mixture of mannitol/glucose syrup were used as filler. Within the group of maltodextrins and glucose syrups, the influences of dextrose equivalent (DE), particle morphology and botanical source of starch were investigated. Comparable macroscopic foam structures were obtained with maltodextrins and glucose syrups whereas different foam morphologies were obtained for the other fillers tested. Regarding the maltodextrins and glucose syrups, different physicochemical and particle properties had a minor impact on granule characteristics and tablet dissolution. Using the maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex resulted in a low specific surface area of the granules and a slow tablet dissolution caused by a slow disintegration. In contrast, a high specific surface area and a fast release were obtained with isomalt and glucose syrup/mannitol mixture indicating that high soluble low molecular weight fillers enable the development of fast dissolving dry foam tablets.

  1. Bacterial biofilm formation and treatment in soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Er, Ozge; Eickhardt, Steffen;

    2014-01-01

    that once the bacteria had settled (into biofilms) within the gels, even succesive treatments with high concentrations of relevant antibiotics were not effective. Our data substantiate bacteria as a cause of adverse reactions reported when using tissue fillers, and the sustainability of these infections...

  2. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  3. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  4. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 2: Physician-Directed-Neuromodulators and Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Ryan M; Louis, Matthew R; Cox, Joshua A; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I; Nigro, Marjory G

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin as well as rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but patients are in control with this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the second in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. Here the authors discuss neuromodulators and fillers in detail, focusing on indications for use, techniques, and common side effects. PMID:27478422

  5. An international perspective on fillers in dermatology-from an American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H

    2012-09-01

    This manuscript is intended to give one an international perspective on the use of fillers around the world-what makes some of them special and what is the need and what is the purpose of having so many fillers in this global dermatologic community we live in. In the US, we have a finite number of fillers and only a handful more currently going through FDA testing. We demand much from our fillers in terms of safety and efficacy, and for all of us in the US, this is a very good reason to keep the numbers of fillers available to a reasonable number.

  6. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    injection. Total volume of the utricle, as well as total number of hair and supporting cells, were estimated on light microscopic sections. Total volume and mean volume of hair cell types I and II and supporting cells were estimated on digital transmission electron micrographs. Total volume of the utricular...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  7. The interaction between the permanent magnet and ceramic superconductor with organic filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźny, L.; Kisiel, A.; Garbera, A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the phenomenon of magnetic levitation for YBaCuO superconducting samples in pure form and with epoxy resin content of 40%. Samples of superconductors were prepared by the standard reaction in the solid state. The forces of interaction between the superconductor and neodymium permanent magnet were measured. Samples with epoxy resin fillers had significantly smaller levitation force than the sample of the sintered superconductors. This is due to a much lower content of pure superconducting material in the sample volume (about 60% of the YBaCuO). However, the obvious advantage of such samples is the possibility of preparation superconductors with complicated shapes, eg. for use in a superconducting bearings or other devices.

  8. Poly(Butylene Terephthalate Based Composites Containing Alumina Whiskers: Influence of Filler Functionalization on Dielectric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Russo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT is one of the most widely used semicrystalline thermoplastics polyester because of its superior thermal and mechanical properties, high dimensional stability and excellent processability. In this research PBT-based nanocomposites, including various amounts (up to 10 wt% of commercial alumina whiskers, have been prepared by using a Brabender internal chamber mixer and analysed in terms of morphological features and dielectric properties. Specific attention has been focused on the effect of the filler functionalization considering 3-glycidoxy propylmethoxysilane (GPS or 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS as coupling agents. Tests, performed on compounds filled with neat and functionalized alumina whiskers, show a clear dependence of relative dielectric permittivity εr, invariance of dissipation factor (tgδ, and a sensible increase of volume electrical resistivity (ρv with the filler’s content and are encouraging for a future introduction of such composites in many electrical applications.

  9. Autonomous Slat-Cove-Filler Device for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated with Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor); Lockard, David P (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Weber, Douglas Leo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A slat cove filler is utilized to reduce airframe noise resulting from deployment of a leading edge slat of an aircraft wing. The slat cove filler is preferably made of a super elastic shape memory alloy, and the slat cove filler shifts between stowed and deployed shapes as the slat is deployed. The slat cove filler may be configured such that a separate powered actuator is not required to change the shape of the slat cove filler from its deployed shape to its stowed shape and vice-versa. The outer contour of the slat cove filler preferably follows a profile designed to maintain accelerating flow in the gap between the slat cove filler and wing leading edge to provide for noise reduction.

  10. Laser brazing with filler wire for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaosong; Li Liqun; Chen Yanbin; Zhou Shanbao

    2005-01-01

    The process properties and interface behavior of CO2 laser brazing with automatic wire feed for galvanized steel sheets were investigated , in which the brazing filler metal was CuSi3 and no flux was used. As to the appearance quality of the brazing seams, the roles of the processing parameters, such as brazing speed, wire feeding rate, inclination and feeding direction of the wire, laser power, spot diameter and heating position, were assessed. The further investigation indicates that the behavior of the active elements Si, Mn and Zn are significantly influenced by energy input. At the interface, the microstructure of the base metal was composed of columnar crystals and the acicalar α solid solution was found on the filler metal side.

  11. Laser Transmission Welding of CFRTP Using Filler Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael

    In the automotive industry the increasing environmental awareness is reflected through consistent lightweight construction. Especially the use of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics (CFRTP) plays an increasingly important role. Accordingto the material substitution, the demand for adequate joining technologies is growing. Therefore, laser transmission welding with filler material provides a way to combine two opaque joining partners by using process specific advantages of the laser transmission welding process. After introducing the new processing variant and the used experimental setup, this paper investigates the process itselfand conditions for a stable process. The influence of the used process parameters on weld quality and process stability is characterized by tensile shear tests. The successfully performed joining of PA 6 CF 42 organic sheets using natural PA 6 as filler material underlines the potential of the described joining method for lightweight design and other industrial applications.

  12. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  13. Evaluation of Fillers Dispersion Degree in Elastomeric Magnetic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Kruželák

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastomeric magnetic composites were prepared by incorporation of strontium ferrite into polymer matrices based on natural as well as butadiene rubber. Besides the rubber and ferrite, or the combinations of ferrite and carbon black (in case of natural rubber, the model rubber compounds contained only ingredients which support curing process. The study was dedicated to the observation of fillers dispersion degree in the rubber matrices and investigation of physical-mechanical and magnetic properties of prepared composites. The results indicate that the dispersion degree of ferrite in the rubber matrices is not very high, but it can be positively influenced by the addition of carbon black. Despite of the fact that ferrite exhibits only low reinforcing effect on cross-linked elastomeric materials, physical-mechanical properties can be also positively influenced by the mutual change in combinations of both fillers (ferrite and carbon black. The prepared materials seem to have suitable magnetic and elastic properties.

  14. Degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack: Experiment investigation on the effect of high volume fly ash content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Tyas, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Concrete is susceptible to a variety of chemical attacks. In the sulfuric acid environment, concrete is subjected to a combination of sulfuric and acid attack. This research is aimed to investigate the degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack based on measurement of compressive strength loss and diameter change. Since the proportion of SCC contains higher cement than that of normal concrete, the vulnerability of this concrete to sulfuric acid attack could be reduced by partial replacement of cement with fly ash at high volume level. The effect of high volume fly ash at 50-70% cement replacement levels on the extent of degradation owing to sulfuric acid will be assessed in this study. It can be shown that an increase in the utilization of fly ash to partially replace cement tends to reduce the degradation as confirmed by less compressive strength loss and diameter change. The effect of fly ash to reduce the degradation of SCC is more pronounced at a later age.

  15. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  16. Functional and Microstructural Effects of Fillers in Comminuted Meat Products

    OpenAIRE

    Comer, Frederick W.; Allan-Wojtas, Paula

    1988-01-01

    Fillers are used in comminuted meat products such as wieners to increase yield, improve stability, and modify textural properties. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that comminutred meat products are mechanical mixtures in which the microstructural features of starch and insoluble protein ingredients are largely retained. The water absorption and gelation properties of these ingredients contribute to the stability and textural firmness....

  17. Effect of Natural Fillers on Mechanical Properties of GFRP Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Dhawan; Sehijpal Singh; Inderdeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) have replaced conventional engineering materials in many areas, especially in the field of automobiles and household applications. With the increasing demand, various modifications are being incorporated in the conventional FRPs for specific applications in order to reduce costs and achieve the quality standards. The present research endeavor is an attempt to study the effect of natural fillers on the mechanical characteristics of FRPs. Rice husk, wheat husk, ...

  18. Hard coal modified with silanes as polyamide filler

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rojek; J. Stabik; Ł. Suchoń

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper shows the influence of coupling agents, especially silanes, on mechanical properties of polyamide 6 filled with hard coal dust.Design/methodology/approach: Before preparing compositions, pulverised filler surface was modified with coupling agents. Then, it was compounded using a twin-screw extruder composite consisting of modified hard coal and polyamide 6. A blend was granulated later and test samples were subjected to injection moulding. Afterwards, mechanical properties...

  19. Evaluation of Fillers Dispersion Degree in Elastomeric Magnetic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ján Kruželák; Sybill Ilisch; Ivan Hudec; Rastislav Dosoudil

    2012-01-01

    Elastomeric magnetic composites were prepared by incorporation of strontium ferrite into polymer matrices based on natural as well as butadiene rubber. Besides the rubber and ferrite, or the combinations of ferrite and carbon black (in case of natural rubber), the model rubber compounds contained only ingredients which support curing process. The study was dedicated to the observation of fillers dispersion degree in the rubber matrices and investigation of physical-mechanical and magnetic pro...

  20. Hydrodynamic parameters of mesh fillers relevant to miniature regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, E. C.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Kirkconnell, Carl S.

    2010-06-01

    Directional hydrodynamic parameters of two fine-mesh porous materials that are suitable for miniature regenerative cryocoolers were studied under steady and oscillating flows of helium. These materials included stacked discs of #635 stainless steel (wire diameter of 20.3 μm) and #325 phosphor bronze (wire diameter of 35.6 μm) wire mesh screens, which are among the commercially available fillers for use in small-scale regenerators and heat exchangers, respectively. Experiments were performed in test sections in which pressure variations across these fillers, in the axial and lateral (radial) directions, were measured under steady and oscillatory flows. The directional permeability and Forchheimer's inertial coefficient were then obtained by using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-assisted method. The oscillatory flow experiments covered a frequency range of 50-200 Hz. The results confirmed the importance of anisotropy in the mesh screen fillers, and indicated differences between the directional hydrodynamic resistance parameters for steady and oscillating flow regimes.

  1. Hard coal modified with silanes as polyamide filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rojek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper shows the influence of coupling agents, especially silanes, on mechanical properties of polyamide 6 filled with hard coal dust.Design/methodology/approach: Before preparing compositions, pulverised filler surface was modified with coupling agents. Then, it was compounded using a twin-screw extruder composite consisting of modified hard coal and polyamide 6. A blend was granulated later and test samples were subjected to injection moulding. Afterwards, mechanical properties were evaluated. These properties have essential meaning for applications of new composites as structural materials.Findings: Tests demonstrated that modification of powdered hard coal surface with coupling agents had not significant effect on mechanical properties of polyamide/hard coal composites.Research limitations/implications: Applied compounding procedure did not allow to achieve good compositions homogenisation. A new method to be applied is planned in future research. Simultaneously, it is necessary to investigate composites with other coupling agents which will improve filler’s adhesion to a polymer. Long-term test are also planned.Practical implications: Hard coal, cheap and widely available filler, used to modify thermoplastic polymers, enable to obtain new materials with attractive properties and many applications.Originality/value: Paper represents innovative polymer filler and methods to modify it.

  2. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  3. Hybrid Composites from Wheat Straw, Inorganic Filler, and Recycled Polypropylene: Morphology and Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Min Yu; Runzhou Huang; Chunxia He; Qinglin Wu; Xueni Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcing effect of hybrid filler including wheat straw (WS) and inorganic filler (heavy calcium carbonate, silicon dioxide, and fly ash) in recycled polypropylene (R-PP) has been investigated. The effects of individual filler (WS) and combined fillers (WS and inorganic filler) on morphological, mechanical, and thermal expansion and water absorption properties of hybrid composites were investigated. The flexural modulus and flexural strength were both reduced when reinforced with three kind...

  4. Comparison of the effect of a single dose of erythromycin with pantoprazole on gastric content volume and acidity in elective general surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents remains one of the most feared complications of anesthesia. A gastric pH of 2.5 or less and a volume of 25 ml (0.4 ml/kg body weight or more in average adult patients are considered critical factors for the development of pulmonary damage in adults. Materials and Methods: This study compared the efficacy of a single oral dose of erythromycin (a macrolide antibiotic with oral pantoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor on pre-operative gastric fluid volume and pH in a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled fashion in 80 adult patients (of ASA physical status I and II planned for elective surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were divided into two groups of 40 patients each. The pantoprazole group (Group I received oral pantoprazole 40 mg and the erythromycin group (Group II received oral erythromycin 250 mg at least 1 h prior to the induction of anesthesia. After tracheal intubation, gastric fluid was aspirated via a Salem Sump tube and its volume and pH were measured. Results: Although both erythromycin and pantoprazole decreased the gastric fluid volume to a similar extent, the decrease in gastric fluid acidity by pantoprazole was significantly greater than that by erythromycin. The proportion of patients at risk of pulmonary aspiration according to traditional criteria, i.e. pH ≤2.5 and volume ≥25ml, was lower in the pantoprazole group. Conclusion: Administration of pantoprazole was found to be more useful than a sub-therapeutic dose of erythromycin in decreasing both volume and acidity of gastric content.

  5. EFFECT OF FILLER LOADING ON PHYSICAL AND FLEXURAL PROPERTIES OF RAPESEED STEM/PP COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Majid Zabihzadeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to develop a new filler for the production of natural filler thermoplastic composites using the waste rapeseed stalks. The long-term water absorption and thickness swelling behaviors and flexural properties of rapeseed filled polypropylene (PP composites were investigated. Three different contents of filler were tested: 30, 45, and 60 wt%. Results of long-term hygroscopic tests indicated that by the increase in filler content from 30% to 60%, water diffusion absorption and thickness swelling rate parameter increased. A swelling model developed by Shi and Gardner can be used to quantify the swelling rate. The increasing of filler content reduced the flexural strength of the rapeseed/PP composites significantly. In contrast to the flexural strength, the flexural modulus improved with increasing the filler content. The flexural properties of these composites were decreased after the water uptake, due to the effect of the water molecules.

  6. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Suan, T. Nguen [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  7. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Effects of Rare Earths on Properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni Base Brazing Filler Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tianjun; Kang Hui; Wu Yongqin; Qu Ping

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the addition of rare earths on the properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni base brazing filler alloys and the mechanical microstructure and properties were studied for the brazed-joints in the vacuum brazing of TC4 by comparing synthetical properties of two kinds of filler metals.The results indicate that the filler metals added with rare earths have lower melting point, better wettability and higher mechanical properties in the brazing joints.

  9. Effect of three filler types on mechanical properties of dental composite

    OpenAIRE

    Pahlavan A.; Ataei M; Zandi-Nejad AA

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Despite the improvements achieved in the field of dental composites, their strength, longevity, and service life specially in high stress areas is not confirmed. Finding better fillers can be a promising step in this task. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the filler type on the mechanical properties of a new experimental dental composite and compare these with the properties of composite containing conventional glass filler. Materials a...

  10. An Overview of Vascular Adverse Events Associated With Facial Soft Tissue Fillers: Recognition, Prevention, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferneini, Elie M; Ferneini, Antoine M

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive facial cosmetic surgery procedures have seen an exponential increase in numbers over the past decade. The most commonly performed procedures are neuromodulator and soft tissue filler procedures. Although soft tissue fillers have a high safety and predictability profile, these procedures recently have been associated with serious and dire adverse events. This article will discuss some of the vascular complications associated with facial soft tissue fillers. Management and prevention of these adverse events also will be discussed. PMID:27067061

  11. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin;

    fillers. In this study commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added into the LSRs and we examined how the properties of the networks were...... these additives, the use of multiple titanium dioxides as filler potentially suits to special applications. In the present study, a series of TiO2 fillers were blended into LSRs, such as hydrophilic/ hydrophobic, micro/ nano scale, anatase/ rutile crystal, sphere/ core-shell structure. The results indicate...

  12. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanbin Chen; Xiaosong Feng; Liqun Li

    2007-01-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry,and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot.The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  13. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbin; Feng, Xiaosong; Li, Liqun

    2007-11-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry, and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot. The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  14. Analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry with large volume direct aqueous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Whitaker, Joshua S; McCarty, Christina L

    2012-07-01

    A large volume direct aqueous injection method was developed for the analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by using reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode. Both the external and internal standard calibration methods were studied for the analysis of monoiodoacetic acid, chloroiodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, and diiodoacetic acid in drinking water. The use of a divert valve technique for the mobile phase solvent delay, along with isotopically labeled analogs used as internal standards, effectively reduced and compensated for the ionization suppression typically caused by coexisting common inorganic anions. Under the optimized method conditions, the mean absolute and relative recoveries resulting from the replicate fortified deionized water and chlorinated drinking water analyses were 83-107% with a relative standard deviation of 0.7-11.7% and 84-111% with a relative standard deviation of 0.8-12.1%, respectively. The method detection limits resulting from the external and internal standard calibrations, based on seven fortified deionized water replicates, were 0.7-2.3 ng/L and 0.5-1.9 ng/L, respectively.

  15. The influence of irradiated wood filler on some properties of polypropylene - wood composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Điporović-Momčilović Milanka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of compatibility between the wood filler and thermoplastic matrix is of essential importance in composite production. Numerous methods have been developed for increasing this compatibility, which is still representing a challenging objective of composite research throughout the world. The research into these methods is primarily directed towards their efficiency from the viewpoint of the composite performance and their economical acceptability. The latter is of particular importance for the composite production in the developing countries with respect to the shortage of the corresponding funds. With this respect, the utilization of ionizing radiation might have considerable advantages. In this research, the beech wood flour was irradiated by a dose of 10 kGy of 60Co gamma rays for purpose of provoking the changes by the ionizing effect. The effects of ionizing radiation upon the properties of wood particles have been examined by IR spectroscopy and by determination of contents of hydroxyl groups in wood by acetylating as an indirect method. All these methods have been expected to reveal the chemical effects of the applied radiation treatment. The irradiated and the control wood flour were used in order to produce the samples of composite with polypropylene. The polypropylene-wood flour (PP-WF composites were produced with 40% of wood particles having fraction size 0.3 mm. The melt-blended composites were modified with amido-acrylic acid (AMACA as a new coupling agent synthesized for this propose in amount of 6 wt.% (based on wood filler and successively with 0.05 wt.% (based on PP of organic peroxide during mixing step. The composites containing coupling agents showed superior mechanical properties, compared to the untreated one. The highest extent of improvement of tensile was achieved in PP-WFl composites modified with AMACA coupling agent.

  16. Effect of three filler types on mechanical properties of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavan A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Despite the improvements achieved in the field of dental composites, their strength, longevity, and service life specially in high stress areas is not confirmed. Finding better fillers can be a promising step in this task. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the filler type on the mechanical properties of a new experimental dental composite and compare these with the properties of composite containing conventional glass filler. Materials and Methods: Experimental composites were prepared by mixing silane-treated fillers with monomers, composed of 70% Bis-GMA and 30% TEGDMA by weight. Fillers were different among the groups. Glass, leucite ceramic and lithium disilicate were prepared as different filler types. All three groups contained 73% wt filler. Comphorquinone and amines were chosen as photo initiator system. Post curing was done for all groups. Diametral tensile strength (DTS, flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured and compared among groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS package using one-way ANOVA test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The results showed that the stronger ceramic fillers have positive effect on the flexural strength. Ceramic fillers increased the flexural strength significantly. No significant differences could be determined in DTS among the groups. Flexural modulus can be affected and increased by using ceramic fillers. Conclusion: Flexural strength is one of the most significant properties of restorative dental materials. The higher flexural strength and flexural modulus can be achieved by stronger ceramic fillers. Any further investigation in this field would be beneficial in the development of restorative dental materials.

  17. Correlation of Electrical and Swelling Properties with Nano Free Volume Structure of Conductive Silicone Rubber Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study focuses on finding a correlation between the positron annihilation parameters in silicone rubber based on Poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) composites loaded with different conductive fillers and their swelling and electrical properties. Four types of conductive fillers have been used in this study: carbon black, graphite, copper, and nickel powders. The maximum degree of swelling Qm %, the penetration rate, P, as well as the diffusion coefficient, D, decrease with increasing the filler content due to the reduction of the size of free volume, as observed through a decrease of the probability of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) formation I3 and the o-Ps lifetime Τ3, representing the size of free volume measured by the positron annihilation lifetime technique (PAL). The electrical conductivity ln (Σ) is positively correlated with the probability of free annihilation of positrons at interfaces I2, thus suggesting an increase in the electron density with the filler content. The activation energy of conduction, Ea, is found to decrease with the increase in the loading of conductive filler and the particle size of the filler. A correlation between the free-volume Vf, and the d.c. electrical conductivity ln (Σ) is found to be in accordance with Miyamoto and Shibayma model of ion conduction.

  18. Study on chemical and volume control system design improvement of pressurized water reactor to use the enriched boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzes and determines the technical and economic feasibility of conversion from natural boric acid to enriched boric acid based on YGN 1,2 for existing plants and UCN 5,6 for new plants. The use of enriched boric acid may result in lower plant radiation exposure, lower stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600, and the improvement of the water chemistry operation for PWR plants, since it is viewed as possibly a safer way of proceeding with an increase in RCS pH with less LiOH. The conversion of enriched boric acid would not affect core design, safety analysis licensing, etc.. The economic analysis shows that for the higher B-10 concentration, the existing power plants are more economical than new plants. It is expected that information and technology gained from this study would be utilized for the optimized CVCS design of the future nuclear power plants. It is also expected that the utilization of the enriched boric acid would become favourable for extended fuel cycle and especially MOX (Mixed Oxide) nuclear fuel because high boric acid concentration should be maintained for the beginning of the fuel cycle. 19 tabs., 20 figs., 20 refs. (Author)

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  20. Measurement and COrrelation on Viscosity and Apparent Molar Volume of Ternary System for L—ascorbic Acid in Aqueous D—Glucose and Sucrose Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长伟; 马沛生

    2003-01-01

    Visosities and densities at ,several temperatures from 293.15 K to 313.15K are reported for L-ascorbic acid in aqueous glucose and sucrose solutions at different concentrations.The parameters of density,Viscosity coefficient B and partial molar volume are calculated by regression.The experimental results show that densities and viscositis decrease as temperature increases at the same solute and solvent (glucose and sucrose aueous solution)concentrations,and increase with concentration of glucose and sucrose at the same solute concentration and temperature,B increases with concentration of glucose and sucrose and temaperature,L-ascorbic acid is sturcture-breaker or structure-making for the glucose and sucrose aqueous solutions ,Furthermore,the solute-solvent interactions in ternary systems of water-glucose-electrolyte and water-sucrose-electrolyte are discussed.

  1. Technical Note: Filler and superplasticizer usage on high strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sümer, M.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of filler (rock-dust usage on high strength concrete have been investigated through lab experiments and some results have been obtained. The experiments involved three series of concrete with different cement proportions of 375 kg/m3, 400 kg/m3, and 425 kg/m3. For each series of concrete, three different groups of samples have been prepared, the first one being the reference concrete which contained 0% chemical admixture and 0% filler, the second one contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 0% filler and finally the last group contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 5% filler to the weight of cement used. The chemical admixture used was a type of Super plasticizer with a brand name of “DARACEM 190”, and the cement used was Ordinary Portland Cement of target compressive strength 42.5 N/mm2, obtained from Nuh Cement Plant. For each batch, Slump Tests and Unit Weight Tests were performed. For each stage and group, two 15 cm cubic samples have been tested for Compressive Strength after being cured in water at 20 ± 2 °C for ages of 3 days, 7 days, 28 and 60 days. The total number of samples was 72. As a result, filler usage was found to reduce the porosity of Concrete, increase the Unit Weight of Concrete, increase the need for water and improve the Compressive Strength Properties of Concrete.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la utilización de un “filler” (polvo mineral en el comportamiento del hormigón de altas prestaciones. Para ello, se realizan ensayos de laboratorio en los que se emplean tres series de hormigón, cada una con una dosificación de cemento distinta, de 375, 400 y 425 kg/m3. Se preparan tres grupos de probetas de cada serie, el primero o de referencia con 0% de aditivo químico y 0% de “filler”, el segundo con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y 0% de “filler” y el tercero con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y un 5% de “filler” en peso del cemento. Como aditivo se

  2. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin;

    low viscosities, which is favorable for loading of inorganic fillers [5]. In this study, commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added...

  3. THE QUANTUM – MECHANICAL MODEL OF FORMING CONTACT AREAS IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS WITH SPHERICAL FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Suhovaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and properties of the composites having Fe-C-B-Р binders alloyed with molybdenum and strengthened by the W-C quickly-cooled filler were investigated in this work. The model based on quantum mechanics principles explaining the dependencies of contact interaction zones width on filler diameter was suggested.

  4. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Starch Co-filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Wheat Starch Co-filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  6. Perspectives for Titanium-Derived Fillers Usage on Denture Base Composite Construction: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal W. Elshereksi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA is an extensively used material in dentistry because of its aesthetics, processability, and reparability. However, PMMA is still far from being ideal in fulfilling the mechanical requirements of prosthesis. PMMA-based denture base polymers exhibit low fracture resistance and radiopacity behavior. Efforts to improve the mechanical and radiopacity properties of denture base materials through inclusion of silica-based fillers are ongoing. Although silane-treated siliceous fillers are commonly used, they are not sufficiently strong. They also exhibit cracks, which either cut through the glass fillers or propagate around the filler particles. This defect occurs when the dental composites are placed in aqueous oral environment because of the hydrolytic degradation of silica-based fillers and silane-coupling agents. The clinical problem of using silanes in adhesion promotion is bond degradation over time in oral environment. In addition, silanes do not bond effectively to nonsilica-based dental restorative materials. This review presents titanium-derived fillers as alternatives to siliceous fillers. Titanate-coupling agents are found to be effective couplers in treating Ti-based fillers because of their chemical compatibility and relatively high stability in aqueous environment.

  7. The mechanical properties of nanofilled resin-based composites: characterizing discrete filler particles and agglomerates using a micromanipulation technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curtis, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    To assess the mechanical properties of discrete filler particles representative of several inorganic fillers in modern dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to assess the validity of a novel micromanipulation technique.

  8. Fracture resistance of rubbers with MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black fillers as assessed by the J-integral: Effects of rubber type and filler concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ricco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The fracture resistance of different rubbers containing various nanofillers, such as multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black (CB, was determined by the J-integral making use of the single edge notched tensile loaded (SEN-T single specimen approach. The elastomeric matrices were natural (NR, ethylene propylene diene (EPDM and hydrogenated nitrile rubbers (HNBR. Moreover, the strain softening (Payne effect of selected rubbers with 30 part per hundred rubber (phr filler content was also investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA in shear mode. DMTA results indicated that the Payne effect follows the ranking: MWCNT(fibrous > organoclay(platy > silica(spherical. J-resistance (JR curves were constructed by plotting the J value as a function of the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD*, monitored during loading. CTOD* = 0.1 mm was considered as crack initiation threshold and thus assigned to the critical value JIc. JIc increased with increasing filler loading, whereby MWCNT outperformed both silica and CB. On the other hand, JIc did not change with filler loading for the NR/organoclay systems that was traced to straininduced crystallization effect in NR. The tearing modulus (TJ also increased with increasing filler loading. The related increase strongly depended on both rubber and filler types. Nonetheless, the most prominent improvement in TJ among the fillers studied was noticed for the fibrous MWCNT.

  9. Whisker-reinforced bioactive composites containing calcium phosphate cement fillers: effects of filler ratio and surface treatments on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H; Quinn, J B

    2001-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets to form microporous solid hydroxyapatite with excellent osteoconductivity, but its brittleness and low strength prohibit use in stress-bearing locations. The aim of this study was to incorporate prehardened CPC particles and ceramic whiskers in a resin matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance, and to investigate the effects of key microstructural variables on composite mechanical properties. Two types of whiskers were used: silicon nitride, and silicon carbide. The whiskers were surface-treated by fusing with silica and by silanization. The CPC particle fillers were either silanized or not silanized. Seven mass ratios of whisker-silica/CPC were mixed: 0:1 (no whisker-silica), 1:5, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0 (no CPC). Each powder was blended with a bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate-based resin to harden in 2 x 2 x 25 mm molds by two-part chemical curing. The specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength, work-of-fracture (toughness), and elastic modulus. Two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the data, and scanning electron microscopy was used to examine specimen fracture surfaces. The whisker-silica/CPC ratio had significant effects on composite properties (p particles without whiskers. The composite properties were determined by whisker-to-CPC ratio and filler surface treatments. PMID:11484178

  10. Effect of fillers and fire retardant compounds on hydroxy terminated polybutadiene based insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Kakade

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyurethane compositions have been formulated using hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene as polymeric binder and carbon black as a major filler. Various binder-to-filler ratios of the formulations were evaluated to get calendered sheets. The formulations have been characterised for pot-life and rollability and the calendered sheets for mechanical and thermal properties, bUm rate, glass transition temperature, shore hardness and density . The different fillers tried were varieties of carbon black as a major filler; metal oxides, silicates and organic compounds; and fire retardants, such as zinc borate, sodium metaborate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and antimony trioxide. The structure and morphology of the fillers have been correlated with the properties. The optimised composition has been evaluated in an end-burning motor, as an insulator for case-bonded application, using a typical composite propellant. The results of interface bonding between the propellant and the insulator have also been presented.

  11. The effects of rattan filler loadings on properties of rattan powder-filled polypropylene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshamila Shaari Balakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of filler loading on the properties of rattan powder-filled polypropylene composites. The composites were prepared by incorporating rattan powder of average size 180 µm into polypropylene matrix using a Polydrive Thermo Haake internal mixer. Filler loadings of the rattan powders ranged between 0 and 40 parts per hundred parts of resin (phr. Mechanical, morphological, and thermal properties were studied. The tensile strength, elongation at tensile failure, and impact strength decreased, while stabilization torque, thermal stability, and water absorption increased with increasing filler loading. Tensile modulus increased with addition of rattan powder and eventually decreased at 40 phr filler loading due to the weakening adhesion between the filler and the matrix. The morphological studies of fractured surfaces using SEM confirmed the deterioration in tensile properties.

  12. Laser welding of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel using Co filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Sun, Daqian; Cai, Xiaolong; Dong, Peng; Gu, Xiaoyan

    2013-02-01

    Dissimilar metal joints of TiNi shape memory alloy wire and stainless steel wire were welded by laser welding method with and without Co filler metal. Comparative microstructure and properties of laser welded joints with and without Co filler metal have been detailed investigated. The effects of Co filler metal thickness on joint microstructure and properties were also discussed. The results indicated that the addition of Co filler metal had great effect to improve joint microstructure and properties. When 20 μm thick Co filler metal was used, the joint tensile strength and elongation reached the maximum values (347 MPa and 4.2%), and the corresponding joint fracture mode changed from pure brittle feature to mixture of cleavage and dimples due to decreasing brittle intermetallic compounds such as TiFe2, TiCr2, etc. But excessive Co addition resulted in decreasing the joint properties because of forming more Co-Ti intermetallic compounds.

  13. Silica-filled elastomers polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    CERN Document Server

    Botti, A; Richter, D; Urban, V; Ipns, A 6 4; Kohlbrecher, J; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  14. Influence of inorganic filler content on the radiopacity of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura; Moldovan, Marioara; Prejmerean, Cristina; Nica, Luminita

    2012-01-01

    Digital radiography was used to measure the radiopacity of 18 resin cements to determine the influence of inorganic filler content on radiopacity. Four disk specimens (n=4) of each light-curing cement were digitally radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge using an intraoral sensor (XIOS Plus, Sirona, Germany), and their mean gray value measured. Percentage of filler by weight was determined using an analytical combustion furnace. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). All materials were more radiopaque than dentin and 12 materials were more radiopaque than enamel. Filler percentage ranged between 17.36 to 53.56 vol% and radiopacity between 1.02 to 3.40 mm Al. There were no statistically significant differences in inorganic filler percentage and radiopacity among the different shades of the same material (p>0.05), but the highest radiopacity was measured for the material which contained a higher percentage of filler.

  15. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  16. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA.

  17. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  18. Complications and management of breast enhancement using hyaluronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Hidenori; Sakata, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of injectable fillers for breast enhancement has offered women several advantages, such as local anesthesia and short recovery times, among others, and the opportunity to more specifically choose breast size. Some fillers, however, have been associated with high complication rates and can be difficult to remove. This article describes the authors’ experience with a commercially available alternative technology that was initially developed for wrinkles and volume restoration, and...

  19. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Gungor, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Kocaman, Suheyla, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Selcuk University, 42031 Konya (Turkey)

    2014-05-15

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  20. Self-monitoring electrically conductive asphalt-based composite containing carbon fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-peng; LIU Xiao-ming; YE Qun-shan; LI Ning

    2006-01-01

    A new novel function materials,structure self-monitoring asphalt-based composite was introduced. The results show that the output resistance of electrically conductive asphalt-based composites would change under cyclic loading and vehicle loading action. The resistance change of conductive asphalt-based composites was aroused by the variation of its interior structure. When the fatigue failure was studied,the larger cracks cut the continuous electrically conductive path and the electron is difficult to overcome the potential barrier of gap. In the early period,the slight deformation and microcrack may be recovered due to the viscoelasticity character of asphalt,which leads to some cracks close again,the output resistance changes a little. But with the shear process performs continuously,the cracks become larger and larger,which would cut the conductive path and block off the transition of electrons,and if the cracks are large enough,the pitch-matrix composites containing carbon fillers will lose electrically conductive function. When the rutting failure was studied,the flowage of conductive substance results in the decrease of substance due to electrically conducting and conductive path decreasing. The decrease of electron volume contribute to electrically conducting and large stone aggregate prevent the electron from transiting. In a word,the variation of output resistance is aroused by the variation of interior structure completely.

  1. Influence of silane content and filler distribution on chemical-mechanical properties of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathy Aparecida XAVIER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of silane concentration and filler size distribution on the chemical-mechanical properties of experimental composites. Experimental composites with silane contents of 0%, 1% and 3% (in relation to filler mass and composites with mixtures of barium glass particles (median size = 0.4, 1 and 2 μm and nanometric silica were prepared for silane and filler analyses, respectively. The degree of conversion (DC was analyzed by FTIR. Biaxial flexural strength (BFS was tested after 24-h or 90-d storage in water, and fracture toughness, after 24 h. The data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05. The DC was not significantly affected by the silane content or filler distribution. The 0% silane group had the lowest immediate BFS, and the 90-d storage time reduced the strength of the 0% and 3% groups. BFS was not affected by filler distribution, and aging decreased the BFS of all the groups. Silanization increased the fracture toughness of both the 1% and 3% groups, similarly. Significantly higher fracture toughness was observed for mixtures with 2 μm glass particles. Based on the results, 3% silane content boosted the initial strength, but was more prone to degradation after water storage. Variations in the filler distribution did not affect BFS, but fracture toughness was significantly improved by increasing the filler size.

  2. Development of novel multifunctional biobased polymer composites with tailored conductive network of micro-and-nano-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Siu N.; Ghaffari, Shahriar; Naguib, Hani E.

    2013-04-01

    Biobased/green polymers and nanotechnology warrant a multidisciplinary approach to promote the development of the next generation of materials, products, and processes that are environmentally sustainable. The scientific challenge is to find the suitable applications, and thereby to create the demand for large scale production of biobased/green polymers that would foster sustainable development of these eco-friendly materials in contrast to their petroleum/fossil fuel derived counterparts. In this context, this research aims to investigate the synergistic effect of green materials and nanotechnology to develop a new family of multifunctional biobased polymer composites with promoted thermal conductivity. For instance, such composite can be used as a heat management material in the electronics industry. A series of parametric studies were conducted to elucidate the science behind materials behavior and their structure-toproperty relationships. Using biobased polymers (e.g., polylactic acid (PLA)) as the matrix, heat transfer networks were developed and structured by embedding hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) in the PLA matrix. The use of hybrid filler system, with optimized material formulation, was found to promote the composite's effective thermal conductivity by 10-folded over neat PLA. This was achieved by promoting the development of an interconnected thermally conductive network through structuring hybrid fillers. The thermally conductive composite is expected to afford unique opportunities to injection mold three-dimensional, net-shape, lightweight, and eco-friendly microelectronic enclosures with superior heat dissipation performance.

  3. Mechanical Behaviour of Composite Bioactive Bone Cements Consisting of Two Different Types of Surface Treated Hydroxyapatite as Filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Bioactive bone cements based on a paste-paste system for orthopaedic applications were developed consisting of hydroxyapatite ( HA ) filler particles in a methacrylate matrix comprising urethane dimethacrylate(UDMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate ( TEGDMA ). To improve the interface between inorganic filler and orgaric matrix the HA particles were subjected to two different surface treatment methods, using polyacrylic acid ( PAA ) and γ- methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (γMPS). The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of surface treatment and the inclusion of multifunctional methacrylates on the mechanical properties,namely 3-point flexural strength (FS) and fracture toughness of the cements and the effect of ageing in simulated body fluid. Comparing the mechanical properties of the two cements, the γMPS-HA cement showed that the fracture toughness of the experimental bone cements were significantly greater (p< 0.001) compared to that of the PMMA cement, whereas PAA-HA containing cement had strength values around 20% lower. Interestingly, PAA was found to be more effective in improving the interface as the PAA treated HA cement ( UTHAPPA ) maintained its strength on immersion in SBF , suggesting that PAA provided a coupling, which was less sensitive to moisture,a similar trend was also observed with the inclusion of the carboxyl containing multifunctional methacrylates.

  4. Carcinogenicity of azo dyes: Acid Black 52 and Yellow 3 in hamsters and rats. Volume 2. Technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankenhorn, L.J.

    1983-09-30

    This document is an appendix to a study concerning the carcinogenicity of the azo dyes acid-black-52 and yellow-3 in male and female hamsters and rats and contains individual histopathology studies of both dyes. Histopathological features were reported in tabular form for the skin, mammary gland, muscle, salivary gland, mandibular lymph node, sciatic nerve, thymus, larynx, thyroid, parathyroid, trachea, bronchus, esophagus, adrenal, stomach, duodenum, jejunem, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum, mesenteric lymph node, lung, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, urinary bladder, seminal vesicle, prostate, testis, cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, sternabrae, femur, bone marrow, and nasal cavity.

  5. Characterization of the polymer-filler interface in (gamma)-irradiated silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, A T; Balazs, B; LeMay, J

    2000-04-03

    The changes in hydrogen bonding at the interface of silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites due to aging in gamma radiation environments were examined in this study. Solvent swelling was utilized to determine the individual contributions of the matrix polymer and polymer-filler interactions to the overall crosslink density. The results show how the polymer-filler hydrogen bonding dominates the overall crosslink density of the material. Air irradiated samples displayed decreased hydrogen bonding at the polymer-filler interface, while vacuum irradiation revealed the opposite effect.

  6. Optimization of Filler Metals Consumption in the Production of Welded Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pańcikiewicz K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the some aspects of the optimization of filler metals consumption in the production of welded steel structures. Correct choice of beveling method can allow to decrease cost of production and increase quality. The review of calculation methods of filler metal consumption at the design stage was carried out. Moreover, the practical examples of amount of filler metals calculation were presented and analyzed. The article also contain examples of mobile apps which are makes it easy to see welding costs in just a few seconds. Apps as well as simple excel spreadsheets with correct mathematic equations allows to optimize welding process.

  7. THE STUDY OF MODIFIED TALC POWDER ON FILLER RETENTION IN PAPERMAKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaitaoZhang; YunzhanZhang; RunanYang

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the study of modified filler gradetalc powder on filler retention. A1203" 3H20 alone orA1203~ 3H20 and P205 in combination have been usedto modify talc powder. It is concluded that theoptimum retention effect of talc can be achieved bycovering it with 5% A1203 ~ 3H20. Adding 30% filler,the retention from 2.5% P205, 2.5% A1203 "3H20covered talc powder is higher than that of 5% A1203~3H20 covered talc powder, which are 29.76% and11.35% higher than that of the unmodified talcpowder respectively.

  8. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  9. Determination of Constant-volume Combustion Energy for the Complexes of Zinc Nitrate with Three Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高胜利; 陈三平; 杨旭武; 胡荣祖; 史启祯

    2001-01-01

    Five solid complexes of zinc with L-α- methionine, L-α-pheny-lalanine and L-α- histidine were prepared. The constant-volume combustion energies of the complexes, AEc (coordination), were determined by a precise rotating bomb calorimeter at 298.15 K. They were -2969.03+0.34, -2929.46±1.59, - 9597.13 ± 6.12, - 4378.98 ± 3.27 and - 14047 ±6.75 k J/mol, respectively. Their standard enthalpies of combustion, AHθm,c(coordination, s, 298.15 K), and standard enthalpies of formation, AHθm,f(coordination, s, 298.15 K),were calculated. They were - 2959.73 ± 0.34, - 2923.88 ±1.59, - 9649.18 ± 6.12, - 4373.40 ± 3.27, - 14048.53 ±6.75 kJ/mol and - 1180.94 ± 0.92, - 1401.26 ± 1.77,- 2501.69± 6.50, - 1381.47 ± 3.49, - 1950.19 ± 7.65 kJ/mol, respectively.

  10. Ti3C2Tx Filler Effect on the Proton Conduction Property of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahua; Zhang, Jiakui; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-08-10

    Conductive polymer electrolyte membranes are increasingly attractive for a wide range of applications in hydrogen-relevant devices, for instance hydrogen fuel cells. In this study, two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx, a typical representative of the recently developed MXene family, is synthesized and employed as a universal filler for its features of large specific surface area, high aspect ratio, and sufficient terminated -OH groups. The Ti3C2Tx is incorporated into polymer matrix to explore its function on membrane microstructure and proton conduction property. Both phase-separated (acidic Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) and non-phase-separated (basic chitosan) polymers are utilized as membrane matrixes. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is demonstrated that Ti3C2Tx generates significant promotion effect on proton conduction of the composite membrane by facilitating both vehicle-type and Grotthuss-type proton transfer, yielding several times increased proton conductivity for every polymer-based composite membrane under various conditions, and the composite membrane achieves elevated hydrogen fuel cell performance. The stable Ti3C2Tx also reinforces the thermal and mechanical stabilities of these composite membranes. Since the MXene family includes more than 70 members, this exploration is expected to open up new perspectives for expanding their applications, especially as membrane modifiers and proton conductors. PMID:27430190

  11. Production of bone cement composites: effect of fillers, co-monomer and particles properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Junior, J.G.F.; Melo, P.A.; Pinto, J.C., E-mail: jjunior@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: melo@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. (PEQ/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Pita, V.J.R.R., E-mail: vjpita@ima.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano; Nele, M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2011-04-15

    Artificial bone cements (BCs) based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) powders and methyl methacrylate (MMA) liquid monomer also present in their formulation small amounts of other substances, including a chemical initiator compound and radiopaque agents. Because inadequate mixing of the recipe components during the manufacture of the bone cement may compromise the mechanical properties of the final pieces, new techniques to incorporate the fillers into the BC and their effect upon the mechanical properties of BC pieces were investigated in the present study. PMMA powder composites were produced in situ in the reaction vessel by addition of X-ray contrasts to the reacting MMA mixture. It is shown that this can lead to much better mechanical properties of test pieces, when compared to standard bone cement formulations, because enhanced dispersion of the radiopaque agents can be achieved. Moreover, it is shown that the addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) and acrylic acid (AA) to the bone cement recipe can be beneficial for the mechanical performance of the final material. It is also shown that particle morphology can exert a tremendous effect upon the performance of test pieces, indicating that the suspension polymerization step should be carefully controlled when optimization of the bone cement formulation is desired. (author)

  12. SIFAT MEKANIK KOMPOSIT COKELAT BATANG DENGAN FILLER BIJI METE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Wiguna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bahan komposit yang banyak dijumpai di masyarakat umumnya terbuat dari material berat seperti, logam, keramik, atau polimer. Pada bahan pangan terdapat pula yang termasuk ke dalam kategori material komposit, diantaranya adalah cracker, cookie, kue pie, chasew chocolate, dan lain sebagianya. Diantara komposit bahan pangan tersebut yang paling banyak digemari sebagai makanan camilan adalah  cokelat. Hal menarik yang dikaji pada studi ini berkaitan dengan sifat mekanik komposit cokelat yaitu kekuatan tekan dari komposit tersebut. Komposit ini terbuat dari bahan makanan cokelat dengan variasi  fraksi massa mete sebagai filler yaitu 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, dan 29%. Matriks yang digunakan adalah cokelat jenis dark chocolate. Sifat mekanik yang dikaji adalah kuat tekan pada komposit cokelat batang. Parameter ini diukur untuk mengetahui ukuran maksimum beban yang dapat diterima komposit tersebut. Komposit yang memiliki kekuatan tekan terbesar ada pada cokelat batang dengan fraksi massa mete 29 % yaitu sebesar 2,81 MPa. Hal ini menunjukkan  bahwa variasi fraksi massa mete berpengaruh pada sifat mekanik material komposit karena berkaitan dengan perilaku distribusi partikel. Kuat tekan komposit cokelat teramati meningkat dengan kenaikan jumlah biji mete pada cokelat batang.Generally, the composite materials found in the civilization are made from heavy materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, and polymers. In fact, the composite material also found in food, such as crackers, cookies, pies, and cashew chocolates. Cashew chocolates usually consumed as the most favourite snack. The most interesting object from this study is related with the mechanical composite characteristic of the chocolate, i.e. compressive strength. Chocolate composite is made from chocolate with variety of cashew mass fraction as the filler, i.e. 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, and 29%. In this study, the composite matrix was a dark chocolate, whereas the mechanical characteristic determined

  13. A comparative study of the thermal interface materials with graphene and boron nitride fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, F.; Salgado, R.; Legedza, S.; Renteria, J.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an experimental study that compares the performance of graphene and boron nitride flakes as fillers in the thermal interface materials. The thickness of both fillers varied from a single atomic plane to about a hundred. The measurements have been conducted using a standard TIM tester. Our results show that the addition of a small fraction of graphene (f=4 wt%) to a commercial thermal interface material increases the resulting apparent thermal conductivity substantially stronger than the addition of boron nitride. The obtained data suggest that graphene and fewlayer graphene flakes couple better to the matrix materials than the boron nitride fillers. A combination of both fillers can be used to increase the thermal conductivity while controlling the electrical conduction.

  14. Fracture and Tribological Evaluation of Dental Composite Resins Containing Pre-polymerized Particle Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fracture and tribological evaluation of dental composite resin containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wereinvestigated. Composite resins, e.g. metafil, silux plus, heliomolar and palfique estelite were selected as specimensin order to evaluate the effects of pre-polymerized particle filler on the fracture and wear characteristics of compositeresins. In the wear tests, a ball-on-flat wear test method was used. The friction coefficient of metafil was quite high.The wear resistance of silux plus and palfique estelite was better than that of metafil and heliomolar underthe sameexperimental condition. The main wear mechanism of composite resins containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wasan abrasive wear by brittle fracture of pre-polymerized particles and by debonding of fillers and matrix.

  15. Mechanical behavior of glass fiber polyester hybrid composite filled with natural fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G.; Gupta, A.; Dhanola, A.; Raturi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Now-a-days, the natural fibers and fillers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act as a reinforcing material for polymer composite material alternative to the use of synthetic fiber like as; glass, carbon and other man-made fibers. Among various natural fibers and fillers like banana, wheat straw, rice husk, wood powder, sisal, jute, hemp etc. are the most widely used natural fibers and fillers due to its advantages like easy availability, low density, low production cost and reasonable physical and mechanical properties This research work presents the effect of natural fillers loading with 5%, 10% and 15% on mechanical behavior of polyester based hybrid composites. The result of test depicted that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under impact and flexural loads. However it is found that the hybrid composite have better strength as compared to single glass fibre composites.

  16. Application of waste bulk moulded composite (BMC) as a filler for isotactic polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczewski, Mateusz; Matykiewicz, Danuta; Andrzejewski, Jacek; Skórczewska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to produce isotactic polypropylene based composites filled with waste thermosetting bulk moulded composite (BMC). The influence of BMC waste addition (5, 10, 20 wt%) on composites structure and properties was investigated. Moreover, additional studies of chemical treatment of the filler were prepared. Modification of BMC waste by calcium stearate (CaSt) powder allows to assess the possibility of the production of composites with better dispersion of the filler and more uniform properties. The mechanical, processing, and thermal properties, as well as structural investigations were examined by means of static tensile test, Dynstat impact strength test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), melt flow index (MFI) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Developed composites with different amounts of non-reactive filler exhibited satisfactory thermal and mechanical properties. Moreover, application of the low cost modifier (CaSt) allows to obtain composites with better dispersion of the filler and improved processability.

  17. Characterization of Nanocomposite filler Morphology using Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, Ryan S.; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN); (AFRL)

    2010-10-22

    Loading polymer matrices with nanoscale fillers is widely believed to have the potential to push polymer properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. Recent nanocomposite research suggests better characterization of the large-scale morphology will provide insight explaining these shortfalls. This work will present ultra-small angle X-ray scattering as a viable tool for elucidating the hierarchical filler morphology that exists within polymer nanocomposites. Scattering analysis tools developed by our group will be applied to scattering data from nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes, layered silicates, and colloidal silica. The relationship between imaging data and scattering data will be discussed in the context of filler dispersion. Finally, the impact of large-scale filler morphology on mechanical and electrical properties will be discussed.

  18. Characterization of granite and limestone powders for use as fillers in bituminous mastics dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRENO BARRA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of studies on materials known as fillers from different mineral origins, used in asphalt mixes, specifically in the formulation of mastics. The research was carried out on samples of limestone and granite rock filler and asphalt binder (50/70. The samples were evaluated through semiquantitative chemical analyses by X-ray fluorescence, granulometry by low angle laser emission, scanning electron microscopy, softening point tests, penetration tests, and aggregate-asphalt binder and aggregate-mastic adhesion tests. The results highlighted convergent trends, indicating that the active behavior of the fillers in the mastic formulation is not related to the size of the particles, but rather to their form, surface texture, specific surface area and mineralogical nature, allowing the filler activity concept to be divided into two components: physical (hardening and chemical (adhesion.

  19. Visibly transparent and radiopaque inorganic organic composites from flame-made mixed-oxide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maedler, Lutz [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)], E-mail: lutz@seas.ucla.edu; Krumeich, Frank [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences (Switzerland); Burtscher, Peter; Moszner, Norbert [Ivoclar Vivadent AG (Liechtenstein)

    2006-08-15

    Radiopaque composites have been produced from flame-made ytterbium/silica mixed oxide within a crosslinked methacrylate resin matrix. The refractive index of the filler powder increased with ytterbium oxide loading. A high transparency was achieved for a matching refractive index of the filler powder and the polymer in comparison to commercial materials with 52 wt% ceramic filling. It was demonstrated that powder homogeneity with regard to particle morphology and distribution of the individual metal atoms is essential to obtain a highly transparent composite. In contrast, segregation of crystalline single-oxide phases drastically decreased the composite transparency despite similar specific surface areas, refractive indices and overall composition. The superior physical strength, transparency and radiopacity compared to composites made from conventional silica based-fillers makes the flame-made mixed-oxide fillers especially attractive for dental restoration materials.

  20. A simple method for fabrication of filler-free stretchable polydimethylsiloxane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacharouche, Jalal; Kunemann, Philippe; Fioux, Philippe; Vallat, Marie-France; Lalevée, Jacques [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Hemmerlé, Joseph [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, I.N.S.E.R.M. – Unite 595, 11, Rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Roucoules, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Roucoules@uha.fr [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simple method to elaborate a filler-free stretchable PDMS surface strong enough to resist to successive elongation/retraction cycles even at high degree of stretching. It consists in creating free radicals on a filler-containing PDMS surface by argon plasma exposure and reacting them with a filler-free PDMS resin during the crosslinking step. Changes of physical and chemical properties upon plasma modification are monitored by FTIR and XPS spectroscopies, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used to identify the nature of radicals involved in interfacial bonding. Although a brittle silica-like layer is created on the filler-containing PDMS surface after plasma treatment, an increase in the PDMS/PDMS interfacial strength is observed and a high interfacial resistance has been found under elongation/retraction (stretching/relaxation) cycles.

  1. 粉末涂料中颜填料的配方设计及其调色方法%Recipe design and color matching for pigments and fillers in powder coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永泰

    2015-01-01

    Pigment and filler/binder (pigment/binder ratio), pigment and fillers volume concentration(PVC value)are very important when design the amount of pigment and fillers in powder coating formulation. According to the color board or color card requirement from the consumer, color matching has done quickly and accurately with the choice of appropriate pigment/binder ratio and PVC value and usage of pigments and fillers in powder coating.%在设计粉末涂料配方的颜填料用量时,颜填料/基料(简称颜基比)、颜填料体积浓度(简称PVC值)是很重要的。选择合适的颜基比和PVC值,在粉末涂料配方中使用颜填料,依据客户色板或色卡要求,快速、准确地调配颜色。

  2. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

  3. Wheat dextrin, psyllium, and inulin produce distinct fermentation patterns, gas volumes, and short-chain fatty acid profiles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Derek A; Stewart, Maria L; Hospattankar, Ashok; Slavin, Joanne L

    2010-08-01

    Dietary fiber fermentation decreases luminal pH by the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Additional proposed physiological benefits of fiber fermentation include decreased growth of pathogenic bacteria, increased mineral absorption, and serving as an energy source for the colon epithelium. This study examined three common fiber supplements--wheat dextrin (WD) (Benefiber, Novartis Consumer Health Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA), psyllium (PS) (Metamucil, Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, OH, USA), and inulin (Fiber Sure, Procter & Gamble)--for pH, SCFAs, and gas production. An established in vitro fermentation model was used to simulate colonic fermentation at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours. At 24 hours, WD and inulin significantly decreased pH compared to PS. Inulin produced significantly more hydrogen and total gas. All treatments produced similar total SCFA concentrations at 24 hours; however, the rate of production was different. PS had a declining rate of SCFA production from 12 to 24 hours, whereas WD and inulin had a higher rate during that period. Fast-fermenting substrates may not provide as much SCFAs to the distal colon as slow-fermenting substrates. Differences in fermentation rate, gas production, and SCFA production observed for WD, PS, and inulin may affect their gastrointestinal tolerance and require further study.

  4. Lysophosphatidylcholines containing polyunsaturated fatty acids were found as Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitors in acutely volume-expanded hog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitors activities against the specific binding of ouabain to Na+,K+-ATPase and 86Rb uptake into hog erythrocytes have been purified from the plasma of acutely saline-infused hog. The purifications were performed by a combination of Amberlite XAD-2 adsorption chromatography and four steps of high-performance liquid chromatography with four different types of columns. Fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass and proton NMR spectrometric studies identified the purified substances as γ-arachidoyl- [LPCA(γ), 34%], β-arachidoyl- [LPCA(β), 4%], γ-linoleoyl- (LPCL, 33%), and γ-oleoyl- (LPCO, 25%) lysophosphatidylcholine, expressed in molar ratio in the plasma. Small amounts of γ-docosapentaenoyl-, γ-eicosatrienoyl-, and γpalmitoyllysophosphatidylcholine were also detected by both FAB mass and 1H NMR spectrometric studies. The inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase activity due to these compounds was always more sensitive than that of both ouabain-binding and 86Rb uptake activities. The ouabain-displacing activity in plasma due to these compounds increased with time during saline infusion. The maximal plasma level was approximately 10 times higher than that in the preinfusion plasma sample. Although these results suggest that γ-acyl-LPC's with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are not simple competitive inhibitors to Na+,K+-ATPase, these compounds could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the circulation abnormality through the modulation of membrane enzyme

  5. Effect of filler type on 3-body abrasion of dental composite

    OpenAIRE

    Yasini E.; Ataei M; Amini M

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composite in stress bearing posterior situations has restricted wider clinical application of this restorative material. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the three body abrasive wear of a dental composite based on a new filler (leucite: KAl Si2O6) and to compare it with the wear resistance of a composite based on commonly used Aluminium – Barium Silicate filler. Materials and Methods: This research was an interv...

  6. Justification of radiation protection fillers based composite materials fosfogipsum binding materials

    OpenAIRE

    Голов, Константин Сергеевич; Иванов, Валерий Анатолиевич; Мисовец, Юрий Викторович

    2012-01-01

    The results of comparative experimental studies of the effect of various radiation protection (RP) fillers of composite materials based on their fosfogipsum binding properties of RP From the analysis of results of experimental studies of the effect of various rare-earth filling of composite materials based on their binding fosfogipsum protective properties may be concluded. Barium sulfate as the RE filler plaster matrix displays technological instability in the manufacturing process of the co...

  7. Investigation of Friction Behaviors of Brake Shoe Materials using Metallic Filler

    OpenAIRE

    E. Surojo; Jamasri; V. Malau; M.N. Ilman

    2015-01-01

    Some vehicles use brake shoe made from semi-metallic materials. Semi-metallic brake shoes are made from a combination of metallic and non-metallic materials. Metallic particles are added in the formulation of brake shoe material to improve composites characteristics. In this paper, friction behaviors of brake shoe material using metallic filler were investigated. Machining chips of cast iron and copper wire of electric motor used were incorporated in composite as metallic fillers with amount ...

  8. STARCH-SODIUM STEARATE COMPLEX MODIFIED PCC FILLER AND ITS APPLICATION IN PAPERMAKING

    OpenAIRE

    Huiming Fan,; Daoxuan Wang,; Wenrui Bai,; Jianan Liu

    2012-01-01

    The use of fillers tends to reduce paper strength, which can limit their application. Therefore research on filler modification is of significant importance in order to overcome this limitation. In this paper, precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) was modified by starch, sodium stearate, and the starch cross-linking agent sodium hexametaphosphate. The purpose of this research is to provide useful references to the industrial application of modified precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Modifie...

  9. A Review on Potentiality of Nano Filler/Natural Fiber Filled Polymer Hybrid Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Naheed Saba; Paridah Md Tahir; Mohammad Jawaid

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for greener and biodegradable materials leading to the satisfaction of society requires a compelling towards the advancement of nano-materials science. The polymeric matrix materials with suitable and proper filler, better filler/matrix interaction together with advanced and new methods or approaches are able to develop polymeric composites which shows great prospective applications in constructions and buildings, automotive, aerospace and packaging industries. The biode...

  10. The influence of filler type on the corrosion stability of the sulfure concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Vidojković Velislav M.; Boljanac Tamara Đ.; Branković Anđelka R.; Vlahović Milica M.; Martinović Sanja P.; Đorđević Nataša G.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur concrete was prepared by using the initial components: sand as an aggregate, modified sulfur binder, and talc, alumina, microsilica, and fly ash as fillers. Portland cement concrete was made of the same aggregate and fillers and portland cement. The durability of prepared concrete samples was tested in following aggressive solutions: 10% HCl, 20% H2SO4, and 3% NaCl as a function of time. Changes in mass and strength of the sulfur concrete were monitored periodicallly during the immersi...

  11. Surface Treated Natural Fibres as Filler in Biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, I.; Stevulova, N.; Singovszka, E.; Terpakova, E.

    2015-11-01

    Biocomposites based on natural fibres as organic filler have been studied for several years because traditional building materials such as concrete are increasingly being replaced by advanced composite materials. Natural fibres are a potential replacement of glass fibres in composite materials. Inherent advantages such as low density, biodegradability and comparable specific mechanical properties make natural fibres an attractive option. However, limitations such as poor thermal stability, moisture absorption and poor compatibility with matrix are challenges that need to be resolved. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of surface treatment on properties of hemp hurds like a natural lignocellulosic material and composites made thereof. Industrial hemp fibre is the one of the most suitable fibres for use in composite materials because of its good specific properties, as well as it being biologically degradable and CO2 neutral. Improving interfacial bonding between fibres and matrix is an important factor in using hemp fibres as reinforcement in composites. In order to improve interfacial bonding, modifications can be made to the hemp fibres to remove non- cellulosic compounds, separate hemp fibres from their bundles, and modify the fibre surface. This paper contains the comparison of FTIR spectra caused by combination of physical and chemical treatment of hemp material with unmodified sample. Modification of hemp hurds was carried out by NaOH solution and by ultrasonic treatment (deionized water and NaOH solution were used as the cleaning mediums).

  12. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction. (paper)

  13. Effects of conductive fillers on temperature distribution of asphalt pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sun provides a cheap and abundant source of clean and renewable energy. Solar cells have been used to capture this energy and generate electricity. A more useful form of the solar cell would be asphalt pavements, which get heated up by solar radiation. Graphite powders are utilized as thermal conductive fillers to make an asphalt collector conductive so as to improve the efficiency of the asphalt collector. Accounting for the important application conditions and evaluating the effects of the heat conductive materials and the solar energy absorbability of the conductive asphalt collector, a finite element model has been developed to predict temperature distributions in the conductive asphalt solar collector. In this study, an experimental validation exercise was conducted using the measured data taken from full-depth asphalt slabs. Validation results showed that the model can satisfactorily predict the temperature distributions in asphalt concrete slabs. The optimal depth is 25-50 mm for placing pipes that serve as the heat exchanger. Meanwhile, the effect of the surroundings on the solar energy potential of the asphalt collector was noticeable.

  14. Effects of conductive fillers on temperature distribution of asphalt pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyu, Chen; Shaopeng, Wu; Yuan, Zhang; Hong, Wang

    2010-05-01

    The sun provides a cheap and abundant source of clean and renewable energy. Solar cells have been used to capture this energy and generate electricity. A more useful form of the solar cell would be asphalt pavements, which get heated up by solar radiation. Graphite powders are utilized as thermal conductive fillers to make an asphalt collector conductive so as to improve the efficiency of the asphalt collector. Accounting for the important application conditions and evaluating the effects of the heat conductive materials and the solar energy absorbability of the conductive asphalt collector, a finite element model has been developed to predict temperature distributions in the conductive asphalt solar collector. In this study, an experimental validation exercise was conducted using the measured data taken from full-depth asphalt slabs. Validation results showed that the model can satisfactorily predict the temperature distributions in asphalt concrete slabs. The optimal depth is 25-50 mm for placing pipes that serve as the heat exchanger. Meanwhile, the effect of the surroundings on the solar energy potential of the asphalt collector was noticeable.

  15. Effects of filler modification and structuring on dielectric enhancement of silicone rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Sara; Razzaghi-Kashani, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    Preferred structuring of filler particles in a polymer matrix by using dielectrophoretic assembly process can enhance anisotropic dielectric properties. For this purpose, precipitated silica (SiO2) was structured in silicone rubber using an alternating electric field. This filler structure was stabilized by vulcanizing rubber during electric field application. Filler particle orientation and resulted anisotropy was verified by equilibrium swelling. Structuring filler in the rubber matrix led to increased dielectric permittivity and loss in the thickness direction. Filler surface modification by (vinyl-tris-(2- diethoxy/methoxy) silane) improved structure formation and anisotropic properties. It was shown that applying silane modifier and orientation of silica particles by dielectrophoretic assembly process increased dielectric permittivity of silicone rubber in the thickness direction while dielectric loss had either minor changes or increased less than permittivity in this direction. Although elastic modulus of composite, which was measured by dynamic-mechanical analysis, increased to some extent, enhancement in dielectric permittivity was much higher. This introduced the structured composite as a potential for dielectric elastomeric actuator with higher efficiency than the original silicone rubber with no filler addition.

  16. Nanoparticle fillers obtained from wood processing wastes for reinforcing of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laka, Marianna; Vikele, Laura; Rozenberga, Linda; Janceva, Sarmite

    2016-05-01

    Paper sheets were produced from bleached kraft pulp, and office and newsprint waste paper. Nanoparticles from black alder bark, grey alder bark and pine bark as well as birch sawdust were obtained for using them as reinforcing fillers in paper. Non-extracted bark and that extracted in biorefinery were used. For producing nanoparticles, the materials were destructed using the thermocatalytic destruction method and then dispersed in water medium in a ball mill. At a sufficient concentration, gel-like dispersions were obtained, which contained nanoparticles with the size ~300 nm. The dispersions were introduced in paper furnish in different amounts. It has been established that all the nanoparticle fillers increase the tensile index and burst index in dry and wet states. The nanoparticle fillers from extracted bark increase the mechanical indices to a higher extent. At 20% filler content, tensile index in a dry state increases in the case of non-extracted grey alder bark, black alder bark and pine bark by 28, 30 and 15%, and in the case of extracted ones - by 44, 40 and 30%, respectively; the burst index increases by 78, 19 and 4%, and 91, 25 and 14%, respectively. The nanoparticle filler from birch sawdust increases the tensile strength in a dry state by 9% and burst index by 20%. The obtained nanoparticle fillers slightly improve also the water resistance of paper.

  17. Brazing of zirconia to titanium using Ag-Cu and Au-Ni filler alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. Pimenta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic is usually joined to metal by the well-known direct brazing process, where costly active filler alloys can be considered a limitation. Brazing using active-metal-free filler alloy as insert between the joint components is an attempt to overcome it. The active metal diffusion from the titanium member through the bulk of molten filler to the ceramic was responsible to produce an active filler alloy in loco and promote reduction of the zirconium oxide to improve wetting on the ceramic surface. Unalloyed titanium was joined in a high-vacuum furnace (<3x10-5 mbar to yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycristals (Y-TZP and zirconia partially stabilized with magnesia (Mg-PSZ, where commercial fillers Ag-28Cu and Au-18Ni with respective thermal cycles were evaluated. Helium gas leak detection test was performed at the ceramic/metal interface at room temperature; samples from reliable vacuum tight joints were examined by microstructural analysis techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at the joint cross-section. Tight joints were produced with eutectic Ag-Cu filler, revealing an intermetallic layer and a dark reaction layer near the ceramic surface; titanium diffusion was efficient for superficial chemical interactions between individual components. Brazing joints were also tested using three-point flexure testing.

  18. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre-reinforced polymer composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANURAG GUPTA; HARI SINGH; R SWALIA

    2016-09-01

    In present research work, pultrusion process is used to develop jute fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) composite and experiments have been performed on an indigenously developed pultrusion experimental setup. The developed composite consists of natural jute fibre as reinforcement and unsaturated polyester resin as matrix with hybrid filler containing bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate (CaCO$_3$). The effect of weight content of bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate on tensile strength of pultruded GFRP composite is evaluated and the optimum hybrid filler composition for maximizing the tensile strength is determined. Different compositions of hybrid filler are prepared by mixing three fillers using Taguchi L$_9$ orthogonal array. Fifteen percent of hybrid filler of different composition by weight was mixed in the unsaturated polyester resin matrix. Taguchi L$_9$ orthogonal array (OA) has been used to plan the experiments and ANOVA is used for analysing tensile strength. A regression model has also been proposed to evaluate the tensile strength of the composite within 7% error by varying the abovefillers weight. A confirmation experiment was performed which gives 73.14 MPa tensile strength of pultruded jute fibre polymer composite at the optimum composition of hybrid filler.

  19. Laser brazing of inconel 718 alloy with a silver based filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, A.; Ghoreishi, M.; Torkamany, M. J.; Bali, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    In the presented study laser brazing of an inconel 718 alloy with silver based filler metal using 400 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser is investigated. Laser brazing was performed with varying laser frequency, pulse width, process speed and gap distance. The effect of preheating on wetting and spreading also was studied. Brazing geometrical images were observed using an optical microscope. The composition analysis and microstructure of the filler metal and brazed joints were examined using X-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Micro-hardness and tensile test were performed for investigation of mechanical properties. The experimental observations show that filler metal consist of α-Ag solid solution, ά-Cu solid solution surround by the α-Ag solid solution and eutectic structure. Phases of the brazed joint are similar to the filler metal. The results indicate that the filler metal has adequate wetting and spreading on inconel 718 and the wetting angle depends on the heat input significantly. Interdiffusion occurs in laser brazing and the average thickness of reaction layer is approximately 2.5 μm. Whenever the gap is big, it is needed to use longer pulse width in order to have a better melting flow. Preheating has significant influence on wetting and spreading of the filler metal.

  20. Effect of Limestone Fillers the Physic-Mechanical Properties of Limestone Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    bederina, Madani; makhloufi, Zoubir; bouziani, Tayeb

    This work focuses on the exploitation of local industrial wastes and their use in the formulation of new concretes which can be used in local constructions. The valorised materials are limestone crushing sand (0/5 mm) and limestone fillers (80 μm). The two materials are extracted from local aggregate crushing wastes. Thus, and since the used gravels are also of limestone nature, the formulated composite is a limestone concrete. So this study constitutes an experimental work that aims at the study of the effect of the addition of limestone fillers on the physico-mechanical behaviour of limestone concrete. To carry out this study, different proportions of fillers ranging from 0 to 40% were considered. Very important results have been achieved on the workability and strength. By increasing the amount of limestone filler in concrete, the first one improves, but the second one increases then decreases passing by an optimal content of fillers which gives a maximum mechanical strength. Finally, and concerning the dimensional variations, it is noteworthy that they decrease at the beginning till an optimal value of fillers content, but beyond this optimum, they start increasing without exceeding recommended values.

  1. Study on the Functionality of Nano-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate as Filler in Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilia, Blessie A.; Panganiban, Marian Elaine G.; Collado, Archilles Allen V. C.; Pesigan, Michael Oliver D.; de Yro, Persia Ada

    This research aims to investigate the functionality of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate (NPCC) as filler in thermoplastic resins based on property enhancement. Three types of thermoplastics were used: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The resins were evaluated by determining the effect of different NPCC loading on the chemical structure, thermal and mechanical properties of thermoplastics. Results showed that there was an interfacial bonding with the NPCC surface and the thermoplastics. Change in absorption peak and area were predominant in the PVC filled composite. There was a decreased in crystallinity of the PE and PP with the addition of filler. Tremendous increase on the tensile and impact strength was exhibited by the NPCC filled PVC composites while PE and PP composites maintained a slight increase in their mechanical properties. Nano-sized filler was proven to improve the mechanical properties of thermoplastics compared with micron-sized filler because nano-sized filler has larger interfacial area between the filler and the polymer matrix.

  2. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  3. Graphene oxide-silica nanohybrids as fillers for PA6 based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo, Italy and STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans (Italy); Fucarino, R.; Khatibi, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Rosselli, S.; Bruno, M. [STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans II, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.

  4. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic-organic separators. [for alkaline batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine-particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity appears to be predictable from coating composition, that is, from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach has been applied to two polymer-'plasticizer'-filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10 mil) fuel-cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform at least as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  5. Low temperature method for the production of calcium phosphate fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastro Alfonso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium phosphate manufactured samples, prepared with hydroxyapatite, are used as either spacers or fillers in orthopedic surgery, but these implants have never been used under conditions of mechanical stress. Similar conditions also apply with cements. Many authors have postulated that cements are a useful substitute material when implanted in vivo. The aim of this research is to develop a low cristalline material similar to bone in porosity and cristallinity. Methods Commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp and monetite (M powders are mixed with water and compacted to produce cylindrical samples. The material is processed at a temperature of 37–120 degrees C in saturated steam to obtain samples that are osteoconductive. The samples are studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Vickers hardness test (HV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and porosity evaluation. Results The X-ray diffractions of powders from the samples show patterns typical of HAp and M powders. After thermal treatment, no new crystal phase is formed and no increase of the relative intensity of the peaks is obtained. Vicker hardness data do not show any relationship with treatment temperature. The total porosity decreases by 50–60% according to the specific thermal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of the samples with either HAp 80%-M 20% (c or Hap 50%-M 50% (f, show cohesion of the powder grains. Conclusions The dissolution-reprecipitation process is more intesive in manufactured samples (c and (f, according to Vickers hardness data. The process occurs in a steam saturated environment between 37 degrees and 120 degrees C. (c (f manufactured samples show pore dimension distributions useful to cellular repopulation in living tissues.

  6. Influence of mineral fillers on the rheological response of polymer-modified bitumens and mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cardone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of the bituminous components (bitumen and bituminous mastic within asphalt mixtures contribute significantly to the major distresses of flexible pavements (i.e. rutting, fatigue and low temperature cracking. Asphalt mixtures are usually composed of mastic-coated aggregates rather than pure bitumen-coated aggregates. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of mineral fillers on the rheological behaviour of several polymer-modified bitumens (PMBs through laboratory mixing. A neat bitumen and two types of polymers (elastomeric and plastomeric were used to produce PMBs, and two fillers with different minerals (limestone and basalt were selected to obtain mastics. The dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR were used to characterize the rheological properties of PMBs and mastics. In particular, multiple stress creep recovery (MSCR tests were performed to evaluate the rutting potential at high temperatures, whereas BBR tests were carried out to investigate the low temperature behaviour of these materials. BBR results for unmodified mastics show that the increase of stiffness is similar regardless of the filler type, whereas results for polymer-modified mastics indicate that the degree of stiffening depends on the combination of filler/polymer types. MSCR results show that adding filler leads to a reduced susceptibility of permanent deformation and an enhanced elastic response, depending on the combination of filler/polymer types. Overall results suggest that a physical–chemical interaction between the filler and bitumen occurs, and that the interaction level is highly dependent on the type of polymer modification.

  7. Influence of different fillers on the properties of an experimental vinyl polysiloxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Könzgen MEINCKE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the incorporation of different fillers on an experimental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS at two different concentrations, 20% and 40%. Different fillers were added to an experimental VPS. The study was developed in two stages: (i incorporation of fillers in different concentrations: (a 20 wt% fillers, and (b 40 wt%. The fillers were added to experimental VPS and mixed with a speed mixer; (ii characterization of experimental VPS; after the base paste and catalyst paste were mixed, the experimental VPS was used to make specimens specifically for each test, which were stored at 23°C for 24 hours. The tests were designed according to the specific standardization for the analysis of tensile strength, detail reproduction, Shore A hardness, and elastic recovery. For analysis of filler size pattern, scanning electron microscopy at 1500× magnification was used. The aerosil OX-50 40% (AE, and pure aluminum hydroxide 40% (PAH groups presented the highest tensile strength and Shore A hardness values. However, those were the only groups that did not present continuous detail reproduction of an intersection of 20 μm line. The elastic recovery was not statistically significant. The undesirable characteristics of VPS (lowest Shore A hardness and tensile strength were observed when it was added to the composition of acrylic polymer (AP and fiberglass (FG in both concentrations, 20% and 40%. In groups AE and PAH, agglomerates of nanofillers were shown in SEM micrography, while the other groups presented different shapes and fillers sizes.

  8. Effect of dry period dietary energy level in dairy cattle on volume, concentrations of immunoglobulin G, insulin, and fatty acid composition of colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S; Leal Yepes, F A; Overton, T R; Lock, A L; Lamb, S V; Wakshlag, J J; Nydam, D V

    2016-02-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of different dry cow feeding strategies on the volume, concentration of IgG and insulin, as well as fatty acid composition of colostrum. Our hypothesis was that different dry period diets formulated to resemble current feeding practices on commercial dairy farms and differing in plane of energy would have an effect on IgG and insulin concentration, as well as composition of fatty acid of colostrum. Animals (n=84) entering parity 2 or greater were dried off 57 d before expected parturition and fed either a diet formulated to meet, but not greatly exceed energy requirements throughout the dry period (CON), or a higher energy density diet, supplying approximately 150% of energy requirements (HI). A third group received the same diet as group CON from dry-off until 29 d before expected parturition. After this time point, from 28 d before expected parturition until calving, they received a diet formulated to supply approximately 125% of energy requirements (I-med). Concentration of IgG and insulin in colostrum were measured by radial immunodiffusion and RIA, respectively. Composition of fatty acids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The IgG concentration was highest in colostrum of cows in group CON [96.1 (95% CI: 83.3-108.9) g/L] and lowest in group HI [72.4 (60.3-84.5) g/L], whereas insulin concentration was highest in group HI [1,105 (960-1,250) μU/mL] and lowest in group CON [853 (700-1,007) μU/mL]. Colostrum yield did not differ between treatments and was 5.9 (4.5-7.4), 7.0 (5.6-8.4), and 7.3 (5.9-8.7) kg in groups CON, I-med, and HI, respectively. A multivariable linear regression model showed the effect of dietary treatment group on IgG concentration was independent of the effect of dry matter. Cows in groups CON, I-med, and HI had an average colostral fat percentage of 5.0 (4.1-5.9), 5.6 (4.8-6.4), and 6.0 (5.2-6.8) and an average fat yield of 289 (196-380), 406 (318-495), and 384 (295-473) g, respectively

  9. Novel hydrogels based on carboxyl pullulan and collagen crosslinking with 1, 4-butanediol diglycidylether for use as a dermal filler: initial in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Xue, Wenjiao; Zhu, Chenhui; Fan, Daidi; Liu, Yannan; XiaoxuanMa

    2015-12-01

    Novel hydrogels based on carboxyl pullulan (PC) and human-like collagen (HLC) crosslinking with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) are promising soft fillers for tissue engineering due to their highly tunable properties. Recent studies, however, have shown that incorporating hyaluronic acid and BDDE results in hydrogels with a microporous structure, a large pore size and high porosity, which reduce cell adhesion and enhance degradation in vivo. To improve biocompatibility and prevent biodegradation, the use of PC to replace hyaluronic acid in the fabrication of PC/BDDE (PCB) and PC/BDDE/HLC (PCBH) hydrogels was investigated. Preparation of gels with PC is a promising strategy due to the high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions of PC. In particular, the Schiff base reaction of HLC and PC produces the novel functional group -RCONHR' in PCBH hydrogels. Twenty-four weeks after subcutaneous injection of either PCB or PCBH hydrogel in mice, the surrounding tissue inflammation, enzymatic response and cell attachment were better compared to hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels. However, the biocompatibility, cytocompatibility and non-biodegradability of PCBH were milder than those of the PCB hydrogels both in vivo and in vitro. These results show that the proposed use of PC and HLC for the fabrication of hydrogels is a promising strategy for generating soft filler for tissue engineering.

  10. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin. PMID:27252000

  11. Effects of Mineral Filler to Polymer Modified Bitumen Ratio on the Design Properties of Hot Mix Asphalt and its Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Hafeez; MUMTAZ AHMED KAMAL

    2010-01-01

    Current development in the design of asphalt concrete especially in the upper layers of flexible pavements contains about acceptable proportion of mineral fillers passing 75?m (# 200) sieve, which contributes towards the mix cohesion, resistant to rutting and improves serviceability. Three filler to PMA (Polymer Modified Asphalt) ratios (i.e. 2.4, 3.4. and 4.4%) in Marshall Method of mix design were used in order to determine the optimum filler content at relatively low design ...

  12. Microstructures and properties of low-melting-point Al-Cu-Si filler metals prepared by different technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zehua; Feng Hua; Jiang Shaoqun; Zhou Zehua

    2010-01-01

    The Al25Cu6. 5Si0. 09RE (RE = La and Ce) and Al25Cu10.5Si2Ni filler metals were prepared by common metal mold casting, copper plate chilling and rapid solidification, respectively. The microstructures and properties of these filler metals were studied. The results show that the as-casting and the corresponding rapid solidification filler metals have the same phases but their microstructures are different. The microstructure of rapid solidification filler metals consults of an a-Al solid solution, the 6 (Al2Cu) intermetallic compound and an Al-Cu-Si eutectk phase. Compared with the as-casting filler metal, the melting temperature ranges (△T) of the corresponding copper plate chilling and rapid solidification filler metals decrease and their wettabilities are improved because of the grain refinement and the improvement of composition uniformity. The wetting area of Al25Cu6.5Si0.09RE rapid solidification filler metal doubles that of the corresponding as-casting filler metal. It is hopeful that the properties of Al-Cu-Si filler metals will be improved by changing preparation technology.

  13. Characterization of green composites from biobased epoxy matrices and bio-fillers derived from seashell wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Calcium carbonate from seashell is an attractive bio-filler in polymeric industry. • We examine composition and thermal properties of calcium carbonate from seashell. • Used with eco-friendly epoxy matrices provides a high renewable content material. • Addition of 30 wt.% of seashell bio-filler increase of over 50% in flexural modulus. • Calcium carbonate from seashell leads higher thermal stability materials. - Abstract: The seashells, a serious environmental hazard, are composed mainly by calcium carbonate, which can be used as filler in polymer matrix. The main objective of this work is the use of calcium carbonate from seashells as a bio-filler in combination with eco-friendly epoxy matrices thus leading to high renewable contents materials. Previously obtaining calcium carbonate, the seashells were washed and grinded. The powder obtained and the resin was characterized by DSC, TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and rheology plate-plate. The results show that addition of 30 wt.% of seashell bio-filler increase mechanical properties as flexural modulus (over 50%) and hardness Shore D (over 6%) and thermal properties as an increase around 13% in glass transitions temperature. The results show that the addition of calcium carbonate from seashells is an effective method to increase mechanical properties of bio-composite and to reduce the residue of seashells from industrial production

  14. Agro biomass by-products to multifunctional ingredients, chemicals and fillers - AgroBio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willfoer, S.; Manelius, R. (Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland), Lab. of Wood and Paper Chemistry), e-mail: swillfor@abo.fi, e-mail: rmanelius@abo.fi; Faulds, C; Sibakov, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)), e-mail: craig.faulds@vtt.fi, e-mail: juhani.sibakov@vtt.fi

    2011-11-15

    The AgroBio project started in August 2010 and now initial tests and analyses have been performed. At the moment, larger raw material amounts are collected so that proper materials tests can be done. The main objective of the project is to develop cost-effective and sustainable technologies to produce tailor- made filler particles from agricultural by-products. More specific scientific and technological goals of the project are to: Acquire by-products and to study the demand of their pre-processing (WP1), Develop the technology for agro by-product conversion and tailoring to desired filler particles by chemical and enzymatic means, and to characterize the produced filler particles (WP2 and WP3), Evaluate the behaviour of filler particles in selected industrial processes and their market potential (WP4), Estimate the economical and business feasibility of the concept and compare it with the currently used filler materials (WP 5). To date, the agro-industrial by-products have been mainly characterized and the first trials on particle size reduction and their food and paper applications have been tested. Additionally, a first round of feasibility interviews have been conducted with participating companies. (orig.)

  15. DIFFERENT TYPES OF MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE AS FILLER MATERIALS IN POLYSODIUM ACRYLATE SUPERABSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikael Larsson; Qi Zhou; Anette Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Three types of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with differences in structure and surface charge were used at low concentration as filler materials in polysodium acrylate superabsorbents (SAPs). The swelling of the composite hydrogels was determined in 0.9% NaCl solution as well as in deionized water. The shear modulus of the samples was determined through uniaxial compression analysis after synthesis and after swelling in 0.9% NaCl solution. Furthermore, the ability to retain filler effects after washing was investigated. The results showed that all of the investigated MFCs had a strong reinforcing effect on the shear modulus after synthesis. The filler effect on swelling and on the associated shear modulus of swollen samples showed a more complicated dependence on structure and surface charge. Finally, it was found that the filler effects were reasonably retained after washing and subsequent drying. The results confirm that MFC holds great potential as a filler material in superabsorbent applications. Furthermore, the results provide some insight on how the structural properties and surface charge of MFC will affect gel properties depending on swelling conditions. This information should be useful in evaluating the use of different types of MFC in future applications.

  16. Prevention of microcracking by REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal in laser clad welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal on microcracking prevention was verified in laser clad welding. Laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal or type 316L stainless steel was conducted using the five different filler metals of alloy 690 varying the La content. Ductility-dip crack occurred in laser clad welding when La-free alloy 690 filler metal was applied. Solidification and liquation cracks occurred contrarily in the laser cladding weld metal when the 0.07mass%La containing filler metal was applied. In case of laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal and type 316L stainless steel, the ductility-dip cracking susceptibility decreased, and solidification/liquation cracking susceptibilities increased with increasing the La content in the weld metal. The relation among the microcracking susceptibility, the (P+S) and La contents in every weld pass of the laser clad welding was investigated. Ductility-dip cracks occurred in the compositional range (atomic ratio) of La/(P+S) 0.99(on alloy 132 weld metal), >0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel), while any cracks did not occur at La/(P+S) being between 0.21-0.99 (on alloy 132 weld metal) 0.10-0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel). Laser clad welding test on type 316L stainless steel using alloy 690 filler metal containing the optimum La content verified that any microcracks did not occurred in the laser clad welding metal. (author)

  17. A facile approach to spinning multifunctional conductive elastomer fibres with nanocarbon fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Shayan; Razal, Joselito M.; Innis, Peter C.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2016-03-01

    Electrically conductive elastomeric fibres prepared using a wet-spinning process are promising materials for intelligent textiles, in particular as a strain sensing component of the fabric. However, these fibres, when reinforced with conducting fillers, typically result in a compromise between mechanical and electrical properties and, ultimately, in the strain sensing functionality. Here we investigate the wet-spinning of polyurethane (PU) fibres with a range of conducting fillers such as carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and chemically converted graphene. We show that the electrical and mechanical properties of the composite fibres were strongly dependent on the aspect ratio of the filler and the interaction between the filler and the elastomer. The high aspect ratio SWCNT filler resulted in fibres with the highest electrical properties and reinforcement, while the fibres produced from the low aspect ratio CB had the highest stretchability. Furthermore, PU/SWCNT fibres presented the largest sensing range (up to 60% applied strain) and the most consistent and stable cyclic sensing behaviour. This work provides an understanding of the important factors that influence the production of conductive elastomer fibres by wet-spinning, which can be woven or knitted into textiles for the development of wearable strain sensors.

  18. MRI in the evaluation of facial dermal fillers in normal and complicated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ascertain by MRI the presence of filler injected into facial soft tissue and characterize complications by contrast enhancement. Nineteen volunteers without complications were initially investigated to study the MRI features of facial fillers. We then studied another 26 patients with clinically diagnosed filler-related complications using contrast-enhanced MRI. TSE-T1-weighted, TSE-T2-weighted, fat-saturated TSE-T2-weighted, and TIRM axial and coronal scans were performed in all patients, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed TSE-T1-weighted scans were performed in complicated patients, who were then treated with antibiotics. Patients with soft-tissue enhancement and those without enhancement but who did not respond to therapy underwent skin biopsy. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. MRI identified and quantified the extent of fillers. Contrast enhancement was detected in 9/26 patients, and skin biopsy consistently showed inflammatory granulomatous reaction, whereas in 5/17 patients without contrast enhancement, biopsy showed no granulomas. Fisher's exact test showed significant correlation (p < 0.001) between subcutaneous contrast enhancement and granulomatous reaction. Cervical lymph node enlargement (longitudinal axis >10 mm) was found in 16 complicated patients (65 %; levels IA/IB/IIA/IIB). MRI is a useful non-invasive tool for anatomical localization of facial dermal filler; IV gadolinium administration is advised in complicated cases for characterization of granulomatous reaction. (orig.)

  19. Bio-based polyurethane composite foams with inorganic fillers studied by thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-based polyurethane (PU) composite foams filled with various inorganic fillers, such as barium sulfate (BaSO4), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and talc were prepared using polyols, such as diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and polyethylene glycol (molecular weight ca. 200) containing molasses and lignin. Reactive hydroxyl groups in plant components and above polyols were used as reaction sites. Morphological observation of fracture surface of composites was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Thermal properties of bio-based PU composites were examined by thermogravimetry. It was found that the above composites decompose in two stages reflecting decomposition of organic components. Decomposition temperature increased with increasing filler content, when plant components were homogenously mixed with inorganic fillers. Activation energy calculated by Ozawa-Wall-Flynn method was ca. 150 kJ mol-1. The durability of composites was predicted using kinetic data. Calculated values indicate that composites with fillers are more durable than that of those without fillers at a moderate temperature region

  20. MRI in the evaluation of facial dermal fillers in normal and complicated cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Girolamo, Marco [Rome Univ. (Italy). Radiology Unit; Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology - Sant' Andrea Hospital; Mattei, Mauro [Rome Univ. (Italy). Radiology Unit; Signore, Alberto [Rome Univ. (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Grippaudo, Francesca Romana [Rome Univ. (Italy). Plastic Surgery Unit

    2015-05-01

    To ascertain by MRI the presence of filler injected into facial soft tissue and characterize complications by contrast enhancement. Nineteen volunteers without complications were initially investigated to study the MRI features of facial fillers. We then studied another 26 patients with clinically diagnosed filler-related complications using contrast-enhanced MRI. TSE-T1-weighted, TSE-T2-weighted, fat-saturated TSE-T2-weighted, and TIRM axial and coronal scans were performed in all patients, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed TSE-T1-weighted scans were performed in complicated patients, who were then treated with antibiotics. Patients with soft-tissue enhancement and those without enhancement but who did not respond to therapy underwent skin biopsy. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. MRI identified and quantified the extent of fillers. Contrast enhancement was detected in 9/26 patients, and skin biopsy consistently showed inflammatory granulomatous reaction, whereas in 5/17 patients without contrast enhancement, biopsy showed no granulomas. Fisher's exact test showed significant correlation (p < 0.001) between subcutaneous contrast enhancement and granulomatous reaction. Cervical lymph node enlargement (longitudinal axis >10 mm) was found in 16 complicated patients (65 %; levels IA/IB/IIA/IIB). MRI is a useful non-invasive tool for anatomical localization of facial dermal filler; IV gadolinium administration is advised in complicated cases for characterization of granulomatous reaction. (orig.)

  1. Science of Hyaluronic Acid Beyond Filling: Fibroblasts and Their Response to the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Marina; Fagien, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Loss of viscoelasticity is one of the primarily signs of skin aging, followed by appearance of visible wrinkles. Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers are widely used to fill wrinkles and compensate for volume loss. Recent clinical observations demonstrate persistence of the filling effect longer than the biological availability of the filler. Stimulation of new collagen by cross-linked HA and up-regulation of elastin have been suggested as possible explanation to this observation and have been supported experimentally. Cross-linked HA substitutes for fragmented collagen in restoring extracellular matrix required for normal activity of fibroblasts, such as collagen and elastin production. To restore extracellular matrix efficiently, serial monthly treatments are required. Boosting of facial and nonfacial skin through fibroblast activation is a new indication for HA-based products. Injectable HA has also been recently registered in Europe as agents specific for the improvement of skin quality (Restylane Skinboosters). Further explanation of the possible mechanisms supported by long-term clinical examples is presented herein. PMID:26441098

  2. Kenaf Powder Filled Recycled High Density Polyethylene/Natural Rubber Biocomposites: The Effect of Filler Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Viet Cao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of kenaf powder (KP as filler for recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE/natural rubber (NR thermoplastic elastomer (TPE composites was investigated. The composites with different filler loading were prepared in a Haake internal mixer. Increasing KP loading in rHDPE/NR/KP biocomposites reduced the tensile strength, elongation at break but increased the stabilization torque and the tensile modulus. SEM study of fracture surface indicated that fibrillation of rHDPE was reduced and detachment of kenaf powder from polymer matrix was present particularly at high filler loading. These observations were responsible for the deterioration of tensile strength and elongation at break of rHDPE/NR/KP biocomposites. Water absorption study also showed that the water absorption of these biocomposites increased with increasing KP content.

  3. Performance of ferrite fillers on electrical behavior of polymer nanocomposite electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Mauli Dwivedi, Mrigank; Singh, Markandey; Agrawal, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal of nanofillers in polymer electrolytes have shown to improve the ionic properties of Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes in recent times. The effects of different nanoferrite fillers (i.e., Al-Zn ferrite, Mg-Zn ferrite, and Zn ferrite) on the electrical transport properties have been studied here on the composite polymer electrolyte system. The interaction of salt/filler with electrolyte has been investigated by XRD studies. SEM image and infrared spectral studies give an indication of nanocomposite formation. In conductivity studies, all electrolyte systems are seen to follow universal power law. Composition dependence (with ferrite filler) gives the maximum conductivity in [93PEO-7NH4SCN]: X ferrite (where X = 2% in Al-Zn ferrite, 1% Mg-Zn ferrite, and 1% Zn ferrite) system.

  4. Polyurethane foam with multi walled carbon nanotubes/magnesium hybrid filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Sinar Arzuria; Zainuddin, Firuz; Zaidi, Nur Hidayah Ahmad; Akil, Hazizan Md.; Ahmad, Sahrim

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/magnesium (Mg) hybrid filler in polyurethane (PU) foams with different weight percentages (0.5 wt.% to 3.0 wt.%). The PU/MWCNTs/Mg foam composites were formed by reaction of based palm oil polyol (POP) with methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) with ratio 1:1.1 by weight. The foam properties were evaluated in density, morphology and compressive strength. The addition of 2.5 wt.% hybrid filler showed the higher density in 59.72 kg/m3 and thus contribute to the highest compressive strength at 1.76 MPa. The morphology show cell in closed structure and addition hybrid filler showed uneven structure.

  5. Research on the Hydrophilic Modified of LDPE for the New Biological Suspended Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Weijia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban sewage is one of the main pollution sources of the city, which pollute soil, deteriorate the water quality and increase the water shortages and urban load. LDPE is low cost and widely used as the basic material of wastewater treatment, but LDPE’s hydrophilic is not good enough to meet the need of suspended filler in wastewater treatment. In this paper the hydrophilic modified of LDPE for the new biological suspended filler was studied and the preparation and processing technique based on LDPE was researched. The hydrophilic and mechanic performance of the hydrophilic modified materials was tested. Results shown that the new type of hydrophilic modified materials has good hydrophilic and meets the demand of urban sewage treatment. The research on the new suspended filler materials has great meaning in solving the problem of urban sewage and recycling.

  6. Effects of pyrolysis temperature and fillers on joining of ceramics via silicone resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Jun; CHEN Zhao-hui; ZHENG Wen-wei; HAN Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    The joining of graphite, ceramic SiC and Cf/SiC composites via preceramic silicone resin(SR) at high temperature (800-1400℃) was studied. The curing and pyrolysis process of SR, pyrolysis temperature, inert and active fillers were especially discussed. The results show that the curing process of SR was accomplished by consuming Si-OH. The temperature of 1200℃ is the appropriate treating temperature for graphite and SiC ceramic, and the temperature of 1400℃ is suitable for Cf/SiC composites. Inert filler SiC powder(5%, mass fraction) has much positive influence on the shear strength of the joints. Active filler nano Ai, Si powder can greatly improve the properties of the joints treated at high temperature. The improvement is over 700%.

  7. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  8. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  9. The effect of nanoclay filler loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Results: For groups with the same concentration of nanoparticles, PMMA-grafted filler-loaded group showed significantly higher flexural strength, except for 0.2% wt. For groups that contain PMMA-grafted nanoclay fillers, the 2% wt had the highest flexural strength value with significant difference to other subgroups. 1% wt and 2% wt showed significantly higher values compared to control (P 0.05. Flexural modulus of 2%, 5% wt PMMA-grafted and 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% wt unmodified nanoclay particles-loaded subgroups decreased significantly compared to control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler loading may enhance the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of unmodified nanoparticles cannot significantly improve the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of both unmodified and PMMA-grafted nanoclay particles in some concentrations decreased the flexural modulus.

  10. Effects of circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ashes as filler on the performances of asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Li; Hui Xu; Xiaoru Fu; Chen Chen; Jianping Zhai [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse

    2009-03-15

    This work investigated the potential of utilizing circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ashes (CFAs) as alternative filler, substituting mineral powders (MPs) that are widely used in asphalt concrete. Physico-chemical characteristics of the CFAs and MPs, as well as effects of different mix designs of CFAs and asphalt on asphalt performances were examined, including moisture susceptibility, viscosity, ductility, softening point, penetration, and antiaging performances. The results of the study show that generally the CFAs have greater effects than the MPs on improving the performances of asphalt, and that the specific surface area (SSA), free CaO (f-CaO), morphology, and mineralogical phases of the CFAs are more favorable than those of the MPs respectively, while the alkaline values, hydrophilic coefficients, particle size distributions (PSDs), and water contents of the two fillers are similar. It is suggested that CFAs may be more suitable than MPs for the use as asphalt concrete filler.

  11. Interactive effects between carbon allotrope fillers on the mechanical reinforcement of polyisoprene based nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galimberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive effects of carbon allotropes on the mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites were investigated. Carbon nanotubes (CNT and nano-graphite with high shape anisotropy (nanoG were melt blended with poly(1,4-cis-isoprene, as the only fillers or in combination with carbon black (CB, measuring the shear modulus at low strain amplitudes for peroxide crosslinked composites. The nanofiller was found to increase the low amplitude storage modulus of the matrix, with or without CB, by a factor depending on nanofiller type and content. This factor, fingerprint of the nanofiller, was higher for CNT than for nanoG. The filler-polymer interfacial area was able to correlate modulus data of composites with CNT, CB and with the hybrid filler system, leading to the construction of a common master curve.

  12. Influence of NdFeB Fillers on Tensile and Electromagnetic Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puripat LERTSURAWAT

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile and electromagnetic properties of hard magnetic natural rubber composites were studied. In a fabrication stage, neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB magnets were recycled from electronic wastes, broken and then ball-milled for 1 - 3 h. The NdFeB powder was then incorporated into natural rubber (NR by a 2-roll mill technique. Since the NdFeB powder behaved as a non-reinforced filler, thus, it inhibited cross-linking and stress-induced recrystallization. Therefore, the cure time and the tensile strength of the NdFeB-NR composites were reduced compared to the control sample without magnetic fillers. The addition of NdFeB fillers improved the electrical permittivity of NR and the magnetic moment in NdFeB-NR composites could be measured by a fluxmeter.

  13. On the weldability of grey cast iron using nickel based filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielded metal arc welding process using nickel based filler metal was used to join grey cast iron. The effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the microstructure and hardness was studied. PWHT included heating up to 870 oC, holding for 1 h at 870 oC and then furnace cooling. By using nickel based filler metal, formation of hard brittle phase (e.g. carbides and martensite) in the fusion zone is prevented. Before PWHT, heat affected zone exhibited martensitic structure and partially melted zone exhibited white cast iron structure plus martensite. Applied PWHT resulted in the dissolution of martensite in heat affected zone and graphitization and in turn the reduction of partially melted zone hardness. Results showed that welding of grey cast iron with nickel based filler metal and applying PWHT can serve as a solution for cast iron welding problems.

  14. Thermo Sensitivity of Polysiloxane/Silica Nanocomposites Affected by the Structure of Polymer-Filler Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Yufeng; Yu, Fengmei; Song, Lixian; Sun, Sumin; Lu, Zhongyuan; Lu, Ai

    2016-03-01

    In this work thermo sensitivity was investigated with the bound rubber theory and thermoelasticity theory of the polymer-filler interface interaction between Polymethylvinylsiloxane (PMVS) and nanofillers (fumed and precipitated silica with the primary particle size of 10 nanometres). Bound rubber (the transition phase between PMVS and silica) content was measured by sol-gel analysis and swelling experiments. Results showed that the amount of bound rubber increases steadily with the increases of filler content. But the increasing rate suddenly decreased at certain silica content (between 40 and 50 phr of precipitated silica and between 30 and 40 phr of fumed silica, respectively), which was constant with the thermoelaticity experiment results. The temperature coefficients in low strain uniaxial extension are found to present sudden changing at the same silica content. This observation shows that thermo sensitivity is closely connected with the structure of polymer-filler interface. PMID:27455698

  15. Influence of carbon fillers nature on the structural and morphological properties of polyurethane-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melentyev, S. V.; Malinovskaya, T. D.; Pavlov, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to studying structural and morphological properties of the resistive composite materials based on the polyurethane binder. The paper shows the influence of nature, size, shape, concentration of conductive carbon fillers (channel black K-163, graphite element GE-3, colloidal-graphite preparation C-1) and the method of their introduction into the binder to form the electrical conductivity of composites. Experimentally it was found out that a homogeneous composite structure reaches dispersive mixing filler and binder within 120 min. The analysis of the morphological pattern surfaces and chipping resistance materials has demonstrated that composites with colloidal-graphite preparation C-1 are more unimodal with the same concentrations of the investigated fillers.

  16. Influencia del filler calizo en las propiedades de los morteros a resistencia constante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández, Francisco

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the effects produced by the lime filler on the Portugal cement used with additions in the production of mortars. The starting point is a Portland cement to which different ratios of lime filler, ranging from 0-50%, are added. The next step consists of preparing mortar specimens using standardized sand as aggregate, curing them up to the age of 28 days when they are put to flexo-tensile and compression tests. The mortar strength is fixed at the age of 28 days, making it coincide with the strength of a pattern cement mortar (cement without additions of the same age. Then the effects of the filler on the slump and the water cement relation are observed for fixed strength.

    En este artículo se estudian los efectos producidos por el "filler" calizo en el cemento portland al utilizar este cemento con adiciones, en la fabricación de morteros. Se parte de un cemento portland al que se le añaden proporciones de "filler" calizo desde O hasta el 50%, y se preparan probetas de mortero utilizando como árido arena normalizada, curándose a continuación hasta la edad de 28 días, fecha en la que se someten a rotura por flexotracción y compresión. La resistencia de los morteros se fija a la edad de 28 días, haciéndola coincidir con la de un mortero de cemento patrón (cemento sin adiciones a la misma edad, y se observan, a resistencia fija, los efectos del "filler" sobre el escurrimiento y relación agua/cemento.

  17. Use of bottom ash from thermal power plant and lime as filler in bituminous mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-López, E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characterization of bottom ash (PCC-BA and determining the mechanical characteristics of hot mix asphalt (HMA using PCC-BA and hydrated lime (HL as filler. Physical and chemical characterization of the bottom ash was carried out to evaluate its eventual reutilization as filler substitute. The materials tested in this study were made using 0%, 25%, 50%, 70% and 100% of PCC-BA combined with HL. HMA mixes were evaluated in terms of their engineering properties, namely: air voids in the mixes, water sensitivity, stiffness modulus, performance in wheel tracking test and fatigue resistance. The results obtained indicate that HMA mixes with a filler blend of 70% PCC-BA and 30% HL fulfil European standards and are suitable for light traffic or small infrastructures.Este estudio se centra en la caracterización de las cenizas de fondo (PCC-BA y la determinación de las características mecánicas de mezclas bituminosas en caliente (HMA, utilizando cenizas de fondo y la cal hidratada (HL como filler. Se realizó la caracterización física y química de las cenizas de fondo para evaluar su empleo como sustituto de filler. Las mezclas ensayadas en este estudio se realizaron utilizando 0%, 25%, 50%, 70% y 100% de cenizas de fondo combinadas con cal hidratada. Se evaluaron propiedades ingenieriles de las mezclas bituminosas, tales como los huecos de aire en las mezclas, la sensibilidad al agua, el módulo de rigidez, el ensayo de pista y la resistencia a la fatiga. Los resultados obtenidos indican que las mezclas bituminosas fabricadas con una combinación de filler del 70% de cenizas de fondo y el 30% cal hidratada, cumplen con las normas europeas y son adecuados para su aplicación con tráficos ligeros o en pequeñas infraestructuras.

  18. Pembuatan Papan Komposit dari Plastik Daur Ulang dan Serbuk Kayu serta Jerami Sebagai Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mulana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of composites was done by mixing the filler and matrix. The common matrix used to produce composite is plastic ore with types of poly propylene, poly ethylene and others. To know the characteristics of composite boards made from recycled plastic type poly ethylene so this research was conducted. This research aims to create a composite board made of solid waste sawdust and straw as a filler and recycled plastics as the matrix and to find out more details of the influence of variable solid waste types and ratio of solid waste weight and plastic toward the quality of the composite board product. Composite board manufacturing process was carried out by hot press method at a temperature of 145 oC for 20 minutes. The composite board products are tested on value of hardness, tensile strength, and thermal value. The results showed that the use of sawdust as a filler resulted the composite hardness value that is better (R79,5 compared with straw (R67 at a ratio of filler composition: matrix of 80:20 respectively. The use of sawdust also gives the value of tensile strength of 6.86 MPa that is better than the using a straw that valued of 3.62 MPa at composition ratio of filler: to matrix (60:40. Largest amount of heat needed to melt the composite boards are 31.19 J/g and 14.02 J/g at composition ratio sawdust: recycled plastics of 80:20 and at composition ratio straw: recycled plastics of 80:20, respectively. Visually composite board with a composition of sawdust:plastic HDPE 50:50 looks better with bright colors and shiny. Keywords: Composite, Solid waste, Plastic, Matrix, Filler,  Poly ethylene

  19. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuiper Jan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV with either a low tidal volume (Vt of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis or with a high Vt of 15 mL/kg and no PEEP (HVt acid, HVt sepsis. Rats sacrificed immediately after acid instillation and non-ventilated septic animals served as controls. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were monitored. After 4 h, lung wet to dry (W/D weight ratios, histological lung injury and plasma mediator concentrations were measured. Results Oxygenation and lung compliance decreased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. Additionally, W/D weight ratios and histological lung injury scores increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. MV increased W/D weight ratio and lung injury score, however this effect was mainly attributable to HVt ventilation after acid instillation. Similarly, effects of HVt on oxygenation were only observed after acid instillation. HVt during sepsis did not further affect oxygenation, compliance, W/D weight ratio or lung injury score. Plasma interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α concentrations were increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis, but plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentration increased during sepsis only. In contrast to lung injury parameters, no additional effects of HVt MV after acid instillation on plasma mediator concentrations were observed. Conclusions During MV more severe lung injury develops after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. HVt causes VILI after acid instillation, but not during sepsis. However, this differential effect was not observed in the systemic release of

  20. Biomechanical characteristics of polymeric UHMWPE composites with hybrid matrix and dispersed fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, Sergey; Kornienko, Lyudmila; Shilko, Sergey; Thuc, Nguyen Xuan; Korchagin, Mikhail; Chaikina, Marina

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop artificial joint implants some biomechanical properties of composites with UHMWPE and hybrid (polymer-polymeric) "UHMWPE+PTFE" matrix with dispersed fillers were studied. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of adding hydroxyapatite micron- and nanopowders as a biocompatible filler was carried out. It was shown that under dry sliding friction the wear rate of nanocomposites with the hybrid matrix is lower as compared with composites with the non-hybrid one. Mechanical activation of components further enhances the durability of nano- and microcomposites to almost double it without any significant reduction in the strength characteristics.

  1. Numerical simulation of copper based filler metal droplets spreading under arc brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhi-shui; LI Rui-feng; QI Kai; ZHOU Fang-ming

    2005-01-01

    The spreading behavior of copper filler metal droplets under arc brazing was studied by numerical simulation method using Surface Evolver software. The mathematical model in which arc pressure force acceleration was added to the droplet microelement as the form of gravity acceleration was used in numerical simulation. Then the 3D filler metal droplet profile for different welding currents was simulated. The results show that the simulation results and the experimental results are in good accordance. And it can be seen that the spreading height decreases and diameter increases with the increasing welding current in an approximate linear relation.

  2. Enhanced mechanical and thermal properties of CNT/HDPE nanocomposite using MMT as secondary filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Mohsin, M. E.; Arsad, Agus; Fouad, H.; Jawaid, M.; Alothman, Othman Y.

    2014-05-01

    This study explains the influence of secondary filler on the dispersion of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposites (CNT/HDPE). In order to understand the mixed-fillers system, Montmorillonite (MMT) was added to CNT/HDPE nanocomposites. It was followed by investigating their effect on the thermal, mechanical and XRD properties of the aforesaid nanocomposite. Incorporation of 3 wt% each of MMT into CNT/HDPE nanocomposite resulted to the increased values for the tensile and flexural strength, as compared to the pure HDPE matrix. The thermal analysis result showed improved thermal stability of the formulated nanocomposites.

  3. Pembuatan Papan Komposit dari Plastik Daur Ulang dan Serbuk Kayu serta Jerami Sebagai Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Mulana; Hisbullah Hisbullah; Iskandar Iskandar

    2011-01-01

    Production of composites was done by mixing the filler and matrix. The common matrix used to produce composite is plastic ore with types of poly propylene, poly ethylene and others. To know the characteristics of composite boards made from recycled plastic type poly ethylene so this research was conducted. This research aims to create a composite board made of solid waste sawdust and straw as a filler and recycled plastics as the matrix and to find out more details of the influence of variabl...

  4. The studies of high-frequency magnetic properties and absorption characteristics for amorphous-filler composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. W.; Yang, Z. H.

    2015-10-01

    Pure amorphous flake fillers and amorphous flakes coated by ferrite nanoparticles with core-shell-like structure were fabricated using mechanical ball-milling. The later with core-shell-like structure can greatly decrease permittivity and improve the absorption properties, as compared to the former. The absorption of all amorphous-filler composites has its origin in a quarter-wavelength resonator. Based on the resonator model, absorption frequency fA and the corresponding return loss RL are calculated, which are well consistent with observed values. It is also found that the resonance frequency is proportional to effective resistivity, based on William-Shockley-Kittel's eddy model.

  5. Long-term performance of thermoplastic composite material with cotton burr and stem (CBS) as a partial filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Cotton burr and stem (CBS) fraction of cotton gin byproducts has shown promise as a fiber filler in thermoplastic composites, with physical and mechanical properties comparable to that made with wood fiber fillers. However, the long-term performance of this composite material is not known...

  6. "Uh," "Um," and Autism: Filler Disfluencies as Pragmatic Markers in Adolescents with Optimal Outcomes from Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Christina A.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Fein, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Filler disfluencies--"uh" and "um"--are thought to serve distinct discourse functions. We examined fillers in spontaneous speech by youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who struggle with pragmatic language, and by youth with ASD who have achieved an "optimal outcome" (OO), as well as in peers with typical…

  7. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Kuiper Jan; Plötz Frans B; Groeneveld AB Johan; Haitsma Jack J; Jothy Serge; Vaschetto Rosanna; Zhang Haibo; Slutsky Arthur S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV) with either a low tidal volume (Vt) of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis) or with a high Vt of 15 ...

  8. Influences of soil volume and an elevated CO[sub 2] level on growth and CO[sub 2] exchange for the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Opuntia ficus-indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Cui, M.; Miller, P.M.; Luo, Y. (UCLA-DOE Lab., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the current (38 Pa) and an elevated (74 Pa) CO[sub 2] partial pressure on root and shoot areas, biomass accumulation and daily net CO[sub 2] exchange were determined for opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller, a highly productive Crassulacean acid metabolism species cultivated worldwide. Plants were grown in environmentally controlled rooms for 18 weeks in pots of three soil volumes (2600, 6500 and 26000 cm[sup 3]), the smallest of which was intended to restrict root growth. For plants in the medium-sized soil volume, basal cladodes tended to be thicker and areas of main and lateral roots tended to be greater as the CO[sub 2] level was doubled. Daughter cladodes tended to be initiated sooner at the current compared with the elevated CO[sub 2] level but total areas were similar by 10 weeks. At 10 weeks, daily net CO[sub 2] uptake for the three soil volumes averaged 24% higher for plants growing under elevated compared with current CO-2 levels, but at 18 weeks only 3% enhancement in uptake occurred. Dry weight gain was enhanced 24% by elevated CO[sub 2] during the first 10 weeks but only 8% over 18 weeks. Increasing the soil volume 10-fold led to a greater stimulation of daily net CO[sub 2] uptake and biomass production than did doubling the CO[sub 2] level. At 18 weeks, root biomass doubled and shoot biomass nearly doubled as the soil volume was increased 10-fold; the effects of soil volume tended to be greater for elevated CO[sub 2]. The amount of cladode nitrogen per unit dry weight decreased as the CO[sub 2] level was raised and increased as soil volume increased, the latter suggesting that the effects of soil volume could be due to nitrogen limitations. (au) (30 refs.)

  9. Biophysical and biological characterization of a new line of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers: A scientific rationale to specific clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gatta, Annalisa; De Rosa, Mario; Frezza, Maria Assunta; Catalano, Claudia; Meloni, Marisa; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Chemico-physical and biological characterization of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers is of key importance to differentiate between numerous available products and to optimize their use. These studies on fillers are nowadays perceived as a reliable approach to predict their performance in vivo. The object of this paper is a recent line of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based dermal fillers, Aliaxin®, available in different formulations that claim a complete facial restoration. The aim of the study is to provide biophysical and biological data that may support the clinical indications and allow to predict performance possibly with respect to similar available products. Aliaxin® formulations were tested for their content in soluble HA, water uptake capacity, rheological behavior, stability to enzymatic degradation, and for in vitro capacity to stimulate extracellular matrix components production. The formulations were found to contain a low amount of soluble HA and were equivalent to each other regarding insoluble hydrogel concentration. The different crosslinking degree declared by the producer was consistent with the trend in water uptake capacity, rigidity, viscosity. No significant differences in stability to enzymatic hydrolysis were found. In vitro experiments, using a full thickness skin model, showed an increase in collagen production in the dermoepidermal junction. Results support the claims of different clinical indications, the classification of products regarding hydro-, lift-action and the specifically suggested needle gauge for the delivery. The biological outcomes also support products effectiveness in skin structure restoration. These data predicted a better performance regarding hydro-action, tissue integration, clinical management during delivery, and a high durability of the aesthetic effect when compared to data on marketed similar products.

  10. Biophysical and biological characterization of a new line of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers: A scientific rationale to specific clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gatta, Annalisa; De Rosa, Mario; Frezza, Maria Assunta; Catalano, Claudia; Meloni, Marisa; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Chemico-physical and biological characterization of hyaluronan-based dermal fillers is of key importance to differentiate between numerous available products and to optimize their use. These studies on fillers are nowadays perceived as a reliable approach to predict their performance in vivo. The object of this paper is a recent line of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based dermal fillers, Aliaxin®, available in different formulations that claim a complete facial restoration. The aim of the study is to provide biophysical and biological data that may support the clinical indications and allow to predict performance possibly with respect to similar available products. Aliaxin® formulations were tested for their content in soluble HA, water uptake capacity, rheological behavior, stability to enzymatic degradation, and for in vitro capacity to stimulate extracellular matrix components production. The formulations were found to contain a low amount of soluble HA and were equivalent to each other regarding insoluble hydrogel concentration. The different crosslinking degree declared by the producer was consistent with the trend in water uptake capacity, rigidity, viscosity. No significant differences in stability to enzymatic hydrolysis were found. In vitro experiments, using a full thickness skin model, showed an increase in collagen production in the dermoepidermal junction. Results support the claims of different clinical indications, the classification of products regarding hydro-, lift-action and the specifically suggested needle gauge for the delivery. The biological outcomes also support products effectiveness in skin structure restoration. These data predicted a better performance regarding hydro-action, tissue integration, clinical management during delivery, and a high durability of the aesthetic effect when compared to data on marketed similar products. PMID:27524055

  11. Multifunctional polymer composites containing inorganic nanoparticles and novel low-cost carbonaceous fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongchao

    Advanced polymer nanocomposites/composites containing inorganic nanoparticles and novel carbonaceous fillers were processed and evaluated for the multifunctional purposes. To prepare the high performance conformal coating materials for microelectronic industries, epoxy resin was incorporated with zirconium tungstate (ZrW 2O8) nanoparticles synthesized from hydrothermal reaction to alleviate the significant thermal expansion behavior. Three types of ZrW 2O8 at different loading levels were selected to study their effect of physical (morphology, particle size, surface area, etc.) and thermal (thermal expansivity) properties on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of epoxy resin. Epoxy resin incorporated by Type-1 ZrW2O8 exhibited the overall excellent performance. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoplatelets were non-covalently encapsulated by a versatile and mussel-adhesive protein polydopamine through the strong pi-pi* interaction. The high-temperature thermoset bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy) reinforced with homogenously dispersed h-BN at different volume fractions and functionalities were processed to investigate their effect on thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, dielectric properties and thermal conductivity. Different theoretical and empirical models were also successfully applied for the prediction of CTE, thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of h-BN/BECy nanocomposites. On the basis of the improvement in dimensional stability, the enhancement in storage modulus in both glassy and rubbery regions, associated with the increment in thermal conductivity without deterioration of thermal stability, glassy transition temperature and dielectric properties, pristine h-BN/BECy nanocomposites exhibited the prospective application in microelectronic packaging industry. Polydopamine functionalized h-BN significantly increased the dielectric constant of cyanate ester at lower frequency region. Asphaltene, a

  12. Incorporation of nano-sized mesoporous MCM-41 material used as fillers in natural rubber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Mesoporous MCM-41 as reinforcing filler to polymers was used in our previous study. → Few paper has mentioned this kind of filler in rubber. → Modification of MCM-41 as reinforcing filler in natural rubber was studied. → The reinforcing effect was remarkable. - Abstract: The nano-sized mesoporous MCM-41 (without template), and the modification of MCM-41 (without template) were used to prepare natural rubber (NR) composites. The effects of coupling agents γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550), γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-570), bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (Si-69), isopropyl tri-(dioctylpyrophosphate)titanate (NDZ-201) on the mechanical properties of the composites were also investigated. The results showed that the tensile properties of Natural rubber/mesoporous MCM-41 nanocomposite were improved as compared with those of NR compound. KH-570 had good effect on enhancing the overall properties of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations revealed that the modified nano-sized MCM-41 material was well dispersed in the polymer matrix and the enhancement of the interface between the matrix and fillers was obtained.

  13. Investigation of Properties of Asphalt Concrete Containing Boron Waste as Mineral Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahit GÜRER

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the manufacture of compounds in the boron mining industry a large quantity of waste boron is produced which has detrimental effects on the environment. Large areas have to be allocated for the disposal of this waste. Today with an increase in infrastructure construction, more efficient use of the existing sources of raw materials has become an obligation and this involves the recycling of various waste materials. Road construction requires a significant amount of raw materials and it is possible that substantial amounts of boron-containing waste materials can be recycled in these applications. This study investigates the usability of boron wastes as filler in asphalt concrete. For this purpose, asphalt concrete samples were produced using mineral fillers containing 4%, 5%, 6%, 7% and 8% boron waste as well as a 6% limestone filler (6%L as the control sample. The Marshall Design, mechanical immersion and Marshall Stability test after a freeze-thaw cycle and indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM test were performed for each of the series. The results of this experimental study showed that boron waste can be used in medium and low trafficked asphalt concrete pavements wearing courses as filler.

  14. Statements on the Safety of Permanent Soft Tissue Fillers in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Daphne; van der Lei, Berend; Cromheecke, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Increasing reported complications associated with permanent soft tissue fillers have led the national medical societies and governmental institutes in Europe to send out warnings regarding their use. Regulation and legislation for the introduction of new products and the use of existing products are

  15. Influence of filler alignment in the mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes/epoxy nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisberto, M. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); INQUIMAE-CONICET-UBA, Pab II Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Arias-Duran, A. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Ramos, J.A.; Mondragon, I. [Dep. Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente. Esc. Politecnica. UPV/EHU, Pza. Europa 1, Donostia-San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Candal, R. [INQUIMAE-CONICET-UBA, Pab II Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia-UNSAM, San Martin, Prov. De Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Rubiolo, G.H., E-mail: rubiolo@cnea.gov.ar [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Dep. Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA-CAC), Avda Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we report the mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes/epoxy composites prepared with aligned and randomly oriented nanotubes as filler. The samples are disks of 30 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness. To obtain the carbon nanotubes alignment, an external electric field (250 VAC; 50 Hz) was applied through the thickness of the sample during all the cure process. The AC electrical current was measured, during the cure, as a strategy to determine the optimum time in which the alignment reaches the maximum value. DC conductivity measured after the cure shows a percolation threshold in the filler content one order of magnitude smaller for composites with aligned nanotubes than for composites with randomly oriented filler (from 0.06 to 0.5 wt%). In the percolation threshold, the achieved conductivity was 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Sm{sup -1}. In both cases, aligned and randomly distributed carbon nanotube composites, the wear resistance increases with the addition of the filler while the Rockwell hardness decreases independently of the nanotubes alignment.

  16. Sulfate Attack of Cement-Based Material with Limestone Filler Exposed to Different Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaojian; Ma, Baoguo; Yang, Yingzi; Su, Anshuang

    2008-08-01

    Mortar prisms made with OPC cement plus 30% mass of limestone filler were stored in various sulfate solutions at different temperatures for periods of up to 1 year, the visual appearance was inspected at intervals, and the flexural and compressive strength development with immersion time was measured according to the Chinese standard GB/T17671-1999. Samples were selected from the surface of prisms after 1 year immersion and examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), laser-raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that MgSO4 solution is more aggressive than Na2SO4 solution, and Mg2+ ions reinforce the thaumasite sulfate attack on the limestone filler cement mortars. The increase of solution temperature accelerates both magnesium attack and sulfate attack on the limestone filler cement mortar, and leads to more deleterious products including gypsum, ettringite and brucite formed on the surface of mortars after 1 year storage in sulfate solutions. Thaumasite forms in the mortars containing limestone filler after exposure to sulfate solutions at both 5 °C and 20 °C. It reveals that the thaumasite form of sulfate attack is not limited to low-temperature conditions.

  17. Influence of filler existence on microleakage of a self-etch adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Mirmohammadi; K. Khosravi; K. Kashani; C.J. Kleverlaan; A.J. Feilzer

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of filler existence in self-etch adhesive resin on the marginal leakage of a class V restoration. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared and restored with a resin composite on the buccal surfaces of 48 premolars lined with unfilled or filled adhesi

  18. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP. PMID:27060197

  19. Surface Modified Characteristics of the Tetracalcium Phosphate as Light-Cured Composite Resin Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to characterize the properties of light-cured composite resins that are reinforced with whisker surface-modified particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP and to investigate the influence of thermal cycling on the reinforced composites properties. The characteristics of ultimate diametral tensile strength (DTS, moduli, pH values, and fracture surfaces of the samples with different amounts of surface-modified TTCP (30%–60% were determined before and after thermal cycling between 5°C and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. The trends of all groups were ductile prior to thermal cycling and the moduli of all groups increased after thermal cycling. The ductile property of the control group without filler was not significantly affected. Larger amounts of fillers caused the particles to aggregate, subsequently decreasing the resin’s ability to disperse external forces and leading to brittleness after thermal cycling. Therefore, the trend of composite resins with larger amounts of filler would become more brittle and exhibited higher moduli after thermal cycling. This developed composite resin with surface modified-TTCP fillers has the potential to be successful dental restorative materials.

  20. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet transfer were observed during welding. The tensile strength of welds was slightly increased by adding CaO to the filler metal, which resulted from the decreased grain size in the weld metal. When welding Mg alloys, fumes have been unavoidable so far because of the low boiling temperature of Mg. Fume reduction was successfully demonstrated with a wire composed of the novel ECO Mg filler. In addition, stable droplet transfer was observed and spatter suppression could be expected by using CaO-added Mg filler wire.

  1. Influence of heat conductivity on the performance of RTV SIR coatings with different fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (RTV SIR) coatings are employed in order to improve the pollution performance of high voltage ceramic insulators by imparting surface hydrophobicity. In this paper, the performance of three RTV SIR coatings containing different fillers is investigated in a salt-fog test. Alumina trihydrate (ATH) and silica are the fillers included in the formulation, aiming to increase the material endurance to the energy supplied by the surface electrical activity during periods of hydrophobicity loss. The primary action of these fillers is to increase the material heat conductivity, i.e. the amount of energy conducted to the substrate. In addition, in the case of ATH relief is also achieved due to particle decomposition. The results indicate that for the compositions commercially available, where low amounts of fillers are used, and under the conditions of the test, ATH filled coatings performed better than the silica filled ones. This is attributed to ATH decomposition which further relieves the material structure and therefore decelerates material aging

  2. Novel encapsulation technique for incorporation of high permittivity fillers into silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    as for the traditionally applied thermoplastic encapsulation. The properties of the elastomers are investigated as function of the filler content and type. The dielectric permittivity, dielectric loss, conductivity, storage modulus as well as viscous loss are compared to elastomers with the same amounts of high...

  3. Effect of denture base-resin with prereacted glass-ionomer filler on dentin demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Mukai; K. Kamijo; F. Fujino; T. Teranaka; J.M. ten Cate

    2009-01-01

    The demineralization of dentin was studied when placed adjacent to one of four experimental denture base-resins. These experimental resins contained polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and 0, 5, 10, 20 or 30 wt% surface reaction-type prereacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler, respectively. A dentin thin-sec

  4. Composite biomaterials with chemical bonding between hydroxyapatite filler particles and PEG/PBT copolymer matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qing; Wijn, de Joost R.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to make composites from hydroxyapatite and a PEG/PBT copolymer (PolyactiveTM 70/30), chemical linkages were introduced between the filler particles and polymer matrix using hexamethylene diisocyanate as a coupling agent. Infrared spectra (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) confi

  5. Mechanical stress in silicon nanosized architectures: Defects of SOD processed silica filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Structural and optical properties of silica filled STI architectures. • The silica filler induces a compressive stress. • PL spectra show a large distribution of emitting defects in the UV–blue. • The defects were identified and located at the silica–liner interface. - Abstract: The mechanical stress in nanosized silicon architectures is studied in shallow trench isolation systems with different liners and spin on dielectrics processed silica filler by means of Raman spectroscopy. The nanopatterning of silicon wafers causes a tensile stress of the system whereas the presence of the filler induces a compressive stress which depends on the interaction between silica filler and liner: by changing the liner from silicon dioxide to silicon nitride one can induce a larger compressive stress. The analysis of the ultraviolet excited emission properties in the visible range (nanosecond lasting bands at 2.5, 3.0 and 3.3 eV) allowed us to individuate and locate silica related defects and to correlate their presence to the induced compressive stress

  6. Experimental dermatological surgery: An animal model for developing skills with dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Catucci Boza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laboratory experiments in the formation of physicians is well recognized since they facilitate scientific development and enhance technical skills. Dermal filling procedures are performed for the correction of wrinkles, rhytids, scars, and lipodystrophy. Till date, experimental models for the training of dermal filling techniques have not been studied. To demonstrate an experimental laboratory model for the training of dermal filling techniques in an animal model. The heads of pigs were used for this purpose, together with Carbopol gel at different densities, which was used to simulate the fillers available in the market. Needles and specific cannulas were used to apply the fillers into the creases and other areas of the pig skin. The pig head appears to be a suitable model for this training. Carbopol gel is a good choice for simulating fillers. This model of laboratory experiment requires a minimum of infrastructure; it is a low-cost alternative and facilitates practical training in the application of dermal fillers.

  7. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga;

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with...

  8. Detection of Bacteria by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization in Culture-Negative Soft Tissue Filler Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adverse reactions to polyacrylamide gel occur as swellings or nodules, and controversy exists whether these are due to bacterial infection or an autoimmune reaction to the filler. OBJECTIVES Biopsies from culture-negative long-lasting nodules after injection with different types of pol...

  9. A study on engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using filler with recycled waste lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Do, Hwang; Hee Mun, Park; Suk keun, Rhee

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on determining the engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using mineral fillers with recycled waste lime, which is a by-product of the production of soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)). The materials tested in this study were made using a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratio based on the conventional mineral filler ratio to analyze the possibility of using recycled waste lime. The asphalt concretes, made of recycled waste lime, hydrated lime, and conventional asphalt concrete, were evaluated through their fundamental engineering properties such as Marshall stability, indirect tensile strength, resilient modulus, permanent deformation characteristics, moisture susceptibility, and fatigue resistance. The results indicate that the application of recycled waste lime as mineral filler improves the permanent deformation characteristics, stiffness and fatigue endurance of asphalt concrete at the wide range of temperatures. It was also determined that the mixtures with recycled waste lime showed higher resistance against stripping than conventional asphalt concrete. It was concluded from various test results that a waste lime can be used as mineral filler and, especially, can greatly improve the resistance of asphalt concrete to permanent deformation at high temperatures. PMID:17408942

  10. Effect of filler surface properties on stress relaxation behavior of carbon nanofiber/polyurethane nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedat Gunes, I.; Jimenez, Guillermo; Jana, Sadhan

    2009-03-01

    The effect of carbon nanofiber (CNF) surface properties on tensile stress relaxation behavior of CNF/polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites was analyzed. PU was synthesized from methylene diisocyanate, polypropylene glycol (PPG diol), and butanediol. CNF, oxidized CNF (ox-CNF), and PPG diol grafted CNF (ol-CNF) were selected as fillers. ol-CNF was obtained by grafting PPG diol onto ox-CNF by reacting it with the carboxyl groups present on ox-CNF surface. The atomic ratios of oxygen to carbon present on the filler surfaces were 0.13 and 0.18 on ox-CNF and on ol-CNF as compared to 0.015 on CNF, mostly due to the presence oxygen containing polar groups on the surfaces of the former. The composites were prepared by in-situ polymerization and melt mixing in a chaotic mixer. The stress relaxation behavior of composites was determined at room temperature after inducing a tensile strain of 100%. The presence of fillers augmented the rate of stress relaxation in composites which was highest in the presence of CNF. The results suggested that relatively weak polymer-filler interactions in composites of CNF promoted higher stress relaxation.

  11. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Clay: Unique Nanostructured Filler for High-Performance Polymer Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Wei-De; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    High-performance composites are produced using nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids as a reinforcing filler. The intercalation of iron particles between the clay platelets serves as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs, while the platelets are exfoliated by the CNTs, forming the unique 3

  12. Micro-nano filler metal foil on vacuum brazing of SiCp/Al composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Zeng; Niu, Jitai

    2016-06-01

    Using micro-nano (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)- xTi (wt%, x = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0) foils as filler metal, the research obtained high-performance joints of aluminum matrix composites with high SiC particle content (60 vol%, SiCp/Al-MMCs). The effect of brazing process and Ti content on joint properties was investigated, respectively. The experimental results indicate that void free dense interface between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam with C-Al-Si-Ti product was readily obtained, and the joint shear strength enhanced with increasing brazing temperature from 560 to 580 °C or prolonging soaking time from 10 to 90 min. Sound joints with maximum shear strength of 112.5 MPa was achieved at 580 °C for soaking time of 90 min with (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)-2Ti filler, where Ti(AlSi)3 intermetallic is in situ strengthening phase dispersed in the joint and fracture occured in the filler metal layer. In this research, the beneficial effect of Ti addition into filler metal on improving wettability between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam was demonstrated, and capable welding parameters were broadened for SiCp/Al-MMCs with high SiC particle content.

  13. A High-Fe Aluminum Matrix Welding Filler Metal for Hardfacing Aluminum-Silicon Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A high-Fe containing aluminum matrix filler metal for hardfacing aluminum-silicon alloys has been developed by using iron,nickel,and silicon as the major strengthening elements,and by measuring mechanical properties,room temperature and high temperature wear tests,and microstructural analysis.The filler metal,which contains 3.0%-5.0% Fe and 11.0%-13.0% Si,exhibits an excellent weldability.The as-cast and as-welded microstructures for the filler metal are of uniformly distribution and its dispersed network of hard phase is enriched with Al-Si-Fe-Ni.The filler metal shows high mechanical properties and wear resistance at both room temperature and high temperatures.The deposited metal has a better resistance to impact wear at 220℃ than that of substrate Al-Si-Mg-Cu piston alloy;at room temperature,the deposited metal has an equivalent resistance to slide wear with lubrication as that of a hyper-eutectic aluminum-silicon alloy with 27% Si and 1% Ni.

  14. Application of waste bulk moulded composite (BMC) as a filler for isotactic polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczewski, Mateusz; Matykiewicz, Danuta; Andrzejewski, Jacek; Skórczewska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to produce isotactic polypropylene based composites filled with waste thermosetting bulk moulded composite (BMC). The influence of BMC waste addition (5, 10, 20 wt%) on composites structure and properties was investigated. Moreover, additional studies of chemical treatment of the filler were prepared. Modification of BMC waste by calcium stearate (CaSt) powder allows to assess the possibility of the production of composites with better dispersion of the filler and more uniform properties. The mechanical, processing, and thermal properties, as well as structural investigations were examined by means of static tensile test, Dynstat impact strength test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), melt flow index (MFI) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Developed composites with different amounts of non-reactive filler exhibited satisfactory thermal and mechanical properties. Moreover, application of the low cost modifier (CaSt) allows to obtain composites with better dispersion of the filler and improved processability. PMID:27222742

  15. Application of waste bulk moulded composite (BMC) as a filler for isotactic polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczewski, Mateusz; Matykiewicz, Danuta; Andrzejewski, Jacek; Skórczewska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce isotactic polypropylene based composites filled with waste thermosetting bulk moulded composite (BMC). The influence of BMC waste addition (5, 10, 20 wt%) on composites structure and properties was investigated. Moreover, additional studies of chemical treatment of the filler were prepared. Modification of BMC waste by calcium stearate (CaSt) powder allows to assess the possibility of the production of composites with better dispersion of the filler and more uniform properties. The mechanical, processing, and thermal properties, as well as structural investigations were examined by means of static tensile test, Dynstat impact strength test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), melt flow index (MFI) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Developed composites with different amounts of non-reactive filler exhibited satisfactory thermal and mechanical properties. Moreover, application of the low cost modifier (CaSt) allows to obtain composites with better dispersion of the filler and improved processability. PMID:27222742

  16. Aesthetic breast augmentation with hyaluronic acid: imaging findings and implications for radiological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divanei Aparecida Bottaro Criado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available New injectable fillers such as hyaluronic acid have recently been employed as a non-surgical alternative to implants such as silicone for aesthetic breast enhancement. Although their utilization is not yet widespread in Brazil, radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings in this context and of the implications of the presence of this filler for the radiological evaluation in the screening for breast cancer.

  17. Aesthetic breast augmentation with hyaluronic acid: imaging findings and implications for radiological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Divanei Aparecida Bottaro Criado; Fernanda Del Campo Braojos; Ulysses dos Santos Torres; Marcos Pontes Muniz

    2012-01-01

    New injectable fillers such as hyaluronic acid have recently been employed as a non-surgical alternative to implants such as silicone for aesthetic breast enhancement. Although their utilization is not yet widespread in Brazil, radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings in this context and of the implications of the presence of this filler for the radiological evaluation in the screening for breast cancer.

  18. Effect of filler type on 3-body abrasion of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composite in stress bearing posterior situations has restricted wider clinical application of this restorative material. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the three body abrasive wear of a dental composite based on a new filler (leucite: KAl Si2O6 and to compare it with the wear resistance of a composite based on commonly used Aluminium – Barium Silicate filler. Materials and Methods: This research was an interventional study done in Iran polymer institute. Five specimens were considered in each group. All ceramic IPS Empress® (Ivoclar- Vivadent ingots based on leucite crystals were ball milled, passed through an 800 sieve and used as filler. Experimental composites were prepared by mixing the silane- treated fillers with monomers (BisGMA and TEGDMA. Camphorquinone and amine were used as photoinitiator system. Degree of conversion of the light-cured and post-cured composites was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. The prepared pastes were inserted into plexy-glass mold and light cured (700 mw/cm2, 40 s. Then for maximum degree of conversion specimens were post- cured (120ºC, 5 hours. Three body abrasion wear testing was performed using a wear machine with 50 rpm rotational movement. In this machine, pumice (150 meshes was used as the third body. Weight loss of specimens in each group was measured by balance after each 50 hours. After wear testing SEM examination was made specimens in each group. The data were analyzed and compared using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P<0.05. Tetric Ceram was tested as commercial composite. Results: There were significantly differences between three body abrasive wear of composites. The ranking from lowest to highest was as follows: leucite composite (19% < Tetric Ceram (22% < glass composite (28%. leucite composite showed the highest wear resistance value, propably due to the crystalliniy and hardness of filler. Conclusion

  19. Development of (fe–b–c-based filler for wear-resistant composite coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Sukhovа

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of multi-alloyed filler for abrasive wear-resistant composites. Methodology. The methods of microstructural, X-ray and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses were used to achieve research purpose. Micro-mechanical properties of structural constituents and abrasive wear-resistance of composites were determined. Findings. The complete dissolution of chromium and vanadium in the borides of Fe2В and FeВ that are initial structural constituents of Fe–В–С peritectic alloys has been established. These elements primarily dissolve in iron monoboride. Dissolution of molybdenum and niobium is not practically observed. As a result the phases of Мо2В, Мо2(В,С or NbВ2 can be seen in the structure. Alloying with chromium and vanadium increases compression strength and crack resistance coefficient, but that with molybdenum and niobium enhances total microhardness and hardness of the alloys. Structure formation of the interfaces between the filler and the binder of the composites based on МNМts 20-20 binder is governed by dissolution and diffusion processes when multi-alloyed (Fe–В–С alloy is applied as filler of the composites. The phase and the structural composition of contact interaction zones can be explained by re-crystallization of the filler surface layers after dissolution caused by contact with the molten binder. Consequently the macroheterogeneous structure of the composites is free of defects and strong adhesion between the filler and the binder is assured. Contact interaction intensity can be controlled by the choice of temperature- and-time infiltration regimes. Originality. The peculiarities in the formation of structure and properties of Fe2В- and FeВ-based solid solutions observed in the structure of the Fe–В–С peritectic alloys were investigated that allowed us to recommend composition of multicomponent alloy to be applied as filler of (Cu–Ni–Mn-matrix macroheterogeneous composites. Practical

  20. Effect of filler particles on surface roughness of experimental composite series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanadi Yousif Marghalani

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different filler sizes and shapes on the surface roughness of experimental resin-composite series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-three disc-shaped specimens of the series (Spherical-RZD 102, 105, 106, 107, 114 and Irregular-RZD 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112 were prepared in a split Teflon mold and irradiated with an halogen light-curing unit (450 mW/cm² for 40 s at both top and bottom surfaces. The specimens were stored for 3 months in distilled water. The surface roughness values in form of surface finish-vertical parameter (Ra, maximum roughness depth (Rmax and horizontal roughness parameter (Sm were recorded using a contact profilometer. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Scheffé post-hoc test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The lowest surface roughness (Ra was observed in S-100 (0.079±0.013, while the roughest surface was noted in I-450/700/1000 (0.125±0.011 and I-450/1000 (0.124±0.004. The spherical-shape series showed the smoothest surface finish compared to the irregular-shape ones with higher significant difference (p>0.05. The vertical surface roughness parameter (Ra values increased as the filler size increased yielding a linear relation (r²=0.82. On the contrary, the horizontal parameter (Sm was not significantly affected by the filler size (r²=0.24 as well as the filler shape. CONCLUSIONS: Filler particle's size and shape have a great effect on the surface roughness parameters of these composite series.

  1. Role of Silicon Dioxide Filler on Mechanical and Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Glass-Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of glass fabric reinforced epoxy (G-E composite with varying weight percentage of silicon dioxide (SiO2 filler have been studied in the present work. The influence of sliding distance, velocity, and applied normal load on dry sliding wear behaviour has been considered using Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Addition of SiO2 increased the density, hardness, flexural, and impact strengths of G-E composite. Results of dry sliding wear tests showed increasing wear volume with increase in sliding distance, load, and sliding velocity for G-E and SiO2 filled G-E composites. Taguchi's results indicate that the sliding distance played a significant role followed by applied load, sliding velocity, and SiO2 loading. Scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces of composite samples at different test parameters show smooth surface, microploughing, and fine grooves under low load and velocity. However, severe damage of matrix with debonding and fiber breakage was seen at high load and velocity especially in unfilled G-E composite.

  2. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah E John, Richard D Price

    2009-01-01

    Hannah E John, Richard D PriceDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Cambridge, UKAbstract: Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the ...

  3. Perspectives in the selection of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial wrinkles and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    John, Hannah E; Price, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic surgery is, in the USA at least, no longer a taboo subject. Outside North America, public acceptance continues to grow as more procedures are performed each year. While there appears, anecdotally, to be a decrease in patients undergoing cosmetic treatments because of the global financial crisis, the overall trend remains upward. Although popular television programs espouse the benefits of surgery, it is nonsurgical procedures that account, numerically, for the majority of procedures...

  4. 对、邻二甲苯和醋酸二元液体混合物在不同温度和压力下的密度和超额摩尔体积%Density and Excess Molar Volume of Binary Mixtures of p-Xylene+Acetic Acid and o-Xylene+Acetic Acid at Different Temperatures and Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天宇; 夏淑倩; 邸志国; 马沛生

    2008-01-01

    A new apparatus was designed with a thick-walled glass capillary, electric heater tube with red copper and heat preservation. The thick-walled glass capillary was used for its advantages of resistance to acid corrosion and pressure, and ease of observation. The experimental densities over the entire range of mole fraction for the bi- nary mixture of p-xylene+acetic acid and o-xylene+acetic acid were measured using the new apparatus at tempera- tures ranging from 313.15K to 473.15K and pressure ranging from 0.20 to 2.0 MPa. The density values were used in the determination of excess molar volumes, VE. The Redlich-Kister equation was used to fit the excess molar volume values, and the coefficients and estimate of the standard error values were presented. The experimental re- suits prove that the density measurement apparatus is successful.

  5. Effect of filler wire on the joint properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys using CO2 laser welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongying; Li Zhijun

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding with filler wire of AZ31 magnesium alloys is investigated using a CO2 laser experimental system. The effect of three different filler wires on the joint properties is researched. The results show that the weld appearance can be effectively improved when using laser welding with filler wire. The microhardness and tensile strength of joints are almost the same as those of the base metal when ER AZ31 or ER AZ61 wire is adopted. However, when the filler wire of ER 5356 aluminum alloy is used, the mechanical properties of joints become worse. For ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 filler wires, the microstructure of weld zone shows small dendrite grains. In comparison, for ER 5356 filler wire, the weld shows a structure of snowy dendrites and many intermetallic compounds and eutectic phases distribute in the dendrites. These intermetallic constituents with low melting point increase the tendency of hot crack and result in fragile joint properties. Therefore, ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 wire are more suitable filler material than ER 5356 for CO2 laser welding of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

  6. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF MICROCRYSTALLINE TAPIOCA STARCH AS A FILLER-BINDER FOR DIRECT COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Shittu*, A.R. Oyi , A.B. Isah , S.O. Kareem and M.A. Ibrahim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tapioca starch (NTS was modified physically at molecular level by annealing and subsequently subjected to enzyme hydrolysis to obtain a more functional filler-binder “microcrystalline tapioca starch (MCTS”. NTS was extracted from cassava tuber (Mannihot esculenta cranzt using a standard method. The powder suspensions were prepared in concentration of 40 %w/w in five separate conical flasks. The starch granules were annealed for 1 h and subsequently hydrolyzed with α-amylase at 58o and pH 7 for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 h in a water bath. The reaction was terminated and neutralized with 0.1 N HCL and 0.1 N NaOH respectively. The MCTS was washed, recovered by sedimentation and air dried at room temperature for 72 h. Following characterization, the granules that were modified for 3 h, sieved fraction >75-250 µm was selected and compacted at a range of compression load 2.5 to 12.5 KN. The average granule size of NTS, annealed tapioca starch (ATS, and MCTS were 10 µm, 11.5 µm, and 13 µm respectively. Average flow rate, angle of repose and compressibility index were 2 g/s, 43o, 50% for NTS respectively, and 2.5 g/s, 35o, 37.5 % for MCTS. The crushing strength for NTS, ATS and MCTS are: 30 N, 90 N and 100 N after 3 h of annealing and hydrolysis respectively, compressed at 6 metric units. MCTS was compared with Starlac®, Cellactose® and MCC. The onset of plastic deformation Py (yield value were: Cellactose (24.2 MNm-2>MCC (25 MNm-2> MCTS (143 MNm-2 =Starlac (143 MNm-2. The degree of plastic deformation occurring during compression (Pk is in the following order: Starlac® (17 MNm-2>MCTS (17.7 MNm-2>MCC (18.6 MNm-2>Cellactose® (19.1 MNm-2. MCTS is more superior in functionality than Cellactose and MCC. The dilution potential obtained for MCTS, compacted with paracetamol (PCM and ascorbic acid (AA as active drug (API were: 20 %w/w PCM and 40 %w/w AA with MCTS. The hardness of MCTS containing 40 % AA was found to be 58 N; MCTS can be used to formulate

  7. Laser-MIG Arc Hybrid Brazing-Fusion Welding of Al Alloy to Galvanized Steel with Different Filler Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujun WANG; Guoliang QIN; Yuhu SU

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum alloy plates were joined to galvanized steel sheets with lap joint by laser-MIG arc hybrid brazingfusion welding with AlSi5,AlSi12,AlMg5 filler wires,respectively.The influences of Si and Mg on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the brazed-fusion welded joint were studied.The increase of Si element in the fusion weld can make the grain refined,and increase the microhardness of the fusion weld.Therefore,the microhardness in fusion weld made from AlSi12 and AlSi5 filler wires can be up to 98.4 HV0.01and 96.8 HV0.01,which is higher than that from AlMg5 filler wire of 70.4 HV0.01.The highest tensile strength can reach 178.9 MPa made with AlMg5 filler wire.The tensile strength is 172.43 MPa made with AlSi5 filler wire.However,the lowest tensile strength is 144 MPa made with AlSi12 filler wire.The average thicknesses of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) layer with AlSi5,AlSi12,AlMg5 filler wires are 1.49-2.64 μm.The lMCs layer made from AlSi5,AlSi12 filler wires are identified as FeAl2,Fe2Als,Fe4Al13 and Al0.5Fe3Si0.5,that from AlMg5 filler wire are identified as FeAl2,Fe2Al5 and Fe4Al13.

  8. Influence of Calcium Carbonate Fillers on the Properties of Recycled Poly(e-caprolactone) Based Thermoplastic Polyurethane

    OpenAIRE

    Vitalija BETINGYTĖ; Žukienė, Kristina; Virginija JANKAUSKAITĖ; Milašienė, Daiva; Kazys Vytautas MICKUS; Ada GULBINIENĖ

    2012-01-01

    In this work the effects of different crystallographic modifications of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) filler on the melt flow, mechanical properties, hydrolytic degradation, and shape memory behaviour of recycled low-temperature poly(e-caprolactone)-based polyurethane (rTPU) were evaluated. Composites were prepared by two-roll milling varying filler content from 2 wt % to 6 wt %. It was found that at temperature range from 20 °C to 50 °C CaCO3 fillers do not change Young’s modulus, they decrease ...

  9. License application design selection feature report: Additive and fillers design feature 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimated additional total system life-cycle cost for each of the filler options in 1999 dollars is as follows: $923.4 million for the iron oxide option, $42.4 million to $966.4 million (depending on the extent of surface facility involvement required) for the partial iron shot fill option, $1,012 million for the complete iron shot fill option, and $134.7 million for the integral filler option (Appendix A). All of the filler options evaluated showed improvements in some aspects of pre- and post-closure waste package and repository performance. However, all of the options, except for the integral filler option, negatively impacted other areas of performance, required modification to surface facility design and operations, and invoked additional uncertainty. The iron oxide filler option will require further testing to measure thermal conductivity to ensure that peak cladding temperatures will not exceed the 350 C limit. The complete iron shot fill option may require structural improvements to the waste package design (use of partial shot fill may eliminate this concern). Both the iron shot and iron oxide options will also require further testing to confirm that the conceptual loading strategy will efficiently load a waste package in a timely manner. In addition, both shot and oxide options will require further testing to develop models for their potential to provide resistance to water flow, and, in the case of iron shot, act as an oxygen getter. Finally, uncertainty also exists as to whether the iron shot option will damage the cladding if sufficient corrosion of the shot occurs. Based on the results presented in this evaluation, the integral filler option appears to be the simplest and most cost efficient method for achieving modest improvements in pre- and post-closure performance. Since unqualified inputs were used in the development of this evaluation, they should be considered TBV (to be verified). This document will not directly support any construction

  10. Teaching Fillers, Discourse Markers and Adjacency Pairs to College Stu-dents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蓓

    2015-01-01

    Speaking has long been underestimated in College English education, compared with reading , writing and listening. Even In universities where spoken courses are provided, verbal filler and discourse markers which vastly exist in native speaker ’s corpora are rarely found in these prescribed spoken course books. For the teaching of adjacency pairs, which are always one of the focuses in teaching conversation skills in College English spoken program ,students are required to make up a new one based on the given scenario after they have memorized model dialogues. Unfortunately, students always experience pragmatic difficulty when they interact with people in the real world if they are guided by this approach. This article suggests a triangle which is com⁃posed of exposure, instruction and practice to teach verbal filler, discourse markers and adjacency pairs. This triangle combines both direct approach and indirect approach. Furthermore, in spoken program , English teachers can adapt spoken course books to integrate features of authentic conversations.

  11. Interfacial structure and joint strengthening in arc brazed galvanized steels with copper based filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-feng; YU Zhi-shui; QI Kai

    2006-01-01

    Galvanized steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas(TIG) and metal inert gas(MIG) brazing process using copper based filler. The results show that the joint zone hardness is higher than that of the base material or copper filler from the microhardness tests of TIG brazing specimens, and the fracture spot is at the base materials zone from the tensile tests of MIG brazing specimens. Examination using energy dispersive X-ray analysis reveals the presence of intermetallic compound Fe5Si3(Cu) in the joint. The dispersal of fine Fe5Si3(Cu) particles is the main strengthening factor for the joint. The Fe5Si3(Cu) particles are determined to arise from three sources, namely, spot micro-melt, whisker-like fragmentation and dissolve-separation actions.

  12. Glycerol as high-permittivity liquid filler in dielectric silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Yu, Liyun; Gerhard, R.;

    2016-01-01

    advantages that make the material useful in a dielectric actuator. First, the glycerol dropletsefficiently enhance the dielectric constant, which can reach astonishingly high values in the composite. Second, the liquid filler also actsas a softener that effectively decreases the elastic modulus...... of the composite. In combination with very low cost and easy preparation, the two property enhancements lead to an extremely attractive dielectric elastomer material. Experimental permittivity data arecompared to various theoretical models that predict relative permittivity changes as a function of filler loading......A recently reported novel class of elastomers was tested with respect to its dielectric properties. The new elastomer materialis based on a commercially available poly(dimethylsiloxane) composition, which has been modified by embedding glycerol droplets intoits matrix. The approach has two major...

  13. Compressive deformation behavior and energy absorption characteristic of aluminum foam with elastic filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程和法; 黄笑梅; 薛国宪; 李剑荣; 韩福生

    2004-01-01

    An open-cell aluminum foam filled with silicate rubber (AFFSR) was fabricated by infiltration of the liquid silicate rubber into the open-cell aluminum foam. The experiments were carried out to investigate the compressive behavior and energy absorption characteristics of the material. It is found that the stress-strain response of the AFFSR exhibits five regions including two plateau regimes, which is quite different from the stress-strain curves of many unfilled metallic foams that usually exhibit three distinct regions. The plastic deformation of the AFFSR is prolonged because of the filled silicate rubber, compared with the aluminum foam without such a filler. The AFFSR also exhibits a higher energy capacity than the aluminum foam without filler. Additionally, for the prolonged plateau region in the stress-strain curve, the energy absorption efficiency of the AFFSR maintains a high level (above 0.6) over a wide strain range from 3% to 60%.

  14. Investigation of Friction Behaviors of Brake Shoe Materials using Metallic Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Surojo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some vehicles use brake shoe made from semi-metallic materials. Semi-metallic brake shoes are made from a combination of metallic and non-metallic materials. Metallic particles are added in the formulation of brake shoe material to improve composites characteristics. In this paper, friction behaviors of brake shoe material using metallic filler were investigated. Machining chips of cast iron and copper wire of electric motor used were incorporated in composite as metallic fillers with amount 0, 2, and 4 vol. %. Friction testing was performed to measure coefficient of friction by pressing surface specimen against the surface of rotating disc. The results show that cast iron chip and Cu short wire have effect on increasing coefficient of friction of brake shoe material. They form contact plateau at contact surface. At contact surface, the Cu short wires which have parallel orientation to the sliding contact were susceptible to detach from the matrix.

  15. Identifying appropriate conditions for producing spindle-like causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate for paper filler applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate (CPCC as a by-product of the green liquor causticizing process can be used as paper filler to save resources and reduce costs. In this study, CPCC was prepared with green liquor and quicklime, which were obtained from an alkali recovery line of a paper mill. The factors influencing crystal morphology of CPCC, such as slaking temperature, slaking time, and causticizing time were investigated. The morphology of CPCC was observed and analyzed for optimizing reaction conditions. The following were compared: properties of CPCC obtained in this study, conventional CPCC (white mud from a paper mill, and commercial PCC as fillers. The results showed that slaking time and causticizing time were important for morphology control. Spindle-like and rod-like CPCC obtained in this study had better drainability and retention, higher paper bulk, opacity, and physical strength compared to conventional CPCC, and had nearly the same performances as commercial PCC.

  16. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  17. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of filler material in UXO - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary

    2007-09-12

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO)-contaminated sites often include ordnance filled with inert substances that were used in dummy rounds. During UXO surveys, it is difficult to determine whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, plaster-of-paris, wax, etc.) or is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the object be blown in place, which has potential impacts to the environment, personnel, communities and survey costs. The Department of Defense (DoD) needs a reliable, timely, non-intrusive and cost-effective way to identify filler material before a removal action. A new technology that serves this purpose would minimize environmental impacts, personnel safety risks and removal costs; and, thus, would be especially beneficial to remediation activities.

  18. Hybrid 2D-3D modelling of GTA welding with filler wire addition

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid 2D-3D model for the numerical simulation of Gas Tungsten Arc welding is proposed in this paper. It offers the possibility to predict the temperature field as well as the shape of the solidified weld joint for different operating parameters, with relatively good accuracy and reasonable computational cost. Also, an original approach to simulate the effect of immersing a cold filler wire in the weld pool is presented. The simulation results reveal two important observations. First, the weld pool depth is locally decreased in the presence of filler metal, which is due to the energy absorption by the cold feeding wire from the hot molten pool. In addition, the weld shape, maximum temperature and thermal cycles in the workpiece are relatively well predicted even when a 2D model for the arc plasma region is used. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bismuth subcarbonate as filler particle for an Epoxy-based root canal sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schwartzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the addition of bismuth subcarbonate with different concentrations regarding the rheological properties of an experimental epoxy-based root canal sealer. Materials and Methods: Endodontic sealers were prepared with epoxy resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate additions of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100%, and 120%. Flow, film thickness, working time, setting time, dimensional change, sorption, solubility, and cytotoxicity were studied according to the ISO standards. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and Tukey multiple comparisons were used, with a significance level of 5%. Results: The flow, working time, water sorption, and solubility significantly decreased and the film thickness and dimensional change increased with higher filler particle addition. There were no statistically significant differences for setting time and cytotoxicity between the filler particle proportions. Conclusion: Experimental resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate addition up to 40% can be an alternative for root canal sealer.

  20. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  1. The effects of fillers on polyurethane resin-based electrical insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altafim Ruy Alberto Corrêa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly widespread use of polymeric insulators in vehicle distributors and transmission systems has led to an ongoing quest for quality and low costs. This quest has, in turn, resulted in improved performance and cost benefits, brought about by the use of new polymeric and composite resins. Occasionally, however, while some properties are improved, others may show a loss of optimal performance. Therefore, to understand the behavior of fillers, such as carbon black, silica and mica added to castor oil-derived polyurethane resins, several thermal, mechanical and electrical tests were conducted on samples and insulators produced specifically for this purpose, using these new materials. The results of these tests clearly demonstrated that this type of resin and its composites can be used to manufacture indoor electrical insulators and that the fillers analyzed in this study improve or maintain the characteristics of the pure resins.

  2. Influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar for pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Wu; Kai, Zhu; Wu, Hao;

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt materials will be ignited and release significant toxic fumes within tunnel fires. Thus, combustion characteristics of asphalt materials used in road tunnel should be studied in order to limit such an adverse effect. In the present work we study the influence of limestone fillers on combu......Asphalt materials will be ignited and release significant toxic fumes within tunnel fires. Thus, combustion characteristics of asphalt materials used in road tunnel should be studied in order to limit such an adverse effect. In the present work we study the influence of limestone fillers...... on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar by thermogravimetric and kinetic analysis. It is shown that the combustion of asphalt mortar is not just a linear superposition of asphalt and limestone. The limestone will increase the ignition point and the activation energy of the primary volatile release...... the assumption of random nucleation and nuclei growth, whereas the limestone decomposition stage appears to follow the one-dimensional phase boundary model....

  3. Properties of natural rubber/attapulgite composites prepared by latex compounding method: Effect of filler loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muttalib, Siti Nadzirah Abdul, E-mail: sitinadzirah.amn@gmail.com; Othman, Nadras, E-mail: srnadras@usm.my; Ismail, Hanafi, E-mail: ihanafi@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    This paper reports on the effect of filler loading on properties of natural rubber (NR)/attapulgite (ATP) composites. The NR/ATP composites were prepared by latex compounding method. It is called as masterbatch. The masterbatch was subsequently added to the NR through melt mixing process. The vulcanized NR/ATP composites were subjected to mechanical, swelling and morphological tests. All the results were compared with NR/ATP composites prepared by conventional system. The composites from masterbatch method showed better results compared to composites prepared by conventional method. They have higher tensile properties, elongation at break and tear strength. The images captured through scanning electron microscopy test revealed the improvement of tensile strength in masterbatch NR/ATP composites. It can be seen clearly that masterbatch NR/ATP have better filler dispersion compared to conventional method NR/ATP composites.

  4. Qualification of new filler metal made of high chromium content nickel base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out by EDF and FRAMATOME in the context of the French Association for design and manufacturing rules of nuclear power boiler's equipment, to research then qualify filler metals dedicated to the welding of the new nickel base including 30 % chromium alloy components of PWR. The aim is to assess their weldability and their stress corrosion behaviour in the conditions prevailing in the primary cooling system of PWR and to compare with products generally used. Moreover, numerous qualification tests have been carried out to verify that such metals meet the criteria accepted in the RCC-M code. Results allowed to qualify some filler metals made of nickel base alloy of qualify equivalent to the one of NC30Fe including 30 % chromium base metals. These metals are at present time used in manufacturing. (authors). 5 figs

  5. Effect of fillers Granulated slag on the durability of HPC in marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Tebbal Nadia; El abidine Rahmouni Zine; Djendi Zoubir

    2014-01-01

    The combined effect of fillers of silica fume and blast furnace slag on the durability of high performance concretes was studied .The storage media are: seawater and tap water as reference. This work focuses on the effect of the incorporation of different amounts of milk more silica fume on the mechanical strength of concretes with limestone cements and its influence on sustainability with respect to marine. The results show that the addition of quantity 10%slag and 5% silica fume offers the ...

  6. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, M. F.; Bonavetti, V. L.; Irassar, E. F.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying...

  7. Nano-perlite as an alternative reinforcing filler to silica in PDMS composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ülkümen, Erim; Ulkumen, Erim

    2013-01-01

    Perlite is a highly potential national resource, and its use in silicone elastomer compounds as an alternative reinforcing filler to commercial grade fumed silica is targeted in this thesis work. Thus, comparative results are projected to be acquired. Expanded and raw perlite are characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), BET Surface Area Analyzer, Pycnometer and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Attrition mill is used to reduce particle size of expanded perlite. Dynamic Light Scattering ...

  8. Magneto-rheological response of elastomer composites with hybrid-magnetic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Sahbi; Klüppel, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    We study the magneto-rheological response of hybrid-magnetic elastomer composites consisting of two different magnetic filler particles at fixed overall concentration. Thereby, we focus on an optimization of mechanical and magnetic properties by combining highly reinforcing magnetic nano-particles (MagSilica) with micro-sized carbonyl-iron particles (CIP), which exhibit high switch ability in a magnetic field. We observe a symbiotic interaction of both filler types, especially in the case when an orientation of the magnetic filler particles is achieved due to curing in an external magnetic field. The orientation effect is significant only for the micro-sized CIP particles with high saturation magnetization, indicating that the induced magnetic moment for the nano-sized particles is too small for delivering sufficient attraction between the particles in an external magnetic field. A pronounced switching behavior is observed for the non-cross-linked melts with 15 and 20 vol.% CIP, whereby the small strain modulus increases by more than 50%. For the sample without the coupling agent silane, one even observes a relative modulus increase of about 140%, which can be related to the combined effect of a higher mobility of the particles without a silane layer and the ability of the particles to come in close contact when they are arranged in strings along the field lines. For the cross-linked samples, a maximum switching effect of about 30% is achieved for the system with pure CIP. This magneto-sensitivity decreases successively if CIP is replaced by MagSilica, while the tensile strength of the systems increases significantly. The use of silane reduces the switching effect, but it is necessary for a good mechanical performance by delivering strong chemical bonding of the magnetic filler particles to the polymer matrix.

  9. Tailoring Cell Behavior on Polymers by the Incorporation of Titanium Doped Phosphate Glass Filler

    OpenAIRE

    W. Chrzanowski; Abou Neel, E. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Bismarck, A.; Young, A. M.; Hart, A. D.; Dalby, M. J.; Knowles, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding tissue response to materials, to enable modulation and guided tissue regeneration is one of the main challenges in biomaterials science. Nowadays polymers, glasses, and metals dominate as biomaterials. Often native properties of those materials are not sufficient and there is a need to combine them, so as to modify and adjust their properties to the application. The primary aim of this study was to improve cell response to polymer (PLDL) using phosphate glass as filler (titanium...

  10. Complex refractive index of starch acetate used as a biodegradable pigment and filler of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinen, Petri; Oksman, Antti; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Mikkonen, Hannu

    2007-05-01

    Complex refractive index of strongly depolarizing starch acetate is investigated as a function of bulk package density, which is compulsory parameter in analysis of light scattering from nanoscale starch acetate pigments and fillers. The measurements were made using a laser-goniometer and spectrophotometer to gain data for refractive index analysis according to the Brewster's law and Fresnel equations. The real part of refractive index was verified by microscopic immersion method.

  11. Microstructure-based modelling of arbitrary deformation histories of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, H.; Klüppel, M.

    2012-11-01

    A physically motivated theory of rubber reinforcement based on filler cluster mechanics is presented considering the mechanical behaviour of quasi-statically loaded elastomeric materials subjected to arbitrary deformation histories. This represents an extension of a previously introduced model describing filler induced stress softening and hysteresis of highly strained elastomers. These effects are referred to the hydrodynamic reinforcement of rubber elasticity due to strain amplification by stiff filler clusters and cyclic breakdown and re-aggregation (healing) of softer, already damaged filler clusters. The theory is first developed for the special case of outer stress-strain cycles with successively increasing maximum strain. In this more simple case, all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of the cycle and the mechanical energy stored in the strained clusters is completely dissipated, i.e. only irreversible stress contributions result. Nevertheless, the description of outer cycles involves already all material parameters of the theory and hence they can be used for a fitting procedure. In the general case of an arbitrary deformation history, the cluster mechanics of the material is complicated due to the fact that not all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of a cycle. For that reason additional reversible stress contributions considering the relaxation of clusters upon retraction have to be taken into account for the description of inner cycles. A special recursive algorithm is developed constituting a frame of the mechanical response of encapsulated inner cycles. Simulation and measurement are found to be in fair agreement for CB and silica filled SBR/BR and EPDM samples, loaded in compression and tension along various deformation histories.

  12. Tissue Engineering of Injectable Soft tissue Filler: Using Adipose Stem Cells and Micronized Acellular Dermal Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Gyeol; Lim, Jin Soo

    2009-01-01

    In this study of a developed soft tissue filler, adipose tissue equivalents were constructed using adipose stem cells (ASCs) and micronized acellular dermal matrix (Alloderm). After labeling cultured human ASCs with fluorescent green protein and attaching them to micronized Alloderm (5×105 cells/1 mg), ASC-Alloderm complexes were cultured in adipogenic differentiation media for 14 days and then injected into the dorsal cranial region of nude male mice. The viabilities of ASCs in micronized Al...

  13. The Surgical Lips Deformity Corrected with Hyaluronic Fillers: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Stolic; Maja Jankovic; Marija Draskovic; Slobodan Georgiev; Marina Stolic

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyaluronic filler is a sterile, biodegradable, viscoelastic, isotonic, transparent injectable gel implant which was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 1996. It is used for face reconstruction and modelling.   CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 40-year-old Serbian woman who presented after surgery of cleft lip, primary and secondary palate. We performed a biphasic therapy; in the first stage in the zone semimucosis lips is initially carried incision scar tis...

  14. A Novel Hypothesis of Visual Loss Secondary to Cosmetic Facial Filler Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Du, Le; Lu, Jian-Jian

    2015-09-01

    With the current tendency of increasing minimally invasive cosmetic surgeries, some rare but disastrous complications of facial filler injections come into sight, such as visual loss. The study aims to investigate the possible route that the injected droplet accesses the ophthalmic artery to explain and prevent such devastating complications. We searched the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database for cases of visual loss secondary to cosmetic facial filler injection, and reviewed relevant case reports/surveys, as well as accompanying references. Data obtained were analyzed, with special interest in injected sites and filler material, and clinical features of visual loss. Based on the anatomy of facial vessels, we inferred the possible route of injected droplet migrating from injection sites to ophthalmic artery. Most physicians propose a retrograde embolic mechanism, but the culprit artery when injecting different sites is not determined. We consider accidentally breaking into supraorbital artery or supratrochlear artery may cause occlusion of ophthalmic artery when injecting into glabella or forehead region. Speaking of the nasolabial fold and nasal dorsum region, any injections in the anastomosis of the dorsal nasal artery, angular artery, and lateral nasal artery can lead to retrograde embolism. Similarly, in the temporal region, we believe there is abnormal anastomosis between frontal branch of superficial temporal artery from external carotid artery and supraorbital artery from ophthalmic artery. In our hypothesis, we can explain the accompanying brain infarction after iatrogenic visual loss. If the injecting pressure is forceful enough, it may push the embolic materials into middle cerebral artery. Although iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion is a rare complication after the facial filler injection surgery, it is usually devastating. Both the patient and the surgeon should be aware of the risk of irreversible blindness. Ideally, the injection sites

  15. Functionalizable hydrogel microparticles of tunable size and stiffness for soft-tissue filler applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Ka Man Carmen; Li, Randolph H.; Chapman, Joseph W.; Trac, Eric M.; Kobler, James B.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Langer, Robert; Karajanagi, Sandeep S

    2014-01-01

    Particle size, stiffness and surface functionality are important in determining the injection site, safety and efficacy of injectable soft-tissue fillers. Methods to produce soft injectable biomaterials with controlled particle characteristics are therefore desirable. Here we report a method based on suspension photopolymerization and semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) to synthesize soft, functionalizable, spherical hydrogel microparticles (MP) of independently tunable size and stiffnes...

  16. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  17. Interactive effects between carbon allotrope fillers on the mechanical reinforcement of polyisoprene based nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Galimberti, M; Agnelli, S.; V. Cipolletti; S. Musto; M. Coombs; L. Conzatti; S. Pandini; T. Ricco

    2014-01-01

    Interactive effects of carbon allotropes on the mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites were investigated. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite with high shape anisotropy (nanoG) were melt blended with poly(1,4-cis-isoprene), as the only fillers or in combination with carbon black (CB), measuring the shear modulus at low strain amplitudes for peroxide crosslinked composites. The nanofiller was found to increase the low amplitude storage modulus of the matrix, with or without CB...

  18. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Wang; Xiaoliang Zeng; Yimin Yao; Rong Sun; Jianbin Xu; Ching-Ping Wong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride...

  19. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal...

  20. Impact of kaolin filler on physical and mechanical paper properties formed by ECF pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Rodrigues dos Santos; Gustavo Ventorim; José Cláudio Caraschi; Jaqueline Silveira Comelato Favaro

    2014-01-01

    The paper industry is the main global consumer of kaolin. It is mostly used as paper filler, due to its lower cost as compared to pulp cost. Color removal process from pulp - chemical bleaching - determines final pulp's characteristics. Effort has been made to make possible to obtain less toxic bleaching processes. This study aims to evaluate the influence of three bleaching sequences, on kaolin retention and paper properties. Industrial eucalyptus kraft pulp, oxygen pre-delignified, was blea...

  1. Towards Early Age Characterisation of Eco-Concrete Containing Blast-Furnace Slag and Limestone Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Carette, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that concrete represents 5% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions, mainly originating from the production of cement, the most essential component of concrete. The recent awareness to the environmental challenges facing our civilization has led the cement industry to consider substituting cement by mineral additions, by-products of existing industries. In this work, a combination of limestone filler and blast furnace slag is used to design an “eco-concrete”, defined as a concrete ...

  2. Basic principles of creating a new generation of high- temperature brazing filler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, B. A.; Suchkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The development of new materials is based on the formation of a structural-phase state providing the desired properties by selecting the base and the complex of alloying elements. The development of amorphous filler alloys for a high-temperature brazing has its own features that are due to the limited life cycle and the production method of brazing filler alloys. The work presents a cycle of analytical and experimental materials science investigations including justification of the composition of a new amorphous filler alloy for brazing the products from zirconium alloys at the temperature of no more than 800 °C and at the unbrazing temperature of permanent joints of more than 1200 °C. The experimental alloys have been used for manufacture of amorphous ribbons by rapid quenching, of which the certification has been made by X-ray investigations and a differential-thermal analysis. These ribbons were used to obtain permanent joints from the spacer grid cells (made from the alloy Zr-1% Nb) of fuel assemblies of the thermal nuclear reactor VVER-440. The brazed samples in the form of a pair of cells have been exposed to corrosion tests in autoclaves in superheated water at a temperature of 350 °C, a pressure of 160 MPa and duration of up to 6,000 h. They have been also exposed to destructive tests using a tensile machine. The experimental results obtained have made it possible to propose and patent a brazing filler alloy of the following composition: Zr-5.5Fe-(2.5-3.5)Be-1Nb-(5-8)Cu-2Sn-0.4Cr-(0.5-1.0)Ge. Its melting point is 780 °C and the recommended brazing temperature is 800°C.

  3. Polyamide/silver antimicrobials: Effect of filler types on the silver ion release

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Radhesh; Howdle, Steve; Münstedt, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: The efficiency of various silver-based antimicrobial fillers (elementary silver and silver substituted materials) in polyamide (PA) toward their silver ion (Ag�) release characteristics in an aqueous medium was investigated and discussed. Anode stripping voltammetry (ASV) was used for the quantitative estimation of Ag� release from these composites. The biocidal (Ag�) release from the composites was found to be dependent on the time of soaking in water and the nature ...

  4. Rubber Composites Based on Polar Elastomers with Incorporated Modified and Unmodified Magnetic Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Kruželák, Ján; Sýkora, Richard; Dosoudil, Rastislav; Hudec, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rubber magnetic composites were prepared by incorporation of unmodified and surface modified strontium ferrite into rubber matrices based on NBR and NBR/PVC. Strontium ferrite was dosed to the rubber matrices in concentration scale ranging from 0 to 100 phr. The main goal was to investigate the influence of the type of ferrite on the curing process, physical-mechanical and magnetic properties of composites. The mutual interactions between the filler and rubber matrices were investigated by de...

  5. Encapsulated high temperature PCM as active filler material in a thermocline-based thermal storage system

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Sánchez, B.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Madina, Virginia; Izagirre, Usoa; Unzurrunzaga-Iturbe, A.; García-Romero, A.

    2015-01-01

    A great concern in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is to boost energy harvesting systems, by finding materials with enhanced thermal performance. Phase Change Materials (PCM) have emerged as a promising option, due to their high thermal storage density compared to sensible storage materials currently used in CSP. A thermal storage system for solar power plants is proposed, a thermocline tank with PCM capsules together with filler materials, based on multi-layered solid-PCM (MLSPCM) thermocline...

  6. Garlic powder and wheat bran as fillers: Their effect on the physicochemical properties of edible biocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fama, Lucia [Physics Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bittante, Ana Monica B.Q.; Sobral, Paulo J.A. [Food Engineering Department, FZEA, University of Sao Paulo, PO Box 23, 13635-900 Pirassununga (SP) (Brazil); Goyanes, Silvia [Physics Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerschenson, Lia N., E-mail: lia@di.fcen.uba.ar [Industry Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-20

    Biocomposites with two different fillers, garlic and wheat bran, were studied. They were based on cassava starch and contained glycerol as a plasticizer and potassium sorbate as an antimicrobial agent and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The mechanical performance at room and lower temperatures was also studied. SEM micrographies of fractured surfaces of the wheat bran composite films showed some ruptured particles of fiber while fibrils of garlic on the order of nanometers were observed when garlic composite films were studied. Mechanical tests, at room temperature, showed that the addition of wheat bran led to an increment in the storage modulus (E') and hardening and a decrease in Tan {delta}, while the garlic composite showed a diminishing in the E' and hardening and did not produce significant changes in Tan {delta} values when compared with systems without fillers (matrix). In the range between -90 deg. C and 20 deg. C, all the materials studied presented two peaks in the Tan {delta} curve. In the case of the wheat bran composite, both relaxation peaks shifted slightly to higher temperatures, broadened and diminished their intensity when compared with those of the matrix; however garlic composite showed a similar behavior to the matrix. DSC thermograms of aqueous systems showed a slight shift of gelatinization temperature (T{sub gelatinization}) to higher values when the fillers were present. Thermograms of films showed that both, garlic and wheat bran composites, had a lower melting point than the matrix. IR data indicated that interaction between starch and fillers determined an increase in the availability of hydroxyl groups to be involved in a dynamic exchange with water.

  7. What Are Your Patients Reading Online About Soft-tissue Fillers? An Analysis of Internet Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Youha, Sarah A.; Bull, Courtney E.; Butler, Michael B.; Williams, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue fillers are increasingly being used for noninvasive facial rejuvenation. They generally offer minimal downtime and reliable results. However, significant complications are reported and patients need to be aware of these as part of informed consent. The Internet serves as a vital resource to inform patients of the risks and benefits of this procedure. Methods: Three independent reviewers performed a structured analysis of 65 Websites providing information on soft-tissue fillers. Validated instruments were used to analyze each site across multiple domains, including readability, accessibility, reliability, usability, quality, and accuracy. Associations between the endpoints and Website characteristics were assessed using linear regression and proportional odds modeling. Results: The majority of Websites were physician private practice sites (36.9%) and authored by board-certified plastic surgeons or dermatologists (35.4%) or nonphysicians (27.7%). Sites had a mean Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 11.9 ± 2.6, which is well above the recommended average of 6 to 7 grade level. Physician private practice sites had the lowest scores across all domains with a notable lack of information on complications. Conversely, Websites of professional societies focused in plastic surgery and dermatology, as well as academic centers scored highest overall. Conclusions: As the use of soft-tissue fillers is rising, patients should be guided toward appropriate sources of information such as Websites sponsored by professional societies. Medical professionals should be aware that patients may be accessing poor information online and strive to improve the overall quality of information available on soft-tissue fillers.

  8. Effect of polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan resinate tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri; Chitropas, Padungkwan; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of different polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on physical properties of multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan (DMP) tablets. DMP resinates were formed by a complexation of DMP and strong cation exchange resins, Dowex 50 W and Amberlite IRP69. The tablets consisted of the DMP resinates and direct compression fillers, such as microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP), and spray-dried...

  9. Roller Compaction, Granulation and Capsule Product Dissolution of Drug Formulations Containing a Lactose or Mannitol Filler, Starch, and Talc

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chialu Kevin; Alvarez–Nunez, Fernando A.; Rinella Jr., Joseph V.; Magnusson, Lars-Erik; Sueda, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of excipient composition to the roller compaction and granulation characteristics of pharmaceutical formulations that were comprised of a spray-dried filler (lactose monohydrate or mannitol), pregelatinized starch, talc, magnesium stearate (1% w/w) and a ductile active pharmaceutical ingredient (25% w/w) using a mixed-level factorial design. The main and interaction effects of formulation variables (i.e., filler type, starch content, and talc content) to ...

  10. Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of A Nanosized Sulfated TiO2 Filler and of Nanocomposite Nafion Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Allodi; Sergio Brutti; Marco Giarola; Mirko Sgambetterra; Maria Assunta Navarra; Stefania Panero; Gino Mariotto

    2016-01-01

    A large number of nano-sized oxides have been studied in the literature as fillers for polymeric membranes, such as Nafion®. Superacidic sulfated oxides have been proposed and characterized. Once incorporated into polymer matrices, their beneficial effect on peculiar membrane properties has been demonstrated. The alteration of physical-chemical properties of composite membranes has roots in the intermolecular interaction between the inorganic filler surface groups and the polymer chains. In t...

  11. The Effect of Incobotulinumtoxin A and Dermal Filler Treatment on Perception of Age, Health, and Attractiveness of Female Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Bernhard; Prager, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Facial age, health, and attractiveness assessments play a major role in human social interaction and affect the way we perceive and think about others. Modern cosmetic dermatology provides a bewildering array of facial treatment procedures with botulinum toxin type A and dermal filler application being the most requested. The authors sought to determine the effect of facial rejuvenation procedures, such as application of incobotulinumtoxin A and dermal filler injections, on people...

  12. Fabrication and anti-microbial evaluation of drug loaded polylactide space filler intended for ridge preservation following tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Nebu George Thomas; Sanil, George P.; Gopimohan Rajmohan; Prabhakaran, Jayachandran V.; Amulya K Panda

    2011-01-01

    Background: The preservation or reduction of alveolar ridge resorption following tooth extraction is important in patients especially for those intended for implants at a later stage. One way to achieve this is by using membranes, graft materials, and biodegradable space fillers to prevent alveolar bone resorption and promote regeneration. A major attraction for using biodegradable and biocompatible polymers as space fillers for ridge preservation is their safety profile in comparison to xeno...

  13. Development of mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds using functionalized silica nano-fillers for the control of cellular functions

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, M.; Nayyer, L.; Butler, P. E.; R.G. Palgrave; Seifalian, A. M.; Kalaskar, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to produce mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds which can alter cellular functions using two different functionalized (OH and NH2) silica nano-fillers. Fumed silica-hydroxyl and fumed silica-amine nano-fillers were mixed with a biocompatible polymer (POSS-PCU) at various wt% to produce scaffolds. XPS and mechanical testing demonstrate that bulk mechanical properties are modified without changing the scaffold's surface chemistry. Mechanical testing showed s...

  14. PVDF-Based Micro Inorganic Fillers-Containing Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Ying; WU Feng; WU Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes based on poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDFHFP) with and without different types of micro inorganic fillers were prepared by phase-inversion process.Morphologies, porosities and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared membranes were investigated by means of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), PC (propylene carbonate) uptake and alternating current(AC) impedance technique. Compared with other membranes, the membrane with micro SiO2 filler shows a dense morphology so that its PC uptake is the highest, namely, 339%. The membrane filled with micro TiO2exhibits good electrochemical performances: the ion conductivity is as high as 1.1 × 10-3 S/cm at 18 ℃,which can meet the demand of lithium ion batteries. Moreover, its initial charge-discharge efficiency exceeds89 %. The composite membranes with micro SiO2, TiO2 and A12O3 are more suitable for the utilization in lithium ion batteries due to better cycleability, whereas the battery assembled with the blank membrane containing no inorganic fillers encounters a short circuit after the 5th cycle.

  15. Properties and osteoblast cytocompatibility of self-curing acrylic cements modified by glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P; Garcia, M P; Fernandes, M H; Fernandes, M H V

    2013-11-01

    Materials filled with a silicate glass (MSi) and a borate glass (MB) were developed and compared in terms of their in vitro behavior. The effect of filler composition and concentration (0, 30, 40 and 50 wt%) on the curing parameters, residual monomer, water uptake, weight loss, bioactivity, mechanical properties (bending and compression) and osteoblast cytocompatibility was evaluated. The addition of bioactive glass filler significantly improved the cements curing parameters and the mechanical properties. The most relevant results were obtained for the lower filler concentration (30 t%) a maximum flexural strength of 40.4 Pa for MB3 and a maximum compressive strength of 95.7 MPa for MSi3. In vitro bioactivity in acellular media was enhanced by the higher glass contents in the cements. Regarding the biological assessment, the incorporation of the silicate glass significantly improved osteoblast cytocompatibility, whereas the presence of the borate glass resulted in a poor cell response. Nevertheless it was shown that the surviving cells on the MB surface were in a more differentiated stage compared to those growing over non-filled poly(methyl methacrylate). Results suggest that the developed formulations offer a high range of properties that might be interesting for their use as self-curing cements.

  16. Effect of Gum arabic on distribution behavior of nanocellulose fillers in starch film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Ammayappan, L.; Huang, Qingrong

    2011-09-01

    Uniform distribution of nanofillers in polymer matrix is posing a major challenge in exploiting the full potential of nanomaterials. Various fillers are being evaluated to improve the performance of biopolymer films like starch. In this work, nanocellulose is used as fillers to increase the performance characteristics of starch film. Due to high surface energy and hydrophilic nature of nanocellulose, they tend to aggregate during the film forming process. To circumvent this problem, Gum arabic (GA) was added to distribute the nanocellulose uniformly. GA helps in reduction of surface energy (as analyzed by contact angle) and thus facilitates the uniform distribution of nanocellulose (as demonstrated through polarized light microscopy). Nanocellulose as filler improved the tensile strength of starch film by 2.5 times while that of uniformly distributed nanocellulose by 3.5 times. Moreover, while nanocellulose as such could reduce the water vapor permeability of starch film by 1.4 times, uniformly distributed nanocellulose reduced it by 2 times proving the importance of GA. Starch film filled with nanocellulose and GA will be a 100% biopolymer-based system having potential demand in eco-friendly applications.

  17. Effect of vertebroplasty filler materials on viability and gene expression of human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazáry, Aron; Speer, Gábor; Varga, Péter Pál; Balla, Bernadett; Bácsi, Krisztián; Kósa, János P; Nagy, Zsolt; Takács, István; Lakatos, Péter

    2008-05-01

    Consequences of intradiscal cement leakage--often occurring after vertebral cement augmentation for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures--are still unknown. In this study, we have investigated the influences of vertebroplasty filler materials (polymethylmethacrylate-, calcium phosphate- and calcium sulfate-based bone cement) on isolated nucleus pulposus cells. Cell viability of cultured human nucleus pulposus cells were measured after treatment with vertebroplasty filler materials. Gene expression profile of selected genes was determined with quantitative real-time PCR. The widely used polymethylmethacrylate and calcium phosphate cement significantly decreased cell number in a dose- and time-dependent manner while calcium sulfate cement affected cell viability less. Expression of genes involved in matrix metabolism of nucleus pulposus--aggrecan, collagens, small proteoglycans--as well as important transcription factors have also significantly changed due to treatment (e.g., 2.5-fold decrease in aggrecan expression was determined in cultures due to polymethylmethacrylate treatment). Our results suggest that vertebroplasty filler materials--depending on the type of applied material--can accelerate the degeneration of nucleus pulposus cells resulting in a less flexible disc in case of intradiscal cement leakage. This process may increase the risk of a subsequent new vertebral fracture, the main complication of vertebral augmentation. PMID:18176942

  18. Influence of using nanoobjects as filler on functionality-based energy use of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our study was to investigate the potential benefits of reinforcing polymer matrices with nanoobjects for structural applications by looking at both the mechanical properties and environmental impacts. For determining the mechanical properties, we applied the material indices defined by Ashby for stiffness and strength. For the calculation of environmental impacts, we applied the life cycle assessment methodology, focusing on non-renewable energy use (NREU). NREU has shown to be a good indicator also for other environmental impacts. We then divided the NREU by the appropriate Ashby index to obtain the 'functionality-based NREU'. We studied 23 different nanocomposites, based on thermoplastic and thermosetting polymer matrices and organophilic montmorillonite, silica, carbon nanotubes (single-walled and multiwalled) and calcium carbonate as filler. For 17 of these, we saw a decrease of the functionality-based NREU with increasing filler content. We draw the conclusion that the use of nanoobjects as filler can have benefits from both an environmental point of view and with respect to mechanical properties.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Aluminum Filler Material on Thermal Properties of Palmyra Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pavanu Sai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites are renewable, cheap, completely or partially recyclable, carbon neutral and biodegradable. Their easy availability, lower density, higher specific properties, lower cost, satisfactory mechanical and thermal properties, non-corrosive nature, lesser abrasion to processing equipment, makes them an attractive ecological alternative to glass, carbon or other man-made synthetic fibers. Natural fiber composites are generally very good thermal insulators and thus cannot be used where thermal conduction is desirable. Increase in thermal conduction may be done by adding metal filler powders to the matrix. In this work, the effect of aluminum filler material on thermal properties of chemically treated palmyra fiber reinforced composites is investigated. Thermal properties studied include thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal degradation and stability. Five different samples with 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% aluminum powder are considered. With the addition of aluminum filler powder, thermal conductivity increases, specific heat capacity decreases, thermal diffusivity increases and thermal stability improves with maximum at 50% aluminum powder.

  20. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hartomy, Omar A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al Said, Said A. Farha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Dishovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: dishov@uctm.edu [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ward, Michael B. [LEMAS, Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mihaylov, Mihail; Ivanov, Milcho [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-03-15

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions.

  1. Optimization of the crystallinity of polypropylene/submicronic-talc composites: The role of filler ratio and cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Makhlouf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micronic and submicronic mineral fillers recently appeared as efficient reinforcing agents for polyolefins in addition to the benefit of bypassing the exfoliation/dispersion problem encountered in the case of incorporation of nanoscopic fillers such as clay. Submicronic-talc, designated as μ-talc, belongs to this kind of new fillers. This work was aimed at searching to optimize the crystallinity ratio of isotactic polypropylene in the presence of μ-talc in relation to the filler ratio of the composites and the cooling rate from the melt. In order to highlight the efficiency of the μ-talc on the crystallization of polypropylene comparison has been made with PP composites containing conventional talc particles. The study has been carried out on samples having μ-talc weight fractions covering the range 3–30%. In the context of optimizing the crystallinity ratio of the polypropylene matrix in the composites, calorimetric experiments have been planned using a full factorial design. The results were statistically processed by analysis of the variance via mathematical models for predicting the crystallinity ratio in relation to the cooling rate and the filler ratio. Contour graphs have been plotted to determine the effect of each parameter on crystallinity. The cooling rate proved to have a significantly stronger influence on crystallinity than the type and content of filler.

  2. Utilization of rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the dimensional stability, as well as, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of polymers, new filler to this purpose has been developed. The mos applied filler to propitiate the features previously mentioned are the glass and carbon fibers, the mineral filler as the calcium carbonate, the talc and the micro glass sphere. The main aim of this work was to study the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite, irradiated by electron beam at different doses, since it is constituted of at least 90% of silicon dioxide, and compared with the talc which is the most applied mineral filler. This comparison was made from a compound made through the refined rice husk ash and the polyamide 6 (PA 6), which is one of the main engineering plastic with applications in several productive areas. The samples were injected and irradiated in a electron accelerator. Afterwards, their mechanical and thermal properties were measured. It was also inject automotive parts to verify the processing of the PA 6 with CCA. The results showed that the use of the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 composite is technically and economically viable. The irradiation of the studied composite (PA 6 with 30% of rice husk ash) did not provide any improvement for the mechanical and thermal properties previously appraised. (author)

  3. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  4. Protolichesterinic acid, isolated from the lichen Cetraria islandica, reduces LRRC8A expression and volume-sensitive release of organic osmolytes in human lung epithelial cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    cancer cells (A549) to PA (20 μg/mL, 24 h) reduces LRRC8A protein expression by 25% and taurine release following osmotic cell swelling (320 → 200 mOsm) by 60%. C75 (20 μg/mL, 24 h), a γ-lactone with a C8 carbon fatty acid chain, reduces VSOAC activity by 30%, i.e. less than PA. Stearic acid (20 μg......We have tested the effect of protolichesterinic acid (PA) on the activity of the volume-sensitive release pathway for the organic osmolyte taurine (VSOAC) and the expression of the leucine-rich-repeat-channel 8A (LRRC8A) protein, which constitutes an essential VSOAC component. Exposing human lung....../mL, 24 h) has no effect on VSOAC. Hence, length of PA's fatty acid chain adds to γ-lactone's inhibitory action. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) activity is essential for swelling-induced activation of VSOAC. PA has no effect on cellular concentration of leukotrienes (5-HETE/LTB4) under hypotonic conditions...

  5. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying shrinkage are not so well described. Analysis of drying shrinkage is relevant because this property influences the possibility of cracking occurrence and, hence, the deterioration of mechanical and durable properties of concrete structures. This paper evaluates the influence on the drying shrinkage of mortars of variable contents of limestone filler and/or blast-furnace slag in Portland cement. Additionally, flexion strength and non evaporable water content were evaluated. Test results show that the inclusion of these mineral admixtures, Joint or separately, increments drying shrinkage of mortars at early ages. Despite this fact, mortars made with limestone filler cement are less susceptible to cracking than mortars made with cements incorporating blast-furnace slag or both admixtures.

    Durante los años 90 el uso de cementos fabricados con clínker Portland y dos adiciones suplementarias (cementos ternarios o compuestos se ha incrementado en forma considerable. En la práctica, es cada vez más común el empleo de estos cementos conteniendo combinaciones de ceniza volante y humo de sílice, escoria y humo de sílice o escoria y filler calcáreo. En la actualidad existen numerosos estudios sobre la influencia de los cementos compuestos en las características en estado fresco y las propiedades mecánicas de morteros y hormigones, pero las deformaciones que estos materiales sufren debido a la retracción por secado no son tan conocidas. El análisis de

  6. Polymer grafted hydroxyapatite whisker as a filler for dental composite resin with enhanced physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengwei; Wang, Ruili; Cheng, Yanhua; Jiang, Xiaoze; Zhang, Qinghong; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface graft polymerization of hydroxyapatite whisker (HW) on physical and mechanical properties of dental composite resin. Poly bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Poly(Bis-GMA)) was grafted onto silanized hydroxyapatite whisker (SHW) via solution polymerization and the amount of the Poly(Bis-GMA) on the surface was effectively controlled by polymerization time. The obtained poly(Bis-GMA) grafted hydroxyapatite whisker (PGHW) with different polymer contents was filled into a resin matrix respectively, meanwhile the composites with HW and with SHW served as controls. Monomer conversion was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and volume shrinkage of the composite resin was measured with a density tester. Mechanical properties were tested with a universal testing machine. The results indicated that the composite filled with PGHW-1h (graft ratio of poly(Bis-GMA): 8.5 wt.%) showed lower shrinkage and better mechanical properties, improving flexural strength by 6.5% and 11.9% compared with SHW filled composite and HW filled composite, respectively. However, PGHW with higher graft ratios aggregated seriously and formed defects in the composite, leading to deterioration of mechanical properties. It was revealed that the poly(Bis-GMA) on the surface of PGHW acted as a functional transition layer and enhanced interfacial compatibility and interaction between whisker and resin matrix, which facilitated the dispersion of PGHW in the composite and decreased the composite shrinkage. Thus, the graft polymerization of Bis-GMA on the surface of filler might be a promising modification method for the fabrication of dental materials.

  7. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of isotactic polypropylene reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like WS{sub 2} nanoparticles: Effect of filler loading and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros (ICTP-CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Naffakh, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammed.naffakh@upm.es [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencia de los Materiales, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-09-16

    The thermal and mechanical behaviour of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nanocomposites reinforced with different loadings of inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles was investigated. The IF-WS{sub 2} noticeably enhanced the polymer stiffness and strength, ascribed to their uniform dispersion, the formation of a large nanoparticle–matrix interface combined with a nucleating effect on iPP crystallization. Their reinforcement effect was more pronounced at high temperatures. However, a drop in ductility and toughness was found at higher IF-WS{sub 2} concentrations. The tensile behaviour of the nanocomposites was extremely sensitive to the strain rate and temperature, and their yield strength was properly described by the Eyring's equation. The activation energy increased while the activation volume decreased with increasing nanoparticle loading, indicating a reduction in polymer chain motion. The nanoparticles improved the thermomechanical properties of iPP: raised the glass transition and heat deflection temperatures while decreased the coefficient of thermal expansion. The nanocomposites also displayed superior flame retardancy with longer ignition time and reduced peak heat release rate. Further, a gradual rise in thermal conductivity was found with increasing IF-WS{sub 2} loading both in the glassy and rubbery states. The results presented herein highlight the benefits and high potential of using IF-nanoparticles for enhancing the thermomechanical properties of thermoplastic polymers compared to other nanoscale fillers. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The thermal and mechanical behaviour of iPP/IF-WS{sub 2} nanocomposites was studied. • Low IF-WS{sub 2} contents provide a good balance between stiffness, strength and toughness. • Their tensile behaviour is sensitive to the strain rate and temperature. • The nanocomposites exhibit superior thermal conductivity and flame retardancy than iPP. • The

  8. Effect of soil fulvic and humic acid on binding of Pb to goethite–water interface: Linear additivity and volume fractions of HS in the Stern layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, J.; Koopal, L.K.; Weng, L.; Wang, J.; Tan, W.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of soil fulvic (JGFA) and humic acid (JGHA) on Pb binding to goethite were investigated with batch experiments and modeling. The CD-MUSIC and NICA-Donnan model could describe the Pb binding to, respectively, the binary Pb–goethite and Pb–HS systems. The adsorption of humic substances (HS

  9. Ajout de phosphogypse à des mortiers à base de cendres volantes et filler calcaire Addition of phosphogypsum to blended mortars based on fly ash and limestone filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alami Talbi M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available L’objectif de ce travail est d’étudier la possibilité de la valorisation du phosphogypse dans les matériaux de construction vue sa grande disponibilité comme sous-produit de l’industrie des phosphates. Nous étudions l’effet de l’ajout du phosphogypse sur un mélange de clinker, cendres volantes et filler calcaire. Les échantillons sont préparés par l’ajout de 10% de phosphogypse et de 30% de cendres volantes aux mélanges constitués du clinker et du filler calcaire. Les mélanges sont hydratés et caractérisés par diffraction des rayons X et spectroscopie infrarouge. Des phases cristallines se développent dès le 3ème jour, et on remarque que les phases les plus fréquentes sont : la Portlandite Ca(OH2, la Calcite CaCO3, l’ettringite Ca6Al2(SO43(OH12 26H2O, Ca5(SiO42(OH2 et le gypse CaSO4, 2H2O mais leur pourcentages varient selon les mélanges. La mesure de la durée de prise des mortiers montre que le début et la fin de la prise sont généralement retardés proportionnellement à l’ajout des cendres volantes et du phosphogypse. La microstructure des matériaux a également été étudiée par la mesure de la perméabilité apparente, les résultats montrent que l’ajout du phosphogypse a contribué à une diminution de la perméabilité des échantillons par contre les cendres volantes ont un effet contraire. La résistance à la compression des mortiers montre des résultats concordants, les résistances augmentent avec la diminution de la perméabilité. The objective of this paper is to study the possibility of valorization of phosphogypsum in building materials because his large availability as a by-product of the phosphate industry. We study the effect of adding phosphogypsum on a mixture of clinker, fly ash and limestone filler. The samples were prepared by adding 10% of phosphogypsum and 30% of fly ash to mixtures consisting of clinker and limestone filler. The mixtures are hydrated and characterized by X

  10. 293.15 K到333.15 K温度下一些氨基酸及其相应基团水溶液中的偏摩尔体积研究%Studies on Partial Molar Volumes of Some Amino Acids and Their Groups in Aqueous Solutions from 293.15 K to 333.15 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长伟; 马沛生; 夏淑倩

    2004-01-01

    Densities of aqueous solutions of eight amino acids, glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-serine,L-threonine, L-arginine and L-phenylalanine, are measured as a function of amino acid concentration from 293.15 K to 333.15K. These data are used to calculate the apparent molar volume V and infinite dilution apparent molar volume V0 (partial molar volume). Data of five amino acids are used to correlate partial molar volume V0 using group contribution method to estimate the contributions of the zwitterionic end groups (NH3+,COO-) and CH2group, OH group, CNHNHNH2 group and C6H5(phenyl) group of amino acids. The results show that V0 values for all kinds of groups of amino acids studied increase with increase of temperature except those for CH2 group,which are almost constant within the studied temperature range. Data of other amino acids, L-valine, L-isoleucine and L-threonine, are chosen for comparison with the predicted partial molar volume V0 using the group additivity parameters obtained. The results confirm that this group additivity method has excellent predictive utility.

  11. Effects of partial replacement of rattan powder by commercial fillers on the properties of natural rubber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadras Othman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of partial replacement of rattan powder (RP by carbon black (CB, mica, and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 on the curing characteristics, tensile properties, rubber-filler interaction, and morphological studies of natural rubber (NR composites were investigated. Rattan powder with an average particle size of less than 180 µm was used in this study. NR/RP/CB, NR/RP/mica, and NR/RP/CaCO3 composites with five different RP/commercial fillers loadings (i.e. 30/0, 20/10, 15/15, 10/20, 0/30 phr were prepared using a laboratory size two-roll mill. Results showed that the maximum torque (MH of the NR/RP/CB, NR/RP/mica, and NR/RP/CaCO3 composites increased with increasing the commercial filler-loading ratio. The scorch time (ts2 and cure time (t90 of NR/RP/CB composites decreased as the ratio of CB loading was increased, whereas, ts2 and t90 of NR/RP/mica and NR/RP/CaCO3 composites increased as mica and CaCO3 loading ratio were raised, respectively. The tensile strength, elongation at break (Eb, stress at 100% elongation (M100, and stress at 300% elongation (M300 of all the composites increased as the commercial filler-loading ratio increased. This is due to the presence of the commercial filler, which brought a better rubber-filler interaction, as confirmed by the rubber-filler interaction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies.

  12. Antibacterial performance of ZnO-based fillers with mesoscale structured morphology in model medical PVC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machovsky, Michal; Kuritka, Ivo, E-mail: ivo@kuritka.net; Bazant, Pavel; Vesela, Daniela; Saha, Petr

    2014-08-01

    Three different ZnO-based antibacterial fillers having different morphologies in microscale region were prepared by the use of the microwave assisted synthesis protocol created in our laboratory with additional annealing in one case. Further, PVC composites containing 0.5–5 wt.% of ZnO based antibacterial fillers were prepared by melt mixing and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Mechanical testing showed no adverse effect on the working of polymer composites due to either of the fillers used or the applied processing conditions in comparison with the neat medical grade PVC. The surface antibacterial activity of the compounded PVC composites was assessed against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P according to ISO 22196: 2007 (E). All materials at almost all filler loading levels were efficient against both species of bacteria. The material with the most expanding morphology assuring the largest contact between filler and matrix achieved an excellent level of more than 99.9999% reduction of viable cells of E. coli in comparison to untreated PVC and performed very well against S. aureus, too. A correlation between the morphology and efficacy of the filler was observed and, as a result, a general rule was formulated which links the proneness of the microparticles to perform well against bacteria to their shape and morphology. - Highlights: • ZnO-based nanostructured microparticles were prepared by microwave synthesis. • Prepared ZnO imparts excellent antibacterial activity to PVC composites. • The microparticulate character of filler makes it processable as common powders. • The inevitable disadvantages of nanoparticles are circumvented. • General rule of proneness of microparticles for antibacterial composites.

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin, E-mail: salah-faroughi@gatech.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States); Huber, Christian [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  14. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  15. The effect of different crystal conditions of filler metal on vacuum brazing of TiAl alloy and 42CrMo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ying; Zhang Mo; Wang Guojian; Li Wenyi; Kang Hui; Qu Ping

    2007-01-01

    Ti-based filler metals made by transient solidification and normal crystallization were selected for the vacuum brazing of the TiAl alloy and 42CrMo under different processing parameters. The results show that the tensile strength of the joint of transient solidified filler metal is higher than that of normal crystallized filler metal under the same processing parameters. By the analysis of scanning electron microscope(SEM) and X-ray diffracting (XRD) , it is found that the higher strength maybe caused by the generating of TiAl , TiNi and TiCu at the interface of joint made by transient solidified filler metal.

  16. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-23

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  17. Influence of hydrogels initial state on their ?lectrochemical and volume-gravimetric properties ?n intergel system polyacrylic acid hydrogel ?nd poly-4-vinylpyridine hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Jumadilov, T.; Abilov, Zh.; Kondaurov, R.; Himersen, H.; Yeskalieva, G.; Akylbekova, M.; Akimov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical properties of intergel system polyacrylic acid (gPAA) and poly-4-vinylpyridine hydrogels (gP4VP) and conformational properties of initial hydrogels were studied depending on hydrogels initial state. Maximum activation area is: for dry hydrogels ? gPAA:gP4VP ratios 5:1 and 1:5, for swollen ? ratios 5:1, 2:4 and 1:5. ?????????? ?????????????? ??????????? ???????????? ??????? ????????? ????????????? ??????? (????) ? ???? ????-4-????????????? (??4??) ?? ????????????? ???????...

  18. Study on development of filler metal for Ni-Cr-W superalloy (joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of filler metal is the important item to be solved in study on development of Ni-Cr-W superalloy for high temperature gas-cooled reactors with coolant outlet temperatures around 1000degC. Effects of minor alloying elements on weldability were studied for the alloy with basic composition of Ni-18.5Cr-21W proposed as an optimum chemical composition for the base metal. On this basis filler metal for the Ni-Cr-W superalloy was developed. The main results obtained were as follows: (1) Minor alloying elements and condition of heat-treatment had large effects on susceptibility to cracking in the weldments of Ni-Cr-W alloy. For this reason, good weldability could not be obtained constantly using alloys within optimum range of chemical composition for the base metal. (2) Improvement effect to reduce susceptibility to cracking in the weldments was little obtained by means of increase in contents of elements which had deoxidizing or desulfurizing effect. Addition of optimum contents of Ti or Mg reduced the susceptibility to cracking in the weldments slightly. (3) It was found that elements such as Zr, Y and B, which were added to the base metal of Ni-Cr-W alloy to maintain high temperature properties, made susceptibility to cracking high significantly when accumulating basic data on weldability of this alloy. Contents of these minor alloying elements were adjusted in the lower ranges than those of the base metal. Filler metal with good weldability for Ni-Cr-W alloy was developed through the investigation of effect on weldability. (author)

  19. Failure mechanisms in cobalt welded with a silver–copper filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt silver–copper (Co–AgCu) weldments approximate the stresses and failure mechanisms of beryllium aluminum–silicon (Be–AlSi) welds, which have strategic importance but are hazardous to study. Failure tests of these surrogate Co–AgCu welds, examined in tension and four-point bending, show that residual stresses and post-welding heat treatment have little or no effect on strength, whereas weld quality and geometry are extremely important. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal abundant defects in poor welds, which usually fail through propagation of preexisting cracks. Fracture surfaces show a variety of morphologies, ranging from dimples in the AgCu filler, to cleavage steps in the CoCu peritectic, and suspected intergranular fracture in the cobalt base. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy reveals significant changes in microstructure near the base–filler interface, whereas wavelength dispersive analysis shows high Cu concentrations in this area.. Contrary to finite element predictions, these welds were found to be stronger during face bending than root bending, likely resulting from the increased number of cracks and imperfections in the Co base. These computations correctly predict that weld strength depends on geometry and that welds fail either in the cobalt base, or along the base–filler interface. Crack compliance measurements show that the largest residual stresses are located along this interface. However, these stresses are unlikely to influence failure due to their direction, whereas stresses in the weld root are too small to have observable effects on failure. The strength of Co–AgCu welds depends strongly on geometry, penetration, and weld quality, but little on residual stresses, and this conclusion is tentatively extended to Be–AlSi welds

  20. Influence of filler existence on microleakage of a self-etch adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mirmohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study evaluated the effect of filler existence in self-etch adhesive resin on the marginal leakage of a class V restoration. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared and restored with a resin composite on the buccal surfaces of 48 premolars lined with unfilled or filled adhesives (n = 24. After thermo cycling, teeth in each group were divided to two subgroups (n = 12, specimens of the first subgroup were incubated for 24 h in distilled water at 37°C, and for the second group three months in the same condition. Specimens were placed in 50% silver nitrate for 24 h at 37°C, and then were cut buccolingually 1 mm thick. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicroscope and scaled from 0 to 5 in a blind method. SEM images were made to evaluate the dentin-adhesive interfaces. Collected data were analyzed using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests at a significant level of P<0.05. Results: There was no significant difference between microleakage of filled and unfilled adhesive at 24 h and 3 months (P<0.05. There was a significant difference in cervical microleakage between 24 h and 3 months, which was independ on filler load of the adhesive (P<0.001. In contrast, there was no significant difference in occlusal microleakage between 24 h and 3 months and the cervical microleakage was significantly higher than occlusal microleakage after 3 months. SEM images reveald that unfilled adhesive infiltrate slightly better than filled adhesive. Conclusion: The application of filler particles in a self etch adhesive system had no influence on marginal leakage at both the enamel and dentin margins. While the unfilled adhesive infiltrate better than the filled adhesive, its long term performance is not promising.

  1. Development and evaluation of buccoadhesive propranolol hydrochloride tablet formulations: effect of fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Nokhodchi, Ali; Farid, Djavad; Adrangui, Massoud; Siahi-Shadbad, Mohammad Reza; Saeedi, Majid

    2004-02-01

    The buccal mucosa has been investigated for local and systemic delivery of therapeutic peptides and other drugs that are subjected to first-pass metabolism or are unstable within the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol HCl) is subjected to first-pass effect, therefore formulation of buccal-adhesive dosage form can circumvent this effect. The effect of lactose (a soluble excipient) and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (an insoluble excipient) on dissolution rate, kinetic of release and adhesion force of buccal-adhesive tablets of propranolol HCl were evaluated. Each tablet composed of 80 mg propranolol HCl, 80 mg hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) K4M, polycarbophil AA1 and lactose or DCP with different ratios. The results showed that the presence of the fillers increased dissolution rate of the drug. The release data also showed that the effect of lactose on the dissolution rate was greater than the DCP. Kinetic release of propranolol HCl from buccal-adhesive matrices was affected by the different ratios of polymers and fillers. The fillers reduced the bioadhesion force and this effect was more considerable in formulation containing DCP. In order to determine the mode of release, the data were analyzed based on the equation Q =kt(n). The results showed that an increase in the concentration of HPMC K4M resulted in a reduction in the value of n. The value of n was not significantly affected by an increase in the concentration of lactose or DCP. The values of n in this study were calculated to be between 0.461 and 0.619, indicating both diffusional release and erosional mechanism.

  2. Failure mechanisms in cobalt welded with a silver–copper filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criss, Everett M., E-mail: ecriss@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Smith, Richard J. [Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Meyers, Marc A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Cobalt silver–copper (Co–AgCu) weldments approximate the stresses and failure mechanisms of beryllium aluminum–silicon (Be–AlSi) welds, which have strategic importance but are hazardous to study. Failure tests of these surrogate Co–AgCu welds, examined in tension and four-point bending, show that residual stresses and post-welding heat treatment have little or no effect on strength, whereas weld quality and geometry are extremely important. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal abundant defects in poor welds, which usually fail through propagation of preexisting cracks. Fracture surfaces show a variety of morphologies, ranging from dimples in the AgCu filler, to cleavage steps in the CoCu peritectic, and suspected intergranular fracture in the cobalt base. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy reveals significant changes in microstructure near the base–filler interface, whereas wavelength dispersive analysis shows high Cu concentrations in this area.. Contrary to finite element predictions, these welds were found to be stronger during face bending than root bending, likely resulting from the increased number of cracks and imperfections in the Co base. These computations correctly predict that weld strength depends on geometry and that welds fail either in the cobalt base, or along the base–filler interface. Crack compliance measurements show that the largest residual stresses are located along this interface. However, these stresses are unlikely to influence failure due to their direction, whereas stresses in the weld root are too small to have observable effects on failure. The strength of Co–AgCu welds depends strongly on geometry, penetration, and weld quality, but little on residual stresses, and this conclusion is tentatively extended to Be–AlSi welds.

  3. Effects of Mineral Filler to Polymer Modified Bitumen Ratio on the Design Properties of Hot Mix Asphalt and its Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Hafeez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current development in the design of asphalt concrete especially in the upper layers of flexible pavements contains about acceptable proportion of mineral fillers passing 75?m (# 200 sieve, which contributes towards the mix cohesion, resistant to rutting and improves serviceability. Three filler to PMA (Polymer Modified Asphalt ratios (i.e. 2.4, 3.4. and 4.4% in Marshall Method of mix design were used in order to determine the optimum filler content at relatively low design asphalt contents (3.83%, for asphalt concrete having PMA and 100% lime stone dust. Designed mix was laid on Southbound Turnol Taxila National Highway Section (N-5, Pakistan as a trial in year 2003. The study reveals that filler to asphalt ratio affects the mix properties to a greater extent and mix laid at site have shown relatively better performance during its service life of initial four critical years. For coarse graded mixes with low asphalt contents, designed especially for heavy loading and high temperatures regions like Pakistan, filler to asphalt ratio less than equal to 1.0 yields better results.

  4. Influence of Calcium Carbonate Fillers on the Properties of Recycled Poly(e-caprolactone Based Thermoplastic Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalija BETINGYTĖ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of different crystallographic modifications of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 filler on the melt flow, mechanical properties, hydrolytic degradation, and shape memory behaviour of recycled low-temperature poly(e-caprolactone-based polyurethane (rTPU were evaluated. Composites were prepared by two-roll milling varying filler content from 2 wt % to 6 wt %. It was found that at temperature range from 20 °C to 50 °C CaCO3 fillers do not change Young’s modulus, they decrease tensile stress and deformation of rTPU, but improve its mechanical properties at elevated temperatures (up to 65 °C. rTPU melt flow index increases due to chain scission during the recycling and filler mixing with mill. Therefore, destruction temperature of rTPU is 20 °C lower than that of TPU. The CaCO3 does not change shape memory properties independently of filler type and transition from secondary shape to the primary shape at 70 °C temperature is completed within 17 s for both filled and unfilled rTPU. The investigation of hydrolytic degradation shows that CaCO3 only slightly increases degradation rate of rTPU.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2433

  5. Evaluation of the use of inorganic pigments and fillers in cure of epoxy resins by microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of microwave in chemical processes began soon after the WW II. The mechanism of curing via microwave heating is independent of the thermal conductivity of the irradiated material and offers a good solution to operate with materials that do not have a good thermal conductivity, such as polymers. Despite these advantages, the use of multimode microwave ovens, the main source used today, indicates some challenges to overcome. Associated with the use of epoxy resins in various applications, the use of pigments and inorganic fillers has added more variables to be studied. Much of the inorganic fillers used commercially are good absorbers of microwave providing changes in the amount of radiation absorbed, and thus the amount of heat transferred to the epoxy resin curing process. After selecting the key fillers and pigments traditionally used in the production of parts with epoxy resins they were subjected to the same microwave irradiation for evaluation of their behavior alone. In order to observe the effect of mixtures 1, 2, and 5% by weight of filler were added to epoxy resin, and it was verified these effects in the curing process. The preliminary results are promising, because for the same cure cycle for different types of fillers added separately, gains in curing time were obtained, making the process of cure via microwave quick and efficient without substantial losses in thermal properties of the final products obtained. (author)

  6. Electromagnetic interference shielding performance of epoxy composites filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes/manganese zinc ferrite hybrid fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, C. H.; Mariatti, M.; Koh, Y. H.

    2016-03-01

    An effective electromagnetic-interference (EMI) shielding epoxy composite has been fabricated with a combination of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and manganese zinc ferrite (MnZn ferrite) fillers. MWCNTs were functionalized to improve dispersibility while manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized via the citrate gel method. The EMI-shielding performance of the fabricated composites was examined. It was found that the composite with a filler ratio of MWNCTs to MnZn ferrite=3:1 obtained the highest EMI shielding effectiveness (SE), with the shielding mechanism dominated by absorption. In addition, the EMI shielding performance of composites was improved by increases in the filler loading and thickness of composites. Composites with a filler loading of 4.0 vol% and thickness of 2.0 mm achieved an SE of 44 dB at 10 GHz with the assistance of conductive silver backing. This EMI SE is better than that of composites filled with single conductive filler and comparable with that of commercial EMI absorber.

  7. Inorganic/organic nanocomposites: Reaching a high filler content without increasing viscosity using core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhadjala, W., E-mail: warda.benhadjala@cea.fr [IMS Laboratory - UMR CNRS 5218, University of Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, 38000 Grenoble (France); Gravoueille, M.; Weiss, M. [EDF, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les Domaines de la Réalisation et de l' Exploitation (CEIDRE), Chinon, BP 80, 37420 Avoine (France); Bord-Majek, I.; Béchou, L.; Ousten, Y. [IMS Laboratory - UMR CNRS 5218, University of Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Suhir, E. [Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science, Portland State University, Oregon 97201 (United States); Buet, M.; Louarn, M.; Rougé, F.; Gaud, V. [Polyrise SAS, 16 Avenue Pey Berland, 33607 Pessac (France)

    2015-11-23

    Extensive research is being conducted on the development of inorganic/organic nanocomposites for a wide variety of applications in microelectronics, biotechnologies, photonics, adhesives, or optical coatings. High filler contents are usually required to fully optimize the nanocomposites properties. However, numerous studies demonstrated that traditional composite viscosity increases with increasing the filler concentration reducing therefore significantly the material processability. In this work, we synthesized inorganic/organic core-shell nanocomposites with different shell thicknesses. By reducing the shell thickness while maintaining a constant core size, the nanoparticle molecular mass decreases but the nanocomposite filler fraction is correlatively increased. We performed viscosity measurements, which clearly highlighted that intrinsic viscosity of hybrid nanoparticles decreases as the molecular mass decreases, and thus, as the filler fraction increases, as opposed to Einstein predictions about the viscosity of traditional inorganic/polymer two-phase mixtures. This exceptional behavior, modeled by Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equation, proves to be a significant breakthrough for the development of industrializable nanocomposites with high filler contents.

  8. Fabrication and anti-microbial evaluation of drug loaded polylactide space filler intended for ridge preservation following tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebu George Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The preservation or reduction of alveolar ridge resorption following tooth extraction is important in patients especially for those intended for implants at a later stage. One way to achieve this is by using membranes, graft materials, and biodegradable space fillers to prevent alveolar bone resorption and promote regeneration. A major attraction for using biodegradable and biocompatible polymers as space fillers for ridge preservation is their safety profile in comparison to xenograft materials like lyophilized bone and collagen. Materials and Methods: Biocompatible polylactide space fillers were fabricated by fusing porous polylactide particles. The sponges were loaded with drugs by placing them in the respective solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a chronic periodontitis patient and in vitro anti-microbial evaluation was done with the drug loaded sponges. Results: Chlorhexidine loaded space filler showed significant anti microbial effect against multiple drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a patient with chronic periodontitis. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that biodegradable drug releasing polylactide space fillers has the potential to be used for ridge preservation following tooth extraction. Release of drugs in the socket may prove useful in preventing development of alveolar osteitis post extraction which can interfere with normal healing of the socket. Synthetic biodegradable polymers also exhibit a controlled degradation rate to achieve complete resorption within the intended time.

  9. Inorganic/organic nanocomposites: Reaching a high filler content without increasing viscosity using core-shell structured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive research is being conducted on the development of inorganic/organic nanocomposites for a wide variety of applications in microelectronics, biotechnologies, photonics, adhesives, or optical coatings. High filler contents are usually required to fully optimize the nanocomposites properties. However, numerous studies demonstrated that traditional composite viscosity increases with increasing the filler concentration reducing therefore significantly the material processability. In this work, we synthesized inorganic/organic core-shell nanocomposites with different shell thicknesses. By reducing the shell thickness while maintaining a constant core size, the nanoparticle molecular mass decreases but the nanocomposite filler fraction is correlatively increased. We performed viscosity measurements, which clearly highlighted that intrinsic viscosity of hybrid nanoparticles decreases as the molecular mass decreases, and thus, as the filler fraction increases, as opposed to Einstein predictions about the viscosity of traditional inorganic/polymer two-phase mixtures. This exceptional behavior, modeled by Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equation, proves to be a significant breakthrough for the development of industrializable nanocomposites with high filler contents

  10. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-11-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved.

  11. Influence of filler metal on birefringent optical properties of photonic crystal fiber with integrated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Vera, Erick; Torres, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the filler metal on the birefringent optical properties of a photonic crystal fiber containing two integrated electrodes. Bismuth and indium were used to examine the effects of the electrode composition on the temperature sensitivity of this special microstructured fiber. We found that the fiber microstructure significantly influences the metal-induced sensitivity of the wavelength dependent birefringence, making the behavior of the birefringence change strongly with the electrode material. By modeling the anisotropic changes induced by the metal expansion in the refractive index within the fiber we examine the essential features of the fiber birefringence.

  12. Effect of filler particles on surface roughness of experimental composite series

    OpenAIRE

    Hanadi Yousif Marghalani

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different filler sizes and shapes on the surface roughness of experimental resin-composite series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-three disc-shaped specimens of the series (Spherical-RZD 102, 105, 106, 107, 114 and Irregular-RZD 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112) were prepared in a split Teflon mold and irradiated with an halogen light-curing unit (450 mW/cm² for 40 s) at both top and bottom surfaces. The specimens were stored for 3 ...

  13. Effect of Wood Fillers on the Viscoelastic and Thermophysical Properties of HDPE-Wood Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood polymer composites (WPC have well proven their applicability in several fields of the plasturgy sector, due to their aesthetics and low maintenance costs. However, for plasturgy applications, the characterization of viscoelastic behavior and thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of WPC with the temperature and wood filler contents is essential. Therefore, the processability of polymer composites made up with different percentage of wood particles needs a better understanding of materials behaviors in accordance with temperature and wood particles contents. To this end, a numerical analysis of the viscoelastic, mechanical, and thermophysical properties of composite composed of high density polyethylene (HDPE reinforced with soft wood particles is evaluated.

  14. Neural network modeling for dynamic pulsed GTAW process with wire filler based on MATLAB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Double-sided weld pool shapes were determined by multiple welding parameters and wire feed parameters during pulsed GTAW with wire filler. Aiming at such a system with multiple inputs and outputs, an effective modeling method, consisting of the impulse signal design, model structure and parameter identification and verification, was developed based on MATLAB software. Then, dynamic neural network models, TDNNM (Topside dynamic neural network model) and BHDNNM (Backside width and topside height dynamic neural network model), were established to predict double-sided shape parameters of the weld pool. The characteristic relationship of the welding process was simulated and analyzed with the models.

  15. Bacterial infection as a likely cause of adverse reactions to polyacrylamide hydrogel fillers in cosmetic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise; Breiting, Vibeke; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    patients and 24 controls were systematically examined for the presence of bacteria by culture, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Gram stain, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results. Bacteria, mostly normal skin bacteria such as Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, were identified...... in the presence of polyacrylamide filler in cosmetic surgery, possibly due to a biofilm mode of growth. Adequate skin preparation and use of sterile technique in these procedures are mandatory, but antibiotic prophylaxis prior to injection of nondegradable gels like polyacrylamide should be explored as well....

  16. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved. PMID:25489292

  17. Preparation of Modified Kaolin Filler with Cesium and Its Application in Security Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Houssni El-Saied; Samya El-Sherbiny; Omnia Ali; Wafaa El-Saied; Said Rohyem

    2013-01-01

    In this study, cesium was added intentionally during paper manufacture for protecting the papers against forgery and counterfeiting by sorbing cesium ions (Cs+) on kaolin, used as special filler in papermaking. The sorption of cesium from aqueous solution by kaolin was studied as a function of pH, shaking time, cesium initial concentration, and mass of kaolin using batch technique. The results showed that a solution containing 10 mg/L Cs+ and 250 mg of kaolin at pH 6 can be used to modify the...

  18. Icebreakers, Fillers y Warmers: actividades breves para la clase de inglés

    OpenAIRE

    Durán Martínez, Ramiro; Sonsoles SÁNCHEZ-REYES PEÑAMARÍA

    2009-01-01

    RESUMEN: En el siguiente artículo vamos a presentar diversos tipos de ejercicios de carácter breve que hemos utilizado en la clase de inglés con el objetivo de facilitar a los alumnos la práctica de la destreza oral. Estas actividades tienen distintos nombres dependiendo de la función que desempeñen: icebreakers, fillers y warmers. Se denominan icebreakers los ejercicios diseñados para romper la tensión que normalmente rodea las primeras sesiones de cualquier nueva actividad, como, por ejempl...

  19. Icebreakers, Fillers y Warmers: actividades breves para la clase de inglés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro DURÁN MARTÍNEZ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En el siguiente artículo vamos a presentar diversos tipos de ejercicios de carácter breve que hemos utilizado en la clase de inglés con el objetivo de facilitar a los alumnos la práctica de la destreza oral. Estas actividades tienen distintos nombres dependiendo de la función que desempeñen: icebreakers, fillers y warmers. Se denominan icebreakers los ejercicios diseñados para romper la tensión que normalmente rodea las primeras sesiones de cualquier nueva actividad, como, por ejemplo, la primera clase de un curso de inglés. Cuando se habla de fillers se enfatiza su función comodín: tareas independientes que normalmente sirven para completar los últimos minutos del horario establecido para la clase de idiomas. El término warmer se aplica a las actividades que se llevan a cabo después de un período vacacional con el propósito de favorecer el reencuentro del alumno con el idioma que está estudiando. El principal objetivo de estos ejercicios es el desarrollo de la capacidad de los alumnos para expresarse de forma oral utilizando la lengua inglesa, concentrándose más en la práctica de la fluidez (fluency que en la precisión (accuracy. Por otra parte, sirven para favorecer la creación de vínculos de unión entre un grupo de estudiantes.ABSTRACT: In this paper, we are going to present a number of short activities that have been used in the English class in order to give students extra speaking practice. These activities were given different names depending on the role they play in the class: icebreakers, fillers and warmers. Icebreakers are fluency practice exercises produced to defuse the tension that the first sessions of every new activity imply: i.e. the first lesson of English. When talking about fillers, we refer to short independent activities that are used when the projected exercises have taken less time than expected. Warmers are also fluency practice activities devised to put students back in touch with the

  20. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  1. CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) for dynamic liver imaging: Comparison of gadoterate meglumine, gadobutrol and gadoxetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, Johannes, E-mail: Johannes.Budjan@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, Melissa; Riffel, Philipp [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Michaely, Henrik J.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Haneder, Stefan [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We examined the influence of different clinically used contrast agents on the image quality of a new sequence called CDT-VIBE for dynamic MRI of the liver. • CDT-VIBE is a robust sequence for clinical routine as it provides good image quality regardless of the utilized contrast agent. • In average, more than 3 hepatic arterial dominant phases are acquired with the CDT-VIBE sequence regardless of the contrast agent. - Abstract: Purpose: CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-VIBE is a robust method for abdominal magnetic resonance imaging providing both high spatial and high temporal resolution. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of different gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA) on image quality (IQ) with CDT-VIBE. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved, retrospective, inter-individual comparison study, 86 patients scanned at 3T were included. Within 28 s, 14 high-resolution 3D datasets were acquired using CDT-VIBE. 37 patients received 0.1 mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine, 28 patients 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol, and 19 patients 0.1 mL/kg gadoxetic acid. Two blinded, board-certified radiologists assessed the image quality on a 5 point scale, as well as the number of hepatic arterial dominant (HAD) phases. Results: Regardless of the GBCA utilized, CDT-VIBE resulted in good IQ in terms of best IQ achieved among all 14 datasets (gadobutrol 4.3, gadoterate meglumine 3.9, gadoxetic acid 3.7). With respect to worst IQ, the three groups showed statistically significant differences with gadobutrol receiving the highest rating (3.6) and gadoxetic acid the lowest (2.4) (gadoterate meglumine 3.0; 0.0014 < p < 0.0485). No statistically significant differences were found in the mean number of acquired HAD phases (gadobutrol 3.4, gadoterate meglumine 3.9, gadoxetic acid 3.1; 0.18 < p < 0.57). Conclusion: Different gadolinium-based contrast agents can be utilized for dynamic liver imaging with CDT-VIBE resulting in good image quality.

  2. Combined omega-3 fatty acids, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation prevents decline in gray matter volume of the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbe, Theresa; Witte, A Veronica; Schnelle, Ariane; Lesemann, Anne; Fabian, Sonja; Tesky, Valentina A; Pantel, Johannes; Flöel, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies in older adults suggested beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplementation, aerobic exercise, or cognitive stimulation on brain structure and function. However, combined effects of these interventions in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are unknown. Using a randomized interventional design, we evaluated the effect of combined omega-3 FA supplementation, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation (target intervention) versus omega-3 FA supplementation and non-aerobic exercise (control intervention) on cognitive function and gray matter volume in patients with MCI. Moreover, we analyzed potential vascular, metabolic or inflammatory mechanisms underlying these effects. Twenty-two MCI patients (8 females; 60-80years) successfully completed six months of omega-3 FA intake, aerobic cycling training and cognitive stimulation (n=13) or omega-3 FA intake and non-aerobic stretching and toning (n=9). Before and after the interventions, cognitive performance, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain at 3T (n=20), intima-media thickness of the internal carotid artery and serum markers of glucose control, lipid and B-vitamin metabolism, and inflammation were assessed. Intervention-related changes in gray matter volume of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related brain regions, i.e., frontal, parietal, temporal and cingulate cortex were examined using voxel-based morphometry of high resolution T1-weighted images. After the intervention period, significant differences emerged in brain structure between groups: Gray matter volume decreased in the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex of patients in the control intervention, while gray matter volume in these areas was preserved or even increased after the target intervention. Decreases in homocysteine levels in the target intervention group were associated with increases in gray matter volume in the middle frontal cortex (p=0.010). No significant differences in cognitive performance or

  3. Photons transport through ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene based composite containing tungsten and boron carbide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, S.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.A. [Russian State Technological University “MATI”, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.E.; Terekhin, P.N.; Dmitriev, S.V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Gorshenkov, M.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Boykov, A.A., E-mail: kink03@gmail.com [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The developed method for predicting X-ray properties of the polymer. • Higher content of the fillers results in an increase of mechanical properties. • X-ray defensive properties of the samples were investigated experimentally. -- Abstract: Polymers are a base for creating of composite materials with high mechanical and chemical properties. Using the heavy metals as filler in these composites can give them X-ray protective properties. These materials have high deactivation rates and can be used to create Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) used in aggressive environments. It was proposed a model for calculation of X-ray protection properties of the polymer-based nanocomposite materials with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix, filled with tungsten and boron carbide particles. X-ray protective properties were calculated in a wide range of filler content using the developed model. Results of calculations allow selecting most effective compounds of X-ray protective UHMWPE based composites.

  4. Microstructure and phase constitution near the interface of Cu/3003 torch brazing using Al Si La Sr filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been mainly studied in this paper on brazing of Cu to Al using Al.Si filler metal. The optimized scanning rate of 2.5 mm/s is first obtained through simulating the temperature field of Cu Al brazing process based on ANSYS software. Then the brazing of Cu C11000 to Al 3003 using Al.Si.La.Sr filler is carried out by torch brazing technology. It is found that the brazing seam region is mainly consisted of α Al solid solution and CuAl2 IMC. Further experimental results also show that the rare earth element La in filler metal can not only refine the grain, but also promote the dispersion of intermetallic compounds into the brazing seam, which significantly improves the brazing seam microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints

  5. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Koshi, E-mail: takenaka@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kuzuoka, Kota [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sugimoto, Norihiro [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-28

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix–filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  6. Laser Brazing of Aluminum with a New Filler Wire AlZn13Si10Cu4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    Laser brazing processes of aluminum with both single beam and double beam techniques were developed using a new AlZn13Si10Cu4 filler wire which has a lower solidification range comparing to normal AlSi12 filler wire and the base material. Brazing experiments on both bead on plate and flange joints showed that the new wire has a very good wettability on the aluminum samples. Comparing to the AlSi12 wire one needs a lower heat input (in some cases 73% less heat input) for joining the same samples with the new filler wire and reaches a high hardness value in the joint. In addition, brazing with double beam technique showed its potential to increase the joint quality.

  7. Transparent Gap Filler Solution over a DVB-RCS2 Satellite Platform in a Railway Scenario: Performance Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peppino Fazio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a performance study of a system equipped with a transparent Gap Filler solution in a DVB-RCS2 satellite platform has been provided. In particular, a simulation model based on a 3-state Markov chain, overcoming the blockage status through the introduction of a transparent Gap Filler (using devices on both tunnel sides has been implemented. The handover time, due to switching mechanism between satellite and Gap Filler, has been taken into account. As reference scenario, the railway market has been considered, which is characterized by a N-LOS condition, due to service disruptions caused by tunnels, vegetation and buildings. The system performance, in terms of end-to-end delay, queue size and packet loss percentage, have been evaluated, in order to prove the goodness of communications in a real railroad path.

  8. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, M.; Salas, F.; Carcel, F.J.; Perales, M.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal. (Author). 12 refs.

  9. Delayed immunologic complications due to injectable fillers by unlicensed practitioners: our experiences and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Joon; Hong, Ji Yeon; Park, Kui Young; Kim, Beom Joon; Seo, Seong Jun; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2016-01-01

    For a number of years, there have been unauthorized practitioners who have been illegally injecting substances. In this series of cases, delayed type hypersensitivity reactions occurred after having unknown material fillers injected by unlicensed practitioners. When injecting an unknown material, there can be a severe immune reaction due to the unknown number of antigens in the material, and therefore may act as a much stronger superantigen than conventional filler materials. It appears that the adverse effects in these cases are more severe and have tendency to break out after a longer period of time in comparison with those caused by approved fillers, likely due to operative technique and use of unverified materials. It is important to recognize the danger of such illegal procedures and to increase awareness of the public, as this has evolved into a significant public health issue. PMID:26814449

  10. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix-filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  11. Surface modification of PCC with guar gum using organic titanium ionic crosslinking agent and its application as papermaking filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Song, Zhanqian; Liu, Zhenhua; Qian, Xueren

    2016-10-01

    Utilized the principles of guar gum (GG) gelation and crosslinking, a novel modified precipitated calcium carbonate (MPCC) papermaking filler was prepared by using organic titanium (OT) ionic crosslinking agent. The MPCC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR results confirmed that GG had been coated on the surface of PCC particles, XPS analysis indicated the presence of titanium atoms on MPCC particles, and SEM and XRD results showed that the modification treatment did change the surface morphology and crystal structure of PCC particles. The handsheet testing results showed that the strength properties of handsheets were obviously improved when using MPCC as papermaking filler, and the optimum preparation conditions of MPCC were obtained. This research suggests that the GG modified PCC by using OT as crosslinking agent can be used to manufacture high filler content paper products. PMID:27312620

  12. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation. PMID:26783258

  13. Melting Point Depression and Fast Diffusion in Nanostructured Brazing Fillers Confined Between Barrier Nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptay, G.; Janczak-Rusch, J.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.

    2016-08-01

    Successful brazing using Cu-based nanostructured brazing fillers at temperatures much below the bulk melting temperature of Cu was recently demonstrated (Lehmert et al. in, Mater Trans 56:1015-1018, 2015). The Cu-based nano-fillers are composed of alternating nanolayers of Cu and a permeable, non-wetted AlN barrier. In this study, a thermodynamic model is derived to estimate the melting point depression (MPD) in such Cu/AlN nano-multilayers (NMLs) as function of the Cu nanolayer thickness. Depending on the melting route, the model predicts a MPD range of 238-609 K for Cu10nm/AlN10nm NMLs, which suggests a heterogeneous pre-melting temperature range of 750-1147 K (476-874 °C), which is consistent with experimental observations. As suggested by basic kinetic considerations, the observed Cu outflow to the NML surface at the temperatures of 723-1023 K (450-750 °C) can also be partially rationalized by fast solid-state diffusion of Cu along internal interfaces, especially for the higher temperatures.

  14. Threading through Macrocycles Enhances the Performance of Carbon Nanotubes as Polymer Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the reinforcement of polymers by mechanically interlocked derivatives of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We compare the mechanical properties of fibers made of polymers and of composites with pristine SWNTs, mechanically interlocked derivatives of SWNTs (MINTs), and the corresponding supramolecular models. Improvements of both Young’s modulus and tensile strength of up to 200% were observed for the polystyrene–MINT samples with an optimized loading of just 0.01 wt %, while the supramolecular models with identical chemical composition and loading showed negligible or even detrimental influence. This behavior is found for three different types of SWNTs and two types of macrocycles. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the polymer adopts an elongated conformation parallel to the SWNT when interacting with MINT fillers, irrespective of the macrocycle chemical nature, whereas a more globular structure is taken upon facing with either pristine SWNTs or supramolecular models. The MINT composite architecture thus leads to a more efficient exploitation of the axial properties of the SWNTs and of the polymer chain at the interface, in agreement with experimental results. Our findings demonstrate that the mechanical bond imparts distinctive advantageous properties to SWNT derivatives as polymer fillers. PMID:27454946

  15. Surface modification of CaCO3 filler and its characterization using inverse gas chromatography (IGC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangcheng ZHANG; Xuetao SHI; Yajuan XING; Ting CHEN

    2008-01-01

    A CaCO3 filler was treated by generally used coupling agents and a special one-ethylene-octene copolymer (POE)-g-maleic anhydride (MAH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results show that the special coupling agent POE-g-MAH, in a chemical reaction with CaCO3, can produce an interfacial layer stronger than simple physical adhesion attained with usual coupling agents. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to investigate the surface free energy of CaCO3 after surface modification and to optimize the monolayer content of coupling agents. Based on the IGC results, it can be deduced that the monolayer cover is around 1.9% for CaCO3 treated with a titanate coupling agent. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation results show that the separated morphology existed in the ternary composites containing CaCO3 after surface treatment with coupling agents, whereas the core-shell morphology was obtained in the ternary composites with POE-g-MAH. The encapsulation of the CaCO3 filler treated with POE-g-MAH was caused by the strong chemical reaction between the elastomer and CaCO3 particles.

  16. Behavior of limestone filler cement mortars exposed to magnesium sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senhadji Y.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the cement production industry, looking for a less expensive binder using industrial waste and natural resources has become a major concern for the deficit level in the manufacture of Portland cement. However, despite the technical, economic and environmental benefits brought by the use of blended cements, they are associated with disadvantages. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of the incorporation of limestone fillers on the mechanical properties and durability of mortars prepared in different combinations based on this admixture material. The durability was evaluated after immersing the specimens in a 5% solution of magnesium sulfate for periods up to 360 days, and the penetration of chloride ions. The test results demonstrated that mortar and paste samples incorporating higher replacement levels of limestone filler were more susceptible to sulfate attack. According to microstructural analysis, such as DRX, the deterioration was significantly associated with formation of thaumasite, gypsum, and the brucite in the deteriorated parts of the specimens.

  17. FILLER LOADING IN THE LUMEN OR/AND CELL WALL OF FIBERS – A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Pal Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature reveals potential advantages that papermakers can achieve by placing minerals in the lumens or cell walls of fibers before the pulp is formed into paper. Loading of filler into the fiber lumen by mechanical deposition or within the cell wall by in-situ precipitation has been reported to generally result in a moderate reduction in light scattering coefficient and increased strength properties of laboratory handsheets, as well as in paper manufactured with pilot plant equipment, when compared to conventional addition of filler. However, there are some exceptions to this general observation, where the fiber loading is reported to decrease the tensile strength of paper. Some related effects can be achieved by either precipitating mineral onto fiber surfaces or co-flocculating mineral particles with cellulosic fines. Challenges remain with respect to the implementation of fiber-loading concepts at a commercial scale. Also, there is a need for further research aimed at establishing high-end applications in which it may be an advantage to load cellulosic fiber cell walls or lumens with minerals or other substances.

  18. FMR Study of the Porous Silicate Glasses with Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zapotoczny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on new magnetic materials for biomedical applications are discussed. These materials are porous silicate glasses with magnetic fillers. To ensure the smallest number of components for subsequent removal from the body, the magnetic fillers are bare magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4. The magnetic properties of these materials have been investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance method (FMR. The FMR analysis has been complemented by scanning electron microscope (SEM measurements. In order to examine the effect of time degradation on filling the porous glass with bare magnetite nanoparticles the FMR measurement was repeated five months later. For the samples with high degree of pore filling, in contrast to the samples with low degree of pore filling, the FMR signal was still strong. The influence of different pH values of magnetite nanoparticles aqueous suspension on the degree of filling the pores of glasses is also discussed. The experimental results are supported by computer simulations of FMR experiment for a cluster of N magnetic nanoparticles locked in a porous medium based on a stochastic version of the Landau-Lifshitz equation for nanoparticle magnetization.

  19. Mechanism of Expansion of Mortars with Limestone Filler due to External Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of expansion of mortars and pastes with limestone filler due to external sulfate attack was studied.Mortars and pastes made at water to solid ratios of 0.45, 0.5, 0.6 from Portland Cement (OPC) with 0%, 20% or 30% (w/w) limestone filler (LF) were cured in a 95±1% RH moist room at 20±1 ℃ for 14 or 28 days. They subsequently were immersed in 5% Na2SO4(0.35 M) solution at ambient temperature (1~35 ℃). The expansion of the specimens was measured every month, and selected samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that mortars with 20% LF show larger expansion than that of OPC mortars at up to 9 months of exposure,and the amount of gypsum in both mortars and pastes with LF is much more than that in mortars and pastes without LF. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that the formation of massive gypsum leads to the lager expansion of the mortars and pastes containing 20% LF. These behaviors may be explained by the changes in hydration products due to the addition of LF.

  20. The influence of filler type on the corrosion stability of the sulfure concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojković Velislav M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur concrete was prepared by using the initial components: sand as an aggregate, modified sulfur binder, and talc, alumina, microsilica, and fly ash as fillers. Portland cement concrete was made of the same aggregate and fillers and portland cement. The durability of prepared concrete samples was tested in following aggressive solutions: 10% HCl, 20% H2SO4, and 3% NaCl as a function of time. Changes in mass and strength of the sulfur concrete were monitored periodicallly during the immersion time of 360 days in above solutions. These changes were used as a measure of deterioration level. It should be highlighted that the samples with the ash and especially talc exhibit higher durability in the solutions of HCl and H2SO4 than the samples with alumina and microsilica. In the solutions of NaCl all samples shown excellent durability while the samples with talc were the best. Portland cement concrete samples after two months lost 20 % of mass and shown degradation of mechanical properties. By usage of sulfur for sulfur concrete production, huge environmental problem regarding storage of waste sulfur from oil refining process is solved. On the other hand, sulfur concrete with its low price has an excellent quality for the application in aggressive environments unlike more expensive PCC.