WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid volumizing filler

  1. The evolving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhn C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Channy Muhn,1 Nathan Rosen,1 Nowell Solish,2 Vince Bertucci,2 Mark Lupin,3 Alain Dansereau,4 Fred Weksberg,5 B Kent Remington,6 Arthur Swift71Division of Dermatology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2Division of Dermatology, New Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, 4Private Practice, Repentigny, Québec, 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 6Private Practice, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 7St Mary's Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Recent advancements, including more versatile facial fillers, refined injection techniques and the adoption of a global facial approach, have contributed to improved patient outcome and increased patient satisfaction. Nine Canadian specialists (eight dermatologists, one plastic surgeon collaborated to develop an overview on volume restoration and contouring based on published literature and their collective clinical experience. The specialists concurred that optimal results in volume restoration and contouring depend on correcting deficiencies at various layers of the facial envelope. This includes creating a foundation for deep structural support in the supraperiosteal or submuscular plane; volume repletion of subcutaneous fat compartments; and the reestablishment of dermal and subdermal support to minimize cutaneous rhytids, grooves and furrows. It was also agreed that volume restoration and contouring using a global facial approach is essential to create a natural, youthful appearance in facial aesthetics. A comprehensive non-surgical approach should therefore incorporate combining fillers such as high-viscosity, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA for structural support and hyaluronic acid (HA for lines, grooves and furrows with neuromodulators, lasers and energy devices.Keywords: hyaluronic acid filler, volumizing, facial

  2. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  3. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheels, Patrick; Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity.

  4. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. Methods: One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Results: Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. Conclusions: CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity. PMID:28280664

  5. Effectiveness evaluation of two volumizing hyaluronic acid dermal fillers in a controlled, randomized, double-blind, split-face clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerscher M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Martina Kerscher,1 Karla Agsten,2 Maria Kravtsov,3 Welf Prager4 1Department of Cosmetic Science, University of Hamburg, 2SCIderm GmbH, Hamburg, Germany; 3Anteis S.A., Geneva, Switzerland; 4Prager & Partner Dermatologische Praxis, Hamburg, Germany Background: Enhancement of the midface can be achieved with volumizing hyaluronic acid (HA fillers.Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the safety and effectiveness of Cohesive Polydensified Matrix® 26 mg/mL HA gel (CPM-26 and Vycross® 20 mg/ml HA gel (VYC-20 in a controlled, randomized, evaluator-blind, split-face clinical study.Patients and methods: Subjects with moderate-to-severe malar volume loss on the Merz Aesthetics Scale (MAS received CPM-26 on one side and VYC-20 on the contralateral side of the face. Effectiveness assessments were performed by blinded evaluators including photographic and live MAS ratings and live Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS ratings. Calculations of anatomical volume variations at month 3 (M3, month 6 (M6, month 12 (M12 and month 18 (M18 were also performed.Results: Non-inferiority of CPM-26 versus VYC-20 was demonstrated at M3 (primary end point based on MAS. GAIS rating showed that significantly more subjects had better improvement with CPM-26 than with VYC-20 at month 1, M3, M12 and M18 (p=0.0032, p=0.0074, p=0.0384 and p=0.0110, respectively. Standardized evaluation of volume variations from baseline to M3, M12 and M18 showed that CPM-26 created more volume augmentation at all time points, and the difference was significant at M3.Conclusion: CPM-26 was non-inferior to VYC-20 based on MAS ratings at M3 and demonstrated a favorable safety and effectiveness profile for midfacial volume enhancement with results lasting up to M18. Keywords: cohesive polydensified matrix, hyaluronic acid fillers, Belotero® Volume, Modélis® SHAPE, Juvéderm® VOLUMA®, volumizing

  6. Efficacy and durability of hyaluronic acid fillers for malar enhancement: a prospective, randomized, spilt-face clinical controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ki Heon; Gwak, Min Jae; Moon, Sung Kyung; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Min Kyung

    2017-01-31

    Various hyaluronic acid fillers can be used for facial attenuation and rejuvenation. The efficacy and durability of hyaluronic acid fillers are of major concern to dermatologists and patients. This study aimed to evaluate three dimensional morphology, tissue distribution, and changes in volume after injection of two different hyaluronic acid fillers. Ten Korean women were enrolled in this study. Each subject was injected with monophasic hyaluronic acid filler in one malar area and biphasic filler in the other. Clinical outcome was measured before and after injection, and after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, using the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale, photographs and Moire's topography. Facial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed twice over six months. Both products showed good results after injection and demonstrated good durability over time. MRI was a useful modality for assessing tissue distribution and volume changes. The effects and durability after injection of monophasic hyaluronic acid filler and biphasic hyaluronic acid filler are generally comparable.

  7. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients.

  8. Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: can adjunctive lidocaine improve patient satisfaction without decreasing efficacy or duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynnelle; Cockerham, Kimberly

    2011-03-14

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are the most widely used injectables to augment facial volume without surgery. HA dermal fillers are popular because of their ease of administration, predictable effectiveness, good safety profile, and quick patient recovery. The most common patient complaint is pain. Our goal is to review the current literature on HA fillers and compare outcomes with and without lidocaine. We found adjunctive lidocaine significantly decreases pain during injection and postinjection with corresponding increased patient satisfaction. The efficacy and safety profile appears unchanged. Rare complications with HA fillers and those associated with constituents of the product, contaminants, and lidocaine are reviewed. The corrective effects of HA fillers are temporary; repeat treatment is required to maintain results. Minimizing pain is crucial to optimize patient satisfaction.

  9. Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: can adjunctive lidocaine improve patient satisfaction without decreasing efficacy or duration?

    OpenAIRE

    Lynnelle Smith; Kimberly Cockerham

    2011-01-01

    Lynnelle Smith1, Kimberly Cockerham21Ophthalmology Department, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 2Ophthalmology Department, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are the most widely used injectables to augment facial volume without surgery. HA dermal fillers are popular because of their ease of administration, predictable effectiveness, good safety profile, and quick patient recovery. The most common patient complaint is pain. Our goal ...

  10. Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Leslie; Ingle, Danny

    The American Heritage dictionary defines filler as ‘something added to augment weight or size or fill space'. Historically, commercial papermakers have used a variety of inexpensive, minimally beneficiated minerals as fillers for economic extension of more costly wood fibre. As such, these fillers played a relatively inconsequential role in contributing specific quality characteristics to the final sheet. However, as paper grades have evolved, the role of mineral fillers has dramatically expanded to contribute specific functionality to final paper grades. In general, this has resulted in a broader offering of mineral products to the papermaker delivering a range of optical and physical properties. Additionally, the use of mineral fillers may significantly impact dynamics on the paper machine itself. For example, the type and level of filler can dramatically affect chemical demand, drainage, speed and drying rates. A basic understanding of the fundamental characteristics of fillers and their resulting impact, both within the paper matrix and on the paper machine, is a critical requirement for cost-effective grade optimization.

  11. ACID-BASE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMERS AND FILLERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; CHEN Fute; HUANG Yuanfu; ZHOU Qingli

    1987-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography(IGC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were applied to determining the relative acid-base strength of polymers and coupling agents. The acid-base characteristics of fillers such as CaCO3 could be altered by treatment with different coupling agents. It was shown that some mechanical properties of filled polymers were obviously associated with acid-base interactions between polymers and fillers.

  12. Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: can adjunctive lidocaine improve patient satisfaction without decreasing efficacy or duration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnelle Smith

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lynnelle Smith1, Kimberly Cockerham21Ophthalmology Department, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 2Ophthalmology Department, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA dermal fillers are the most widely used injectables to augment facial volume without surgery. HA dermal fillers are popular because of their ease of administration, predictable effectiveness, good safety profile, and quick patient recovery. The most common patient complaint is pain. Our goal is to review the current literature on HA fillers and compare outcomes with and without lidocaine. We found adjunctive lidocaine significantly decreases pain during injection and postinjection with corresponding increased patient satisfaction. The efficacy and safety profile appears unchanged. Rare complications with HA fillers and those associated with constituents of the product, contaminants, and lidocaine are reviewed. The corrective effects of HA fillers are temporary; repeat treatment is required to maintain results. Minimizing pain is crucial to optimize patient satisfaction.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, lidocaine, drug toxicity, hypersensitivity, collagen, herpes simplex

  13. Soft tissue augmentation - Use of hyaluronic acid as dermal filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue augmentation has revolutionized the treatment of the aging face. It is a technique in which a substance is injected under the skin. The concept of utilizing materials for soft tissue augmentation actually began around 1950 with the use of fluid silicone. Today we have a large armamentarium of implant materials to delay the tell tale signs of aging. Filling has replaced conventional surgery in facial rejuvenation. In this article, the emphasis will be on hyaluronic acid as this substance is easily available in India and ranks among the most widely used dermal fillers.

  14. Use of hyaluronic acid fillers for the treatment of the aging face

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H Gold

    2007-01-01

    Michael H GoldGold Skin Care Center, Tennessee Clinical Research Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical School,Vanderbilt University Nursing School, Nashville, TN, USA; Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: Hyaluronic acid fillers have become popular soft tissue filler augmentation agents over the past several years. They have helped revolutionize the filler market with a number of new products available for use for our patient...

  15. A complete range of hyaluronic acid filler with distinctive physical properties specifically designed for optimal tissue adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Sandrine; Anthonioz, Lise; Fuchez, Fabien; Herbage, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    A new range of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers has been designed using Optimal Balance Technology™, which centers around three main parameters: the degree of cross-linking, the size of gel calibration and the HA concentration. The five different products in the range (HA E Touch, HA E Classic, HA E Lips, HA E Deep and HA E Volume) have the same concentration of HA (20 mg/mL) and various degrees of cross-linking and gel calibration, in order to have distinctive physical properties adapted to their specific indications. HA E Classic, HA E Deep, HA E Lips and HA E Volume are available in two different formulations either with or without lidocaine. The efficacy, safety and patient satisfaction of the HA E range in various indications have been assessed in several classical studies. In this study, the rheological measurements of HA E Deep being the firmest gel within the range. Addition of lidocaine did not change the rheological properties of the HA E fillers. HA E fillers have three different degrees of gel calibration, with HA E Touch, HA E Classic and HA E Lips having the same smallest gel calibration and HA E Volume having the largest gel calibration within the range. Injection of all HA E fillers was smooth, regular, and required low extrusion force when using the Ultra Thin Wall (UTW)needle provided for each product. In summary, the HA E fillers have distinctive physical properties in terms of gel firmness and gel calibration, which were designed to adapt to their specific indications.

  16. Avoiding the "danger zones" when injecting dermal fillers and volume enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic providers need to be aware of the serious potential complications that can result from occlusion of specific facial arterial and venous structures. This article focuses on the anatomical "danger zones" to avoid during dermal filler and volume enhancer injection procedures. Clinical pearls are provided on how to avoid these "danger zones" and what to do if a rare complication (e.g., skin necrosis or vision loss) does occur.

  17. Severe Acute Local Reactions to a Hyaluronic Acid-derived Dermal Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dyke, Susan; Hays, Geoffrey P.; Caglia, Anthony E.; Caglia, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Injectable fillers are normally well tolerated by patients with little or no adverse effects. The most common side effects include swelling, redness, bruising, and pain at the injection site. This report describes three cases in which patients injected with a hyaluronic acid-derived injectable filler that is premixed with lidocaine developed adverse reactions including persistent swelling, pain, and nodule formation. Two of the three patients' abscesses were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic...

  18. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Adri D; Prager, Welf; Rubin, Mark G; Moretti, Ernesto A; Nikolis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material. Objective The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero® fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation. Methods A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero® fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume) and equivalent products (Esthélis®, Mesolis®, Fortélis®, Modélis®). Results This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero® Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118) and Restylane® (at 4 weeks, n=40), and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero® Intense than with Perlane® (at 2 weeks, n=20). With Belotero® Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1–6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8–12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero® Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging), Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach), and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients). The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were temporary. There were no reports of Tyndall effect, nodules, granulomas, or tissue necrosis. Conclusion Clinical evidence indicates sustainable esthetic effects, good safety profile, and long-term tolerability of the Belotero® fillers, particularly Belotero® Basic/Balance and Intense. PMID:27660479

  19. Biological Evaluation of Flexible Polyurethane/Poly l-Lactic Acid Composite Scaffold as a Potential Filler for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Fai Lui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradable bone graft substitute for large-volume bone defects is a continuously developing field in orthopedics. With the advance in biomaterial in past decades, a wide range of new materials has been investigated for their potential in this application. When compared to common biopolymers within the field such as PLA or PCL, elastomers such as polyurethane offer some unique advantages in terms of flexibility. In cases of bone defect treatments, a flexible soft filler can help to establish an intimate contact with surrounding bones to provide a stable bone-material interface for cell proliferation and ingrowth of tissue. In this study, a porous filler based on segmented polyurethane incorporated with poly l-lactic acid was synthesized by a phase inverse salt leaching method. The filler was put through in vitro and in vivo tests to evaluate its potential in acting as a bone graft substitute for critical-sized bone defects. In vitro results indicated there was a major improvement in biological response, including cell attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase expression for osteoblast-like cells when seeded on the composite material compared to unmodified polyurethane. In vivo evaluation on a critical-sized defect model of New Zealand White (NZW rabbit indicated there was bone ingrowth along the defect area with the introduction of the new filler. A tight interface formed between bone and filler, with osteogenic cells proliferating on the surface. The result suggested polyurethane/poly l-lactic acid composite is a material with the potential to act as a bone graft substitute for orthopedics application.

  20. A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF ACID-TOLERANT PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLERS IN PAPERMAKING OF DEINKED PULP DERIVED FROM RECYCLED NEWSPAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of acid-tolerant precipitated calcium carbonate fillers, including phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphosphate modified precipitated CaCO3 filler, and sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphos-phate modified precipitated CaCO3 filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was explored. These two acid-tolerant fillers provided considerably more brightness improvement in papers in comparison the unmodified filler, presumably indicating alleviated pulp darkening achieved as a result of better acid-resistant properties. The addition of acid-tolerant fillers into the furnish slurries gave lower system pH as compared with unmodified filler. Among the three fillers used in this work, the effect on retention of modification of the filler with sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphosphate was probably the best, as evaluated from ash content measurements. For air permeability of the paper, the use of acid-tolerant fillers provided slightly more improvement in comparison to the unmodified filler. For tensile and burst strength of the paper, the use of sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexameta-phosphate modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler gave better results as compared with the other two fillers. Additionally, the improving effect of acid-tolerant fillers on furnish static drainage was found to be slightly weaker than that of unmodified filler.

  1. Influence of the filler content on the free nanohole volume in epoxy-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tognana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A study on free nanohole volumes in particulate epoxy matrix composites as a function of the aluminum particles content is presented. Specifically, the influence of the filler content in the epoxy matrix on the nanohole volume is analyzed in terms of the mechanical and morphological properties of the composites fabricated. Nanoholes data were measured using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy recently published by the authors. Applying the Park-Earmme micromechanical model, these data are interpreted in terms of the thermal stresses generated during the curing process applied during fabrication. Some input parameters of the model were experimentally obtained. In order to obtain a satisfactory description of the evolution of the free nanohole volume in the whole range of filler contents, a contribution due to the matrix-particle interphases is taken into account in the micromechanical model. To this aim, specific information on the interphases was obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, differencital scanning calorimetry (DSC and a free-constraint analysis of the positron lifetime data.

  2. Hyaluronic acid fillers with cohesive polydensified matrix for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetyo AD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adri D Prasetyo,1 Welf Prager,2 Mark G Rubin,3 Ernesto A Moretti,4 Andreas Nikolis5 1Rejuva Skin & Beauty, Surabaya, Indonesia; 2Prager & Partner, Hamburg, Germany; 3University of California, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Gamma Health Group, Sanatorio Los Arroyos, Santa Fe, Republic of Argentina; 5Victoria Park Clinical Research Centre, Westmount, QC, Canada Background: Cohesive monophasic polydensified fillers show unique viscoelastic properties and variable density of hyaluronic acid, allowing for a homogeneous tissue integration and distribution of the material.Objective: The aim of this paper was to review the clinical data regarding the performance, tolerability, and safety of the Belotero® fillers for soft-tissue augmentation and rejuvenation.Methods: A literature search was performed up until May 31, 2015 to identify all relevant articles on Belotero® fillers (Basic/Balance, Hydro, Soft, Intense, Volume and equivalent products (Esthélis®, Mesolis®, Fortélis®, Modélis®.Results: This comprehensive review included 26 papers. Findings from three randomized controlled trials showed a greater reduction in nasolabial fold severity with Belotero® Basic/Balance than with collagen (at 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, n=118 and Restylane® (at 4 weeks, n=40, and higher patient satisfaction with Belotero® Intense than with Perlane® (at 2 weeks, n=20. With Belotero® Basic/Balance, an improvement of at least 1 point on the severity scale can be expected in ~80% of patients 1–6 months after injection, with an effect still visible at 8–12 months. Positive findings were also reported with Belotero® Volume (no reduction in hyaluronic acid volume at 12 months, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, Soft (improvement in the esthetic outcomes when used in a sequential approach, and Hydro (improvement in skin appearance in all patients. The most common adverse effects were mild-to-moderate erythema, edema, and hematoma, most of which were

  3. Severe Acute Local Reactions to a Hyaluronic Acid-derived Dermal Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Susan; Hays, Geoffrey P; Caglia, Anthony E; Caglia, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Injectable fillers are normally well tolerated by patients with little or no adverse effects. The most common side effects include swelling, redness, bruising, and pain at the injection site. This report describes three cases in which patients injected with a hyaluronic acid-derived injectable filler that is premixed with lidocaine developed adverse reactions including persistent swelling, pain, and nodule formation. Two of the three patients' abscesses were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mycobacterium. All three cultures were negative. Abscess persistence in all cases necessitated physical removal and/or enzymatic degradation with hyaluronidase. The effects subsided only after the product had been removed. Two of these patients were subsequently treated with other hyaluronic acid-derived dermal fillers without adverse events.

  4. Tracking and Increasing Viability of Topically Injected Fibroblasts Suspended in Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hi-Jin; Namgoong, Sik; Rhee, Sung-Mi; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    A new injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue consisting of a mixture of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler and cultured human fibroblasts have been developed by the authors. To establish this method as a standard treatment, a further study was required to determine whether the injected fibroblasts could stay at the injected place or move to other sites. In addition, effective strategies were needed to increase viability of the injected fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to track the injected fibroblasts and to determine the effect of adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) or vitamin C on the viability of fibroblasts.Human fibroblasts labeled with fluorescence dye were suspended in HA filler and injected into 4 sites on the back of nude mice. The injected bioimplants consisted of one of the 4 followings: HA filler without cells (HA group), fibroblasts suspended in HA filler (HA + FB group), PGE1-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + PGE1 group), and vitamin C-supplemented fibroblasts in HA filler (HA + FB + VC group). At 4 weeks after injection, locations and intensities of the fluorescence signals were evaluated using a live imaging system.The fluorescence signals of the fibroblast-containing groups were visible only at the injected sites without dispersing to other sites. The HA +FB + PGE1 group showed a significantly higher fluorescence signal than the HA + FB and the HA + FB +VC groups (P FB and HA + FB +VC groups (P = 0.69).The results of the current study collectively suggest that injected fibroblasts suspended in HA filler stay at the injected place without moving to other sites. In addition, PGE1 treatment may increase the remaining rhodamine B isothiocynanate dye at the injected site of the human dermal fibroblasts.

  5. Effect of different carbon fillers and dopant acids on electrical properties of polyaniline nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Johny Jelmy; S Ramakrishnan; Murali Rangarajan; Nikhil K Kothurkar

    2013-02-01

    Electrically conducting nanocomposites of polyaniline (PANI) with carbon-based fillers have evinced considerable interest for various applications such as rechargeable batteries, microelectronics, sensors, electrochromic displays and light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The nature of both the carbon filler and the dopant acid can significantly influence the conductivity of these nanocomposites. This paper describes the effects of carbon fillers like carbon black (CB), graphite (GR) and muti-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and of dopant acids like methane sulfonic acid (MSA), camphor sulfonic acid (CSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on the electrical conductivity of PANI. The morphological, structural and electrical properties of neat PANI and carbon–PANI nanocomposites were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), UV–Vis spectroscopy and the four-point probe technique, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were also conducted for different PANI composites. The results show that PANI and carbon–PANI composites with organic acid dopants show good thermal stability and higher electrical conductivity than those with inorganic acid dopants. Also, carbon–PANI composites generally show higher electrical conductivity than neat PANI, with highest conductivities for PANI–CNT composites. Thus, in essence, PANI–CNT composites prepared using organic acid dopants are most suitable for conducting applications.

  6. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  7. Effect of film thickness and filler properties on sulphuric acid permeation in various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valix, M; Mineyama, H; Chen, C; Cheung, W H; Shi, J; Bustamante, H

    2011-01-01

    The performance of various commercially available epoxy mortar coatings was compared by measuring their sulphuric acid diffusivity. Apparent diffusivities, which were measured gravimetrically, were found to be dependent on coating tortuosity. In composite materials like epoxy mortars, the tortuosity was determined by filler properties and polymer alignment. Tortuosity was found to depend on the filler size, their dispersion, filler aspect ratio and concentration. The order and greater alignment of polymer aggregates, which characterises thinner coatings effects higher tortuosity and thus lower permeabilities. The result is that sulphuric acid diffusivities were observed to increase with coating thickness, which challenges the notion that greater coating thicknesses provide greater protection or environmental barrier. The effect of film thickness and filler properties observed in this study has significant implications to the current selection of coatings and sewer protection.

  8. Hydrophobic silica nanoparticles as reinforcing filler for poly (lactic acid polymer matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilić Branka M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of poly (lactic acid (PLA and its nanocomposites, with silica nanoparticles (SiO2, as filler were investigated. Neat PLA films and PLA films with different percentage of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 wt. % were prepared by solution casting method. Several tools were used to characterize the influence of different silica content on crystalline behavior, and thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of PLA/SiO2 nanocomposites. Results from scanning electron microscope (SEM showed that the nanocomposite preparation and selection of specific hydrophobic spherical nano filler provide a good dispersion of the silica nanoparticles in the PLA matrix. Addition of silica nanoparticles improved mechanical properties, the most significant improvement being observed for lowest silica content (0.2wt.%. Barrier properties were improved for all measured gases at all loadings of silica nanoparticles. The degree of crystallinity for PLA slightly increased by adding 0.2 and 0.5 wt. % of nano filler. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46001

  9. Esthetic Reconstruction of Diastema with Adhesive Tooth-Colored Restorations and Hyaluronic Acid Fillers

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    Supawadee Naorungroj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This report presents a comprehensive esthetic treatment with adhesive tooth-colored restorations in a combination with hyaluronic acid (HA fillers of diastema in an orthodontic patient with relapse. Case Report. A 36-year-old female patient consulted about 1.5–2 mm midline diastema after an orthodontic relapse of replacing missing central incisors with lateral incisors and dark-colored gingival tissue as a result of a metal post and core with porcelain fused to a metal (PFM crown at the left lateral incisor. Restorative treatments included replacing the PFM with all-ceramic material and placing a ceramic veneer on the right lateral incisor. To close the space, crown forms of both lateral incisors were altered. A direct resin composite was then used to reform right and left canines to a more ideal lateral incisor shape. An HA fillers injection was used to fill the remaining open gingival embrasure. Eighteen months after treatment, the interdental papilla remained stable and the patient was satisfied with the result. Conclusion. Esthetic reconstruction of diastema and open gingival embrasure in this case can be accomplished without orthodontic retreatment. Tooth-colored restorations and HA filler injection appear as a promising modality to address this patient’s esthetic concern.

  10. Carbon Microparticles from Organosolv Lignin as Filler for Conducting Poly(Lactic Acid

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    Janea Köhnke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon microparticles were produced from organosolv lignin at 2000 °C under argon atmosphere following oxidative thermostabilisation at 250 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electro-conductivity measurements revealed that the obtained particles were electrically conductive and were composed of large graphitic domains. Poly(lactic acid filled with various amounts of lignin-derived microparticles showed higher tensile stiffness increasing with particle load, whereas strength and extensibility decreased. Electric conductivity was measured at filler loads equal to and greater than 25% w/w.

  11. Clinical performance of a dermal filler containing natural glycolic Acid and a polylactic Acid polymer: results of a clinical trial in human immunodeficiency virus subjects with facial lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Jorge M; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-02-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.(1-3) Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  12. Use of Ekibastuzsk coal ash as a filler for acid resistant plaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsakov, F.F.; Isichenko, I.I.; Kabanov, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Acid resistant plasters are used extensively at thermal power plants for protection of gas conduits, ash traps with spouts and hydraulic valves, and the internal surfaces of smoke pump housings. The surface being protected is preliminarily cleaned and a No. 16-20 steel grid attached to the surface by electrial welding. In producing the acid resistant plaster, 14-17 parts by weight of sodium silicofluoride are added to 100 parts by weight of sodium water glass; the remainder consists of andesite or diabase meal to the required consistency. The water glass fulfills the role of a binder; the sodium silicofluoride accelerates solidification of the water glass and the andesite and diabase meal serve as fillers. We found, tested in the laboratory and used successfully (under experimental-industrial conditions) a substitute for andesite and diabase meal. This substitute was ash of Ekibastuzsk coal, which was not only comparable to the meal in regard to quality of the acid resistant plaster, but even exceeded andesite and diabase meal in regard to several qualitative indicators. At the present time, a formula is being developed for an acid resistant plaster produced on the basis of water glass, sodium silicofluoride and ash of Ekibastuzsk coal. In order to verify the possibility of using other ashes instead of andesite and diabase meal, we also tested, under laboratory conditions, acid resistant plasters using ash from thermal power plants (TPP's) also burning Karagandinsk, Kuuchekinsk, Kuznetsk and Kansko-Achinsk coals. In compositions produced with polymer binders, Kansko-Achinsk coal ash was one of the best fillers, providing the most favorable physico-mechanical properties of the composition.

  13. Lip Injection Techniques Using Small-Particle Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Annie; Fabi, Sabrina; Dayan, Steven; Nogueira, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    The shape and fullness of the lips have a significant role in facial aesthetics and outward appearance. The corrective needs of a patient can range from a subtle enhancement to a complete recontouring including correction of perioral rhytides. A comprehensive understanding of the lower face anatomical features and injection site techniques are foundational information for injectors. Likewise, the choice of filler material contributes to the success of the injection techniques used, and facilitates a safe, effective, and natural appearing outcome. The small-particle HA 20 mg/mL with lidocaine 0.3% (SP-HAL, Restylane® Silk; Galderma Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas) is indicated for submucosal implantation for lip augmentation and dermal implantation for correction of perioral rhytides. Due to its rheological properties and smaller particle size, SP-HAL is a well-suited filler for the enhancement and correction of lip shape and volume, as well as for the correction of very fine perioral rhytides. This work is a combined overview of techniques found in the current literature and recommendations provided by contributing authors. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1076-1082.

  14. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer: Results of a Clinical Trial in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Subjects with Facial Lipoatrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tagle, Jorge M.; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in t...

  15. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Lui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation.

  16. Porous poly(L-lactic acid) sheet prepared by stretching with starch particles as filler for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Dandan; Han, Lijing; Li, Zonglin; Chen, Yunjing; Wang, Qingjiang; Bian, Junjia; Dong, Lisong

    2016-05-20

    Porous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) sheets were prepared by uniaxial stretching PLLA sheets containing starch filler. Here, the starch filler content, stretching ratio, stretching rate and stretching temperature are important factors to influence the structure of the porous PLLA sheets, therefore, they have been investigated in detail. The pore size distribution and tortuosity were characterized by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry. The results revealed that the porosity and pore size enlarged with the increase of the starch filler content and stretching ratio, while shrank with the rise of stretching temperature. On the other hand, the pore structure almost had no changes with the stretching rate ranging between 5 and 40 mm/min. In order to test and verify that the porous PLLA sheet was suitable for the tissue engineering, the starch particles were removed by selective enzymatic degradation and its in vitro biocompatibility to osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells was investigated.

  17. Skin Necrosis with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Due to a Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Il Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Performing rhinoplasty using filler injections, which improve facial wrinkles or soft tissues, is relatively inexpensive. However, intravascular filler injections can cause severe complications, such as skin necrosis and visual loss. We describe a case of blepharoptosis and skin necrosis caused by augmentation rhinoplasty and we discuss the patient’s clinical progress. We describe the case of a 25-year-old female patient who experienced severe pain, blepharoptosis, and decreased visual acuity immediately after receiving a filler injection. Our case suggests that surgeons should be aware of nasal vascularity before performing an operation, and that they should avoid injecting fillers at a high pressure and/or in excessive amounts. Additionally, filler injections should be stopped if the patient complains of severe pain, and appropriate measures should be taken to prevent complications caused by intravascular filler injections.

  18. An Open-Label Uncontrolled, Multicenter Study for the Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of the Dermal Filler Princess VOLUME in the Treatment of Nasolabial Folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Kopera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dermal filler Princess VOLUME is a highly cross-linked, viscoelastic hyaluronic acid injectable gel implant used for aesthetic treatment. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Princess VOLUME in the treatment of nasolabial folds, an open-label uncontrolled, multicenter study was conducted. Forty-eight subjects were recruited who had moderate to deep wrinkles, according to the Modified Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale (MFWS. Subjects received Princess VOLUME in both nasolabial folds at Day 0. Nasolabial fold severity was evaluated at 30, 90, 180, and 270 days after treatment, using the MFWS and the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS. Adverse events and treatment site reactions were recorded. Among the 48 subjects, 93.8% were female with a median age of 52 years. There were significant improvements (P<0.0001 in the MFWS scores at 30, 180, and 270 days after treatment compared with those at baseline, with a mean decrease of 1.484 (±0.408, 1.309 (±0.373, and 1.223 (±0.401, respectively; hence the primary endpoint was achieved and clinical efficacy demonstrated. Princess VOLUME was well tolerated, and most adverse events were injection site reactions of mild to moderate severity. Subject satisfaction (97.9%, subject recommendation of the treatment (93.6%, and investigators GAIS scores (97.9% improvement were high.

  19. Improving the quality of biopolymer (poly lactic acid) with the addition of bentonite as filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani; Agusnar, Harry; Wirjosentono, Basuki; Rihayat, Teuku; Nurhanifa

    2017-07-01

    PLA (Poly Lactid Acid) - Bentonite polymer nanocomposite which is a combination of natural and nanometer-scale inorganic substances created through three processes, mixing using a melt blending, molding with a hot press using specimens Standard ASTM D 638 Type IV and drying. In this study, PLA combined with two types of natural bentonite obtained from different areas to find differences in the quality of the results of characterization. To optimize the performance of filler, before mixing, bentonite have to furificate first with (NaPO3)6 and also open the interlayer space with CTAB. D-spacing of bentonite imterlayer were analyze by X-Ray difraction (XRD). Characterization bionanocomposite resulting morphologic structure was tested using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Mechanical analysis of PLA-bentonite nanocomposite in the form of tensile strength was tested using a tensile test specimens of standard American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) D 638 Type 4, and thermal resistance using Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  20. Barrier Properties of Polylactic Acid in Cellulose Based Packages Using Montmorillonite as Filler

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    Daniela Sánchez Aldana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polylactic acid (PLA and montmorillonite (CB as filler were studied as coatings for cellulose based packages. Amorphous (AM and semi crystalline (SC PLA were used at different concentrations according to a 2 × 6 × 3 full factorial experimental design. CB loading was three concentrations and coating was performed by casting. Contact angle (CA, water vapor (WVP and grease permeabilities were measured for each resultant package and were compared to commercial materials (Glassine Paper, Grease Proof Papers 1 and 2 produced commercially. Significant differences were found and the main factors were the type and concentration of PLA. The best values were: for grease penetration, +1800 s; WVP from 161.36 to 237.8 g·µm·kPa−1·m−2·d−1 and CA from 69° to 73° for PLA–AM 0.5% and CB variable. These parameters are comparable to commercial packages used in the food industry. DSC revealed three different thermal events for PLA–SC and just Tg for PLA–AM. Crystallinity was also verified, obtaining a ΔHcrys of 3.7 J·g−1 for PLA–SC and 14 J·g−1 for PLA–SC–BC, evidencing clay interaction as a crystal nucleating agent. Differences found were explained on terms of the properties measured, where structural and chemical arrays of the coatings play a fundamental role for the barrier properties.

  1. Delayed immune mediated adverse effects to hyaluronic acid fillers: report of five cases and review of the literature

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    Ora Bitterman-Deutsch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA fillers in cosmetic medicine have been considered relatively safe, though fillers used in European countries and throughout the world are not necessarily approved by the Food and Drug Administration. As their use continues to expand worldwide, physicians in a wide range of medical specialties are authorized to perform HA injections, including general medicine practitioners and even dentists. An increasing number of reports have appeared regarding side effects to these products. It is now known that reactions to Hyaluronic acid are related not only to technical faults of the injections, but also to immune responses, including delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions. Herein, we describe five cases treated by a variety of treatment modalities, all with delayed reactions to different brands of hyaluronic acid fillers. As there is currently no standardization of treatment options of adverse effects, these cases accentuate the debate regarding the approach to the individual patient and the possible need for pre-testing in patients with an atopic tendency.

  2. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Semipermanent volumizing effects can be achieved by HA injection if the target area has an underlying bony floor. Periosteal stem cells may be activated by HA injection and may contribute to persistent volumizing effects. This treatment may be a much less invasive alternative to fat or bone grafting.

  3. Poly(acrylic acid) grafted montmorillonite as novel fillers for dental adhesives: synthesis, characterization and properties of the adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhi, Laleh; Atai, Mohammad; Nodehi, Azizollah; Imani, Mohammad; Ghaemi, Azadeh; Khosravi, Kazem

    2012-04-01

    This work investigates the graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto nanoclay platelets to be utilized as reinforcing fillers in an experimental dental adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive and its shear bond strength to dentin are studied. The effect of the modification on the stability of the nanoparticle dispersion in the dilute adhesive is also investigated. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted onto the pristine Na-MMT nanoclay (Cloisite(®) Na(+)) through the free radical polymerization of acylic acid in an aqueous media. The resulting PAA-g-nanoclay was characterized using FTIR, TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The modified nanoclays were added to an experimental dental adhesive in different concentrations and the morphology of the nanoclay layers in the photocured adhesive matrix was studied using TEM and XRD. Shear bond strength of the adhesives containing different filler contents was tested on the human premolar teeth. The stability of nanoclay dispersion in the dilute adhesive was also studied using a separation analyzer. The results were then statistically analyzed and compared. The results confirmed the grafting reaction and revealed a partially exfoliated structure for the PAA-g-nanoclay. Incorporation of 0.2 wt.% of the modified nanoclay into the experimental adhesive provided higher shear bond strength. The dispersion stability of the modified nanoparticles in the dilute adhesive was also enhanced more than 25 times. Incorporation of the modified particles as reinforcing fillers into the adhesive resulted in higher mechanical properties. The nanofiller containing bonding agent also showed higher shear bond strength due to the probable interaction of the carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of the modified particles with hydroxyapatite of dentin. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reparation technique on restorations with broken or damaged porcelain which are still attached with the teeth are difficult, because it is very hard to remove the porcelain restoration without damaging it, and it needs a long time. Various ways have been developed to repair the broken porcelain, one of them is the use of composite resin as the material for the restoration of fractured porcelain. Repairing porcelain inside the mouth without removing the restoration of the damaged porcelain using light cured composite resins material seems to be an advantageous option because it is relatively simple, has low risks, good esthetically and cheap. Purpose: The objective of this study was to find out the difference of shear bond strength in porcelain reparation using nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching by using Autograph measuring device. Methods: Twenty pieces of the porcelain samples devided into 2 groups. Group I: etching process using 9% hydrofluoric acid, and group II : without etching process. Result: The data was analyzed using t test in a p value of 0.0001 (p≤0.05, which means there is a significant different of shear bond strength between treated group I and II. The biggest shear bond strength was in treatment group I. Conclusion: The use of 9% hydrofluoric acid on the surface of porcelain can increase the shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin.

  5. A split-face comparison of a new hyaluronic acid facial filler containing pre-incorporated lidocaine versus a standard hyaluronic acid facial filler in the treatment of naso-labial folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Phillip M; De Boulle, Koenraad; Raspaldo, Herve

    2009-09-01

    This split-face, single-blind study compared the comfort and ease of injection of a new hyaluronic acid facial filler containing pre-incorporated lidocaine (Juvederm ULTRA 3) versus the established hyaluronic acid facial filler Restylane-Perlane. A total of 126 individuals were treated with both products, randomly assigned to the right or left naso-labial fold. Injector assessment-indicated mean injection pain, pain of massaging the injected area and post-injection discomfort (based on a scale of 0=no pain to 10=extreme pain) were 2.1, 0.9 and 0.4 for Juvederm ULTRA 3, and 4.1, 3.3 and 1.7 for Restylane-Perlane, respectively (p<0.0001). Patient assessment of the same parameters were 2.8, 1.3 and 0.4 for Juvederm ULTRA 3, and 4.9, 3.6 and 1.8 for Restylane-Perlane (p<0.0001). Injectors indicated that 92% of Juvederm ULTRA 3 injections were 'very easy', compared with 21% for Restylane-Perlane. Post-treatment smoothness was comparable, but 95% of individuals preferred Juvederm ULTRA 3 for overall injection comfort. A total of 95% of individuals indicated that Juvederm ULTRA 3 was a more comfortable and gentle experience.

  6. Wrinkle Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... packages for authenticity. The FDA is aware of counterfeit products being marketed and used in the U.S. Do ... dermal filler products online, because they could be counterfeit products, or products not approved for use in the ...

  7. Comparison of Intra-arterial and Subcutaneous Testicular Hyaluronidase Injection Treatments and the Vascular Complications of Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Muyao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronidase is a key preventative treatment against vascular complications of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler injection, but the degradation profile of HA to hyaluronidase is limited, and the comparison between intra-arterial and subcutaneous injections of hyaluronidase has not been studied. To evaluate HA degradation to hyaluronidase and compare different treatments between intra-arterial and subcutaneous testicular hyaluronidase injections. The authors observed HA degradation to hyaluronidase in vitro via microscopic examination and particle analysis. Rabbit ears were used for the in vivo study. There were 2 control groups receiving ligation or HA-induced embolism in the arteries, respectively, and 2 intervention groups receiving hyaluronidase treatments in different regions. The laser Doppler blood perfusion monitoring measurements were made at defined time points, and biopsies were taken on Day 2. Nearly, all of the HAs degraded in vitro at the 1-hour time point. Subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment showed better recovery of blood perfusion. Histology showed severe inflammation in the embolism group and mild inflammation in the intervention groups. A complete enzymatic degradation of HA filler to hyaluronidase needs a certain time, and subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment may be the better option.

  8. Surface functionalization of an osteoconductive filler by plasma polymerization of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(acrylic acid) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petisco-Ferrero, S.; Sánchez-Ilárduya, M. B.; Díez, A.; Martín, L.; Meaurio Arrate, E.; Sarasua, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    One of the major limitations found in the use of nanocomposites based on synthetic hydroxyapatite and polymeric matrix for bone-tissue regeneration lies in the poor interfacial adhesion between the inorganic filler and the polymer matrix. The integrity of the nanocomposite is severely compromised since, on the one hand, high surface fillers tend to form aggregates and on the other, there is no chemical bonding between these two different categories of materials. Thus, customized surface functionalization stands as an effective route to improve the interfacial behaviour between particles and polymeric matrices. Amongst the current state of development of coating technologies, the high film-chemistry controllability offered by plasma polymerization technology enhances the synthesis of polymeric films from virtually any starting organic monomer. In this sense, the work presented here provides strong evidences of surface functionalization achieved by plasma polymerization starting respectively from ε-caprolactone and acrylic acid monomers. The chemistry of the deposited films has been descriptively analysed by XPS demonstrating outstanding retention of monomer functionalities and FTIR spectra of the deposited films revealed a high resemblance to those obtained by conventional synthesis. Results provided thereof are expected to significantly contribute to improve the interfacial behaviour in terms of matrix-reinforcement compatibilization, of crucial importance for bone-tissue engineering applications.

  9. Treatment of Hyaluronic Acid Filler-Induced Impending Necrosis With Hyaluronidase: Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L; Biesman, Brian S; Dayan, Steven H; DeLorenzi, Claudio; Lambros, Val S; Nestor, Mark S; Sadick, Neil; Sykes, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Injection-induced necrosis is a rare but dreaded consequence of soft tissue augmentation with filler agents. It usually occurs as a result of injection of filler directly into an artery, but can also result from compression or injury. We provide recommendations on the use of hyaluronidase when vascular compromise is suspected. Consensus recommendations were developed by thorough discussion and debate amongst the authors at a roundtable meeting on Wednesday June 18, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV as well as significant ongoing written and verbal communications amongst the authors in the months prior to journal submission. All authors are experienced tertiary care providers. A prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment with high doses of hyaluronidase (at least 200 U) are critically important. It is not felt necessary to do a skin test in cases of impending necrosis. Some experts recommend dilution with saline to increase dispersion or lidocaine to aid vasodilation. Additional hyaluronidase should be injected if improvement is not seen within 60 minutes. A warm compress also aids vasodilation, and massage has been shown to help. Some experts advocate the use of nitroglycerin paste, although this area is controversial. Introducing an oral aspirin regimen should help prevent further clot formation due to vascular compromise. In our experience, patients who are diagnosed promptly and treated within 24 hours will usually have the best outcomes.

  10. Safety and persistence of non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid fillers for nasolabial folds correction in 30 Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehnaz Z Arsiwala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of nasolabial creases through minimally invasive procedures is increasingly being sought by patients. Injecting non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid filler is a highly effective method to achieve an optimal and persistent cosmetic result. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy, persistence and safety of Restylane and Perlane (Q-Med, Sweden for correction of nasolabial folds in Indian patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty Indian patients with mild, moderate and severe nasolabial folds (based on Wrinkle Assessment Scale were recruited in the study after informed consent for correction of their folds with Restylane or Perlane or both. Injections were administered in a single sitting after global assessment of the patient′s face using Wrinkle assessment scale (WAS.Optimal filling was performed by using appropriate techniques and its safety and efficacy assessed independently by the investigator as well as by patients at immediately, 3, 6 and 9 months post-procedure. Any adverse reactions were noted. Results: Twenty two females and 8 males (age range 45-55 years, mean age 52 years were recruited in the study. An optimum cosmetic correction was obtained in all patients. The efficacy increased with time and was greatest at 3 months after the treatment. Grade 2 improvement was maintained at 9 months in mild and moderate folds, and grade 3 improvement for severe folds. Minor post injection side effects like erythema at puncture site, needle marks and bruising were seen. Conclusion: Restylane and Perlane are safe and effective dermal fillers for correction of nasolabial creases and offer immediate effect.

  11. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-07-12

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  12. Safety and performance of cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting – an open-label, multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Ulrich; Esmann, Jørgen; von Heimburg, Dennis; Imhof, Matthias; Weissenberger, Petra; Sattler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM®) hyaluronic acid fillers are now available with or without lidocaine. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of CPM® fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting. In an open-label, prospective, postmarketing study, 108 patients from seven sites in Germany and Denmark were treated with one or more lidocaine-containing CPM® fillers. Performance was assessed using the Merz Aesthetics Scales® (MAS). Pain was rated on an 11-point visual analog scale. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction as well as adverse events were recorded. Improvements of ≥1-point on MAS immediately after and 17 days posttreatment were observed in ~90% of patients compared with baseline. All investigators assessed ejection force, product positioning, and performance as similar or superior to the respective nonlidocaine products. Overall, 94% of investigators were satisfied with the esthetic outcomes and were willing to continue using the products. All patients except one were satisfied with the results, and all were willing to repeat the treatment. Mean pain scores were low during (<3.0) and after injection (<0.6). Except for one case of bruising, all adverse events were mild to moderate. CPM® fillers with lidocaine are safe and effective for a wide range of esthetic facial indications. PMID:27799807

  13. Graphene Nanoplatelets as Novel Reinforcement Filler in Poly(lactic acid/Epoxidized Palm Oil Green Nanocomposites: Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Giita Silverajah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP was investigated as a novel reinforcement filler in mechanical properties for poly(lactic acid (PLA/epoxidized palm oil (EPO blend. PLA/EPO/xGnP green nanocomposites were successfully prepared by melt blending method. PLA/EPO reinforced with xGnP resulted in an increase of up to 26.5% and 60.6% in the tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposites respectively, compared to PLA/EPO blend. XRD pattern showed the presence of peak around 26.5° in PLA/EPO nanocomposites which corresponds to characteristic peak of graphene nanoplatelets. However, incorporation of xGnP has no effect on the flexural strength and modulus. Impact strength of PLA/5 wt% EPO improved by 73.6% with the presence of 0.5 wt% xGnP loading. Mechanical properties of PLA were greatly improved by the addition of a small amount of graphene nanoplatelets ( < 1 wt%.

  14. Application of novel catalytic-ceramic-filler in a coupled system for long-chain dicarboxylic acids manufacturing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Fan, Chunzhen; He, Shengbing; Dai, Bibo; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Gao, Lei

    2016-02-01

    To gain systematic technology for long-chain dicarboxylic acids (LDCA) manufacturing wastewater treatment, catalytic micro-electrolysis (CME) coupling with adsorption-biodegradation sludge (AB) process was studied. Firstly, novel catalytic-ceramic-filler was prepared from scrap iron, clay and copper sulfate solution and packed in the CME reactor. To remove residual n-alkane and LDCA, the CME reactor was utilized for LDCA wastewater pretreatment. The results revealed that about 94% of n-alkane, 98% of LDCA and 84% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed by the aerated CME reactor at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.0 h. In this process, catalysis from Cu and montmorillonites played an important role in improving the contaminants removal. Secondly, to remove residual COD in the wastewater, AB process was designed for the secondary biological treatment, about 90% of the influent COD could be removed by biosorption, bio-flocculation and biodegradation effects. Finally, the effluent COD (about 150 mg L(-1)) discharged from the coupled CME-AB system met the requirement of the national discharged standard (COD ≤ 300 mg L(-1)). All of these results suggest that the coupled CME-AB system is a promising technology due to its high-efficient performance, and has the potential to be applied for the real LDCA wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and performance of cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting – an open-label, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühne U

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Kühne,1 Jørgen Esmann,2 Dennis von Heimburg,3 Matthias Imhof,1 Petra Weissenberger,4 Gerhard Sattler,5 On behalf of the BALIA Study Group 1Aesthetische Dermatologie im Medico Palais, Bad Soden, Germany; 2Jørgen Esmann Aps, Hellerup, Denmark; 3Praxisklinik Kaiserplatz, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; 4Corporate Clinical Research, Merz Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; 5Rosenparkklinik GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany Abstract: Cohesive polydensified matrix (CPM® hyaluronic acid fillers are now available with or without lidocaine. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of CPM® fillers with lidocaine in the clinical setting. In an open-label, prospective, postmarketing study, 108 patients from seven sites in Germany and Denmark were treated with one or more lidocaine-containing CPM® fillers. Performance was assessed using the Merz Aesthetics Scales® (MAS. Pain was rated on an 11-point visual analog scale. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction as well as adverse events were recorded. Improvements of ≥1-point on MAS immediately after and 17 days posttreatment were observed in ~90% of patients compared with baseline. All investigators assessed ejection force, product positioning, and performance as similar or superior to the respective nonlidocaine products. Overall, 94% of investigators were satisfied with the esthetic outcomes and were willing to continue using the products. All patients except one were satisfied with the results, and all were willing to repeat the treatment. Mean pain scores were low during (<3.0 and after injection (<0.6. Except for one case of bruising, all adverse events were mild to moderate. CPM® fillers with lidocaine are safe and effective for a wide range of esthetic facial indications. Keywords: cohesive polydensified matrix, dermal fillers, Belotero, Esthélis, Fortélis, Modélis

  16. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  17. A prospective, open-label, multicenter, observational, postmarket study of the use of a 15 mg/mL hyaluronic acid dermal filler in the lips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp-Dormston, Wolfgang G; Hilton, Said; Nathan, Myooran

    2014-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based injectable fillers three-dimensionally restore the natural contours of the lips and perioral area, thereby reducing some signs of aging lips. To evaluate the short-term aesthetic impact of treatment with the HA dermal filler Juvéderm(®) VOLBELLA(®) with Lidocaine, formulated utilizing VYCROSS(™) technology, for enhancement or correction of asymmetry of the lips, evaluated using a patient-centric approach. Sixty-two subjects were enrolled in this study, conducted at two sites in Germany. Primary endpoints were satisfaction with improvement, look and feel of the lips, assessed by subject and physician at first visit and 4 weeks post-treatment. Immediately after injection at first visit, 83.6% of subjects were Extremely Satisfied, Very Satisfied or Satisfied with improvement in the lips, which increased to 94.1% and 93.0% of subjects with/without top-up treatment at follow-up, respectively. After injection at first visit, 61.7% of subjects rated the look and feel of their lips as Extremely Natural or Very Natural, which increased to 75.0% and 93.0% of subjects with/without top-up treatment, respectively. The HA dermal filler was associated with minimal discomfort, bruising or swelling of the lips; almost two-thirds of subjects (62%) returned to social engagements on the same day. The high degree of subject satisfaction with aesthetic improvement in the lips, as well as the natural look and feel, indicates that this HA dermal filler represents an effective treatment option for patients requiring lip enhancement.

  18. Clinical comparison between two hyaluronic acid-derived fillers in the treatment of nasolabial folds in Chinese subjects: BioHyalux versus Restylane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Sun, Nan; Xu, Yue; Liu, Huixian; Zhong, Shaomin; Chen, Liyang; Li, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid fillers are used to improve the appearance of nasolabial folds (NLF). This study aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and durability of a new hyaluronic acid gel (BioHyalux) versus Restylane for the correction of NLF. This was a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial involving 88 subjects with moderate to severe NLF. Subjects were randomized to BioHyalux and Restylane on either sides of the NLF. NLF was assessed before and right after injection, and at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months. Patients were followed up for 13-15 months to evaluate the durability and long-term safety. A clinically meaningful response was predefined as at least one-point improvement on the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale, which is a five-point scale. At 6 months, the response rate of BioHyalux was not inferior to that of Restylane (P  0.05) at all time points. At 6 months, 100 % reported improvements on both side; at 13-15 months, 60 % of subjects reported improvements with BioHyalux versus 64 % with Restylane. Adverse events were transient and predominantly mild or moderate in severity including injection site swelling, pain, itching, bruising, and tenderness. BioHyalux had reliable safety and tolerance, and could be an effective injectable filler for correcting NLF.

  19. [Rhinoplasty and dermal fillers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallut, Y; Nguyen, P S

    2014-12-01

    The use of fillers for camouflage after surgical rhinoplasty or during medical rhinoplasty process represent an attractive technique which allows to avoid or to delay surgical time often dreaded by the patients. This technique apparently quite simple, must be applied carefully in order to avoid possible complications that can sometimes be very serious. Through their seven years of experience, the authors have selected absorbable type of products: hyaluronic acid or calcium hydroxylapatite, both approved by ANSM. Preference is given to microcannulas (27G) over needles and injection techniques through multiple tunnels fitted with small fragmented boluses. Due to possible Tyndall effect and skin necrosis risk, a one-shot injection with a lot of product should be avoided. Calcium hydroxyapaptite is preferred for the dorsum area while hyaluronic acid is recommended for the tip. The authors also relate the major encountered complications and describe the appropriated treatments. Nevertheless the strict application of the described technique represents the best way to prevent adverse complications.

  20. Facial volume restoration of the aging face with poly-l-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Vleggaar, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss current techniques used with poly-l-lactic acid to safely and effectively address changes observed in the aging face. Several important points deserve mention. First, this unique agent is not a filler but a stimulator of the host's own collagen, which then acts to volumize tissue in a gradual, progressive, and predictable manner. The technical differences between the use of biostimulatory agents and replacement fillers are simple and straightforward, but are critically important to the safe and successful use of these products and will be reviewed in detail. Second, in addition to gains in technical insights that have improved our understanding of how to use the product to best advantage, where to use the product to best advantage in facial filling has also improved with ever-evolving insights into the changes observed in the aging face. Finally, it is important to recognize that a patient's final outcome, and the amount of product and work it will take to get there, is a reflection of the quality of tissues with which they start. This is, of course, an issue of patient selection and not product selection.

  1. Facial rejuvenation with fillers: The dual plane technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Salti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial aging is characterized by skin changes, sagging and volume loss. Volume is frequently addressed with reabsorbable fillers like hyaluronic acid gels. Materials and Methods: From an anatomical point of view, the deep and superficial fat compartments evolve differently with aging in a rather predictable manner. Volume can therefore be restored following a technique based on restoring first the deep volumes and there after the superficial volumes. We called this strategy "dual plane". A series of 147 consecutive patients have been treated with fillers using the dual plane technique in the last five years. Results: An average of 4.25 session per patient has been carried out for a total of 625 treatment sessions. The average total amount of products used has been 12 ml per patient with an average amount per session of 3.75 ml. We had few and limited adverse events with this technique. Conclusion: The dual plane technique is an injection technique based on anatomical logics. Different types of products can be used according to the plane of injection and their rheology in order to obtain a natural result and few side effects.

  2. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  3. Bio-based fillers for environmentally friendly composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokhothu, Thabang H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available of Composites from Renewable Materials, Volume 1, Structure and Chemistry, p. 243-270 Bio-based Fillers for Environmentally Friendly Composites Thabang H. Mokhothu and Maya J. John ABSTRACT: The use of bio-based fillers as alternative replacement...

  4. Late-Onset Complication of Fillers: Paraffinoma of the Lower Eyelids Clinically Mimicking Xanthelasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Park, Hyun-sun; Yoon, Hyun-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Injectable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is world-famous filler used in lipoatrophy and facial rejuvenation because of its collagen neogenesis effect which leads to gradual volume restoration. Until recently, quite a number of unwanted adverse events of PLLA have been reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, paraffinoma as a complication of PLLA has never been reported. We herein describe the first case of paraffinoma after Sculptra® injection and propose its possible mechanism. PMID:27904276

  5. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Tapioca Starch by Plasticizers, Inorganic Fillers and Agrowaste-Based Fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Azwar; Minna Hakkarainen

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tapioca starch-based films were tuned by different additives and additive combinations. The additives included plasticizers (glycerol, sorbitol, and citric acid), inorganic fillers (halloysite and kaolin), and agrowaste-based fillers (milled wood flour and rice bran). In addition, new biobased additives were prepared from wood flour and rice bran through liquefaction reaction. Through different additive combinations, starch-based materials with significant differences...

  6. FILLER ENGINEERING FOR PAPERMAKING: COMPARISION WITH FIBER ENGINEERING AND SOME IMPORTANT RESEARCH TOPICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibers and fillers are important raw materials for the preparation of paper products. Similar to fiber engineering, filler engineering for papermaking has become an active research area. There are similarities as well as differences between engineering involving each of these classes of materials. There are differences in such aspects as the nature of materials to be engineered, applicable engineering methods, and engineerablity of the material surfaces. The co-development of fiber engineering and filler engineering can potentially provide many benefits to the papermaking industry. For filler engineering, the relevant research topics broadly can include fibrous filler engineering, hollow/porous filler engineering, acid-stabilization of calcium carbonate fillers, surface encapsulation of naturally occurring polymers or their derivatives, preflocculation, precoagulation, cationic modification, filler/size hybrid formation, organic filler engineering, using combinations of different types of available fillers, multilayer deposition modification, modification with polymer latexes or dispersants, physical modification, mechanical modification, surface functionalization, fines-filler composite/hybrids or fiber-filler composite/ hybrid formation, in-situ polymerization modification, surface grafting, physical treatment in the presence of polymeric additives, filler precipitation, and core-shell composite filler engineering.

  7. Effect of processing parameter and filler content on tensile properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method using the Haake Rheomix internal mixer. In order to obtain the optimal processing parameter, the nanocomposite with 89 wt % of PLA was blended with 10 wt % of LNR and 1 wt % of MWCNTs were mixed with various mixing parameter condition; mixing temperature, mixing speed and mixing time. The optimum processing parameter of the composites was obtained at temperature of 190°C, rotation speed of 90 rpm and mixing time of 14 min. Next, the effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The nanocomposites were melt blended using the optimal processing parameter with MWCNTs loading of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4 wt %. The result showed that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs gave higher tensile strength and Young's modulus. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA nanocomposites. However, the elongation at break decreased with increasing the percentage of MWCNTs.

  8. Standard guidelines for the use of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used fillers vary greatly in their sources, efficacy duration and site of deposition; detailed knowledge of these properties is essential for administering them. Indications for fillers include facial lines (wrinkles, folds, lip enhancement, facial deformities, depressed scars, periocular melanoses, sunken eyes, dermatological diseases-angular cheilitis, scleroderma, AIDS lipoatrophy, earlobe plumping, earring ptosis, hand, neck, dιcolletι rejuvenation. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may use fillers after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during postgraduation or at any workshop dedicated to the subject of fillers. The physicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the area designated to receive an injection of fillers and the aesthetic principles involved. They should also have a thorough knowledge of the chemical nature of the material of the filler, its longevity, injection techniques, and any possible side effects. Facility: Fillers can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the filler should be discussed with the patient. Patients should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. Detailed consent forms need to be completed by the patients. A consent form should include the type of filler, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be carried out. Choice of the filler depends on the site, type of defect, results needed, and the physician′s experience. Injection technique and volume depend on the filler and the physician′s preference, as outlined in these guidelines.

  9. Peculiarities of Shape Recovery in Polymer Composites with Compacting Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Beloshenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of the shape memory effect development in composites based on the epoxy polymer and various fillers, such as thermoexpanded graphite, aerosils, metallized graphite, and basalt flakes, have been investigated. It has been determined that straining followed by the shape recovery of composites is accompanied by changes in their volume. Extent and character of the changes depend on the ability of fillers to compaction under pressure, deformation scheme, adsorption ability of the filler. It is shown that the combined deformation consisting of compression and stretching of specimens in different sequence gives structural states for which the longitudinal strain-transverse strain ratio can take zero, positive, or negative values.

  10. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  11. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films.

  12. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anthony J.; Chang, Brian L.; Percec, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005–2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration–approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that “product customization” is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes. PMID:28018778

  13. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, José Raúl; Wilson, Anthony J; Chang, Brian L; Percec, Ivona

    2016-12-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005-2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration-approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that "product customization" is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes.

  14. Complications caused by injection of dermal filler in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Zachariae, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number of complicati......Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number...... of complications is likely to increase as well.  Methods: A total of 37 patients with complications were collected retrospectively during a period of 13 years using original data files. Information on the type, date, number and location of the injections, type and date of complications, treatment, bacteria...... and complications was 2 years (range 1 day–8 years). The most common reported complications were edema (81 %), noduli (67.7 %), infections (54.1 %), discoloration (51.4 %), and granuloma formation (48.6 %). Surgical removal of the filler material was attempted in four patients.  Conclusions: With the increased use...

  15. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  16. The clinical value of hyaluronic acid filler in maxillofacial cosmetology%注射用透明质酸在颌面注射美容中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂敏松; 李逸松; 代晓明

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a kind of extracellular macromolecules acidic mucopolysaccharide.It has been listed for no more than 6 years in China, but has been widely used as a dermal filler in the maxillofacial cosmetology for soft tissue augmentation.This paper presents a review of the studies conducted so far into the use of hyaluronic acid in the filed of facial wrinkles, nose &chin re -shaping and scar repair treatment.%透明质酸是一种细胞外大分子酸性粘多糖,在我国上市时间不到6年,已被作为组织容量填充剂广泛应用于颌面部美容。文章对近年来注射用透明质酸在面部除皱、隆鼻颏、瘢痕修复中的应用作一综述。

  17. Lower Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, André; Humphrey, Shannon; Weinkle, Susan; Yee, G Jackie; Remington, B Kent; Lorenc, Z Paul; Yoelin, Steve; Waldorf, Heidi A; Azizzadeh, Babak; Butterwick, Kimberly J; de Maio, Mauricio; Sadick, Neil; Trevidic, Patrick; Criollo-Lamilla, Gisella; Garcia, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The use of injectable fillers enables facial sculpting through treatment of volume depletion and modeling of facial contours. Injectable fillers are among the most frequently performed minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.However, treatment of the lower third of the face can be challenging and requires expertise in facial anatomy. In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the lower third of the face, highlighting danger zones. In addition, the authors describe their preferred approach and detailed technique used in the treatment of each specific area, namely the jawline, prejowl sulcus, melomental folds, and lips.

  18. The influence of monomeric resin and filler characteristics on the performance of experimental resin-based composites (RBCs) derived from a commercial formulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hahnel, Sebastian

    2012-04-01

    To explore experimental RBCs derived from a successful commercially available RBC (Grandio) to investigate resin monomer blend and filler parameters (volume fraction, density and diameter) on RBC performance.

  19. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. G. Loomis (INEEL); A. P. Zdinak (MSE); M. A. Ewanic (MSE); J. J. Jessmore (INEEL)

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity

  20. Low-volume plus ascorbic acid vs high-volume plus simethicone bowel preparation before colonoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefano Pontone; Rita Angelini; Monica Standoli; Gregorio Patrizi; Franco Culasso; Paolo Pontone; Adriano Redler

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of low-volume plus ascorbic acid [polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (PEG + Asc)] and high-volume plus simethicone [polyethylene glycol plus simethicone (PEG + Sim)] bowel preparations.METHODS: A total of one hundred and forty-four outpatients (76 males), aged from 20 to 84 years (me dian age 59.5 years), who attended our Department, were divided into two groups, age and sex matched, and underwent colonoscopy. Two questionnaires, one for patients reporting acceptability and the other for endoscopists evaluating bowel cleansing effectiveness according to validated scales, were completed. Indica tions, timing of examination and endoscopical findings were recorded. Biopsy forceps were used as a measur ing tool in order to determine polyp endoscopic sizeestimation. Difficulty in completing the preparation was rated in a 5-point Likert scale (1 = easy to 5 = un able). Adverse experiences (fullness, cramps, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, headache and insomnia), number of evacuations and types of activities per formed during preparation (walking or resting in bed) were also investigated.RESULTS: Seventy-two patients were selected for each group. The two groups were age and sex matched as well as being comparable in terms of medical history and drug therapies taken. Fourteen patients dropped out from the trial because they did not complete the preparation procedure. Ratings of global bowel cleans ing examinations were considered to be adequate in 91% of PEG + Asc and 88% of PEG + Sim patients. Residual Stool Score indicated similar levels of amount and consistency of residual stool; there was a signifi cant difference in the percentage of bowel wall visuali zation in favour of PEG + Sim patients. In the PEG + Sim group, 12 adenomas < 10 mm diameter (5/left co lon + 7/right colon) vs 9 (8/left colon + 1/right colon) in the PEG + Asc group were diagnosed. Visualization of small lesions seems to be one of the primary advan tages of

  1. Filler content influence on the positron annihilation response in an epoxy resin composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Tandil (Argentina); Somoza, A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Dept. de Materiales, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubiolo, G. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Marzocca, A. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consolati, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata

    2001-07-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and mechanical properties tests were used to study the influence of the filler content on the epoxy resin DGEBA. Using a mechanical model recently developed by the authors of the present work, and the values of the long lifetime component it is possible to evaluate correctly the internal stresses introduced in the epoxy lattice for the filler. Additional information obtained from the analysis of the short-lived lifetime component is also presented. Specifically, in the case of the matrix charged with metallic particles, an interesting correlation between the associated intensity to this component and the filler volume fraction is shown. (orig.)

  2. Effect of elastic filler on the fatigue failure of thermoplastic polyurethane film at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishetskii, I. V.; Parfeev, V. M.; Erykalova, T. A.; Borisova, E. Yu.

    1989-11-01

    It was established by mathematical modeling of the curves of spectral transmissivity and by comparing them with experiments that in the mixture of polyurethane with caoutchouc an increase of the volume fraction of filler entails changes of the characteristic dimensions of its particles. With small volume fractions of filler (less than 10%), in consequence of the predominantly small size of the impurities, the mechanism of quasibrittle failure is realized without development of bulk damage to the mixture. When the mixture contains 20-30% filler, satisfactory static elastic and strength properties are retained, and in case of fatigue a considerable amount of damage accumulates and the mechanism of inhibiting macrocracks on the boundaries of impurities begins to act. When the proportion of filler increases further, the elastic and strength properties of the mixture are rapidly impaired, and as a consequence the material becomes practically unusable in operation.

  3. Effects of Al2O3-Particulate-Contained Composite Filler Materials on the Shear Strength of Alumina Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    All2O3/Al2O3 joints were brazed with a new kind of filler materials, which were formed by adding Al2O3 particulates into Ag-Cu-Ti active filler metal. The results showed that the material parameters (the Ti content, Al2O3 particulate volume fraction) of the composite filler materials affected the shear strength of brazed joints. When the Ti content was 2 wt pct in the filler metal, the shear strength of brazing joints decreased with the increasing the volume ratio of Al2O3 particulate. When the Ti content was 3 wt pct in the filler metal, the shear strength of joints increased from 93.75 MPa(Al2O3p 0 vol. pct) to 135.32 MPa(Al2O3p 15 vol. pct).

  4. Electrical conductivity modeling of multiple carbon fillers in liquid crystal polymer composites for fuel cell bipolar plate applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, R.L.; Keith, J.M.; King, J.A. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-08-15

    This study modelled the electrical conductivity of a single filler composite system using a general effective media (GEM) equation. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of synthetic graphite and carbon fiber in liquid crystal polymers for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The polymer consisted of 73 mole per cent hydroxybenzoic acid and 27 mole per cent hydroxynaphthoic acid. Composites of various concentrations of single and multiple filler combinations were tested. A volumetric in-plane electrical conductivity test was conducted on all samples in order to measure voltage drop. A through-plane conductivity test was conducted to measure resistivity. The GEM equation was then used to model the conductivity data obtained during the tests. Results of the study showed that at 45 vol per cent, the electrical conductivity of the multiple filler composite was comparable to data obtained from single filler electrical conductivities. The electrical conductivity of the multiple filler composite at 60 per cent graphite and 10 per cent carbon fiber was comparable to the single filler carbon fiber composite, but lower than the single filler synthetic graphite composite. Results also showed that the GEM equation provided excellent agreement with results obtained during the experiments. It was concluded that the percolation threshold of the multiple filler composite was almost identical to the single carbon fiber filler, but lower than the single synthetic graphite composite. 35 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Effect of intraarticular osmic acid on synovial membrane volume and inflammation, determined by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P;

    1995-01-01

    The changes in MR-determined synovial membrane volume, early synovial enhancement, and cartilage and bone erosions after osmic acid knee synovectomy were studied. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees with persistent arthritis was performed before and 1 month after...... treatment. The synovial membrane volume was significantly reduced (median -52%) in all 9 patients brought into clinical remission (p

  6. Fatty acid intake in relation to reproductive hormones and testicular volume among young healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Mínguez-Alarcón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that dietary fats may influence testicular function. However, most of the published literature on this field has used semen quality parameters as the only proxy for testicular function. We examined the association of fat intake with circulating reproductive hormone levels and testicular volume among healthy young Spanish men. This is a cross-sectional study among 209 healthy male volunteers conducted between October 2010 and November 2011 in Murcia Region of Spain. Participants completed questionnaires on lifestyle, diet, and smoking, and each underwent a physical examination, and provided a blood sample. Linear regression was used to examine the association between each fatty acid type and reproductive hormone levels and testicular volumes. Monounsaturated fatty acids intake was inversely associated with serum blood levels of calculated free testosterone, total testosterone, and inhibin B. A positive association was observed between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and luteinizing hormone concentrations. In addition, the intake of trans fatty acids was associated with lower total testosterone and calculated free testosterone concentrations (P trend = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively. The intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was positively related to testicular volume while the intake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids was inversely related to testicular volume. These data suggest that fat intake, and particularly intake of omega 3, omega 6, and trans fatty acids, may influence testicular function.

  7. Effect of waste rubber powder as filler for plywood application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Huei Ruey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the suitability of waste rubber powder (WRP use as filler in adhesive formulation for plywood application. Melamine Urea Formaldehyde (MUF was employed as resin for formulating the wood adhesive. To improve chemical properties and bonding quality of adhesive, WRP was treated by different chemicals like 20% nitric acid, 30% hydrogen peroxide and acetone solution. The treated WRP were analysed by XRD and it showed that inorganic compounds were removed and carbon was remained as major component under the treatment of 20% HNO3. The treatment improved the mechanical properties like shear strength and formaldehyde emission of plywood (high shear strength and low formaldehyde emission. The physico-chemical interaction between the wood, resin and filler was investigated using fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR technique and the interactions among N-H of MUF and C=O of wood and WRP were identified. The morphology of wood-adhesive interface was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and light microscope (LM. It showed that the penetration of adhesives and fillers through the wood pores was responsible for mechanical interlocking. Therefore, chemically treated WRP proved its potential use as filler in MUF based adhesive for making plywood.

  8. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Dušica R.; Jovanović Vladimir D.; Kolonja Božo M.; Sekulić Živko T.; Mihajlović Slavica R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler) such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaki...

  9. Mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride mixtures with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlović, Slavica R.; Sekulić, Živko T.; Vučinić, Dušica R.; Jovanović, Vladimir D.; Kolonja, Božo M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant and filler) such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure had better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking s...

  10. [Determination of Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X

    1997-06-01

    A method of simultaneous and direct determination for Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES is reported. The spectral interferences and effect of acidity have been investigated. Working conditions were optimized. The method has been applied to the analysis of silver brazing filler metals with RSD of 4-7% and recovery of 94-105%. This method was accurate, simple and rapid.

  11. Correction of tear trough deformity with novel porcine collagen dermal filler (Dermicol-P35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David J

    2009-01-01

    Deformity of the tear trough region, which can occur during the aging process, can result in dark shadows under the eyes and a fatigued appearance. Augmentation of the tear trough is challenging because of the thin skin and lack of fat in the region. Adding volume to the tear trough region with a dermal filler is a nonsurgical procedure with minimal discomfort to the patient. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence; Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ) is a new, ribose crosslinked, highly purified, porcine-based collagen filler that does not require prior skin testing and has shown improved persistence compared with bovine collagen-based dermal fillers. In this article, we present the clinical outcomes of patients who have received treatment with a novel ribose crosslinked porcine collagen dermal filler for the correction of tear trough deformity.

  12. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Effect of Geopolymer filler in Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) Pipe for Piping Application: Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus Abu Hashim, Mohammad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali, Che; Hussin, Kamarudin; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The present work is aimed to carry out the effect of geopolymer material which is fly ash as filler in the glass reinforced epoxy pipe on the micro structure of fly ash geopolymer, compression properties, and bulk density using the filament winding method. Conventional glass reinforced epoxy pipes has its own disadvantages such as high corrosion resistance at acidic environment and low strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymer is a type of amorphous alumino-silicate and can be synthesized by geopolymerization process. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is fly ash with 4 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of the raw material fly ash and fly ash based-geopolymer surface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the additions of fly ash at the beginning with 10 wt% are showing higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without fly ash geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these series of samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples fly ash based-geopolymer filler are higher as compared to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with fly ash geopolymer filler continues to decline when added to 20 wt% - 40 wt% of geopolymer filler loading. The results showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  14. Polymer surface modification and characterization of particulate calcium carbonate fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui Miao

    2003-12-30

    The efficacy of the surface treatment of particulate fillers depends on the chemical character of the components, on the method and conditions of the treatment, and on the amount of the treating agent. Here, the ultra-fine calcium carbonate is surface treated with 1, 2, 3 and 4 wt.% polyacrylic acid (PAA) synthesized by ourselves, which has strong ionic interaction and is an efficient surface modifier. The PAA coated filler is submitted to the measurement of the surface bonded amount, bonding efficacy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inverse gas chromatography. Maximum efficacy is expected at the monolayer coverage of the surface, which is about 0.6 wt.% according to the calculation based on the way they are aligned and is basically in agreement with the 'substrate overlayer' model based on the mole ratio of C{sup 286} and C{sup 290} taking no account of the possible underestimation because of the inaccuracy or because of the CH{sub x} contamination present originally on the CaCO{sub 3}. The initial decrease of the mole ratio of C{sup 290}/O and C{sup 290}/Ca with the surface bonded PAA may indicate that the bonding interaction between the polymer and the filler surface is the leaving of one molecular carbon dioxide. The IGC measurement shows that there is a considerable surface tension falling in the case of the PAA modified filler compared with the reference. An abnormal high surface energy in the case of filler treated with 4% PAA is observed.

  15. Shape Effect of Crushed Sand Filler on Rheology: A Preliminary Experimental and Numerical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, Jon; Cepuritis, Rolands; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    was quantified with the slump flow test (i.e. mini cone). The shape effect was isolated in the experiments by the use of non overlapping bimodal particle distributions of cement particles with a number average diameter of approximate to 0.01 mm and filler particles with a number average diameter of approximate...... classification, and had length/thickness (L/T) aspect ratios of 2.00 and 1.82, respectively. The particles were characterized with X-ray micro-computed tomography, coupled with spherical harmonic analysis to mathematically describe the full 3-D shape of the particles, while the rheological performance...... to 0.1 mm. The two filler types were tested with a range of chi-values (volume of cement divided by total volume of solids). The flowability of the matrix increased with decreasing aspect ratios of the filler. However, the chi-value at which the maximum volume fraction threshold was obtained varied...

  16. Elucidation of filler-to-filler and filler-to-rubber interactions in silica-reinforced natural rubber by TEM Network Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, W.K.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Filler-to-rubber interaction is a key parameter in the reinforcement of rubber. This paper presents an investigation into filler-to-filler and filler-to-rubber interactions in silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR) in the presence and absence of a silane coupling agent. Using a special network visual

  17. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if metal... Standards for Plastic, and Rubber and Rubber-Like Materials. Fillers shall be designed so that they in no... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION,...

  18. Adverse reactions to injectable soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, Luis; Requena, Celia; Christensen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, injections with filler agents are often used for wrinkle-treatment and soft tissue augmentation by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the ideal filler has not yet been discovered and all of them may induce adverse reactions. Quickly biodegradable or resorbable...

  19. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    at 28 days from about 35 MPa down to about 13 MPa. The cementing efficiency factor of the chalk filler was found to be in the range 0.21 - 0.42. The chalk filler performed equally well with a grey and a white cement; the latter opens the possibility to produce white SCC more cost effectively....

  20. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  1. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  2. Electro-mechanical properties of hydrogel composites with micro- and nano-cellulose fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Mohamed Shahid U.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Lakshmana Rao, C.

    2015-09-01

    Stimuli responsive cross-linked hydrogels are of great interest for applications in diverse fields such as sensors and biomaterials. In this study, we investigate polymer composites filled with cellulose fillers. The celluloses used in making the composites were a microcrystalline cellulose of commercial grade and cellulose nano-whiskers obtained through acid hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. The filler concentration was varied and corresponding physical, mechanical and electro-mechanical characterization was carried out. The electro-mechanical properties were determined using a quasi-static method. The fillers not only enhance the mechanical properties of the composite by providing better reinforcement but also provide a quantitative electric potential in the composite. The measurements reveal that the polymer composites prepared from two different cellulose fillers possess a quantitative electric potential which can be utilized in biomedical applications. It is argued that the mechanism behind the quantitative electric potential in the composites is due to streaming potentials arising due to electrical double layer formation.

  3. Effects of Al2O3 Particulates on the Thickness of Reaction Layer of Al2O3 Joints Brazed with Al2O3-Particulate-Contained Composite Filler Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo YANG; Jingwei WU; Hongyuan FANG

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the rate-controlling process for the interfacial layer growth of brazing joints brazed with activecomposite filler materials, the thickness of brazing joints brazed with conventional active filler metal and activecomposite filler materials with different volume fraction of Al2O3 particulate was studied. The experimental resultsindicate although there are Al2O3 particulates added into active filler metals, the time dependence of interfacial layergrowth is t2 as described by Fickian law for the joints brazed with conventional active filler metal. It also shows thatthe key factor affecting the interfacial layer growth is the volume fraction of alumina in the composite filler materialcompared with the titanium weight fraction in the filler material.

  4. Effects of copper filler sizes on the dielectric properties and the energy harvesting capability of nonpercolated polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putson, C.; Lebrun, L.; Guyomar, D.; Muensit, N.; Cottinet, P.-J.; Seveyrat, L.; Guiffard, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonpercolated composites based on polyurethane (PU) filled with low concentrations copper (Cu) powders of varying sizes were studied as electrostrictive materials for mechanical energy harvesting. The dispersion of the fillers within the polymeric matrix was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and results showed a relatively homogeneous dispersion for the microsized fillers and the existence of agglomerates for their nanosized counterparts. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements displayed that there occurred no interaction between the polymeric matrix and the microsized fillers whereas the nanosized fillers slightly enhanced the glass transition of the soft segments of PU and significantly affected the recrystallization temperature. The dependence of the dielectric properties of the composites as a function of the filler volume fraction and filler size was investigated over a broad range of frequencies, showing an increase in the permittivity when fillers were used. This increase was more pronounced for the composites containing nanosized fillers. The measurement of the harvested current and of the harvested power also demonstrated an enhancement of the energy harvesting capability when nanofillers were employed. From the experimental data, it appeared that the electrostrictive coefficient Q was not proportional to the inverse ratio of the permittivity and the Young modulus for the studied composites. Finally, analytical modeling of the harvested current and of the harvested energy offered an accurate description of the experimental data.

  5. Computational study of filler microstructure and effective property relations in dielectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu U.; Tan, Daniel Q.

    2011-05-01

    Phase field modeling and computer simulation is employed to study the relations between filler microstructures and effective properties of dielectric composites. The model solves electrostatic equations in terms of polarization vector field in reciprocal space using a fast Fourier transform technique and parallel computing algorithm. Composites composed of linear constituent phases of different dielectric constants are considered. Interphase boundary conditions are automatically taken into account without explicitly tracking interphase interfaces in the composites. Various factors associated with filler microstructures are systematically investigated, including dielectric constant mismatch between fillers and matrix, particle size, shape, orientation, volume fraction, and spatial arrangement as well as directional alignment. Heterogeneous distributions of polarization, charge density, and local electric field are calculated for each composite microstructure, based on which effective dielectric constant and dielectric anisotropy of the composites are determined. It is found that electrostatic interactions among high-dielectric-constant fillers embedded in low-dielectric-constant matrix play critical roles in determining the composite properties, which sensitively depend on filler arrangement and, especially, directional alignment into fibrous microstructures (chains). Such microstructurally engineered composites, whose fillers are not randomly dispersed, exhibit strong dielectric anisotropy despite all constituent components being isotropic.

  6. Al2O3/Al2O3 Joint Brazed with Al2O3-particulate-contained Composite Ag-Cu-Ti Filler Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo YANG; Hongyuan FANG; Xin WAN

    2005-01-01

    Microstructure and interfacial reactions of Al2O3 joints brazed with Al2O3-particulate-contained composite Ag-Cu-Ti filler material were researched by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microscopy analysis (EPMA),energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The interfacial reaction layer thickness of joints brazed with conventional active filler metal and active composite filler materials with different volume fraction of Al2O3 particulate was also studied. The experimental results indicated although there were Al2O3 particulates added into active filler metals, the time dependence of interfacial layer growth of joints brazed with active composite filler material is t1/2 as described by Fickian law as the joints brazed with conventional active filler metal.

  7. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection.

  8. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Alberto Goldman2 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital, Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Abstract: Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. Keywords: acne, scars, dermal fillers, injection, extracellular matrix

  9. Effect of electromagnetic Stirring on the Element Distribution in Laser Beam Welding of Aluminium with Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, M.; Tang, Z.; Vollertsen, F.

    Additional external electromagnetic fields are used in laser beam welding of aluminium with silicon containing filler wire to manipulate the flow of the liquid metal due to induced volume forces and hence to modify the element distribution. Aiming for a better understanding of the fluid-dynamic processes inside the meld pool, a CFD model has been implemented to simulate the melt flow. In this paper, simulation results on the resulting element distribution of filler wire material under a coaxial magnetic field with different frequencies is compared to experimental results for the same parameters. It is shown that in both cases the concentration of alloying elements of the filler material has a spatial periodicity. From the CFD model it can be concluded that the change of the distribution of the filler material results from a modulation of the melt flow due to the periodic induced electromagnetic volume forces.

  10. Effect of intraarticular osmic acid on synovial membrane volume and inflammation, determined by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P

    1995-01-01

    The changes in MR-determined synovial membrane volume, early synovial enhancement, and cartilage and bone erosions after osmic acid knee synovectomy were studied. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees with persistent arthritis was performed before and 1 month after...

  11. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  12. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher; Baran, George

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent s...

  13. Structure, transport properties and interfacial stability of PVdF/HFP electrolytes containing modified inorganic filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarska, M.; Niedzicki, L.; Borkowska, R.; Zalewska, A.; Wieczorek, W. [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-31

    Gel polymer electrolyte membranes composed of poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) and surface modified aluminum or titanium oxide were prepared according to the so-called Bellcore process. Modifications were done by impregnating ceramic powder with 1-8% sulphuric acid aqueous solutions. Filler grain size varied from 10 to 12 {mu}m. The membranes were conditioned in liquid electrode - 1 mol/l LiClO{sub 4} in PC. The ionic conductivity of polymer membrane increased by more than one order of magnitude upon the addition of filler into polymer host. For electrolyte membrane containing modified aluminum or titanium oxide, the interfacial resistance is stable in time as opposed to unmodified gel electrolytes. An increase in lithium transference number is observed upon the addition of filler. Lithium transference number also increases with the fraction of acidic surface groups. (author)

  14. The Effect of Particle Size of Wollastonite Filler on Thermal Performance of Intumescent Fire Retardant Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent Fire retardant coatings (IFRC’s are one of the simplest ways to protect substrates exposed to fire. In this study, Wollastonite (W filler of two different particle sizes were used to determine the fire performance of intumescent fire retardant coating. The basic ingredients of the coating were ammonium poly-phosphate (APP as acid source, expandable graphite (EG as carbon source, melamine (MEL as blowing agent in epoxy binder, boric acid as additive and hardener as curing agent. A series of coating formulations were developed by using different weight percentages of both sized Wollastonite fillers. The coated steel substrate samples were tested for fire performance using Bunsen burner and char expansion was measured using furnace fire test. A Comparison of the coatings thermal performance was determined. Wollastonite containing filler particle size 10 μm showed better thermal performance than formulations containing filler’s particle size 44 μm.

  15. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nikhil Gupta; Balraj Singh Brar; Eyassu Woldesenbet

    2001-04-01

    Flyash is incorporated in glass fibre reinforced epoxies to study their response to the filler addition. Low cost of flyash can reduce the overall cost of the component. Only very low volume fractions of filler are investigated in the present study. To obtain further clarification of the observed phenomenon, another abundantly available low cost material, calcium carbonate is incorporated in one set of the specimens. Compressive strength of the material is found to decrease, whereas steep increase in impact strength is observed by introduction of very small quantity of fillers. Specimens containing calcium carbonate are tested for impact properties only. Effect of specimen aspect ratio on the compressive strength values is also studied by testing specimens of three different aspect ratios. Scanning electron microscopic observations are taken to develop a better understanding of the phenomena taking place in the material system at microscopic level.

  16. Positron annihilation study on free volume of amino acid modified, starch-grafted acrylamide copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, K.R. [Physics and Chemistry Department, Faculty of Education, Tanta University, Kafr El-Shaikh (Egypt)]. E-mail: kamalreyad@hotmail.com; Al-Sigeny, S. [Physics and Chemistry Department, Faculty of Education, Tanta University, Kafr El-Shaikh (Egypt); Sharshar, T. [Physics and Chemistry Department, Faculty of Education, Tanta University, Kafr El-Shaikh (Egypt); El-Hamshary, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa 31982 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-05-15

    Free volume measurements using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed for uncrosslinked and crosslinked starch-grafted polyacrylamide, and their modified amino acid samples including some of their iron(III) complexes. The measurements were performed at room temperature. The analysis of lifetime spectra yielded mostly three lifetime components. It was observed that the values of the short lifetime component {tau} {sub 1} are slightly higher than the lifetime associated with the self-decay of para-positronium atoms in polymers. The free volume was probed using ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation lifetime parameters. The mean free volume has also been calculated from the lifetime data. The avrage value of this parameter of the crosslinked polymer were found to be higher than those of the uncrosslinked polymer.

  17. Positron annihilation study on free volume of amino acid modified, starch-grafted acrylamide copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, K. R.; Al-Sigeny, S.; Sharshar, T.; El-Hamshary, H.

    2006-05-01

    Free volume measurements using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed for uncrosslinked and crosslinked starch-grafted polyacrylamide, and their modified amino acid samples including some of their iron(III) complexes. The measurements were performed at room temperature. The analysis of lifetime spectra yielded mostly three lifetime components. It was observed that the values of the short lifetime component τ1 are slightly higher than the lifetime associated with the self-decay of para-positronium atoms in polymers. The free volume was probed using ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation lifetime parameters. The mean free volume has also been calculated from the lifetime data. The avrage value of this parameter of the crosslinked polymer were found to be higher than those of the uncrosslinked polymer.

  18. A Numerical Study on Electrical Percolation of Polymer-Matrix Composites with Hybrid Fillers of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical percolation of polymer-matrix composites (PMCs containing hybrid fillers of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and carbon black (CB is estimated by studying the connection possibility of the fillers using Monte Carlo simulation. The 3D simulation model of CB-CNT hybrid filler is established, in which CNTs are modeled by slender capped cylinders and CB groups are modeled by hypothetical spheres with interspaces because CB particles are always agglomerated. The observation on the effects of CB and CNT volume fractions and dimensions on the electrical percolation threshold of hybrid filled composites is then carried out. It is found that the composite electrical percolation threshold can be reduced by increasing CNT aspect ratio, as well as increasing the diameter ratio of CB groups to CNTs. And adding CB into CNT composites can decrease the CNT volume needed to convert the composite conductivity, especially when the CNT volume fraction is close to the threshold of PMCs with only CNT filler. Different from previous linear assumption, the nonlinear relation between CB and CNT volume fractions at composite percolation threshold is revealed, which is consistent with the synergistic effect observed in experiments. Based on the nonlinear relation, the estimating equation for the electrical percolation threshold of the PMCs containing CB-CNT hybrid fillers is established.

  19. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO2) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphogypsum Utilization Part III: as Adhesive Filler and Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to make use of phosphogypsum (PG) waste material, which is produced in phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizer manufactures. A number of wood adhesive formulations based on polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) polymer and phosphogypsum as a filler have been prepared, using different percentages of phusphogypsum, ranging between 5~20 wt pct. The prepared formulations wore tested for adhesion strength and compared with both natural and pure gypsum fillers. The results indicate that PG improves the adhesion strenth when 5 wt pct added, and that may be due to filling the porous surface of wood with the fine particles of PG, as well as coating the particles of the filler (PG) with PVAc units. Also, a number of formulations based on urea-formaldehyde polymer have been prepared using phosphogypsum as an active filler in the ratio of 40~75 wt pct to prepare composite materials used for some decoration purposes and construction. Mechanical, physical, and thermal properties of these formulations were studied. Also, the activation energy was calculated. The results indicate that PG without acid hardener can be used for preparation of composite materials based on urea-formaldehyde between 40~63.64 wt pct for construction purposes in the humid atmosphere, while between 63.64~75 wt pct for decoration purposes. The improvement of the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composite material may be attributed to the simultaneous hydration hardening action of phosphogypsum and the presence of 0.8% P2O5. These effects act as an active hardener for urea-formaldehyde resin and accelerate the cross-linking and network formation reinforced by the fine dusty inorganic particles of PG. The advantage of this method is to prepare composite material gypsum-urea-formaldehyde, which achieves the utilization of large amount of PG, reducing the price of the main product phosphate, minimizing the pollution and producing new materials which possess high thermal

  1. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  2. INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-MODIFICATION FOR CALCIUM CARBONATE ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE FILLERS AND POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ming Xu; Xiao-le Tao; Qiang Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The surface of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles was modified with stearic acid (SA) and the chemicalstructures of the product were characterized by FT-IR analysis. The interaction between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) andCaCO3 fillers with different surface character was investigated by means of dynamic rheologicai and bound rubber tests foruncured compounds and mechanical properties measurements for the corresponding vulcanites. The results of dynamic testsindicate that with the increase of SA mass fraction, the span of the linear viscoelastic region broadens and the height of themodulus plateau decreases. The reasons for these are ascribed to that the SA decreases the surface energy of filler particlesand weakens their tendency to agglomerate. Moreover, the results of mechanical measurements reveal that the vulcanizedcompound filled with modified filler has a relative high tensile strength induced by a reinforced interaction between fillerand polymer matrix, which is confirmed by the bound rubber tests and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations.

  3. Synthesis of Superabsorbent Polymer via Inverse Suspension Method: Effect of Carbon Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Munirah Ezzah Tuan; Shima Jamari, Saidatul; Ling, Yeong Yi; Ghazali, Suriati

    2017-05-01

    This paper studies on the effect of the addition of carbon filler towards the performance of superabsorbent polymer composite (SAPc). In this work, the SAPc was synthesized using inverse suspension polymerization method. The process involved two different solutions; dispersed phase which contains partially neutralized acrylic acid, acrylamide, APS and NN-Methylenebisacrylamide, and continuous phase which contains cyclohexane, span-80 and carbon filler (at different weight percent). The optimum SAPs and filler ratio was measured in terms of water retention in soil and characterized by Mastersizer, FTIR and SEM. Biodegradability of the polymer was determined by soil burial test and SAPc with 0.02% carbon has highest biodegradability rate. SAPc with 0.04wt% carbon showed the optimal water retention percentage among all the samples. The synthesized SAPc producing spherical shapes with parallel alignment due to the addition of carbon fiber. It can be concluded that the addition of carbon fiber able to enhance the performance of the SAP composite (SAPc).

  4. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Chol Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal properties. The combination of conductive filler with carbon fiber in asphalt mixture was evaluated. Also, rheological properties of modified asphalt binders with conductive fillers were measured using dynamic shear rheometer and bending beam rheometer at grade-specific temperatures. Based on rheological testing, the conductive fillers improve rutting resistance and decrease thermal cracking resistance. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon black improve the thermal properties of asphalt mixes and the combined conductive fillers are more effective than the single filler.

  5. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol at various temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M L Parmar; R K Awasthi; M K Guleria

    2004-01-01

    Partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid have been determined in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight of ethanol) at different temperatures and acid concentrations from the solution density measurements. The data have been evaluated by using Masson equation and the obtained parameters have been interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The partial molar volumes vary with temperature as a power series of temperature. Structure making/breaking capacities of the organic acids have been inferred from the sign of [2$\\phi^{0}_{v}$/2], i.e. secondderivative of partial molar volume with respect to temperature at constant pressure. Both the organic acids behave as structure breakers in water and water + ethanol.

  6. Filler functionality in edible solid foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. B

  7. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  8. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  9. Mechanical properties and filler distribution as a function filler content in silica filled PDMS samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M. E. (Marilyn E.); Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, E. B. (E. Bruce); Houlton, R. J. (Robert J.); Chitanvis, K. E. (Kiran E.); Brown, G. W. (Geoffrey W.); Hanson, D. E. (David E.)

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase imaging and tensile stress-strain measurements are used to study a series of model compression molded fumed silica filled polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) samples with filler content of zero, 20, 35, and 50 parts per hundred (phr) to determine the relationship between filler content and stress-strain properties. AFM phase imaging was used to determine filler size, degree of aggregation, and distribution within the soft PDMS matrix. A small tensile stage was used to measure mechanical properties. Samples were not pulled to break in order to study Mullins and aging effects. Several identical 35 phr samples were subjected to an initial stress, and then one each was reevaluated over intervals up to 26 weeks to determine the degree to which these samples recovered their initial stress-strain behavior as a function of time. One sample was tested before and after heat treatment to determine if heating accelerated recovery of the stress-strain behavior. The effect of filler surface treatment on mechanical properties was examined for two samples containing 35 phr filler treated or untreated with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ), respectively. Fiduciary marks were used on several samples to determine permanent set. 35 phr filler samples were found to give the optimum mechanical properties. A clear Mullins effect was seen. Within experimental error, no change was seen in mechanical behavior as a function of time or heat-treatment. The mechanical properties of the sample containing the HDMZ treated silica were adversely affected. AFM phase images revealed aggregation and nonuniform distribution of the filler for all samples. Finally, a permanent set of about 3 to 6 percent was observed for the 35 phr samples.

  10. Dermal fillers for tissue augmentation: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeplin, Philip H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Treatments with dermal fillers for tissue augmentation constitute the majority of all non-surgical procedures in plastic surgery. Newly developed products get launched and the market grows continuously, but the “ideal” substance has yet not been found. The substances used these days are high molecular compounds. They have substantial differences in their physicochemical properties and are suspended in complex matrices. This overview describes the latest history of dermal fillers and the commonly used substances of different origin and formalizes the need for the development of systematic procedures of standardized pre-clinical tests with subsequent certification as well as the establishment of interdisciplinary clinical guidelines to ensure custumer’s safety.

  11. POLYMER FILLER INTERACTIONS IN POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) FILLED WITH GLASS-BEADS - EFFECT OF GRAFTED POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FOLKERSMA, R; CHALLA, G; SCHOUTEN, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion between filler and matrix has been studied using a model system composed of glass bead filled poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). Stress-strain and volume-strain tests and scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion is improved by grafting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), which is known to

  12. Polymer-filler interactions in poly(vinyl chloride) filled with glass beads : effect of grafted poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, Gert; Folkersma, Rudy; Challa, Ger; Schouten, Arend Jan; Bosma, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion between filler and matrix has been studied using a model system composed of glass bead filled poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). Stress-strain and volume-strain tests and scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion is improved by grafting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), which is known to

  13. Evaluation of dermal fillers with noncontact optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Over 2 million dermal filler procedures are performed each year in the USA alone, and this figure is only expected to increase as the aging population continues to grow. Dermal filler treatments can last from a few months to years depending on the type of filler and its placement. Although adverse reactions are rare, they can be quite severe due to ischemic events and filler migration. Previously, techniques such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging have been used to evaluate the filler injections. However, these techniques are not practical for real-time filler injection guidance due to limitations such as the physical presence of the transducer. In this work, we propose the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for image-guided dermal filler injections due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of OCT. In addition, we utilize a noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) technique, to evaluate the efficacy of the dermal filler injection. A grid of air-pulse OCE measurements was taken, and the dynamic response of the skin to the air-pulse was translated to the Young's modulus and shear viscosity. Our results show that OCT was able to visualize the dermal filler injection process, and that OCE was able to localize the dermal filler injection sites. Combined with functional techniques such as optical microangiography, and recent advanced in OCT hardware, OCT may be able to provide real-time injection guidance in 3D by visualizing blood vessels to prevent ischemic events.

  14. Bacterial biofilm formation and treatment in soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Er, Ozge; Eickhardt, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    fraction these. We developed a novel mouse model and evaluated hyaluronic acid gel, calcium hydroxyl apatite microspheres and polyacrylamide hydrogel for their potential for sustaining bacterial infections and their possible treatments. We were able to culture Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus...... epidermidis and Probionibacterium acnes in all three gels. When contaminated gels were left for 7 days in a mouse model, we found sustainment of bacterial infection with the permanent gel, less with the semi-permanent gel and no growth within the temporary gel. Evaluation of treatment strategies showed...... that once the bacteria had settled (into biofilms) within the gels, even succesive treatments with high concentrations of relevant antibiotics were not effective. Our data substantiate bacteria as a cause of adverse reactions reported when using tissue fillers, and the sustainability of these infections...

  15. A review of chemical-approach and ultramorphological studies on the development of fluoride-releasing dental adhesives comprising new pre-reacted glass ionomer (PRG) fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Endo, Takeshi; Pashley, David H

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on fluoride-releasing adhesives and the related studies in this field based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. A revolutionary PRG (pre-reacted glass ionomer) filler technology--where fillers were prepared by the acid-base reaction of a fluoroaluminosilicate glass with polyalkenoic acid in water, was newly developed, and a new category as "Giomer" was introduced into the market. On fluoride release capability, SIMS examination revealed in vitro fluoride ion uptake by dentin substrate from the PRG fillers in dental adhesive. On bonding durability, it was found that the improved durability of resin-dentin bonds might be achieved not only via the strengthened dentin due to fluoride ion uptake from the PRG-Ca fillers, but also due to retention of relatively insoluble 4-AETCa formed around remnant apatite crystallites within the hybrid layer in 4-AET-containing self-etching adhesives. On ultramorphological study of the resin-dentin interface, TEM images of the PRG-Ca fillers revealed that the dehydrated hydrogel was barely distinguishable from normal glass fillers, if not for the concurrent presence of remnant, incompletely reacted glass cores. In conclusion, it was expected that uptake of fluoride ions with cariostatic effect from PRG-Ca fillers would endow dentin substrates with the benefit of secondary caries prevention, together with an effective and durable adhesion to dentin.

  16. Methylmalonic acid quantification in low serum volumes by UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Theresa L; Keyes, William R; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Allen, Lindsay H; Newman, John W

    2011-06-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a metabolic intermediate transformed to succinic acid (SA) by a vitamin B(12)-dependent catalytic step, and is broadly used as a clinical biomarker of functional vitamin B12 status. However, reported methods use between 100 and 1000 μL of serum or plasma making them sub-optimal for sample-limited studies, including those with neonates and infants. LC-MS/MS based protocols to measure MMA as n-butyl esters in the presence of tri-deuterated MMA (MMA-d(3)) were modified for use with 25 μL of human serum by scaling down sample processing volumes and analysis by UPLC-MS/MS. Plasma-based calibration solutions were found to be unnecessary, and chromatographic resolution and peak shape of SA and MMA was optimized in cyclohexyl-urido-3-dodecanoic acid (CUDA) was included as internal standard allowing direct assessment of MMA recovery. Sample concentrations in the low normal range produced a signal:noise of >100:1. MMA intra- and inter-assay variability was under 10%. MMA-d(3) surrogate recovery averaged 93±14%. MMA stability exceeded three years in frozen samples and was unaffected by up to five freeze/thaw cycles. In conclusion, we report that methylmalonic acid can be measured with 25 μL of serum using water based standards. The assay signal:noise per concentration indicates that the method could perform as implemented with as little as 5 μL of serum. The reported method is applicable for studies of functional B12 status in sample limited experiments including investigations of nutritional status in neonates and in studies where low normal MMA levels are expected.

  17. Influence of solution volume on the dissolution rate of silicon dioxide in hydrofluoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsev, Boris; Gelman, Danny; Komissarov, Ilia; Epshtein, Alon; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data and modeling of the dissolution of various Si/SiO2 thermal coatings in different volumes of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are reported. The rates of SiO2 -film dissolution, measured by means of various electrochemical techniques, and alteration in HF activity depend on the thickness of the film coating. Despite the small volumes (0.6-1.2 mL) of the HF solution, an effect of SiO2 -coating thickness on the dissolution rate was detected. To explain alterations detected in HF activity after SiO2 dissolution, spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FTIR) of the chemical composition of the solutions were conducted. This is associated with a modification in the chemical composition of the HF solution, which results in either the formation of an oxidized species in solution or the precipitation of dissolution products. HF2 (-) accumulation in the HF solution, owing to SiO2 dissolution was identified as the source of the chemical alteration.

  18. A Review of the Effect of Injected Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Volume on Reflux Correction Following Endoscopic Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Dave

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature suggests that multiple variables affect vesicoureteric reflux (VUR resolution rates following dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA injection. This article reviews the evidence pertaining to the effect of injected Dx/HA volume on success rates following endoscopic correction. Lack of prospective studies which use injected volume as a continuous variable coupled with a nonstandardized injection technique and endpoint hinders the ability to reach a definite conclusion.

  19. Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

  20. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortsman, X.; Wortsman, J.; Orlandi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect...... cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated...... with the presence of those agents. Methods We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Results Fillers...

  1. Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acids). PEMs with frozen-in free volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, Morton [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Early work with rigid rod aromatic polyelectrolytes implied that steric hindrance in packing of the rigid rods left unoccupied volumes that could absorb and hold water molecules strongly. We called this “frozen in free volume). It is illustrated and contrasted with the packing of flexible backbone polyelectrolytes (Reference 5 of this report). This was quantified for poly(biphenylene disulfonic acid) (PBDSA) and poly(phenylene disulfonic acid) (PPDSA). We found that PPDSA held three water molecules per acid group down to 11% relative humidity (RH) and had very high conductivity even at these low RHs. (Reference 1 of report.) The frozen-in free volume was calculated to be equivalent to a λ of 3.5. The work reported below concentrated on studying these polymers and their copolymers with biphenylene disulfonic acid. As expected, the polyelectrolytes are water soluble. Several approaches towards making water stable films were studied. Grafting alkyl benzene substituents on sulfonic acid groups had worked for PBPDSA (1) so it was tried with PPDSA and a 20%/80% copolymer of BPDSA and PDSA (B20P80). T-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl benzene were grafted. Good films could be made. Water absorption and conductivity were studied as a function of RH and temperature (Reference 2). When less than 20% of the sulfonic acid groups were grafted, conductivity was much higher than that of Nafion NR212 at all RHs. At low graft levels, conductivity was ten times higher. Mechanical properties and swelling were acceptable below 90% RH. However, all the films were unstable in water and slowly disintegrated. The proposed explanation was that the molecules formed nano-aggregates in solution held together by hydrophobic bonding. Their cast films disintegrated when placed in water since hydrophobic bonding between the nano-aggregates was poor. We then shifted to crosslinking as a method to produce water stable films (References 3 and 4). Biphenyl could easily be reacted with the polymer

  2. Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acids). PEMs with frozen-in free volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, Morton [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Early work with rigid rod aromatic polyelectrolytes implied that steric hindrance in packing of the rigid rods left unoccupied volumes that could absorb and hold water molecules strongly. We called this “frozen in free volume). It is illustrated and contrasted with the packing of flexible backbone polyelectrolytes (Reference 5 of this report). This was quantified for poly(biphenylene disulfonic acid) (PBDSA) and poly(phenylene disulfonic acid) (PPDSA). We found that PPDSA held three water molecules per acid group down to 11% relative humidity (RH) and had very high conductivity even at these low RHs. (Reference 1 of report.) The frozen-in free volume was calculated to be equivalent to a λ of 3.5. The work reported below concentrated on studying these polymers and their copolymers with biphenylene disulfonic acid. As expected, the polyelectrolytes are water soluble. Several approaches towards making water stable films were studied. Grafting alkyl benzene substituents on sulfonic acid groups had worked for PBPDSA (1) so it was tried with PPDSA and a 20%/80% copolymer of BPDSA and PDSA (B20P80). T-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl benzene were grafted. Good films could be made. Water absorption and conductivity were studied as a function of RH and temperature (Reference 2). When less than 20% of the sulfonic acid groups were grafted, conductivity was much higher than that of Nafion NR212 at all RHs. At low graft levels, conductivity was ten times higher. Mechanical properties and swelling were acceptable below 90% RH. However, all the films were unstable in water and slowly disintegrated. The proposed explanation was that the molecules formed nano-aggregates in solution held together by hydrophobic bonding. Their cast films disintegrated when placed in water since hydrophobic bonding between the nano-aggregates was poor. We then shifted to crosslinking as a method to produce water stable films (References 3 and 4). Biphenyl could easily be reacted with the polymer

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  4. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  5. New Filler Material for Reference Free Part Encapsulation Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-zhi; YANG Jian-guo; ZHOU Hu

    2002-01-01

    Reference free part encapsulation (RFPE) is a nontraditional universal fixturing technique. In this paper,new filler material-a lower melting point alloy for RFPE technique is introduced. Based on experiment, the shrinlkage and expansion rate, the effect of filler on workpiece drift and the effect of filler thickness on cutting distortion are studied. The alloy has a good mechanical and physical performance and the need of RFPE fixturing can be perfectly satisfied. The result shows that if the formula and process parameters of filler material are properly selected, it can obviously improve the quality of the workpiece, enhance the machining efficiency and reduce the manufacturing cost.

  6. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement.

  7. Hyaluron Filler Containing Lidocaine on a CPM Basis for Lip Augmentation: Reports from Practical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tanja C; Sattler, Gerhard; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-06-01

    Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers is established. As monophasic polydensified hyaluronic acid products with variable density, CPM-HAL1 (Belotero Balance Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) and CPM-HAL2 (Belotero Intense Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) are qualified for beautification and particularly natural-looking rejuvenation, respectively. The aim of this article was to assess the handling and outcome of lip augmentation using the lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid fillers, CPM-HAL1 and CPM-HAL2. Data were documented from patients who received lip augmentation by means of beautification and/or rejuvenation using CPM-HAL1 and/or CPM-HAL2. Observation period was 4 months, with assessment of natural outcome, evenness, distribution, fluidity, handling, malleability, tolerability, as well as patient satisfaction and pain. A total of 146 patients from 21 German centers participated. Physicians rated natural outcome and evenness as good or very good for more than 95% of patients. Distribution, fluidity, handling, and malleability were assessed for both fillers as good or very good in more than 91% of patients. At every evaluation point, more than 93% of patients were very or very much satisfied with the product. A total of 125 patients (85.6%) experienced transient injection-related side effects. Pain intensity during the procedure was mild (2.72 ± 1.72 on the 0-10 pain assessment scale) and abated markedly within 30 minutes (0.42 ± 0.57). Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers produced a long-term cosmetic result. Due to the lidocaine content, procedural pain was low and transient. Accordingly, a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved that was maintained throughout the observation period.

  8. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways.

  9. Structure, scattering patterns and phase behavior of polymer nanocomposites with nonspherical fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Lisa M [ORNL; Schweizer, Kenneth S [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites made with carbon nanotubes, clay platelets, laponite disks and other novel nonspherical fillers have been the focus of many recent experiments. However, the effects of nanoparticle shape on statistical structure, polymer-mediated effective interactions, scattering patterns, and phase diagrams are not well understood. We extend and apply the polymer reference interaction site model liquid state theory to study the equilibrium properties of pseudo one-, two- and threedimensional particles (rod, disk, cube) of modest steric anisotropy and fixed space-filling volume in a dense adsorbing homopolymer melt up to relatively high volume fractions. The second virial coefficient, nanoparticle potential-of-mean force, osmotic compressibilities, and isotropic spinodal demixing boundaries have been determined. The entropic depletion attraction between nanoparticles is dominant for weakly adsorbing polymer, while strongly adsorbing chains induce a bridging attraction. Intermediate interfacial cohesion results in the formation of a steric stabilizing adsorbed polymer layer around each nanoparticle, which can partially damp inter-filler collective order on various length scales and increase order on an averaged length scale. The details of depletion, stabilization, or bridging behavior are shape-dependent and often, but not always, trends are monotonic with increasing filler dimensionality. Distinctive nanoparticle shape-dependent low angle features are predicted for the collective polymer structure factor associated with competing macrophase fluctuations and microphase-like ordering. The influence of nonzero mixture compressibility on the scattering profiles is established.

  10. Characterization of morphology and composition of inorganic fillers in dental alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Meneghel, Luciana Lira; da Silva, Fabiane Borges; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Archimedes' Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C), Hydrogum 5 (H5), Hydrogum (H), Orthoprint (O), and Jeltrate Plus (JP). The different alginate powders (0.5 mg) were fixed on plastic stubs (n = 5) and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450(°)C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si) by weight (C-81.59%, H-79.89%, O-78.87%, H5-77.95%, JP-66.88%, wt). The filler fractions in volume (vt) were as follows: H5-84.85%, JP-74.76%, H-70.03%, O-68.31%, and C-56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology.

  11. Characterization of Morphology and Composition of Inorganic Fillers in Dental Alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Danil Guiraldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Archimedes’ Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C, Hydrogum 5 (H5, Hydrogum (H, Orthoprint (O, and Jeltrate Plus (JP. The different alginate powders (0.5 mg were fixed on plastic stubs (n=5 and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450°C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si by weight (C—81.59%, H—79.89%, O—78.87%, H5—77.95%, JP—66.88%, wt. The filler fractions in volume (vt were as follows: H5—84.85%, JP—74.76%, H—70.03%, O—68.31%, and C—56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology.

  12. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  13. Effect of Fillers on E-Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Deshpande

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an investigation was carried out on E-glass fiber/jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites filled with varying concentrations of bone and coconut shell powder. The composites were fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, flexural strength, inter laminar shear strength (ILSS, tensile modulus, impact strength and hardness of the fabricated composites were tested. The test results of these were compared with unfilled HFRP composites. From the results it was found that the mechanical properties of the composites increased with the increase in filler content. Composites filled with 15% volume coconut shell powder exhibited maximum flexural strength, inter laminar shear strength (ILSS, tensile modulus and hardness. Maximum impact strength was achieved by addition of filler (15% Vol. of bone powder.

  14. Surface chemistry and effects on bone regeneration of a novel biomimetic synthetic bone filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Marco; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Sartori, Maria; Ferrari, Andrea; Parrilli, Annapaola; Bollati, Daniele; Baena, Ruggero Rodriguez Y; Cassinelli, Clara; Fini, Milena

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents results of physico-chemical and biological investigations of a surface-engineered synthetic bone filler. Surface analysis confirms that the ceramic phosphate granules present a collagen nanolayer to the surrounding environment. Cell cultures tests show that, in agreement with literature reports, surface-immobilized collagen molecular cues can stimulate progression along the osteogenic pathway of undifferentiated human mesenchymal cells. Finally, in vivo test in a rabbit model of critical bone defects shows statistically significant increase of bone volume and mineral apposition rate between the biomimetic bone filler and collagen-free control. All together, obtained data confirm that biomolecular surface engineering can upgrade the properties of implant device, by promoting more specific and targeted implant-host cells interactions.

  15. Evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of composite polymers by considering the filler size distribution law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorin HOLOTESCU; Floriana D.STOIAN

    2009-01-01

    We present an empirical model for the effective thermal conductivity(ETC)of a polymer composite that includes dependency on the filler size distribution-chosen as the Rosin-Rammler distribution.The ETC is determined based on certain hypotheses that connect the behavior of a real composite matefial A.to that of a model composite material B,filled with mono-dimensional filler.The application of these hypotheses to the Maxwell model for ETC is presented.The validation of the new model and its characteristic equation was carried out using experimental data from the reference.The comparison showed that by using the size distribution law a very good fit between the equation of the new model(the size distribution model for the ETC)and the reference experimental results is obtained,even for high volume fractions,up to about 50%.

  16. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of low-volume polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid versus standard-volume polyethylene glycol solution as bowel preparations for colonoscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Standard-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG gut lavage solutions are safe and effective, but they require the consumption of large volumes of fluid. A new lower-volume solution of PEG plus ascorbic acid has been used recently as a preparation for colonoscopy. AIM: A meta-analysis was performed to compare the performance of low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid with standard-volume PEG as bowel preparation for colonoscopy. STUDY: Electronic and manual searches were performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared the performance of low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid with standard-volume PEG as bowel preparation for colonoscopy. After a methodological quality assessment and data extraction, the pooled estimates of bowel preparation efficacy during bowel cleansing, compliance with preparation, willingness to repeat the same preparation, and the side effects were calculated. We calculated pooled estimates of odds ratios (OR by fixed- and/or random-effects models. We also assessed heterogeneity among studies and the publication bias. RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were identified for analysis. The pooled OR for preparation efficacy during bowel cleansing and for compliance with preparation for low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid were 1.08 (95% CI = 0.98-1.28, P = 0.34 and 2.23 (95% CI = 1.67-2.98, P<0.00001, respectively, compared with those for standard-volume PEG. The side effects of vomiting and nausea for low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid were reduced relative to standard-volume PEG. There was no significant publication bias, according to a funnel plot. CONCLUSIONS: Low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid gut lavage achieved non-inferior efficacy for bowel cleansing, is more acceptable to patients, and has fewer side effects than standard-volume PEG as a bowel preparation method for colonoscopy.

  17. Comparison of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and pirenzepine-ranitidine combination for reducing preoperative gastric fluid acidity and volume in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, N; Nishina, K; Mikawa, K; Shiga, M; Obara, H

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a two-part controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative oral pirenzepine (muscarinic receptor antagonist known to inhibit gastric secretion), ranitidine, and the combination pirenzepine-ranitidine in controlling gastric fluid pH and volume in 210 ASA I children, aged 2-14 yr, undergoing elective surgery. In the first part of the study (n = 90), the proportion of children considered at risk for aspiration pneumonitis was reduced with pirenzepine 25 mg (P pirenzepine 25 mg with placebo; ranitidine 75 mg with placebo; pirenzepine 25 mg with ranitidine 75 mg; and placebo and placebo. These medications were administered 1 h before anaesthesia. After tracheal intubation, volume and pH of the gastric fluid aspiration via a multiorifice orogastric tube were measured. Pirenzepine 25 mg decreased gastric fluid volume (P pirenzepine-ranitidine combination reduced gastric fluid acidity and volume (P < 0.05).

  18. High filler concrete using fly ash. Chloride penetration and microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.G.; Leegwater, G.A.; Visser, J.H.M.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most high filler concrete studies are based on relatively high contents of powder (cement + filler) (>400 kg m-3). This paper aims to increase the total fly ash content relative to the clinker content, while simultaneously minimizing the total powder content in the concrete to values lower than 300

  19. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  20. Selecting fillers on emotional appearance improves lineup identification accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowe, Heather D; Klatt, Thimna; Colloff, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    Mock witnesses sometimes report using criminal stereotypes to identify a face from a lineup, a tendency known as criminal face bias. Faces are perceived as criminal-looking if they appear angry. We tested whether matching the emotional appearance of the fillers to an angry suspect can reduce criminal face bias. In Study 1, mock witnesses (n = 226) viewed lineups in which the suspect had an angry, happy, or neutral expression, and we varied whether the fillers matched the expression. An additional group of participants (n = 59) rated the faces on criminal and emotional appearance. As predicted, mock witnesses tended to identify suspects who appeared angrier and more criminal-looking than the fillers. This tendency was reduced when the lineup fillers matched the emotional appearance of the suspect. Study 2 extended the results, testing whether the emotional appearance of the suspect and fillers affects recognition memory. Participants (n = 1,983) studied faces and took a lineup test in which the emotional appearance of the target and fillers was varied between subjects. Discrimination accuracy was enhanced when the fillers matched an angry target's emotional appearance. We conclude that lineup member emotional appearance plays a critical role in the psychology of lineup identification. The fillers should match an angry suspect's emotional appearance to improve lineup identification accuracy.

  1. Morphology and thermal degradation studies of melt-mixed poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) biodegradable polymer blend nanocomposites with TiO2 as filler

    OpenAIRE

    Mofokeng, J.P.; Luyt,A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology and thermal stability of melt-mixed poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blend nanocomposites with small amounts of TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated. The nanoparticles were mostly located in the PLA phase, with good dispersion of individual particles, although significant aggregation was also visible. The thermal stability and degradation behaviour of the different samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and TGA-Fourier-transform infrared (...

  2. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Dušica R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking strength of the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with 1.5% stearic acid using wet process, are higher for 2.8% and 5.2%, respectively, compared to the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with the same amount of acid used in the dry process. The tensile strength difference between the mixtures increases with the increase of the concentration of used stearic acid up to 3%. The strength of PVC mixture with the calcite modified by wet process is 3.1% higher compared to the mixture containing calcite modified by dry process. The results showed that the bonding strength between calcite and the adsorbed organic component affected tensile strength, tensile elongation and breaking strength of the PVC mixtures. The best filler was obtained by wet modification using 1.5% stearic acid solution that provided the formation of a stearate monolayer chemisorbed on calcite. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet process using 1.5% stearic acid solution exhibited the best mechanical properties. This calcite was completely hydrophobic with dominant chemically adsorbed surfactant, which means that stearate chemisorbed on calcite provided stronger interaction in the calcite-stearic acid-PVC system.

  3. Effect of Natural Fillers on Mechanical Properties of GFRP Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Dhawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs have replaced conventional engineering materials in many areas, especially in the field of automobiles and household applications. With the increasing demand, various modifications are being incorporated in the conventional FRPs for specific applications in order to reduce costs and achieve the quality standards. The present research endeavor is an attempt to study the effect of natural fillers on the mechanical characteristics of FRPs. Rice husk, wheat husk, and coconut coir have been used as natural fillers in glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs. In order to study the effect of matrix on the properties of GFRPs, polyester and epoxy resins have been used. It has been found that natural fillers provide better results in polyester-based composites. Amongst the natural fillers, in general, the composites with coconut coir have better mechanical properties as compared to the other fillers in glass/epoxy composites.

  4. EFFECT OF RICE HUSKS AS FILLER IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hardinnawirda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rice husk-filled polyester composites were produced with rice husks (RH as the filler and unsaturated polyester resin (UPR as the matrix. Several percentages of filler loadings were used (10, 15, 20 and 25 wt % in order to gain insights into the effect of filler content on the mechanical properties and water intake of the composites. The tensile strength of the RH-filled UPR composites was found to decrease as the filler loading increased; however, as it reached 25 wt %, the strength showed a moderate increase. The Young’s modulus showed a remarkable increase for 15 wt % of RH but decreased as the RH percentage increased further to 25 wt %. A water absorption test was conducted and the results showed that the composites absorb more water as the percentage weight of RH increased, which is attributed to the ability of the RH filler to absorb water.

  5. Study of the Mechanical and Morphology Properties of Recycled HDPE Composite Using Rice Husk Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ying Tong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WPCs are being used in a large number of applications in the automotive, construction, electronic, and aerospace industries. There are an increasing number of research studies and developments in WPC technology involving rice husk as fillers. This study investigated the effects of different compositions of rice husk (RH filler on the mechanical and morphological properties of recycled HDPE (rHDPE composite. The composites were prepared with five different loading contents of RH fibers (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt% using the twin screw extrusion method. Maleic acid polyethylene (MAPE was added as a coupling agent. Results showed that tensile and flexural properties improved with increasing RH loading. However, the impact strength of the composites decreased as the RH loading increased. SEM micrographs revealed good interfacial bonding between the fiber and polymer matrix.

  6. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in (1) H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: rM . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to rM can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of rM weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of rM taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of rM . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of rM can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to rM successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects.

  7. Tensile Residual Stress Mitigation Using Low Temperature Phase Transformation Filler Wire in Welded Armor Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Bunn, Jeffrey R [ORNL; Tzelepis, Demetrios A [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) has been a persistent issue in welding of high-strength steels. Mitigating residual stresses is one of the most efficient ways to control HIC. The current study develops a proactive in-process weld residual stress mitigation technique, which manipulates the thermal expansion and contraction sequence in the weldments during welding process. When the steel weld is cooled after welding, martensitic transformation will occur at a temperature below 400 C. Volume expansion in the weld due to the martensitic transformation will reduce tensile stresses in the weld and heat affected zone and in some cases produce compressive residual stresses in the weld. Based on this concept, a customized filler wire which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation during cooling was developed. The new filler wire shows significant improvement in terms of reducing the tendency of HIC in high strength steels. Bulk residual stress mapping using neutron diffraction revealed reduced tensile and compressive residual stresses in the welds made by the new filler wire.

  8. Multi-scale analysis of the effect of nano-filler particle diameter on the physical properties of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Inoue, Sayuri; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of silica nano-filler particle diameters in a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin (CR) block on physical properties at the multi-scale in silico. CAD/CAM CR blocks were modeled, consisting of silica nano-filler particles (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 nm) and matrix (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA), with filler volume contents of 55.161%. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios for the block at macro-scale were analyzed by homogenization. Macro-scale CAD/CAM CR blocks (3 × 3 × 3 mm) were modeled and compressive strengths were defined when the fracture loads exceeded 6075 N. MPS values of the nano-scale models were compared by localization analysis. As the filler size decreased, Young's moduli and compressive strength increased, while Poisson's ratios and MPS decreased. All parameters were significantly correlated with the diameters of the filler particles (Pearson's correlation test, r = -0.949, 0.943, -0.951, 0.976, p CAD/CAM CR blocks can be enhanced by loading silica nanofiller particles of smaller diameter. CAD/CAM CR blocks by using smaller silica nano-filler particles have a potential to increase fracture resistance.

  9. Modulation of the enzymatic efficiency of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase by the amino acid volume around the catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Matías A; Arakaki, Adrián K; Rial, Daniela V; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin (flavodoxin)-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are ubiquitous flavoenzymes that deliver NADPH or low-potential one-electron donors (ferredoxin, flavodoxin, adrenodoxin) to redox-based metabolic reactions in plastids, mitochondria and bacteria. Plastidic FNRs are quite efficient reductases. In contrast, FNRs from organisms possessing a heterotrophic metabolism or anoxygenic photosynthesis display turnover numbers 20- to 100-fold lower than those of their plastidic and cyanobacterial counterparts. Several structural features of these enzymes have yet to be explained. The residue Y308 in pea FNR is stacked nearly parallel to the re-face of the flavin and is highly conserved amongst members of the family. By computing the relative free energy for the lumiflavin-phenol pair at different angles with the relative position found for Y308 in pea FNR, it can be concluded that this amino acid is constrained against the isoalloxazine. This effect is probably caused by amino acids C266 and L268, which face the other side of this tyrosine. Simple and double FNR mutants of these amino acids were obtained and characterized. It was observed that a decrease or increase in the amino acid volume resulted in a decrease in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme without altering the protein structure. Our results provide experimental evidence that the volume of these amino acids participates in the fine-tuning of the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme.

  10. Structural dynamics and interfacial properties of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, J; Klueppel, M, E-mail: Manfred.Klueppel@DIKautschuk.de [Deutsches Institut fuer Kautschuktechnologie e V, Eupener Strasse 33, D-30519 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-01-26

    The combined effect of filler networking and reduced chain mobility close to the filler interface is analyzed based on investigations of the relaxation dynamics of a solution of styrene butadiene rubber filled with different loadings and types of nanostructured carbon blacks. Dynamic-mechanical and dielectric spectra are studied in a wide frequency and temperature range. By referring to a tunneling process of charge carriers over nanoscopic gaps between adjacent carbon black particles the gap distance is evaluated from the dielectric spectra. This distance corresponds to the length of glassy-like polymer bridges forming flexible bonds between adjacent filler particles of the filler network. It is found that the gap distance decreases with increasing filler loading and specific surface area which correlates with an increase of the apparent activation energy of the filler network evaluated from dynamic-mechanical data. Due to the thermal activation of glassy-like polymer bridges the time-temperature superposition principle is not fulfilled for filled elastomers and the introduction of vertical shift factors is necessary to obtain viscoelastic master curves. The change in the low frequency viscoelastic properties by the incorporation of fillers is shown to be related to the superimposed dynamics of the filler network governed by the viscoelastic response of the glassy-like polymer bridges. This effect is distinguished from the reduced chain mobility close to the filler surface which results in a broadening of the glass transition on the high temperature or low frequency side. The microstructure-based interpretation of viscoelastic data is supported by an analysis of the relaxation time spectra.

  11. Structural dynamics and interfacial properties of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, J.; Klüppel, M.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of filler networking and reduced chain mobility close to the filler interface is analyzed based on investigations of the relaxation dynamics of a solution of styrene butadiene rubber filled with different loadings and types of nanostructured carbon blacks. Dynamic-mechanical and dielectric spectra are studied in a wide frequency and temperature range. By referring to a tunneling process of charge carriers over nanoscopic gaps between adjacent carbon black particles the gap distance is evaluated from the dielectric spectra. This distance corresponds to the length of glassy-like polymer bridges forming flexible bonds between adjacent filler particles of the filler network. It is found that the gap distance decreases with increasing filler loading and specific surface area which correlates with an increase of the apparent activation energy of the filler network evaluated from dynamic-mechanical data. Due to the thermal activation of glassy-like polymer bridges the time-temperature superposition principle is not fulfilled for filled elastomers and the introduction of vertical shift factors is necessary to obtain viscoelastic master curves. The change in the low frequency viscoelastic properties by the incorporation of fillers is shown to be related to the superimposed dynamics of the filler network governed by the viscoelastic response of the glassy-like polymer bridges. This effect is distinguished from the reduced chain mobility close to the filler surface which results in a broadening of the glass transition on the high temperature or low frequency side. The microstructure-based interpretation of viscoelastic data is supported by an analysis of the relaxation time spectra.

  12. Research on Alkaline Filler Flame-Retarded Asphalt Pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shuguang; ZHANG Houji; WANG Jiaolan

    2006-01-01

    Used as flame retardant of tunnel asphalt pavement, organic bromides produce a large amount of poisons and smoke in construction and flame retardation stage. The alkaline filler was found to replace mineral filler, and the flame-retarded asphalt mixtures were produced. Experimental results show that these asphalt mixtures are smoke restrained; the performances and construction technology of asphalt pavement are not influenced; also the alkaline filler is of low-price. So this kind of flame-retarded asphalt mixtures is suitable for tunnel pavement.

  13. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing use of injectable fillers has been increasing the occurrence of disfiguring anaerobic infection or granulomas. This study presents two types of laser-assisted evacuation of filler material and inflammatory and necrotic tissue that were used to treat disfiguring facial...... nodules after different types of gel fillers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Infectious lesions after hydrogels were drained using a lithium triborate laser at 532 nm, with subsequent removal of infected gel and pus (laser assisted evacuation). Granuloma after gels containing microparticles were treated using...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of polymer matrix composite material with combination of ZnO filler and nata de coco fiber as a candidate of semiconductor material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Asep Handaya; Anindita, Hana Nabila

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of semiconductor composite using acrylic matrix filled with ZnO and nata de coco fiber has been conducted in this research. The purpose of this research is to obtain semiconductor composite material that has a good mechanical strength and thermal resistance. In situ polymerization method is used in this research and the composites are ready to be characterized after 12 hours. The main parameter that is characterized is the electric conductivity of the composite. Additional parameters are also characterized such as composite's elastic modulus and glass transition temperature. The composites that has been made in this research can be classified as semiconductor material because the conductivity is in the range of 10-8-103 S/cm. In general the addition of ZnO and nata de coco filler can increase the conductivity of the composite. The highest semiconductor characteristic in acrylic/ZnO composite is obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 3.4 x 10-7 S/cm. Similar with acrylic/ZnO composite, in acrylic/nata de coco fiber composite the highest semiconductor characteristic is also obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 1.15 x 10-7 S/cm. Combination of 20% volume of ZnO, 10% volume of nata de coco, and 70% volume of acrylic resulting in composite with electric conductivity of 1.92 x 10-7 S/cm. In addition, combination of ZnO and nata de coco fiber as filler in composite can also improve the characteristic of composite where composite with 20% volume of ZnO filler and 10% volume of nata de coco fiber resulting in composite with elastic modulus of 1.79 GPa and glass transition temperature of 175.73°C which is higher than those in acrylic/ZnO composite.

  15. Shrinkage reduction of dental composites by addition of expandable zirconia filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    A problem with dental resin composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which makes the filling loosen from the tooth or induces crack formation. We have developed an expandable metastable tetragonal zirconia filler, which upon reaction with water, is able to counter the polymer shrinkage....... The shrinkage of the composite was calculated from density measurements using Archimedes method. The rate of the phase transformation in resin was measured by determining the volume fraction of monoclinic zirconia (vm). The composite had a vm of 0.5 after 8 h of water storage. The overall shrinkage...... of the composites was reduced from 3.2% (initially) to 1.7%....

  16. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  17. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  18. Bonding of ceramic insert to a laboratory particle filler composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienanen, Pietari; Alander, Pasi; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-10-01

    The push-out bond strength of cylindrical ceramic inserts (CI) to particulate filler resin composite (VC) was evaluated in this study. Various surface treatments to improve the adhesion of CI to resin composite were tested. Additionally, the effect of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) laminate encapsulation around CI was tested. Feldspathic porcelain CI with a diameter of 3.1 mm was bonded to VC. Adhesive resin was used for bonding. In group 1, no surface treatment of CI was done. In group 2, CI was encapsulated with a thin layer of woven glass FRC. In group 3, the surface of the CI was tribochemically silica coated and silanized. In group 4, the surface of the CI was grit-blasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide and etched with hydrofluoric acid. In group 5, the grit-blasted CI was encapsulated with a layer of FRC. The specimens (n = 6/group) were either dry stored or thermocycled in water (6000 x 5-55 degrees C). The push-out test was carried out with a universal material testing machine. The highest push-out strength was achieved in group 5 (20.4 MPa) and the lowest in group 2 (11.5 MPa). ANOVA revealed that both surface treatment and storage condition had a significant effect on push-out strength (p < 0.05). We conclude that the additional glass FRC encapsulation can be used to increase the bond strength of insert to composite.

  19. Use of Cellulose-Containing Fillers in Composites with Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna LAKA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The composites, containing recycled polypropylene and fillers, obtained from different lignocellulosics by the thermocatalytic destruction method, were investigated. Birch sawdust, newsprint wastes, cotton residues and wood bleached sulphate pulp were used as raw materials for obtaining fillers. The indices of mechanical properties (tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, deformation at break, shear modulus, toughness, twisting moment of the composites' samples were determined. It has been found that the obtained composites have relatively good mechanical properties. Better results were obtained, using fillers from sawdust and wood pulp. After treating the fillers with rapeseed oil, their water vapour sorption and water retention value (WRV decreased. In this case, the strength of the composites was higher.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.484

  20. Microstructural and rheological analysis of fillers and asphalt mastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, R.; Simon, A.; Kocserha, I.; Buzimov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pavements are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and organic binder. The aggregates are sorted in different sizes and different amount which are mixed together with bitumen. The finest mineral fraction (ddolomite) which are used in Hungarian road constructions with the use of different techniques (particle size distribution, scanning electronmicroscopy tests, mercury intrusion porosimetry, BET specific surface tests, determination of hydrophobicity). After the tests of fillers, asphalt mastics were prepared and rheological examinations were obtained. These examinations served to observe the interaction and the effect of fillers. The stiffening effect of fillers and the causes of rutting were also investigated. Based on our results, it can be stated that particle size, hydrophobic properties and the amount of fillers highly affect the rheological properties of mastics.

  1. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norshamira, A., E-mail: myra.arshad@gmail.com; Mariatti, M., E-mail: mariatti@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  2. Influence of silanization and filler fraction on aged dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C T; Lee, S Y; Keh, E S; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-11-01

    The effect of silanization and filler fraction on the mechanical properties of aged dental composites was investigated. Experimental composites (75/25 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% 8 microm silanized/unsilanized BaSiO6) were fabricated into 4.7 mm diameter x 2.2 mm thick discs and 3.5 mm diameter x 7.3 mm thick discs for diametral tensile and compressive tests, respectively. The effect of immersion in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for 0-30 days on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) of the samples was evaluated and analysed by ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The fracture interface between filler and resin matrix was then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results and subsequent statistical evidence from DTS (18.6+/-7.6 MPa, silanized versus 11.7+/-2.6 MPa, unsilanized) and CS (85.1+/-29.7 MPa, silanized versus 56.0+/-11.3 MPa, unsilanized) strongly implies that silanization may greatly enhance the mechanical properties of the resin composites. Furthermore, it also shows that both DTS and CS increased proportionally as the filler fraction of the composites increased. However, in the unsilanized groups, DTS decreased (up to 40%) as the filler fraction increased, and CS showed no relevance to the filler fraction at all. As for the influence of aging, it was found that both DTS and CS showed a significant decrease after immersion in 75% ethanol, and silanization heavily correlated with the filler fraction of aged-resin composites. Microscopic examination of the fractured samples showed that failure primarily occurred within the resin matrix per se for silanized composites and adjacent to the filler particles for unsilanized composites. All the evidence points to the conclusion that mechanical properties of aged-resin composites can be greatly influenced by silanization and the filler fraction.

  3. High-volume extraction of nucleic acids by magnetic bead technology for ultrasensitive detection of bacteria in blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Melanie; Kleesiek, Knut; Dreier, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid isolation, the most technically demanding and laborious procedure performed in molecular diagnostics, harbors the potential for improvements in automation. A recent development is the use of magnetic beads covered with nucleic acid-binding matrices. We adapted this technology with a broad-range 23S rRNA real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay for fast and sensitive detection of bacterial contamination of blood products. We investigated different protocols for an automated high-volume extraction method based on magnetic-separation technology for the extraction of bacterial nucleic acids from platelet concentrates (PCs). We added 2 model bacteria, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli, to a single pool of apheresis-derived, single-donor platelets and assayed the PCs by real-time RT-PCR analysis with an improved primer-probe system and locked nucleic acid technology. Co-amplification of human beta(2)-microglobulin mRNA served as an internal control (IC). We used probit analysis to calculate the minimum concentration of bacteria that would be detected with 95% confidence. For automated magnetic bead-based extraction technology with the real-time RT-PCR, the 95% detection limit was 29 x 10(3) colony-forming units (CFU)/L for S. epidermidis and 22 x 10(3) CFU/L for E. coli. No false-positive results occurred, either due to nucleic acid contamination of reagents or externally during testing of 1030 PCs. High-volume nucleic acid extraction improved the detection limit of the assay. The improvement of the primer-probe system and the integration of an IC make the RT-PCR assay appropriate for bacteria screening of platelets.

  4. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Nano Filler Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnia Noor Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on mechanical and morphological properties of unsaturated polyester (UP reinforced with two different types of filler which is nano size clay Cloisite 30B (C30B and Carbon Black (CB. Samples were fabricated via hand lay-up and open molding technique. Percentages of Cloisite 30B & Carbon Black (CB used vary from 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt%. The mechanical properties were evaluated by impact, flexural and hardness testing. Result shows that the mechanical strength of C30B was better compare to CB filled composite. The combination of UP with C30B helps to improve the properties due to the high surface area of nanosize filler in the matrix. The result shows that increasing of filler content had increased mechanical properties of composites. Optimum percentage represent good mechanical properties are 4% for both fillers. SEM images showed that rough surface image indicate to agglomeration of filler in the matrix for CB sample and smooth surface image on C30B sample indicate to homogenous blending between filler and matrix polyester. SEM images proved that mechanical properties result indicate that C30B polyester composite is a good reinforcement compare to CB polyester composite.

  5. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  7. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  8. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  9. Host Tissue Interaction, Fate, and Risks of Degradable and Nondegradable Gel Fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    -bindings to the polymer in order to obtain a more dense molecular structure, which will prolong degradation and filling effect of the gel. Other gel fillers contain particles of organic (poly-lactic acid) or inorganic (calcium hydroxylapatite) material, which have been used in human tissue for other purposes (degradable...... instead steroids or large doses of NSAIDs) the bacteria form a biofilm, which gives rise to a low-grade chronic infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Complications following particulated gels and silicone oil are not known, but bacteria in a biofilm and/or endotoxins released...

  10. Nanotubularchrysotile fillers for radiationand protective constructional composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening of manifestation of quantum-dimensional effect in nanoparticles will make considerable impact on absorption of photon radiation. Therefore, application of ultradisperse systems will promote high-quality strengthening of radiation protective properties of material and will allow creation of more compact material with improved protective characteristics. The unique combination of properties of chrysotile allows creation of the materials on its basis which possess high mechanical and thermal strength, radiation resistance. The presence of the combined water in its structure favours appearance of radiation protective properties by neutron radiation in such materials. In this connection the authors offered to fill chrysotile nanotubes with nanodispersed compounds that make it possible to raise its radiation protective characteristics. As a result, these compounds have to possess higher extinction coefficient of γ-radiation, and respectively possess high density and content of heavy elements. Nanocrystal plumbous tungstate of PbWO4 is offered to use as compound for intercalation. The authors developed a method to produce nanotubular filler of radiation protective composite materials by filling hydrosilicate nanotubes of chrysotile structure with refractory slightly soluble compound on the basis of PbWO4 and serial processing of material with solutions of reagents. The best result has been achieved when chrysotile was treated consistently in K2WO4 and Pb(СН3СОО2 solutions, at the same time mass content of PbWO4 in an end product reaches 30%. The introduced K2WO4 filled nanotubes not only in the internal channel, but also in interlayered space, and localization of PbWO4 happens both in internal channels of nanotubes and on their surface. In spite of the fact that the developed technology does not allow us to modify chrysotile so that all injected PbWO4 could be contained only in internal canals of nanotubes, the obtained product gets

  11. Penggunaan precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC sebagai filler untuk sol karet sepatu olah raga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminiwati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of the research was to investigate the utilization of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC as filler in producing sport shoe rubber soles. PCC is a white filler needed for production of nonblack colour rubber products. There are four types of PCC that have been used including two local PCC from Wonosari and East Java, and two imported PCC from Japan and Taiwan. The amount of PCC added into the sport shoe sole rubber compound was varied in 30,45,60,75 and 90 per hundred rubber (phr. The compounding was carried-out by using two roll mills machine, and the compound was subsequently measured their optimum vulcanization time by using rheometer. The produced compound was then subjected to vulcanistion process by using hydrolic press at temperature 1500C and pressure 150 kg/ cm2. The quality of shoes sole vulcanisates were compare to standard quality of SNI. 12-7075-2005 about cemented system sport shoes. The results indicated that the best formula of rubber compound for sport shoes sole were made by using NR 80 phr, NBR 20 phr, paraffinic oil 10 phr, aluminium silicate 30 phr, ZnO 5 phr, TiO2 10 phr, stearic acid 1 phr, vulkanox SP 1 phr, paraffin wax 1 phr, TMTD 0,5 phr, CBS 2 phr, sulphur 1,2 phr with the amount of PCC Actifort 700 of 45 phr. The best formula meet the requirement SNI 12-7075-2005 and they were characterized by tensile sterength 16,79 N/mm2, elongation at break 529,92% tear resistance 9,06 N/mm2, specific gravity 1,28 g/cm3, hardness 55 shore A, Grasselli absrassion resistancing filler. The local PCC from Wonosari can be used for substitution of the imported PCC as the white filler for the production of rubber compound sport shoes sole. However, particle size reduction and coating or surface treatment of local PCC were needed for improving the quality and the role of reinforcing filler.

  12. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of percolates and its evaporates from Technosols before and after limestone filler stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of waters is recognized as a relevant monitoring tool when assessing the adverse effects of acid mine drainage. The weathering of sulphide minerals produces a great variety of efflorescences of soluble sulphate salts. These minerals play an important role for environmental pollution, since they can be either a sink or a source for acidity and trace elements. This communication deals with the leachability of potentially toxic elements (PTE) eluting from technosols formed from soils affected by mining activities and limestone filler. A total of three contaminated soils affected by opencast mining were selected and mixed with limestone filler at three percentages: 10 %, 20 % and 30 %, providing nine stabilised samples. These samples were stored in containers and moistened simulating rainfall. The percolates obtained were collected, and the PTEs content (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) was determined. Evaporation-precipitation experiments were carried out in these waters, and the mineralogical composition of efflorescences was evaluated. The study area is heavily polluted as a result of historical mining and processing activities, producing large amount of wastes, characterised by high trace elements content and acidic pH. The results obtained for the percolates after the rain episode showed that, before the stabilization approach, waters had an acidic pH, high electrical conductivity and high PTEs content. When these soils were mixed with 10, 20 and 30 % of limestone filler, the pH was neutral and the soluble trace element content strongly decreased, being under the detection limit when limestone percentage was 20 % and 30 %. The mineralogical composition of efflorescences before the stabilisation approach showed that predominant minerals were copiapite, followed by gypsum and bilinite. Other soluble sulphates were determined in lower percentage, such as hexahydrite, halotriquite or pickeringite. After the mixing with 10 % of limestone filler, the evaporates

  13. Fatty acid intake in relation to reproductive hormones and testicular volume among young healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MInguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Chavarro, Jorge E; Mendiola, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    and testicular volume among healthy young Spanish men. This is a cross-sectional study among 209 healthy male volunteers conducted between October 2010 and November 2011 in Murcia Region of Spain. Participants completed questionnaires on lifestyle, diet, and smoking, and each underwent a physical examination...

  14. Study of apparent molal volume and viscosity of mutual citric acid and disodium hydrogen orthophosphate aqueous systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Man Singh

    2006-05-01

    Fundamental properties, density () and viscosity (), of citric acid (CA) and disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (DSP) at various strengths were obtained at different temperatures. The and values were used to determine apparent molal volumes and viscosity of systems. The , and values were regressed against molality for ρ0, 0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$f, the limiting constants at infinite dilution ( → 0) forionic and molecular interactions. The ρ0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$f of aq. acids are higher than those of aq. DSP and the viscosity of DSP is higher than that of aq. CA. Examination of ρ0 and $V^{0}_{\\phi}$ functions indicates that mutual compositions of CA and DSP counterbalance concentration and temperature effects on pH in bioprocesses.

  15. Development of polymer concrete radioactive waste management containers - Effect of ceramic fillers on the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of polymer concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Chun; Park, Min Jin; Shin, Hyun Ick; Choi, Yong Jin [Myongji University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Particle size distribution of the ceramic filler is the primary factor to influence the composition of polymer concrete. The estimated optimum compositions of the polymer concretes prepared in the study are 62 {approx} 71wt% for fine aggregates, 6 {approx} 29wt% for ceramic fillers and 9 {approx}13wt% for polymer resin. Calcium Carbonate and silica are the ceramic fillers practically usable for manufacturing polymer concrete. Less polymer resin is required for the preparation of polymer concrete at lower relative packing volume of ceramic fillers. It has been found that depended on the type of fine aggregates, the effect of ceramic filler on the mechanical behavior of polymer concrete can be opposite. Strength and elastic modulus of polymer concrete are affected by gamma radiation. Crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin and epoxy resin are promoted by gamma radiation up to 00 MRad and 50 MRad, respectively. However, higher dose of radiation degrades the mechanical properties of polymer concrete. Hydrothermal treatment of polymer concrete at 80 deg. C and 1bar for 30 days causes about 25% reduction of bending strength and elastic modulus. The strength reduction arises from the hydrolysis of ester groups in unsaturated polyester catalyzed by hydrothermal condition. 13 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs. (Author)

  16. Waste oyster shell as a kind of active filler to treat the combined wastewater at an estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongbing; Huang, Gu; Fu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Daocai; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Bo; Fan, Liangqian; Chen, Fenghui; Sun, Xiubo

    2013-10-01

    Estuaries have been described as one of the most difficult environments on Earth. It is difficult to know how to treat the combined wastewater in tidal rivers at the estuary, where the situation is very different from ordinary fresh water rivers. Waste oyster shell was used as the active filler in this study in a bio-contact oxidation tank to treat the combined wastewater at the Fengtang Tidal River. With a middle-experimental scale of 360 m3/day, the average removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH3-N, TP and TSS was 80.05%, 85.02%, 86.59%, 50.58% and 85.32%, respectively, in this bio-contact oxidation process. The living microbes in the biofilms on the waste oyster shell in this bio-contact oxidation tank, which were mainly composed of zoogloea, protozoa and micro-metazoa species, revealed that waste oyster shell as the filler was suitable material for combined wastewater degradation. This treatment method using waste oyster shell as active filler was then applied in a mangrove demonstration area for water quality improvement near the experiment area, with a treatment volume of 5 x 10(3) m3/day. Another project was also successfully applied in a constructed wetland, with a wastewater treatment volume of 1 x 10(3) m3/day. This technology is therefore feasible and can easily be applied on a larger scale.

  17. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  18. Chemical characterization of a degradable polymeric bone adhesive containing hydrolysable fillers and interpretation of anomalous mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anne M; Man Ho, Sze; Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Ahmed, Ifty; Barralet, Jake E; Knowles, Jonathan C; Nazhat, Showan N

    2009-07-01

    An experimental, light-curable, degradable polyester-based bone adhesive reinforced with phosphate glass particles ((P(2)O(5))(0.45)(CaO)(x)(Na(2)O)(0.55-)(x), x=0.3 or 0.4mol) or calcium phosphate (monocalcium phosphate/beta-tricalcium phosphate (MCPM/beta-TCP)) has been characterized. Early water sorption (8wt.% at 1week) by the unfilled set adhesive catalysed subsequent bulk degradation (4wt.% at 2weeks) and substantial decline in both elastic and storage moduli. Addition of phosphate glass fillers substantially enhanced this water sorption, catalysed greater bulk mass loss (40-50 and 52-55wt.%, respectively) but enabled generation of a microporous scaffold within 2weeks. The high levels of acidic polymer degradation products (38-50wt.% of original polymer) were advantageously buffered by the filler, which initially released primarily sodium trimetaphosphate (P(3)O93-). Calcium phosphate addition raised polymer water sorption to a lesser extent (16wt.%) and promoted intermediate early bulk mass loss (12wt.%) but simultaneous anomalous increase in modulus. This was attributed to MCPM reacting with absorbed water and beta-TCP to form more homogeneously dispersed brushite (CaHPO(4)) throughout the polymer. Between 2 and 10weeks, linear erosion of both polymer (0.5wt.%week(-1)) and composites (0.7-1.2wt.%week(-1)) occurred, with all fillers providing long-term buffer action through calcium and orthophosphate (PO43-) release. In conclusion, both fillers can raise degradation of bone adhesives whilst simultaneously providing the buffering action and ions required for new bone formation. Through control of water sorption catalysed filler reactions, porous structures for cell support or substantially stiffer materials may be generated.

  19. Structural, thermal and ion transport studies of different particle size nanocomposite fillers incorporated PVdF-HFP hybrid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, G. Gnana [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ae Rhan [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Kee Suk [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nahmks@chonbuk.ac.kr; Elizabeth, R. Nimma [Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai 625002 (India)

    2009-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid membranes based on poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexa fluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP)/sulfosuccinic acid were fabricated with different nanometer sizes of silica particles. Morphological images reveal the embedded ceramic filler over the membrane. Structural characterizations were made by FT-IR and XPS, ensure the inclusion of sulfosuccinic acid and silica into the PVdF-HFP polymer matrix. Sulfonic acid groups promote the IEC values and greater swelling behavior. Silica content in the hybrid membranes had a great effect on crystalline character as well as thermal properties of the membranes. Decrease in the filler size creates an effective route of polymer-filler interface and promotes the protonic conductivity of the membranes. The high conductivities in the range of 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} were achieved through synergistic interactions between the organic and inorganic moieties of the hybrid membranes. Due to these splendid features, the prepared hybrid membranes can be a trademark in the field of fuel cells.

  20. Carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber/hybrid filler composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mousa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of the OSW and NLS are measured with the dynamic contact-angle technique. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS of the OSW reveals that the OSW possesses various reactive functional groups namely hydroxyl groups (OH. Hybrid filler from NLS and OSW were incorporated into carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR to produce XNBR hybrid composites. The reaction of OH groups from the OSW with COOH of the XNBR is checked by attenuated total reflectance spectra (ATR-IR of the composites. The degree of curing ΔM (maximum torque-minimum torque as a function of hybrid filler as derived from moving die rheometer (MDR is reported. The stress-strain behavior of the hybrid composites as well as the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA is studied. Bonding quality and dispersion of the hybrid filler with and in XNBR are examined using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM in SEM.

  1. Comparative study of filler influence on polylactide photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bocchini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polylactide (PLA based nanocomposites of organically modified montmorillonite and micro-talc based microcomposites were prepared with different compositions and were UV-light irradiated under artificial accelerated conditions representative of solar irradiation. The chemical modifications resulting from photo-oxidation were followed by infrared (IR and ultraviolet (UV-visible spectroscopies. The infrared analysis of PLA photooxidation shows the formation of a band at 1847 cm–1 due to the formation of anhydrides. The filler addition provokes an increase of anhydride formation rate dependent on filler nature, amount and dispersion degree on the matrix. The main factors that influence oxidation rate are the total extension of polymer/filler interfacial area and the presence of transition metal impurities of clays.

  2. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  3. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M., E-mail: engr.ziamustafa@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  4. Properties of hybrid resin composite systems containing prepolymerized filler particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackham, Jason T; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the properties of newer hybrid resin composites with prepolymerized-filler particles to traditional hybrids and a microfill composite. The following properties were examined per composite: diametral tensile strength, flexural strength/modulus, Knoop microhardness and polymerization shrinkage. Physical properties were determined for each Jason T Blackham, DMD, USAF, General Dentistry, Tyndall composite group (n = 8), showing significant differences between groups per property (p hybrid composites (Z250, Esthet-X) had higher strength, composites containing pre-polymerized fillers (Gradia Direct Posterior, Premise) performed more moderately and the microfill composite (Durafill VS) had lower strength. Premise and Durafill VS had the lowest polymerization shrinkage.

  5. Effects of immersion in solution of an experimental toothpaste containing S-PRG filler on like-remineralizing ability of etched enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Ito, Shuichi; Nakagaki, Susumu; Kohda, Naohisa; Muguruma, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the like-remineralizing ability of experimental toothpaste containing surface reaction-type pre-reacted glassionomer (S-PRG) filler on etched enamel. Human enamel blocks were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and immersed in 5-mL distilled water, fourfold diluted solution of NaF-containing toothpaste, or S-PRG filler-containing experimental toothpaste. Nanoindentation testing was carried out during immersion and the enamel surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis of the ions in each solution was performed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluoride electrode. After 1 month of immersion, the hardness and elastic modulus of the specimen immersed in S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste showed significantly greater values than those of the specimen immersed in NaF-containing toothpaste. Considerable amounts of Al, B, Na, Si, Sr, F ions were detected in the solution of S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste. Experimental S-PRG filler-containing toothpaste may enhance the like-remineralizing ability of etched enamel surfaces due to its ion-releasing ability.

  6. Effect of biobased fillers nature on biodeterioration of hybrid polyethylene composites by mold fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalygina, E. E.; Popov, A. A.; Pantyukhov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deterioration of natural fillers and polyethylene composites on their basis (polyethylene/filler=70/30) due to the action of mold fungi. The fillers chemical composition, dimensional parameters and biodegradability have been analyzed as factors exert a considerable impact on composite materials biodeterioration. It has been found that the principal factor determining the biodeterioration of polyethylene/filler composites by mold fungi is chemical composition of a filler and, in turn, its biodegradability. The excess of holocellulose content over lignin content and high protein content in a filler are able to induce biofouling of the polymeric composite materials. The presence of soluble and easy hydrolysed fraction in a filler increases its availability in a polymeric matrix. According to the study results, most effective natural fillers as additives stimulating polyethylene composites biodegradability are milled straw of seed flax and hydrolyzed keratin of bird’s feather.

  7. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper.

  8. Effect of filler addition on porosity and strength of polysiloxane-derived porous silicon carbide ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KUMAR, B. V. Manoj; EOM, Jung-Hye; KIM, Young-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Polycarbosilane (PCS) or silicon carbide (SiC) fillers were used as fillers in fabricating partially interconnected, open-cell porous SiC ceramics by carbothermal reduction of polysiloxane-derived SiOC and subsequent sintering process...

  9. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...... have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA...

  10. Effect of Conductive Inorganic Fillers on Space Charge Accumulation Characteristics in Cross-linked Polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Maeno, Takashi; Mizuno, Takehiko; Takahashi, Tohru

    We have observed space charge profiles in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) under dc high electric field using the PEA (pulsed electro-acoustic) system to study the relationship between space charge behavior and dielectric breakdown. In our previous research work, we have found that a large amount of, so called, packet-like charge generates in low density polyethylene (LDPE) under high dc electric field of more than 100 kV/mm. The packet-like charge enhances the electric field locally in bulk of the sample, and then finally it leads a breakdown. On the other hand, a new type of XLPE which was made through adding conductive inorganic fillers, shows a good dc dielectric breakdown characteristic and high volume resistivity under dc stress. In this report, we tried to observe the space charge behavior under high dc electric field in this material. From the results, it is found that the charge injection is effectively suppressed by adding only a small amount of conductive inorganic fillers to XLPE.

  11. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  12. Effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus dermal filler in the treatment of severe nasolabial folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Mary P; Smith, Stacy R; Thomas, Jane A; Murphy, Diane K; Beddingfield, Frederick C

    2008-01-01

    With the baby boomer generation firmly ensconced in middle age and the ubiquity of botulinum toxin type A, nonsurgical facial rejuvenation is becoming increasingly prevalent. As this generation continues to age, products with greater therapeutic power to correct aging changes will be in growing demand. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, within-subject, controlled study was conducted comparing Juvéderm Ultra Plus hyaluronic acid filler with bovine collagen. A subset of subjects classified as having treatment for severe nasolabial folds is presented in this article. Subjects received Juvéderm Ultra Plus in one severe nasolabial fold and Zyplast collagen in the other nasolabial fold; up to two touch-up treatments were allowed at 2-week intervals. Nasolabial fold severity was evaluated every 4 weeks for 24 weeks using a five-point scale. Treatment site reactions and adverse events were also recorded. A complimentary treatment was offered at the end of the trial, with effectiveness evaluations just before retreatment and up to 48 weeks after repeated treatment for a subset of subjects. Of the 87 subjects, most were female Caucasians, but all Fitzpatrick skin types were represented (36 percent types IV through VI). At 24 weeks, 96 percent of nasolabial folds treated with Juvéderm had maintained clinically significant correction, and 81 percent maintained the correction for 1 year or more. Results were similar for those subjects with follow-up through 48 weeks after repeated treatment. The median volume required for repeated treatment with Juvéderm was significantly less than that for initial treatment (0.7 ml versus 1.6 ml). Juvéderm Ultra Plus provides correction of severe nasolabial folds through 1 year or more.

  13. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    The aminoglycoside kanamycin is a commonly used antibiotic, but unfortunately it is oto- and nephrotoxic in large doses. The negative effects are thought to be due to the formation of free radicals which is why strong antioxidants and iron chelators like 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) are of great...... interest. This study estimates cellular quantitative changes in the utricular macula of mice following systemic treatment with kanamycin alone or in combination with DHB. The animals were injected with either saline, kanamycin or kanamycin+DHB for 15 days and perfusion fixed three weeks after last...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  14. Impact of fillers on dissolution kinetic of fenofibrate dry foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Sprunk, Angela; Kleinebudde, Peter; Page, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Dry foam technology reveals the opportunity to improve the dissolution behavior of poorly soluble drugs tending to agglomeration due to micronization. In this study, the impact of fillers on the manufacturability, the properties of dry foams and granules as well as the dissolution kinetics of dry foam tablets was investigated using fenofibrate as a model compound. Different maltodextrins and dried glucose syrups, a maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex, isomalt and a 1:1 mixture of mannitol/glucose syrup were used as filler. Within the group of maltodextrins and glucose syrups, the influences of dextrose equivalent (DE), particle morphology and botanical source of starch were investigated. Comparable macroscopic foam structures were obtained with maltodextrins and glucose syrups whereas different foam morphologies were obtained for the other fillers tested. Regarding the maltodextrins and glucose syrups, different physicochemical and particle properties had a minor impact on granule characteristics and tablet dissolution. Using the maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex resulted in a low specific surface area of the granules and a slow tablet dissolution caused by a slow disintegration. In contrast, a high specific surface area and a fast release were obtained with isomalt and glucose syrup/mannitol mixture indicating that high soluble low molecular weight fillers enable the development of fast dissolving dry foam tablets.

  15. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Ven, M. van de; Vliet, D. van

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand-bitumen ratio and the com

  16. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Van de Ven, M.; Van Vliet, D.

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand–bitumen ratio and the com

  17. Multipass Narrow Gap of Heavy Gauge Steel with Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markushov, Y.; Evtihiev, N.; Grezev, N.; Murzakov, M.

    This article describes method of heavy gauge welding using laser radiation as beam source of energy. The article contains the results of single-pass laser-arc welding and multipass laser welding with filler wire; highlight benefits and drawbacks of each welding method. The results obtained were compared with the traditional methods of welding of the same thickness.

  18. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  19. Volume profile of α-chymotrypsin during adsorption and enzymatic reaction on a poly(acrylic acid) brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Artem; Erlkamp, Mirko; Steitz, Roland; Czeslik, Claus

    2016-04-07

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes are known to provide a native-like environment for proteins. In this study, we explore this biocompatibility under high pressure conditions. Using α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) as a model enzyme, we report on the pressure dependencies of the enzymatic activity and the neutron scattering length density profile, when this enzyme is adsorbed on a PAA brush. From high pressure total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy, an increasing enzymatic activity has been observed up to 1000 bar, but a rather pressure independent enzymatic activity at higher pressures up to 2000 bar. This finding suggests a non-constant activation volume of α-CT on the PAA brush that is negative below 1000 bar. Thus, the compact nature of the transition state of α-CT is largely preserved upon adsorption. We have also performed high pressure neutron reflectivity experiments to determine the spatial distribution of α-CT inside the PAA brush. Apparently, the enzyme is strongly binding to the PAA chains with 2.3 mg m(-2) of adsorbed enzyme that is reduced to about 1.7 mg m(-2) at 1000-2000 bar. This change of adsorbed mass is consistent with a positive volume change of adsorption, which is probably reflecting electrostriction upon protein-PAA interaction. Thus, the performed high pressure experiments provide new insights into the volume profile of α-CT during adsorption and enzymatic activity on the PAA brush. They also demonstrate that the biocompatible properties of a PAA brush can even be enhanced by pressure.

  20. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  2. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  3. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  4. Influence of anodization parameters on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide formed in mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tzung-Ta; Chang, Yao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The growth of anodic alumina oxide was conducted in the mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids. The influence of anodizing voltage, electrolyte temperature, and concentration of phosphoric and oxalic acids on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide has been investigated. Either anodizing parameter is chosen to its full extent of range that allows the anodization process to be conducted without electric breakdown and to explore the highest possible volume expansion factor. The volume expansion factors were found to vary between 1.25 and 1.9 depending on the anodizing parameters. The variation is explained in connection with electric field, ion transport number, temperature effect, concentration, and activity of acids. The formation of anodic porous alumina at anodizing voltage 160 V in 1.1 M phosphoric acid mixed with 0.14 M oxalic acid at 2 °C showed the peak volume expansion factor of 1.9 and the corresponding moderate growth rate of 168 nm/min.

  5. An international perspective on fillers in dermatology-from an American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H

    2012-09-01

    This manuscript is intended to give one an international perspective on the use of fillers around the world-what makes some of them special and what is the need and what is the purpose of having so many fillers in this global dermatologic community we live in. In the US, we have a finite number of fillers and only a handful more currently going through FDA testing. We demand much from our fillers in terms of safety and efficacy, and for all of us in the US, this is a very good reason to keep the numbers of fillers available to a reasonable number.

  6. Poly(Butylene Terephthalate Based Composites Containing Alumina Whiskers: Influence of Filler Functionalization on Dielectric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Russo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT is one of the most widely used semicrystalline thermoplastics polyester because of its superior thermal and mechanical properties, high dimensional stability and excellent processability. In this research PBT-based nanocomposites, including various amounts (up to 10 wt% of commercial alumina whiskers, have been prepared by using a Brabender internal chamber mixer and analysed in terms of morphological features and dielectric properties. Specific attention has been focused on the effect of the filler functionalization considering 3-glycidoxy propylmethoxysilane (GPS or 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS as coupling agents. Tests, performed on compounds filled with neat and functionalized alumina whiskers, show a clear dependence of relative dielectric permittivity εr, invariance of dissipation factor (tgδ, and a sensible increase of volume electrical resistivity (ρv with the filler’s content and are encouraging for a future introduction of such composites in many electrical applications.

  7. Optical coherence tomography for image-guided dermal filler injection and biomechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Dermal fillers are a very popular anti-ag ing treatment with estimated sales in the billions of dollars and millions of procedures performed. As the aging population continues to grow, these figures are only e xpected to increase. Dermal fillers have various compositions depending on their intended applicati on. Reactions to dermal fillers can be severe, such as ischemic events and filler migration to the eyes. Howe ver, these adverse reactions are rare. Nevertheless, the capability to perform imag e-guided filler injections would minimize th e risk of such reacti ons. In addition, the biomechanical properties of various fillers have been evalua ted, but there has been no investigation on the effects of filler on the biomechanical properties of skin. In this work, we utilize optical cohe rence tomography (OCT) for visualizing dermal filler injections with micrometer-scale sp atial resolution. In addition, we utilize noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify the changes in the biomechan ical properties of pig skin after the dermal filler injections. OCT was successfully able to visualize the dermal filler injecti on process, and OCE showed that the viscoelasticity of the pig skin was increased locally at the filler injection sites. OCT may be able to provide real-time image guidance in 3D, and when combined with functional OCT techniques such as optical microangiography, could be used to avoid blood vessels during the injection.

  8. Pengaruh Penggunaan Aspal Buton sebagai Filler Campuran Split Mastic Asphalt terhadap Karakteristik Marshall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryadin Eko Raharjo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji penggunaan asbuton sebagai filler dalam campuran SMA beserta pengaruhnya terhadap karakteristik marshal yang meliputi: VITM, VFWA, Stabilitas, flow dan MQ. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode eksperimen dengan menguji penggunaan asbuton sebagai filler dalam campuran SMA. Variasi kadar asbuton sebagai filler dibuat 4%, 4,5%, 5%, 5,5% dan 6%. Setiap varian dalam penelitian ini menggunakan 3 benda uji sehingga jumlah sampel adalah 15 buah. Uji menggunakan Aspal yang digunakan Aspalt AC 80/100. Filler yang digunakan Asbuton mikro B30. Kadar aspal yang digunakan ditetapkan sebesar  7%. Analisis data dilakukan dengan menggunakan statistik deskriptif Penelitian ini menyimpulkan bahwa: (1 nilai VITM akan mengalami penurunan seiring bertambahnya kadar filler asbuton mikro, (2 penambahan filler asbuton kadar 4 – 5% akan meningkatkan nilai VFWA , namun pada kadar filler 5,5% dan 6% akan menurunkan nilai VFWA karena filler yang digunakan terlalu banyak sehingga persentase bitumen terhadap total aspal dalam campuran juga semakin besar, (3 penggunaan asbuton mikro filler pada campuran SMA memberi pengaruh menurunnya nilai stabilitas (4 penambahan filler asbuton mikro akan menaikkan nilai flow, hal ini terjadi karena dengan penambahan asbuton mikro kandungan aspal pada campuran akan bertambah, dan (5 nilai MQ mengalami penurunan seiring dengan bertambahnya kadar filler.

  9. Study on a novel Sn-electroplated silver brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-08-01

    Novel Sn-electroplated Ag brazing filler metal with a high tin content was prepared by combining the plating and thermal diffusion method. The BAg45CuZn alloy was used as a base filler metal, and a Sn layer was electroplated on it. Then the H62 brass was brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metal containing 6.2 wt% of Sn. The results showed that the microstructure of the brazed joints with the Sn-plated filler mainly consisted of the Ag phase, Cu phase, CuZn phase and Cu5Zn8 phase. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was 326 MPa, which was higher than that of the joints with the base filler metal. Fracture analysis showed that the fractures of the joints brazed by the Sn-plated filler metal was mainly ductile fracture mixed with a small quantity of brittle fracture.

  10. Partial molar volume and partial molar compressibility of four homologous {alpha}-amino acids in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K., E-mail: krpal25@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Government College of Engg., Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamilnadu (India); Edwin Gladson, S., E-mail: aseg_win@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, St. Xavier' s Catholic College of Engg., Chunkankadai 629 003, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: Partial molar volume indicates strong solute-cosolute interaction in the NaF solution. Partial molar compressibility results compliment partial molar volume results. Hydration number proves that sodium fluoride has dehydration effect on amino acids. Interactions between sodium fluoride and (NH{sub 3}{sup +},COO{sup -}) group of amino acid are stronger. - Abstract: Density and ultrasonic speed of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine) in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions {l_brace}(0.1 to 0.5) M{r_brace} have been measured at T = (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. Apparent molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}), partial molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer volumes ({Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}) and hydration number (n{sub H}) are evaluated using density data. Adiabatic compressibility ({beta}{sub s}), change ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}), and relative change in compressibility ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}/{beta}{sub 0}), apparent molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}), partial molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer compressibility ({Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), and hydration number (n{sub H}) have been calculated using ultrasonic speed data. The linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},{Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} and {Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids have been used utilised to calculate the contribution of charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} group and other alkyl chain of the amino acids. The analysis shows that the ion-ion interactions are much stronger than ion-hydrophobic interactions over the entire concentration range of sodium fluoride. It is observed that sodium fluoride has a strong dehydration effect on amino acids.

  11. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  12. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators.

  13. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM. PMID:28788177

  14. Laser brazing with filler wire for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaosong; Li Liqun; Chen Yanbin; Zhou Shanbao

    2005-01-01

    The process properties and interface behavior of CO2 laser brazing with automatic wire feed for galvanized steel sheets were investigated , in which the brazing filler metal was CuSi3 and no flux was used. As to the appearance quality of the brazing seams, the roles of the processing parameters, such as brazing speed, wire feeding rate, inclination and feeding direction of the wire, laser power, spot diameter and heating position, were assessed. The further investigation indicates that the behavior of the active elements Si, Mn and Zn are significantly influenced by energy input. At the interface, the microstructure of the base metal was composed of columnar crystals and the acicalar α solid solution was found on the filler metal side.

  15. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no ...

  16. The influence of filler particles on space charge measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, Stephane [Laboratoire des Instruments et Systemes d' Ile de France, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - 10, rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France (France); Sylvestre, Alain [Laboratoire d' lectrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517 - 25, avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen [Direction des Recherches Materiaux, Schneider Electric SA - 20, rue Henri Tarze, 38050 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2004-07-07

    The effects of filler particles on the signal measured using the pressure-wave-propagation method to determine the space charge distribution are analysed. A special test sample geometry is used to classify the influence of particles, and in particular, the role of piezoelectricity is discussed. Applications with Epoxy resin samples loaded either by silica or alumina particles are presented. Silica particles are shown to exhibit piezoelectricity which strongly modifies the measured signals.

  17. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  18. Hydrodynamic parameters of mesh fillers relevant to miniature regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, E. C.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Kirkconnell, Carl S.

    2010-06-01

    Directional hydrodynamic parameters of two fine-mesh porous materials that are suitable for miniature regenerative cryocoolers were studied under steady and oscillating flows of helium. These materials included stacked discs of #635 stainless steel (wire diameter of 20.3 μm) and #325 phosphor bronze (wire diameter of 35.6 μm) wire mesh screens, which are among the commercially available fillers for use in small-scale regenerators and heat exchangers, respectively. Experiments were performed in test sections in which pressure variations across these fillers, in the axial and lateral (radial) directions, were measured under steady and oscillatory flows. The directional permeability and Forchheimer's inertial coefficient were then obtained by using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-assisted method. The oscillatory flow experiments covered a frequency range of 50-200 Hz. The results confirmed the importance of anisotropy in the mesh screen fillers, and indicated differences between the directional hydrodynamic resistance parameters for steady and oscillating flow regimes.

  19. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  20. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  1. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    injection. Total volume of the utricle, as well as total number of hair and supporting cells, were estimated on light microscopic sections. Total volume and mean volume of hair cell types I and II and supporting cells were estimated on digital transmission electron micrographs. Total volume of the utricular...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  2. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem KARAHANCER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% substitution. Therefore, welded tuff was substituted with limestone filler in proportion of 25%, 50%, 65% and 75%. Next, Indirect Tensile Strength test was practiced on the fabricated specimens and the results were assessed. According to the Indirect Tensile Strength results, welded tuff with 65% was given higher strength than the limestone filler. As a result, it has come up that welded tuff can be used as mineral filler in the hot mix asphalt.

  3. New fillers under consideration: what is the future of injectable aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    The past 5 years in the United States have seen an explosion in the popularity of noninvasive aesthetic procedures. Not only have fillers and Botox turned out to be fantastically reliable and effective aesthetic tools, but also they have vastly expanded the accessibility of cosmetic procedures. Our cosmetic filler options are growing quickly as more and more fillers are coming before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking entry into the lucrative U.S. market. This article outlines the approval process that foreign fillers go through in their home countries and gives an idea of the fillers that are currently under consideration by the FDA. As our armamentarium of injectable fillers grows, it will be essential to know each product's strengths and weaknesses so that we can provide our patients with the best possible aesthetic results.

  4. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling.

  5. Influence of Erosion Phenomenon on Flow Behavior of Liquid Al-Si Filler Between Brazed Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Takahiro; Ueda, Toshiki

    Automotive heat exchangers are predominantly composed of plates, tubes and fins. Each component is brazed by using Al-Si filler. In the plate/tube/fin brazed-structures, the flow of the liquid filler between the components affects the fillet size at each joint. In this study, the influence of the erosion phenomenon, i.e., silicon diffusion from the braze cladding into the core alloy, in the tube on the flow behavior of the liquid filler flowing on the tube from the plate to the fin has been investigated. As a result, the area of the liquid filler not flowing but existing around α phases on the tube during brazing, which is defined as filler flow channel, can change depending on the erosion degree. The flow ability of the liquid filler flowing from the plate to the fin increases as the area increases.

  6. Effect of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Hayakawa, Iwao; Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth were examined. Four types of experimental resins were prepared: one was a matrix resin, while the others were composite resins containing three different types of fillers (nano-sized silica filler with or without silanization, and prepolymerized filler). Specimens were immersed in distilled water, coffee, red wine, or curry. Color change after immersion was measured using a colorimeter. Color difference values (delta E) and changes in translucency parameter (delta TP) were statistically analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparison. On the influence of the polishing factor, statistically significant differences were neither observed in delta E nor delta TP between polished and non-polished tooth surfaces. On the contrary, the influences of filler type and discoloration medium, and their interaction thereof, were significant. With unsilanized filler, the delta E value of composite resin artificial teeth was significantly increased.

  7. EFFECT OF FILLER LOADING ON PHYSICAL AND FLEXURAL PROPERTIES OF RAPESEED STEM/PP COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Majid Zabihzadeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to develop a new filler for the production of natural filler thermoplastic composites using the waste rapeseed stalks. The long-term water absorption and thickness swelling behaviors and flexural properties of rapeseed filled polypropylene (PP composites were investigated. Three different contents of filler were tested: 30, 45, and 60 wt%. Results of long-term hygroscopic tests indicated that by the increase in filler content from 30% to 60%, water diffusion absorption and thickness swelling rate parameter increased. A swelling model developed by Shi and Gardner can be used to quantify the swelling rate. The increasing of filler content reduced the flexural strength of the rapeseed/PP composites significantly. In contrast to the flexural strength, the flexural modulus improved with increasing the filler content. The flexural properties of these composites were decreased after the water uptake, due to the effect of the water molecules.

  8. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  9. Brazing of copper to stainless steel with a low-silver-content brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukikoshi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yūki; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Kanasaki, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    The brazing of copper to stainless steel (SUS304 JIS) was performed using a low- silver-content brazing filler metal, Ag-50Cu, under an Ar gas atmosphere with a conventional furnace, owing to the potential economic benefits of using low-silver-content filler metals. The brazeability of the low-silver-content brazing filler metal to copper and SUS304 was investigated. A good joint was obtained, and a drastic dissolution reaction occurred at the copper side. Molten BAg8 penetrated along the crystal grain boundary of the copper base metal when BAg8 was used as the filler metal. This was caused by the dissolution of Ni from the stainless steel into the molten filler metal. Ag-50Cu, which was investigated in this work, can be used instead of BAg8 filler metal.

  10. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Characteristics of The Fillers Used for Realizing the Asphalt Mixtures in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Mihaela Dămiean

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the lab results for four types of filler used in producing the asphalt mixture in Romania, as well as other physical-chemical characteristics of a new type of filler, derivate of the grinding of the bituminous shists through a ball mill/crusher. Knowing these physical-chemical characteristics is crucial for asphalt mixtures due to the complex purpose of the filler.

  12. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Suan, T. Nguen [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  13. Effects of Rare Earths on Properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni Base Brazing Filler Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tianjun; Kang Hui; Wu Yongqin; Qu Ping

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the addition of rare earths on the properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni base brazing filler alloys and the mechanical microstructure and properties were studied for the brazed-joints in the vacuum brazing of TC4 by comparing synthetical properties of two kinds of filler metals.The results indicate that the filler metals added with rare earths have lower melting point, better wettability and higher mechanical properties in the brazing joints.

  14. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    fillers. In this study commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added into the LSRs and we examined how the properties of the networks were...... these additives, the use of multiple titanium dioxides as filler potentially suits to special applications. In the present study, a series of TiO2 fillers were blended into LSRs, such as hydrophilic/ hydrophobic, micro/ nano scale, anatase/ rutile crystal, sphere/ core-shell structure. The results indicate...

  15. Suspect filler similarity in eyewitness lineups: a literature review and a novel methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan J; Oriet, Chris; Price, Heather L

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitness lineups typically contain a suspect (guilty or innocent) and fillers (known innocents). The degree to which fillers should resemble the suspect is a complex issue that has yet to be resolved. Previously, researchers have voiced concern that eyewitnesses would be unable to identify their target from a lineup containing highly similar fillers; however, our literature review suggests highly similar fillers have only rarely been shown to have this effect. To further examine the effect of highly similar fillers on lineup responses, we used morphing software to create fillers of moderately high and very high similarity to the suspect. When the culprit was in the lineup, a higher correct identification rate was observed in moderately high similarity lineups than in very high similarity lineups. When the culprit was absent, similarity did not yield a significant effect on innocent suspect misidentification rates. However, the correct rejection rate in the moderately high similarity lineup was 20% higher than in the very high similarity lineup. When choosing rates were controlled by calculating identification probabilities for only those who made a selection from the lineup, culprit identification rates as well as innocent suspect misidentification rates were significantly higher in the moderately high similarity lineup than in the very high similarity lineup. Thus, very high similarity fillers yielded costs and benefits. Although our research suggests that selecting the most similar fillers available may adversely affect correct identification rates, we recommend additional research using fillers obtained from police databases to corroborate our findings.

  16. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  17. The Microstructural Evolution of Vacuum Brazed 1Cr18Ni9Ti Using Various Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and weldability of a brazed joint of 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel with BNi-2, BNi82CrSiBFe and BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metals in vacuum were investigated. It can be observed that an interdiffusion region existed between the filler metal and the base metal for the brazed joint of Ni-based filler metals. The width of the interdiffusion region was about 10 μm, and the microstructure of the brazed joint of BNi-2 filler metal was dense and free of obvious defects. In the case of the brazed joint of BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metal, there were pits, pores and crack defects in the brazing joint due to insufficient wettability of the filler metal. Crack defects can also be observed in the brazed joint of BNi82CrSiBFe filler metal. Compared with BMn50NiCuCrCo and BNi82CrSiBFe filler metals, BNi-2 filler metal is the best material for 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel vacuum brazing because of its distinct weldability.

  18. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Brostow

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs. We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic—with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention.

  19. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E Hagg; Hnatchuk, Nathalie; Perez, Jose M

    2017-03-16

    Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs). We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic-with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention.

  20. Degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack: Experiment investigation on the effect of high volume fly ash content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Tyas, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Concrete is susceptible to a variety of chemical attacks. In the sulfuric acid environment, concrete is subjected to a combination of sulfuric and acid attack. This research is aimed to investigate the degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack based on measurement of compressive strength loss and diameter change. Since the proportion of SCC contains higher cement than that of normal concrete, the vulnerability of this concrete to sulfuric acid attack could be reduced by partial replacement of cement with fly ash at high volume level. The effect of high volume fly ash at 50-70% cement replacement levels on the extent of degradation owing to sulfuric acid will be assessed in this study. It can be shown that an increase in the utilization of fly ash to partially replace cement tends to reduce the degradation as confirmed by less compressive strength loss and diameter change. The effect of fly ash to reduce the degradation of SCC is more pronounced at a later age.

  1. The effect of concentrations and volumes of methanol in reducing free fatty acid content of used cooking oil as biodiesel feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julianto, Tatang Shabur; Suratmi

    2017-03-01

    The research on purification of used cooking oil as biodiesel feedstock has been done. Refining was performed using methanol with varied concentrations and volumes. A total of 10 grams of used cooking oil was extracted using methanol with a variation concentration of 100%, 70%, 50% and 30%, and a variation of volume 10, 25, 50, 100, and 150 mL. After extraction, the free fatty acids contents of the extracted oil were analyzed. The results showed that pure methanol has the highest ability to reduce the content of free fatty acid with a percentage of reduction for 89.23%. The optimum ratio of used cooking oil and methanol is about 1:15 (v/v).

  2. Acceleration of percolation for cementitious sensors using conductive paint filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Irvin Jude Joseph

    Structural health monitoring has emerged as an important branch of civil engineering in recent times, with the need to automatically monitor structural performance over time to ensure structural integrity. More recently, the advent of smart sensing materials has given this field a major boost. Research has shown that smart sensing materials fabricated with conductive filler at a concentration close to the percolation threshold results in high sensitivity to strain due to the piezoresistive effect. Of particular interest to this research are cementitious sensors fabricated using carbon black fillers. Carbon black is considered because of its widespread availability and low cost over other conductive fillers such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. A challenge in the fabrication of these sensors is that cementitious materials require a significant amount of carbon black to percolate, resulting in a loss in mechanical properties. This research investigates a new method to accelerate percolation of the materials, enabling cementitious sensors with fewer carbon black particles. A carbon black-based conductive paint that allows earlier percolation by facilitating conducting networks in cementitious sensors is used. The conductive paint consists of a block copolymer, SEBS (styrene-co-ethylene-co-butylene-co-styrene), filled with carbon black particles. The percolation thresholds of sensors fabricated both with and without conductive paint are, as well as their strain sensing characteristics and compressive strength. The study found that SEBS could successfully reduce the percolation threshold by 42%, and that samples with SEBS showed better electrical responses in dynamic conditions. Despite showing lower compressive strength, cementitious sensors fabricated with this novel conductive paint show promise for real time health monitoring applications.

  3. Influence of the filler content on the thermal expansion behavior of an epoxy matrix particulate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognana, S. [IFIMAT - Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT - Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Somoza, A. [IFIMAT - Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Pomarico, J.A.; Ranea-Sandoval, H.F. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); IFAS - Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

    2009-02-15

    The thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix particulate composites prepared with different volumetric filler contents ({phi}) up to 25 vol.% was studied. Using a very simple absolute optical dilatometer developed in our laboratory, the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) for pure epoxy resin matrix and the composites in the glassy and rubbery states (293 K {<=} T {<=} 493 K) were obtained. For the matrix, the CTE obtained in the two states are in good agreement with those reported. For composites the results are discussed into the frame of different approaches using well-known mechanical models. In the glassy state, the CTE behavior could be well described by the upper bound of the Hashin-Shtrikman model. In the rubbery state it was necessary to evaluate the contribution of the average volume of nanoholes in the epoxy matrix as a consequence of the addition of particles. To this aim, using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, the dependence of the average volume of nanoholes with {phi} was measured.

  4. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Nano Filler Polyester Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnia Noor Najmi; Redzuan Aein Afina; Shuhaimeen Nurul Shakirah

    2016-01-01

    This research is focusing on mechanical and morphological properties of unsaturated polyester (UP) reinforced with two different types of filler which is nano size clay Cloisite 30B (C30B) and Carbon Black (CB). Samples were fabricated via hand lay-up and open molding technique. Percentages of Cloisite 30B & Carbon Black (CB) used vary from 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt%. The mechanical properties were evaluated by impact, flexural and hardness testing. Result shows that the mechanical strength of ...

  5. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare; Gungor, Ahmet; Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-01

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  6. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbin; Feng, Xiaosong; Li, Liqun

    2007-11-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry, and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot. The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  7. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanbin Chen; Xiaosong Feng; Liqun Li

    2007-01-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry,and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot.The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  8. The influence of irradiated wood filler on some properties of polypropylene - wood composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Điporović-Momčilović Milanka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of compatibility between the wood filler and thermoplastic matrix is of essential importance in composite production. Numerous methods have been developed for increasing this compatibility, which is still representing a challenging objective of composite research throughout the world. The research into these methods is primarily directed towards their efficiency from the viewpoint of the composite performance and their economical acceptability. The latter is of particular importance for the composite production in the developing countries with respect to the shortage of the corresponding funds. With this respect, the utilization of ionizing radiation might have considerable advantages. In this research, the beech wood flour was irradiated by a dose of 10 kGy of 60Co gamma rays for purpose of provoking the changes by the ionizing effect. The effects of ionizing radiation upon the properties of wood particles have been examined by IR spectroscopy and by determination of contents of hydroxyl groups in wood by acetylating as an indirect method. All these methods have been expected to reveal the chemical effects of the applied radiation treatment. The irradiated and the control wood flour were used in order to produce the samples of composite with polypropylene. The polypropylene-wood flour (PP-WF composites were produced with 40% of wood particles having fraction size 0.3 mm. The melt-blended composites were modified with amido-acrylic acid (AMACA as a new coupling agent synthesized for this propose in amount of 6 wt.% (based on wood filler and successively with 0.05 wt.% (based on PP of organic peroxide during mixing step. The composites containing coupling agents showed superior mechanical properties, compared to the untreated one. The highest extent of improvement of tensile was achieved in PP-WFl composites modified with AMACA coupling agent.

  9. Preparation and application of nanocrystalline cellulose derived from sugarcane waste as filler modified alkanolamide on crosslink of natural rubber latex film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, Hamidah; Hayat, Nuim; Lubis, Marfuah

    2017-07-01

    Sugarcane waste is abundant sources of cellulose and it has potential to reutilize. Cellulose from sugarcane waste can be derived into nanocystalline cellulose (NCC) from crystalline region. The NCC as a filler has capability to reinforce natural rubber latex product. The crosslink in vulcanized natural rubber latex film influences several properties of product. In this work, we extracted NCC from sugarcane waste then added into natural rubber latex as filler modified alkanolamide (ALK) and also studied the crosslink of natural rubber latex films. NCC were produced from sugarcane waste by hydrolysis process with sulfuric acid 45%. The obtained NCC was characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infra red (FTIR). NCC was modified by alkanolamide and dispersed in water with filler concentration of 10%. Then the dispersion were added into latex system followed by pre-vulcanization at 70 °C. The films were prepared by coagulant dipping method and dried at 100 °C and 120 °C for 20 minutes. Characterization of NCC from sugarcane waste by using FTIR was done, it clearly showed the functional groups of cellulose. TEM showed the obtained NCC were rod-shaped with about 40-160 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length, and XRD showed that the degree of crystalinity of NCC from sugarcane waste is 92.33%. The crosslink of natural rubber films were studied by measure the crosslink density for different filler loading by using swelling measurement with toluene solution. The result show that the crosslink density increased in line with amount of filler which added into the system, and also the crosslink density that obtained from vulcanization at 120 °C were higher than 100 °C.

  10. Long-term effects of L- and N-type calcium channel blocker on uric acid levels and left atrial volume in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Mitsuru; Mano, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Akiyo; Fujiwara, Shohei; Sugahara, Masataka; Hirotani, Shinichi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Komamura, Kazuo; Koshiba, Masahiro; Masuyama, Tohru

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is associated with hypertension and hyperuricemia. However, it is not clear whether the L- and N-type calcium channel blocker will improve LV diastolic dysfunction through the reduction of uric acid. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anti-hypertensive therapy, the L- and N-type calcium channel blocker, cilnidipine or the L-type calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, on left atrial reverse remodeling and uric acid in hypertensive patients. We studied 62 patients with untreated hypertension, randomly assigned to cilnidipine or amlodipine for 48 weeks. LV diastolic function was assessed with the left atrial volume index (LAVI), mitral early diastolic wave (E), tissue Doppler early diastolic velocity (E') and the ratio (E/E'). Serum uric acid levels were measured before and after treatment. After treatment, systolic and diastolic blood pressures equally dropped in both groups. LAVI, E/E', heart rate and uric acid levels decreased at 48 weeks in the cilnidipine group but not in the amlodipine group. The % change from baseline to 48 weeks in LAVI, E wave, E/E' and uric acid levels were significantly lower in the cilnidipine group than in the amlodipine group. Larger %-drop in uric acid levels were associated with larger %-reduction of LAVI (p uric acid levels.

  11. Effect of three filler types on mechanical properties of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavan A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Despite the improvements achieved in the field of dental composites, their strength, longevity, and service life specially in high stress areas is not confirmed. Finding better fillers can be a promising step in this task. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the filler type on the mechanical properties of a new experimental dental composite and compare these with the properties of composite containing conventional glass filler. Materials and Methods: Experimental composites were prepared by mixing silane-treated fillers with monomers, composed of 70% Bis-GMA and 30% TEGDMA by weight. Fillers were different among the groups. Glass, leucite ceramic and lithium disilicate were prepared as different filler types. All three groups contained 73% wt filler. Comphorquinone and amines were chosen as photo initiator system. Post curing was done for all groups. Diametral tensile strength (DTS, flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured and compared among groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS package using one-way ANOVA test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The results showed that the stronger ceramic fillers have positive effect on the flexural strength. Ceramic fillers increased the flexural strength significantly. No significant differences could be determined in DTS among the groups. Flexural modulus can be affected and increased by using ceramic fillers. Conclusion: Flexural strength is one of the most significant properties of restorative dental materials. The higher flexural strength and flexural modulus can be achieved by stronger ceramic fillers. Any further investigation in this field would be beneficial in the development of restorative dental materials.

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  13. Ionic conductivity enhancement of polymer electrolytes with ceramic nanowire fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Nian; Sun, Jie; Hsu, Po-Chun; Li, Yuzhang; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Cui, Yi

    2015-04-08

    Solid-state electrolytes provide substantial improvements to safety and electrochemical stability in lithium-ion batteries when compared with conventional liquid electrolytes, which makes them a promising alternative technology for next-generation high-energy batteries. Currently, the low mobility of lithium ions in solid electrolytes limits their practical application. The ongoing research over the past few decades on dispersing of ceramic nanoparticles into polymer matrix has been proved effective to enhance ionic conductivity although it is challenging to form the efficiency networks of ionic conduction with nanoparticles. In this work, we first report that ceramic nanowire fillers can facilitate formation of such ionic conduction networks in polymer-based solid electrolyte to enhance its ionic conductivity by three orders of magnitude. Polyacrylonitrile-LiClO4 incorporated with 15 wt % Li0.33La0.557TiO3 nanowire composite electrolyte exhibits an unprecedented ionic conductivity of 2.4 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at room temperature, which is attributed to the fast ion transport on the surfaces of ceramic nanowires acting as conductive network in the polymer matrix. In addition, the ceramic-nanowire filled composite polymer electrolyte shows an enlarged electrochemical stability window in comparison to the one without fillers. The discovery in the present work paves the way for the design of solid ion electrolytes with superior performance.

  14. Impedance characterization of epoxy composite containing conductive hybrid carbon fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Raja Nor; Tawil, Siti Nooraya; Zailan, Suhaila

    2017-08-01

    Epoxy composites containg carbon fillers are prepared in this work with an intention to characterise their electrical properties. The performance of electrical conductivity of epoxy composites is assessed by adding various loadings of conductive carbon fillers into the neat epoxy. First, Carbon Black (CB) was incorporated within epoxy matrix at several loadings. The increase in the specific conductivity of more than five orders of magnitude was observed between 3 wt. % and 4 wt.% CB loading, recorded at 10 kHz frequency. As such, the critical percolation loading, pc was recorded in between 3 wt.% and 4 wt.%. For the samples containing CB at loading 4 wt.% and above, the conductivity remains independent of the frequency, indicating a purely ohmic behaviour. It is also observed that the specific conductivity values can be altered by increasing the hardener stirring time up to 15 minutes, where the pc was successfully lowered down to < 3 wt. % It was further intended to study the hybrid effects by adding CNT to the composites. The conductivity data showed that the composite becomes frequency independent, even at 2 wt. % carbon loading (1 wt. % CB + 1 wt. % CNT), demonstrating the roles contributed by high aspect ratio conductive CNT in enhancing the formation of percolated path at much lower loading.

  15. Polymethylmethacrylate dermal fillers: evaluation of the systemic toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, C C G; Borghetti, R L; Nicoletti, N; da Silva, V D; Cherubini, K; Salum, F G; de Figueiredo, M A Z

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated local and systemic reactions after an intravascular injection of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) at two concentrations in a murine model. Thirty rats were divided equally into three groups: 2% PMMA, 30% PMMA, and a control group (normal saline only injection). The filler was injected into the ranine vein. The rats were sedated at 7 and 90 days and a clinical evaluation performed. After euthanasia, the right lung, liver, and right kidney were removed, weighed, and microscopically analyzed. The submandibular lymph nodes and tongue were removed and examined microscopically. Serum was subjected to liver and kidney function tests. No groups showed clinical alterations. Microspheres were not observed at any distant organ. Two samples from the 2% PMMA group showed a local inflammatory response at day 7 and another two samples from the 30% PMMA group at day 90. The group injected with 30% PMMA presented higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.047) after 90 days when compared with the other groups. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that intravascular injections of PMMA fillers show potential health risks such as chronic inflammation at the implantation site.

  16. Technical Note: Filler and superplasticizer usage on high strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sümer, M.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of filler (rock-dust usage on high strength concrete have been investigated through lab experiments and some results have been obtained. The experiments involved three series of concrete with different cement proportions of 375 kg/m3, 400 kg/m3, and 425 kg/m3. For each series of concrete, three different groups of samples have been prepared, the first one being the reference concrete which contained 0% chemical admixture and 0% filler, the second one contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 0% filler and finally the last group contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 5% filler to the weight of cement used. The chemical admixture used was a type of Super plasticizer with a brand name of “DARACEM 190”, and the cement used was Ordinary Portland Cement of target compressive strength 42.5 N/mm2, obtained from Nuh Cement Plant. For each batch, Slump Tests and Unit Weight Tests were performed. For each stage and group, two 15 cm cubic samples have been tested for Compressive Strength after being cured in water at 20 ± 2 °C for ages of 3 days, 7 days, 28 and 60 days. The total number of samples was 72. As a result, filler usage was found to reduce the porosity of Concrete, increase the Unit Weight of Concrete, increase the need for water and improve the Compressive Strength Properties of Concrete.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la utilización de un “filler” (polvo mineral en el comportamiento del hormigón de altas prestaciones. Para ello, se realizan ensayos de laboratorio en los que se emplean tres series de hormigón, cada una con una dosificación de cemento distinta, de 375, 400 y 425 kg/m3. Se preparan tres grupos de probetas de cada serie, el primero o de referencia con 0% de aditivo químico y 0% de “filler”, el segundo con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y 0% de “filler” y el tercero con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y un 5% de “filler” en peso del cemento. Como aditivo se

  17. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    low viscosities, which is favorable for loading of inorganic fillers [5]. In this study, commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added...

  18. THE QUANTUM – MECHANICAL MODEL OF FORMING CONTACT AREAS IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS WITH SPHERICAL FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Suhovaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and properties of the composites having Fe-C-B-Р binders alloyed with molybdenum and strengthened by the W-C quickly-cooled filler were investigated in this work. The model based on quantum mechanics principles explaining the dependencies of contact interaction zones width on filler diameter was suggested.

  19. Perspectives for Titanium-Derived Fillers Usage on Denture Base Composite Construction: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal W. Elshereksi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA is an extensively used material in dentistry because of its aesthetics, processability, and reparability. However, PMMA is still far from being ideal in fulfilling the mechanical requirements of prosthesis. PMMA-based denture base polymers exhibit low fracture resistance and radiopacity behavior. Efforts to improve the mechanical and radiopacity properties of denture base materials through inclusion of silica-based fillers are ongoing. Although silane-treated siliceous fillers are commonly used, they are not sufficiently strong. They also exhibit cracks, which either cut through the glass fillers or propagate around the filler particles. This defect occurs when the dental composites are placed in aqueous oral environment because of the hydrolytic degradation of silica-based fillers and silane-coupling agents. The clinical problem of using silanes in adhesion promotion is bond degradation over time in oral environment. In addition, silanes do not bond effectively to nonsilica-based dental restorative materials. This review presents titanium-derived fillers as alternatives to siliceous fillers. Titanate-coupling agents are found to be effective couplers in treating Ti-based fillers because of their chemical compatibility and relatively high stability in aqueous environment.

  20. Alternative Fillers for the Production of Bituminous Mixtures: A Screening Investigation on Waste Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Sangiorgi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the demand for using recycled materials in construction because of the lack and limitation of available natural resources. A number of industrial and domestic waste products are being used in the replacement of traditional materials for road construction, and many studies have been carried out in recent years on the use of different recycled materials in substitution of conventional fillers in Asphalt Concretes (AC. The aim of this laboratory research is to analyze the physical characteristics of three different recycled fillers and compare them with those of a traditional limestone filler. The alternative fillers presented in this paper are: a waste bleaching clay that comes from two consecutive stages in the industrial process for decolouring vegetable oils and producing biogas (Ud filler, a dried mud waste from a tungsten mine (MW filler and a recycled glass powder (Gl filler. Results show significant differences between the fillers, and, in particular, Rigden Voids (RV seem to have the largest potential influence on the rheology of ACs.

  1. Influence of Sn on Microstructure and Performance of Electric Vacuum Ag-Cu Filler Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHI Lei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Influence of Sn on microstructure, melting characteristic and brazing performance of electric vacuum Ag-Cu filler metal was studied by using scanning electronic microscope (SEM with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and contrast tests. The results show that, while the addition of Sn is 4% (mass fraction,the same below, there is no brittle β-Cu phase in Ag60Cu filler metal,the effect on the processing performance is not obvious; with the increase of Sn content, the liquidus temperature of Ag60Cu filler metal decreases gradually, but the solidus temperature drops drastically,resulting in wider melting temperature range, and worse gap filling ability of filler metal. The Ag60Cu filler metal with Sn content of 4% has good spreading and metallurgical bonding abilities on copper plates, which are closer to that of BAg72Cu filler metal, and it can be processed into flake filler metal to replace the BAg72Cu flake filler metal to be used.

  2. Effect of Filler Composition on the Brazing of Alumina to Copper Using Ultrasonic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalid M. HAFEZ; Masaaki NAKA

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasonic wave was applied during brazing of alumina to Cu. First alumina was metallized by applying ultrasonicwave in braze bath. Then the metallized alumina was brazed with Cu using the same filler alloy. The filler used wereZn-Al alloys and Zn-Sn A

  3. The mechanical properties of nanofilled resin-based composites: characterizing discrete filler particles and agglomerates using a micromanipulation technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curtis, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    To assess the mechanical properties of discrete filler particles representative of several inorganic fillers in modern dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to assess the validity of a novel micromanipulation technique.

  4. Fracture resistance of rubbers with MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black fillers as assessed by the J-integral: Effects of rubber type and filler concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ricco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The fracture resistance of different rubbers containing various nanofillers, such as multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black (CB, was determined by the J-integral making use of the single edge notched tensile loaded (SEN-T single specimen approach. The elastomeric matrices were natural (NR, ethylene propylene diene (EPDM and hydrogenated nitrile rubbers (HNBR. Moreover, the strain softening (Payne effect of selected rubbers with 30 part per hundred rubber (phr filler content was also investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA in shear mode. DMTA results indicated that the Payne effect follows the ranking: MWCNT(fibrous > organoclay(platy > silica(spherical. J-resistance (JR curves were constructed by plotting the J value as a function of the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD*, monitored during loading. CTOD* = 0.1 mm was considered as crack initiation threshold and thus assigned to the critical value JIc. JIc increased with increasing filler loading, whereby MWCNT outperformed both silica and CB. On the other hand, JIc did not change with filler loading for the NR/organoclay systems that was traced to straininduced crystallization effect in NR. The tearing modulus (TJ also increased with increasing filler loading. The related increase strongly depended on both rubber and filler types. Nonetheless, the most prominent improvement in TJ among the fillers studied was noticed for the fibrous MWCNT.

  5. Tissue Engineering and the Future of Facial Volumization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Marsha; Watson, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Volume loss due to facial aging can be restored by facial volumization using a variety of materials. Volumization can be performed in isolation or concurrent with other facial rejuvenation procedures to obtain an optimal aesthetic result. There is a myriad of manufactured products available for volumization. The use of autologous fat as facial filler has been adopted more recently and possesses certain advantages; however, the ideal filler is still lacking. Tissue engineering may offer a solution. This technology would provide autologous soft-tissue components for use in facial volumization. The use of stem cells may enable customization of the engineered product for the specific needs of each patient. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Effect of fillers and fire retardant compounds on hydroxy terminated polybutadiene based insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Kakade

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyurethane compositions have been formulated using hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene as polymeric binder and carbon black as a major filler. Various binder-to-filler ratios of the formulations were evaluated to get calendered sheets. The formulations have been characterised for pot-life and rollability and the calendered sheets for mechanical and thermal properties, bUm rate, glass transition temperature, shore hardness and density . The different fillers tried were varieties of carbon black as a major filler; metal oxides, silicates and organic compounds; and fire retardants, such as zinc borate, sodium metaborate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and antimony trioxide. The structure and morphology of the fillers have been correlated with the properties. The optimised composition has been evaluated in an end-burning motor, as an insulator for case-bonded application, using a typical composite propellant. The results of interface bonding between the propellant and the insulator have also been presented.

  7. Effect of Additional Elements of Al-Si Filler Alloy on Flowability and Clearance Fillability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Masakazu; Yoshino, Michihide; Kuroda, Shuu

    Aluminum alloys are widely used for automotive heat exchangers manufactured by brazing processes. All joint gaps must be filled with Al-Si filler metal to prevent the leak of refrigerant. Recently, brazing of heat exchanger components has become difficult due to the decrease in the thickness of the brazing sheets. Since the fluidity of Al-Si molten metal is very high, the flow of molten filler metal sometimes causes dissolution of the base metal or defect of joints. In this study, we investigated the effect of additional elements (such as Mn, Fe, Ti and Zr) of Al-Si filler metal on the flowability and clearance fillability using our original evaluation model. The results indicated that the addition of Mn or Ti improved the clearance fillability significantly. We clarified the mechanism that additional elements change the properties of molten filler metal, by measuring the viscosity of each filler metal and observing the solidified microstructure.

  8. Silica-filled elastomers: polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, A.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Richter, D. [IFF-Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Urban, V. [ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); IPNS, Argonne 60439-4814 (United States); Kohlbrecher, J. [PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Straube, E. [University of Halle, FB Physik, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  9. Influence of inorganic filler content on the radiopacity of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura; Moldovan, Marioara; Prejmerean, Cristina; Nica, Luminita

    2012-01-01

    Digital radiography was used to measure the radiopacity of 18 resin cements to determine the influence of inorganic filler content on radiopacity. Four disk specimens (n=4) of each light-curing cement were digitally radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge using an intraoral sensor (XIOS Plus, Sirona, Germany), and their mean gray value measured. Percentage of filler by weight was determined using an analytical combustion furnace. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). All materials were more radiopaque than dentin and 12 materials were more radiopaque than enamel. Filler percentage ranged between 17.36 to 53.56 vol% and radiopacity between 1.02 to 3.40 mm Al. There were no statistically significant differences in inorganic filler percentage and radiopacity among the different shades of the same material (p>0.05), but the highest radiopacity was measured for the material which contained a higher percentage of filler.

  10. The effects of rattan filler loadings on properties of rattan powder-filled polypropylene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshamila Shaari Balakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of filler loading on the properties of rattan powder-filled polypropylene composites. The composites were prepared by incorporating rattan powder of average size 180 µm into polypropylene matrix using a Polydrive Thermo Haake internal mixer. Filler loadings of the rattan powders ranged between 0 and 40 parts per hundred parts of resin (phr. Mechanical, morphological, and thermal properties were studied. The tensile strength, elongation at tensile failure, and impact strength decreased, while stabilization torque, thermal stability, and water absorption increased with increasing filler loading. Tensile modulus increased with addition of rattan powder and eventually decreased at 40 phr filler loading due to the weakening adhesion between the filler and the matrix. The morphological studies of fractured surfaces using SEM confirmed the deterioration in tensile properties.

  11. Silica-filled elastomers polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    CERN Document Server

    Botti, A; Richter, D; Urban, V; Ipns, A 6 4; Kohlbrecher, J; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  12. Wetting and spreading behavior of molten brazing filler metallic alloys on metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Satoshi; Kajiura, Tetsurou; Hanada, Yukiakira; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Wetting and spreading of molten brazing filler material are important factors that influence the brazing ability of a joint to be brazed. Several investigations into the wetting ability of a brazing filler alloy and its surface tension in molten state, in addition to effects of brazing time and temperature on the contact angle, have been carried out. In general, dissimilar-metals brazing technology and high-performance brazed joint are necessities for the manufacturing field in the near future. Therefore, to address this requirement, more such studies on wetting and spreading of filler material are required for a deeper understanding. Generally, surface roughness and surface conditions affect spreading of molten brazing filler material during brazing. Wetting by and interfacial reactions of the molten brazing filler material with the metallic substrate, especially, affect strongly the spreading of the filler material. In this study, the effects of surface roughness and surface conditions on the spreading of molten brazing filler metallic alloys were investigated. Ag-(40-x)Cu-xIn and Ag- (40-x)Cu-xSn (x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25) alloys were used as brazing filler materials. A mild-steel square plate (S45C (JIS); side: 30 mm; thickness: 3mm) was employed as the substrate. A few surfaces with varying roughness were prepared using emery paper. Brazing filler material and metallic base plate were first washed with acetone, and then a flux was applied to them. The filler, 50 mg, was placed on the center of the metallic base with the flux. A spreading test was performed under Ar gas using an electrically heated furnace, after which, the original spreading area, defined as the sessile drop area, and the apparent spreading area, produced by the capillary grooves, were both evaluated. It was observed that the spreading area decreased with increasing In and Sn content.

  13. Influence of variously functionalized SBA-15 fillers on conductivity and electrochemical properties of PBI composite membranes for high temperature polymer fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, S.; Villa, D. C.; Cattaneo, A. S.; Mustarelli, P.; Quartarone, E.

    2015-10-01

    The use of inorganic fillers is an interesting strategy to improve the electrochemical performances of PBI membranes for application as electrolytes in HT-PEMFCs. Here, we prepared several mesoporous silica (SBA-15) based hybrids, functionalised with different moieties, namely acidic (SO3H-), basic (NH2-), and amphoteric (SO3H-NH2) units. The electrochemical properties of the resulting electrolytes were investigated in terms of proton transport and functional tests by varying the silica functionalization degree in the range 10-70 mol%, as well as the particles loading in the polymer (0-30 wt%). The actual effectiveness of the SBA-15 functionalization process in improving the electrolyte properties was compared with both the unfilled membrane and the one filled with pristine SBA-15. The best conductivity (∼90 mS cm-1 at 120 °C, 30%RH) was obtained with PBI composites loaded with 30 wt% of non-functionalized SBA-15. The use of fillers functionalized with acidic, basic of amphoteric groups did not lead to improvements with respect to pure SBA-15. This could be related to the set up of significant interactions between the functionalised fillers and H3PO4, which negatively influence the proton mobility. Encouraging MEA results (power peak >320 mW cm-2) were obtained in case of membranes based on pure SBA-15. These performances make the SBA-15/PBI composites particularly interesting for application in HT-PEMFCs.

  14. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  15. Analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry with large volume direct aqueous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Whitaker, Joshua S; McCarty, Christina L

    2012-07-01

    A large volume direct aqueous injection method was developed for the analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by using reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode. Both the external and internal standard calibration methods were studied for the analysis of monoiodoacetic acid, chloroiodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, and diiodoacetic acid in drinking water. The use of a divert valve technique for the mobile phase solvent delay, along with isotopically labeled analogs used as internal standards, effectively reduced and compensated for the ionization suppression typically caused by coexisting common inorganic anions. Under the optimized method conditions, the mean absolute and relative recoveries resulting from the replicate fortified deionized water and chlorinated drinking water analyses were 83-107% with a relative standard deviation of 0.7-11.7% and 84-111% with a relative standard deviation of 0.8-12.1%, respectively. The method detection limits resulting from the external and internal standard calibrations, based on seven fortified deionized water replicates, were 0.7-2.3 ng/L and 0.5-1.9 ng/L, respectively.

  16. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Gungor, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Kocaman, Suheyla, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Selcuk University, 42031 Konya (Turkey)

    2014-05-15

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  17. Electrorheology of polystyrene filler/polyhedral silsesquioxane suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Ernest C; Yang, Hengxi; Green, Peter F

    2012-04-01

    An important challenge in the field of electrorheology is identifying low-viscosity fluids that would exhibit significant changes in viscosity, or a yield stress, upon the application of an external electric field. Our recent research showed that optimal compositions of mixtures, 10 wt % sulfonated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (s-POSS) mixed with polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), exhibited significant electrorheological activity. Here we show that s-POSS/PDMS mixtures containing polystyrene (PS) fillers, of micrometer-sized dimensions, containing as little as ~1 wt % s-POSS, exhibited an increase in ER activity by an order of magnitude, beyond that of s-POSS/PDMS mixtures. The dynamic yield stress was found to scale with the particle diameter, a, as τ(y) is proportional to a(0.5) and with the electric field as τ(y) is proportional to E(1.5-2.5); this behavior is reasonably well understood within the context of dielectric electrorheological theory.

  18. Changes in pulp web properties by addition of natural filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaludin, Nurul Hasanah; Ghazali, Arniza; Daud, Wan Rosli Wan; Ghazali, Salmi

    2012-09-01

    Development of the desired pulp-based products eco-properties are governed by factors like choice and suitability of raw material, the design and operation of pulping process and choice of additives. Fines recovered during refining discharge of an alkaline peroxide pulping system were collected based on their retention on varying mesh-sizes screens. Analysis shows that 12% of the 400-mesh fines added to the web enhances paper tensile strength by 100%. This defines the usefulness of fibrillar particles whose cell wall collapsibility increases the web density by increasing bonding ability and thus, strength of pulp-based products such as paper. The study acknowledges fines functioning as natural filler in pulp network and collection of fines from the refining discharge was found to reduce 70% turbidity and this improvement will help reduce the costs pertinent to generation of whitewater from the pulping system.

  19. Influence of filler selection on twin screw foam granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, K E; Weatherley, S; Sheskey, P J; Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    The influence of filler selection in wet granulation was studied for the novel case where the binder is delivered as an unstable, semi-rigid aqueous foam to an extrusion process. The work primarily examined the impact of differing concentrations of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH® 101) in a formulation with spray-dried α-lactose monohydrate (Flowlac® 100) in regards to wetting and granule nucleation for this relatively new technique known as continuous foam granulation. Foam stability was varied within the work to change its drainage and coarsening behavior atop these powder excipients, by use of different foamable binding agents (METHOCEL™ F4 PLV and METHOCEL™ Premium VLV) as well as by adjusting the foam quality. A static bed penetration test was first used to study the foam behavior in wetting these powders without the processing constraints of an extruder which limit possible liquid-to-solids ratios as well as introduce shear which may complicate interpretation of the mechanism. The test found that the penetration time to saturate these powders decreased as their water absorption capacity increased which in turn decreased the size of the formed nuclei. Differences in the stability of the foamed binder had minimal influence on these attributes of wetting despite its high spread-to-soak behavior. The size of granules produced by extrusion similarly demonstrated sensitivity to the increasing water absorption capacity of the filler and little dependency on foam properties. The different liquid-to-solids ratios required to granulate these different formulations inside the extruder highlighted an evolving concept of powder lubricity for continuous foam granulation.

  20. Design and fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with conducting fillers as electronic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushibe, Eliud Kizito

    The growing demand for small, portable and high performance electronic devices has resulted in research activity for embedded electronic components. This offers prospects for the development of flexible electronic components that combines the use of organic and inorganic materials and can be produced on a roll-to-roll process. This dissertation presents advances in the fabrication and characterization of flexible polymeric nanocomposite thin films. Inorganic and synthetic metal nanostructures with high electrical and dielectric properties were employed as filler materials. The processability of these functional filler materials was achieved by dispersion in conventional polymer matrices such as polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) to afford electroactive polymeric composite materials. In the fabrication of inorganic nanostructures, a Tubes by Fiber Template technique was employed to afford submicron metal and metal oxide tubes. Silver and copper nanostructures were fabricated by electroless deposition on electrospun fiber templates. To obtain hollow, submicron tubes, the sacrificial polymer template materials were removed by a combination of solvent dissolution and thermal degradation under an inert atmosphere. Polyaniline thin film deposited on the fiber template was used as a binding interface to enhance uniform and continuous deposition of the metal. This was instrumental in fabricating tubes with varied wall thicknesses ranging from 50 to 300 nm obtained as a function of plating time. By doping electrically conducting polymers such as polyaniline, the conductivity can be modified. We describe the fabrication of highly conducting polyaniline nanostructures via template free synthesis. A novel approach that involves a combination of hydrochloric acid and camphorsulfonic acid dopant at low concentrations was adopted. This approach afforded nanofibers with diameters of 150 ± 50 nm and high electrical conductivity of 4.2

  1. Self-monitoring electrically conductive asphalt-based composite containing carbon fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-peng; LIU Xiao-ming; YE Qun-shan; LI Ning

    2006-01-01

    A new novel function materials,structure self-monitoring asphalt-based composite was introduced. The results show that the output resistance of electrically conductive asphalt-based composites would change under cyclic loading and vehicle loading action. The resistance change of conductive asphalt-based composites was aroused by the variation of its interior structure. When the fatigue failure was studied,the larger cracks cut the continuous electrically conductive path and the electron is difficult to overcome the potential barrier of gap. In the early period,the slight deformation and microcrack may be recovered due to the viscoelasticity character of asphalt,which leads to some cracks close again,the output resistance changes a little. But with the shear process performs continuously,the cracks become larger and larger,which would cut the conductive path and block off the transition of electrons,and if the cracks are large enough,the pitch-matrix composites containing carbon fillers will lose electrically conductive function. When the rutting failure was studied,the flowage of conductive substance results in the decrease of substance due to electrically conducting and conductive path decreasing. The decrease of electron volume contribute to electrically conducting and large stone aggregate prevent the electron from transiting. In a word,the variation of output resistance is aroused by the variation of interior structure completely.

  2. Degradation kinetics of ethylene-octene copolymer/wood flour biocomposites in dependence to filler content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova, A. K.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Monakhova, T. V.; Popov, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    This article is focused on thermal oxidative degradation and biodegradation in soil of biocomposites based on ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC), filled by wood flour (from 30 to 70% wt.), in dependence to the filler content. The study of oxidative degradation of composites was carried out at two temperatures (80 and 130°C respectively). The induction period and the rates of oxidation were determined. It was concluded that as filler content raises, the induction period increases. It can be explained by the higher specific area of composites in comparison with pure EOC. However, high filled composites (60 and 70 % of the filler) are oxidized with a huge induction period because polyphenols in the filler inhibit the oxidation process. Biodegradation test under laboratory conditions was carried out to investigate the biodegradability of the material. Composites with lower filler content have lower weight loss rate. Small particles are capsulated by polymer and are isolated from moisture and microorganisms. On the other hand, at a high filling of the composite small particles stick together and act as large ones. Such filler agglomerates are connected with each other and allow microorganisms to penetrate into the composite. It was concluded as filler content raises the mass loss increases.

  3. Influence of silane content and filler distribution on chemical-mechanical properties of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathy Aparecida XAVIER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of silane concentration and filler size distribution on the chemical-mechanical properties of experimental composites. Experimental composites with silane contents of 0%, 1% and 3% (in relation to filler mass and composites with mixtures of barium glass particles (median size = 0.4, 1 and 2 μm and nanometric silica were prepared for silane and filler analyses, respectively. The degree of conversion (DC was analyzed by FTIR. Biaxial flexural strength (BFS was tested after 24-h or 90-d storage in water, and fracture toughness, after 24 h. The data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05. The DC was not significantly affected by the silane content or filler distribution. The 0% silane group had the lowest immediate BFS, and the 90-d storage time reduced the strength of the 0% and 3% groups. BFS was not affected by filler distribution, and aging decreased the BFS of all the groups. Silanization increased the fracture toughness of both the 1% and 3% groups, similarly. Significantly higher fracture toughness was observed for mixtures with 2 μm glass particles. Based on the results, 3% silane content boosted the initial strength, but was more prone to degradation after water storage. Variations in the filler distribution did not affect BFS, but fracture toughness was significantly improved by increasing the filler size.

  4. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.

  5. Mechanical Behaviour of Composite Bioactive Bone Cements Consisting of Two Different Types of Surface Treated Hydroxyapatite as Filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Bioactive bone cements based on a paste-paste system for orthopaedic applications were developed consisting of hydroxyapatite ( HA ) filler particles in a methacrylate matrix comprising urethane dimethacrylate(UDMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate ( TEGDMA ). To improve the interface between inorganic filler and orgaric matrix the HA particles were subjected to two different surface treatment methods, using polyacrylic acid ( PAA ) and γ- methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (γMPS). The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of surface treatment and the inclusion of multifunctional methacrylates on the mechanical properties,namely 3-point flexural strength (FS) and fracture toughness of the cements and the effect of ageing in simulated body fluid. Comparing the mechanical properties of the two cements, the γMPS-HA cement showed that the fracture toughness of the experimental bone cements were significantly greater (p< 0.001) compared to that of the PMMA cement, whereas PAA-HA containing cement had strength values around 20% lower. Interestingly, PAA was found to be more effective in improving the interface as the PAA treated HA cement ( UTHAPPA ) maintained its strength on immersion in SBF , suggesting that PAA provided a coupling, which was less sensitive to moisture,a similar trend was also observed with the inclusion of the carboxyl containing multifunctional methacrylates.

  6. Whisker-reinforced dental core buildup composites: effect of filler level on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C

    2000-12-15

    The strength and toughness of dental core buildup composites in large stress-bearing restorations need to be improved to reduce the incidence of fracture due to stresses from chewing and clenching. The aims of the present study were to develop novel core buildup composites reinforced with ceramic whiskers, to examine the effect of filler level, and to investigate the reinforcement mechanisms. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whisker surface for improved retention in the matrix. Filler level was varied from 0 to 70%. Flexural strength, compressive strength, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured. A nano-indentation system was used to measure elastic modulus and hardness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the fracture surfaces of specimens. Whisker filler level had significant effects on composite properties. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) increased from (95+/-15) for the unfilled resin to (193+/- 8) for the composite with 50% filler level, then slightly decreased to (176+/-12) at 70% filler level. The compressive strength increased from (149+/-33) for the unfilled resin to (282+/-48) at 10% filler level, and remained equivalent from 10 to 70% filler level. Both the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. In conclusion, silica particle-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers significantly reinforced dental core buildup composites. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack deflection and bridging by the whiskers. Whisker filler level had significant effects on the flexural strength, compressive strength, elastic modulus, and hardness of composites.

  7. Dental composite resins containing silica-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers with various filler levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H

    1999-07-01

    Currently available direct-filling composite resins are susceptible to fracture and hence are not recommended for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to use ceramic single-crystalline whiskers as fillers to reinforce composites, and to investigate the effect of whisker filler level on composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers, thereby improving retention in the matrix. The composite flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, and degree of polymerization conversion were measured as a function of whisker filler mass fraction, which ranged from 0% to 70%. Selected composites were polished simulating clinical procedures, and the surface roughness was measured with profilometry. The whisker composite with a filler mass fraction of 55% had a flexural strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 196+/-10 MPa, significantly higher than 83+/-14 MPa of a microfill and 120+/-16 MPa of a hybrid composite control (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison). The composite modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The flexural strength first increased, then plateaued with increasing filler level. The degree of conversion decreased with increasing filler level. The whisker composite had a polished surface roughness similar to that of a conventional hybrid composite (p>0.1; Student's t). To conclude, ceramic whisker reinforcement can significantly improve the mechanical properties of composite resins; the whisker filler level plays a key role in determining composite properties; and the reinforcement mechanisms appear to be crack pinning by whiskers and friction from whisker pullout resisting crack propagation.

  8. Effects of Metal Fillers on Properties of Epoxy for Rapid Tooling Inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Tanwyn Mohd Khushairi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal filled epoxy has been recognised as an alternative material used in rapid tooling application such as core and cavity for injection moulding. The addition of fillers into the metal filled epoxy has proven to increase the epoxy’s mechanical performance such as wear, strength, improved machinability and thermal properties. Physical and thermal properties such as density, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and compressive strength were analysed to evaluate the effects of inclusion of metal fillers such as copper and brass particles into the blended epoxy matrix. Brass and copper powders were added separately ranging from 10%, 20% and 30% of its weight into the aluminium filled epoxy mix ratio. Increased density, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity values were evident with a linear trend when both filler compositions were increased from 10% to 30%. Brass and copper density values of 2.22 g/cm3 and 2.08 g/cm3 respectively were recorded at the highest filler composition. Copper fillers with 30% composition in epoxy matrix exhibited the highest average value of thermal diffusivity of 1.12 mm2/s and thermal conductivity of 1.87 W/mK, while inclusion of brass showed no significant improvement on the properties. Compressive strength increased from 76.8 MPa to 93.2 MPa with 20% of brass fillers and 80.8 MPa with 10% of copper fillers composition. The addition of more metal fillers resulted in a decrease in compressive strength due to the presence of porosity. This study validated previous researchers that fillers enhance mechanical, thermal properties and density of aluminium filled epoxy.

  9. Study on vacuum induction brazing of SiCp/LY12 composite using Al-Cu-Si-Mg filler metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹家生; 许如强; 赵其章; 陈铮

    2003-01-01

    The vacuum induction brazing of SiC particulate reinforced LY12 alloy matrix composite using Al-28Cu-5Si-2Mg filler metal has been carried out. The micrograph of the joint interface was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The joint strength was determined by shear tests. The results show that brazing temperature, holding time, SiC particle volume percentage and post heat treatment influence joint strength. SiC particles happen in the brazing seam and the distribution of SiC particles in the joint is not uniform. Particle-poor zones in the joint exist near the base metal, and particle concentrate zones exist in the center of the brazing seam. In addition, the failure of the composite is predominantly initiated by the rooting of SiC particle in the brazing seam and the micro-crack expanded along the brazing seam with low energy.

  10. Measurement and COrrelation on Viscosity and Apparent Molar Volume of Ternary System for L—ascorbic Acid in Aqueous D—Glucose and Sucrose Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长伟; 马沛生

    2003-01-01

    Visosities and densities at ,several temperatures from 293.15 K to 313.15K are reported for L-ascorbic acid in aqueous glucose and sucrose solutions at different concentrations.The parameters of density,Viscosity coefficient B and partial molar volume are calculated by regression.The experimental results show that densities and viscositis decrease as temperature increases at the same solute and solvent (glucose and sucrose aueous solution)concentrations,and increase with concentration of glucose and sucrose at the same solute concentration and temperature,B increases with concentration of glucose and sucrose and temaperature,L-ascorbic acid is sturcture-breaker or structure-making for the glucose and sucrose aqueous solutions ,Furthermore,the solute-solvent interactions in ternary systems of water-glucose-electrolyte and water-sucrose-electrolyte are discussed.

  11. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  12. Effect of Filler Concentration on Thermal Stability of Vinyl Copolymer Elastomer (VCE) Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devlin, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pacheco, Robin Montoya [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-06

    To study the thermal stability of vinyl copolymer elastomer (VCE) in its composite form, systematic TGA characterizations were conducted in both nonisothermal and isothermal modes. The effects of filler concentration on the aging behaviors of the VCE/filler composites were investigated under nitroplasticizer (NP) environment. FTIR characterization was used to probe the structural changes in the VCE polymer before and after the thermal treatments. This study suggests that the filler concentration significantly deteriorates the thermal stability of NP at a moderate temperature (< 70 °C). The degradation of NP, in turn, accelerates the aging process of the VCE polymer in its composite form.

  13. Effect of stainless steel chemical composition on brazing ability of filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Kei; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Many kinds of stainless steel have been used in the engineering field. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of SUS chemical compositions on the brazing ability of filler metal. In this study, SUS315J containing Cr, Ni, Si, Cu, and Mo was employed as a base metal. Excellent spreading ability of the molten nickel-based brazing filler on SUS315J was obtained as compared with that on SUS316. Copper and silicon influenced the significant spreading ability of the filler.

  14. Optimization of Filler Metals Consumption in the Production of Welded Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pańcikiewicz K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the some aspects of the optimization of filler metals consumption in the production of welded steel structures. Correct choice of beveling method can allow to decrease cost of production and increase quality. The review of calculation methods of filler metal consumption at the design stage was carried out. Moreover, the practical examples of amount of filler metals calculation were presented and analyzed. The article also contain examples of mobile apps which are makes it easy to see welding costs in just a few seconds. Apps as well as simple excel spreadsheets with correct mathematic equations allows to optimize welding process.

  15. The effect of pre-anaesthetic fasting time and type of food on gastric content volume and acidity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvas, Ioannis; Rallis, Timoleon; Raptopoulos, Dimitris

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the effect of pre-anaesthetic fasting time and variety of food on gastric content (GC) volume and pH in dogs. Randomized, cross-over, prospective experimental study. Fifteen mongrel dogs (nine females and six males 1-4 years old, weighing 10-24.5 kg). Each dog received the same seven treatments in random order: dry food 3 hours before anaesthesia (BA) (treatment 3D), canned food (half daily rate) 3 hours BA (treatment 3C), 0% fat cow milk 3 hours BA (treatment 3M), dry food 10 hours BA (treatment 10D), canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10C), low fat canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10F) and low protein canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10P). All animals were pre-medicated with propionyl promazine and anaesthesia was induced with thiopental sodium and maintained with halothane. GC was aspirated using an orogastric catheter and its volume and pH were measured. Treatment 10F had significantly lower GC pH than all the 3-hour treatments. Treatments 10D and 10P had significantly lower pH than treatments 3D and 3C. Treatment 3M had significantly lower pH than the other 3-hour treatments. Treatment 3D had significantly greater gastric volume than treatments 3M, 10C, 10F and 10P. Canned food at half the daily rate administered 3 hours before anaesthesia did not increase significantly the GC volume compared to the other types of food used. The GC pH was also high. This type of food fed 3 hours before induction of anaesthesia may be of benefit in reduction of the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux during anaesthesia in dogs.

  16. Actualización en microimplantes de relleno perioral atendiendo a su permanencia Update on facial filler microimplants and their durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Aced Jiménez

    2013-06-01

    filling materials for the correction of wrinkles, folds and other faults is increasingly demanded by our patients. They are materials that on having been infiltrated lead to an increase in volume. These products can be classified depending on the time of they remain in the body and as temporary or biodegradable (between 4 and 8 months, semi-permanent (between 12 and 18 months and permanent (not biodegradable. The aim of this work is to review the facial filling materials that are currently approved by the Spanish Medicines and Health Devices Agency (AEMPS in September, 2010. Material and methods: The official web page of the AEMPS was searched for facial filling materials approved in September, 2010. A review was then made of the most recent scientific literature on these materials. Results: The temporary materials used are hyaluronic acid, collagen and agarose gel, with polylactic acid, calcium hydroxyapatite, and polycaprolactone as semi-permanent materials, and polymethyl methacrylate and the acrylamides in the group of the permanent materials. Discussion: The ideal characteristics for a facial filler are that it should be biocompatible, non-carcinogenic, non-teratogenic, non-migratory, and have satisfactory results with permanence. These types of materials are health products and must comply with the regulations of the AEMPS. Therefore, they must only be used by qualified professionals specifically trained in this area. Conclusions: The temporary face fillers are those that are most used for aesthetic purposes. Nevertheless, knowledge is required on the nature of every material, its indications, and the possible complications that can appear after his use, to be able to achieve the maximum benefits and obtain the best possible results.

  17. Production of bone cement composites: effect of fillers, co-monomer and particles properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Junior, J.G.F.; Melo, P.A.; Pinto, J.C., E-mail: jjunior@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: melo@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. (PEQ/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Pita, V.J.R.R., E-mail: vjpita@ima.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano; Nele, M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2011-04-15

    Artificial bone cements (BCs) based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) powders and methyl methacrylate (MMA) liquid monomer also present in their formulation small amounts of other substances, including a chemical initiator compound and radiopaque agents. Because inadequate mixing of the recipe components during the manufacture of the bone cement may compromise the mechanical properties of the final pieces, new techniques to incorporate the fillers into the BC and their effect upon the mechanical properties of BC pieces were investigated in the present study. PMMA powder composites were produced in situ in the reaction vessel by addition of X-ray contrasts to the reacting MMA mixture. It is shown that this can lead to much better mechanical properties of test pieces, when compared to standard bone cement formulations, because enhanced dispersion of the radiopaque agents can be achieved. Moreover, it is shown that the addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) and acrylic acid (AA) to the bone cement recipe can be beneficial for the mechanical performance of the final material. It is also shown that particle morphology can exert a tremendous effect upon the performance of test pieces, indicating that the suspension polymerization step should be carefully controlled when optimization of the bone cement formulation is desired. (author)

  18. Acid deposition: decision framework. Volume 1. Description of conceptual framework and decision-tree models. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balson, W.E.; Boyd, D.W.; North, D.W.

    1982-08-01

    Acid precipitation and dry deposition of acid materials have emerged as an important environmental issue affecting the electric utility industry. This report presents a framework for the analysis of decisions on acid deposition. The decision framework is intended as a means of summarizing scientific information and uncertainties on the relation between emissions from electric utilities and other sources, acid deposition, and impacts on ecological systems. The methodology for implementing the framework is that of decision analysis, which provides a quantitative means of analyzing decisions under uncertainty. The decisions of interest include reductions in sulfur oxide and other emissions thought to be precursors of acid deposition, mitigation of acid deposition impacts through means such as liming of waterways and soils, and choice of strategies for research. The report first gives an overview of the decision framework and explains the decision analysis methods with a simplified caricature example. The state of scientific information and the modeling assumptions for the framework are then discussed for the three main modules of the framework: emissions and control technologies; long-range transport and chemical conversion in the atmosphere; and ecological impacts. The report then presents two versions of a decision tree model that implements the decision framework. The basic decision tree addresses decisions on emissions control and mitigation in the immediate future and a decade hence, and it includes uncertainties in the long-range transport and ecological impacts. The research emphasis decision tree addresses the effect of research funding on obtaining new information as the basis for future decisions. Illustrative data and calculations using the decision tree models are presented.

  19. Recipe design and color matching for pigments and fillers in powder coating%粉末涂料中颜填料的配方设计及其调色方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永泰

    2015-01-01

    在设计粉末涂料配方的颜填料用量时,颜填料/基料(简称颜基比)、颜填料体积浓度(简称PVC值)是很重要的。选择合适的颜基比和PVC值,在粉末涂料配方中使用颜填料,依据客户色板或色卡要求,快速、准确地调配颜色。%Pigment and filler/binder (pigment/binder ratio), pigment and fillers volume concentration(PVC value)are very important when design the amount of pigment and fillers in powder coating formulation. According to the color board or color card requirement from the consumer, color matching has done quickly and accurately with the choice of appropriate pigment/binder ratio and PVC value and usage of pigments and fillers in powder coating.

  20. SIFAT MEKANIK KOMPOSIT COKELAT BATANG DENGAN FILLER BIJI METE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Wiguna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bahan komposit yang banyak dijumpai di masyarakat umumnya terbuat dari material berat seperti, logam, keramik, atau polimer. Pada bahan pangan terdapat pula yang termasuk ke dalam kategori material komposit, diantaranya adalah cracker, cookie, kue pie, chasew chocolate, dan lain sebagianya. Diantara komposit bahan pangan tersebut yang paling banyak digemari sebagai makanan camilan adalah  cokelat. Hal menarik yang dikaji pada studi ini berkaitan dengan sifat mekanik komposit cokelat yaitu kekuatan tekan dari komposit tersebut. Komposit ini terbuat dari bahan makanan cokelat dengan variasi  fraksi massa mete sebagai filler yaitu 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, dan 29%. Matriks yang digunakan adalah cokelat jenis dark chocolate. Sifat mekanik yang dikaji adalah kuat tekan pada komposit cokelat batang. Parameter ini diukur untuk mengetahui ukuran maksimum beban yang dapat diterima komposit tersebut. Komposit yang memiliki kekuatan tekan terbesar ada pada cokelat batang dengan fraksi massa mete 29 % yaitu sebesar 2,81 MPa. Hal ini menunjukkan  bahwa variasi fraksi massa mete berpengaruh pada sifat mekanik material komposit karena berkaitan dengan perilaku distribusi partikel. Kuat tekan komposit cokelat teramati meningkat dengan kenaikan jumlah biji mete pada cokelat batang.Generally, the composite materials found in the civilization are made from heavy materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, and polymers. In fact, the composite material also found in food, such as crackers, cookies, pies, and cashew chocolates. Cashew chocolates usually consumed as the most favourite snack. The most interesting object from this study is related with the mechanical composite characteristic of the chocolate, i.e. compressive strength. Chocolate composite is made from chocolate with variety of cashew mass fraction as the filler, i.e. 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, and 29%. In this study, the composite matrix was a dark chocolate, whereas the mechanical characteristic determined

  1. Cytotoxicity of resin composites containing bioactive glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Satin; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C; Pfeifer, Carmem; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-02-01

    To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity of dental composites containing bioactive glass fillers. Dental composites (50:50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin: 72.5wt% filler, 67.5%Sr-glass and 5% OX50) containing different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15wt%) of two sol-gel bioactive glasses, BAG65 (65mole% SiO2, 31mole% CaO, 4mole% P2O5) and BAG61 (3mole% F added) were evaluated for cytotoxicity using Alamar Blue assay. First, composite extracts were obtained from 7 day incubations of composites in cell culture medium at 37°C. Undifferentiated pulp cells (OD-21) were exposed to dilutions of the original extracts for 3, 5, and 7 days. Then freshly cured composite disks were incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 2 days. Subsequently, fresh composite disks were incubated in culture medium at 37°C for 7 days, and then the extracted disks were incubated with OD-21 cells for 2 days. Finally, fresh composites disks were light cured for 3, 5, and 20s and incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. To verify that the three different curing modes produced different levels of degree of conversion (DC), the DC of each composite was determined by FTIR. Groups (n=5) were compared with ANOVA/Tukey's (α≤0.05). Extracts from all composites significantly reduced cell viability until a dilution of 1:8 or lower, where the extract became equal to the control. All freshly-cured composites showed significantly reduced cell viability at two days. However, no reduction in cell viability was observed for any composite that had been previously soaked in media before exposure to the cells. Composites with reduced DC (3s vs. 20s cure), as verified by FTIR, showed significantly reduced cell viability. The results show that the composites, independent of composition, had equivalent potency in terms of reducing the viability of the cells in culture. Soaking the composites for 7 days before exposing them to the cells suggested that the "toxic" components had been extracted and the materials were

  2. SIFAT MEKANIK KOMPOSIT COKELAT BATANG DENGAN FILLER BIJI METE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Wiguna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bahan komposit yang banyak dijumpai di masyarakat umumnya terbuat dari material berat seperti, logam, keramik, atau polimer. Pada bahan pangan terdapat pula yang termasuk ke dalam kategori material komposit, diantaranya adalah cracker, cookie, kue pie, chasew chocolate, dan lain sebagianya. Diantara komposit bahan pangan tersebut yang paling banyak digemari sebagai makanan camilan adalah  cokelat. Hal menarik yang dikaji pada studi ini berkaitan dengan sifat mekanik komposit cokelat yaitu kekuatan tekan dari komposit tersebut. Komposit ini terbuat dari bahan makanan cokelat dengan variasi  fraksi massa mete sebagai filler yaitu 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, dan 29%. Matriks yang digunakan adalah cokelat jenis dark chocolate. Sifat mekanik yang dikaji adalah kuat tekan pada komposit cokelat batang. Parameter ini diukur untuk mengetahui ukuran maksimum beban yang dapat diterima komposit tersebut. Komposit yang memiliki kekuatan tekan terbesar ada pada cokelat batang dengan fraksi massa mete 29 % yaitu sebesar 2,81 MPa. Hal ini menunjukkan  bahwa variasi fraksi massa mete berpengaruh pada sifat mekanik material komposit karena berkaitan dengan perilaku distribusi partikel. Kuat tekan komposit cokelat teramati meningkat dengan kenaikan jumlah biji mete pada cokelat batang.Generally, the composite materials found in the civilization are made from heavy materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, and polymers. In fact, the composite material also found in food, such as crackers, cookies, pies, and cashew chocolates. Cashew chocolates usually consumed as the most favourite snack. The most interesting object from this study is related with the mechanical composite characteristic of the chocolate, i.e. compressive strength. Chocolate composite is made from chocolate with variety of cashew mass fraction as the filler, i.e. 13 %, 17%, 20%, 23%, 26 %, and 29%. In this study, the composite matrix was a dark chocolate, whereas the mechanical characteristic determined

  3. Characterization of granite and limestone powders for use as fillers in bituminous mastics dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRENO BARRA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of studies on materials known as fillers from different mineral origins, used in asphalt mixes, specifically in the formulation of mastics. The research was carried out on samples of limestone and granite rock filler and asphalt binder (50/70. The samples were evaluated through semiquantitative chemical analyses by X-ray fluorescence, granulometry by low angle laser emission, scanning electron microscopy, softening point tests, penetration tests, and aggregate-asphalt binder and aggregate-mastic adhesion tests. The results highlighted convergent trends, indicating that the active behavior of the fillers in the mastic formulation is not related to the size of the particles, but rather to their form, surface texture, specific surface area and mineralogical nature, allowing the filler activity concept to be divided into two components: physical (hardening and chemical (adhesion.

  4. Provskite Structure Based Filler Impregnated Pvdf—Hfp Micro Composites For Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickraman, P.; Pandiraj, A.

    2011-07-01

    Lithium BETI (Lithium bis (perfluoroethanesulfonyl) imide) (guest species) based PVDF-HFP(host matrix) Polymer NanoComposites (PNC) films by loading barium titanate (BaTiO3) as a filler, in ascending proportions with the plasticizer (mixture of EC+DMC) while keeping host and guest content as constants, has been investigated by employing AC impedance, Thermal, and XRD. The ionic conductivity measurements on these PNC show that 2.5% BaTiO3 loaded PNC showed mitigation in magnitude of the conductivity compared to that of 0 wt% loaded PNC but thereafter increase in conductivity is noted with increase in filler content upto 7.5 wt%. The higher conductivity is observed for 7.5 % filler loaded membrane. The XRD study identifies suppression of polymer phase associated with (200) plane. The thermal profile registers the endothermic changes associated with polymer host indicating varying heat of fusion ΔHm with filler increase.

  5. Visibly transparent and radiopaque inorganic organic composites from flame-made mixed-oxide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maedler, Lutz [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)], E-mail: lutz@seas.ucla.edu; Krumeich, Frank [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences (Switzerland); Burtscher, Peter; Moszner, Norbert [Ivoclar Vivadent AG (Liechtenstein)

    2006-08-15

    Radiopaque composites have been produced from flame-made ytterbium/silica mixed oxide within a crosslinked methacrylate resin matrix. The refractive index of the filler powder increased with ytterbium oxide loading. A high transparency was achieved for a matching refractive index of the filler powder and the polymer in comparison to commercial materials with 52 wt% ceramic filling. It was demonstrated that powder homogeneity with regard to particle morphology and distribution of the individual metal atoms is essential to obtain a highly transparent composite. In contrast, segregation of crystalline single-oxide phases drastically decreased the composite transparency despite similar specific surface areas, refractive indices and overall composition. The superior physical strength, transparency and radiopacity compared to composites made from conventional silica based-fillers makes the flame-made mixed-oxide fillers especially attractive for dental restoration materials.

  6. Characterization of Nanocomposite filler Morphology using Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, Ryan S.; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN); (AFRL)

    2010-10-22

    Loading polymer matrices with nanoscale fillers is widely believed to have the potential to push polymer properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. Recent nanocomposite research suggests better characterization of the large-scale morphology will provide insight explaining these shortfalls. This work will present ultra-small angle X-ray scattering as a viable tool for elucidating the hierarchical filler morphology that exists within polymer nanocomposites. Scattering analysis tools developed by our group will be applied to scattering data from nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes, layered silicates, and colloidal silica. The relationship between imaging data and scattering data will be discussed in the context of filler dispersion. Finally, the impact of large-scale filler morphology on mechanical and electrical properties will be discussed.

  7. Effect of Chromite-Silica Sands Characteristics on Performance of Ladle Filler Sands for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Free opening rate is mainly determined by the performance of the ladle filler sand. High free opening rates of ladles are required in steel making to improve steel quality. Chromite ladle filler sands are one of the most widely used ladle filler sand. Several operative variables and materials characteristics affect the performance of the sands. Three sets of chromite ladle filler sands were selected and researches were focused on the sintering hehaviour and per- formance of the sands under operative conditions. The effect of particle size distribution on sintering, microstruc- ture, flowability, and permeability were presented. In all cases, the particle size varies from 0.1 to 1.5 mm corre- sponding to free flowing powders. One of the samples has higher permeability factor in comparison with others due to low particle size distribution. The other sample presents very good free opening due to its very good flowability and permeability factor.

  8. A simple method for fabrication of filler-free stretchable polydimethylsiloxane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacharouche, Jalal; Kunemann, Philippe; Fioux, Philippe; Vallat, Marie-France; Lalevée, Jacques [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Hemmerlé, Joseph [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, I.N.S.E.R.M. – Unite 595, 11, Rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Roucoules, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Roucoules@uha.fr [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simple method to elaborate a filler-free stretchable PDMS surface strong enough to resist to successive elongation/retraction cycles even at high degree of stretching. It consists in creating free radicals on a filler-containing PDMS surface by argon plasma exposure and reacting them with a filler-free PDMS resin during the crosslinking step. Changes of physical and chemical properties upon plasma modification are monitored by FTIR and XPS spectroscopies, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used to identify the nature of radicals involved in interfacial bonding. Although a brittle silica-like layer is created on the filler-containing PDMS surface after plasma treatment, an increase in the PDMS/PDMS interfacial strength is observed and a high interfacial resistance has been found under elongation/retraction (stretching/relaxation) cycles.

  9. Application of waste bulk moulded composite (BMC) as a filler for isotactic polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczewski, Mateusz; Matykiewicz, Danuta; Andrzejewski, Jacek; Skórczewska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to produce isotactic polypropylene based composites filled with waste thermosetting bulk moulded composite (BMC). The influence of BMC waste addition (5, 10, 20 wt%) on composites structure and properties was investigated. Moreover, additional studies of chemical treatment of the filler were prepared. Modification of BMC waste by calcium stearate (CaSt) powder allows to assess the possibility of the production of composites with better dispersion of the filler and more uniform properties. The mechanical, processing, and thermal properties, as well as structural investigations were examined by means of static tensile test, Dynstat impact strength test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), melt flow index (MFI) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Developed composites with different amounts of non-reactive filler exhibited satisfactory thermal and mechanical properties. Moreover, application of the low cost modifier (CaSt) allows to obtain composites with better dispersion of the filler and improved processability.

  10. Mechanical behavior of glass fiber polyester hybrid composite filled with natural fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G.; Gupta, A.; Dhanola, A.; Raturi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Now-a-days, the natural fibers and fillers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act as a reinforcing material for polymer composite material alternative to the use of synthetic fiber like as; glass, carbon and other man-made fibers. Among various natural fibers and fillers like banana, wheat straw, rice husk, wood powder, sisal, jute, hemp etc. are the most widely used natural fibers and fillers due to its advantages like easy availability, low density, low production cost and reasonable physical and mechanical properties This research work presents the effect of natural fillers loading with 5%, 10% and 15% on mechanical behavior of polyester based hybrid composites. The result of test depicted that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under impact and flexural loads. However it is found that the hybrid composite have better strength as compared to single glass fibre composites.

  11. Visibly transparent & radiopaque inorganic organic composites from flame-made mixed-oxide fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mädler, Lutz; Krumeich, Frank; Burtscher, Peter; Moszner, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    Radiopaque composites have been produced from flame-made ytterbium/silica mixed oxide within a crosslinked methacrylate resin matrix. The refractive index of the filler powder increased with ytterbium oxide loading. A high transparency was achieved for a matching refractive index of the filler powder and the polymer in comparison to commercial materials with 52 wt% ceramic filling. It was demonstrated that powder homogeneity with regard to particle morphology and distribution of the individual metal atoms is essential to obtain a highly transparent composite. In contrast, segregation of crystalline single-oxide phases drastically decreased the composite transparency despite similar specific surface areas, refractive indices and overall composition. The superior physical strength, transparency and radiopacity compared to composites made from conventional silica based-fillers makes the flame-made mixed-oxide fillers especially attractive for dental restoration materials.

  12. Fracture and Tribological Evaluation of Dental Composite Resins Containing Pre-polymerized Particle Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fracture and tribological evaluation of dental composite resin containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wereinvestigated. Composite resins, e.g. metafil, silux plus, heliomolar and palfique estelite were selected as specimensin order to evaluate the effects of pre-polymerized particle filler on the fracture and wear characteristics of compositeresins. In the wear tests, a ball-on-flat wear test method was used. The friction coefficient of metafil was quite high.The wear resistance of silux plus and palfique estelite was better than that of metafil and heliomolar underthe sameexperimental condition. The main wear mechanism of composite resins containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wasan abrasive wear by brittle fracture of pre-polymerized particles and by debonding of fillers and matrix.

  13. Monitorization of technosols in old mining sites treated with calcareous fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchez, MJose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, MariLuz; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Martínez-Lopez, Salvadora; Hernandez, Carmen; Molina, Jose; Martínez, Lucia B.

    2014-05-01

    experimental areas was done in 18 sampling points in which sediment and water samples were collected and analyzed. Monitorization was carried out during a 4 years period, samples being obtained at two month intervals. The pH and the electrical conductivity were determined, in naddition to the heavy metal concentration. The Zn content was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Pb, Cd and Cu content was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. The As content was measured by atomic fluorescence spectrometry using an automated continuous flow hydride generation spectrometer. In addition, Microtox bioassay was applied in order to study ecotoxicity of collected water samples. Sediments before the remediation technique showed acidic pH, high EC values and high trace elements content. The results obtained after the immobilization showed that sediment samples had neutral pH (average value of 8.3) low electrical conductivity (1.32 dS m-1) and low trace elements concentration, in some cases below the detection limit. When water samples obtained in the piezometers were evaluated, the results indicated that these samples correspond to rainfall waters and were characterized by neutral pH and trace elements concentration below the detection limit. In addition, none of them showed toxicity when submitted to the selected bioassay Then, we can conclude that the use of limestone filler constitutes an excellent option in sediments polluted by trace elements, because of risk for human health or ecosystem does not exist or is decreased in a large extent after the intervention. In addition, the designed experience allows stabilizer proportion to be optimized and may suppose a big cost-saving in the project in areas affected by mining activities.

  14. Filler leachability of composites stored in distilled water or artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, K J; Mukherjee, R; Longmate, J

    1996-09-01

    Though dental composite materials leach filler elements when stored in distilled water, it is not known whether similar leaching occurs in saliva. The hypothesis to be tested was that due to ion exchange occurring at the filler surfaces, more filler elements leach from composites stored in a salt solution simulating saliva than from composites stored in distilled water. Another aim was to determine how matrix selection, filler composition, and filler silanization affect filler leachability of composites after storage in the simulated saliva and water media. We made 128 batches of experimental composites. Half of these used a bis-GMA/TEGDMA matrix and the other a UEDMA/TEGDMA matrix. Either silica or barium glass filler particles were incorporated into these matrices. Filler silanization was followed by a filler drying at 60 degrees C for 24 h. Half of the silanized particles received an additional heat treatment for 1 h at 110 degrees C in vacuum. One specimen per batch was stored in distilled water and the other in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. After each 30-day interval for one year, the specimens were transferred to either freshly distilled water or newly mixed artificial saliva. The "old" solutions were analyzed by ICP for determination of the Si, Ba, and Al concentrations. Analysis of variance revealed that storage solution, filler composition, and total time in the storage solution had strong effects on the leachability (p water) and 2.80 +/- 1.20 microgram/mL (artificial saliva). For barium-glass-filled composites, the corresponding Si leaching values were 0.73 +/- 0.48 microgram/mL and 5.00 +/- 2.20 microgram/mL. The monthly means of the barium leaching values were 2.00 +/- 1.00 microgram/mL (distilled water) and 3.10 +/- 1.80 microgram/mL (artificial saliva). The large difference between leaching in artificial saliva and in distilled water, as well as the interaction between storage medium and filler, cast doubt on the clinical relevance of in vitro

  15. Intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid increases the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated in a large osteochondral defect by implantation of a double-network gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takaaki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Yokota, Masashi; Kondo, Eiji; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Implantation of PAMPS/PDMAAm double-network (DN) gel can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in the osteochondral defect. However, it is a problem that the volume of the regenerated cartilage tissue is gradually reduced at 12 weeks. This study investigated whether intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) increases the volume of the cartilage regenerated with the DN gel at 12 weeks. A total of 48 rabbits were used in this study. A cylindrical osteochondral defect created in the bilateral femoral trochlea was treated with DN gel (Group DN) or left without any implantation (Group C). In both Groups, we injected 1.0 mL of HA in the left knee, and 1.0 mL of saline solution in the right knee. Quantitative histological evaluations were performed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks, and PCR analysis was performed at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. In Group DN, the proteoglycan-rich area was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 12 weeks (P = 0.0247), and expression of type 2 collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 mRNAs was significantly greater in the HA-injected knees than in the saline-injected knees at 2 weeks (P = 0.0475, P = 0.0257, P = 0.0222, respectively). The intra-articular administration of HA significantly enhanced these gene expression at 2 weeks and significantly increased the volume of the hyaline cartilage regenerated by implantation of a DN gel at 12 weeks. This information is important to develop an additional method to increase the volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue in a potential cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel.

  16. Acid-base and electrolyte status during normovolemic hemodilution with succinylated gelatin or HES-containing volume replacement solutions in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna K Teloh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the past, several studies have compared different colloidal replacement solutions, whereby the focus was usually on the respective colloid. We therefore systematically studied the influence of the carrier solution's composition of five approved colloidal volume replacement solutions (Gelafundin, Gelafusal, Geloplasma, Voluven and Volulyte on acid-base as well as electrolyte status during and following acute severe normovolemic hemodilution. The solutions differed in the colloid used (succinylated gelatin vs. HES and in the presence and concentration of metabolizable anions as well as in their electrolyte composition. METHODS: Anesthetized Wistar rats were subjected to a stepwise normovolemic hemodilution with one of the solutions until a final hematocrit of 10%. Subsequent to dilution (162 min, animals were observed for an additional period (150 min. During dilution and observation time blood gas analyses were performed eight times in total. Additionally, in the Voluven and Volulyte groups as well as in 6 Gelafundin animals, electrolyte concentrations, glucose, pH and succinylated gelatin were measured in urine and histopathological evaluation of the kidney was performed. RESULTS: All animals survived without any indications of injury. Although the employed solutions differed in their respective composition, comparable results in all plasma acid-base and electrolyte parameters studied were obtained. Plasma pH increased from approximately 7.28 to 7.39, the plasma K(+ concentration decreased from circa 5.20 mM to 4.80-3.90 mM and the plasma Cl(- concentration rose from approximately 105 mM to 111-120 mM. Urinary analysis revealed increased excretion of K(+, H(+ and Cl(-. CONCLUSIONS: The present data suggest that the carrier solution's composition with regard to metabolizable anions as well as K(+, Ca(2+ only has a minor impact on acid-base and electrolyte status after application of succinylated gelatin or HES-containing colloidal

  17. Investigation of Thermostability of a Composite Resistive Material with Nanodimensional Carbon Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Vlasov, V. A.; Volokitin, G. G.; Melentyev, S. V.

    2014-06-01

    Thermostability of resistive materials based on polyurethane used as heat-liberating elements in the design of heating elements of thermoactive formworks is investigated. The application of polyurethane as a binder provides solid contact of polymer molecules with nanodimensional carbon fillers and their uniform distribution in a composite material. The influence of thermal treatment and dispersed fillers on the stability of electrophysical and thermophysical properties of carbon-filled polyurethane coatings is established.

  18. Use of Fillers, Pigments and Additives in Fouling-Release Coatings: a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaev, Nail; Kiil, Søren; Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, Stefan Møller

    2015-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based fouling-release coatings represent a non-toxic alternative in the area of marine protection. Many researches and testing procedures are dedicated to the challenge of exploring of effective, reliable and high-performance constituents of the coatings ‒ fillers, pigments and additives ‒ in order to achieve the desired and long-lasting fouling-release properties.Primarily, coating formulations are prepared on the basis of PDMS with inorganic fillers such as fumed...

  19. A preliminary study on filler metals for vacuum brazing of Al/Ti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱颖; 赵鹏飞; 康慧; 胡刚; 曲平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, nine new filler metals contained Sn and Ga based on Al-11.5Si have been designed for vacuum brazing of Al/Ti. It is found that the addition of Sn and Ga can lower the solidus of filler metal, change the structure of intermetallic compound formed in the joint during brazing, and enhance the strength of joint. But the detail mechanism need further research.

  20. Fatigue and Creep Properties of Al-Si Brazing Filler Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Masakazu; Enomoto, Masatoshi; Takayama, Yoshimasa

    The manufacturing process for automotive heat exchangers involves brazing using an aluminum brazing sheet. To ensure structural strength and improve durability, it is necessary to acquire mechanical properties for each of the materials. Al-Si alloys are most commonly used as the filler metal; however, the properties of the fillets formed by the solidification of the Al-Si filler melt have scarcely been reported previously.

  1. Influence of filler wire composition on weld microstructures of a 444 ferritic stainless steel grade

    OpenAIRE

    Villaret, Vincent; Deschaux-Beaume, Frédéric; Bordreuil, Cyril; Rouquette, Sébastien; Chovet, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Seven compositions of metal cored filler wires for Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), containing the same weight percent of chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) as 444 steel, but with different titanium (Ti) and niobium (Nb) contents were investigated. Experimental results pointed out that the filler wire Ti content required to be twice time more than the amount expected in the deposited metal. This was due to the low Ti transfer ratio during arc welding. Moreover, Ti increase...

  2. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA.

  3. Plasma-modified graphene nanoplatelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as fillers for advanced rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicinski, M.; Gozdek, T.; Bielinski, D. M.; Szymanowski, H.; Kleczewska, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2015-07-01

    In modern rubber industry, there still is a room for new fillers, which can improve the mechanical properties of the composites, or introduce a new function to the material. Modern fillers like carbon nanotubes or graphene nanoplatelets (GnP), are increasingly applied in advanced polymer composites technology. However, it might be hard to obtain a well dispersed system for such systems. The polymer matrix often exhibits higher surface free energy (SFE) level with the filler, which can cause problems with polymer-filler interphase adhesion. Filler particles are not wet properly by the polymer, and thus are easier to agglomerate. As a consequence, improvement in the mechanical properties is lower than expected. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and GnP surface were modified with low-temperature plasma. Attempts were made to graft some functionalizing species on plasma-activated filler surface. The analysis of virgin and modified fillers’ SFE was carried out. MWCNT and GnP rubber composites were produced, and ultimately, their morphology and mechanical properties were studied.

  4. Nanoparticle fillers obtained from wood processing wastes for reinforcing of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laka, Marianna; Vikele, Laura; Rozenberga, Linda; Janceva, Sarmite

    2016-05-01

    Paper sheets were produced from bleached kraft pulp, and office and newsprint waste paper. Nanoparticles from black alder bark, grey alder bark and pine bark as well as birch sawdust were obtained for using them as reinforcing fillers in paper. Non-extracted bark and that extracted in biorefinery were used. For producing nanoparticles, the materials were destructed using the thermocatalytic destruction method and then dispersed in water medium in a ball mill. At a sufficient concentration, gel-like dispersions were obtained, which contained nanoparticles with the size ~300 nm. The dispersions were introduced in paper furnish in different amounts. It has been established that all the nanoparticle fillers increase the tensile index and burst index in dry and wet states. The nanoparticle fillers from extracted bark increase the mechanical indices to a higher extent. At 20% filler content, tensile index in a dry state increases in the case of non-extracted grey alder bark, black alder bark and pine bark by 28, 30 and 15%, and in the case of extracted ones - by 44, 40 and 30%, respectively; the burst index increases by 78, 19 and 4%, and 91, 25 and 14%, respectively. The nanoparticle filler from birch sawdust increases the tensile strength in a dry state by 9% and burst index by 20%. The obtained nanoparticle fillers slightly improve also the water resistance of paper.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Cement Replacement Fillers on the Performance of Slurry Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Mansour; Alrezaei, Hossein Ali; Naji Almasi, Soroush

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the level of roads service is a process that starts from the first day of the operation of road and the slope of deterioration curve of road sustainability becomes faster with the passage of time. After building the road, adopting an economic approach in order to maintain the road is very important. Slurry seal as one type of protective asphalts that works by sealing inactive cracks of the road and increasing skid resistance is the most effective types of restoration with environmentally friendly behaviour. Fillers are responsible for adjusting set time in slurry seal. Cement is the most common filler used in slurry seal. Cements having suitable properties as a filler, has a very energy demanding manufacturing process and a notable amount of energy is used for manufacturing cement in the country annually. On the other hand, manufacturing process and application of cement have increased levels of pollutant gases, followed by significant environmental pollution. So in this study other options as a filler such as hydrated lime, stone powder and the slag from iron melting furnace were compared with two common types of cement (Portland and type-v cement) in the mixtures of slurry seal by wet abrasion and cohesion tests. Results indicated that, in both tests, lime and slag fillers had behaviours close to the cement filler.

  6. The Influence of Chicken Egg Shell as Fillers on Biocomposite Acrylic Resin for Denture Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, M.; Ginting, M. H. S.; Dalimunthe, N. F.; Hasibuan, D. M. T.; Sastrodihardjo, S.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted to discover the influence of the addition of chicken egg shells microparticle as filler on the mechanical properties such as modulus of elasticity, modulus of rapture and particle size analysis on biocomposite acrylic resin for denture based. The raw materials used in this research were acrylic resin, egg shell, cold mold seals, gypsum, Vaseline and wax. The process of making biocomposite acrylic resin for denture based with mix the acrylic resin in ratio 2:1 (w/w). Then added the microparticle filler 0,10,20,30 (%w) to mold and boil in 75°C for 90 minutes and increase the temperature to 90 °C for 30 minutes. Took the sample and let it dried. The results of research showed the increase of modulus elasticity and modulus of rapture. The modulus of elasticity showed a very significant increase by adding fillers 10% of 2.123 GPa, which was only 1.932 GPa without adding the filler of chicken egg shells. For modulus of rapture showed the increase by adding fillers 20% of 48,311MPa, which was only 46,865 GPa without adding the filler of chicken egg shells

  7. Effect of Limestone Fillers the Physic-Mechanical Properties of Limestone Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    bederina, Madani; makhloufi, Zoubir; bouziani, Tayeb

    This work focuses on the exploitation of local industrial wastes and their use in the formulation of new concretes which can be used in local constructions. The valorised materials are limestone crushing sand (0/5 mm) and limestone fillers (80 μm). The two materials are extracted from local aggregate crushing wastes. Thus, and since the used gravels are also of limestone nature, the formulated composite is a limestone concrete. So this study constitutes an experimental work that aims at the study of the effect of the addition of limestone fillers on the physico-mechanical behaviour of limestone concrete. To carry out this study, different proportions of fillers ranging from 0 to 40% were considered. Very important results have been achieved on the workability and strength. By increasing the amount of limestone filler in concrete, the first one improves, but the second one increases then decreases passing by an optimal content of fillers which gives a maximum mechanical strength. Finally, and concerning the dimensional variations, it is noteworthy that they decrease at the beginning till an optimal value of fillers content, but beyond this optimum, they start increasing without exceeding recommended values.

  8. Enhanced dielectric performance in polymer composite films with carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide hybrid filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, TaeYoung; Suk, Ji Won; Chou, Harry; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-08-27

    The electrical conductivity and the specific surface area of conductive fillers in conductor-insulator composite films can drastically improve the dielectric performance of those films through changing their polarization density by interfacial polarization. We have made a polymer composite film with a hybrid conductive filler material made of carbon nanotubes grown onto reduced graphene oxide platelets (rG-O/CNT). We report the effect of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler on the dielectric performance of the composite film. The composite film had a dielectric constant of 32 with a dielectric loss of 0.051 at 0.062 wt% rG-O/CNT filler and 100 Hz, while the neat polymer film gave a dielectric constant of 15 with a dielectric loss of 0.036. This is attributed to the increased electrical conductivity and specific surface area of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler, which results in an increase in interfacial polarization density between the hybrid filler and the polymer.

  9. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre-reinforced polymer composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANURAG GUPTA; HARI SINGH; R SWALIA

    2016-09-01

    In present research work, pultrusion process is used to develop jute fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) composite and experiments have been performed on an indigenously developed pultrusion experimental setup. The developed composite consists of natural jute fibre as reinforcement and unsaturated polyester resin as matrix with hybrid filler containing bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate (CaCO$_3$). The effect of weight content of bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate on tensile strength of pultruded GFRP composite is evaluated and the optimum hybrid filler composition for maximizing the tensile strength is determined. Different compositions of hybrid filler are prepared by mixing three fillers using Taguchi L$_9$ orthogonal array. Fifteen percent of hybrid filler of different composition by weight was mixed in the unsaturated polyester resin matrix. Taguchi L$_9$ orthogonal array (OA) has been used to plan the experiments and ANOVA is used for analysing tensile strength. A regression model has also been proposed to evaluate the tensile strength of the composite within 7% error by varying the abovefillers weight. A confirmation experiment was performed which gives 73.14 MPa tensile strength of pultruded jute fibre polymer composite at the optimum composition of hybrid filler.

  10. Thermal properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf reinforced epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, N.; Paridah, M. T.; Abdan, K.; Ibrahim, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this research study was to fabricate nano oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and to make comparative study on the thermal properties of nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites with the montmorillonite (MMT)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and organically modified MMT (OMMT)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites. Epoxy based kenaf hybrid nanocomposites was prepared by dispersing the nano filler (nano OPEFB filler, MMT, OMMT) at 3% loading through high speed mechanical stirrer followed by hand lay-up technique. Thermal properties of hybrid nanocomposites were analyzed through thermogravimetry analyzer (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Obtained results specified that addition of nano OPEFB filler improves the thermal stability and char yield of kenaf/epoxy composites. Furthermore, the increase in decomposition temperature by the nano OPEFB filler was quite comparable to the MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively less than OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites. We concluded from overall consequences that the nano OPEFB filler can be used as the promising and innovative alternative of existing expensive nano filler, with relatively lesser impact on the environment having marked pronounced impact on the construction, automotive, aerospace, electronics and semiconducting sectors as future industries based on bio-wastes with satisfactory light weight and thermal stability on other side.

  11. Study on the Functionality of Nano-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate as Filler in Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilia, Blessie A.; Panganiban, Marian Elaine G.; Collado, Archilles Allen V. C.; Pesigan, Michael Oliver D.; de Yro, Persia Ada

    This research aims to investigate the functionality of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate (NPCC) as filler in thermoplastic resins based on property enhancement. Three types of thermoplastics were used: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The resins were evaluated by determining the effect of different NPCC loading on the chemical structure, thermal and mechanical properties of thermoplastics. Results showed that there was an interfacial bonding with the NPCC surface and the thermoplastics. Change in absorption peak and area were predominant in the PVC filled composite. There was a decreased in crystallinity of the PE and PP with the addition of filler. Tremendous increase on the tensile and impact strength was exhibited by the NPCC filled PVC composites while PE and PP composites maintained a slight increase in their mechanical properties. Nano-sized filler was proven to improve the mechanical properties of thermoplastics compared with micron-sized filler because nano-sized filler has larger interfacial area between the filler and the polymer matrix.

  12. Brazing of zirconia to titanium using Ag-Cu and Au-Ni filler alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. Pimenta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic is usually joined to metal by the well-known direct brazing process, where costly active filler alloys can be considered a limitation. Brazing using active-metal-free filler alloy as insert between the joint components is an attempt to overcome it. The active metal diffusion from the titanium member through the bulk of molten filler to the ceramic was responsible to produce an active filler alloy in loco and promote reduction of the zirconium oxide to improve wetting on the ceramic surface. Unalloyed titanium was joined in a high-vacuum furnace (<3x10-5 mbar to yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycristals (Y-TZP and zirconia partially stabilized with magnesia (Mg-PSZ, where commercial fillers Ag-28Cu and Au-18Ni with respective thermal cycles were evaluated. Helium gas leak detection test was performed at the ceramic/metal interface at room temperature; samples from reliable vacuum tight joints were examined by microstructural analysis techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at the joint cross-section. Tight joints were produced with eutectic Ag-Cu filler, revealing an intermetallic layer and a dark reaction layer near the ceramic surface; titanium diffusion was efficient for superficial chemical interactions between individual components. Brazing joints were also tested using three-point flexure testing.

  13. Laser brazing of inconel 718 alloy with a silver based filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, A.; Ghoreishi, M.; Torkamany, M. J.; Bali, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    In the presented study laser brazing of an inconel 718 alloy with silver based filler metal using 400 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser is investigated. Laser brazing was performed with varying laser frequency, pulse width, process speed and gap distance. The effect of preheating on wetting and spreading also was studied. Brazing geometrical images were observed using an optical microscope. The composition analysis and microstructure of the filler metal and brazed joints were examined using X-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Micro-hardness and tensile test were performed for investigation of mechanical properties. The experimental observations show that filler metal consist of α-Ag solid solution, ά-Cu solid solution surround by the α-Ag solid solution and eutectic structure. Phases of the brazed joint are similar to the filler metal. The results indicate that the filler metal has adequate wetting and spreading on inconel 718 and the wetting angle depends on the heat input significantly. Interdiffusion occurs in laser brazing and the average thickness of reaction layer is approximately 2.5 μm. Whenever the gap is big, it is needed to use longer pulse width in order to have a better melting flow. Preheating has significant influence on wetting and spreading of the filler metal.

  14. PENGEMBANGAN TEKNOLOGI PROSES PRODUKSI BIONANOKOMPOSIT FILLER BIOMASSA ROTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nikmatin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rattan biomass is a fiber waste from processing industry of rattan. Its abundant availability, as well as does not threaten the balance of food and feed, make it a potential source as raw material for composite filler of cellulose nanoparticles. To obtain a high cellulose content, it was inoculated with White rote fungi and Aspergillus niger. The experiments were conducted at inoculation time of 15, 21, and 30 days. The results showed that biomass of rattan extracted with White rote fungi and Aspergillus niger reached maximum cellulose content at the inoculation time of 21 days ie 76.47% cellulose, lignin 2.39%, and 20% moisture content. Cellulose has a monoclinic crystal structure, a =7.87; b=10.31; c=10.13 α= γ = 90, β=120. Nanoparticles were produced by disk mill-hummer mill method with variation milling time of 15, 30, and 45 minutes. Collision, friction, and heat for 30 minutes of milling could produce energy that was transferred to the particles and caused cavitation which resulted particles of 16.22-51.30 nm particle size. Production of test piece and prototype of nanocomposite using TSE and injection molding produced material which has 2 phases of crystal structure, namely monoclinic, and orthorhombic phases. The mechanical properties of impact strength was 67.769 J/m and hardness of 79.97 HRR. Thermal properties and density of bionanokomposit showed comparable values with synthetic composites.

  15. Surface Treated Natural Fibres as Filler in Biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, I.; Stevulova, N.; Singovszka, E.; Terpakova, E.

    2015-11-01

    Biocomposites based on natural fibres as organic filler have been studied for several years because traditional building materials such as concrete are increasingly being replaced by advanced composite materials. Natural fibres are a potential replacement of glass fibres in composite materials. Inherent advantages such as low density, biodegradability and comparable specific mechanical properties make natural fibres an attractive option. However, limitations such as poor thermal stability, moisture absorption and poor compatibility with matrix are challenges that need to be resolved. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of surface treatment on properties of hemp hurds like a natural lignocellulosic material and composites made thereof. Industrial hemp fibre is the one of the most suitable fibres for use in composite materials because of its good specific properties, as well as it being biologically degradable and CO2 neutral. Improving interfacial bonding between fibres and matrix is an important factor in using hemp fibres as reinforcement in composites. In order to improve interfacial bonding, modifications can be made to the hemp fibres to remove non- cellulosic compounds, separate hemp fibres from their bundles, and modify the fibre surface. This paper contains the comparison of FTIR spectra caused by combination of physical and chemical treatment of hemp material with unmodified sample. Modification of hemp hurds was carried out by NaOH solution and by ultrasonic treatment (deionized water and NaOH solution were used as the cleaning mediums).

  16. Protolichesterinic acid, isolated from the lichen Cetraria islandica, reduces LRRC8A expression and volume-sensitive release of organic osmolytes in human lung epithelial cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    We have tested the effect of protolichesterinic acid (PA) on the activity of the volume-sensitive release pathway for the organic osmolyte taurine (VSOAC) and the expression of the leucine-rich-repeat-channel 8A (LRRC8A) protein, which constitutes an essential VSOAC component. Exposing human lung...... of apoptosis) and p21 (regulator of cell cycle progression), respectively. PA reduces cell viability by 30% but has no effect on p21/Bax expression. This excludes PA as a pro-apoptotic drug in A549 cells....... cancer cells (A549) to PA (20 μg/mL, 24 h) reduces LRRC8A protein expression by 25% and taurine release following osmotic cell swelling (320 → 200 mOsm) by 60%. C75 (20 μg/mL, 24 h), a γ-lactone with a C8 carbon fatty acid chain, reduces VSOAC activity by 30%, i.e. less than PA. Stearic acid (20 μg......, excluding that PA mediated inhibition of VSOAC involves 5-LO inhibition. A549 cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin (10 μM, 24 h) reveal signs of apoptosis, i.e. 25% reduction in cell viability as well as 1.3-, 1.5- and 3.3-fold increase in the expression of LRRC8A, Bax (regulator...

  17. Low volume polyethylene glycol with ascorbic acid,sodium picosulfate-magnesium citrate,and clear liquid diet alone prior to small bowel capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erin Rayner-Hartley; Majid Alsahafi; Paula Cramer; Nazira Chatur; Fergal Donnellan

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To compare low volume polyethylene glycol with ascorbic acid,sodium picosulfate-magnesium citrate and clear liquid diet alone as bowel preparation prior to small bowel capsule endoscopy(CE).METHODS:We retrospectively collected all CE studies done from December 2011 to July 2013 at a single institution.CE studies were reviewed only if low volume polyethylene glycol with ascorbic acid,sodium picosulfatemagnesium citrate or clear liquid diet alone used as the bowel preparation.The studies were then reviewed by the CE readers who were blinded to the preparation type.Cleanliness and bubble burden were graded independently within the proximal,middle and distal small bowel using a four-point scale according to the percentage of small bowel mucosa free of debris/bubbles:grade 1 = over 90%,grade 2 = between 90%-75%,grade 3 = between 50%-75%,grade 4 = less than 50%.Data are expressed as mean ± SEM.ANOVA and Fishers exact test were used where appropriate.P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.RESULTS:A of total of 123 CE studies were reviewed.Twenty-six studies were excluded from analysis because of incomplete small bowel examination.In the remainingstudies,48 patients took low volume polyethylene glycol with ascorbic acid,31 took sodium picosulfate-magnesium citrate and 27 took a clear liquid diet alone after lunch on the day before CE,followed by overnight fasting in all groups.There was no significant difference in small bowel cleanliness(1.98 ± 0.09 vs 1.84 ± 0.08 vs 1.76 ± 0.08) or small bowel transit time(213 ± 13 vs 248 ± 14 ± 225 ± 19 min) for clear liquid diet alone,Movi Prep and PicoSalax respectively.The bubble burden in the mid small bowel was significantly higher in the Movi Prep group(1.6 ± 0.1 vs 1.9 ± 0.1 vs 1.6 ± 0.1,P < 0.05).However this did not result in a significant difference in diagnosis of pathology.CONCLUSION:There was no significant difference in small bowel cleanliness or diagnostic yield of small bowel CE between

  18. Graphene oxide-silica nanohybrids as fillers for PA6 based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo, Italy and STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans (Italy); Fucarino, R.; Khatibi, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Rosselli, S.; Bruno, M. [STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans II, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.

  19. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  20. Evaluation of an automated high-volume extraction method for viral nucleic acids in comparison to a manual procedure with preceding enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourfar, M K; Schmidt, M; Seifried, E; Roth, W K

    2005-08-01

    Nucleic acid extraction still harbours the potential for improvements in automation and sensitivity of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) testing. This study evaluates the feasibility of a novel automated high-volume extraction protocol for NAT minipool testing in a blood bank setting. The chemagic Viral DNA/RNA Kit special for automated purification of viral nucleic acids from 9.6 ml of plasma by using the chemagic Magnetic Separation Module I was investigated. Analytical sensitivity for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and parvovirus B19 (B19) was compared to our present manual procedure that involves virus enrichment by centrifugation. Chemagic technology allows automation of the viral DNA/RNA extraction process. Viral nucleic acids were bound directly to magnetic beads from 9.6-ml minipools. By combining the automated magnetic beads-based extraction technology with our in-house TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, 95% detection limits were 280 IU/ml for HCV, 4955 IU/ml for HIV-1, 249 IU/ml for HBV, 462 IU/ml for HAV and 460 IU/ml for B19, calculated for an individual donation in a pool of 96 donors. The detection limits of our present method were 460 IU/ml for HCV, 879 IU/ml for HIV-1, 90 IU/ml for HBV, 203 IU/ml for HAV and 314 IU/ml for B19. The 95% detection limits obtained by using the chemagic method were within the regulatory requirements for blood donor screening. The sensitivities detected for HCV, HBV, HAV and B19 were found to be in a range similar to that of the manual purification method. Sensitivity for HIV-1, however, was found to be inferior for the chemagic method in this study.

  1. Carcinogenicity of azo dyes: Acid Black 52 and Yellow 3 in hamsters and rats. Volume 2. Technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankenhorn, L.J.

    1983-09-30

    This document is an appendix to a study concerning the carcinogenicity of the azo dyes acid-black-52 and yellow-3 in male and female hamsters and rats and contains individual histopathology studies of both dyes. Histopathological features were reported in tabular form for the skin, mammary gland, muscle, salivary gland, mandibular lymph node, sciatic nerve, thymus, larynx, thyroid, parathyroid, trachea, bronchus, esophagus, adrenal, stomach, duodenum, jejunem, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum, mesenteric lymph node, lung, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, urinary bladder, seminal vesicle, prostate, testis, cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, sternabrae, femur, bone marrow, and nasal cavity.

  2. A novel 3D sandwich structure of hybrid graphite nanosheets and silver nanowires as fillers for improved thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiao; Zhou, Yongcun; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    We explored a novel 3D sandwich structure of fillers in the polymer matrix to enhance thermal conductivity. A variety of fillers in the polymer matrix play a significant role in the physical properties of the composite. Fillers containing particle and line structures are popular, and enhance the thermal and electrical conductivities. Therefore, filler-based matrix network improves conductivity. We propose a sandwich structure consisting of hybrid graphite nanosheets (two dimensions), and silver nanowires (AgNWs) (one dimension), to create a 3D sandwich structure of polyimide matrix with improved thermal conductivity. Surface treatment of graphite and silver nanowires were conducted to reduce the dielectric constant of the composite. We designed the filler of 20 wt% resulting in a high thermal conductivity of 3.21 W m‑1 K‑1 with 15% C@SiO2 and 5% AgNWs@SiO2 filler loading. The novel combination and structure markedly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the composite.

  3. A novel technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks using the filler press and monomer infiltration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Koichi; Kameya, Takehiro; Ishino, Hiroshige; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed a new technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks (CRBs): the filler press and monomer infiltration (FPMI) method. In this method, surface-treated filler is molded into a green body in which the filler particles are compressed to form an agglomeration. The green body is then infiltrated with a monomer mixture before being polymerized. It is possible to produce CRBs using this method through which densely packed nanofiller is uniformly dispersed. The greater the pressure of the filler molding, the more filler in the CRB, resulting at high pressure in a very dense CRB. A CRB obtained by applying 170 MPa of pressure contained up to 70 wt% of nano-silica filler and had a flexural strength of 200 MPa, as well. It is anticipated that CRBs obtained using the FPMI method will be useful as a dental CAD/CAM material for the fabrication of permanent crown restorations.

  4. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  5. A dual action of saturated fatty acids on electrical activity in rat pancreatic β-cells. Role of volume-regulated anion channel and KATP channel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, L; Jarman, E; Brown, P D

    2011-03-15

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) exert complex actions on pancreatic β-cells. Typically, an initial potentiation of insulin release is followed by a gradual impairment of β-cell function, the latter effect being of possible relevance to hyperlipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The molecular actions of FFAs are poorly understood. The present study investigated the acute effects of saturated FFAs on electrophysiological responses of rat pancreatic β-cells. Membrane potential and KATP channel activity were recorded using the perforated patch technique. Volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) activity was assessed from conventional whole-cell recordings. Cell volume regulation was measured using a video-imaging technique. Addition of octanoate caused a transient potentiation of glucose-induced electrical activity, followed by a gradual hyper-polarisation and a prolonged inhibition of electrical activity. Octanoate caused an initial increase in VRAC activity followed by a secondary inhibition coinciding with increased KATP channel activity. Similar effects were observed with palmitate and 2-bromopalmitate whereas butyrate was virtually ineffective. Octanoate and palmitate also exerted a dual effect on electrical activity evoked by tolbutamide. Octanoate significantly attenuated cell volume regulation in hypotonic solutions, consistent with VRAC inhibition. It is concluded that medium and long chain FFAs have a dual action on glucose-induced electrical activity in rat pancreatic β-cells: an initial stimulatory effect followed by a secondary inhibition. These effects appear to be the result of reciprocal actions on VRAC and KATP channel currents, and could contribute towards the stimulatory and inhibitory actions of FFAs on pancreatic β-cell function.

  6. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  7. Low temperature method for the production of calcium phosphate fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastro Alfonso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium phosphate manufactured samples, prepared with hydroxyapatite, are used as either spacers or fillers in orthopedic surgery, but these implants have never been used under conditions of mechanical stress. Similar conditions also apply with cements. Many authors have postulated that cements are a useful substitute material when implanted in vivo. The aim of this research is to develop a low cristalline material similar to bone in porosity and cristallinity. Methods Commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp and monetite (M powders are mixed with water and compacted to produce cylindrical samples. The material is processed at a temperature of 37–120 degrees C in saturated steam to obtain samples that are osteoconductive. The samples are studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Vickers hardness test (HV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and porosity evaluation. Results The X-ray diffractions of powders from the samples show patterns typical of HAp and M powders. After thermal treatment, no new crystal phase is formed and no increase of the relative intensity of the peaks is obtained. Vicker hardness data do not show any relationship with treatment temperature. The total porosity decreases by 50–60% according to the specific thermal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of the samples with either HAp 80%-M 20% (c or Hap 50%-M 50% (f, show cohesion of the powder grains. Conclusions The dissolution-reprecipitation process is more intesive in manufactured samples (c and (f, according to Vickers hardness data. The process occurs in a steam saturated environment between 37 degrees and 120 degrees C. (c (f manufactured samples show pore dimension distributions useful to cellular repopulation in living tissues.

  8. Influence of mineral fillers on the rheological response of polymer-modified bitumens and mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cardone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of the bituminous components (bitumen and bituminous mastic within asphalt mixtures contribute significantly to the major distresses of flexible pavements (i.e. rutting, fatigue and low temperature cracking. Asphalt mixtures are usually composed of mastic-coated aggregates rather than pure bitumen-coated aggregates. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of mineral fillers on the rheological behaviour of several polymer-modified bitumens (PMBs through laboratory mixing. A neat bitumen and two types of polymers (elastomeric and plastomeric were used to produce PMBs, and two fillers with different minerals (limestone and basalt were selected to obtain mastics. The dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR were used to characterize the rheological properties of PMBs and mastics. In particular, multiple stress creep recovery (MSCR tests were performed to evaluate the rutting potential at high temperatures, whereas BBR tests were carried out to investigate the low temperature behaviour of these materials. BBR results for unmodified mastics show that the increase of stiffness is similar regardless of the filler type, whereas results for polymer-modified mastics indicate that the degree of stiffening depends on the combination of filler/polymer types. MSCR results show that adding filler leads to a reduced susceptibility of permanent deformation and an enhanced elastic response, depending on the combination of filler/polymer types. Overall results suggest that a physical–chemical interaction between the filler and bitumen occurs, and that the interaction level is highly dependent on the type of polymer modification.

  9. Influence of different fillers on the properties of an experimental vinyl polysiloxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Könzgen MEINCKE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the incorporation of different fillers on an experimental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS at two different concentrations, 20% and 40%. Different fillers were added to an experimental VPS. The study was developed in two stages: (i incorporation of fillers in different concentrations: (a 20 wt% fillers, and (b 40 wt%. The fillers were added to experimental VPS and mixed with a speed mixer; (ii characterization of experimental VPS; after the base paste and catalyst paste were mixed, the experimental VPS was used to make specimens specifically for each test, which were stored at 23°C for 24 hours. The tests were designed according to the specific standardization for the analysis of tensile strength, detail reproduction, Shore A hardness, and elastic recovery. For analysis of filler size pattern, scanning electron microscopy at 1500× magnification was used. The aerosil OX-50 40% (AE, and pure aluminum hydroxide 40% (PAH groups presented the highest tensile strength and Shore A hardness values. However, those were the only groups that did not present continuous detail reproduction of an intersection of 20 μm line. The elastic recovery was not statistically significant. The undesirable characteristics of VPS (lowest Shore A hardness and tensile strength were observed when it was added to the composition of acrylic polymer (AP and fiberglass (FG in both concentrations, 20% and 40%. In groups AE and PAH, agglomerates of nanofillers were shown in SEM micrography, while the other groups presented different shapes and fillers sizes.

  10. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin.

  11. Novel hydrogels based on carboxyl pullulan and collagen crosslinking with 1, 4-butanediol diglycidylether for use as a dermal filler: initial in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Xue, Wenjiao; Zhu, Chenhui; Fan, Daidi; Liu, Yannan; XiaoxuanMa

    2015-12-01

    Novel hydrogels based on carboxyl pullulan (PC) and human-like collagen (HLC) crosslinking with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) are promising soft fillers for tissue engineering due to their highly tunable properties. Recent studies, however, have shown that incorporating hyaluronic acid and BDDE results in hydrogels with a microporous structure, a large pore size and high porosity, which reduce cell adhesion and enhance degradation in vivo. To improve biocompatibility and prevent biodegradation, the use of PC to replace hyaluronic acid in the fabrication of PC/BDDE (PCB) and PC/BDDE/HLC (PCBH) hydrogels was investigated. Preparation of gels with PC is a promising strategy due to the high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions of PC. In particular, the Schiff base reaction of HLC and PC produces the novel functional group -RCONHR' in PCBH hydrogels. Twenty-four weeks after subcutaneous injection of either PCB or PCBH hydrogel in mice, the surrounding tissue inflammation, enzymatic response and cell attachment were better compared to hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels. However, the biocompatibility, cytocompatibility and non-biodegradability of PCBH were milder than those of the PCB hydrogels both in vivo and in vitro. These results show that the proposed use of PC and HLC for the fabrication of hydrogels is a promising strategy for generating soft filler for tissue engineering.

  12. Experimental Research for Denitrification by Caisson Filler Enhanced MBR Process%沉箱填料强化MBR工艺脱氮的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭宁; 裴廷权; 刘欢; 赵振业; 梅立永; 张锐

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究沉箱填料强化MBR工艺对有机物和氮的去除效果.[方法]通过向MBR反应池投加沉箱填料处理生活污水,研究沉箱填料强化MBR工艺对有机物和氮的去除效果.[结果]未加填料和已投填料的出水COD均值分别为26.8、24.7 mg/L,投加填料比未加填料的脱氮效果要好,对NH3-N去除率均值分别为98.44%、96.37%;对TN去除率均值分别24.03%、16.43%.出水COD和NH3-N浓度低于《城镇污水处理厂污染物排放标准》(GB18918-2002)一级A标准.出水TN主要以NO3-N形式存在(98.06%),NH3-N和NO2-(-0N所占的比例很小,只占整个TN的1.22%和0.72%.对反硝化脱氮研究的进一步建议:①沉箱填料与反应池体积比重增至4%~5%;②更换单个体积较小,内部纤维量较多的填料;③适量减少曝气量,使MBR反应池内的DO减少到1.5 ~3.0 mg/L.[结论]该研究为今后的工程实践提供了理论依据.%[ Objective ] The research aimed to study removal effects of the organic matter and N by caisson filler enhanced MBR process. [ Method ] By adding caisson filler to reaction pool of the MBR to treat domestic sewage, removal effects of the organic matter and N by caisson filler enhanced MBR process were studied. [Result] COD means in effluent were respectively 26. 8 and 24.7 mg/L by without adding filler and with adding filler. Average removal rates of the NH3-N were 98.44% and 96. 37% , while average removal rates of the TN were 24.03% and 16.43% , respectively. COD and NH3-N concentrations in effluent were lower than the first A grade criteria of Discharge Standard of the Pollutant for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB18918-2002). NO3--N was main form of the TN in effluent and occupied 98. 06% , while NH3 -N and NO2- -N only accounted for 1. 22% and 0. 72% . Further suggestion for denitrification study was as below. Firstly, the proportion of caisson filler on volume of the reaction cell should be increased to 4% -5

  13. Microstructures and properties of low-melting-point Al-Cu-Si filler metals prepared by different technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zehua; Feng Hua; Jiang Shaoqun; Zhou Zehua

    2010-01-01

    The Al25Cu6. 5Si0. 09RE (RE = La and Ce) and Al25Cu10.5Si2Ni filler metals were prepared by common metal mold casting, copper plate chilling and rapid solidification, respectively. The microstructures and properties of these filler metals were studied. The results show that the as-casting and the corresponding rapid solidification filler metals have the same phases but their microstructures are different. The microstructure of rapid solidification filler metals consults of an a-Al solid solution, the 6 (Al2Cu) intermetallic compound and an Al-Cu-Si eutectk phase. Compared with the as-casting filler metal, the melting temperature ranges (△T) of the corresponding copper plate chilling and rapid solidification filler metals decrease and their wettabilities are improved because of the grain refinement and the improvement of composition uniformity. The wetting area of Al25Cu6.5Si0.09RE rapid solidification filler metal doubles that of the corresponding as-casting filler metal. It is hopeful that the properties of Al-Cu-Si filler metals will be improved by changing preparation technology.

  14. Dielectric elastomer actuators of silicone rubber-titanium dioxide composites obtained by dielectrophoretic assembly of filler particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Razzaghi-Kashani, M.

    2010-04-01

    Formation of controlled morphology of fillers in polymeric composites may be difficult to achieve by conventional methods such as mechanical shear or chemical methods. Tunable structure of filler and anisotropic properties in composites can be obtained by exploiting dielectrophoretic assembly of fillers in a polymer composite by using electric fields. In this study, different concentrations of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) particles in silicone rubber matrix were assembled in a chain-like structure by using an alternating electric field. Silicone rubber matrix was vulcanized to transform the liquid to solid and maintain the filler structure in the desired direction. Generation of chain structure of filler was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and equilibrium swelling. It was shown that dielectric permittivity of the oriented composite is higher whereas its dielectric loss factor is lower in the orientation (thickness) direction than those for the composites with random distribution of filler. This phenomenon was in agreement with results of dynamic-mechanical loss factor for these composites, and can be utilized in more efficient dielectric elastomer actuators. Elastic modulus is higher for the structured samples, but presence of titania filler induced a softening effect at higher strains where the actuators are practically being pre-stretched. A critical concentration of filler was distinguished as the percolation point at which the change in dielectric behavior is amplified. Using a simple blocking-force measurement, potential advantages of structured composites over the ones with randomly-distributed filler was explained for potential dielectric elastomer actuator applications.

  15. Electrical Properties of Composite Materials with Electric Field-Assisted Alignment of Nanocarbon Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Olena; Matzui, Ludmila; Danylova, Ganna; Zadorozhnii, Victor; Vovchenko, Ludmila; Perets, Yulia; Lazarenko, Oleksandra

    2017-07-01

    The article reports about electric field-induced alignment of the carbon nanoparticles embedded in epoxy matrix. Optical microscopy was performed to consider the effect of the electric field magnitude and configuration, filler morphology, and aspect ratio on alignment process. Characteristic time of aligned network formation was compared with modeling predictions. Carbon nanotube and graphite nanoplatelet rotation time was estimated using an analytical model based on effective medium approach. Different depolarization factor was applied according to the geometries of the particle and electric field. Solid nanocomposites were fabricated by using AC electric field. We have investigated concentration dependence of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy composites using two-probe technique. It was established that the electrical properties of composites with random and aligned filler distribution are differ by conductivity value at certain filler content and distinguish by a form of concentration dependence of conductivity for fillers with different morphology. These differences were explained in terms of the dynamic percolation and formation of various conductive networks: chained in case of graphite nanoplatelets and crossed framework in case of carbon nanotubes filler.

  16. MRI in the evaluation of facial dermal fillers in normal and complicated cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Girolamo, Marco [Rome Univ. (Italy). Radiology Unit; Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology - Sant' Andrea Hospital; Mattei, Mauro [Rome Univ. (Italy). Radiology Unit; Signore, Alberto [Rome Univ. (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Grippaudo, Francesca Romana [Rome Univ. (Italy). Plastic Surgery Unit

    2015-05-01

    To ascertain by MRI the presence of filler injected into facial soft tissue and characterize complications by contrast enhancement. Nineteen volunteers without complications were initially investigated to study the MRI features of facial fillers. We then studied another 26 patients with clinically diagnosed filler-related complications using contrast-enhanced MRI. TSE-T1-weighted, TSE-T2-weighted, fat-saturated TSE-T2-weighted, and TIRM axial and coronal scans were performed in all patients, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed TSE-T1-weighted scans were performed in complicated patients, who were then treated with antibiotics. Patients with soft-tissue enhancement and those without enhancement but who did not respond to therapy underwent skin biopsy. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. MRI identified and quantified the extent of fillers. Contrast enhancement was detected in 9/26 patients, and skin biopsy consistently showed inflammatory granulomatous reaction, whereas in 5/17 patients without contrast enhancement, biopsy showed no granulomas. Fisher's exact test showed significant correlation (p < 0.001) between subcutaneous contrast enhancement and granulomatous reaction. Cervical lymph node enlargement (longitudinal axis >10 mm) was found in 16 complicated patients (65 %; levels IA/IB/IIA/IIB). MRI is a useful non-invasive tool for anatomical localization of facial dermal filler; IV gadolinium administration is advised in complicated cases for characterization of granulomatous reaction. (orig.)

  17. Phenolic rigid organic filler/isotactic polypropylene composites. Ⅲ. Impact resistance property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heming LIN; Dongming QI; Jian HAN; Zhiqi CAI; Minghua WU

    2009-01-01

    A novel phenolic rigid organic filler (KT) was used to modify isotactic polypropylene (iPP). The influence of KT particles on the impact resistance property of PP/KT specimens (with similar interparticles distance, 1.8 μm) was studied by notched izod impact tests. It was found that the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) of the PP/KT microcomposites took place at the filler content of about 4%, and the impact strength attains the maximum at 5% (with filler particles size of 1.5 μm), which is about 2.5 times that of unfilled iPP specimens. The impact fracture morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the PP/KT specimens and the high-density polyethylene/KT (HDPE/KT) specimens in ductile fracture mode, many microfibers could be found on the whole impact fracture surface. It was the filler particles that induced the plastic deformation of interparticles ligament and hence improved the capability of iPP matrix on absorbing impact energy dramatically. The determinants on the BDT were further discussed on the basis of stress concentration and debonding resistance. It can be concluded that aside from the interparticle distance, the filler particles size also plays an important role in semicrystal-line polymer toughening.

  18. Electrical Properties of Composite Materials with Electric Field-Assisted Alignment of Nanocarbon Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Olena; Matzui, Ludmila; Danylova, Ganna; Zadorozhnii, Victor; Vovchenko, Ludmila; Perets, Yulia; Lazarenko, Oleksandra

    2017-12-01

    The article reports about electric field-induced alignment of the carbon nanoparticles embedded in epoxy matrix. Optical microscopy was performed to consider the effect of the electric field magnitude and configuration, filler morphology, and aspect ratio on alignment process. Characteristic time of aligned network formation was compared with modeling predictions. Carbon nanotube and graphite nanoplatelet rotation time was estimated using an analytical model based on effective medium approach. Different depolarization factor was applied according to the geometries of the particle and electric field.Solid nanocomposites were fabricated by using AC electric field. We have investigated concentration dependence of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy composites using two-probe technique. It was established that the electrical properties of composites with random and aligned filler distribution are differ by conductivity value at certain filler content and distinguish by a form of concentration dependence of conductivity for fillers with different morphology. These differences were explained in terms of the dynamic percolation and formation of various conductive networks: chained in case of graphite nanoplatelets and crossed framework in case of carbon nanotubes filler.

  19. EFFECT OF INCORPORATING STARCH/SILICA COMPOUND FILLERS INTO UNCURED SSBR ON ITS DYNAMIC RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Yihu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic rheological properties of a composite composed of solution-polymerized styrene butadiene rubber (SSBR) filled with starch/silica (SiO2) compound fillers were studied by means of temperature,frequency and strain sweeps,respectively,and the influence of the starch content in the compound fillers (SCCF) on the rheological behaviors was discussed.It is found from frequency sweeps that a maximum of loss tangent (tanδ) appears at 20 rad/s,which is independent of SCCF.G' of the composites decreases whereas tanδ and critical strain (γc) of Payne effect increase with increasing SCCF.The reasons for these are believed to be that both SiO2 and starch could form filler networks due to interaction of hydrogen bounding between them,and the interactions between SiO2 and SSBR are stronger than those between starch and SSBR.Moreover,increasing SCCF in the compound fillers is in favor of improving the stability of the filler networks.Furthermore,tanδ values at 0℃ and 60℃ representing the properties for the wet traction and the rolling resistance of SSBR composites respectively can be improved by partial replacing SiO2 with starch.However,the reinforcement effect of starch to SSBR is weaker than that of SiO2 due to starch agglomeration.

  20. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  1. DIFFERENT TYPES OF MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE AS FILLER MATERIALS IN POLYSODIUM ACRYLATE SUPERABSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikael Larsson; Qi Zhou; Anette Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Three types of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with differences in structure and surface charge were used at low concentration as filler materials in polysodium acrylate superabsorbents (SAPs). The swelling of the composite hydrogels was determined in 0.9% NaCl solution as well as in deionized water. The shear modulus of the samples was determined through uniaxial compression analysis after synthesis and after swelling in 0.9% NaCl solution. Furthermore, the ability to retain filler effects after washing was investigated. The results showed that all of the investigated MFCs had a strong reinforcing effect on the shear modulus after synthesis. The filler effect on swelling and on the associated shear modulus of swollen samples showed a more complicated dependence on structure and surface charge. Finally, it was found that the filler effects were reasonably retained after washing and subsequent drying. The results confirm that MFC holds great potential as a filler material in superabsorbent applications. Furthermore, the results provide some insight on how the structural properties and surface charge of MFC will affect gel properties depending on swelling conditions. This information should be useful in evaluating the use of different types of MFC in future applications.

  2. A facile approach to spinning multifunctional conductive elastomer fibres with nanocarbon fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Shayan; Razal, Joselito M.; Innis, Peter C.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2016-03-01

    Electrically conductive elastomeric fibres prepared using a wet-spinning process are promising materials for intelligent textiles, in particular as a strain sensing component of the fabric. However, these fibres, when reinforced with conducting fillers, typically result in a compromise between mechanical and electrical properties and, ultimately, in the strain sensing functionality. Here we investigate the wet-spinning of polyurethane (PU) fibres with a range of conducting fillers such as carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and chemically converted graphene. We show that the electrical and mechanical properties of the composite fibres were strongly dependent on the aspect ratio of the filler and the interaction between the filler and the elastomer. The high aspect ratio SWCNT filler resulted in fibres with the highest electrical properties and reinforcement, while the fibres produced from the low aspect ratio CB had the highest stretchability. Furthermore, PU/SWCNT fibres presented the largest sensing range (up to 60% applied strain) and the most consistent and stable cyclic sensing behaviour. This work provides an understanding of the important factors that influence the production of conductive elastomer fibres by wet-spinning, which can be woven or knitted into textiles for the development of wearable strain sensors.

  3. Surface Modifications of Organic Fillers to Improve the Strength of Paperboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study the authors determined that non-woody materials including brewers’ grain (BG and oil palm frond (OPF could be alternatives to wood powder as organic fillers. However, they have the disadvantage of deteriorating the strength of paperboard. If the strength of paperboard could be improved, then one would expect more production cost reductions and bulk improvements by increasing the addition of organic fillers. In this study, surface modification of organic fillers was used as a method to improve paperboard strength. The goal was to find the most effective condition for surface modifications. Surface modifications of BG and OPF fillers were carried out using cationic and oxidized starches, and the strengths and reductions in the drying energies of the sheets were measured. The zeta potentials of the modified organic fillers showed that the surface modifications were performed properly. Surface modification with starches improved the bulk and strength of the sheets simultaneously, and modification with the addition of a large amount of cationic starch was more effective in improving the strengths and the reductions in drying energies of the sheets than using cationic and oxidized starches together.

  4. Effect of Filler and Heat Treatment on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of the Brazed Joint between Carbide Tip and Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winardi, Y.; Triyono; Wijayanta, A. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effect of filler and heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of the brazed joint carbide tip and steel was investigated. Tip carbide YG6 and low carbon steel (SS400) is joining by torch brazing with two filler metals, silver, and copper filler. Heat treatment was performed in induction furnace. Microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joint have been investigated. Many silver filler layer are formed on the surface of the base metal rather then using copper filler. The highest shear strength is achieved using a silver filler metal at temperatur 725°C. The highest shear load is 18.62 kN.

  5. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

  6. Wheat dextrin, psyllium, and inulin produce distinct fermentation patterns, gas volumes, and short-chain fatty acid profiles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Derek A; Stewart, Maria L; Hospattankar, Ashok; Slavin, Joanne L

    2010-08-01

    Dietary fiber fermentation decreases luminal pH by the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Additional proposed physiological benefits of fiber fermentation include decreased growth of pathogenic bacteria, increased mineral absorption, and serving as an energy source for the colon epithelium. This study examined three common fiber supplements--wheat dextrin (WD) (Benefiber, Novartis Consumer Health Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA), psyllium (PS) (Metamucil, Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, OH, USA), and inulin (Fiber Sure, Procter & Gamble)--for pH, SCFAs, and gas production. An established in vitro fermentation model was used to simulate colonic fermentation at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours. At 24 hours, WD and inulin significantly decreased pH compared to PS. Inulin produced significantly more hydrogen and total gas. All treatments produced similar total SCFA concentrations at 24 hours; however, the rate of production was different. PS had a declining rate of SCFA production from 12 to 24 hours, whereas WD and inulin had a higher rate during that period. Fast-fermenting substrates may not provide as much SCFAs to the distal colon as slow-fermenting substrates. Differences in fermentation rate, gas production, and SCFA production observed for WD, PS, and inulin may affect their gastrointestinal tolerance and require further study.

  7. Chemical, modulus and cell attachment studies of reactive calcium phosphate filler-containing fast photo-curing, surface-degrading, polymeric bone adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, E A; Palmer, G; Knowles, J C; Salih, V; Young, A M

    2010-07-01

    The initial structure, setting and degradation processes of a poly(lactide-co-propylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate adhesive filled with 50, 60 or 70 wt.% reactive calcium phosphates (monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP)) have been assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and gravimetric studies. Filler incorporation reduced the rapid light-activated monomer polymerization rates slightly, but not the final levels. Upon immersion in water for 24h, the set composite mass and volume increased due to water sorption. This promoted initial soluble MCPM loss from the composite surfaces, but also its reaction and monetite precipitation within the specimen bulk. After 48 h, composite gravimetric and chemical studies were consistent with surface erosion of polymer with reacted/remaining filler. The filled formulations exhibited more rapid early water sorption and subsequent surface erosion than the unfilled polymer. Calcium and phosphate release profiles and solution pH measurements confirmed early loss of surface MCPM with protons from polymer degradation products. At later times, the slower release of monetite/beta-TCP buffered composite storage solutions at approximately 5 instead of 3.2 for the unfilled polymer. Incorporation of filler increased both the early and later time material modulus. At intermediate times this effect was lost, presumably as a result of enhanced water sorption. The early modulus values obtained fell within the range reported for cancellous bone. Despite surface degradation, initial human mesenchymal cell attachment to both composites and polymer could be comparable with a non-degrading positive Thermanox control. These studies indicate that the filled formulations may be good candidates for bone repair. Release of calcium and phosphate ions provides components essential for such repair.

  8. Research on the Hydrophilic Modified of LDPE for the New Biological Suspended Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Weijia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban sewage is one of the main pollution sources of the city, which pollute soil, deteriorate the water quality and increase the water shortages and urban load. LDPE is low cost and widely used as the basic material of wastewater treatment, but LDPE’s hydrophilic is not good enough to meet the need of suspended filler in wastewater treatment. In this paper the hydrophilic modified of LDPE for the new biological suspended filler was studied and the preparation and processing technique based on LDPE was researched. The hydrophilic and mechanic performance of the hydrophilic modified materials was tested. Results shown that the new type of hydrophilic modified materials has good hydrophilic and meets the demand of urban sewage treatment. The research on the new suspended filler materials has great meaning in solving the problem of urban sewage and recycling.

  9. Aminoalcohol functionalized zirconium phosphate as versatile filler for starch-based composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Monica; Donnadio, Anna; Bianchi, Valentina; Fop, Sacha; Casciola, Mario

    2013-08-14

    Microcrystalline zirconium phosphate was exfoliated by treatment with aqueous solutions of α,ω-alkylaminoalcohols and employed for the fabrication of potato starch composite membranes. Glycerol-based and glycerol-free composite membranes, containing 5 wt% of filler, were prepared from gelatinized starch and characterized for their physico-chemical properties. Despite of a partial filler reaggregation, as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis, all the composites exhibited a significant increase in the Young's modulus with respect to the glycerol-starch membrane, up to 80% and 190% for the glycerol-based and the glycerol-free composites, respectively. For both kinds of membranes the filler delays to a large extent the starch decomposition above about 300°C. A significant reduction in the water uptake of the composites was also observed with respect to the neat glycerol-based membrane, up to about 70% for the glycerol-free composites.

  10. Kenaf Powder Filled Recycled High Density Polyethylene/Natural Rubber Biocomposites: The Effect of Filler Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Viet Cao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of kenaf powder (KP as filler for recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE/natural rubber (NR thermoplastic elastomer (TPE composites was investigated. The composites with different filler loading were prepared in a Haake internal mixer. Increasing KP loading in rHDPE/NR/KP biocomposites reduced the tensile strength, elongation at break but increased the stabilization torque and the tensile modulus. SEM study of fracture surface indicated that fibrillation of rHDPE was reduced and detachment of kenaf powder from polymer matrix was present particularly at high filler loading. These observations were responsible for the deterioration of tensile strength and elongation at break of rHDPE/NR/KP biocomposites. Water absorption study also showed that the water absorption of these biocomposites increased with increasing KP content.

  11. Influence of NdFeB Fillers on Tensile and Electromagnetic Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puripat LERTSURAWAT

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile and electromagnetic properties of hard magnetic natural rubber composites were studied. In a fabrication stage, neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB magnets were recycled from electronic wastes, broken and then ball-milled for 1 - 3 h. The NdFeB powder was then incorporated into natural rubber (NR by a 2-roll mill technique. Since the NdFeB powder behaved as a non-reinforced filler, thus, it inhibited cross-linking and stress-induced recrystallization. Therefore, the cure time and the tensile strength of the NdFeB-NR composites were reduced compared to the control sample without magnetic fillers. The addition of NdFeB fillers improved the electrical permittivity of NR and the magnetic moment in NdFeB-NR composites could be measured by a fluxmeter.

  12. Polyurethane foam with multi walled carbon nanotubes/magnesium hybrid filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Sinar Arzuria; Zainuddin, Firuz; Zaidi, Nur Hidayah Ahmad; Akil, Hazizan Md.; Ahmad, Sahrim

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/magnesium (Mg) hybrid filler in polyurethane (PU) foams with different weight percentages (0.5 wt.% to 3.0 wt.%). The PU/MWCNTs/Mg foam composites were formed by reaction of based palm oil polyol (POP) with methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) with ratio 1:1.1 by weight. The foam properties were evaluated in density, morphology and compressive strength. The addition of 2.5 wt.% hybrid filler showed the higher density in 59.72 kg/m3 and thus contribute to the highest compressive strength at 1.76 MPa. The morphology show cell in closed structure and addition hybrid filler showed uneven structure.

  13. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  14. Effects of pyrolysis temperature and fillers on joining of ceramics via silicone resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Jun; CHEN Zhao-hui; ZHENG Wen-wei; HAN Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    The joining of graphite, ceramic SiC and Cf/SiC composites via preceramic silicone resin(SR) at high temperature (800-1400℃) was studied. The curing and pyrolysis process of SR, pyrolysis temperature, inert and active fillers were especially discussed. The results show that the curing process of SR was accomplished by consuming Si-OH. The temperature of 1200℃ is the appropriate treating temperature for graphite and SiC ceramic, and the temperature of 1400℃ is suitable for Cf/SiC composites. Inert filler SiC powder(5%, mass fraction) has much positive influence on the shear strength of the joints. Active filler nano Ai, Si powder can greatly improve the properties of the joints treated at high temperature. The improvement is over 700%.

  15. Mechanical evaluation of asphalt-aggregate mixtures prepared with fly ash as a filler replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapkin, T. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-01-15

    This paper examined methods of introducing fly ash waste products as a filler in asphalt concrete mixtures. A literature review of studies involving fly ash and asphalts was conducted. The effect of fly ash filler replacements on the mechanical properties of asphalt-aggregate mixtures was investigated. A dense bituminous calcareous aggregate was used as a reference mixture for a series of tests. Three types of fly ash were investigated, notably (1) portland cement; (2) lime; and (3) control specimens. Changes in elastic strain, elastic modulus, and permanent strain properties of the asphalt mixtures were determined through a series of fatigue tests. The behaviour of the asphalt concrete pavements were analyzed under applied loads. Results of the tests showed that the fatigue life of the fly ash specimens was higher than the calcareous aggregate specimens. It was concluded that fly ash can used as a filler replacement for dense-graded wearing courses. 35 refs., 17 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. LDH dye hybrid material as coloured filler into polystyrene: Structural characterization and rheological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviot-Gueho, C.; Illaik, A.; Vuillermoz, C.; Commereuc, S.; Verney, V.; Leroux, F.

    2007-05-01

    The organic inorganic hybrid assembly composed of a dye molecule of large size, direct yellow®50, as interleaved anionic molecule and layered double hydroxide host was investigated by X-ray diffraction. Upon hydrothermal post-synthesis treatment, the basal spacing is strongly decreased, explained by a drastic change in the orientation of the organic molecule against the LDH sheets, from perpendicular to parallel. The interactions were studied by 13C CPMAS NMR technique. Dispersed into polystyrene, the coloured filler was found to behave better in the viscoelastic domain than conventional surfactant LDH filler, maintaining similar rheological properties to filler-free PS. We demonstrate here that an intercalated nanocomposite polymer structure, providing an additional function as colour, is not preposterous.

  17. The effect of nanoclay filler loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Results: For groups with the same concentration of nanoparticles, PMMA-grafted filler-loaded group showed significantly higher flexural strength, except for 0.2% wt. For groups that contain PMMA-grafted nanoclay fillers, the 2% wt had the highest flexural strength value with significant difference to other subgroups. 1% wt and 2% wt showed significantly higher values compared to control (P 0.05. Flexural modulus of 2%, 5% wt PMMA-grafted and 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% wt unmodified nanoclay particles-loaded subgroups decreased significantly compared to control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler loading may enhance the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of unmodified nanoparticles cannot significantly improve the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of both unmodified and PMMA-grafted nanoclay particles in some concentrations decreased the flexural modulus.

  18. Performance of ferrite fillers on electrical behavior of polymer nanocomposite electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Mauli Dwivedi, Mrigank; Singh, Markandey; Agrawal, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal of nanofillers in polymer electrolytes have shown to improve the ionic properties of Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes in recent times. The effects of different nanoferrite fillers (i.e., Al-Zn ferrite, Mg-Zn ferrite, and Zn ferrite) on the electrical transport properties have been studied here on the composite polymer electrolyte system. The interaction of salt/filler with electrolyte has been investigated by XRD studies. SEM image and infrared spectral studies give an indication of nanocomposite formation. In conductivity studies, all electrolyte systems are seen to follow universal power law. Composition dependence (with ferrite filler) gives the maximum conductivity in [93PEO-7NH4SCN]: X ferrite (where X = 2% in Al-Zn ferrite, 1% Mg-Zn ferrite, and 1% Zn ferrite) system.

  19. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  20. Influencia del filler calizo en las propiedades de los morteros a resistencia constante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández, Francisco

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the effects produced by the lime filler on the Portugal cement used with additions in the production of mortars. The starting point is a Portland cement to which different ratios of lime filler, ranging from 0-50%, are added. The next step consists of preparing mortar specimens using standardized sand as aggregate, curing them up to the age of 28 days when they are put to flexo-tensile and compression tests. The mortar strength is fixed at the age of 28 days, making it coincide with the strength of a pattern cement mortar (cement without additions of the same age. Then the effects of the filler on the slump and the water cement relation are observed for fixed strength.

    En este artículo se estudian los efectos producidos por el "filler" calizo en el cemento portland al utilizar este cemento con adiciones, en la fabricación de morteros. Se parte de un cemento portland al que se le añaden proporciones de "filler" calizo desde O hasta el 50%, y se preparan probetas de mortero utilizando como árido arena normalizada, curándose a continuación hasta la edad de 28 días, fecha en la que se someten a rotura por flexotracción y compresión. La resistencia de los morteros se fija a la edad de 28 días, haciéndola coincidir con la de un mortero de cemento patrón (cemento sin adiciones a la misma edad, y se observan, a resistencia fija, los efectos del "filler" sobre el escurrimiento y relación agua/cemento.

  1. Pembuatan Papan Komposit dari Plastik Daur Ulang dan Serbuk Kayu serta Jerami Sebagai Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mulana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of composites was done by mixing the filler and matrix. The common matrix used to produce composite is plastic ore with types of poly propylene, poly ethylene and others. To know the characteristics of composite boards made from recycled plastic type poly ethylene so this research was conducted. This research aims to create a composite board made of solid waste sawdust and straw as a filler and recycled plastics as the matrix and to find out more details of the influence of variable solid waste types and ratio of solid waste weight and plastic toward the quality of the composite board product. Composite board manufacturing process was carried out by hot press method at a temperature of 145 oC for 20 minutes. The composite board products are tested on value of hardness, tensile strength, and thermal value. The results showed that the use of sawdust as a filler resulted the composite hardness value that is better (R79,5 compared with straw (R67 at a ratio of filler composition: matrix of 80:20 respectively. The use of sawdust also gives the value of tensile strength of 6.86 MPa that is better than the using a straw that valued of 3.62 MPa at composition ratio of filler: to matrix (60:40. Largest amount of heat needed to melt the composite boards are 31.19 J/g and 14.02 J/g at composition ratio sawdust: recycled plastics of 80:20 and at composition ratio straw: recycled plastics of 80:20, respectively. Visually composite board with a composition of sawdust:plastic HDPE 50:50 looks better with bright colors and shiny. Keywords: Composite, Solid waste, Plastic, Matrix, Filler,  Poly ethylene

  2. Synthesis of nanodispersed filler for polymer composite materials of thermostatic purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the synthesis of nanosized filler for nonpolar polymer matrix. Aqueous solution of sodium methylsiliconate with empirical formula CH3–Si(OH2ONa was used as the base component for the synthesis of nanosized filler. The production process of filler consists of several stages, these are the main ones: synthesizing of gel that was obtained in gel formation from sol colloidal solution – transformation of free-dispersed system (sol into connected-dispersed one; gel precipitation by centrifugation and washing from ion Na+; gel drying at temperature of 100оC to obtain a powder filler; dispersion in the mill to the particle size of 0,1–1 microns. To destroy globules and diminish particle size to nanoscale level the obtained material was exposed to dispersion in planetary mill with further sonication (22 Hz. To study the obtained filler X-ray, differential thermal and microscopic methods have been used. For quantification of colloidal component (nanoparticles in the suspension the centrifugation method was used at high speeds. It has been determined that the content of nanoparticles (up to 200 nm in the obtained substance is about 10%. Damping edge angle of the obtained material is 110–120оC, that shows high hydrophobic properties of the synthesized powder. The obtained material possesses high dispersiveness, hydrophobicity and silicone frame resistant to the temperature range up to 531оC (there are no significant chemical transformations except dealkylation and dehydration reactions. Thermal degradation of the synthesized filler distinctly observed at the temperaturemore than 531оC.

  3. Use of bottom ash from thermal power plant and lime as filler in bituminous mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-López, E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characterization of bottom ash (PCC-BA and determining the mechanical characteristics of hot mix asphalt (HMA using PCC-BA and hydrated lime (HL as filler. Physical and chemical characterization of the bottom ash was carried out to evaluate its eventual reutilization as filler substitute. The materials tested in this study were made using 0%, 25%, 50%, 70% and 100% of PCC-BA combined with HL. HMA mixes were evaluated in terms of their engineering properties, namely: air voids in the mixes, water sensitivity, stiffness modulus, performance in wheel tracking test and fatigue resistance. The results obtained indicate that HMA mixes with a filler blend of 70% PCC-BA and 30% HL fulfil European standards and are suitable for light traffic or small infrastructures.Este estudio se centra en la caracterización de las cenizas de fondo (PCC-BA y la determinación de las características mecánicas de mezclas bituminosas en caliente (HMA, utilizando cenizas de fondo y la cal hidratada (HL como filler. Se realizó la caracterización física y química de las cenizas de fondo para evaluar su empleo como sustituto de filler. Las mezclas ensayadas en este estudio se realizaron utilizando 0%, 25%, 50%, 70% y 100% de cenizas de fondo combinadas con cal hidratada. Se evaluaron propiedades ingenieriles de las mezclas bituminosas, tales como los huecos de aire en las mezclas, la sensibilidad al agua, el módulo de rigidez, el ensayo de pista y la resistencia a la fatiga. Los resultados obtenidos indican que las mezclas bituminosas fabricadas con una combinación de filler del 70% de cenizas de fondo y el 30% cal hidratada, cumplen con las normas europeas y son adecuados para su aplicación con tráficos ligeros o en pequeñas infraestructuras.

  4. Biomechanical characteristics of polymeric UHMWPE composites with hybrid matrix and dispersed fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, Sergey; Kornienko, Lyudmila; Shilko, Sergey; Thuc, Nguyen Xuan; Korchagin, Mikhail; Chaikina, Marina

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop artificial joint implants some biomechanical properties of composites with UHMWPE and hybrid (polymer-polymeric) "UHMWPE+PTFE" matrix with dispersed fillers were studied. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of adding hydroxyapatite micron- and nanopowders as a biocompatible filler was carried out. It was shown that under dry sliding friction the wear rate of nanocomposites with the hybrid matrix is lower as compared with composites with the non-hybrid one. Mechanical activation of components further enhances the durability of nano- and microcomposites to almost double it without any significant reduction in the strength characteristics.

  5. Pembuatan Papan Komposit dari Plastik Daur Ulang dan Serbuk Kayu serta Jerami Sebagai Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Mulana; Hisbullah Hisbullah; Iskandar Iskandar

    2011-01-01

    Production of composites was done by mixing the filler and matrix. The common matrix used to produce composite is plastic ore with types of poly propylene, poly ethylene and others. To know the characteristics of composite boards made from recycled plastic type poly ethylene so this research was conducted. This research aims to create a composite board made of solid waste sawdust and straw as a filler and recycled plastics as the matrix and to find out more details of the influence of variabl...

  6. Bacterial infection as a likely cause of adverse reactions to polyacrylamide hydrogel fillers in cosmetic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise; Breiting, Vibeke; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background. The etiology of long-lasting adverse reactions to gel fillers used in cosmetic surgery is not known. Bacterial infection and immunological reaction to the product have been suggested. Methods. We performed a case-control study, with 77 biopsies and 30 cytology specimens originating from...... in the presence of polyacrylamide filler in cosmetic surgery, possibly due to a biofilm mode of growth. Adequate skin preparation and use of sterile technique in these procedures are mandatory, but antibiotic prophylaxis prior to injection of nondegradable gels like polyacrylamide should be explored as well....

  7. The studies of high-frequency magnetic properties and absorption characteristics for amorphous-filler composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. W.; Yang, Z. H.

    2015-10-01

    Pure amorphous flake fillers and amorphous flakes coated by ferrite nanoparticles with core-shell-like structure were fabricated using mechanical ball-milling. The later with core-shell-like structure can greatly decrease permittivity and improve the absorption properties, as compared to the former. The absorption of all amorphous-filler composites has its origin in a quarter-wavelength resonator. Based on the resonator model, absorption frequency fA and the corresponding return loss RL are calculated, which are well consistent with observed values. It is also found that the resonance frequency is proportional to effective resistivity, based on William-Shockley-Kittel's eddy model.

  8. Development of brazing process for W-EUROFER joints using Cu-based fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2016-02-01

    A successful joint between W and EUROFER using high temperature brazing technique has been achieved for structural application in future fusion power plants. Cu-based powder alloy mixed with a polymeric binder has been used as filler. Microstructural analysis of the joints revealed that the joint consisted mainly of primary phases and acicular structures in a Cu matrix. Interaction between EUROFER and filler took place at the interface giving rise to several Cu-Ti-Fe rich layers. A loss of hardness at the EUROFER substrate close to the joint due to a diffusion phenomenon during brazing cycle was measured; however, the joints had an adequate shear strength value.

  9. Ajout de phosphogypse à des mortiers à base de cendres volantes et filler calcaire Addition of phosphogypsum to blended mortars based on fly ash and limestone filler

    OpenAIRE

    Alami Talbi M.; Raoui A.; Diouri A.; Kamali-Bernard S.

    2012-01-01

    L’objectif de ce travail est d’étudier la possibilité de la valorisation du phosphogypse dans les matériaux de construction vue sa grande disponibilité comme sous-produit de l’industrie des phosphates. Nous étudions l’effet de l’ajout du phosphogypse sur un mélange de clinker, cendres volantes et filler calcaire. Les échantillons sont préparés par l’ajout de 10% de phosphogypse et de 30% de cendres volantes aux mélanges constitués du clinker et du filler calcaire. Les mélanges sont hydratés e...

  10. Long-term performance of thermoplastic composite material with cotton burr and stem (CBS) as a partial filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Cotton burr and stem (CBS) fraction of cotton gin byproducts has shown promise as a fiber filler in thermoplastic composites, with physical and mechanical properties comparable to that made with wood fiber fillers. However, the long-term performance of this composite material is not known...

  11. Effect of silanization of hydroxyapatite fillers on physical and mechanical properties of a bis-GMA based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Sarfraz, Zenab; Habib, Amir; Khan, Abdul Samad; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of an experimental bis-GMA-based resin composite incorporated with non-silanized and silanized nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP) fillers. Experimental bis-GMA based resin composites samples which were reinforced with nHAP fillers were prepared. Filler particles were surface treated with a silane coupling agent. Five test groups were prepared: 1. Unfilled, 2. Reinforced with 10wt% and 30wt% non-silanized nHAP fillers, and 3. Reinforced with 10wt% and 30wt% silanized nHAP fillers. The samples were subjected to tests in dry condition and in deionized water, aged at 37°C for 30 days. Prepared silanized and non-silanized nHAP were analyzed with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The micro-hardness and water sorption were evaluated. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA (psilane treated fillers was superior to unfilled and untreated fillers resins. The resin matrix loaded with 30wt% silanized-nHAP fillers would improve the physical and mechanical properties of a bis-GMA based resin.

  12. Alumina-clay nanoscale hybrid filler assembling in cross-linked polyethylene based nanocomposites: mechanics and thermal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Josmin P; Thomas, Sabu

    2014-07-28

    Herein, investigation on XLPE-Al2O3-clay ternary hybrid systems of Al2O3 and clay in 1 : 1 and 2 : 1 ratios, binary systems of XLPE-clay and XLPE-Al2O3 nanocomposites, with special reference to the hybrid filler effect and the superior microstructural development in ternary systems is conducted. The ternary hybrid composite of Al2O3 and clay in a 1 : 1 ratio exhibits the highest tensile strength (100% increase) and Young's modulus (208% increase), followed by the Al2O3 : clay = 2 : 1 system. The interaction between alumina and clay altered the composite morphology, filler dispersion and gave rise to a unique filler architecture leading to a substantial boost up in mechanics compared to predictions based on the idealized filler morphology. Experimentally observed much higher mechanics compared to theoretical predictions confirmed that the dramatic improvement in mechanics is the outcome of the positive hybrid effect and a second factor of synergism, i.e. filler-filler networks. Morphological control of the hybrid filler network is realized by adjusting the ratio between different fillers. For the Al2O3 : clay = 2 : 1 system, the microstructural limitation of dispersion due to the steric effect of alumina clusters shifts the properties to the negative hybrid effect region.

  13. Effect on mechanical properties of glass reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe filled with different geopolymer filler molarity for piping application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, M. F. Abu; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Ghazali, C. M. R.; Hussin, K.; Binhussain, M.

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the use of a novel white clay geopolymer as a filler to produce high strength glass reinforced epoxy pipe. It was found that using white clay geopolymer as filler gives better compressive strength to the glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The disadvantages of current glass reinforced epoxy pipes such low compressive strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymerization is an innovative technology that can transform several aluminosilicate materials into useful products called geopolymers or inorganic polymers. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentages white clay geopolymer filler with 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of white clay geopolymer filler surface was indicates using scanning electron microscopy. The additions of white clay geopolymer filler for both 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity show higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without any geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these epoxy geopolymer pipe samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. Nonetheless, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with white clay geopolymer filler continues to drop when added to 40 wt% of the geopolymer filler loading for both 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity. These outcomes showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be attained in this research.

  14. Investigation of the corrosion performance of different braze fillers fused onto stainless steel type 1.4401 (UNS S31600)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.; Eklund, T.; Persson, O. [Alfa Laval Corporate AB, Tumba (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Corrosion measurements were performed on a new iron based braze filler, AlfaNova{sup 1} developed by Alfa Laval. The braze filler was fused onto stainless steel type EN 1.4401 (UNS S31600). The susceptibility to general corrosion, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion was evaluated by gravimetrical and electrochemical methods as well as metallographical examination of the samples. Different sample configurations were utilised, which simulate the geometry of a braze joint in a plate heat exchange. The results were compared with a selection of commercial nickel-based braze fillers. It was shown that the newly developed iron-based braze filler had similar corrosion resistance as the commercially available nickel-based fillers. It was seen that the precipitation of intermetallic phases due to melting point depressants had a governing effect on the corrosion resistance of the braze joint. (orig.)

  15. Effect of dry period dietary energy level in dairy cattle on volume, concentrations of immunoglobulin G, insulin, and fatty acid composition of colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S; Leal Yepes, F A; Overton, T R; Lock, A L; Lamb, S V; Wakshlag, J J; Nydam, D V

    2016-02-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of different dry cow feeding strategies on the volume, concentration of IgG and insulin, as well as fatty acid composition of colostrum. Our hypothesis was that different dry period diets formulated to resemble current feeding practices on commercial dairy farms and differing in plane of energy would have an effect on IgG and insulin concentration, as well as composition of fatty acid of colostrum. Animals (n=84) entering parity 2 or greater were dried off 57 d before expected parturition and fed either a diet formulated to meet, but not greatly exceed energy requirements throughout the dry period (CON), or a higher energy density diet, supplying approximately 150% of energy requirements (HI). A third group received the same diet as group CON from dry-off until 29 d before expected parturition. After this time point, from 28 d before expected parturition until calving, they received a diet formulated to supply approximately 125% of energy requirements (I-med). Concentration of IgG and insulin in colostrum were measured by radial immunodiffusion and RIA, respectively. Composition of fatty acids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The IgG concentration was highest in colostrum of cows in group CON [96.1 (95% CI: 83.3-108.9) g/L] and lowest in group HI [72.4 (60.3-84.5) g/L], whereas insulin concentration was highest in group HI [1,105 (960-1,250) μU/mL] and lowest in group CON [853 (700-1,007) μU/mL]. Colostrum yield did not differ between treatments and was 5.9 (4.5-7.4), 7.0 (5.6-8.4), and 7.3 (5.9-8.7) kg in groups CON, I-med, and HI, respectively. A multivariable linear regression model showed the effect of dietary treatment group on IgG concentration was independent of the effect of dry matter. Cows in groups CON, I-med, and HI had an average colostral fat percentage of 5.0 (4.1-5.9), 5.6 (4.8-6.4), and 6.0 (5.2-6.8) and an average fat yield of 289 (196-380), 406 (318-495), and 384 (295-473) g, respectively

  16. In-situ preparation of hierarchical flower-like TiO2/carbon nanostructures as fillers for polymer composites with enhanced dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nuoxin; Zhang, Qilong; Yang, Hui; Xia, Yuting; Jiang, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    Novel three-dimensional hierarchical flower-like TiO2/carbon (TiO2/C) nanostructures were in-situ synthesized via a solvothermal method involving calcination of organic precursor under inert atmosphere. The composite films comprised of P (VDF-HFP) and as-prepared hierarchical flower-like TiO2/C were fabricated by a solution casting and hot-pressing approach. The results reveal that loading the fillers with a small amount of carbon is an effective way to improve the dielectric constant and suppress the dielectric loss. In addition, TiO2/C particles with higher carbon contents exhibit superiority in promoting the dielectric constants of composites when compared with their noncarbon counterparts. For instance, the highest dielectric constant (330.6) of the TiO2/C composites is 10 times over that of noncarbon-TiO2-filled ones at the same filler volume fraction, and 32 times over that of pristine P (VDF-HFP). The enhancement in the dielectric constant can be attributed to the formation of a large network, which is composed of local micro-capacitors with carbon particles as electrodes and TiO2 as the dielectric in between. PMID:28262766

  17. Effect of filler content on the properties of expanded- graphite-based composite bipolar plates for application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Aakash; Borah, Munu; Pathak, Abhishek K.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2017-09-01

    Minimization of the weight and volume of a hydrogen-based PEM fuel cell stack is an essential area of research for the development and commercialization of PEMFCs for various applications. Graphite-based composite bipolar plates have significant advantages over conventional metallic bipolar plates due to their corrosion resistivity and low cost. On the other hand, expanded graphite is seen to be a potential candidate for facilitating the required electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of bipolar plates with a low density. Therefore, in the present study, the focus is on minimization of the high loading of graphite and optimizes its composition to meet the target properties of bipolar plates as per the USDOE target. Three types of expanded graphite (EG)-phenolic-resin-based composite bipolar plates were developed by partially replacing the expanded graphite content with natural graphite (NG) and carbon black as an additional filler. The three types of composite plate with the reinforcing constituent ratio EG:NG:R (25:25:50) give a bending strength of 49 MPa, a modulus of ~6 GPa, electrical conductivity  >100 S cm‑1, a shore hardness of 55 and a bulk density of 1.55 g/cc. The 50 wt% loading of resin is sufficient to wet the 50 wt% filler content in the composite plate. This study gives an insight into using hybrid reinforcements in order to achieve the desired properties of bipolar plates.

  18. In-situ preparation of hierarchical flower-like TiO2/carbon nanostructures as fillers for polymer composites with enhanced dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nuoxin; Zhang, Qilong; Yang, Hui; Xia, Yuting; Jiang, Yongchang

    2017-03-01

    Novel three-dimensional hierarchical flower-like TiO2/carbon (TiO2/C) nanostructures were in-situ synthesized via a solvothermal method involving calcination of organic precursor under inert atmosphere. The composite films comprised of P (VDF-HFP) and as-prepared hierarchical flower-like TiO2/C were fabricated by a solution casting and hot-pressing approach. The results reveal that loading the fillers with a small amount of carbon is an effective way to improve the dielectric constant and suppress the dielectric loss. In addition, TiO2/C particles with higher carbon contents exhibit superiority in promoting the dielectric constants of composites when compared with their noncarbon counterparts. For instance, the highest dielectric constant (330.6) of the TiO2/C composites is 10 times over that of noncarbon-TiO2-filled ones at the same filler volume fraction, and 32 times over that of pristine P (VDF-HFP). The enhancement in the dielectric constant can be attributed to the formation of a large network, which is composed of local micro-capacitors with carbon particles as electrodes and TiO2 as the dielectric in between.

  19. A study on engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using filler with recycled waste lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Do, Hwang; Hee Mun, Park; Suk keun, Rhee

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on determining the engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using mineral fillers with recycled waste lime, which is a by-product of the production of soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)). The materials tested in this study were made using a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratio based on the conventional mineral filler ratio to analyze the possibility of using recycled waste lime. The asphalt concretes, made of recycled waste lime, hydrated lime, and conventional asphalt concrete, were evaluated through their fundamental engineering properties such as Marshall stability, indirect tensile strength, resilient modulus, permanent deformation characteristics, moisture susceptibility, and fatigue resistance. The results indicate that the application of recycled waste lime as mineral filler improves the permanent deformation characteristics, stiffness and fatigue endurance of asphalt concrete at the wide range of temperatures. It was also determined that the mixtures with recycled waste lime showed higher resistance against stripping than conventional asphalt concrete. It was concluded from various test results that a waste lime can be used as mineral filler and, especially, can greatly improve the resistance of asphalt concrete to permanent deformation at high temperatures.

  20. Effects of dehydration on the apolar surface energetics of inorganic paper fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burry, William M; Keller, D Steven

    2002-10-04

    The surface energies of various inorganic fillers including kaolin clay, titanium dioxide, and talc were examined using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). In an earlier investigation that examined calcium carbonate fillers, dehydration by heating under a dry nitrogen purge had a substantial influence on the apolar (gammaS(LW)) and polar (gammaS(AB)) components of surface energy as measured using IGC. Using the same approach, the influence of such conditioning on several inorganic fillers used in papermaking were determined using preconditioning IGC from 100 to 300 degrees C, and sequential isothermal analysis at 100 degrees C. Results from IGC analysis of titanium dioxides (rutile and anatase) were similar to precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) for temperatures up to 200 degrees C. PCC was significantly more energetic after preconditioning at 300 degrees C, which may indicate the onset of significant thermal decomposition that titanium dioxides will not exhibit. Kaolin clay samples had relatively high apolar surface energy similar to that of the chalk samples. Calcination gave lower gammaS(LW) values that could not be accounted for by changes in the microporous structure. More likely the differences resulted from contamination of highly energetic surface sites with adsorbates other than water. Talc samples exhibited relatively high apolar surface energies that increased with preconditioning temperature. The results provided insight into the significance of water on the final adhesion properties of fillers in the sheet structure or coating layer.

  1. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples...

  2. Micro and nanocomposites of polybutadienebased polyurethane liners with mineral fillers and nanoclay: thermal and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Pablo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro and nanocomposites of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB-based polyurethanes (NPU were obtained using five mineral fillers and Cloisite 20A nanoclay, respectively. Samples were prepared by the reaction of HTPB polyol and toluene diisocyanate (TDI, and the chain was further extended with glyceryl monoricinoleate to produce the final elastomeric polyurethanes. Mechanical and thermal properties were studied, showing that mineral fillers (20%w/w significantly increased tensile strength, in particular nanoclay (at 5% w/w. When nanoclay-polymer dispersion was modified with a silane and hydantoin-bond promoter, elongation at break was significantly increased with respect to NPU with C20A. Thermal properties measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were not significantly affected in any case. The molecular structure of prepared micro and nanocomposites was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Interaction of fillers with polymer chains is discussed, considering the role of silanes in compatibilization of hydrophilic mineral fillers and hydrophobic polymer. The functionalization of nanoclay with HMDS silane was confirmed using FTIR. Microstructure of NPU with C20A nanoclay was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM.

  3. Polyols as filler-binders for disintegrating tablets prepared by direct compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Rexwinkel, Erik G.; Zuurman, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although polyols are frequently used as tablet excipients in lozenges, chewing tablets, and orodisperse tablets, special directly compressible (DC) forms are recommended as filler-binder in common disintegrating tablets. Aim: In this article, DC types of isomalt, lactitol, mannitol, sorb

  4. Fabrications of electrospun nanofibers containing inorganic fillers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Hwang, Won-Pill; Seo, Min-Hye; Lee, Jin-Kook; Kim, Mi-Ra

    2014-08-01

    Poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers containing inorganic fillers were fabricated by electrospinning. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using these nanofibers showed improved short circuit currents without degraded fill factors or open circuit voltages. The long-term stabilities of cells using electrospun PVDF-HFP/titanium isopropoxide (TIP) nanofibers were significantly improved.

  5. Mechanical stress in silicon nanosized architectures: Defects of SOD processed silica filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, Pier Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Casula, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Gulleri, Gianluca; Fumagalli, Francesco [Micron Semiconductor Italia, s.r.l. via Camillo Olivetti, 2 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Carbonaro, Carlo Maria; Corpino, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Structural and optical properties of silica filled STI architectures. • The silica filler induces a compressive stress. • PL spectra show a large distribution of emitting defects in the UV–blue. • The defects were identified and located at the silica–liner interface. - Abstract: The mechanical stress in nanosized silicon architectures is studied in shallow trench isolation systems with different liners and spin on dielectrics processed silica filler by means of Raman spectroscopy. The nanopatterning of silicon wafers causes a tensile stress of the system whereas the presence of the filler induces a compressive stress which depends on the interaction between silica filler and liner: by changing the liner from silicon dioxide to silicon nitride one can induce a larger compressive stress. The analysis of the ultraviolet excited emission properties in the visible range (nanosecond lasting bands at 2.5, 3.0 and 3.3 eV) allowed us to individuate and locate silica related defects and to correlate their presence to the induced compressive stress.

  6. Cross-linguistic evidence for storage costs in filler-gap dependencies with wh-adjuncts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur eStepanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates processing of interrogative filler-gap dependencies in which the filler integration site or gap is not directly subcategorized by the verb. This is the case when the wh-filler is a structural adjunct such as how or when rather than subject or object. Two self-paced reading experiments in English and Slovenian provide converging cross-linguistic evidence that wh-adjuncts elicit a kind of memory storage cost similar to that previously shown in the literature for wh-arguments. Experiment 1 investigates the storage costs elicited by the adjunct when in Slovenian, and Experiment 2 the storage costs elicited by how quickly and why in English. The results support the class of theories of storage costs based on the metric in terms of incomplete phrase structure rules or incomplete syntactic head predictions. We also demonstrate that the endpoint of the storage cost for a wh-adjunct filler provides valuable processing evidence for its base structural position, the identification of which remains a murky issue in current grammatical research.

  7. Gas permeability of ENR/PVC membrane with the addition of inorganic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Farhan Mohd; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Othaman, Rizafizah

    2013-11-01

    Epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) was blended with polyvinyl chloride to form a flexible and porous membrane. SiO2 and MgO were added into the membrane for pore formation and the effects of the addition was investigated by means of FTIR, TGA, SEM, EDX and gas permeability towards CO2 and N2 gases. FTIR result showed the presence of Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching at the absorption peak of 467 cm-1 for ENR/PVC/SiO2 membrane and MgO signature peak at 3700 cm-1 for ENR/PVC/MgO membrane. Thermal analysis showed that the thermal stability of ENR/PVC membrane increased with the addition of fillers. Morphological studies prove that subsequently, the pores in the membranes increased showing that some of the added fillers were drawn towards the water leaving empty spaces and tracks. The remaining fillers are homogenously distributed on the surface of the membranes. CO2 and N2 gas permeability increased with increasing filler content and the permeability of ENR/PVC/SiO2 membranes towards CO2 and N2 gasses was higher than ENR/PVC/MgO membranes.

  8. Influence of nanoclay-carbon black hybrid fillers on cure and properties of natural rubber compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapkota, J.; Poikelispää, M.; Das, A.; Dierkes, W.K.; Vuorinen, J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of organically modified nanoclay-carbon black (CB) hybrid filler on the curing behavior of natural rubber (NR) was explored in this investigation. Here an effort was paid to understand the curing kinetics of organomodified nanoclay filled rubber compounds. On the basis of two different

  9. Surface Modified Characteristics of the Tetracalcium Phosphate as Light-Cured Composite Resin Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to characterize the properties of light-cured composite resins that are reinforced with whisker surface-modified particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP and to investigate the influence of thermal cycling on the reinforced composites properties. The characteristics of ultimate diametral tensile strength (DTS, moduli, pH values, and fracture surfaces of the samples with different amounts of surface-modified TTCP (30%–60% were determined before and after thermal cycling between 5°C and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. The trends of all groups were ductile prior to thermal cycling and the moduli of all groups increased after thermal cycling. The ductile property of the control group without filler was not significantly affected. Larger amounts of fillers caused the particles to aggregate, subsequently decreasing the resin’s ability to disperse external forces and leading to brittleness after thermal cycling. Therefore, the trend of composite resins with larger amounts of filler would become more brittle and exhibited higher moduli after thermal cycling. This developed composite resin with surface modified-TTCP fillers has the potential to be successful dental restorative materials.

  10. Use of Fillers, Pigments and Additives in Fouling-Release Coatings: a Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaev, Nail; Kiil, Søren; Noguer, Albert Camós

    an opportunity of potential enhancement of the mechanical strength without negative influence on the fouling-release properties. Another benefit of the nanoparticles is in altering of wetting abilities with forming self-cleaning or superhydrophobic surfaces [5]. Effect of the filler presence was tested...

  11. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet transfer were observed during welding. The tensile strength of welds was slightly increased by adding CaO to the filler metal, which resulted from the decreased grain size in the weld metal. When welding Mg alloys, fumes have been unavoidable so far because of the low boiling temperature of Mg. Fume reduction was successfully demonstrated with a wire composed of the novel ECO Mg filler. In addition, stable droplet transfer was observed and spatter suppression could be expected by using CaO-added Mg filler wire.

  12. Preparation and Properties of a Novel Al-Si-Ge-Zn Filler Metal for Brazing Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhiwei; Huang, Jihua; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2015-06-01

    The study is concerned with developing a filler metal with low melting temperature and good processability for brazing aluminum and its alloys. For this purpose, a novel Al-Si-Ge-Zn alloy was prepared according to Al-Si-Ge and Al-Si-Zn ternary phase diagrams. The melting characteristics, microstructures, wettability, and processing property of the alloy were investigated. The results showed that the melting temperature range of the novel filler metal was 505.2-545.1 °C, and the temperature interval between the solidus and the liquidus was 39.9 °C. Compared with a common Al-Si-Ge alloy, it had smaller and better dispersed β-GeSi solid solution precipitates, and the Zn-rich phases distributed on the boundary of the β-GeSi precipitates. The novel filler metal has good processability and good wettability with Al. There was one obvious transition layer with a thin α-Al solid solution between the filler metal and base metal, which is favorable to improve the strength of brazing joint.

  13. Influence of filler alignment in the mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes/epoxy nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisberto, M. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); INQUIMAE-CONICET-UBA, Pab II Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Arias-Duran, A. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Ramos, J.A.; Mondragon, I. [Dep. Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente. Esc. Politecnica. UPV/EHU, Pza. Europa 1, Donostia-San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Candal, R. [INQUIMAE-CONICET-UBA, Pab II Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia-UNSAM, San Martin, Prov. De Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Rubiolo, G.H., E-mail: rubiolo@cnea.gov.ar [LPyMC, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Pab I Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Dep. Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA-CAC), Avda Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we report the mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes/epoxy composites prepared with aligned and randomly oriented nanotubes as filler. The samples are disks of 30 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness. To obtain the carbon nanotubes alignment, an external electric field (250 VAC; 50 Hz) was applied through the thickness of the sample during all the cure process. The AC electrical current was measured, during the cure, as a strategy to determine the optimum time in which the alignment reaches the maximum value. DC conductivity measured after the cure shows a percolation threshold in the filler content one order of magnitude smaller for composites with aligned nanotubes than for composites with randomly oriented filler (from 0.06 to 0.5 wt%). In the percolation threshold, the achieved conductivity was 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Sm{sup -1}. In both cases, aligned and randomly distributed carbon nanotube composites, the wear resistance increases with the addition of the filler while the Rockwell hardness decreases independently of the nanotubes alignment.

  14. Polyactive as a bone-filler in a beagle dog model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.; Dooren, van A.; Gallard, M.L.; Dalmeijer, R.; Putter, de C.; Koole, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Calcification is a crucial step in the bone-bonding mechanism of PEO/PBT hydrogel copolymers (Polyactive®), a new generation of bone-fillers. A beagle dog study was conducted to determine whether the preoperative presence of a calcium phosphate layer (precalcification) on a PEO/PBT 80/20 copolymer w

  15. Detection of Bacteria by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization in Culture-Negative Soft Tissue Filler Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adverse reactions to polyacrylamide gel occur as swellings or nodules, and controversy exists whether these are due to bacterial infection or an autoimmune reaction to the filler. OBJECTIVES Biopsies from culture-negative long-lasting nodules after injection with different types of pol...

  16. Examining the Effects of Filler Concentration and Mold Geometry on Performance of Cylindrical Injection Molded Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing interest in using fillers in plastic products to displace petroleum components, reduce cost, and improve mechanical properties. Many studies have examined the use of materials such as clay, talc, paper, wood flour, lignin, flax, and bamboo, to name just a few. For successful utili...

  17. Effects of Filler Concentration and Geometry on Performance of Cylindrical Injection Molded Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing interest in using fillers in plastic products to displace petroleum components, reduce cost, and improve mechanical properties. Many studies have examined the use of materials such as clay, talc, paper, wood flour, lignin, flax, and bamboo, to name just a few. For successful utili...

  18. Interaction of bonding agent with filler in coking-pitch compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firsanov, A.V.; Beylina, N.Yu.; Kolodin, E.A.; Ostrovskiy, V.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shipkov, N.N.

    1983-01-01

    Coke's selective sorption of highly molecular components of pitch was determined with the aid of gel-penetrating chromatography. It was shown that behavior of pitch in coking-pitch compositions, as well as the nature of release of pyrolysis products is determined by dispersion of the filler.

  19. Novel encapsulation technique for incorporation of high permittivity fillers into silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    as for the traditionally applied thermoplastic encapsulation. The properties of the elastomers are investigated as function of the filler content and type. The dielectric permittivity, dielectric loss, conductivity, storage modulus as well as viscous loss are compared to elastomers with the same amounts of high...

  20. Investigation of Properties of Asphalt Concrete Containing Boron Waste as Mineral Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahit GÜRER

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the manufacture of compounds in the boron mining industry a large quantity of waste boron is produced which has detrimental effects on the environment. Large areas have to be allocated for the disposal of this waste. Today with an increase in infrastructure construction, more efficient use of the existing sources of raw materials has become an obligation and this involves the recycling of various waste materials. Road construction requires a significant amount of raw materials and it is possible that substantial amounts of boron-containing waste materials can be recycled in these applications. This study investigates the usability of boron wastes as filler in asphalt concrete. For this purpose, asphalt concrete samples were produced using mineral fillers containing 4%, 5%, 6%, 7% and 8% boron waste as well as a 6% limestone filler (6%L as the control sample. The Marshall Design, mechanical immersion and Marshall Stability test after a freeze-thaw cycle and indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM test were performed for each of the series. The results of this experimental study showed that boron waste can be used in medium and low trafficked asphalt concrete pavements wearing courses as filler.

  1. Novel Organically Modified Core-Shell Clay for Epoxy Composites-"SOBM Filler 1".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheaturu, Nnamdi Chibuike; Madufor, Innocent Chimezie

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of a novel organically modified clay from spent oil base drilling mud (SOBM) that could serve as core-shell clay filler for polymers is herein reported. Due to the hydrophilic nature of clay, its compatibility with polymer matrix was made possible through modification of the surface of the core clay sample with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) compound prior to its use. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize clay surface modification. Electron dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to expose filler chemical composition and morphology, while electrophoresis measurement was used to examine level of filler dispersion. Results show an agglomerated core clay powder after high temperature treatment, while EDX analysis shows that the organically modified clay is composed of chemical inhomogeneities, wherein elemental compositions in weight percent vary from one point to the other in a probe of two points. Micrographs of the 3-APTES coupled SOBM core-shell clay filler clearly show cloudy appearance, while FT-IR indicates 25% and 5% increases in fundamental vibrations band at 1014 cm(-1) and 1435 cm(-1), respectively. Furthermore, 3-APTES coupled core-shell clay was used to prepare epoxy composites and tested for mechanical properties.

  2. Assessment of decontamination methods as pretreatment of silanization of composite glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, K; Yoshida, Y; Nakayama, Y; Fujitani, M; Shintani, H; Wakasa, K; Okazaki, M; Snauwaert, J; Van Meerbeek, B

    2000-01-01

    In terms of mechanical properties and durability, the surface of glass fillers should be decontaminated in order to optimize the silanization process for the production of resin composites. The objective of this study was to evaluate the decontamination efficiency of 18 cleaning methods on glass fillers as pretreatment of silane coupling. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that SiO(2) boiled with a 5% sodium peroxodisulfate aqueous solution for 15 min, followed by ultrasonic rinsing with acetone for 30 min was most effective among all the decontamination methods investigated. In addition, nano-indentation measurements on SiO(2) treated by the above-mentioned method revealed that the surface was not significantly weakened as compared to untreated SiO(2). The results of this study should lead to an improved filler-matrix coupling and thus contribute to the development of better wear and fatigue-resistant composites. Therefore, sodium peroxodisulfate is proposed as a presilanization filler decontamination step in the production process of resin composites.

  3. Experimental dermatological surgery: An animal model for developing skills with dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Catucci Boza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laboratory experiments in the formation of physicians is well recognized since they facilitate scientific development and enhance technical skills. Dermal filling procedures are performed for the correction of wrinkles, rhytids, scars, and lipodystrophy. Till date, experimental models for the training of dermal filling techniques have not been studied. To demonstrate an experimental laboratory model for the training of dermal filling techniques in an animal model. The heads of pigs were used for this purpose, together with Carbopol gel at different densities, which was used to simulate the fillers available in the market. Needles and specific cannulas were used to apply the fillers into the creases and other areas of the pig skin. The pig head appears to be a suitable model for this training. Carbopol gel is a good choice for simulating fillers. This model of laboratory experiment requires a minimum of infrastructure; it is a low-cost alternative and facilitates practical training in the application of dermal fillers.

  4. Effect of denture base-resin with prereacted glass-ionomer filler on dentin demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Mukai; K. Kamijo; F. Fujino; T. Teranaka; J.M. ten Cate

    2009-01-01

    The demineralization of dentin was studied when placed adjacent to one of four experimental denture base-resins. These experimental resins contained polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and 0, 5, 10, 20 or 30 wt% surface reaction-type prereacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler, respectively. A dentin thin-sec

  5. Synthesis of mesh-shaped calcia partially stabilized zirconia using eggshell membrane template as filler composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Gempita

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted experimentally to synthesize Calcia Partially Stabilized Zirconia (Ca-PSZ by sol-gel method using eggshell membrane template as a composite filler. The eggshell membrane was used to produce a mesh shaped structure, which hopefully can improve the mechanical properties of the composite. Ca-PSZ filler was synthesized from ZrOCl2 precursor and Ca(NO32 stabilizer with a 24 hours immersion time. Ca-PSZ of synthesis then mixed with the resin matrix to test its composite hardness. The EDS characterization results suggested that the sample contained elements of zirconia, calcium, and oxygen. Whereas, the XRD characterization identified that crystal structures that formed in the sample were nano scale tetragonal. Characterization of SEM showed Ca-PSZ with mesh structured. The average composite hardness value was 15.79 VHN. The composites with Ca-PSZ-synthesized filler could be prepared and its hardness value was higher than the composite with Ca-PSZ filler in spherical particles, but the hardness was still below the composite on the market.

  6. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP.

  7. Influence of filler existence on microleakage of a self-etch adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Khosravi, K.; Kashani, K.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of filler existence in self-etch adhesive resin on the marginal leakage of a class V restoration. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared and restored with a resin composite on the buccal surfaces of 48 premolars lined with unfilled or filled adhesi

  8. Techniques for hot embossing microstructures on liquid silicone rubbers with fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    of the simplest, most cost-effective, and time-saving methods for replicating microstructures. In the present study, films made fromliquid silicone rubber (LSR) formulations containing fillers are hot embossed under modified operating conditions. The use of such relatively hard silicone elastomers shows...

  9. Filler particles used in dental biomaterials induce production and release of inflammatory mediators in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansteinsson, Vibeke E; Samuelsen, Jan Tore; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-04-01

    Although dental composites are in extensive use today, little is known about the biological effects of the filler particles. As composite materials are gradually broken down in the aggressive environment of the oral cavity, the filler particles may leak and induce toxic effects on the surrounding tissue and cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate possible adverse biological effects of commonly used dental filler particles; bariumaluminiumsilica (BaAlSi) and bariumaluminiumfluorosilica (BaAlFSi) with mean size of 1 microm. BEAS-2B cells were used as a model system. Particle morphology, mean particle size in solution, and particle surface charge were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Malvern zetasizer technology, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect secretion of cytokine and chemokine (IL-8 and IL-6) and quantitative PCR for detection of gene activity. Both types of particle increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. BaAlFSi particles induced a more marked IL-8 response compared to BaAlSi particles, whereas no significant difference was observed for the IL-6 response. Mechanistic studies using specific inhibitors and activators indicated that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A is partly involved in the observed IL-8 response. In conclusion, we consider dental filler particles to have potential to induce adverse biological response in cell cultures.

  10. Development of (fe–b–c-based filler for wear-resistant composite coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Sukhovа

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of multi-alloyed filler for abrasive wear-resistant composites. Methodology. The methods of microstructural, X-ray and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses were used to achieve research purpose. Micro-mechanical properties of structural constituents and abrasive wear-resistance of composites were determined. Findings. The complete dissolution of chromium and vanadium in the borides of Fe2В and FeВ that are initial structural constituents of Fe–В–С peritectic alloys has been established. These elements primarily dissolve in iron monoboride. Dissolution of molybdenum and niobium is not practically observed. As a result the phases of Мо2В, Мо2(В,С or NbВ2 can be seen in the structure. Alloying with chromium and vanadium increases compression strength and crack resistance coefficient, but that with molybdenum and niobium enhances total microhardness and hardness of the alloys. Structure formation of the interfaces between the filler and the binder of the composites based on МNМts 20-20 binder is governed by dissolution and diffusion processes when multi-alloyed (Fe–В–С alloy is applied as filler of the composites. The phase and the structural composition of contact interaction zones can be explained by re-crystallization of the filler surface layers after dissolution caused by contact with the molten binder. Consequently the macroheterogeneous structure of the composites is free of defects and strong adhesion between the filler and the binder is assured. Contact interaction intensity can be controlled by the choice of temperature- and-time infiltration regimes. Originality. The peculiarities in the formation of structure and properties of Fe2В- and FeВ-based solid solutions observed in the structure of the Fe–В–С peritectic alloys were investigated that allowed us to recommend composition of multicomponent alloy to be applied as filler of (Cu–Ni–Mn-matrix macroheterogeneous composites. Practical

  11. Effect of Biomass Waste Filler on the Dielectric Properties of Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Been Seok

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of biomass waste fillers, namely coconut shell (CS and sugarcane bagasse (SCB on the dielectric properties of polymer composite was investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of CS and SCB to be used as conductive filler (natural source of carbon in the polymer composite. The purpose of the conductive filler is to increase the dielectric properties of the polymer composite. The carbon composition the CS and SCB was determine through carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur (CHNS elemental analysis whereas the structural morphology of CS and SCB particles was examined by using scanning electron microscope. Room temperature open-ended coaxial line method was used to determine the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor over broad band frequency range of 200 MHz-20 GHz. Based on this study, the results found that CS and SCB contain 48% and 44% of carbon, which is potentially useful to be used as conductive elements in the polymer composite. From SEM morphology, presence of irregular shape particles (size ≈ 200 μm and macroporous structure (size ≈ 2.5 μm were detected on CS and SCB. For dielectric properties measurement, it was measured that the average dielectric constant (ε' is 3.062 and 3.007 whereas the average dielectric loss factor (ε" is 0.282 and 0.273 respectively for CS/polymer and SCB/polymer composites. The presence of the biomass waste fillers have improved the dielectric properties of the polymer based composite (ε' = 2.920, ε" = 0.231. However, the increased in the dielectric properties is not highly significant, i.e. up to 4.86 % increase in ε' and 20% increase in ε". The biomass waste filler reinforced polymer composites show typical dielectric relaxation characteristic at frequency of 10 GHz - 20 GHz and could be used as conducting polymer composite for suppressing EMI at high frequency range.

  12. Role of Silicon Dioxide Filler on Mechanical and Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Glass-Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of glass fabric reinforced epoxy (G-E composite with varying weight percentage of silicon dioxide (SiO2 filler have been studied in the present work. The influence of sliding distance, velocity, and applied normal load on dry sliding wear behaviour has been considered using Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Addition of SiO2 increased the density, hardness, flexural, and impact strengths of G-E composite. Results of dry sliding wear tests showed increasing wear volume with increase in sliding distance, load, and sliding velocity for G-E and SiO2 filled G-E composites. Taguchi's results indicate that the sliding distance played a significant role followed by applied load, sliding velocity, and SiO2 loading. Scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces of composite samples at different test parameters show smooth surface, microploughing, and fine grooves under low load and velocity. However, severe damage of matrix with debonding and fiber breakage was seen at high load and velocity especially in unfilled G-E composite.

  13. Effect of filler wire on the joint properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys using CO2 laser welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongying; Li Zhijun

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding with filler wire of AZ31 magnesium alloys is investigated using a CO2 laser experimental system. The effect of three different filler wires on the joint properties is researched. The results show that the weld appearance can be effectively improved when using laser welding with filler wire. The microhardness and tensile strength of joints are almost the same as those of the base metal when ER AZ31 or ER AZ61 wire is adopted. However, when the filler wire of ER 5356 aluminum alloy is used, the mechanical properties of joints become worse. For ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 filler wires, the microstructure of weld zone shows small dendrite grains. In comparison, for ER 5356 filler wire, the weld shows a structure of snowy dendrites and many intermetallic compounds and eutectic phases distribute in the dendrites. These intermetallic constituents with low melting point increase the tendency of hot crack and result in fragile joint properties. Therefore, ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 wire are more suitable filler material than ER 5356 for CO2 laser welding of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

  14. Microstructure analysis of graphite/Cu joints brazed with (Cu-50TiH{sub 2}) + B composite filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yangwu, E-mail: yangwu.mao@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Plasma Chemistry and Advanced Materials of Hubei Province, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Yu, Si [Key Laboratory of Plasma Chemistry and Advanced Materials of Hubei Province, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Zhang, Yizhong [Zhuzhou Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools Co., Ltd., Zhuzhou, Hunan 412007 (China); Guo, Beibei; Ma, Zhibin; Deng, Quanrong [Key Laboratory of Plasma Chemistry and Advanced Materials of Hubei Province, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • TiB whiskers are synthesized in situ in the filler layer of graphite/copper joints. • Boron content has a considerable effect on the strength and microstructure of joints. • TiB whiskers could serve as reinforcements, contributing to the improvement of joints. - Abstract: Joining of carbon materials to copper will benefit the fabrication of plasma facing components for fusion applications. Graphite/Cu joints have been prepared by brazing with (Cu-50TiH{sub 2}) + B composite filler in a vacuum. The effect of boron content in the composite filler on the mechanical property and microstructure of brazed graphite/Cu joints has been investigated. The average shear strength of joints increases with boron content raising from 0 to 15 vol%. The maximum average shear strength of 19.8 MPa was obtained with boron content of 15 vol%. Then, the strength of joints decreases with boron content higher than 15 vol%. The microstructure analysis of joints brazed with (Cu-50TiH{sub 2}) + 15 vol% B filler indicates that TiB whiskers have been in situ synthesized in the filler layer. The filler layer is mainly composed of Cu based solid solution and Ti-Cu intermetallic compounds with TiB whiskers distributed inside. The distribution of TiB whiskers in the filler layer could serve as reinforcements, contributing to the improvement of graphite/Cu joints.

  15. Al2O3/SUS304 Brazing via AgCuTi-W Composite as Active Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cherng-Yuh; Zhuang, Xie-Zongyang; Pan, Cheng-Tang

    2014-03-01

    Alumina ceramic (α-Al2O3) was brazed to stainless steel (SUS304) using an Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler and a traditional active brazing filler alloy (CuSil-ABA). Then, the effects of the presence of W particles and of the brazing parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the brazed joints were investigated. The maximum tensile strength of the joints obtained using Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler was 13.2 MPa, which is similar to that obtained using CuSil-ABA filler (13.5 MPa). When the joint was brazed at 930 °C for 30 min, the tensile strengths decreased for both kinds of fillers, although the strength was slightly higher for the Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler than for the Ag-Cu-Ti filler. The interfacial microstructure results show that the Ti reacts with W to form a Ti-W-O compound in the brazing alloy. When there are more W particles in the brazing alloy, the thickness of the Ti X O Y reaction layer near the alumina ceramic decreases. Moreover, W particles added to the brazing alloy can reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of the brazing alloy, which results in lower residual stress between the Al2O3 and SUS304 in the brazing joints and thus yields higher tensile strengths as compared to those obtained using the CuSil-ABA brazing alloy.

  16. Study on the Effect of Organic Additives and Inorganic Fillers on Properties of Sodium Silicate Wood Adhesive Modified by Polyvinyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the properties of sodium silicate wood adhesive modified by PVOH (polyvinyl alcohol, different organic additives (compound A and inorganic fillers (compound B were added into the system. Their effects on the thermal stability and molecular structure of the composite adhesive were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, spectroscopic analysis (FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and thermo- gravimetric analysis (TGA. The results showed that when the compound A consisting of amino acid, TEOS (Tetraethyl orthosilicate, sodium dodecyl sulfate with the mass ratio of 5:3:3 and B consisting of 50% active magnesium oxide and 50% nano-silica were added into the cross-linked sodium silicate adhesive system with the ratio of 90:3, the bonding and water resistance properties were improved by 97.6% and 46.7%, or 13.7% and 36% relative to pure and cross-linked sodium silicate, respectively. The addition of organic additives and inorganic fillers had a good effect on both the bonding strength and thermal stability of sodium silicate wood adhesive modified by PVOH.

  17. Protein Thermostability Is Owing to Their Preferences to Non-Polar Smaller Volume Amino Acids, Variations in Residual Physico-Chemical Properties and More Salt-Bridges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Sundar Panja

    Full Text Available Protein thermostability is an important field for its evolutionary perspective of mesophilic versus thermophilic relationship and for its industrial/ therapeutic applications.Presently, a total 400 (200 thermophilic and 200 mesophilic homologue proteins were studied utilizing several software/databases to evaluate their amino acid preferences. Randomly selected 50 homologous proteins with available PDB-structure of each group were explored for the understanding of the protein charges, isoelectric-points, hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, tyrosine phosphorylation and salt-bridge occurrences. These 100 proteins were further probed to generate Ramachandran plot/data for the gross secondary structure prediction in and comparison between the thermophilic and mesophilic proteins.Present results strongly suggest that nonpolar smaller volume amino acids Ala (χ2 = 238.54, p<0.001 and Gly (χ2 = 73.35, p<0.001 are highly and Val moderately (χ2 = 144.43, p<0.001 occurring in the 85% of thermophilic proteins. Phospho-regulated Tyr and redox-sensitive Cys are also moderately distributed (χ2~20.0, p<0.01 in a larger number of thermophilic proteins. A consistent lower distribution of thermophilicity and discretely higher distribution of hydrophobicity is noticed in a large number of thermophilic versus their mesophilic protein homolog. The mean differences of isoelectric points and charges are found to be significantly less (7.11 vs. 6.39, p<0.05 and 1 vs. -0.6, p<0.01, respectively in thermophilic proteins compared to their mesophilic counterpart. The possible sites for Tyr phosphorylation are noticed to be 25% higher (p<0.05 in thermophilic proteins. The 60% thermophiles are found with higher number of salt bridges in this study. The average percentage of salt-bridge of thermophiles is found to be higher by 20% than their mesophilic homologue. The GLU-HIS and GLU-LYS salt-bridge dyads are calculated to be significantly higher (p<0.05 and p<0

  18. Laser-MIG Arc Hybrid Brazing-Fusion Welding of Al Alloy to Galvanized Steel with Different Filler Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujun WANG; Guoliang QIN; Yuhu SU

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum alloy plates were joined to galvanized steel sheets with lap joint by laser-MIG arc hybrid brazingfusion welding with AlSi5,AlSi12,AlMg5 filler wires,respectively.The influences of Si and Mg on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the brazed-fusion welded joint were studied.The increase of Si element in the fusion weld can make the grain refined,and increase the microhardness of the fusion weld.Therefore,the microhardness in fusion weld made from AlSi12 and AlSi5 filler wires can be up to 98.4 HV0.01and 96.8 HV0.01,which is higher than that from AlMg5 filler wire of 70.4 HV0.01.The highest tensile strength can reach 178.9 MPa made with AlMg5 filler wire.The tensile strength is 172.43 MPa made with AlSi5 filler wire.However,the lowest tensile strength is 144 MPa made with AlSi12 filler wire.The average thicknesses of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) layer with AlSi5,AlSi12,AlMg5 filler wires are 1.49-2.64 μm.The lMCs layer made from AlSi5,AlSi12 filler wires are identified as FeAl2,Fe2Als,Fe4Al13 and Al0.5Fe3Si0.5,that from AlMg5 filler wire are identified as FeAl2,Fe2Al5 and Fe4Al13.

  19. The Efficacy of Massage in Reducing Nodule Formation After Poly-L-Lactic Acid Administration for Facial Volume Loss: A Randomized, Evaluator-Blinded Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Douglas C; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2016-11-01

    The risk of nodule formation following poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) injections for facial volume loss is well known. Traditionally, post-treatment massage according to the 5-5-5 rule (5 times per day for 5 minutes for 5 days) has been applied to mitigate this risk. However, such a regimen may be onerous for patient compliance. Using currently accepted injection technique and product dilution, the efficacy of massage for nodule prevention has never been formally evaluated. To evaluate the efficacy of massage in reducing the incidence of nodule formation post-PLLA injection. After obtaining informed consent, 20 subjects with facial lipoatrophy were enrolled in this randomized, evaluator-blinded clinical trial. Each subject was treated with 1 vial of PLLA each month for 3 months. Vials were diluted with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine and 7 ml of bacteriostatic water, shaken with a vortex and refrigerated for 24 to 48 hours before injection. Ten subjects were instructed to massage the treated areas according to the 5-5-5 rule and 10 subjects did not perform any massage post-treatment. Six-month follow-up data were collected for treatment efficacy and adverse events. No nodules were reported by subjects or detected by the blinded evaluator regardless of massage status. Significant improvements in facial lipoatrophy were detected 1, 3, and 6 months after the final treatment session and were not statistically different between the 2 groups. Using currently recommended guidelines for product preparation and injection, the application of massage post-PLLA facial treatment does not have a significant impact on nodule formation or treatment efficacy.

  20. Influence of imidazolium based green solvents on volume phase transition temperature of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Jung; Reddy, P Madhusudhana; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Huang, Hsin-Chun

    2015-01-28

    The volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel in water in the presence of five imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) was studied. The VPTT of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel can be modulated to different extents by the addition of different amounts of ILs. The modulations in VPTT values can be attributed to the IL-induced alterations in hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hydrogen bonding interactions of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel with the neighboring solvent and molecular chains. The influence of ILs having a common cation, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([Bmim]) and different anions, such as iodide (I-), tetrafluoroborate (BF4-), chloride (Cl-), acetate (CH3COO-) and hydrogen sulfate (HSO4-), on the phase transition of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel was monitored by the aid of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interfacial properties between aqueous IL and polymer surface were scrutinized with the help of contact angle (CA) measurements. The overall specific ranking of ILs in preserving the hydration layer around the PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel in water was [Bmim][I]>[Bmim][BF4]>[Bmim][Cl]>[Bmim][Ac]>[Bmim][HSO4]. The trend of these ILs followed the well-known Hofmeister series. Interestingly, the PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel in water shows abnormal salting-out property in the presence of [Bmim][BF4] at higher concentration and this abnormal behavior can be explained based on the lack of sufficient binding sites on the macromolecule for higher number of [Bmim][BF4] at a higher concentration.

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy of Structural-Mechanical Properties of Polyethylene Reinforced by Silicate Needle-Shaped Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Morozov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental studies of polyethylene-based composites reinforced with silicate needle-shaped filler (palygorskite of different mass fraction (0, 5, 10, and 15%. These composites are less flammable and fire toxic than unfilled polyethylene. The structure (size, shape, and agglomeration of filler and local mechanical properties of composites in nonstretched and elongated states were investigated by AFM. In stretched samples palygorskite takes a wavy shape, and at extremely high elongation the filler is orthogonal to the axis of tension. The smooth surfaces of the samples, required for AFM, were prepared using the heating/cooling procedure.

  2. Influences of soil volume and an elevated CO[sub 2] level on growth and CO[sub 2] exchange for the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Opuntia ficus-indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Cui, M.; Miller, P.M.; Luo, Y. (UCLA-DOE Lab., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the current (38 Pa) and an elevated (74 Pa) CO[sub 2] partial pressure on root and shoot areas, biomass accumulation and daily net CO[sub 2] exchange were determined for opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller, a highly productive Crassulacean acid metabolism species cultivated worldwide. Plants were grown in environmentally controlled rooms for 18 weeks in pots of three soil volumes (2600, 6500 and 26000 cm[sup 3]), the smallest of which was intended to restrict root growth. For plants in the medium-sized soil volume, basal cladodes tended to be thicker and areas of main and lateral roots tended to be greater as the CO[sub 2] level was doubled. Daughter cladodes tended to be initiated sooner at the current compared with the elevated CO[sub 2] level but total areas were similar by 10 weeks. At 10 weeks, daily net CO[sub 2] uptake for the three soil volumes averaged 24% higher for plants growing under elevated compared with current CO-2 levels, but at 18 weeks only 3% enhancement in uptake occurred. Dry weight gain was enhanced 24% by elevated CO[sub 2] during the first 10 weeks but only 8% over 18 weeks. Increasing the soil volume 10-fold led to a greater stimulation of daily net CO[sub 2] uptake and biomass production than did doubling the CO[sub 2] level. At 18 weeks, root biomass doubled and shoot biomass nearly doubled as the soil volume was increased 10-fold; the effects of soil volume tended to be greater for elevated CO[sub 2]. The amount of cladode nitrogen per unit dry weight decreased as the CO[sub 2] level was raised and increased as soil volume increased, the latter suggesting that the effects of soil volume could be due to nitrogen limitations. (au) (30 refs.)

  3. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  4. EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY VARIATIONS IN PLATE AND WELD FILLER METAL ON THE CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF NI-CR-MO ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.V. Fix

    2006-02-07

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  5. Effect of Chemistry Variations in Plate and Weld Filler Metal on the Corrosion Performance of Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  6. A Study on Mechanical Properties of Vinylester Based BioComposite Material with Starch as a Filler Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Vignesh M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In composites a conglomeration produces material properties which are unavailable from individual constituent materials. The use of petroleum based products as constituents in polymer matrix composite has raised concerns regarding environmental issue and non-renewability of the resource. Therefore in this work an attempt has been made to develop a biocomposite material using untreated dupion silk fiber as reinforcement material and vinyl ester as matrix material with Potato Starch used as filler material by hand layup technique. The biocomposites were prepared in varying percentage of filler addition (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% and different mechanical tests (tensile, flexure and hardness were conducted on the samples prepared to the ASTM standards. From the results of the experiments conducted on the specimen it can be concluded that the performance of 10% Starch filler content Biocomposite is satisfactory in all aspects compared to 0%, 20%, and 30% Starch filler content Biocomposites.

  7. Behaviors of Oxide Layer at Interface between Semi-solid Filler Metal and Aluminum Matrix Composites during Vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Shi; Jiuchun Yan; Yanfei Han; Bo Peng

    2011-01-01

    The joint interface between semi-solid Zn-Al filler metal and SiCp/Al composites with applying vibration for different time was examined. With increasing vibrating time, the oxide layer was disrupted prior at the centre to the periphery of the interface. And the solid grains near the centre of interface in semi-solid filler metal aggregated into two solid regions and compressed the composites during vibration; the solid grains near the periphery of interface moved toward the edge and scraped the composites during vibration. The models of disrupting oxide layer under the vibration condition were developed. At the centre of interface, the oxide layer was tore and stripped during the solid grains in the semi-solid filler metal depressing the composites with a very high compressive stress. At the periphery of interface, the oxide layer was cut and stripped into the filler metal during the solid grains scraping the interface.

  8. Microstructure of Si3 N4/Si3 N4 joint brazed using Cu-Pd-Ti alloy filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie(张杰); N. Massaki; ZHOU Yu(周玉)

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure of the Si3 N4/Si3 N4 joint brazed using an active filler of Cu-Pd-Ti alloy was analyzed by means of EPMA and XRD. The results indicate that a perfect Si3 N4/Si3 N4 joint is obtained by using an active filler of Cu76.5Pd8.5Ti15 alloy with brazing temperature, pressure and holding time of 1 373 - 1 473 K, 2× 10-3 MPa and 1.8 ks, respectively. The filler alloy in the joint is a Cu-Pd solution containing reactant of TiN, PdTiSi and Pd2Si.The interface between the filler alloy and Si3 N4 ceramic is composed of TiN reactant.

  9. ArteFill: a third-generation permanent dermal filler and tissue stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemperle, Gottfried; de Fazio, Stefania; Nicolau, Pierre

    2006-10-01

    The technical and physiologic shortcomings associated with prior generations of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) dermal fillers have been reduced significantly since their original market introduction in 1989. For example, the PMMA microspheres in the third-generation product ArteFill meet the new limit set by the FDA of less than 1 particle below 20 micrometers per 100 microspheres (< 1% by the number). Therefore, it is expected that the already low granuloma rate following injections with second-generation product Artecoll (1:5000) will be reduced further with injections of ArteFill. In the authors' experience, both Artecoll and ArteFill have proven to be safe, predictable, and effective dermal fillers. It is anticipated that Artefill will receive FDA approval in late 2006 and will be marketed internationally.

  10. Standard Guide for Identification of Fibers, Fillers, and Core Materials in Computerized Material Property Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This guide establishes the essential and desirable elements of data required for the identification in computerized material property databases of fibers, fillers, and core materials used in composite materials. A recommended format for entry of these fields into a computerized database is provided. Examples of the application of this guide are also included. 1.2 The recommended format described in this guide is suggested for use in recording data in a database, which is different from contractural reporting of actual test results. The latter type of information is described in materials specifications shown in business transactions and is subject to agreement between vendor and purchaser. 1.3 The materials covered by this guide include fibers, both continuous and discontinuous, and fillers of various geometries which are used as reinforcements in composite materials, as well as core materials used in sandwich composites. Cores may be foam, honeycomb, or naturally occurring materials such as balsa wood....

  11. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of filler material in UXO - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary

    2007-09-12

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO)-contaminated sites often include ordnance filled with inert substances that were used in dummy rounds. During UXO surveys, it is difficult to determine whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, plaster-of-paris, wax, etc.) or is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the object be blown in place, which has potential impacts to the environment, personnel, communities and survey costs. The Department of Defense (DoD) needs a reliable, timely, non-intrusive and cost-effective way to identify filler material before a removal action. A new technology that serves this purpose would minimize environmental impacts, personnel safety risks and removal costs; and, thus, would be especially beneficial to remediation activities.

  12. Hybrid 2D-3D modelling of GTA welding with filler wire addition

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid 2D-3D model for the numerical simulation of Gas Tungsten Arc welding is proposed in this paper. It offers the possibility to predict the temperature field as well as the shape of the solidified weld joint for different operating parameters, with relatively good accuracy and reasonable computational cost. Also, an original approach to simulate the effect of immersing a cold filler wire in the weld pool is presented. The simulation results reveal two important observations. First, the weld pool depth is locally decreased in the presence of filler metal, which is due to the energy absorption by the cold feeding wire from the hot molten pool. In addition, the weld shape, maximum temperature and thermal cycles in the workpiece are relatively well predicted even when a 2D model for the arc plasma region is used. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  14. Space charge behaviour in an epoxy resin: the influence of fillers, temperature and electrode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallot-Lavallee, O [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier-118, Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France); Teyssedre, G [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier-118, Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France); Laurent, C [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier-118, Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France); Rowe, S [Direction des Recherches Materiaux, Schneider Electric SA-20, Rue Henri Tarze, Grenoble 38050 (France)

    2005-06-21

    This study aims to characterize the behaviour of the space charge in an epoxy resin used as electrical insulation in systems such as transformers and bus bars. Temperature, field level, filler content and nature of the electrodes are the parameters that were considered. Space charge measurements were performed using the pulsed electro acoustic technique, in a range of field and temperature up to 40 kV mm{sup -1} and 72 deg. C, respectively, on gold-coated and un-coated samples. We discuss the possibility of performing space charge measurement on filled epoxy resin despite the piezoelectricity of quartz fillers. Under dc field we observed a quasi-symmetrical build-up of homocharges at both electrodes, followed by a substitution of the homocharges by heterocharges, mainly close to the cathode. In addition, we recorded the space charge behaviour just before breakdown on a filled sample at 72 deg. C under 12 kV mm{sup -1}.

  15. Properties of natural rubber/attapulgite composites prepared by latex compounding method: Effect of filler loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muttalib, Siti Nadzirah Abdul, E-mail: sitinadzirah.amn@gmail.com; Othman, Nadras, E-mail: srnadras@usm.my; Ismail, Hanafi, E-mail: ihanafi@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    This paper reports on the effect of filler loading on properties of natural rubber (NR)/attapulgite (ATP) composites. The NR/ATP composites were prepared by latex compounding method. It is called as masterbatch. The masterbatch was subsequently added to the NR through melt mixing process. The vulcanized NR/ATP composites were subjected to mechanical, swelling and morphological tests. All the results were compared with NR/ATP composites prepared by conventional system. The composites from masterbatch method showed better results compared to composites prepared by conventional method. They have higher tensile properties, elongation at break and tear strength. The images captured through scanning electron microscopy test revealed the improvement of tensile strength in masterbatch NR/ATP composites. It can be seen clearly that masterbatch NR/ATP have better filler dispersion compared to conventional method NR/ATP composites.

  16. Teaching Fillers, Discourse Markers and Adjacency Pairs to College Stu-dents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蓓

    2015-01-01

    Speaking has long been underestimated in College English education, compared with reading , writing and listening. Even In universities where spoken courses are provided, verbal filler and discourse markers which vastly exist in native speaker ’s corpora are rarely found in these prescribed spoken course books. For the teaching of adjacency pairs, which are always one of the focuses in teaching conversation skills in College English spoken program ,students are required to make up a new one based on the given scenario after they have memorized model dialogues. Unfortunately, students always experience pragmatic difficulty when they interact with people in the real world if they are guided by this approach. This article suggests a triangle which is com⁃posed of exposure, instruction and practice to teach verbal filler, discourse markers and adjacency pairs. This triangle combines both direct approach and indirect approach. Furthermore, in spoken program , English teachers can adapt spoken course books to integrate features of authentic conversations.

  17. Friction and wear of HNBR with different fillers under dry rolling and sliding conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxide cured hydrogenated acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber (HNBR compounds with 20 parts per hundred rubber (phr active fillers, such as carbon black (CB, multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT and silica were produced and their friction and wear properties under unlubricated rolling and sliding conditions were evaluated. The network-related properties of the HNBR compounds were deduced from dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA. The coefficient of friction (COF and the specific wear rate (Ws were determined in different home-made test rigs. The CB and MWCNT containing HNBR compounds exhibited the best resistance to rolling and sliding wear, respectively, among the HNBR systems studied. The worn surfaces were inspected in scanning electron microscope (SEM and the wear mechanisms were analyzed and discussed in respect to the types of wear and fillers.

  18. Investigation of Friction Behaviors of Brake Shoe Materials using Metallic Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Surojo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some vehicles use brake shoe made from semi-metallic materials. Semi-metallic brake shoes are made from a combination of metallic and non-metallic materials. Metallic particles are added in the formulation of brake shoe material to improve composites characteristics. In this paper, friction behaviors of brake shoe material using metallic filler were investigated. Machining chips of cast iron and copper wire of electric motor used were incorporated in composite as metallic fillers with amount 0, 2, and 4 vol. %. Friction testing was performed to measure coefficient of friction by pressing surface specimen against the surface of rotating disc. The results show that cast iron chip and Cu short wire have effect on increasing coefficient of friction of brake shoe material. They form contact plateau at contact surface. At contact surface, the Cu short wires which have parallel orientation to the sliding contact were susceptible to detach from the matrix.

  19. Factors influencing the biodegradability of biocomposites based on ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) and vegetable fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova, A. K.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Monakhova, T. V.; Kolesnikova, N. N.; Popov, A. A.; Ramos, C. C.

    2016-11-01

    In this study the role of the content of filler, its nature (particle geometry in particular) and the type of the copolymer matrix were examined. For the study three grades of ethylene-octene copolymer were chosen. Composites were mixed in proportion from 70 to 30 wt % of the polymer matrix content. Water absorption was determined; thermal oxidative degradation was studied; and a biodegradation test on recovered soil was carried out. It was concluded that water absorption and weight loss correlate with the filler content. It was found that biocomposites with oil flax straw are more prone to water absorption and weight loss than the same ones with wood flour. The most stable matrix to oxidation was Lucene 370, then Lucene 670 and Lucene 760. Therefore, biocomposites based on Lucene 760 should be more biodegradable than others.

  20. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  1. Evaluation of Waste from Aluminum Industry as Filler in Polypropylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samat, N.; Sabaruddin, F. A.; Meor Yusoff, M. S.; Dayang Habibah, A. I. H.

    2017-01-01

    White aluminum (Al) dross is the waste or by-product generated from the smelting of Al. Improper disposal of this waste will affect the sustainability of the environment. This study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of Al dross as a thermoplastic filler. Various content of Al dross (10-40 wt.%) was blended with polypropylene (PP) using an extruder. An improvement in thermal and flame resistance properties was evident, which was associated with the presence of aluminum hydroxide elements in Al dross as revealed from x-ray diffraction analysis. It was shown that the higher Al dross content in PP did cause the composites to possess high stiffness and low crystallinity. An advantage in wear properties further showed that the Al dross can be used as a filler for thermoplastics.

  2. Yolk shell nanocomposite particles as bioactive bone fillers and growth factor carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pujiang; Abbah, Sunny A; Chuah, Yon Jin; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yong; He, Pengfei; Wong, Hee Kit; Goh, James C H

    2017-09-20

    The efficient delivery of bioactive molecules via rationally designed nanoparticles is an important focus in regenerative medicine. The yolk shell nanocomposite particles described herein are composed of silk fibroin movable cores formed within voided calcium carbonate shells to load and control the release of labile cytokines. These particles are excellent carrier vehicles of potent molecules as they sustained the release of bioactive Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2) for more than 28 days in vitro. Implantation into bone defects in rabbits corroborates the in vitro results and also reveals that upon contact with phosphate containing body fluids, implanted yolk shell particles agglomerate and transform into a filler that adapts to defect contour to further act as an absorbable hemostatic agent. Taken together, the fabrication of these yolk shell particle-based "bone fillers" could expand the horizon for the development of newer generations of advanced bioactive materials in tissue regeneration applications.

  3. Arcjet Tests of Different Gap-Filler Options for the Orion PICA Heatshield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokova, Kristina; Ellerby, Donald; Blosser, Max; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Bouslog, Stan; Reuther, James

    2009-01-01

    PICA (Phenolic Infiltrated Carbon Ablator) is one of the candidate thermal protection materials for the Orion vehicle. Because PICA is fabricated in blocks, gaps exist between the blocks, similar to the individual ceramic tiles of the Shuttle thermal protection system. The results of this work focus on arcjet test results of different gap-filler options for PICA, performed as part of the Orion TPS Advanced Development Project. The arcjet tests were performed at NASA Ames Research Center on stagnation models 4 inches in diameter at conditions representative of Orion flight conditions for both Lunar and Low Earth Orbit return. Performance of gap-filler options was evaluated based on the extent of backface temperature change, as compared to PICA without gaps, and on the extent of flow penetration into the gap, evident from the gap opening and widening.

  4. Bismuth subcarbonate as filler particle for an Epoxy-based root canal sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schwartzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the addition of bismuth subcarbonate with different concentrations regarding the rheological properties of an experimental epoxy-based root canal sealer. Materials and Methods: Endodontic sealers were prepared with epoxy resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate additions of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100%, and 120%. Flow, film thickness, working time, setting time, dimensional change, sorption, solubility, and cytotoxicity were studied according to the ISO standards. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and Tukey multiple comparisons were used, with a significance level of 5%. Results: The flow, working time, water sorption, and solubility significantly decreased and the film thickness and dimensional change increased with higher filler particle addition. There were no statistically significant differences for setting time and cytotoxicity between the filler particle proportions. Conclusion: Experimental resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate addition up to 40% can be an alternative for root canal sealer.

  5. Evaluation of Waste from Aluminum Industry as Filler in Polypropylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samat, N.; Sabaruddin, F. A.; Meor Yusoff, M. S.; Dayang Habibah, A. I. H.

    2017-04-01

    White aluminum (Al) dross is the waste or by-product generated from the smelting of Al. Improper disposal of this waste will affect the sustainability of the environment. This study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of Al dross as a thermoplastic filler. Various content of Al dross (10-40 wt.%) was blended with polypropylene (PP) using an extruder. An improvement in thermal and flame resistance properties was evident, which was associated with the presence of aluminum hydroxide elements in Al dross as revealed from x-ray diffraction analysis. It was shown that the higher Al dross content in PP did cause the composites to possess high stiffness and low crystallinity. An advantage in wear properties further showed that the Al dross can be used as a filler for thermoplastics.

  6. Interfacial structure and joint strengthening in arc brazed galvanized steels with copper based filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-feng; YU Zhi-shui; QI Kai

    2006-01-01

    Galvanized steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas(TIG) and metal inert gas(MIG) brazing process using copper based filler. The results show that the joint zone hardness is higher than that of the base material or copper filler from the microhardness tests of TIG brazing specimens, and the fracture spot is at the base materials zone from the tensile tests of MIG brazing specimens. Examination using energy dispersive X-ray analysis reveals the presence of intermetallic compound Fe5Si3(Cu) in the joint. The dispersal of fine Fe5Si3(Cu) particles is the main strengthening factor for the joint. The Fe5Si3(Cu) particles are determined to arise from three sources, namely, spot micro-melt, whisker-like fragmentation and dissolve-separation actions.

  7. Complex refractive index of starch acetate used as a biodegradable pigment and filler of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinen, Petri; Oksman, Antti; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Mikkonen, Hannu

    2007-05-01

    Complex refractive index of strongly depolarizing starch acetate is investigated as a function of bulk package density, which is compulsory parameter in analysis of light scattering from nanoscale starch acetate pigments and fillers. The measurements were made using a laser-goniometer and spectrophotometer to gain data for refractive index analysis according to the Brewster's law and Fresnel equations. The real part of refractive index was verified by microscopic immersion method.

  8. Microstructure-based modelling of arbitrary deformation histories of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, H.; Klüppel, M.

    2012-11-01

    A physically motivated theory of rubber reinforcement based on filler cluster mechanics is presented considering the mechanical behaviour of quasi-statically loaded elastomeric materials subjected to arbitrary deformation histories. This represents an extension of a previously introduced model describing filler induced stress softening and hysteresis of highly strained elastomers. These effects are referred to the hydrodynamic reinforcement of rubber elasticity due to strain amplification by stiff filler clusters and cyclic breakdown and re-aggregation (healing) of softer, already damaged filler clusters. The theory is first developed for the special case of outer stress-strain cycles with successively increasing maximum strain. In this more simple case, all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of the cycle and the mechanical energy stored in the strained clusters is completely dissipated, i.e. only irreversible stress contributions result. Nevertheless, the description of outer cycles involves already all material parameters of the theory and hence they can be used for a fitting procedure. In the general case of an arbitrary deformation history, the cluster mechanics of the material is complicated due to the fact that not all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of a cycle. For that reason additional reversible stress contributions considering the relaxation of clusters upon retraction have to be taken into account for the description of inner cycles. A special recursive algorithm is developed constituting a frame of the mechanical response of encapsulated inner cycles. Simulation and measurement are found to be in fair agreement for CB and silica filled SBR/BR and EPDM samples, loaded in compression and tension along various deformation histories.

  9. Dermal fillers in aesthetics: an overview of adverse events and treatment approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Funt D; Pavicic T

    2013-01-01

    David Funt,1 Tatjana Pavicic21Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The ever-expanding range of dermal filler products for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation is of benefit for patients and physicians, but as indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications will likely also increase.Objective: To describe potential ...

  10. Magneto-rheological response of elastomer composites with hybrid-magnetic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Sahbi; Klüppel, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    We study the magneto-rheological response of hybrid-magnetic elastomer composites consisting of two different magnetic filler particles at fixed overall concentration. Thereby, we focus on an optimization of mechanical and magnetic properties by combining highly reinforcing magnetic nano-particles (MagSilica) with micro-sized carbonyl-iron particles (CIP), which exhibit high switch ability in a magnetic field. We observe a symbiotic interaction of both filler types, especially in the case when an orientation of the magnetic filler particles is achieved due to curing in an external magnetic field. The orientation effect is significant only for the micro-sized CIP particles with high saturation magnetization, indicating that the induced magnetic moment for the nano-sized particles is too small for delivering sufficient attraction between the particles in an external magnetic field. A pronounced switching behavior is observed for the non-cross-linked melts with 15 and 20 vol.% CIP, whereby the small strain modulus increases by more than 50%. For the sample without the coupling agent silane, one even observes a relative modulus increase of about 140%, which can be related to the combined effect of a higher mobility of the particles without a silane layer and the ability of the particles to come in close contact when they are arranged in strings along the field lines. For the cross-linked samples, a maximum switching effect of about 30% is achieved for the system with pure CIP. This magneto-sensitivity decreases successively if CIP is replaced by MagSilica, while the tensile strength of the systems increases significantly. The use of silane reduces the switching effect, but it is necessary for a good mechanical performance by delivering strong chemical bonding of the magnetic filler particles to the polymer matrix.

  11. Basic principles of creating a new generation of high- temperature brazing filler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, B. A.; Suchkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The development of new materials is based on the formation of a structural-phase state providing the desired properties by selecting the base and the complex of alloying elements. The development of amorphous filler alloys for a high-temperature brazing has its own features that are due to the limited life cycle and the production method of brazing filler alloys. The work presents a cycle of analytical and experimental materials science investigations including justification of the composition of a new amorphous filler alloy for brazing the products from zirconium alloys at the temperature of no more than 800 °C and at the unbrazing temperature of permanent joints of more than 1200 °C. The experimental alloys have been used for manufacture of amorphous ribbons by rapid quenching, of which the certification has been made by X-ray investigations and a differential-thermal analysis. These ribbons were used to obtain permanent joints from the spacer grid cells (made from the alloy Zr-1% Nb) of fuel assemblies of the thermal nuclear reactor VVER-440. The brazed samples in the form of a pair of cells have been exposed to corrosion tests in autoclaves in superheated water at a temperature of 350 °C, a pressure of 160 MPa and duration of up to 6,000 h. They have been also exposed to destructive tests using a tensile machine. The experimental results obtained have made it possible to propose and patent a brazing filler alloy of the following composition: Zr-5.5Fe-(2.5-3.5)Be-1Nb-(5-8)Cu-2Sn-0.4Cr-(0.5-1.0)Ge. Its melting point is 780 °C and the recommended brazing temperature is 800°C.

  12. X-band microwave absorbing characteristics of multicomponent composites with magnetodielectric fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afghahi, Seyyed Salman Seyyed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, Mojtaba, E-mail: m.jafarian@srbiau.ac.ir [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stergiou, Charalampos A. [Lab. of Inorganic Materials, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 57001 Thermi (Greece)

    2016-12-01

    We have studied the microwave absorbing performance in the X-band (8–12.4 GHz) of epoxy composites filled with magnetic and dielectric oxides and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. To this end, pure cobalt-substituted Ba-hexaferrite and calcium titanate were synthesized with the hydrothermal method in the form of nanosized powder. Moreover, the produced powders were characterized in regard of their structural, morphological and static magnetic properties. For the electromagnetic investigation, composite samples were also prepared with various thicknesses up to 4 mm and two basic filler compositions; namely 30 wt% of BaCoFe{sub 11}O{sub 19} and 30 wt% of the mixture BaCoFe{sub 11}O{sub 19}/CaTiO{sub 3}/carbon nanotubes. The magnetic composites show strong but narrowband reflection losses up to 27.5 dB, whereas the magnetodielectric composites with maximum losses of 15.8 dB possess wider bandwidth of operation, due to improved impedance matching. Furthermore, the characteristic frequency of the maximum losses for these quarter-wavelength absorbers was verified to be in inverse proportion to the layer thickness. These findings are supported by reflectance measurements of the samples both in waveguide and free-space. - Highlights: • Single and multi-component composite absorbers with magnetodielectric fillers were synthesized. • The prepared absorbers are lightweight with 30 wt% filler content in epoxy matrix. • The microwave absorption characteristics of composites were measured by waveguide and free-space methods in the X-band. • Composites with a combination of magnetic and dielectric fillers exhibit wider reflection loss peaks. • Composite absorbers have a realistic potential as microwave absorbers in the X-band.

  13. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  14. Utilization of bagasse and coconut fibers waste as fillers of sandwich composite for bridge railway sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehardjo, K. A.; Basuki, A.

    2017-07-01

    The bridge railway sleepers is an essential component in the construction of railways, as the foundation of the rail support in order to withstand the load a train that runs above it. Sleepers used in bridge construction are expected to have a longer service life, lighter weight and durable so that can be used more efficient. This research was carried out to create a model of bridges railway sleepers made of sandwich structured composite from fiber glass, epoxy resin with fillers waste of bagasse (sugar cane pulp mill) or coconut fiberboard (copra industry) that using polyurethane as an adhesive. The process of making was conditioned for small and medium industrial applications. Railway sleepers’ specifications adapted to meet the requirements of end user. The process steps in this research include; lay-up fiberglass combined with bagasse/coconut fiberboard (as fillers), gluing with epoxy resin, molded it with pressure to be solid, curing after solidification process. The specimens of composite, bagasse and coconut fiber board were tested for tensile and compressive strength. The prototype were tested of mechanical test: flexural moment test to the stand rail, flexural moment test to the middle of the sleepers and tensile strength test on one side of the sleepers, in accordance to SNI 11-3388-1994 Method testing of single block concrete sleepers and bearing single rail fastening systems. The results of mechanical testing all variations meet the technical specifications of end user such as test results for flexural moment on all prototypes, after load test, there is no visible crack. While in the tensile strength test, it seem the prototype with coconut fiberboard filler, shows better performance than bagasse fiberboard filler, the decisions is just depended on techno economic and lifetime.

  15. Garlic powder and wheat bran as fillers: Their effect on the physicochemical properties of edible biocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fama, Lucia [Physics Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bittante, Ana Monica B.Q.; Sobral, Paulo J.A. [Food Engineering Department, FZEA, University of Sao Paulo, PO Box 23, 13635-900 Pirassununga (SP) (Brazil); Goyanes, Silvia [Physics Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerschenson, Lia N., E-mail: lia@di.fcen.uba.ar [Industry Department, School of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-20

    Biocomposites with two different fillers, garlic and wheat bran, were studied. They were based on cassava starch and contained glycerol as a plasticizer and potassium sorbate as an antimicrobial agent and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The mechanical performance at room and lower temperatures was also studied. SEM micrographies of fractured surfaces of the wheat bran composite films showed some ruptured particles of fiber while fibrils of garlic on the order of nanometers were observed when garlic composite films were studied. Mechanical tests, at room temperature, showed that the addition of wheat bran led to an increment in the storage modulus (E') and hardening and a decrease in Tan {delta}, while the garlic composite showed a diminishing in the E' and hardening and did not produce significant changes in Tan {delta} values when compared with systems without fillers (matrix). In the range between -90 deg. C and 20 deg. C, all the materials studied presented two peaks in the Tan {delta} curve. In the case of the wheat bran composite, both relaxation peaks shifted slightly to higher temperatures, broadened and diminished their intensity when compared with those of the matrix; however garlic composite showed a similar behavior to the matrix. DSC thermograms of aqueous systems showed a slight shift of gelatinization temperature (T{sub gelatinization}) to higher values when the fillers were present. Thermograms of films showed that both, garlic and wheat bran composites, had a lower melting point than the matrix. IR data indicated that interaction between starch and fillers determined an increase in the availability of hydroxyl groups to be involved in a dynamic exchange with water.

  16. Study of the valorization of phosphogypsum in the region of Gafsaas filler in paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, S.; Anna, Z.; Elaloui E, E.; Belgacem, M. N.; Mauret, E.

    2012-02-01

    Four different fractions of phosphogypsum were characterized by several analytical techniques. The size and shape of particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy. Analyses of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have shown that these particles are mainly composed of calcium sulfate more or less hydrated. Calcination tests were carried out showed that treatment of these powders at 600°C for one hour increase their initial britghtness to values high enough to be used as a filler in paper.

  17. 对、邻二甲苯和醋酸二元液体混合物在不同温度和压力下的密度和超额摩尔体积%Density and Excess Molar Volume of Binary Mixtures of p-Xylene+Acetic Acid and o-Xylene+Acetic Acid at Different Temperatures and Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天宇; 夏淑倩; 邸志国; 马沛生

    2008-01-01

    A new apparatus was designed with a thick-walled glass capillary, electric heater tube with red copper and heat preservation. The thick-walled glass capillary was used for its advantages of resistance to acid corrosion and pressure, and ease of observation. The experimental densities over the entire range of mole fraction for the bi- nary mixture of p-xylene+acetic acid and o-xylene+acetic acid were measured using the new apparatus at tempera- tures ranging from 313.15K to 473.15K and pressure ranging from 0.20 to 2.0 MPa. The density values were used in the determination of excess molar volumes, VE. The Redlich-Kister equation was used to fit the excess molar volume values, and the coefficients and estimate of the standard error values were presented. The experimental re- suits prove that the density measurement apparatus is successful.

  18. Ablation properties of inorganic filler modified benzoxazine composite coating irradiated by high-intensity continuous laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Hezhang; Gao, Lihong; Wang, Fuchi

    2017-05-01

    Benzoxazine resin with good heat resistance, low combustion heat release and high char yield is a promising thermosetting resin. Meanwhile, research shows that the inorganic filler can effectively improve the thermodynamic property of the resin. It makes that the inorganic filler modified benzoxazine may have a potential application in laser ablation. The benzoxazine coating with and without inorganic filler ammonium polyphosphate, melamine and pentaerythritol (P-BOZ and BOZ) were prepared by brush and thermal curing method. The ablation properties of these coatings irradiated by high-intensity laser were investigated. The scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were used to characterize the micrographs, carbon layer structure and thermodynamic property of the sample. Results show that the composite coating has excellent thermal protective properties. The back temperature of 20 wt% P-BOZ coating under different parameter laser power (1000W/cm2, 5s; 1000W/cm2, 10s) are 40% lower than these of the BOZ coating and the 20 wt% P-BOZ has higher mass ablation rate. In the surface layer of the irradiated area, dense carbon layer is produced which reduces the absorb of the laser energy of the interior. In the interior of the sample, a large number of closed bell shaped holes are generated which are beneficial to obstruct the heat conduction.

  19. Properties and osteoblast cytocompatibility of self-curing acrylic cements modified by glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P; Garcia, M P; Fernandes, M H; Fernandes, M H V

    2013-11-01

    Materials filled with a silicate glass (MSi) and a borate glass (MB) were developed and compared in terms of their in vitro behavior. The effect of filler composition and concentration (0, 30, 40 and 50 wt%) on the curing parameters, residual monomer, water uptake, weight loss, bioactivity, mechanical properties (bending and compression) and osteoblast cytocompatibility was evaluated. The addition of bioactive glass filler significantly improved the cements curing parameters and the mechanical properties. The most relevant results were obtained for the lower filler concentration (30 t%) a maximum flexural strength of 40.4 Pa for MB3 and a maximum compressive strength of 95.7 MPa for MSi3. In vitro bioactivity in acellular media was enhanced by the higher glass contents in the cements. Regarding the biological assessment, the incorporation of the silicate glass significantly improved osteoblast cytocompatibility, whereas the presence of the borate glass resulted in a poor cell response. Nevertheless it was shown that the surviving cells on the MB surface were in a more differentiated stage compared to those growing over non-filled poly(methyl methacrylate). Results suggest that the developed formulations offer a high range of properties that might be interesting for their use as self-curing cements.

  20. The Effects of Biopolymers Composite Based Waste Cooking Oil and Titanium Dioxide Fillers as Superhydrophobic Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsi, N.; Rus, A. Z. M.

    2017-08-01

    This project presents the effect of biopolymer composite surface coating on TiO2 fillers by analysing the static water contact angle, SEM micrographs, porosity, density and refractive index of biopolymer doped with different loading of TiO2. The different ratio loading of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 (wt/wt%) TiO2 can be used to improve the material properties in practical use for outdoor application especially to enhance the stability of surface coating. It is found that the smooth surfaces with a low ratio loading of TiO2 fillers on biopolymer composite surface coating increases the static water contact angle up to 162.29°. It is interpreted with respect to nano- features existing on the surface of the water repellent creates a thin superhydrphobic layer. The relationship between porosity and density is indirectly proportional where the higher the loading of TiO2 filler produce the lower porosity up to 0.86% of the surface coating. The movement from shorter to longer of wavelength was observed before and after exposure indicates that there are optimization of absorption of UV-B radiation as the amount of delocalisation.