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Sample records for acid mine drainage

  1. Acid mine drainage research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acidic drainage resulting from base metal, precious metal, and uranium mining is the largest single environmental problems facing the Canadian mining industry today. Technologies to prevent acidic drainage from occurring in waste rock piles and tailings sites, and on the walls of open pits and underground mines, need to be developed and demonstrated. There are two grounds in Canada which have accepted this challenge: the national Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) program and the British Columbia Acid Mine Drainage (BC AMD) Task Force. This paper summarizes the activities of these two organizations

  2. Evolution of Acid Mine Drainage Formation in Sulphidic Mine Tailings

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhard Dold

    2014-01-01

    Sulphidic mine tailings are among the largest mining wastes on Earth and are prone to produce acid mine drainage (AMD). The formation of AMD is a sequence of complex biogeochemical and mineral dissolution processes. It can be classified in three main steps occurring from the operational phase of a tailings impoundment until the final appearance of AMD after operations ceased: (1) During the operational phase of a tailings impoundment the pH-Eh regime is normally alkaline to neutral and reduci...

  3. Bioreactor for acid mine drainage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluski, Marek H.; Manchester, Kenneth R.

    2001-01-01

    A bioreactor for reacting an aqueous heavy metal and sulfate containing mine drainage solution with sulfate reducing bacteria to produce heavy metal sulfides and reduce the sulfuric acid content of the solution. The reactor is an elongated, horizontal trough defining an inlet section and a reaction section. An inlet manifold adjacent the inlet section distributes aqueous mine drainage solution into the inlet section for flow through the inlet section and reaction section. A sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition in the inlet section provides sulfate reducing bacteria that with the sulfuric acid and heavy metals in the solution to form solid metal sulfides. The sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition is retained in the cells of a honeycomb structure formed of cellular honeycomb panels mounted in the reactor inlet section. The honeycomb panels extend upwardly in the inlet section at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal. The cells defined in each panel are thereby offset with respect to the honeycomb cells in each adjacent panel in order to define a tortuous path for the flow of the aqueous solution.

  4. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  5. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.E.; Mathur, R.; Dohnalkova, A.C.; Wall, A.J.; Runkel, R.L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed (Colorado, USA). The ??65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of enargite (??65Cu = -0.01 ?? 0.10???; 2??) and chalcopyrite (??65Cu = 0.16 ?? 0.10???) are within the range of reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1??? fractionation (??aq-min = ??65Cuaq - ??65Cumin, where the latter is measured on mineral samples from the field system), equals 1.43 ?? 0.14??? and 1.60 ?? 0.14??? for chalcopyrite and enargite, respectively. To interpret this field survey, we leached chalcopyrite and enargite in batch experiments and found that, as in the field, the leachate is enriched in 65Cu relative to chalcopyrite (1.37 ?? 0.14???) and enargite (0.98 ?? 0.14???) when microorganisms are absent. Leaching of minerals in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans results in smaller average fractionation in the opposite direction for chalcopyrite (??aq-mino = - 0.57 ?? 0.14 ???, where mino refers to the starting mineral) and no apparent fractionation for enargite (??aq-mino = 0.14 ?? 0.14 ???). Abiotic fractionation is attributed to preferential oxidation of 65Cu+ at the interface of the isotopically homogeneous mineral and the surface oxidized layer, followed by solubilization. When microorganisms are present, the abiotic fractionation is most likely not seen due to preferential association of 65Cuaq with A. ferrooxidans cells and related precipitates. In the biotic experiments, Cu was observed under TEM to occur in precipitates around bacteria and in intracellular polyphosphate granules. Thus, the values of ??65Cu in the field and laboratory systems are presumably determined by the balance of Cu released abiotically and Cu that interacts with cells and related precipitates. Such isotopic signatures resulting from Cu sulfide dissolution should be useful for acid mine drainage remediation and ore prospecting purposes. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Acid mine drainage: mining and water pollution issues in British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The importance of protecting water quality and some of the problems associated with mineral development are described. Negative impacts of mining operations such as sedimentation, water disturbances, and water pollution from waste rock and tailings are considered. Mining wastes, types of water pollution from mining, the legacy of acid mine drainage, predicting acid mine drainage, preventing and mitigating acid mine drainage, examples from the past, and cyanide heap-leaching are discussed. The real costs of mining at the Telkwa open pit coal mine are assessed. British Columbia mines that are known for or are potentially acid generating are shown on a map. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Bryn E; Mathur, Ryan; Dohnalkova, Alice; Wall, A J; Runkel, R L; Brantley, Susan L

    2009-03-01

    We surveyed the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed located in southwestern Colorado, USA. The δ65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of local enargite (δ65Cu = -0.01 ± 0.10‰; 2σ) and chalcopyrite (δ65Cu = 0.16 ± 0.10‰) are within the general range of previously reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1‰ < δ65Cu < 1). These mineral samples show lower δ65Cu values than stream waters (δ65Cu = 1.36 - 1.74 ± 0.10‰), with an average isotopic fractionation (quantified as Δaq-mino = δ65Cuaq – δ65Cu min, where Cuaq is leached Cu and Cu mino is the original mineral) of 1.60 ± 0.14‰ and 1.43 ± 0.14‰ for enargite and chalcopyrite, respectively.

  8. Evolution of Acid Mine Drainage Formation in Sulphidic Mine Tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Dold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulphidic mine tailings are among the largest mining wastes on Earth and are prone to produce acid mine drainage (AMD. The formation of AMD is a sequence of complex biogeochemical and mineral dissolution processes. It can be classified in three main steps occurring from the operational phase of a tailings impoundment until the final appearance of AMD after operations ceased: (1 During the operational phase of a tailings impoundment the pH-Eh regime is normally alkaline to neutral and reducing (water-saturated. Associated environmental problems include the presence of high sulphate concentrations due to dissolution of gypsum-anhydrite, and/or effluents enriched in elements such as Mo and As, which desorbed from primary ferric hydroxides during the alkaline flotation process. (2 Once mining-related operations of the tailings impoundment has ceased, sulphide oxidation starts, resulting in the formation of an acidic oxidation zone and a ferrous iron-rich plume below the oxidation front, that re-oxidises once it surfaces, producing the first visible sign of AMD, i.e., the precipitation of ferrihydrite and concomitant acidification. (3 Consumption of the (reactive neutralization potential of the gangue minerals and subsequent outflow of acidic, heavy metal-rich leachates from the tailings is the final step in the evolution of an AMD system. The formation of multi-colour efflorescent salts can be a visible sign of this stage.

  9. Mine drainage treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Boris; Golomeov, Blagoj; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Water flowing from underground and surface mines and contains high concentrations of dissolved metals is called mine drainage. Mine drainage can be categorized into several basic types by their alkalinity or acidity. Sulfide rich and carbonate poor materials are expected to produce acidic drainage, and alkaline rich materials, even with significant sulfide concentrations, often produce net alkaline water. Mine drainages are dangerous because pollutants may decompose in the environment. In...

  10. Sulfate Reduction at Low Ph To Remediate Acid Mine Drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Andrea, I.; Sanz, J.L.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, b

  11. Acid mine-drainage problem of the Patoka River watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, D.M.

    1969-10-01

    Of the 20,000 acres of cast overburden ground-water aquifers in Pike County, less than 4,000 acres produce acidic water. The remaining 16,000 acres produce nonacidic water, most of which is high in sulfate, and in some instances, high in chloride. The acid mine-drainage problem is a creation of past mining operations for coal, and not one of current origin as many have suspected. Most of the abandoned mine areas that produce sustained flows of acidic water, unaffected by storm runoff, are confined to disturbed areas. Acid contributions from storm runoff are usually many times greater than those from sustained flow, and most generally originate in the compacted 5 to 10% of the areas disturbed by surface mining that accelerate runoff. These compacted areas are essentially comprised of mine-waste piles, haulroads and abandoned railroad grades; open pits, and preparation plant and tipple areas. In the early 1950's several dams were constructed in the area forming lakes and reservoirs that ''bottled up'' the acidic water that would have essentially been discharged by gravity; consequently, the sustained flows from the area are still acidic, as is the water in the several lakes. It is not only impracticable but probably infeasible for the coal industry and society to correct the mine-drainage problem in the Patoka River Watershed without first removing the flushout menace. This flushout hazard can be effectively corrected through a well managed program of draining out the ''bottled up'' acidic water in lakes, ponds, and cast overburden in the areas and covering this material either with nontoxic landfill, or continual inundation with nonacidic water. Stabilization of acidic flows at a reduced level would make feasible the treatment of 5,000,000 gallons of water per day.

  12. Microbial aspects of acid mine drainage and its bioremediation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.A.NATARAJAN

    2008-01-01

    The role of chemolithotrophs such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans which were isolated from some abandoned mines and processed waste tailings in the generation of acid mine drainage and toxic metal dissolution was discussed.Mechanisms of acid formation and dissolution of copper,zinc,iron and arsenic from copper,lead-zinc and arsenopyrite-bearing sulfide ores and tailings were established in the presence of Acidithiobacillus group of bacteria.Sulphate Reducing Bacteria(SRB) isolated from the above mine sites could be used to precipitate dissolved metals such as copper,zinc,iron and arsenic.Arsenic bioremediation was demonstrated through the use of native microorganisms such Thiomonas spp.which could oxidize arsenite to arsenate.Bioremoval of arsenic through the use of jarosite precipitates generated by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was also found to be very effective.Biotechnological processes hold great promise in the remediation of acid mine drainage and efficient removal of toxic metal ions such as copper,zinc and arsenic.

  13. Geochemical characterisation of seepage and drainage water quality from two sulphide mine tailings impoundments: Acid mine drainage versus neutral mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, P.M.; Raisanen, M.L.; Johnson, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seepage water and drainage water geochemistry (pH, EC, O2, redox, alkalinity, dissolved cations and trace metals, major anions, total element concentrations) were studied at two active sulphide mine tailings impoundments in Finland (the Hitura Ni mine and Luikonlahti Cu mine/talc processing plant). The data were used to assess the factors influencing tailings seepage quality and to identify constraints for water treatment. Changes in seepage water quality after equilibration with atmospheric conditions were evaluated based on geochemical modelling. At Luikonlahti, annual and seasonal changes were also studied. Seepage quality was largely influenced by the tailings mineralogy, and the serpentine-rich, low sulphide Hitura tailings produced neutral mine drainage with high Ni. In contrast, drainage from the high sulphide, multi-metal tailings of Luikonlahti represented typical acid mine drainage with elevated contents of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Co. Other factors affecting the seepage quality included weathering of the tailings along the seepage flow path, process water input, local hydrological settings, and structural changes in the tailings impoundment. Geochemical modelling showed that pH increased and some heavy metals were adsorbed to Fe precipitates after net alkaline waters equilibrated with the atmosphere. In the net acidic waters, pH decreased and no adsorption occurred. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic treatments is proposed for Hitura seepages to decrease the sulphate and metal loading. For Luikonlahti, prolonged monitoring of the seepage quality is suggested instead of treatment, since the water quality is still adjusting to recent modifications to the tailings impoundment.

  14. Geochemical Processes Controlling the Generation and Environmental Impacts of Acid Mine Drainage in Semi Arid Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Magombedze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the geochemical processes that control the geochemistry of acid mine drainage in semi arid conditions. The central objective is to characterise and understand the evolution of acid mine drainage and its potential environmental impacts on the Mazowe River sub-catchment, in north east Zimbabwe. The work is based on a case study at three neighbouring metal sulphide mines, namely Trojan Nickel Mine, Mazowe Gold Mine and Iron Duke Pyrites.The methodology used in this research ...

  15. Erosion characteristic of slope sandstone soaking in acid mine drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li-chun; CHEN Jia-sheng; WU Ai-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Acid mine drainage(AMD) is one of the main reasons of slope instability in chemical mines with high sulfide. The pH values of the solution inside the mining pit decrease with the increasing of distance from ore body and vary from 1.2 to 4.6,according to the results of the water environmental investigation and the composition test of the slope sandstone in Xinqiao Pyrite Mine. Comparative experiments between original sandstone and AMD eroded sandstone samples show that after AMD erosion the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease by 30%-50% and 25%-45%, respectively, the cohesion and internal friction angle decrease obviously, and the Poisson ratio fluctuates between 0.20-0.29. The greater joints development, the higher residual stress after peak value, and the longer time to damage. Besides above, the reaction mechanism analysis of AMD eroded sandstone shows that the fillings in joints and fissures of sandstone are frequently decomposed and polyreacted, resulting in changes of interior molecule structure and framework composition, and decreases of cohesion and angle of internal friction between rock structure interfaces.

  16. Acid mine drainage biogeochemistry at Iron Mountain, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihring Thomas M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Shasta County, California, USA provides an excellent opportunity to study the chemical and biological controls on acid mine drainage (AMD generation in situ, and to identify key factors controlling solution chemistry. Here we integrate four years of field-based geochemical data with 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and rRNA probe-based studies of microbial population structure, cultivation-based metabolic experiments, arsenopyrite surface colonization experiments, and results of intermediate sulfur species kinetics experiments to describe the Richmond Mine AMD system. Extremely acidic effluent (pH between 0.5 and 0.9 resulting from oxidation of approximately 1 × 105 to 2 × 105 moles pyrite/day contains up to 24 g/1 Fe, several g/1 Zn and hundreds of mg/l Cu. Geochemical conditions change markedly over time, and are reflected in changes in microbial populations. Molecular analyses of 232 small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA gene sequences from six sites during a sampling time when lower temperature (0.8 conditions predominated show the dominance of Fe-oxidizing prokaryotes such as Ferroplasma and Leptospirillum in the primary drainage communities. Leptospirillum group III accounts for the majority of Leptospirillum sequences, which we attribute to anomalous physical and geochemical regimes at that time. A couple of sites peripheral to the main drainage, "Red Pool" and a pyrite "Slump," were even higher in pH (>1 and the community compositions reflected this change in geochemical conditions. Several novel lineages were identified within the archaeal Thermoplasmatales order associated with the pyrite slump, and the Red Pool (pH 1.4 contained the only population of Acidithiobacillus. Relatively small populations of Sulfobacillus spp. and Acidithiobacillus caldus may metabolize elemental sulfur as an intermediate species in the oxidation of pyritic sulfide to sulfate. Experiments show that elemental sulfur which

  17. Acid mine drainage in Australia: its extent and potential future liability. Supervising Scientist Report 125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to better understand the impact of acid drainage in Australia and to provide a basis for assessing long-term management options, the Office of the Supervising Scientist (OSS) and the Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) initiated this study to prepare a status report on acid mine drainage in Australia. The study is supported by the Minerals Council of Australia. The coverage of this study includes all mine sites where sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes or mine workings leads to the release of contaminated drainage with off-site impacts. The objectives of the study were: 1. to quantify and characterise the generation of contaminated drainage by sulphidic oxidation from historic and current mining activities in Australia; 2. to develop a classification scheme to characterise the potential for off-site impacts from sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes; 3. to compare the cost at the national level of managing sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes and any resulting contaminated drainage with other mining and environmental costs; 4. to make recommendations based on the information received to improve the understanding and management of acid mine drainage in Australia. Information was collected on the extent and management of sulphidic oxidation and acid drainage at operating, historic and derelict mines in Australia. Mining operators, environmental officers, industry representatives, state government departments and others were asked about their experience with acid mine drainage and how it is currently managed at operating and historic mine sites. Based on the information collected, the additional cost of managing potentially acid generating wastes at operating mine sites is estimated to be about AUD 60 million per year. Potentially, the financial risk could be much greater if sulphide oxidation and release of pollutants is discovered after mine closure, as was the case for historic sites like Mt Lyell, Rum Jungle or Mt Morgan. The

  18. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul H.; Morris, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  19. Modelling of acid mine drainage (AMD in columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Bernardes de Souza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed in this paper to describe the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD in leaching columns. The model considers: (i Water flow through the column, which is calculated using the 1 - D analytic solution of the Richards' equation assuming the existence of a similarity relationship between the water retention function and the water content profiles at a given time; and (ii Pyrite oxidation weighted by microbiological effects occurring in spherical particles according to the shrinking core model. Mass balances of oxygen and pyrite were derived in order to evaluate the intrinsic oxidation rate and the pyrite fraction reacted with time and column position. The model was used to simulate a six month operation of a leaching column, which comprised successive weekly cycles of dry and wet periods. Simulation results demonstrated that AMD generation is strongly affected by the presence of microorganisms. A relative deviation of 5% between simulation and experimental data was obtained.

  20. Fly ash grouts for remediation of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering investigation into the use of electric utility wastes for grouting acidic mine spoil resulting from coal extraction has been undertaken. Laboratory investigations into the physical and chemical properties of various grout mixtures and grouted spoil materials are underway. Grout mixtures are placed in columns and permeated with distilled water. The hydraulic conductivity of the grout was measured. The effect of the high alkaline ashes on the acidic drainage is of particular interest. This series of experiments provided information so that the most favorable grout (low hydraulic conductivity and high alkalinity) could be selected for injection into acidic spoil material. Both standard combustion and fluidized bed ashes were tested. Grout mixtures include ashes, scrubber sludge, lime, bentonite and/or kaolinite. Permeabilities of the mixtures averaged approximately 1.OE-4 cm/sec. A second series of laboratory experiments consists of grouting large diameter drums of acidic spoil with the fly ash grouts. The drums have been constructed and filled with acidic spoil material. The ungrouted infiltration rates have been determined and the resulting effluents chemically analyzed

  1. Assessing aluminium toxicity in streams affected by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, A S; Webster-Brown, J G

    2013-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has degraded water quality and ecology in streams on the Stockton Plateau, the site of New Zealand's largest open-cast coal mining operation. This has previously been attributed largely to the effects of acidity and elevated aluminium (Al) concentrations. However, the toxicity of dissolved Al is dependent on speciation, which is influenced by pH which affects Al hydrolysis, as well as the concentrations of organic carbon and sulphate which complex Al. Methods for the assessment of the toxic fraction of Al, by chemical analysis and geochemical modelling, have been investigated in selected streams on the Stockton Plateau, where dissolved Al concentrations ranged from 0.034 to 27 mg L(-1). Modelling using PHREEQC indicated that between 0.2 and 85% of the dissolved Al was present as the free ion Al(3+), the most toxic Al species, which dominated in waters of pH = 3.8-4.8. Al-sulphate complexation reduced the Al(3+) concentration at lower pH, while Al-organic and -hydroxide complexes dominated at higher pH. Macroinvertebrate richness in the streams identified an Al(3+) 'threshold' of approximately 0.42 mg/L, above which taxa declined rapidly. Colorimetric 'Aluminon' analysis on unpreserved, unfiltered waters provided a better estimation of Al(3+) concentrations than inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on filtered, acidified waters. The Aluminon method does not react with particulate Al or strong Al complexes, often registering as little as 53% of the dissolved Al concentration determined by ICP-MS. PMID:23579831

  2. Acid Mine Drainage and Heavy Metal Pollution from Solid Waste in the Tongling Mines, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaochun; XIE Qiaoqin; CHEN Fang; WANG Jun; WU Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Based on investigation of the characteristics of solid waste of two different mines, the Fenghuangshan copper mine and the Xinqiao pyrite mine in Tongling, Anhui province in central-east China, the possibility and the differences of acid mine drainage (AMD) of the tailings and the waste rocks are discussed, and the modes of occurrence of heavy metal elements in the mine solid waste are also studied. The Fenghuangshan copper mine hardly produces AMD, whereas the Xinqiao pyrite mine does and there are also differences in the modes of occurrence of heavy metal elements in the tailings. For the former, toxic heavy metals such as Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As and Hg exist mostly in the slag mode, as compared to the latter, where the dcoxidization mode has a much higher content, indicating that large amounts minerals in the waste rocks have begun to oxidize at the earth surface. AMD is proved to promote the migration and spread of the heavy metals in mining waste rocks and lead to environmental pollution of the surroundings of the mine area.

  3. Injection of FGD Grout to Abate Acid Mine Drainage in Underground Coal Mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafi, S.; Damian, M.T.; Senita, R.E.; Jewitt, W.C.; Bair, S.; Chin, Y.C.; Whitlatch, E.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1997-07-01

    Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) from abandoned underground coal mines in Ohio is a concern for both residents and regulatory agencies. Effluent from these mines is typically characterized by low pH and high iron and sulfate concentrations and may contaminate local drinking-water supplies and streams. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of injecting cementitious alkaline materials, such as Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) material to mitigate current adverse environmental impacts associated with AMD in a small, abandoned deep mine in Coshocton County Ohio. The Flue Gas Desulfurization material will be provided from American Electric Power`s (AEP) Conesville Plant. It will be injected as a grout mix that will use Fixated Flue Gas Desulfurization material and water. The subject site for this study is located on the border of Coshocton and Muskingum Counties, Ohio, approximately 1.5 miles south-southwest of the town of Wills Creek. The study will be performed at an underground mine designated as Mm-127 in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources register, also known as the Roberts-Dawson Mine. The mine operated in the mid-1950s, during which approximately 2 million cubic feet of coal was removed. Effluent discharging from the abandoned mine entrances has low pH in the range of 2.8-3.0 that drains directly into Wills Creek Lake. The mine covers approximately 14.6 acres. It is estimated that 26,000 tons of FGD material will be provided from AEP`s Conesville Power Plant located approximately 3 miles northwest of the subject site.

  4. MECHANISMS OF HEAVY METAL REMOVAL FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING CHITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) emanating from inactive or active mine sites contains elevated levels of toxic heavy metals, which can have an adverse impact to the surrounding environment. The major pathway involved in generation of AMD is weathering of pyritic mineral ores, where in s...

  5. Historical overview and future directions of the microbial role in the acidic coal mine drainage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteria have been implicated and analyzed at every step in the production of acidic coal mine drainage (AMD). This review paper provides detailed information about microbial studies in mines, laboratory settings, waste piles, ground water, receiving streams, and downstream rivers and lakes. Research on AMD treatment, beneficial uses, and seasonal variability is also reviewed. 102 refs

  6. NRMRL EVALUATES ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-page article describing three SITE demonstration projects underway on the Leviathan mine site in California. BiPhasic lime treatment, lime treatment lagoons and compost free BioReactors are being evaluated as innovative technologies for treating acid mine drainage.

  7. Potential risks of effluent from acid mine drainage treatment plants at abandoned coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jaehwan; Kang, Sung-Wook; Ji, Wonhyun; Jo, Hun-Je; Jung, Jinho

    2012-06-01

    The lethal and sublethal toxicity of effluent from three acid mine drainage treatment plants were monitored from August 2009 to April 2010 using Daphnia magna (reference species) and Moina macrocopa (indigenous species). Acute lethal toxicity was observed in Samma effluent due to incomplete neutralization of acid mine drainages by the successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS). Additionally, there was no significant difference in toxicity values (TU) between D. magna and M. macrocopa (p < 0.05). Toxicity identification results of the final effluent collected in January 2010 showed that Al and Zn were key toxicants in addition to acidic pH. Unlike the Samma effluent, both Hwangji and Hamtae effluent had pH values that were near neutrality and showed either no acute toxicity or toxicity values less than 1 TU. However, the feeding rates of D. magna and M. macrocopa were significantly reduced when compared to the control (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that the Hamtae and Hwangji effluent likely have a sublethal effect on aquatic organisms in receiving water bodies. PMID:22415647

  8. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Montgomery, Gary A.; Ritenour, Kelsey L.; Tucker, Travis W.

    2009-01-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A??cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges - hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes - can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  9. Acid mine drainage. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning laboratory and field analyses of acid mine drainage. Topics include site investigations and characterization, remediation and monitoring programs, contaminant treatment research, and control and abatement studies. Chemical analyses of affected areas, and evaluation of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses to acid drainage are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  11. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  12. Study of environmental pollution and mineralogical characterization of sediment rivers from Brazilian coal mining acid drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luis F O; Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Martinez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Castro, Kepa; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Sampaio, Carlos H; de Brum, Irineu A S; de Leão, Felipe B; Taffarel, Silvio R; Madariaga, Juan M

    2013-03-01

    Acid drainage from coal mines and metal mining is a major source of underground and surface water contamination in the world. The coal mining acid drainage (CMAD) from mine contains large amount of solids in suspension and a high content of sulphate and dissolved metals (Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Fe, etc.) that finally are deposited in the rivers. Since this problem can persist for centuries after mine abandonment, it is necessary to apply multidisciplinary methods to determine the potential risk in a determinate area. These multidisciplinary methods must include molecular and elemental analysis and finally all information must be studied statistically. This methodology was used in the case of coal mining acid drainage from the Tubarao River (Santa Catarina, Brazil). During molecular analysis, Raman Spectroscopy, electron bean, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been proven very useful for the study of minerals present in sediment rivers near this CMAD. The obtained spectra allow the precise identification of the minerals as jarosite, quartz, clays, etc. The elemental analysis (Al, As, Fe, K, Na, Ba, Mg, Mn, Ti, V, Zn, Ag, Co, Li, Mo, Ni, Se, Sn, W, B, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sr) was realised by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis) of these dates of concentration reveals the existence of different groups of samples with specific pollution profiles in different areas of the Tubarao River.

  13. Techniques to correct and prevent acid mine drainage: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pozo-Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad uno de los problemas medioambientales con mayor necesidad de actuación es la contaminación por la formación de drenajes ácidos de mina (AMD: “Acid Mine Drainage” procedentes de estériles de mina. Este es el término utilizado para describir el drenaje generado por la oxidación natural de sulfuros minerales que son expuestos a la acción combinada de agua y oxígeno atmosférico. Los minerales responsables de la generación de AMD son los sulfuros de hierro (pirita, FeS2 y en menor medida la pirrotita, Fe1-XS, los cuales son estables e insolubles mientras no se encuentren en contacto con agua y oxígeno atmosférico. Sin embargo, como consecuencia de la actividad minera, estos dos sulfuros son expuestos a condiciones ambientales oxidantes. La necesidad de prevenir la formación de AMD ha desarrollado numerosas investigaciones sobre los mecanismos de oxidación y su prevención. En el presente trabajo además de realizar una explicación y valoración teórica del proceso de oxidación de la pirita también se realiza un compendio de las medidas preventivas y correctoras más empleadas.

  14. Study of environmental pollution and mineralogical characterization of sediment rivers from Brazilian coal mining acid drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid drainage from coal mines and metal mining is a major source of underground and surface water contamination in the world. The coal mining acid drainage (CMAD) from mine contains large amount of solids in suspension and a high content of sulphate and dissolved metals (Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Fe, etc.) that finally are deposited in the rivers. Since this problem can persist for centuries after mine abandonment, it is necessary to apply multidisciplinary methods to determine the potential risk in a determinate area. These multidisciplinary methods must include molecular and elemental analysis and finally all information must be studied statistically. This methodology was used in the case of coal mining acid drainage from the Tubarao River (Santa Catarina, Brazil). During molecular analysis, Raman Spectroscopy, electron bean, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been proven very useful for the study of minerals present in sediment rivers near this CMAD. The obtained spectra allow the precise identification of the minerals as jarosite, quartz, clays, etc. The elemental analysis (Al, As, Fe, K, Na, Ba, Mg, Mn, Ti, V, Zn, Ag, Co, Li, Mo, Ni, Se, Sn, W, B, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sr) was realised by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis) of these dates of concentration reveals the existence of different groups of samples with specific pollution profiles in different areas of the Tubarao River. Highlights: ► Increasing coal drainage sediments geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Brazilian coal mining information will increase recuperation planning information. ► The nanominerals showed strong sorption ability to aqueous hazardous elements

  15. Study of environmental pollution and mineralogical characterization of sediment rivers from Brazilian coal mining acid drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luis F.O., E-mail: felipeqma@hotmail.com [Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development – IPADH, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Fdez- Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Martinez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Castro, Kepa [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of the Basque Country (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development – IPADH, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Sampaio, Carlos H.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CEP: 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Leão, Felipe B. de; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Madariaga, Juan M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of the Basque Country (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    Acid drainage from coal mines and metal mining is a major source of underground and surface water contamination in the world. The coal mining acid drainage (CMAD) from mine contains large amount of solids in suspension and a high content of sulphate and dissolved metals (Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Fe, etc.) that finally are deposited in the rivers. Since this problem can persist for centuries after mine abandonment, it is necessary to apply multidisciplinary methods to determine the potential risk in a determinate area. These multidisciplinary methods must include molecular and elemental analysis and finally all information must be studied statistically. This methodology was used in the case of coal mining acid drainage from the Tubarao River (Santa Catarina, Brazil). During molecular analysis, Raman Spectroscopy, electron bean, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been proven very useful for the study of minerals present in sediment rivers near this CMAD. The obtained spectra allow the precise identification of the minerals as jarosite, quartz, clays, etc. The elemental analysis (Al, As, Fe, K, Na, Ba, Mg, Mn, Ti, V, Zn, Ag, Co, Li, Mo, Ni, Se, Sn, W, B, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sr) was realised by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis) of these dates of concentration reveals the existence of different groups of samples with specific pollution profiles in different areas of the Tubarao River. Highlights: ► Increasing coal drainage sediments geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Brazilian coal mining information will increase recuperation planning information. ► The nanominerals showed strong sorption ability to aqueous hazardous elements.

  16. A review of acid drainage from waste rock dumps and mine sites (Australian and Scandinavia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the literature from Australia and Scandinavia on acid drainage from pyritic waste rock dumps with an emphasis on measurements and theory of processes that control the rage of oxidation and the release of pollutants. Conditions within waste rock dumps have been measured at several mine sites and a range of rehabilitation treatments have been tried to reduce the release of pollutants. A number of models have been proposed to calculate air flow, water transport and geochemistry. The data and experience at the mine sites are compared with predictions of the models. Details of Australian and Swedish mine sites where waste rock is a source of acid drainage are described in the Appendices. 92 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs

  17. Phycomicrobial ecology of acid mine drainage in the Piedmont of Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaswamy, R.; Hanger, R.A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1998-12-31

    Acid mine drainage encompasses 18 km{sup 2} of Louisa County, Virginia. Heavy metal laden acidic leachate flows from abandoned mines along the Piedmont`s Gold-Pyrite Belt. The oxidation of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and other sulfide minerals that are disseminated throughout the mine tailings release H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, As, Pb and other heavy metals into the Contrary Creek watershed and beyond, into Lake Anna. Downstream of these abandoned pyrite mines, high levels of acidity and heavy metals have made this a severely stressed environment incapable of supporting a healthy creek ecosystem. In an effort to assess in-situ, bioaccumulatory remediation of acid mine drainage by phycomicrobial mats, surveys have been conducted for 11 months in Contrary Creek; several extremophiles that are tolerant of acid mine systems have been found. Twelve to thirteen genera of algae and a few cocci and bacilli have been identified in surface waters. Predominant genera include Ulothrix, Pinnularia and Oscillatoria. Preliminary results demonstrate that the phycomicrobial communities found in this acid mine system maintain density and species diversity independent of pH and heavy metal fluctuations. These extremophiles also demonstrate high potential for heavy metal sorption. Phycomicrobial mats bioaccumulate 60--70% more heavy metals than concentrations found in surface waters and the creek. To date, remediatory attempts to restore Contrary Creek have not been successful. Results suggest that the extremophile ecology found in this system will facilitate the remediation process of other, similar acid mine affected ecosystems.

  18. Chemical evolution of coal mine drainage in a non-acid producing environment, Wasatch Plateau, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, A. L.; Petersen, E. C.; Kravits, C.

    2000-09-01

    The causes and problems of coal mine drainage, particularly acid mine drainage, in the Eastern and Interior Coal Provinces of the United States are well documented. West of the Mississippi River, where coal mines account for about 45% of total US coal production and where acid mine drainage is rare, the chemical evolution of coal mine drainage is less well documented and understood. In this investigation, we have used solute and isotopic compositions of non-evolved inflow groundwater and evolved mine discharge water to quantify the chemical evolution of mine discharge water in a western underground coal mine. Water enters the mine from fractures and roof bolt holes, which intercept groundwater in the overlying rock. Carbon-14, and 3H data indicate that these waters recharged between 12,000 and 19,500 years ago. The TDS and solute compositions of roof drip waters are spatially zoned and TDS concentrations range from about 300 to 550 mg l -1. After the water encounters minerals and other substances in the mine, the chemical differences between various mine regions become more pronounced and the TDS of mine drainage water increases to about 850 mg l -1. The TDS of mine drainage is related to water-rock ratios. Mine drainage issuing from the older mined areas, where water-rock ratios are low, has the greatest TDS. Geochemical and isotopic mass balance calculations were performed to quantify chemical reactions in the mine, and to identify sources contributing to the TDS of mine drainage. Chemical reaction pathways evaluated include pyrite oxidation, dissolution of native and rock dust gypsum, dissolution of calcite and dolomite, precipitation of calcite, ion exchange, precipitation of iron hydroxide, and organic decomposition of mining machine emulsion fluid. Solute and isotopic mass transfer reaction calculations demonstrate that the oxidation of pyrite triggers a series of cascading in-mine chemical reactions that are the primary cause of the elevated TDS of mine

  19. Sediment-water interaction in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage : experimental and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Sánchez, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage into a water reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. In this setting, sediment is commonly thought to act as a sink for pollutants. However, redox oscillations in the bottom water promoted by stratification-turnover events may significantly alter the metal cycling. A new sequential extraction procedure has been developed to study the metal partitioning in the sediment. The new scheme for iron, sulfur and organic carbon rich sediments was evaluated...

  20. Acid mine drainage treatment using by-products from quicklime manufacturing as neutralization chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarpola, Arja; Hu, Tao; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate whether by-products from quicklime manufacturing could be used instead of commercial quicklime (CaO) or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2), which are traditionally used as neutralization chemicals in acid mine drainage treatment. Four by-products were studied and the results were compared with quicklime and hydrated lime. The studied by-products were partly burnt lime stored outdoors, partly burnt lime stored in a silo, kiln dust and a mixture of partly burnt lime stored outdoors and dolomite. Present application options for these by-products are limited and they are largely considered waste. Chemical precipitation experiments were performed with the jar test. All the studied by-products removed over 99% of Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and approximately 60% of sulphate from acid mine drainage. However, the neutralization capacity of the by-products and thus the amount of by-product needed as well as the amount of sludge produced varied. The results indicated that two out of the four studied by-products could be used as an alternative to quicklime or hydrated lime for acid mine drainage treatment. PMID:25193795

  1. Behaviour of U-Isotopes in an Estuary Affected by Acid Mine Drainage and Industrial Releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto and Odiel rivers (SW of Spain) is an ecosystem of great interest that is seriously affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) from long-term mining activities (pH < 3). Additionally, a large industrial complex is located in the surroundings of this estuary and Huelva town, which includes two phosphate rock processing plants that produce about 3 millions of tons per year of a byproduct called phosphogypsum (PG) containing high U-series radionuclides concentrations. For these reasons, the estuary of Huelva is one of the most heavy metals and radionuclides polluted estuarine systems in Europe with extremely low pH.

  2. Acid mine drainage and stream recovery: Effects of restoration on water quality, macroinvertebrates, and fish

    OpenAIRE

    Williams K.M.; Turner A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a prominent threat to water quality in many of the world’s mining districts as it can severely degrade both the biological community and physical habitat of receiving streams. There are relatively few long-term studies investigating the ability of stream ecosystems to recover from AMD. Here we assess watershed scale recovery of a cold-water stream from pollution by AMD using a 1967 survey of the biological and chemical properties of the stream as a pre-restoration ...

  3. Oxidative Precipitation of Manganese from Acid Mine Drainage by Potassium Permanganate

    OpenAIRE

    Regeane M. Freitas; Perilli, Thomaz A. G.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.

    2013-01-01

    Although oxidative precipitation by potassium permanganate is a widely recognised process for manganese removal, research dealing with highly contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD) has yet to be performed. The present study investigated the efficiency of KMnO4 in removing manganese from AMD effluents. Samples of AMD that originated from inactive uranium mine in Brazil were chemically characterised and treated by KMnO4 at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. Analyses by Raman spectroscopy and geochemical mode...

  4. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from 450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization. PMID:16631855

  5. Plan for injection of coal combustion byproducts into the Omega Mine for the reduction of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Omega Mine Complex is located outside of Morgantown, West Virginia. The mine is in the Upper Freeport Coal, an acid-producing coal seam. The coal was mined in a manner that has resulted in acid mine drainage (AMD) discharges at multiple points. During the 1990's, the West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) assumed responsibility for operating a collection and treatment system for the AMD. Collection and treatment costs are approximately $300,000 per year. Injecting grout into the mine workings to reduce AMD (and thus reducing treatment costs) is proposed. The procedure involves injecting grout mixes composed primarily of coal combustion byproducts (CCB's) and water, with a small quantity of cement. The intention of the injection program is to fill the mine voids in the north lobe of the Omega Mine (an area where most of the acidity is believed to be generated) with the grout, thus reducing the contact of air and water with potentially acidic material. The grout mix design consists of an approximate 1:1 ratio of fly ash to byproducts from fluidized bed combustion. Approximately 100 gallons of water per cubic yard of grout is used to achieve flowability. Observation of the mine workings via subsurface borings and downhole video camera confirmed that first-mined areas were generally open while second-mined areas were generally partially collapsed. The injection program was developed to account for this by utilizing closer injection hole spacing in second-mined areas. Construction began in January 1998, with grout injection expected to commence in mid-April 1998

  6. CCB-based encapsulation of pyrite for remediation of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Sowmya; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Rustagi, Neha

    2007-05-17

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned coal mines continues to be one of the most significant environmental problems. Remediation of AMD requires an addition of lime source to decrease the acidity, and grouting the entire mine and encapsulating the pyrite by calcium-rich additives is often employed. Utilization of alkaline coal combustion by-products (CCBs) has gained acceptance in such remediation applications because of their cost-effectiveness. A study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of CCBs to abate acid mine drainage by encapsulation of pyrite. Geomechanical, hydraulic, and environmental tests were performed on grouts prepared with various ratios of CCBs as well as an alternative free lime source, lime kiln dust (LKD). The results indicated that the mechanical properties of grouts were dependent on their free lime contents. Hydraulic conductivities of pyrite-grout columns were relatively high due to the coating of the pyrite rock with the grout rather than the filling of all of the void spaces, as commonly experienced in field applications. The leaching tests indicated that the presence of high amounts of lime in a grout is not solely sufficient to improve the quality of AMD, since the rate of dissolution of a high lime content grout may be slow due to its rapid hardening. Therefore, it is recommended that grouts be selected with consideration of their hardening capacities, as well as the percentage of lime content present in the mixture. PMID:17303328

  7. Application of nanofiltration to the treatment of acid mine drainage waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the separation of uranium and other elements in high concentrations from acid mine waters at Caldas Uranium Mining, in the southeast of Brazil, using nanofiltration membranes. Nanofiltrarion is widely used in water treatment due to the lower energy requirements and higher yields than reverse osmosis. Separation characteristics are dependent on both the molecular size and charge of the dissolved species in the feed solution as well as membrane properties. In this investigation the potential of nanofiltration to removed dissolved species like uranium from acid mine water drainage was measured. Two composite aromatic polyamide commercially membranes of FilmTec/Dow were tested and it found that uranium rejections of greater than 90% and also showed potential for the separation of aluminum and manganese. (author)

  8. Application of nanofiltration to the treatment of acid mine drainage waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Edna T.R.; Barbosa, Celina C.R.; Oliveira, Elizabeth E.M.; Carvalho, Leonel M. de; Pedro Junior, Antonio [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: ednaruas@ien.gov.br; Queiroz, Vanessa B.C. de [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the separation of uranium and other elements in high concentrations from acid mine waters at Caldas Uranium Mining, in the southeast of Brazil, using nanofiltration membranes. Nanofiltrarion is widely used in water treatment due to the lower energy requirements and higher yields than reverse osmosis. Separation characteristics are dependent on both the molecular size and charge of the dissolved species in the feed solution as well as membrane properties. In this investigation the potential of nanofiltration to removed dissolved species like uranium from acid mine water drainage was measured. Two composite aromatic polyamide commercially membranes of FilmTec/Dow were tested and it found that uranium rejections of greater than 90% and also showed potential for the separation of aluminum and manganese. (author)

  9. Roles of Benthic Algae in the Structure, Function, and Assessment of Stream Ecosystems Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tens of thousands of stream kilometers around the world are degraded by a legacy of environmental impacts and acid mine drainage (AMD) caused by abandoned underground and surface mines, piles of discarded coal wastes, and tailings. Increased acidity, high concentrations of metals...

  10. Assessment of the microbial community in a constructed wetland that receives acid coal mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2006-01-15

    Constructed wetlands are used to treat acid drainage from surface or underground coal mines. However, little is known about the microbial communities in the receiving wetland cells. The purpose of this work was to characterize the microbial population present in a wetland that was receiving acid coal mine drainage (AMD). Samples were collected from the oxic sediment zone of a constructed wetland cell in southeastern Ohio that was treating acid drainage from an underground coal mine seep. Samples comprised Fe(Ill) precipitates and were pretreated with ammonium oxalate to remove interfering iron, and the DNA was extracted and purified by agarose gel electrophoresis prior to amplification of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Amplified products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA from seven distinct bands was excised from the gel and sequenced. The sequences were matched to sequences in the GenBank bacterial 16S rDNA database. The DNA in two of the bands yielded matches with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and the DNA in each of the remaining five bands was consistent with one of the following microorganisms: Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, strain TRA3-20 (a eubacterium), strain BEN-4 (an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium), an Alcaligenes sp., and a Bordetella sp. Low bacterial diversity in these samples reflects the highly inorganic nature of the oxic sediment layer where high abundance of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria would be expected. The results we obtained by molecular methods supported our findings, obtained using culture methods, that the dominant microbial species in an acid receiving, oxic wetland are A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans.

  11. Bacterial phylogenetic diversity in a constructed wetland system treating acid coal mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicorarat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Dopson, M.; Tuovinen, O.H. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (USA)

    2008-02-15

    Microorganisms in acid mine drainage are typically acidophiles that mediate the oxidation of reduced compounds of iron and sulfur. However, microbial populations in wetland systems constructed to treat acid mine drainage are not well characterized. This study was to analyze bacterial diversity, using cultivation-independent molecular ecological techniques, in a constructed wetland that received acid drainage from an abandoned underground coal mine. DNA was purified from Fe(III)-precipitates from the oxidized surface zone of wetland sediments and 16S rRNA gene sequences were amplified and cloned. A total of 200 clones were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 77 unique RFLP patterns were obtained with four restriction enzymes. Of these patterns, 30 most dominant unique clones were selected for sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. Half of these 30 clones could be matched with autotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiohacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans). Several clones also formed a clade with heterotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria (TRA2-10, TRA3-20, and TRA5-3) and heterotrophic bacteria (Stenotrophomas maltophilia, Bordetella spp., Alcalgenes sp., Alcaligenesfaecalis, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans). Approximately 40% and 35% of the analyzed RFLP restriction patterns were consistent with A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans, respectively. The relatively high frequency of acidithiobacilli is consistent with the chemical and physical characteristics of this site i.e., continuous, abundant supply of reduced iron and sulfur compounds, pH 3-4, ambient temperature, and limited organics originating from the coal seam and from vegetation or soil surrounding the inlet channel to the wetland.

  12. Tracking acid mine-drainage in Southeast Arizona using GIS and sediment delivery models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, L.M.; Gray, F.; Guertin, D.P.; Wissler, C.; Bliss, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the application of models traditionally used to estimate erosion and sediment deposition to assess the potential risk of water quality impairment resulting from metal-bearing materials related to mining and mineralization. An integrated watershed analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based tools was undertaken to examine erosion and sediment transport characteristics within the watersheds. Estimates of stream deposits of sediment from mine tailings were related to the chemistry of surface water to assess the effectiveness of the methodology to assess the risk of acid mine-drainage being dispersed downstream of abandoned tailings and waste rock piles. A watershed analysis was preformed in the Patagonia Mountains in southeastern Arizona which has seen substantial mining and where recent water quality samples have reported acidic surface waters. This research demonstrates an improvement of the ability to predict streams that are likely to have severely degraded water quality as a result of past mining activities. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  13. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene, E-mail: irene.sanchezandrea@wur.nl [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sanz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bijmans, Martijn F.M. [Wetsus, Centre of Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stams, Alfons J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  14. Mine Drainage Generation and Control Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinchao; Rodak, Carolyn M; Zhang, Shicheng; Han, Yuexin; Wolfe, F Andrew

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a snapshot of papers published in 2015 relevant to the topic of mine drainage generation and control options. The review is broken into 3 sections: Generation, Prediction and Prevention, and Treatment Options. The first section, mine drainage generation, focuses on the characterization of mine drainage and the environmental impacts. As such, it is broken into three subsections focused on microbiological characterization, physiochemical characterization, and environmental impacts. The second section of the review is divided into two subsections focused on either the prediction or prevention of acid mine drainage. The final section focuses on treatment options for mine drainage and waste sludge. The third section contains subsections on passive treatment, biological treatment, physiochemical treatment, and a new subsection on beneficial uses for mine drainage and treatment wastes.

  15. Hyperspectral analysis for qualitative and quantitative features related to acid mine drainage at a remediated open-pit mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G.; Calvin, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    The exposure of pyrite to oxygen and water in mine waste environments is known to generate acidity and the accumulation of secondary iron minerals. Sulfates and secondary iron minerals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) exhibit diverse spectral properties in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The use of hyperspectral imagery for identification of AMD mineralogy and contamination has been well studied. Fewer studies have examined the impacts of hydrologic variations on mapping AMD or the unique spectral signatures of mine waters. Open-pit mine lakes are an additional environmental hazard which have not been widely studied using imaging spectroscopy. A better understanding of AMD variation related to climate fluctuations and the spectral signatures of contaminated surface waters will aid future assessments of environmental contamination. This study examined the ability of multi-season airborne hyperspectral data to identify the geochemical evolution of substances and contaminant patterns at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site. The mine is located 24 miles southeast of Lake Tahoe and contains remnant tailings piles and several AMD collection ponds. The objectives were to 1) distinguish temporal changes in mineralogy at a the remediated open-pit sulfur mine, 2) identify the absorption features of mine affected waters, and 3) quantitatively link water spectra to known dissolved iron concentrations. Images from NASA's AVIRIS instrument were collected in the spring, summer, and fall seasons for two consecutive years at Leviathan (HyspIRI campaign). Images had a spatial resolution of 15 meters at nadir. Ground-based surveys using the ASD FieldSpecPro spectrometer and laboratory spectral and chemical analysis complemented the remote sensing data. Temporal changes in surface mineralogy were difficult to distinguish. However, seasonal changes in pond water quality were identified. Dissolved ferric iron and chlorophyll

  16. Effect of loess for preventing contamination of acid mine drainage from coal waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bao-guo; WANG Hui-yong; GAO Ran; LI Shu-li

    2012-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) that releases highly acidic,sulfate and metals-rich drainage is a serious environmental problem in coal mining areas in China.In order to study the effect of using loess for preventing AMD and controlling heavy metals contamination from coal waste,the column leaching tests were conducted.The results come from experiment data analyses show that the loess can effectively immobilize cadmium,copper,iron,lead and zinc in AMD from coal waste,increase pH value,and decrease Eh,EC,and SO42-concentrations of AMD from coal waste.The oxidation of sulfide in coal waste is prevented by addition of the loess,which favors the generation and adsorption of the alkalinity,the decrease of the population of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans,the heavy metals immobilization by precipitation of sulfide and carbonate through biological sulfate reduction inside the column,and the halt of the oxidation process of sulfide through iron coating on the surface of sulfide in coal waste.The loess can effectively prevent AMD and heavy metals contamination from coal waste in in-situ treatment systems.

  17. The geochemistry of rare earth elements (REE) in acid mine drainage from the Sitai coal mine, Shanxi Province, North China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, geochemical characteristics of rare earth elements (REE) in acid mine drainage (AMD) from the Sitai coal mine of Shanxi Province, North China were investigated by determining concentrations of dissolved REEs and major solutes in the AMD samples, concentrations of REEs in the AMD precipitate samples and country rock samples (mudstone and coal), and modeling REEs species in the AMD. The results show that AMD in the Sitai coal mine have high REEs and SO42- concentrations in comparison with several terrestrial waters worldwide. The REE speciation modeling indicates that sulfate complexes (LnSO4+, > 60%) and free metal species (Ln3+, 20%-40%) are dominant REEs species in the AMD. AMD of the Sitai coal mine also shows a middle REE-enriched NASC (North American Shale Composite)-normalized pattern. The authors suggest that both REE sulfates (LnSO4+) in the AMD and country rock of coal measures are possible reasons for middle REE-enriched NASC-normalized pattern of the Sitai coal mine AMD. Further work on the AMD precipitates is needed to obtain more information on the origin of the middle REE-enriched NASC-normalized patterns. (author)

  18. Bio-Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage in the Sarcheshmeh Porphyry Copper Mine by Fungi: Batch and Fixed Bed Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Soleimanifar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD containing high concentrations of iron and sulphate, low pH and variableconcentrations of heavy metals leads to many environmental problems. The concentrations of Cu and Mnare high in the AMD of the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper mine, Kerman province, south of Iran. In thisstudy, the bio-remediation of Cu and Mn ions from acid mine drainage was investigated using two nativefungi called Aspergillus niger and Phanerochaete chrysosporium which were extracted from the soil andsediment samples of the Shour River at the Sarcheshmeh mine. The live fungi was first harvested andthen killed by boiling in 0.5 N NaOH solution. The biomass was finally dried at 60 C for 24 h andpowdered. The optimum biosorption parameters including pH, temperature, the amount of biosorbent andcontact time were determined in a batch system. The optimum pH varied between 5 and 6. It was foundthat the biosorption process increased with an increase in temperature and the amount of biosorbent.Biosorption data were attempted by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and showed a good match.Kinetic studies were also carried out in the present study. The results show that the second-order kineticsmodel fits well the experimental data. The biosorption experiments were further investigated with acontinuous system to compare the biosorption capacities of two systems. The results show thatbiosorption process using a continuous system increases efficiency up to 99%. A desorption process waseventually performed in order to recover Copper and Manganese ions. This process was successful andfungi could be used again.

  19. Use of natural and applied tracers to guide targeted remediation efforts in an acid mine drainage system, Colorado Rockies, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Rory; Williams, Mark W.; Wireman, Mike; Runkel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Stream water quality in areas of the western United States continues to be degraded by acid mine drainage (AMD), a legacy of hard-rock mining. The Rico-Argentine Mine in southwestern Colorado consists of complex multiple-level mine workings connected to a drainage tunnel discharging AMD to passive treatment ponds that discharge to the Dolores River. The mine workings are excavated into the hillslope on either side of a tributary stream with workings passing directly under the stream channel. There is a need to define hydrologic connections between surface water, groundwater, and mine workings to understand the source of both water and contaminants in the drainage tunnel discharge. Source identification will allow targeted remediation strategies to be developed. To identify hydrologic connections we employed a combination of natural and applied tracers including isotopes, ionic tracers, and fluorescent dyes. Stable water isotopes (δ18O/δD) show a well-mixed hydrological system, while tritium levels in mine waters indicate a fast flow-through system with mean residence times of years not decades or longer. Addition of multiple independent tracers indicated that water is traveling through mine workings with minimal obstructions. The results from a simultaneous salt and dye tracer application demonstrated that both tracer types can be successfully used in acidic mine water conditions.

  20. A novel acidophile community populating waste ore deposits at an acid mine drainage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Chun-bo; ZHANG Hong-xun; BAI Zhi-hui; HU Qing; ZHANG Bao-guo

    2007-01-01

    Waste ore samples (pH 3.0) were collected at an acid mine drainage site in Anhui, China. The present acidophilic microbial community in the waste ore was studied with 16S rRNA gene clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Eighteen different clones were identified and affiliated with Actinobacteria, low G + C Gram-positives, Thermomicrobia, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Candidate division TM7, and Planctomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a diversity of acidophiles in the samples that were mostly novel. It is unexpected that the moderately thermophilic acidophiles were abundant in the acidic ecosystem and may play a great role in the generation of AMD. The result of DGGE was consistent with that of clone library analysis. These findings help in the better understanding of the generation mechanism of AMD and in developing a more efficient method to control AMD.

  1. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment by Perlite Nanomineral, Batch and Continuous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Kumars Seifpanahi; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Badii, Khshayar; Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the adsorption activity of perlite nanoparticles for removal of Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions at Iran Sarcheshmeh copper acid mine drainage was discussed. Thus, raw perlite that provided from internal resource was modified and prepared via particles size reduction to nano scale and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transforms infrared and BET specific surface area analysis. The results of acid mine drainage show that pH of acid mine drainage is 5.1 and Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions are 10.5, 4.1 and 8.3 ppm, respectively. Firstly in the batch system the influence of adsorbent dose and temperature parameters were considered and then isothermal and kinetic models were investigated. According to the results the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetic model showed better correlation with the experimental data than other isotherm and kinetic models. Obtained thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° show that the Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions adsorption from acid mine drainage is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, perlite nanoparticles adsorbent was packed inside a glass column and used for the removal of heavy metals in 1, 3, 5 ml/min acid mine drainage flow rates, the breakthrough curves show that the column was saturated at 180, 240 and 315 min for different flow rates, respectively. According to the obtained results, this abundant, locally available and cheap silicate mineral showed a great efficiency for the removal of heavy metal pollutants from acid mine drainage and can be utilized for much volume of acid mine drainage or industrial scale. W pracy omówiono zdolności adsorpcyjne nano-cząsteczek perlitu wykorzystywanych o usuwania jonów Cu2+, Fe2+ i Mn2+ z kwaśnych wód kopalniach w kopalni miedzi w Sarcheshmeh w Iranie. Surowy perlit pozyskiwany ze źródeł własnych został zmodyfikowany i odpowiednio spreparowany poprzez zre-dukowanie cz

  2. Implications for global climate change from microbially-produced acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlund, K. L.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Warren, L. A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial catalysis of sulphur cycling in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments is well known but the reaction pathways are poorly characterised. These reaction pathways involve both acid-consuming and acid- generating steps, with important consequences for overall AMD production as well as sulphur and carbon global biogeochemical cycles. Mining-associated sulphuric acid has been implicated in climate change through the weathering of carbonate minerals resulting in the release of 29 Tg C/year as carbon dioxide. Understanding of microbial AMD generation is based predominantly on studies of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans despite the knowledge that other environmentally common strains of bacteria are also active sulphur oxidizers and that microbial consortia are likely very important in environmental processes. Using an integrated experimental approach including geochemical experimentation, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we document a novel syntrophic sulphur metabolism involving two common mine bacteria: autotrophic sulphur oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and heterotrophic Acidiphilium spp. The proposed sulphur geochemistry associated with this bacterial consortium produces 40-90% less acid than expected based on abiotic AMD models, with significant implications for both AMD mitigation and AMD carbon flux modelling. The two bacterial strains are specifically spatially segregated within a macrostructure of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that provides the necessary microgeochemical conditions for coupled sulphur oxidation and reduction reactions. STXM results identify multiple sulphur oxidation states associated with the pods, indicating that they are the sites of active sulphur disproportionation and recycling. Recent laboratory experimentation using type culture strains of the bacteria involved in pod-formation suggesting that this phenomenon is likely to be widespread in environments

  3. Impact of Acid Mine Drainage on the hydrogeological system at Sia, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stephen; Malpas, John

    2013-04-01

    Discontinued mining of the volcanogenic massive sulphide ore bodies of Cyprus has left significant environmental concerns including Acid Mine Drainage. Remnant sulphide ore and tailings in waste dumps react with oxygenated rainwater to produce sulphuric acid, a process which is multiplied when metal-loving acidophilic bacteria are present. Given that Cyprus has a Mediterranean climate, characterized by its warm and dry summers and cool and wet winters, the low pH effluent with high levels of trace elements, particularly metals, is leached out of the waste tips particularly during the wet season. The Sia site includes an open mine-pit lake, waste rock and tailings dumps, a river leading to a downstream dam-lake, and a localised groundwater system. The study intends to: identify the point source and nature of contamination; analyze the mechanism and results of local acid generation; and understand how the hydrogeological system responds to seasonal variations. During two sampling campaigns, in the wet and dry seasons of 2011, water samples were collected from the mine pit lake, from upstream of the adjacent river down to the dam catchment, and from various boreholes close to the sulphide mine. The concentration of ions in waters varies between wet and dry seasons but, in both, relative amounts are directly related to pH. In the mine-pit lake, Fe, Mn, Mg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co and Cd are found in higher concentrations in the dry season, as a result of substantial evaporation of water. The Sia River runs continuously in the wet season, and waters collected close to the waste tips have pH as low as 2.5 and higher concentrations of Al, Cu, Fe and Zn. Further downstream there is a significant decrease in trace metal contents with a concomitant rise of pH. Al and Fe dominate total cation content when pH is lower than 4. Al is derived from the weathering of clay minerals, especially during the wet season. Fe is derived from the oxidation of pyrite. Once pH's exceed 4, a white

  4. The Regulation of Acid Mine Drainage in South Africa: Law and Governance Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Feris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is arguably one of the most serious environmental concerns in South Africa. AMD is a legacy left behind by abandoned, derelict and defunct mines, and is a continuing by-product of existing mining activities. In addition to its environmental impacts, AMD will also impact on all the parameters of sustainability, including ecological, social and economic concerns. In particular, AMD is set to affect infrastructure, displace people and affect their livelihoods, influence economic activity, impact on the resource extraction industry, and affect South Africa's policies and actions in relation to climate change and its efforts to move towards a low carbon economy; and it will test the efficiency of regulatory interventions emanating from both the private and the public sector to the extreme. Given these pervasive challenges, in this article we provide a survey of the AMD problem in South Africa through the law and governance lens. We commence by highlighting the various issues and challenges that result from AMD in the environmental context on the one hand, and the law and governance context on the other hand. We then describe the many provisions of the regulatory framework that we believe would be instrumental in responding to the threat. We conclude the article with brief remarks on what we believe are important considerations in the future regulation of AMD.

  5. Heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage by calcined eggshell and microalgae hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the use of calcined eggshells and microalgae for the removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) and the simultaneous enhancement of biomass productivity. The experiment was conducted over a period of 6 days in a hybrid system containing calcined eggshells and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. The results show that the biomass productivity increased to ~8.04 times its initial concentration of 0.367 g/L as measured by an optical panel photobioreactor (OPPBR) and had a light transmittance of 95 % at a depth of 305 mm. On the other hand, the simultaneous percent removal of Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, As, and Cd from the AMD effluent was found to be 99.47 to 100 %. These results indicate that the hybrid system with calcined eggshells and microalgae was highly effective for heavy metal removal in the AMD.

  6. Field validation of specific ecotoxicological tools for aquatic systems impacted with acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, I.; Goncalves, F.; Nogueira, A.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Ribeiro, R. [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Coimbra (Portugal). Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra

    2000-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is characterised by very low pH and high heavy metal concentrations. Serious ecotoxicological effects, often leading to the complete disruption of the ecosystem, can be observed at the regions suffering this kind of contamination. Those effects can be caused either by low pH itself or by other contaminants that emerge with water acidification (mobilisation and increased solubility of heavy metals). The discrimination between the toxicity due to each of these two factors is not possible with the existing toxicity tests; the addition of chelating agents or serial dilution methods seriously alter the chemical and physical properties of the effluent. A toxicity test, based on the survival time of Ceriodaphnia dubia (Crustacea, Cladocera) neonates exposed to the unchanged effluent was developed and field validated, on an AMD contaminated site. 28 refs.

  7. Acid mine drainage and stream recovery: Effects of restoration on water quality, macroinvertebrates, and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a prominent threat to water quality in many of the world’s mining districts as it can severely degrade both the biological community and physical habitat of receiving streams. There are relatively few long-term studies investigating the ability of stream ecosystems to recover from AMD. Here we assess watershed scale recovery of a cold-water stream from pollution by AMD using a 1967 survey of the biological and chemical properties of the stream as a pre-restoration benchmark. We sampled water chemistry, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish throughout the watershed during the spring and summer of 2011. Water chemistry results indicated that pH and total alkalinity increased post-restoration, while acidity, sulfate, and iron concentrations decreased. Watershed-level taxa richness, local taxa richness, biomass, diversity, and density of macroinvertebrates were significantly higher post-restoration; however, %EPT was not significantly different. Fish species richness, density, and brook trout density were all significantly higher post-restoration. These results provide clear evidence that both abiotic and biotic components of streams can recover from AMD pollution.

  8. TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE: I. EQUILIBRIUM BIOSORPTION OF ZINC AND COPPER ON NON-VIABLE ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosorption is potentially attractive technology for treament of acid mine drainage for separation/recovery of metal ions and mitigation of their toxicity to sulfate reducing bacteria. This study describes the equilibrium biosorptio of Zn(II) and CU(II) by nonviable activated slu...

  9. Application of fracture-flow hydrogeology to acid-mine drainage at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmar, Thomas E.

    1994-03-01

    The mechanics of groundwater flow through fractured rock has become an object of major research interest during recent years. This project has investigated the flow of groundwater through fractured Precambrian metaquartzite rocks in a portion of the Bunker Hill Mine near Kellogg, Idaho. Groundwater flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as faults, joints and relict bedding planes. Groundwater that flows into the mine via the fractures is acidic and is contaminated by heavy metals, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the groundwater flow system is a prerequisite of the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The information obtained includes fracture type, orientation, trace length, the number of visible terminations, roughness, waviness, infilling material, and a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture. The hydrogeologic field data collected include routine measurements of the discharge from four individual structural features and four areas where large quantities of water are discharging from vertical rock bolts, the depths to water in three piezometer nests at the ground surface, the pressure variations in four diamond drillholes, and constant discharge flow tests conducted on three of the diamond drillholes. The field data indicate that relict bedding planes are the primary conduits for groundwater flow, and suggest that the two major joint sets that are present connect water flowing through the discontinuous bedding planes. The three minor joint sets that are present do not seem to have a significant impact on groundwater flow, but along with the two major joint sets may store relatively large quantities of

  10. Accumulation of aluminium and iron by bryophytes in streams affected by acid-mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engleman, C.J.; McDiffett, W.F. [Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    This paper examines the accumulation of two heavy metals (Al and Fe) by bryophytes in a northern Pennsylvania stream system affected by acid-mine drainage. Four sites within one watershed were selected on the basis of their pH and dissolved metal concentrations. Significant differences among sites were found with regard to bioaccumulation of Al an Fe. A negative relationship between pH and Fe concentrations in bryophyte tissues was found, with the highest accumulation of Fe observed at the most acidic site (pH 3.5), whereas accumulation of Al was highest at a site with an intermediate pH of 5.2. Bryophytes transplanted from a circum-neutral site to acidic sites showed highly significant increases in Fe and Al concentrations in tissues after 6 weeks, and transplants from more acidic sites to a circum-neutral site generally showed highly significant declines in Fe and Al concentration in tissues after the incubation period.

  11. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  12. Oxidative Precipitation of Manganese from Acid Mine Drainage by Potassium Permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regeane M. Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although oxidative precipitation by potassium permanganate is a widely recognised process for manganese removal, research dealing with highly contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD has yet to be performed. The present study investigated the efficiency of KMnO4 in removing manganese from AMD effluents. Samples of AMD that originated from inactive uranium mine in Brazil were chemically characterised and treated by KMnO4 at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. Analyses by Raman spectroscopy and geochemical modelling using PHREEQC code were employed to assess solid phases. Results indicated that the manganese was rapidly oxidised by KMnO4 in a process enhanced at higher pH. The greatest removal, that is, 99%, occurred at pH 7.0, when treated waters presented manganese levels as low as 1.0 mg/L, the limit established by the Brazilian legislation. Birnessite (MnO2, hausmannite (Mn3O4, and manganite (MnOOH were detected by Raman spectroscopy. These phases were consistently identified by the geochemical model, which also predicted phases containing iron, uranium, manganese, and aluminium during the correction of the pH as well as bixbyite (Mn2O3, nsutite (MnO2, pyrolusite (MnO2, and fluorite (CaF2 following the KMnO4 addition.

  13. Identification of nitrogen-fixing genes and gene clusters from metagenomic library of acid mine drainage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Dai

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community.

  14. Acid mine drainage abatement using fluidized bed combustion ash grout after geophysical site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyritic coal refuse and pit cleanings buried in a 15-ha (37-acre) surface mine produce severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material had been buried in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash, mixed with water to form a grout, was used in different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen. In the first approach, grout was pressure injected directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. A second approach used the grout to divert water from specific areas. Pods which did not accept grout because of a clay matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. The grout was also used in certain areas to blanket the clay pit floor since clays are believed to be a primary source of aluminum at this site. In certain areas, the AMD migrates downward though fractures in the pit floor to the groundwater table. Grout was injected along the fractures in some of these areas to seal them. This would inhibit further AMD migration toward one of the receiving streams. The initial postgrouting water quality data have been encouraging

  15. Preservation procedures for arsenic speciation in a stream affected by acid mine drainage in southwestern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodas, Daniel; Oliveira, Vanesa; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis; Nieto, José Miguel

    2006-04-01

    A preservation study has been performed for arsenic speciation in surface freshwaters affected by acid mine drainage (AMD), a pollution source characterized by low pH and high metallic content. Two sample preservation procedures described in the literature were attempted using opaque glass containers and refrigeration: i) addition of 0.25 mol L(-1) EDTA to the samples, which maintained the stability of the arsenic species for 3 h; and ii) in situ sample clean-up with a cationic exchange resin, in order to reduce the metallic load, which resulted in a partial co-adsorption of arsenic onto Fe precipitates. A new proposed method was also tried: sample acidification with 6 mol L(-1) HCl followed by in situ clean-up with a cationic exchange resin, which allowed a longer preservation time of at least 48 h. The proposed method was successfully applied to water samples with high arsenic content, taken from the Aguas Agrias Stream (Odiel River Basin, SW Spain), which is severely affected by AMD that originates at the nearby polymetallic sulfide mine of Tharsis. The speciation results obtained by liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-HG-AFS) indicated that during the summer the main arsenic species was As(V) at the hundred microg L(-1) level, followed by DMA (dimethyl arsenic) and As(III) below the ten microg L(-1) level. In winter, As(V) and As(III) increased at least fivefold, whereas the DMA was not detected.

  16. Biogenic catalysis in sulphide minerals' weathering processes and acid mine drainage genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kušnierová, Mária; Praščáková, Mária; Nowak, Anna K; Gorazda, Katarzyna; Wzorek, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Bioleaching and biogenesis are the main outputs from a large group of environmental processes participating in the natural material cycle, used in raw materials processing. Bio-oxidation reactions are the main basis for bioleaching procedures, often participating in parallel leaching processes. During the leaching processes of polycomponent sulphide substrates, the factor of process selection also plays an important role, being in direct relation to the electric properties and galvanic effect occurring between the individual components of the leaching substrate. This work gives a summary of the results of a research focused on the possibilities of using biotechnological procedures for treatment of Slovak sulphide ores. The object of the research is extraction of valuable metals, undesirable admixtures and degradation of crystal lattice of sulphides for subsequent chemical leaching processing of precious metals. The results of experiments on the existence of biogenic processes in situ on waste dumps from exploitation containing residual sulphides are also presented. The processes result in acid mine drainage water generation. These waters are strongly mineralised (over 48 g/L) and of low pH; that is why they are very caustic. The arsenic content (2.558 mg/L) in outflowing waters from old mines is high and over the limits set by the law. PMID:24445359

  17. Effects of bacterial action on waste rock producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is an evolution of the methodology showed in the paper 'Study of waste of waste rock piles producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine', also submitted for INAC2009. Therefore, the present work also related to the determination of chemical species leaching from waste rock pile 4 (WRP4) of the Uranium Mine and Milling Facility located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, as well as the generation of acid waters. With the previous experimental setup, it has been observed that not only water and available oxygen are significant to pyrite oxidation reaction, but bacterial activity as well. As a first approach, the present work addresses the same experiment, but now testing without the influence of bacterial action. Therefore, the new methodology and experimental setup is now capable of determining the acidity of water in contact with material from the WRP4 and the concentration of chemical species dissolved as function of time. Such would also show the extent of bacterial action interference on the pyrite oxidation reaction. Results are based on mass balances comparing concentrations of chemical species in the waste rock before the experiment and in the waste rock plus the remaining water after the experiment. In addition, the evolution of the pH and EMF (electromotive force) values along with chemical species quantified through the experiment are presented through graphics. That is followed by discussions on the significance of such results in terms of concentration of the involved chemical species. The present work has also shown the need of improving the injection of air into the system. A more sophisticated experimental setup should be assembled in the near future, which would allow the quantification of differences between experimental tests with and without bacterial action. (author)

  18. Acid mine drainage risks - A modeling approach to siting mine facilities in Northern Minnesota USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Most watershed-scale planning for mine-caused contamination concerns remediation of past problems while future planning relies heavily on engineering controls. As an alternative, a watershed scale groundwater fate and transport model for the Rainy Headwaters, a northeastern Minnesota watershed, has been developed to examine the risks of leaks or spills to a pristine downstream watershed. The model shows that the risk depends on the location and whether the source of the leak is on the surface or from deeper underground facilities. Underground sources cause loads that last longer but arrive at rivers after a longer travel time and have lower concentrations due to dilution and attenuation. Surface contaminant sources could cause much more short-term damage to the resource. Because groundwater dominates baseflow, mine contaminant seepage would cause the most damage during low flow periods. Groundwater flow and transport modeling is a useful tool for decreasing the risk to downgradient sources by aiding in the placement of mine facilities. Although mines are located based on the minerals, advance planning and analysis could avoid siting mine facilities where failure or leaks would cause too much natural resource damage. Watershed scale transport modeling could help locate the facilities or decide in advance that the mine should not be constructed due to the risk to downstream resources.

  19. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction. PMID:27058913

  20. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction.

  1. Field rates for natural attenuation of arsenic in Tinto Santa Rosa acid mine drainage (SW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P; Ayora, Carlos; Acero, Patricia; Cama, Jordi

    2010-05-15

    Reactive transport modelling of the main processes related to the arsenic natural attenuation observed in the acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted stream of Tinto Santa Rosa (SW Spain) was performed. Despite the simplicity of the kinetic expressions used to deal with arsenic attenuation processes, the model reproduced successfully the major chemical trends observed along the acid discharge. Results indicated that the rate of ferrous iron oxidation was similar to the one obtained in earlier field studies in which microbial catalysis is reported to occur. With regard to the scaled arsenic oxidation rate, it is one order of magnitude faster than the values obtained under laboratory conditions suggesting the existence of a catalytic agent in the natural system. Schwertmannite precipitation rate, which was represented by a simple kinetic expression relying on Fe(III) and pH, was in the range calculated for other AMD impacted sites. Finally, the obtained distribution coefficients used for representing arsenic sorption onto Fe(III) precipitates were lower than those deduced from reported laboratory data. This discrepancy is attributed to a decrease in the schwertmannite arsenate sorption capacity as sulphate increases in the solution.

  2. Novel nickel resistance genes from the rhizosphere metagenome of plants adapted to acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2007-10-01

    Metal resistance determinants have traditionally been found in cultivated bacteria. To search for genes involved in nickel resistance, we analyzed the bacterial community of the rhizosphere of Erica andevalensis, an endemic heather which grows at the banks of the Tinto River, a naturally metal-enriched and extremely acidic environment in southwestern Spain. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of rhizosphere DNA revealed the presence of members of five phylogenetic groups of Bacteria and the two main groups of Archaea mostly associated with sites impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). The diversity observed and the presence of heavy metals in the rhizosphere led us to construct and screen five different metagenomic libraries hosted in Escherichia coli for searching novel nickel resistance determinants. A total of 13 positive clones were detected and analyzed. Insights about their possible mechanisms of resistance were obtained from cellular nickel content and sequence similarities. Two clones encoded putative ABC transporter components, and a novel mechanism of metal efflux is suggested. In addition, a nickel hyperaccumulation mechanism is proposed for a clone encoding a serine O-acetyltransferase. Five clones encoded proteins similar to well-characterized proteins but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance, and the remaining six clones encoded hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions. This is the first report documenting nickel resistance genes recovered from the metagenome of an AMD environment. PMID:17675438

  3. The chemistry of conventional and alternative treatment systems for the neutralization of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of pyritic mining waste is a self-perpetuating corrosive process which generates acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent for centuries or longer. The chemical neutralization of these complex, buffered effluents result in unstable, metal-laden sludges, which require disposal to minimize long-term environmental consequences. A variety of passive treatment systems for AMD, developed in the past two decades, combine limestone and organic substrates in constructed wetlands. These systems work well initially but over the longer term fail due to clogging with and the depletion of available organic carbon. However, some ecologically engineered systems, which exploit the activities of acid reducing microbes in the sediment, rely on photosynthesis in the water column as a source of organic matter. The primary productivity in the water column, which also generates some alkalinity, provides electron donors for the microbial reduction processes in the sediment. In its consideration of 'passive' systems, the literature has placed undue emphasis on sulphate reduction; thermodynamical iron reduction is equally important as is the need to prevent iron oxidation. Secondary precipitates of iron play a significant role in sediment-driven biomineralization processes, which affect the anaerobic degradation of organic matter and the stability of the resulting metal sulfides. One such passive system, which utilized a floating root mass as a source of organic carbon, is described. An extensive review of the literature and the chemical and biogeochemical reactions of AMD treatment systems, lead to the conclusion, that sediment based ecological systems offer the greatest potential for the sustainable treatment of AMD

  4. The chemistry of conventional and alternative treatment systems for the neutralization of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Margarete; Fyson, Andrew; Wheeler, William N

    2006-08-01

    The oxidation of pyritic mining waste is a self-perpetuating corrosive process which generates acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent for centuries or longer. The chemical neutralization of these complex, buffered effluents result in unstable, metal-laden sludges, which require disposal to minimize long-term environmental consequences. A variety of passive treatment systems for AMD, developed in the past two decades, combine limestone and organic substrates in constructed wetlands. These systems work well initially but over the longer term fail due to clogging with and the depletion of available organic carbon. However, some ecologically engineered systems, which exploit the activities of acid reducing microbes in the sediment, rely on photosynthesis in the water column as a source of organic matter. The primary productivity in the water column, which also generates some alkalinity, provides electron donors for the microbial reduction processes in the sediment. In its consideration of 'passive' systems, the literature has placed undue emphasis on sulphate reduction; thermodynamical iron reduction is equally important as is the need to prevent iron oxidation. Secondary precipitates of iron play a significant role in sediment-driven biomineralization processes, which affect the anaerobic degradation of organic matter and the stability of the resulting metal sulfides. One such passive system, which utilized a floating root mass as a source of organic carbon, is described. An extensive review of the literature and the chemical and biogeochemical reactions of AMD treatment systems, lead to the conclusion, that sediment based ecological systems offer the greatest potential for the sustainable treatment of AMD. PMID:16375949

  5. Fate of Fe, As in Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was created Disused Metal Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Kang, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; So, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study is a natural reduction of Fe and As in AMD. AMD is produced by oxidation of pyrite, the iron, the sulfate mineral dissolution action. It is generated by the sulfide minerals, water, oxygen, the reaction of microorganisms in the underground. AMD is low pH due to dissolved minerals in the mine are different kinds of heavy metals will leach. If the flow out of mines and react with dissolved oxygen (DO) is increased, due to oxidation and microbiological activity of the Fe it is precipitated biomat is produced. This study area is Ilgwng disused mines in the Republic of Korea Busan Gijanggun. March to September 2010 taken by the AMD and biomat analyze Fe and As. The main mineral is Chalcopyrite (Cu2Fe2S4), Arsenopyrite (FeAsS), Pyrite (FeS2), Pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS), Sphalerite (ZnS), Galena (PbS), Scheelite (CaWO4), Wolframite ((Fe, Mn)WO4) and the like. Analysis of the AMD of underground pH 2.4~2.8, DO 1.3~4.8mg/L, Fe 474.3~178.8mg/L, As 0~3.2mg/L. Analysis AMD of the flow out of mine pH 2.3~2.9, DO 6.7~9.5mg/L, Fe 81.9~438.7L, As 0~2.8mg/L. The content of Fe in the biomat is 244.242mg/kg, the content of As is 5647mg/kg in the adsorption reaction of the Fe. AMD of disused metal mine mineral leaching occur in a reducing environment, in an oxidizing environment it caused precipitation and adsorption reactions.

  6. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234U/238U and 230Th/232Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  7. BONE MEAL AS ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT FOR ACIDIC AND METAL CONTAMINATED ACID MINE DRAINAGE WATER EFFLUENT: LAB SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Payus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical methods of treatment for acidic and metal contaminated water effluent such as the Acid Mine Drainage (AMD will always focus on either civil engineering methods, such as disposal, excavation, drainage and encapsulation or process based technologies such as effluent washing and treatment. These techniques are not environmental friendly, costly and unsustainable, thus environmental damaging. Nowadays, there is a growing need for an alternative remediation treatment that is innovative and more natural in order to prevent pollution in the environment. Therefore, in this study, a new alternative treatment, that is more organic, biodegradable and cost effective, using bone meal was presented. In this research, bone meal comprising of chicken bones were used as an alternative passive treatment to determine its potential in neutralizing and removing heavy metals from the abandoned cooper mine, Mamut Acid Mine Drainage (AMD waste water effluent. A pretreatment process for bone meal was performed by incineration process where it was heated up in the furnace at 500°C for 24 h after it was cleaned, crushed, boiled and dried. Batch experiment test has been carried out to test whether the selected bone meal sizes 45, 75 and 150 µm was able to neutralize the AMD Mamut water samples. Inductive Plasma Couple-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES test was carried out to test the concentration of the heavy metals before and after the treatment. The surface morphology of bone meal was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Enlargement of pores after the neutralization treatment was seen on the surface morphology of the bone meal by SEM analyses. A significant rising of pH from 2.98 to 5.69 within 6 h 30 min was observed during neutralization process and 99% removal of Fe, Zn, Al, Cu and 36% removal of Mg concentration was achieved after the treatment through the neutralization treatment of the AMD waste water effluent. The results from this

  8. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  9. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A. PMID:24367969

  10. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements and Yttrium from Passive-Remediation Systems of Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayora, Carlos; Macías, Francisco; Torres, Ester; Lozano, Alba; Carrero, Sergio; Nieto, José-Miguel; Pérez-López, Rafael; Fernández-Martínez, Alejandro; Castillo-Michel, Hiram

    2016-08-01

    Rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) are raw materials of increasing importance for modern technologies, and finding new sources has become a pressing need. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly considered an environmental pollution issue. However, REY concentrations in AMD can be several orders of magnitude higher than in naturally occurring water bodies. With respect to shale standards, the REY distribution pattern in AMD is enriched in intermediate and valuable REY, such as Tb and Dy. The objective of the present work is to study the behavior of REY in AMD passive-remediation systems. Traditional AMD passive remediation systems are based on the reaction of AMD with calcite-based permeable substrates followed by decantation ponds. Experiments with two columns simulating AMD treatment demonstrate that schwertmannite does not accumulate REY, which, instead, are retained in the basaluminite residue. The same observation is made in two field-scale treatments from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest Spain). On the basis of the amplitude of this process and on the extent of the IPB, our findings suggest that the proposed AMD remediation process can represent a modest but suitable REY source. In this sense, the IPB could function as a giant heap-leaching process of regional scale in which rain and oxygen act as natural driving forces with no energy investment. In addition to having environmental benefits of its treatment, AMD is expected to last for hundreds of years, and therefore, the total reserves are practically unlimited. PMID:27351211

  11. Phytoassessment of acid mine drainage: Lemna gibba bioassay and diatom community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, A; de Bisthoven, L Janssens; Guhr, K; Soares, A M V M; Pereira, M J

    2008-01-01

    An integrated multilevel phytoassessment of an acid mine drainage (AMD, pH range 3.3-6.8) in southern Portugal was performed. A 7-day phytotoxicity bioassay with the duckweed Lemna gibba (chlorosis, necrosis, growth) was carried out, both in the laboratory and in situ, combined with an analysis of the resident epilithic diatom community. The toxicity test was performed with water from the AMD gradient, an unpolluted river control and acidified control water, in order to discriminate potential pH-effects from combined pH- and metal-effects. Diatom communities discriminated well among the sites (alkalophilic species versus halobiontic, acidobiontic and acidophilic species), showing inter-site differences to be larger than intra-site seasonal variations. In L. gibba exposed to AMD, necrosis and growth inhibition were higher in situ compared to the laboratory experiments. L. gibba was more sensitive to AMD than to acidified water. Already after 4 days, growth rate inhibition in L. gibba proved to be a reliable indicator of AMD-stress. Ecotoxicological thresholds obtained with L. gibba corresponded with those obtained previously with animals of intermediate tolerance to AMD. The results were summarised in a multimetric index. PMID:17952593

  12. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: a model post audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Verplanck, Philip L.; Broshears, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H+, and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations.

  13. Molecular analysis of benthic biofilms from acidic coal mine drainage, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, D. B.; Jones, D. S.; Burgos, W. D.; Macalady, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common environmental problem in Pennsylvania that results from the oxidation of sulfide minerals exposed at abandoned coal mines. In these systems, acidophilic microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric iron (Fe3+), which precipitates as iron-hydroxide minerals. To develop and improve low-pH bioremediation strategies, characterization of the microbiology of AMD systems is essential. An acidic (pH 2-4) AMD spring known as ‘Lower Red Eyes’ in Gallitzan State Forest, PA, is fed by anoxic groundwater with ferrous iron concentrations above 550 mg/L. More than half of the total iron is removed after the springwater flows downstream over 80 m of stagnant pools and iron-oxide terraces. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rDNA cloning to characterize the microbial communities from orange sediments and green benthic biofilms. 16S rDNA sequences were extracted from a green biofilm found in a pH 3.5 pool 10 m downstream of the emergence. Based on chloroplast 16S rDNA sequences and morphological characteristics, we found that Euglena mutabilis was the dominant eukaryotic organism from this location. Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protozoan common in acidic and heavy metal affected environments, and likely contributes to the precipitation of iron oxides through the production of molecular oxygen. Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences were cloned from iron-oxide sediments with orange cauliflower morphology 27 m downstream from the spring emergence. More than 60% of bacterial sequences retrieved from the orange sediment sample are related to the iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacterium Ferrovum myxofaciens. Other bacterial sequences include relatives of iron-oxidizing genera in the Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. FISH analyses show that Betaproteobacteria-dominated communities are associated with Euglena in multiple upstream locations where pH is above 3.0. Using light microscopy

  14. Colloidal precipitates related to Acid Mine Drainage: bacterial diversity and micro fungi-heavy metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, G.; Carbone, C.; Consani, S.; Zotti, M.; Di Piazza, S.; Pozzolini, M.; Giovine, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) settings colloidal precipitates control the mobility of Potential Toxic Elements (PTEs). Mineral-contaminant relationships (i.e. adsorption, ion-exchange, desorption) are rarely pure abiotic processes. Microbes, mainly bacteria and microfungi, can catalyze several reactions modifying the element speciation, as well as the bioavailability of inorganic pollutants. Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a potential reservoir of extremophile bacteria and fungi exploitable for biotechnological purposes. Two different AMD related colloids, an ochraceous precipitate (deposited in weakly acidic conditions, composed by nanocrystalline goethite) and a greenish-blue precipitate (deposited at near-neutral pH, composed by allophane + woodwardite) were sampled. The aims of this work were to a) characterize the mycobiota present in these colloidal minerals by evaluating the presence of alive fungal propagules and extracting bacteria DNA; b) verify the fungal strains tolerance, and bioaccumulation capability on greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media; c) evaluate potential impact of bacteria in the system geochemistry. The preliminary results show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains were isolated in pure culture. Among them, species belonging to Penicillium and Trichoderma genera were tested on both greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media. The results show a significant tolerance and bioaccumulation capability to some PTEs. The same colloidal precipitates were processed to extract bacteria DNA by using a specific procedure developed for sediments. The results give a good yield of nucleic acids and a positive PCR amplification of 16S rDNA accomplished the first step for future metagenomic analyses.

  15. Water quality, fate of metals and predictive model validation of a constructed wetland treating acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsch, W.J.; Wise, K.M. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes how 0.39 ha constructed wetland designed with 9 cells, including two anaerobic cells that were to stimulate dissimilatory sulfate reduction, was evaluated for its effect on water quality of a low-order acid mine drainage (AMD) stream in southeastern Ohio, USA. Emphasis was on the uptake and fate of selected metals and the accuracy of a simulation model that predicted this specific wetland`s behavior before it was built.

  16. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of streams with and without acid mine drainage impacts: A paired catchment study in karst geology, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Tang, Changyuan; Wu, Pan; Strosnider, William H. J.; Han, Zhiwei

    2013-11-01

    A paired catchment study was used to assess karst hydrogeochemistry of two streams.Chemistry of streams with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) was very different.The observation was supported by PHREEQC modeling of equilibrium conditions.Ionic fluxes of AMD-impacted water were higher than that of non-AMD-impacted water.The higher ionic fluxes were predominantly controlled by the oxidation of pyrite.

  17. Metals in agricultural produce associated with acid-mine drainage in Mount Morgan (Queensland, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Beckett, Victoria A; McCauley, Gaylene J Taylor; Duivenvoorden, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) into the Dee River from the historic gold and copper mine in Mount Morgan, Queensland (Australia) has been of concern to farmers in the area since 1925. This study sought to determine the levels of AMD-related metals and sulfur in agricultural produce grown near the mine-impacted Dee River, compare these with similar produce grown in reference fields (which had no known AMD influence), and assess any potential health risk using relevant Australian or US guidelines. Analyses of lucerne (Medicago sativa; also known as alfalfa) from five Dee fields showed the following average concentrations (mg/kg dry basis): Cd Citrus reticulata) from Dee sites (mg/kg wet weight) were Cd 0.011, Cu 0.59, Fe 2.2, Mn 0.56, Pb 0.18, S 91 and Zn 0.96. Cd and Zn were less than or close to, average Fe and Mn levels were at most twice, Cd 1.8 or 6.5 times, and Pb 8.5 or 72 times the maximum levels in raw oranges reported in the US total diet study (TDS) or the Australian TDS, respectively. Average Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn levels in the citrus reference samples were found to exceed the maximum reported in one or both TDS surveys. Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn plant-soil transfer factor (TF) values were citrus fruit samples were 0.14 and 0.73, respectively; lucerne and lucerne hay from both Dee and reference sites gave TF = 10, suggesting some potential risk to cattle, although this conclusion is tentative because Cd levels were close to or less than the detection limit. TF values for S in lucerne, lucerne hay, pasture grass and mandarin oranges from Dee sites were 18, 14, 3 and 3.6, respectively, indicating that S in soil was readily available to plant or fruit. Sulfur in pasture grass and citrus fruit (TF = 11 for both) was apparently more bioavailable at the reference sites than at the Dee sites (TF = 3.0 for pasture grass; TF = 3.6 for citrus fruit). PMID:26979303

  18. Development and Validation of an Acid Mine Drainage Treatment Process for Source Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Ann [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Throughout Northern Appalachia and surrounding regions, hundreds of abandoned mine sites exist which frequently are the source of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). AMD typically contains metal ions in solution with sulfate ions which have been leached from the mine. These large volumes of water, if treated to a minimum standard, may be of use in Hydraulic Fracturing (HF) or other industrial processes. This project’s focus is to evaluate an AMD water treatment technology for the purpose of providing treated AMD as an alternative source of water for HF operations. The HydroFlex™ technology allows the conversion of a previous environmental liability into an asset while reducing stress on potable water sources. The technology achieves greater than 95% water recovery, while removing sulfate to concentrations below 100 mg/L and common metals (e.g., iron and aluminum) below 1 mg/L. The project is intended to demonstrate the capability of the process to provide AMD as alternative source water for HF operations. The second budget period of the project has been completed during which Battelle conducted two individual test campaigns in the field. The first test campaign demonstrated the ability of the HydroFlex system to remove sulfate to levels below 100 mg/L, meeting the requirements indicated by industry stakeholders for use of the treated AMD as source water. The second test campaign consisted of a series of focused confirmatory tests aimed at gathering additional data to refine the economic projections for the process. Throughout the project, regular communications were held with a group of project stakeholders to ensure alignment of the project objectives with industry requirements. Finally, the process byproduct generated by the HydroFlex process was evaluated for the treatment of produced water against commercial treatment chemicals. It was found that the process byproduct achieved similar results for produced water treatment as the chemicals currently in use. Further

  19. [Study on heavy metals in soils contaminated by acid mine drainage from Dabaoshan mine, Guangdong].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shan-Ming; Zhou, Yong-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Yan; Zeng, Feng; Gao, Quan-Zhou; Peng, Xian-Zhi; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Cheng-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Dou, Lei; Qiu, Rong-Liang; Ding, Jian

    2007-04-01

    Mining activities in the Dabaoshan area in the upper reach of the Hengshihe River have caused severe environmental changes, the waste water of milling and refining drained directly into the Hengshihe River, which contaminated the soils along the river severely. It is shown that Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu have contaminated the soil, the Cd contamination was more severe, and the contaminated level of Pb, Zn reached moderately to strongly polluted. The pH value of river and soil affected directly the heavy metals concentration of total and exchangeable ions, and presented negative pertinences. The levels of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in the surface soil of Shangbacun village in the lower reach of the river were found as high as 257.762, 350.235, 5.083 and 186.901 mg x kg(-1) respectively, which were relatively higher than those of the background values of soil 1.03, 1.75, 16.9 and 3.7 times respectively, and the result on the soil profiles showed that the contaminations have infiltrated into lower layer soil, ecological environment was harmed severely.

  20. Combination of Successive Alkalinity Producing System (SAPS) and Aeration for Passive Treatment of Highly Acidic Mine Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, C.; Ji, S.

    2015-12-01

    Passive treatment system has been widely used for remediation of mine drainage since its advantage of low installation and maintenance cost. The system, however, has also a disadvantage in assuring remediation and management efficiency if the drainage is highly acidic mine drainage. To remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) especially showing high acidity, passive treatment system which consists of successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) and subsequent aeration pond was proposed and its mechanisms and efficiency was evaluated in this research. Target AMD was obtained from Waryong coal mine and showed typical characteristics of AMD having high metal concentration and low pH (acidity > 300 mg/L as CaCO3). Four experimental cases were conducted; untreated, treated with SAPS, treated with aeration, treated with SAPS and aeration to compare role and mechanism of each unit. Between organic matter and limestone layer which constitute SAPS, the former eliminated most of Fe(III) and Al in the AMD so that the latter was kept from being clogged by precipitates. Net acidity of the AMD rapidly decreased by supplement of alkalinity at the limestone layer. A primary function of SAPS, producing alkalinity constantly without clogging, was attained due to addition a portion of limestone particle into the organic matter layer. The discharge from SAPS had low ORP and DO values because of an anaerobic environment formed at the organic matter layer although its alkalinity was increased. This water quality was unfavorable for Fe(II) to be oxidized. Installation of aeration pond after SAPS, therefore, could be effective way of enhancing oxidation rate of Fe(II). Among the experimental cases, the combination of SAPS and aeration pond was only able to remediate the AMD. This concluded that to remediate highly acidic mine drainage with passive treatment system, three critical conditions were required; pre-precipitation of Fe(III) and Al at organic matter layer in SAPS, constant alkalinity

  1. Microbial Communities and a Novel Symbiotic Interaction in Extremely Acidic Mine Drainage at Iron Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Culture-independent studies of microbial communities in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system associated with the Richmond ore body at Iron Mountain, CA, demonstrated that the total number of prokaryote lineages is small compared to other environments. Phylogenetic analyses of 232 small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from six clone libraries revealed some novel lines of descent. Many of the novel clones were from libraries constructed from subaerial biofilms associated with fine grained pyrite. The clones form several distinct groups within the order Thermoplasmatales and are most closely related to Ferroplasma spp. and Thermoplasma spp. Another novel group detected in a pH 1.4 pool and a pH 0.8 biofilm falls within the Rickettsiales (alpha-proteobacteria and related to mitochondria) and is most closely related to a-proteobacterial endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba spp. An oligonucleotide rRNA probe designed to target alpha-proteobacteria revealed that these are protist endosymbionts, and that they are associated with a small percentage (2%) of the total eukaryotes in samples from the Richmond mine. Measurements of the internal pH of these protists show that their cytosol is close to neutral. Thus, protists provide a habitat within the AMD system that is at least 5 pH units less acidic than the surroundings. The uncultured AMD endosymbionts have a conserved 273 nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in the variable V1 region of their 16S rRNA gene. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but predicted secondary structure form well defined stem loops. The discovery of inserts within a highly conserved gene is extremely rare. At present we have not identified the protist host. However, it is interesting to note that protists previously shown to have a-proteobacterial endosymbionts possess 18S rRNA genes that contain both IVSs and group I introns. The possibility that the IVS in the AMD bacteria is a result of extensive genetic exchange between a

  2. Formation of iron oxides from acid mine drainage and magnetic separation of the heavy metals adsorbed iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hee Won; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kim, Young Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Woo [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    There are a few thousand abandoned metal mines in South Korea. The abandoned mines cause several environmental problems including releasing acid mine drainage (AMD), which contain a very high acidity and heavy metal ions such as Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, and As. Iron oxides can be formed from the AMD by increasing the solution pH and inducing precipitation. Current study focused on the formation of iron oxide in an AMD and used the oxide for adsorption of heavy metals. The heavy metal adsorbed iron oxide was separated with a superconducting magnet. The duration of iron oxide formation affected on the type of mineral and the degree of magnetization. The removal rate of heavy metal by the adsorption process with the formed iron oxide was highly dependent on the type of iron oxide and the solution pH. A high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system successfully separated the iron oxide and harmful heavy metals.

  3. Simulation of acid mine drainage generation around Küre VMS Deposits, Northern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Cansu; Kurt, Mehmet Ali; Çelik Balci, Nurgül

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated comparative leaching characteristics of acidophilic bacterial strains under shifting environmental conditions at proposed two stages as formation stage or post acidic mine drainage (AMD) generation. At the first stage, initial reactions associated with AMD generation was simulated in shaking flasks containing massive pyritic chalcopyrite ore by using a pure strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus sp. mostly dominated by A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans at 26oC. At the second stage, long term bioleaching experiments were carried out with the same strains at 26oC and 40oC to investigate the leaching characteristics of pyritic chalcopyrite ore under elevated heavy metal and temperature conditions. During the experiments, physicochemical characteristics (e.i. Eh, pH, EC) metal (Fe, Co, Cu, Zn) and sulfate concentration of the experimental solution were monitored during 180 days. Significant acid generation and sulfate release were determined during bioleaching of the ore by mixed acidophilic cultures containing both iron and sulfur oxidizers. In the early stage of the experiments, heavy metal release from the ore was caused by generation of acid due to accelerated bacterial oxidation of the ore. Generally high concentrations of Co and Cu were released into the solution from the experiments conducted by pure cultures of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans whereas high Zn and Fe was released into the solution from the mixed culture experiments. In the later stage of AMD generation and post AMD, chemical oxidation is accelerated causing excessive amounts of contamination, even exceeding the amounts resulted from bacterial oxidation by mixed cultures. Acidithibacillus ferrooxidans was found to be more effective in leaching Cu, Fe and Co at higher temperatures in contrary to mixed acidophiles that are more prone to operate at optimal moderate conditions. Moreover, decreasing Fe values are noted in bioleaching

  4. Utilizing acid mine drainage sludge and coal fly ash for phosphate removal from dairy wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y R; Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a new and sustainable approach for the reuse of industrial by-products from wastewater treatment. The dairy industry produces huge volumes of wastewater, characterized by high levels of phosphate that can result in eutrophication and degradation of aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated the application of acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge, coal fly ash, and lignite as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of phosphate from dairy wastewater. Material characterization using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis revealed significant amounts of crystalline/amorphous Fe/Al/Si/Ca-based minerals and large surface areas of AMD sludge and fly ash. Batch adsorption isotherms were best described using the Freundlich model. The Freundlich distribution coefficients were 13.7 mg(0.577) L(0.423) g(-1) and 16.9 mg(0.478) L(0.522) g(-1) for AMD sludge and fly ash, respectively, and the nonlinearity constants suggested favourable adsorption for column applications. The breakthrough curves of fixed-bed columns, containing greater than 10 wt% of the waste materials (individual or composite blends) mixed with sand, indicated that phosphate breakthrough did not occur within 100 pore volumes while the cumulative removal was 522 and 490 mg kg(-1) at 10 wt% AMD sludge and 10 wt% fly ash, respectively. By contrast, lignite exhibited negligible phosphate adsorption, possibly due to small amounts of inorganic minerals suitable for phosphate complexation and limited surface area. The results suggest that both AMD sludge and fly ash were potentially effective adsorbents if employed individually at a ratio of 10 wt% or above for column application. PMID:24617077

  5. Toxicity and metal speciation in acid mine drainage treated by passive bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neculita, C.M.; Vigneaul, B.; Zagury, G.J. [Ecole Polytechnic, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Sulfate-reducing passive bioreactors treat acid mine drainage (AMD) by increasing its pH and alkalinity and by removing metals as metal sulfide precipitates. In addition to discharge limits based on physicochemical parameters, however, treated effluent is required to be nontoxic. Acute and sublethal toxicity was assessed for effluent from 3.5-L column bioreactors filled with mixtures of natural organic carbon sources and operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) for the treatment of a highly contaminated AMD. Effluent was first tested for acute (Daphnia magna and Oncorhynchus mykiss) and sublethal (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Ceriodaphnia dabia, and Lemna minor) toxicity. Acute toxicity was observed for D. magna, and a toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedure was then performed to identify potential toxicants. Finally, metal speciation in the effluent was determined using ultrafiltration and geochemical modeling for the interpretation of the toxicity results. The 10-d HRT effluent was nonacutely lethal for 0. mykiss but acutely lethal for D. magna. The toxicity to D. magna, however, was removed by 2 h of aeration, and the TIE procedure suggested iron as a cause of toxicity. Sublethal toxicity of the 10-d HRT effluent was observed for all test species, but it was reduced compared to the raw AMD and to a 7.3-d HRT effluent. Data regarding metal speciation indicated instability of both effluents during aeration and were consistent with the toxicity being caused by iron. Column bioreactors in operation for more than nine months efficiently improved the physicochemical quality of highly contaminated AMD at different HRTs.

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF MODULAR FIELD-BIOREACTOR FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper focuses on the improvements to engineered features of a passive technology that has been used for remediation of acid rock drainage (ARD). This passive remedial technology, a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bioreactor, takes advantage of the ability of SRB that, if sup...

  7. MiniSipper: a new in situ water sampler for high-resolution, long-duration acid mine drainage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas P; Todd, Andrew S

    2012-11-15

    Abandoned hard-rock mines can be a significant source of acid mine drainage (AMD) and toxic metal pollution to watersheds. In Colorado, USA, abandoned mines are often located in remote, high elevation areas that are snowbound for 7-8 months of the year. The difficulty in accessing these remote sites, especially during winter, creates challenging water sampling problems and major hydrologic and toxic metal loading events are often under sampled. Currently available automated water samplers are not well suited for sampling remote snowbound areas so the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a new water sampler, the MiniSipper, to provide long-duration, high-resolution water sampling in remote areas. The MiniSipper is a small, portable sampler that uses gas bubbles to separate up to 250 five milliliter acidified samples in a long tubing coil. The MiniSipper operates for over 8 months unattended in water under snow/ice, reduces field work costs, and greatly increases sampling resolution, especially during inaccessible times. MiniSippers were deployed in support of an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) project evaluating acid mine drainage inputs from the Pennsylvania Mine to the Snake River watershed in Summit County, CO, USA. MiniSipper metal results agree within 10% of EPA-USGS hand collected grab sample results. Our high-resolution results reveal very strong correlations (R(2)>0.9) between potentially toxic metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) and specific conductivity at the Pennsylvania Mine site. The large number of samples collected by the MiniSipper over the entire water year provides a detailed look at the effects of major hydrologic events such as snowmelt runoff and rainstorms on metal loading from the Pennsylvania Mine. MiniSipper results will help guide EPA sampling strategy and remediation efforts in the Snake River watershed. PMID:23103760

  8. Humic acid decreases acute toxicity and ventilation frequency in eastern rainbowfish (Melanotaenia splendida splendida) exposed to acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2014-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a global problem leading to the acidification of freshwaters, as well as contamination by heavy metals. The ability of humic substances (HS) such as humic acid (HA) to decrease toxicity of heavy metals is widely known, whereas limited studies have examined the ability of HS to decrease toxicity linked with multiple stressors such as those associated with AMD. This study investigated the ability of HA to decrease acute toxicity defined as morbidity and ventilation frequency (measured via the time elapsed for ten operculum movements) in eastern rainbowfish (Melanotaenia splendida splendida) exposed to the multiple stressors of AMD-driven heavy metal concentrations, together with low pH. Water from the Mount Morgan open pit (a now closed gold and copper mine site), located at Mount Morgan, Central Queensland, Australia, was used as the AMD source. Fish were exposed to zero per cent (pH 7.3), two per cent (pH 6.7), three per cent (pH 5.7) and four per cent (pH 4.6) AMD in the presence of 0, 10 and 20mg/L Aldrich Humic Acid (AHA) over 96h. HA was shown to significantly decrease the acute toxicity of AMD and its adverse effects on ventilation frequency. These results are important in showing that HA can influence toxicity of metal mixtures and low pH, thus indicating a potential role for HA in decreasing toxicity of multiple environmental stressors more widely, and possible value as a rehabilitation aid. PMID:25173849

  9. The Impact of Microbial Communities on Water Quality in an Acid Mine Drainage Impacted Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, G. R.; Rademacher, L. K.; Faul, K. L.; Brunell, M.; Burmeister, K. C.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from the former Leona Heights Sulfur mine in Oakland, CA, contributes toxic levels of Cu, Cd, and Zn and elevated levels of Fe2+ and SO42- to downstream reaches of Lion Creek via Leona Creek. To investigate the extent of AMD and its relationship to microbial community structure, water samples were collected from three tributaries (two natural, and one with AMD) as well as the inlet and outlet of Lake Aliso (a reservoir downstream of the confluence of the three tributaries) beginning in July 2009. Lake Aliso was dammed in the late 1800s but since the early 1990s it has been full during the dry season and drained during the wet season, thus dramatically altering the geochemical conditions on a seasonal basis. Natural waters from Lion Creek and Horseshoe Creek tributaries dilute the water from Leona Creek, thus reducing concentrations of major ions and metals below toxic levels before water discharges into Lake Aliso. Precipitation events lead to episodes of increased mobilization of Cu and Cd in Leona Creek and produce toxic levels of these metals below the confluence with Lion Creek. Tributary mixing calculations suggest that even though Leona Creek contributes the smallest volume of water of the three tributaries, it is the main source of metals entering Lake Aliso. The input of the metal-rich AMD from Leona Creek changes the redox conditions of Lion Creek. In addition, Lake Aliso has a significant impact on water quality in the Lion Creek watershed. Observations of temperature, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen in lake depth profiles indicate that Lake Aliso is stratified during the dry season when the lake is full. Based on concentration differences between the inlet and outlet of the lake, Na, Mg, SO42-, Ca, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Ni are removed from the water while K, As, Pb and Fe are mobilized when Lake Aliso is full. Geochemical modeling using PhreeqcI suggests the deposition of minerals containing the metals that are being removed

  10. Ecological assessment of coal mine and metal mine drainage in South Korea using Daphnia magna bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Injeong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the ecological effect of acid mine drainage, metal mine (Dalsung) and coal mine (Samtan) drainage in South Korea were collected. The each mine drainage then investigated by whole effluent toxicity test (WET) and toxicity identification evaluation (TIE). WET results demonstrated that DS leachate and ST mine water is more toxic than other mine drainage due to the presence of cationic metals and acidic pH. TIE results revealed that the acidic pH and copper (Cu) could be the ma...

  11. Distribution, ecology and inhibition of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to acid drainage from Witwatersrand gold mine dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution and ecology of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in gold mine dumps and possible means for its inhibition were investigated. A literature survey of the micro-ecology of mine waste dumps in various parts of the world was undertaken. A linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS), NANSA 80/S, and a cetyl pyridinium chloride, Ceepryn, were tested as possible inhibitors for mine dump application. The LAS was rejected because it is poorly soluble in water and required higher concentrations than SLS for the inhibition of T.ferrooxidans. Ceepryn was an efficient inhibitor, but its efficiency was dramatically impeded in the presence of mine dump sand making it unsuitable for application on dumps. The SLS and LAS were tested against a mixed population of T.ferrooxidans from gold mine dumps and these bacteria were shown to be marginally more resistant to the inhibitors than the pure T.ferrooxidans culture. Sampling from mine dumps on the Witwatersrand suggested that the major T.ferrooxidans populations occurred in the moist sand of the drainage areas at the base of dumps, with few viable iron-oxidising bacteria located on the surfaces or in the centre of dumps. Sites of low moisture in dumps contained few or no viable bacteria. In the laboratory the bacterial viability decreased rapidly with loss of moisture from the sand. Moisture was shown to be important to bacterial activity and should be considered with respect to acid drainage control. Experimental sand columns showed that iron was leached with water from mine dump sand in the absence and presence of bacteria. In this study substrates, moisture, oxygen and carbon dioxide availability, ph, temperature, microorganisms and metal pollutants of uranium waste dumps are also covered

  12. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  13. Using a mass balance to understand the geology and geochemistry of a reservoir receiving and discharging acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Williams Lake is a 14.5 acre reservoir located in an abandoned coal mine in Perry County, Ohio. With a pH of 3.0 and acidity values of 300--400 mg/L, the reservoir has no plants or fish currently surviving in the lake. Reclamation of spoil piles adjacent to the lake to the north in the late 1980s was not successful in reducing the acidity of the lake. Currently, papermill sludge is being used on the reclaimed area to the north to promote vegetation, but the reservoir has shown no signs of improving. The goal of this project is to transform the lake into a fishable and swimmable one. The reservoir is receiving about 175 gallons per minute of acid mine drainage, not including seepage into the lake, from eight different sources. Three of the sources account for about 165 gallons per minute of the surface water that enters the lake. These inflows have relatively low acidity readings, which range from 66 mg/L to 568 mg/L. The other five sources of acid mine drainage have much lower flowrates, but have acidity values as high as 3,000 mg/L. Samples of all of the surface inflows and the outflow of the lake were taken and sent to a laboratory and tested for the following parameters: total acidity as CaCO3, total alkalinity as CaCO2, specific conductivity, total suspended solids, sulfate, chloride calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, total iron, total manganese, aluminum, and hardness. During sampling of the surface inflows, volumetric flowrates were measured for each inflow. Once the flowrates and the concentrations of the various parameters were known, a mass balance could be constructed which would show how much of each parameter was entering the lake each day. These data were then used to gain an understanding of the geochemistry and geology of the site

  14. Ecological assessment of coal mine and metal mine drainage in South Korea using Daphnia magna bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Injeong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the ecological effect of acid mine drainage, metal mine (Dalsung) and coal mine (Samtan) drainage in South Korea were collected. The each mine drainage then investigated by whole effluent toxicity test (WET) and toxicity identification evaluation (TIE). WET results demonstrated that DS leachate and ST mine water is more toxic than other mine drainage due to the presence of cationic metals and acidic pH. TIE results revealed that the acidic pH and copper (Cu) could be the main toxicants in both mine drainage. The strong acidic pH (pH toxicity by increase of metal activity and bioavailability. The toxicity of most mine drainage revealed that the positive correlation between metal concentration and toxicity unit (TU). The regression data between TU and sum of cumulative criterion unit (CCU) demonstrated the reasonable statistical significance (R = 0.89; p toxicity by the effect of amorphous iron precipitate. PMID:26405638

  15. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an Acid mine drainage-contaminated natural wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, John W; Fournelle, John H; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  16. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  17. Acid Mine Drainage Research in Gauteng Highlighting Impacts on Infrastructure and Innovation of Concrete-Based Remedial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, S.; Ekolu, S.; Azene, F.

    2013-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is presently one of the most important environmental problems in in the densely populated Gauteng Province, South Africa. The threat of acid mine drainage has demanded short-term interventions (some of which are being implemented by government) but more importantly sustainable long-term innovative solutions. There have been moments of public apprehension with some media reports dubbing the current scenario as a future 'nightmare of biblical proportions' and 'South Africa's own Chernobyl' that could cause dissolving of concrete foundations of buildings and reinforcement steel, leading to collapse of structures. In response to the needs of local and provincial authorities, this research was conducted to (1) generate scientific understanding of the effects of AMD on infrastructure materials and structures, and (2) propose innovative long-term remedial systems based on cementitious materials for potential AMD treatment applications of engineering scale. Two AMD solutions from the goldfields and two others from the coalfields were used to conduct corrosion immersion tests on mild steel, stainless steel, mortars, pastes and concretes. Results show that AMD water from the gold mines is more corrosive than that from the coal mines, the corrosion rate of the former being about twice that of the latter. The functionality of metal components of mild steel can be expected to fail within one month of exposure to the mine water. The investigation has also led to development of a pervious concrete filter system of water-cement ratio = 0.27 and cement content = 360 kg/m3, to be used as a permeable reactive barrier for AMD treatment. Early results show that the system was effective in removing heavy metal contaminants with removal levels of 30% SO4, 99% Fe, 50-83% Mn, 85% Ca, and 30% TDS. Further work is on-going to improve and optimise the system prior to field demonstration studies.

  18. Acid Mine Drainage Passive Remediation: Potential Use of Alkaline Clay, Optimal Mixing Ratio and Long Term Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, F.; Liang, X.; Wen, Y.; Perone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is one of the most adverse environmental problems of the mine industry. Surface water and ground water affected by this pollution are characterized by their acidity and the high content of sulfates and heavy metals. In this study, alkaline clay, an industrial waste with a high pH, which is utilized in the alumina refining process, was used as the remediation material to inhibit pyrite oxidation. Through a series of batch and column experiments, complemented with field measurements and geochemical modeling, three important issues associated with this passive and auto sustainable acid mine drainage remediation method were investigated: 1) the potential use of alkaline clay as an AMD remediation material, 2) the adequate alkaline clay/coal refuse mixing ratio (AC/CR) to ensure pH values near to neutral conditions, and, 3) the prediction of long term impacts, in terms of the trends of the main parameters involved in this process such as pH, concentrations of sulfate, iron and other dissolved contaminants. Both field measurements and the samples used for the experiments came from a coal waste site located in Mather, Pennsylvania. Alkaline clay proved to be an effective remediation material for AMD. It was found that 10% AC/CR is an adequate mixing ratio (i.e. the upper limit), which has been also indicated by field measurements. The concentrations of some contaminants such as iron, manganese or sulfate are significantly reduced with the remediation approach, compared to those representative concentrations found in mine tailings. Moreover, results suggest a very reliable long-term stability of the remediation (i.e. neutral pH conditions are maintained), thus enhancing the generation of iron precipitates that could produce pyrite grain coating and hardpan (i.e. cemented layer) on the surface. These processes also made the amended layer less porous, thus increasing water retention and hindering oxygen diffusion.

  19. Benthic Communities of Low-Order Streams Affected by Acid Mine Drainages: A Case Study from Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Svitok

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Only little attention has been paid to the impact of acid mine drainages (AMD on aquatic ecosystems in Central Europe. In this study, we investigate the physico-chemical properties of low-order streams and the response of benthic invertebrates to AMD pollution in the Banská Štiavnica mining region (Slovakia. The studied streams showed typical signs of mine drainage pollution: higher conductivity, elevated iron, aluminum, zinc and copper loads and accumulations of ferric precipitates. Electric conductivity correlated strongly with most of the investigated elements (weighted mean absolute correlation = 0.95 and, therefore, can be recommended as a good proxy indicator for rapid AMD pollution assessments. The diversity and composition of invertebrate assemblages was related to water chemistry. Taxa richness decreased significantly along an AMD-intensity gradient. While moderately affected sites supported relatively rich assemblages, the harshest environmental conditions (pH < 2.5 were typical for the presence of a limited number of very tolerant taxa, such as Oligochaeta and some Diptera (Limnophyes, Forcipomyiinae. The trophic guild structure correlated significantly with AMD chemistry, whereby predators completely disappeared under the most severe AMD conditions. We also provide a brief review of the AMD literature and outline the needs for future detailed studies involving functional descriptors of the impact of AMD on aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M; Manjón, G; Hurtado, S; García-Tenorio, R

    2011-07-01

    After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including (234)U/(238)U and (230)Th/(232)Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  1. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%. PMID:23437664

  2. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  3. Diversity and Distribution of Arsenic-Related Genes Along a Pollution Gradient in a River Affected by Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoeuvre, Angélique; Casiot, Corinne; Héry, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Some microorganisms have the capacity to interact with arsenic through resistance or metabolic processes. Their activities contribute to the fate of arsenic in contaminated ecosystems. To investigate the genetic potential involved in these interactions in a zone of confluence between a pristine river and an arsenic-rich acid mine drainage, we explored the diversity of marker genes for arsenic resistance (arsB, acr3.1, acr3.2), methylation (arsM), and respiration (arrA) in waters characterized by contrasted concentrations of metallic elements (including arsenic) and pH. While arsB-carrying bacteria were representative of pristine waters, Acr3 proteins may confer to generalist bacteria the capacity to cope with an increase of contamination. arsM showed an unexpected wide distribution, suggesting biomethylation may impact arsenic fate in contaminated aquatic ecosystems. arrA gene survey suggested that only specialist microorganisms (adapted to moderately or extremely contaminated environments) have the capacity to respire arsenate. Their distribution, modulated by water chemistry, attested the specialist nature of the arsenate respirers. This is the first report of the impact of an acid mine drainage on the diversity and distribution of arsenic (As)-related genes in river waters. The fate of arsenic in this ecosystem is probably under the influence of the abundance and activity of specific microbial populations involved in different As biotransformations. PMID:26603631

  4. Leaf Associated Microbial Activities in a Stream Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlief, Jeanette

    2004-11-01

    Microbial activity was assessed on birch leaves and plastic strips during 140 days of exposure at three sites in an acidic stream of the Lusatian post-mining landscape, Germany. The sites differed in their degrees of ochre deposition and acidification. The aim of the study was (1) to follow the microbial activities during leaf colonization, (2) to compare the effect of different environmental conditions on leaf associated microbial activities, and (3) to test the microbial availability of leaf litter in acidic mining waters. The activity peaked after 49 days and subsequently decreased gradually at all sites. A formation of iron plaques on leaf surfaces influenced associated microbial activity. It seemed that these plaques inhibit the microbial availability of leaf litter and serve as a microbial habitat by itself. (

  5. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  6. The fate of arsenic in sediments formed at a river confluence affected by acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P. A.; Pizarro, G.; Simonson, K.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Gonzalez, C.; Bonilla, C.

    2012-12-01

    Fluvial confluences receiving acid mine drainage may play a critical role in a watershed as a suite of interactions between chemistry and hydrodynamics occur, determining the fate of toxic contaminants like arsenic. Solid reactive phases of iron and/or aluminum oxi-hydroxides may form or transform, ranging from iron oxide nanoparticles that aggregate and form floccules that are transported in the suspended load up to gravel and arsenic-rich rock coatings. In order to further understand the role of reactive fluvial confluences, we have studied the mixing between the Caracarani River (flow=170-640 L/s, pH 8, conductivity 1.5 mS/cm, total As 10 mS/cm, total As>2 mg/L, total Fe=35-125 mg/L), located in the Lluta watershed in northern Chile. This site is an excellent natural laboratory located in a water-scarce area, where the future construction of a dam has prompted the attention of decision makers and scientists interested in weighing the risks derived by the accumulation of arsenic-rich sediments. Suspended sediments (> 0.45 μm), riverbed sediments, and coated rocks were collected upstream and downstream from the confluence. Suspended sediments >0.45 μm and riverbed sediments were analyzed by total reflection x-ray fluorescence for metals, while coated river bed rocks were analyzed by chemical extractions and a semi-quantitative approach through portable x-ray fluorescence. Water from the Caracarani and Azufre rivers were mixed in the laboratory at different ratios and mixing velocities aiming to characterize the effect of the chemical-hydrodynamic environment where arsenic solids were formed at different locations in the confluence. Despite a wide range of iron and arsenic concentrations in the suspended sediments from the field (As=1037 ± 1372 mg/kg, Fe=21.0 ± 24.5 g/kg), we found a rather narrow As/Fe ratio, increasing from 36.5 to 55.2 mgAs/kgFe when the bulk water pH increased from 3 to 6. Sequential extraction analyses suggest that ~80% of As in the solid

  7. Characterization of water reservoirs affected by acid mine drainage: geochemical, mineralogical, and biological (diatoms) properties of the water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, T; Rivera, M J; Almeida, S F P; Delgado, C; Gomes, P; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Santisteban, M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, and biological data obtained in water reservoirs located in one of the most paradigmatic mining regions, suffering from acid mine drainage (AMD) problems: the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Four water reservoirs located in the Spanish sector of the IBP, storing water for different purposes, were selected to achieve an environmental classification based on the effects of AMD: two mining dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas), a reservoir for industrial use (Sancho), and one with water used for human supply (Andévalo). The results indicated that the four reservoirs are subject to the effect of metallic loads from polluted rivers, although with different levels: Águas Ácidas > Gossan > Sancho ≥ Andévalo. In accordance, epipsammic diatom communities have differences in the respective composition and dominant taxa. The dominant diatoms in each reservoir indicated acid water: Pinnularia acidophila and Pinnularia aljustrelica were found in the most acidic dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas, with pH <3), Pinnularia subcapitata in Sancho (pH 2.48-5.82), and Eunotia exigua in Andévalo (pH 2.34-6.15). PMID:26032451

  8. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of the Microbial Community in the Tailings of a Pb-Zn Mine Generating Acidic Drainage ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Hallberg, Kevin B.; Wan, Cai-Yun; Li, Jie; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of spatial and temporal variations in the microbial community in the abandoned tailings impoundment of a Pb-Zn mine revealed distinct microbial populations associated with the different oxidation stages of the tailings. Although Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum spp. were consistently present in the acidic tailings, acidophilic archaea, mostly Ferroplasma acidiphilum, were predominant in the oxidized zones and the oxidation front, indicating their importance to generation of acid mine drainage. PMID:21705549

  9. Biosorption of Fe, Al and Mn of acid drainage from coal mine using brown seaweed sargassum sp. in continuous process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) are leaches as result of a coal mining running, it have low ph and high concentrations of heavy metals that convert them in strong polluter; with the purpose of reduce its concentration, a continuous biosorption system was designed by removing heavy metals from drainages using a cheap biosorbent material. The brown seaweed was pre-treatment with solutions 0,1 N of NaOH, Ca(OH)2 NaCl, CaCl2, NaSO4 y H2SO4 for to study the effect on biosorption process; the removal percentage were determined, which are better than 80% with the exception of pre-treatment with H2SO4 who cancel the algae sorption capacity. The seaweed was packed in plastic mesh and polyester tulle in the shape of a rectangular prism; there isn't effect on the biosorption process by using this packet. The continuous biosorption process was studied in two units of operation: a packed-bed flow-through sorption column and an horizontal vessel like a canal with baffles, which treated adequately 3,5 and 4,71 of AMD respectively, using in each one of them 100 g of algae. The burning of algae was studied like an alternative for the problem of handling of residual algae. The ashes kept the metals removed from AMD, furthermore keep stable too by the attack of solutions of different pH

  10. Hydrological modeling of a watershed affected by acid mine drainage (Odiel River, SW Spain). Assessment of the pollutant contributing areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, L.; Olías, M.; Cánovas, C. R.; Sarmiento, A. M.; Nieto, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    The Odiel watershed drains materials belonging to the Iberian Pyrite Belt, where significant massive sulfide deposits have been mined historically. As a result, a huge amount of sulfide-rich wastes are deposited in the watershed, which suffer from oxidation, releasing acidic lixiviates with high sulfate and metal concentrations. In order to reliably estimate the metal loadings along the watershed a complete series of discharge and hydrochemical data are essential. A hydrological model was performed with SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to solve the scarcity of gauge stations along the watershed. The model was calibrated and validated from daily discharge data (from 1980 to 2010) at the outlet of the watershed, river inputs into an existent reservoir, and a flow gauge station close to the northern area of the watershed. Discharge data obtained from the hydrological model, together with analytical data, allowed the estimation of the dissolved pollutant load delivered annually by the Odiel River (e.g. 9140 t of Al, 2760 t of Zn). The pollutant load is influenced strongly by the rainfall regime, and can even double during extremely rainy years. Around 50% of total pollution comes from the Riotinto Mining District, so the treatment of Riotinto lixiviates reaching the Odiel watershed would reduce the AMD (Acid Mine Drainages) in a remarkable way, improving the water quality downstream, especially in the reservoir of Alcolea, currently under construction. The information obtained in this study will allow the optimization of remediation efforts in the watershed, in order to improve its water quality.

  11. THE USE OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey A. Canty; Jess W. Everett

    2004-09-30

    In 1994 a demonstration project was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of using CCBs for the in situ treatment of acidic mine water. Actual injection of alkaline material was performed in 1997 with initial positive results; however, the amount of alkalinity added to the system was limited and resulted in short duration treatment. In 1999, a CBRC grant was awarded to further investigate the effectiveness of alkaline injection technology (AIT). Funds were released in fall 2001. In December 2001, 2500 tons of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash were injected into the wells used in the 1997 injection project. Post injection monitoring continued for 24 months. During this period the mine chemistry had gone through a series of chemical changes that manifested as stages or ''treatment phases.'' The mine system appeared to be in the midst of reestablishing equilibrium with the partial pressure of mine headspace. Alkalinity and pH appeared to be gradually increasing during this transition. As of December 2003, the pH and alkalinity were roughly 7.3 and 65 ppm, respectively. Metal concentrations were significantly lower than pre-injection levels, but iron and manganese concentrations appeared to be gradually increasing (roughly 30 ppm and 1.25 ppm, respectively). Aluminum, nickel, and zinc were less than pre-injection concentrations and did not appear to be increasing (roughly

  12. Acid mine drainage prevention, control and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee area. Topical report, March 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project was initiated to assist the State of Montana to develop a methodology to ameliorate acid mine drainage problems associated with the abandoned mines located in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area near Great Falls, Montana. Extremely acidic water is continuously discharging from abandoned coal mines in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area at an estimated rate of greater than 600 acre-feet per year (about 350 to 400 gallons per minute). Due to its extreme acidity, the water is unusable and is contaminating other water supplies. Most of the local alluvial aquifers have been contaminated, and nearly 5% of the private wells that were tested in the area during the mid-1980's showed some degree of contamination. Significant government money has been spent replacing water supplies due to the magnitude of this problem. In addition, millions of dollars have been spent trying to remediate acid mine drainage occurring in this coal field. To date, the techniques used have focused on the management and containment of mine waters, rather than designing technologies that would prevent the formation of acid mine drainage

  13. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N, Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Moyano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae. These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting

  14. Hydrogeochemical and mineralogical characteristics related to heavy metal attenuation in a stream polluted by acid mine drainage: a case study in Dabaoshan Mine, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huarong; Xia, Beicheng; Qin, Jianqiao; Zhang, Jiaying

    2012-01-01

    Dabaoshan Mine, the largest mine in south China, has been developed since the 1970s. Acid mine drainage (AMD) discharged from the mine has caused severe environmental pollution and human health problems. In this article, chemical characteristics, mineralogy of ocher precipitations and heavy metal attenuation in the AMD are discussed based on physicochemical analysis, mineral analysis, sequential extraction experiments and hydrogeochemistry. The AMD chemical characteristics were determined from the initialwater composition, water-rock interactions and dissolved sulfide minerals in the mine tailings. The waters, affected and unaffected by AMD, were Ca-SO4 and Ca-HCO3 types, respectively. The affected water had a low pH, high SO4(2-) and high heavy metal content and oxidation as determined by the Fe2+/Fe3+ couple. Heavy metal and SO4(2-) contents of Hengshi River water decreased, while pH increased, downstream. Schwertmannite was the major mineral at the waste dump, while goethite and quartz were dominant at the tailings dam and streambed. Schwertmannite was transformed into goethite at the tailings dam and streambed. The sulfate ions of the secondary minerals changed from bidentate- to monodentate-complexes downstream. Fe-Mn oxide phases of Zn, Cd and Pb in sediments increased downstream. However, organic matter complexes of Cu in sediments increased further away from the tailings. Fe3+ mineral precipitates and transformations controlled the AMD water chemistry. PMID:23505864

  15. Occurrence and role of algae and fungi in acid mine drainage environment with special reference to metals and sulfate immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.K.; Roy, A.; Koschorreck, M.; Mandal, S.M.; Wendt-Potthoff, K.; Bhattacharya, J. [Indian Institute for Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2009-03-15

    Passive remediation of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is a popular technology under development in current research. Roles of algae and fungi, the natural residents of AMD and its attenuator are not emphasized adequately in the mine water research. Living symbiotically various species of algae and fungi effectively enrich the carbon sources that help to maintain the sulfate reducing bacterial (SRB) population in predominantly anaerobic environment. Algae produce anoxic zone for SRB action and help in biogenic alkalinity generation. While studies on algal population and actions are relatively available those on fungal population are limited. Fungi show capacity to absorb significant amount of metals in their cell wall, or by extracellular polysaccharide slime. This review tries to throw light on the roles of these two types of microorganisms and to document their activities in holistic form in the mine water environment. This work, inter alia, points out the potential and gap areas of likely future research before potential applications based on fungi and algae initiated AMD remediation can be made on sound understanding.

  16. Response of macroinvertebrate communities to remediation-simulating conditions in Pennsylvania streams influenced by acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R.M.; Long, E.S.; Dropkin, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    We compared naturally alkaline streams with limestone lithology to freestone streams with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) to predict benthic macroinvertebrate community recovery from AMD in limestone-treated watersheds. Surrogate-recovered (limestone) and, in many cases, freestone systems had significantly higher macroinvertebrate densities; diversity; taxa richness; Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa; EPT/chironomid ratios; scraper/collector - gatherer ratios; herbivores; collector - filterers; and scrapers. AMD-influenced systems had significantly greater numbers of Diptera and collector - gatherers. An entire trophic level (herbivores) was 'restored' in surrogate-recovered streams, which also showed greater trophic specialization. Indicator analysis identified seven taxa (within Crustacea, Diptera, Nematoda, Trichoptera, and Ephemeroptera) as significant indicators of limestone systems and six taxa (within Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Tricoptera, Coleoptera, and Mollusca) as significant freestone indicators, all useful as biological indicators of recovery from AMD. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  17. BIOREMEDIATION FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE: ORGANIC SOLID WASTE AS CARBON SOURCES FOR SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Jamil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological sulfate reduction has been slowly replacing chemical unit processes to treat acid mine drainage (AMD. Bioremediations for AMD treatment are favored due to their low capital and maintenance cost. This paper describes the available AMD treatment, current SRB commercialization such as THIOPAQ® and BioSulphide® technologies, and also the factors and limitations faced. THIOPAQ® and BioSulphide® technologies use expensive carbon sources such as hydrogen as the electron donor. This paper discusses the possibility of organic solid waste as an alternative substrate as it is cheaper and abundant. A possible AMD treatment system setup was also proposed to test the efficiency of sulfate-reducing bacteria utilizing organic solid substrate.

  18. Filamentous hydrous ferric oxide biosignatures in a pipeline carrying acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain Mine, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Campbell, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    A pipeline carrying acidic mine effluent at Iron Mountain, CA, developed Fe(III)-rich precipitate caused by oxidation of Fe(II)aq. The native microbial community in the pipe included filamentous microbes. The pipe scale consisted of microbial filaments, and schwertmannite (ferric oxyhydroxysulfate, FOHS) mineral spheres and filaments. FOHS filaments contained central lumina with diameters similar to those of microbial filaments. FOHS filament geometry, the geochemical environment, and the presence of filamentous microbes suggest that FOHS filaments are mineralized microbial filaments. This formation of textural biosignatures provides the basis for a conceptual model for the development and preservation of biosignatures in other environments.

  19. Behaviour of U-Series Radionuclides in an Estuary Affected by Acid Mine Drainage and Industrial Releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estuary formed by the Tinto and Odiel rivers is an ecosystem of great interest because it is seriously affected by the acid mine drainage (AMD) produced by the high mining activity in the watersheds of these rivers, generating in their waters an extremely low pH (2.5- 3.5), and consequently high concentrations of heavy metals and natural radionuclides in dissolution. Secondly, in their estuary there is a large chemical industrial complex, and in particular two phosphoric acid production plants, which use a sedimentary phosphate rock from Morocco as raw material containing at approximately 1.5 Bq/g of U-series radionuclides, which produce annually about 2.5-3 millions of tonnes of a byproduct, called phosphogypsum (PG). PG contains high concentrations of some U-series radionuclides as 226Ra (650 Bq/kg), 210Pb-210Po (600 Bq/kg) or 230Th (450 Bq/kg). Seventeen sampling stations along the end of these rivers and this estuary were selected to study the behaviour of U-series radionuclides in the recent surface sediments and its waters. The most relevant results show a non-conservative behaviour of Uisotopes, precipitating in the zone where large pH changes (3-5) are produced. This behaviour is different from the majority of typical estuaries where only salinity changes are produced, and therefore, a conservative behaviour of uranium is observed. (author)

  20. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Capo, Rosemary C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Stewart, Brian W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Hedin, Robert S. [Hedin Environmental, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Weaver, Theodore J. [Hedin Environmental, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Edenborn, Harry M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  1. Weathering behaviour of overburden-coal ash blending in relation to overburden management for acid mine drainage prevention in coal surface mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentially acid forming (PAF) materials are encapsulated with non-acid forming materials (NAF) in order to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD) in surface coal mines. NAF compaction techniques with fly and bottom ashes from coal-fired power plants are used in mines with limited amounts of NAF materials. This study investigated the weathering behaviour of blended overburden and coal combustion ash in laboratory conditions. Free draining column leach tests were conducted on different blending schemes. The weathering process was simulated by spraying the samples with de-ionized water once per day. The leachates were then analyzed using X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analyses in order to identify the mineral composition of the samples over a 14 week period. Results of the study indicated that the weathering process plays a significant role in controlling infiltration rates, and may increase the capability of capping materials to prevent infiltration into PAF materials. Fly- and bottom-ash additions improved the performance of the encapsulation materials. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Weathering behaviour of overburden-coal ash blending in relation to overburden management for acid mine drainage prevention in coal surface mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautama, R.S.; Kusuma, G.J.; Lestari, I.; Anggana, R.P. [Bandung Inst. Teknologi (Indonesia). Dept. of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Potentially acid forming (PAF) materials are encapsulated with non-acid forming materials (NAF) in order to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD) in surface coal mines. NAF compaction techniques with fly and bottom ashes from coal-fired power plants are used in mines with limited amounts of NAF materials. This study investigated the weathering behaviour of blended overburden and coal combustion ash in laboratory conditions. Free draining column leach tests were conducted on different blending schemes. The weathering process was simulated by spraying the samples with de-ionized water once per day. The leachates were then analyzed using X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analyses in order to identify the mineral composition of the samples over a 14 week period. Results of the study indicated that the weathering process plays a significant role in controlling infiltration rates, and may increase the capability of capping materials to prevent infiltration into PAF materials. Fly- and bottom-ash additions improved the performance of the encapsulation materials. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  3. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine. The Gantt Chart on the following page details progress by task.

  4. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion -- FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  5. Potential application of oxygen-18 and deuterium in mining effluent and acid rock drainage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomshei, M.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering; Allen, D.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2000-05-01

    Oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O) and deuterium (D, or {sup 2}H) are routinely used in hydrologic, climatologic and geothermal studies. In hydrology, stable isotopes provide information on the type and topology (altitude and latitude) of the recharge waters and the historical effects on water, related to such physical processes as evaporation (in ponds) melting (of snow or ice), condensation, evapotranspiration and mixing. In geothermal studies, stable isotopes provide key information related to recharge and the various temperature-dependent water/rock isotope exchange reactions. The latter is assessed through the oxygen shift in the {sup 18}O/D correlation. At acid rock drainage (ARD) sites, water/rock interactions are primarily controlled by pH and oxidation potential. Using the isotopic characteristics of the rocks and the recharge waters as a basis, the relative oxygen shift of the ARD effluent can provide information on: (1) the residence time, (2) the rate of water/rock reactions, and (3) the actual pH at the rock/water interface. This paper offers a methodology for conducting oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies related to ARD and other mineral effluent problems. The methodology is based on: (1) comprehensive sampling of regional waters, ARD effluent and major contributing minerals and rocks, (2) isotopic and elemental analysis, and (3) data interpretation on the basis of zero-dimensional (mass balance), multi-component mixing model. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the effects of water hardness and chemical pollutants on the zooplankton community in uranium mining lakes with acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, H.; Ferrari, C.; Nascimento, M.R. [Brazilian Nulcear Energy Commission/Pocos de Caldas Laboratory (Brazil); Rodgher, S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho/Science and Technology Institute (Brazil); Wisniewski, M.J. [Alfenas Federal University/Limnology Laboratory (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Several mining lakes are characterized by the inorganic pollution of its waters, known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The current study was developed in order to evaluate the effect of water hardness and chemical pollutants on the richness and density of the zoo-planktonic community species. A seasonal study was conducted in a uranium mining lake affected by AMD. In environmental conditions of extremely high hardness water values (960.3 to 1284,9 mg/l), zoo-planktonic species have indicated resistance to the combined effect of elevated average concentrations of chemical pollutants such as Al (81.9 mg/l), Zn (15.5 mg/l), Mn (102.8 mg/l), U (2.9 mg/l) and low pH values (average = 3.8). Thus, in environments of extreme chemical conditions, such as a uranium mining lake affected by AMD, the hardness showed to be the best predictor of the zoo-planktonic community richness, indicating a protective effect of ions Ca{sup +2} over in special to Bosminopsis deitersi, Bosmina sp., Keratella americana and K. cochlearis. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  7. Generation of acid mine drainage around the Karaerik copper mine (Espiye, Giresun, NE Turkey): implications from the bacterial population in the Acısu effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Emine Selva; Akçay, Miğraç; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; İnan Bektaş, Kadriye; Beldüz, Ali Osman

    2016-09-01

    The Karaerik Cu mine is a worked-out deposit with large volumes of tailings and slags which were left around the mine site without any protection. Natural feeding of these material and run-off water from the mineralised zones into the Acısu effluent causes a serious environmental degradation and creation of acid mine drainage (AMD) along its entire length. This research aims at modelling the formation of AMD with a specific attempt on the characterisation of the bacterial population in association with AMD and their role on its occurrence. Based on 16SrRNA analyses of the clones obtained from a composite water sample, the bacterial community was determined to consist of Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Ferrovum myxofaciens, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans as iron-oxidising bacteria, Acidocella facilis, Acidocella aluminiidurans, Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum as iron-reducing bacteria, and Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidiphilium cryptum as sulphur-oxidising bacteria. This association of bacteria with varying roles was interpreted as evidence of a concomitant occurrence of sulphur and iron cycles during the generation of AMD along the Acısu effluent draining the Karaerik mine. PMID:27338270

  8. Evaluation of the effects of water hardness and chemical pollutants on the zooplankton community in uranium mining lakes with acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several mining lakes are characterized by the inorganic pollution of its waters, known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The current study was developed in order to evaluate the effect of water hardness and chemical pollutants on the richness and density of the zoo-planktonic community species. A seasonal study was conducted in a uranium mining lake affected by AMD. In environmental conditions of extremely high hardness water values (960.3 to 1284,9 mg/l), zoo-planktonic species have indicated resistance to the combined effect of elevated average concentrations of chemical pollutants such as Al (81.9 mg/l), Zn (15.5 mg/l), Mn (102.8 mg/l), U (2.9 mg/l) and low pH values (average = 3.8). Thus, in environments of extreme chemical conditions, such as a uranium mining lake affected by AMD, the hardness showed to be the best predictor of the zoo-planktonic community richness, indicating a protective effect of ions Ca+2 over in special to Bosminopsis deitersi, Bosmina sp., Keratella americana and K. cochlearis. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  9. The development of bio-carbon adsorbents from Lodgepole Pine to remediate acid mine drainage in the Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Eun-Jae [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)], E-mail: eshin@mines.edu; Lauve, Alexander; Carey, Maxwell [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Bukovsky, Eric; Ranville, James F. [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Evans, Robert J.; Herring, Andrew M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Activated carbon adsorbents were produced from biomass locally available in the Rocky Mountain West, e.g. Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta), by vacuum pyrolysis at moderate temperatures followed by steam activation, for use as metal adsorbents for acid mine drainage (AMD). Wood cubes from fresh cut Lodgepole Pine (P. contorta) with different sizes, 3 and 12 mm, were made. Sawdust was also used to study the effect of sample size as well as sample material. We applied chemical pretreatment with potassium hydroxide before charring to improve the quality of the activated carbons. We compared the characteristics of the activated carbons, which were chemically pretreated, before and after washing with water. After washing, the BET surface area was found to increase and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy showed changes in the carbon matrix. We then tested the samples for metal adsorption from AMD sampled from AMD sites in Colorado, Clear Creek County and the Leadville mine drainage tunnel, along with a commercial activated carbon for comparison. We used a batch method to measure maximum metal adsorption of the activated carbons. The metals chosen to be monitored were copper, cadmium, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc, because they are the principal metals of interest for the test areas, and metal concentrations were determined by ion coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The samples produced in this work outperformed the commercial activated carbon in two AMD water treatment tests and for the six metals monitored. This metal adsorption data indicate that locally produced inexpensive activated carbons can be used as adsorbents for AMD successfully.

  10. Enrichment of rare earth elements as environmental tracers of contamination by acid mine drainage in salt marshes: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Joaquín; Pérez-López, Rafael; Galván, Laura; Nieto, José Miguel; Boski, Tomasz

    2012-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were analyzed in surface sediments from the Guadiana Estuary (SW Iberian Pyrite Belt). NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized REE patterns show clearly convex curvatures in middle-REE (MREE) with respect to light- and heavy-REE, indicating acid-mixing processes between fluvial waters affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) and seawater. However, REE distributions in the mouth (closer to the coastal area) show slightly LREE-enriched and flat patterns, indicating saline-mixing processes typical of the coastal zone. NASC-normalized ratios (La/Gd and La/Yb) do not discriminate between both mixing processes in the estuary. Instead, a new parameter (E(MREE)) has been applied to measure the curvature in the MREE segment. The values of E(MREE)>0 are indicative of acid signatures and their spatial distribution reveal the existence of two decantation zones from flocculation processes related to drought periods and flood events. Studying REE fractionation through the E(MREE) may serve as a good proxy for AMD-pollution in estuarine environments in relation to the traditional methods. PMID:22748838

  11. Predicting the occurrence of acid mine drainage in the Alleghenian coal-bearing strata of western Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that simulated weathering experiments on coals and shales demonstrate that the critical factors responsible for the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) are the amounts of total sulfur, total carbonate, and the surface area of the pyrite. Total sulfur and carbonate carbon contents differ markedly among paleoenvironments whose distribution has been mapped for the Alleghenian state of western Pennsylvania. Freshwater (Estheria-bearing) shales have a mean total sulfur content of 0.15 percent and a mean carbonate carbon content of 0.54 percent. Brackish (Lingula-bearing) shales have a mean total sulfur content of 2.40 percent and a mean carbonate carbon content of 0.14 percent. Marine (Chonetes-bearing) shales have a mean total sulfur content of 0.95 percent and a mean carbonate carbon content of 0.63 percent. In the simulated weathering experiments, the amount of acidity, sulfate, and total iron exhibit a well-defined positive linear relation with total sulfur in samples whose carbonate carbon content is ≤ 0.01 percent. Where carbonate carbon contents are >0.01 percent, the amount of acidity, sulfate, and total iron is considerably less, and the linear relation no longer exists

  12. Inhibition of acid mine drainage and immobilization of heavy metals from copper flotation tailings using a marble cutting waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gulsen Tozsin

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) with high concentrations of sulfates and metals is generated by the oxidation of sulfide bearing wastes. CaCO3-rich marble cutting waste is a residual material produced by the cutting and polishing of marble stone. In this study, the feasibility of using the marble cutting waste as an acid-neutralizing agent to inhibit AMD and immobilize heavy metals from copper flotation tailings (sul-fide-bearing wastes) was investigated. Continuous-stirring shake-flask tests were conducted for 40 d, and the pH value, sulfate content, and dissolved metal content of the leachate were analyzed every 10 d to determine the effectiveness of the marble cutting waste as an acid neu-tralizer. For comparison, CaCO3 was also used as a neutralizing agent. The average pH value of the leachate was 2.1 at the beginning of the experiment (t = 0). In the experiment employing the marble cutting waste, the pH value of the leachate changed from 6.5 to 7.8, and the sul-fate and iron concentrations decreased from 4558 to 838 mg/L and from 536 to 0.01 mg/L, respectively, after 40 d. The marble cutting waste also removed more than 80wt% of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from AMD generated by copper flotation tailings.

  13. Inhibition of acid mine drainage and immobilization of heavy metals from copper flotation tailings using a marble cutting waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozsin, Gulsen

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) with high concentrations of sulfates and metals is generated by the oxidation of sulfide bearing wastes. CaCO3-rich marble cutting waste is a residual material produced by the cutting and polishing of marble stone. In this study, the feasibility of using the marble cutting waste as an acid-neutralizing agent to inhibit AMD and immobilize heavy metals from copper flotation tailings (sulfide- bearing wastes) was investigated. Continuous-stirring shake-flask tests were conducted for 40 d, and the pH value, sulfate content, and dissolved metal content of the leachate were analyzed every 10 d to determine the effectiveness of the marble cutting waste as an acid neutralizer. For comparison, CaCO3 was also used as a neutralizing agent. The average pH value of the leachate was 2.1 at the beginning of the experiment ( t = 0). In the experiment employing the marble cutting waste, the pH value of the leachate changed from 6.5 to 7.8, and the sulfate and iron concentrations decreased from 4558 to 838 mg/L and from 536 to 0.01 mg/L, respectively, after 40 d. The marble cutting waste also removed more than 80wt% of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from AMD generated by copper flotation tailings.

  14. Enrichment of rare earth elements as environmental tracers of contamination by acid mine drainage in salt marshes: A new perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth elements (REE) were analyzed in surface sediments from the Guadiana Estuary (SW Iberian Pyrite Belt). NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized REE patterns show clearly convex curvatures in middle-REE (MREE) with respect to light- and heavy-REE, indicating acid-mixing processes between fluvial waters affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) and seawater. However, REE distributions in the mouth (closer to the coastal area) show slightly LREE-enriched and flat patterns, indicating saline-mixing processes typical of the coastal zone. NASC-normalized ratios (La/Gd and La/Yb) do not discriminate between both mixing processes in the estuary. Instead, a new parameter (EMREE) has been applied to measure the curvature in the MREE segment. The values of EMREE > 0 are indicative of acid signatures and their spatial distribution reveal the existence of two decantation zones from flocculation processes related to drought periods and flood events. Studying REE fractionation through the EMREE may serve as a good proxy for AMD-pollution in estuarine environments in relation to the traditional methods.

  15. Relationships between sources of acid mine drainage and the hydrochemistry of acid effluents during rainy season in the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ostalé, E; Grande, J A; Valente, T; de la Torre, M L; Santisteban, M; Fernández, P; Diaz-Curiel, J

    2016-01-01

    In the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), southwest Spain, a prolonged and intense mining activity of more than 4,500 years has resulted in almost a hundred mines scattered through the region. After years of inactivity, these mines are still causing high levels of hydrochemical degradation in the fluvial network. This situation represents a unique scenario in the world, taking into consideration its magnitude and intensity of the contamination processes. In order to obtain a benchmark regarding the degree of acid mine drainage (AMD) pollution in the aquatic environment, the relationship between the areas occupied by the sulfide mines and the characteristics of the respective effluents after rainfall was analysed. The methodology developed, which includes the design of a sampling network, analytical treatment and cluster analysis, is a useful tool for diagnosing the contamination level by AMD in an entire metallogenic province, at the scale of each mining group. The results presented the relationship between sulfate, total dissolved solids and electrical conductivity, as well as other parameters that are typically associated with AMD and the major elements that compose the polymetallic sulfides of IPB. This analysis also indicates the low level of proximity between the affectation area and the other variables. PMID:26819390

  16. Acid mine drainage abatement from small, buried piles of tipple refuse using fluidized bed fly ash grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buried, pyrite-rich tipple refuse and pit cleanings on a reclaimed 37 acre surface coal mine site in Pennsylvania were found to be producing severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material is located in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. A fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash was used as a grout in two different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen, thus preventing AMD production. The first was pressure injecting grout directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. Pods which would not accept the grout because of a clayey matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. In certain areas, the AMD migrates to the groundwater table below the mine through fractures in the pit floor. The FBC ash grout was used in some of these areas in an attempt to seal the pit floor. A combination of geophysical mapping and monitoring wells is being used to monitor changes in the water quality. Minimal surface disturbance is required because only the sources of severe AMD production were targeted with the grout applications. Reduced costs are also possible since the FBC ash is a waste product. This methodology is designed as a true abatement technique requiring no future maintenance. The project was nearing completion at the time of this writing. This paper is an interim report

  17. Evaluation of genetic toxicity caused by acid mine drainage of coal mines on fish fauna of Simsang River, Garohills, Meghalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, B; Kalita, H K; Baishya, R A; Basumatary, S; Sarma, D

    2016-09-01

    Fishery ecology of the Simsang River, Meghalaya is being threatened by large scale environmental degradation due to acid mine drainage (AMD) of coal mines. In the present paper, effort has been made to evaluate the genotoxicity caused due to AMD of coal mines on Channa punctata under laboratory condition through comet assay, micronucleus and chromosome aberration tests. Water samples were collected seasonally from affected and unaffected sites of the River and physico-chemical quality of water indicated low pH (4.6), high concentration of sulphates (270mgL(-1)) and iron (7.2mgL(-1)) beyond permissible limits. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) showed highest concentration of 4-ring PAH and Benzo[a]anthracene was the most important pollutant in the water collected from affected sites. The highest and the lowest mean concentrations of PAHs were estimated in monsoon and winter season, respectively. The index of DNA damage assessed by comet assay, micronucleus and chromosome aberration tests demonstrated significant differences season wise in different sampling sites. Frequency of DNA-damaged cells was found highest in the water samples collected from affected site in monsoon season. PMID:27213561

  18. Diminished Metal Accumulation in Riverine Fishes Exposed to Acid Mine Drainage over Five Decades

    OpenAIRE

    Ross A Jeffree; Markich, Scott J.; Twining, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Bony bream (Nematalosa erebi) and black catfish (Neosilurus ater) were sampled from the fresh surface waters of the Finniss River in tropical northern Australia, along a metal pollution gradient draining the Rum Jungle copper/uranium mine, a contaminant source for over five decades. Paradoxically, populations of both fish species exposed to the highest concentrations of mine-related metals (cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, uranium and zinc) in surface water and sediment had the lowest...

  19. pH dependence of iron photoreduction in a rocky mountain stream affected by acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Diane M.; Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The redox speciation of dissolved iron and the transport of iron in acidic, metal-enriched streams is controlled by precipitation and dissolution of iron hydroxides, by photoreduction of dissolved ferric iron and hydrous iron oxides, and by oxidation of the resulting dissolved ferrous iron. We examined the pH dependence of these processes in an acidic mine-drainage stream, St Kevin Gulch, Colorado, by experimentally increasing the pH of the stream from about 4.0 to 6.5 and following the downstream changes in iron species. We used a solute transport model with variable flow to evaluate biogeochemical processes controlling downstream transport. We found that at pH 6.4 there was a rapid and large initial loss of ferrous iron concurrent with the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. Below this reach, ferrous iron was conservative during the morning but there was a net downstream loss of ferrous iron around noon and in the afternoon. Calculation of net oxidation rates shows that the noontime loss rate was generally much faster than rates for the ferrous iron oxidation at pH 6 predicted by Singer and Stumm (1970. Science 167: 1121). The maintenance of ferrous iron concentrations in the morning is explained by the photoreduction of photoreactive ferric species, which are then depleted by noon. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Neutralization of acid mine drainage using the final product from CO2 emissions capture with alkaline paper mill waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of low-cost alkaline paper mill wastes as acidity neutralizing agents for treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Paper wastes include a calcium mud by-product from kraft pulping, and a calcite powder from a previous study focused on sequestering CO2 by carbonation of calcium mud. The neutralization process consisted of increase of pH by alkaline additive dissolution, decrease of metals solubility and precipitation of gypsum and poorly crystallized Fe-Al oxy-hydroxides/oxy-hydroxysulphates, which acted as a sink for trace elements to that extent that solutions reached the pre-potability requirements of water for human consumption. This improvement was supported by geochemical modelling of solutions using PHREEQC software, and observations by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction of reaction products. According to PHREEQC simulations, the annual amount of alkaline additive is able to treat AMD (pH 3.63, sulphate 3800 mg L-1, iron 348 mg L-1) with an average discharge of about 114 and 40 L s-1 for calcium mud and calcite powder, respectively. Likewise, given the high potential of calcium mud to sequester CO2 and of resulting calcite powder to neutralize AMD, paper wastes could be a promising solution for facing this double environmental problem.

  1. Mercury mine drainage and processes that control its environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mine drainage from mercury mines in the California Coast Range mercury mineral belt is an environmental concern because of its acidity and high sulfate, mercury, and methylmercury concentrations. Two types of mercury deposits are present in the mineral belt, silica-carbonate and hot-spring type. Mine drainage is associated with both deposit types but more commonly with the silica-carbonate type because of the extensive underground workings present at these mines. Mercury ores consisting primarily of cinnabar were processed in rotary furnaces and retorts and elemental mercury recovered from condensing systems. During the roasting process mercury phases more soluble than cinnabar are formed and concentrated in the mine tailings, commonly termed calcines. Differences in mineralogy and trace metal geochemistry between the two deposit types are reflected in mine drainage composition. Silica-carbonate type deposits have higher iron sulfide content than hot- spring type deposits and mine drainage from these deposits may have extreme acidity and very high concentrations of iron and sulfate. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations in mine drainage are relatively low at the point of discharge from mine workings. The concentration of both mercury species increases significantly in mine drainage that flows through and reacts with calcines. The soluble mercury phases in the calcines are dissolved and sulfate is added such that methylation of mercury by sulfate reducing bacteria is enhanced in calcines that are saturated with mine drainage. Where mercury mine drainage enters and first mixes with stream water, the addition of high concentrations of mercury and sulfate generates a favorable environment for methylation of mercury. Mixing of oxygenated stream water with mine drainage causes oxidation of dissolved iron(II) and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxide that accumulates in the streambed. Both mercury and methylmercury are strongly adsorbed onto iron oxyhydroxide over the p

  2. Major and trace-element analyses of acid mine waters in the Leviathan mine drainage basin, California/Nevada - October, 1981 to October, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Water issuing from the inactive Leviathan open-pit sulfur mine has caused serious degradation of the water quality in the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin which drains into the East Fork of the Carson River. This report presents the analytical results from this sampling survey. Sixty-seven water samples were filtered and preserved on-site at 45 locations and at 3 different times. Temperature, discharge, pH, and Eh and specific conductance were measured on-site. Concentrations of 37 major and trace constituents were determined later in the laboratory on preserved samples. The quality of the analyses was checked by using two or more techniques to determine the concentrations including d.c.-argon plasma emission spectrometry (DCP), flame and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. Leviathan acid mine waters contain mg/L concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Tl, V and Zn, and hundreds to thousands of mg/L concentrations of Al, Fe, and sulfate at pH values as low as 1.8. Other elements including Ba, B, Be, Bi, Cd, Mo, Sb, Se and Te are elevated above normal background concentrations and fall in the microgram/L range. The chemical and 34 S/32 S isotopic analyses demonstrate that these acid waters are derived from pyrite oxidation and not from the oxidation of elemental sulfur. 16 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Acid drainages of the pyritic sterile from the Pocos de Caldas uranium mine: environmental interpretation and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the planned closure of the first uranium mine and milling plant operating in Brazil, located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, in the State of Minas Gerais, in the next two years, there is the need to obtain basic information for its decommissioning. Special attention has been directed to the following critical areas: open pit, tailing, dam and waste rock piles, because these are the main sources of acid drainage generation. These waters cannot be allowed to flow in the external environment because in addition to sulphuric acid, there is a number of elements in concentration above those allowed by regulations. Among the waste piles (bota-foras BF) two of them BF-4 and BF-8, are in a process of acid generation, thus requiring more attention. The objective of this work was to simulate at the laboratory scale the oxidation and the reduction zones of BF-4. The experiments were conducted in acrylic columns, where the waste sample was kept under aerated and saturated conditions, in different columns. The control of the chemical (solubilized chemical species), physico-chemical (redox potential, pH, conductivity) and biological (bacterial activity) parameters has been carried out on the acid solutions generated by the chemical and biological reactions that occur at the waste. Although the results refer to a four month period, some relevant points can be highlighted, which will serve as a basis for further research. The mineralogical characterization identified the existence of other sulphides associated to pyrite with lower oxidation potential than the latter. The results obtained with the biological characterization for the two conditions studied revealed that the bacterial activity is more intense in the region in contact with air, than in saturated region. (author)

  4. Inorganic contaminants attenuation in acid mine drainage by fly ash and fly ash-ordinary Portland cement (OPC) blends : column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitari, W.M. [Venda Univ., Thohoyandou (South Africa). Dept. of Ecology and Resources Management, School of Environmental Studies; Petrik, L.F.; Etchebers, O. [Western Cape Univ., Bellville (South Africa). Environmental and Nanosciences Group, Dept. of Chemistry; Key, D.L. [Western Cape Univ., Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry; Okujeni, C. [Western Cape Univ., Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2010-07-01

    The infiltration of acid mine drainage (AMD) material into mine voids is one of the environmental impacts of underground coal mining. In this study, the mitigation of AMD in a mine void was simulated in laboratory conditions. Various mixtures of fly ash, solid residues, and Portland cement were added to packed columns over a 6-month period. The fly ash additions generated near-neutral to alkaline pH levels, which in turn induced precipitation, co-precipitation, and adsorption contaminant attenuation mechanisms. A modelling study demonstrated that the precipitation of ferrihydrite, Al-hydroxides, Al-oxyhydroxysulphates, gypsum, ettringite, manganite, and rhodochrosite lowered contaminant levels. Results of the study indicated that the pH regime and acidity level of the AMD strongly influenced both the leaching of the toxic trace elements as well as the attenuation of the AMD. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Heavy metal removal in groundwater originating from acid mine drainage using dead Bacillus drentensis sp. immobilized in polysulfone polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Insu; Lee, Minhee; Wang, Sookyun

    2014-12-15

    Batch, column, and pilot scale feasibility experiments for a bio-sorption process using a bio-carrier (beads) with dead Bacillus drentensis sp. in polysulfone polymer were performed to remove heavy metals in groundwater originating from an acid mine drainage (AMD). For batch experiments, various amounts of bio-carrier each containing a different amount of dead biomass were added in artificial solution, of which the initial heavy metal concentration and pH were about 10 mg/L and 3, respectively. The heavy metal removal efficiencies of the bio-carrier under various conditions were calculated and more than 92% of initial Pb and Cu were found to have been removed from the solution when using 2 g of bio-carriers containing 5% biomass. For a continuous experiment with a column packed with bio-carriers (1 m in length and 0.02 m in diameter), more than 98% of Pb removal efficiency was maintained for 36 pore volumes and 1.553 g of Pb per g of bio-carrier was removed. For the pilot scale feasibility test, a total of 80 tons of groundwater (lower than pH of 4) were successfully treated for 40 working days and the removal efficiencies of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Fe were maintained above 93%, demonstrating that one kg of bio-carrier can clean up at least 1098 L of groundwater in the field.

  6. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicomrat, Duongruitai; Dick, Warren A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2006-01-01

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at detection in the bacterial community. The results from the FISH technique from this field study are consistent with results from other experiments involving enumeration by most probable number, dot-blot hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses and with the geochemistry of the site. PMID:16825452

  7. Aluminium and iron burdens of aquatic biota in New Zealand streams contaminated by acid mine drainage. Effects of trophic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterbourn, M.J. [Department of Zoology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); McDiffett, W.F.; Eppley, S.J. [Biology Department, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA (United States)

    2000-05-24

    Concentrations of Al and Fe were determined in samples of filamentous algae, bryophytes and invertebrates from 24 stream sites in North Westland, South Island, New Zealand. Sites were variably contaminated by acid coal mine drainage and ranged in pH from 2.6 to 6.2. Conductivity of stream water ranged from 16 to 944 {mu}S{sub 25} cm{sup -1} and maximum concentrations of total dissolved Al and total Fe measured in two successive years were 35.5 and 32.6 mg l{sup -1}, respectively. Metal burdens of algae and bryophytes were not correlated with pH, conductivity or the concentrations of Al and Fe observed in stream water. Metal concentrations in invertebrates were significantly lower than those in plants (mg per g dry wt.), and were similar in herbivore-detritivores (mainly mayfly larvae) and carnivorous species. No evidence was found for the biomagnification of either metal within aquatic food webs. However, invertebrate species exposed to very high concentrations of Al and Fe varied considerably in body burdens, suggesting that groups of insects differ considerably in their physiological or morphological ability to exclude potentially toxic metals.

  8. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). Environmental Science Graduate Programme

    2006-07-15

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant.

  9. Water quality changes in acid mine drainage streams in Gangneung, Korea, 10 years after treatment with limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Moo Joon; Choi, Byoung Young; Lee, Giehyeon; Hwang, Yun Ho; Yang, Jung-Seok; O' Loughlin, Edward J.; Kwon, Man Jae

    2015-12-01

    To determine the long-term effectiveness of the limestone treatment for acid mine drainage (AMD) in Gangneung, Korea, we investigated the elemental distribution in streams impacted by AMD and compared the results of previous studies before and approximately 10 years after the addition of limestone. Addition of limestone in 1999 leads to a pH increase in 2008, and with the exception of Ca, the elemental concentrations (e.g., Fe, Mn, Mg, Sr, Ni, Zn, S) in the streams decreased. The pH was 2.5–3 before the addition of limestone and remained stable at around 4.5–5 from 2008 to 2011, suggesting the reactivity of the added limestone was diminished and that an alternative approach is needed to increase the pH up to circumneutral range and maintain effective long-term treatment. To identify the processes causing the decrease in the elemental concentrations, we also examined the spatial (approximately 7 km) distribution over three different types of streams affected by the AMD. The elemental distribution was mainly controlled by physicochemical processes including redox reactions, dilution on mixing, and co-precipitation/adsorption with Fe (hydr)oxides.

  10. Kinetics and microbial ecology of batch sulfidogenic bioreactors for co-treatment of municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongyang; Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics and microbial ecology in sulfidogenic bioreactors used in a novel two-stage process for co-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) were investigated. Michaelis-Menten modeling of COD oxidation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) (Vmax=0.33mgL(-1)min(-1), Km=4.3mgL(-1)) suggested that the Vmax can be reasonably achieved given the typical COD values in MWW and anticipated mixing with AMD. Non-competitive inhibition modeling (Ki=6.55mgL(-1)) indicated that excessive iron level should be avoided to limit its effects on SRB. The COD oxidation rate was positively correlated to COD/sulfate ratio and SRB population, as evidenced by dsrA gene copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed diverse microbial communities dominated by sulfate reducing delta-proteobacteria. Microbial community and relative quantities of SRB showed significant differences under different COD/sulfate ratios (0.2, 1 and 2), and the highest dsrA gene concentration and most complex microbial diversity were observed under COD/sulfate ratio 2. Major species were associated with Desulfovirga, Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Syntrophus sp. The reported COD kinetics, SRB abundances and the phylogenetic profile provide insights into the co-treatment process and help identify the parameters of concerns for such technology development.

  11. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed concentration. Optimal test results were obtained with a relatively small media particle size (average particle radius 0.028 cm) and resulted in 96 % removal of P from the influent over 46 days of continuous operation. These results indicate that fixed bed sorption of P would be a feasible option for the utilization of AMD residues, thus helping to decrease AMD treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  12. Influence of water chemistry on the distribution of an acidophilic protozoan in an acid mine drainage system at the abandoned Green Valley coal mine, Indiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A.; Hasiotis, S.T. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography Geology & Anthropology

    2001-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis, a benthic photosynthetic protozoan that intracellularly sequesters Fe, is variably abundant in the main effluent channel that contains acid mine drainage (AMD) discharging from the Green Valley coal mine site in western Indiana. Samples of effluent (pH 3.0-4.6) taken from the main channel and samples of contaminated stream water (pH 3.3 to 8.0) collected from an adjacent stream were analyzed to evaluate the influence of water chemistry on E. mutabilis distribution. E. mutabilis communities were restricted to areas containing unmixed effluent with the thickest (up to 3 mm) benthic communities residing in effluent containing high concentrations of total Fe (up to 12110 mg/l), SO{sub 4}(up to 2940 mg/l), Al (up to 1846 mg/l), and Cl (up to 629 mg/l). Communities were also present, but much less abundant, in areas with effluent containing lower concentrations of these same constituents. In effluent where SO{sub 4} was most highly concentrated, E. mutabilis was largely absent, suggesting that extremely high concentrations of SO{sub 4} may have an adverse effect on this potentially beneficial Fe-mediating, acidophilic protozoan.

  13. Diminished metal accumulation in riverine fishes exposed to acid mine drainage over five decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Jeffree

    Full Text Available Bony bream (Nematalosa erebi and black catfish (Neosilurus ater were sampled from the fresh surface waters of the Finniss River in tropical northern Australia, along a metal pollution gradient draining the Rum Jungle copper/uranium mine, a contaminant source for over five decades. Paradoxically, populations of both fish species exposed to the highest concentrations of mine-related metals (cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, uranium and zinc in surface water and sediment had the lowest tissue (bone, liver and muscle concentrations of these metals. The degree of reduction in tissue concentrations of exposed populations was also specific to each metal and inversely related to its degree of environmental increase above background. Several explanations for diminished metal bioaccumulation in fishes from the contaminated region were evaluated. Geochemical speciation modeling of metal bioavailability in surface water showed no differences between the contaminated region and the control sites. Also, the macro-nutrient (calcium, magnesium and sodium water concentrations, that may competitively inhibit metal uptake, were not elevated with trace metal contamination. Reduced exposure to contaminants due to avoidance behavior was unlikely due to the absence of refugial water bodies with the requisite metal concentrations lower than the control sites and very reduced connectivity at time of sampling. The most plausible interpretation of these results is that populations of both fish species have modified kinetics within their metal bioaccumulation physiology, via adaptation or tolerance responses, to reduce their body burdens of metals. This hypothesis is consistent with (i reduced tissue concentrations of calcium, magnesium and sodium (macro-nutrients, in exposed populations of both species, (ii experimental findings for other fish species from the Finniss River and other contaminated regions, and (iii the number of generations exposed to likely

  14. Remediation of acid mine drainage at the friendship hill national historic site with a pulsed limestone bed process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, P.L.; Watten, B.; Boone, T.; ,

    2003-01-01

    A new process utilizing pulsed fluidized limestone beds was tested for the remediation of acid mine drainage at the Friendship Hill National Historic Site, in southwestern Pennsylvania. A 230 liter-per-minute treatment system was constructed and operated over a fourteen-month period from June 2000 through September 2001. Over this period of time, 50,000 metric tons of limestone were used to treat 50 million liters of water. The influent water pH was 2.5 and acidity was 1000 mg/L as CaCO3. Despite the high potential for armoring at the site, effluent pH during normal plant operation ranged from 5.7 to 7.8 and averaged 6.8. As a result of the high influent acidity, sufficient CO2 was generated and recycled to provide a net alkaline discharge with about 50 mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity. Additions of commercial CO2 increased effluent alkalinity to as high as 300 mg/L, and could be a useful process management tool for transient high flows or acidities. Metal removal rates were 95% for aluminum (60 mg/L in influent), 50 to 90% for iron (Fe), depending on the ratio of ferrous to ferric iron, which varied seasonally (200 mg/L in influent), and iron and Mn removal was incomplete because of the high pH required for precipitation of these species. Iron removal could be improved by increased aeration following neutralization, and Mn removal could be effected by a post treatment passive settling/oxidation pond. Metal hydroxide sludges were settled in settling tanks, and then hauled from the site for aesthetic purposes. Over 450 metric tons of sludge were removed from the water over the life of the project. The dried sludge was tested by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Protocol (TCLP) and was found to be non-hazardous. Treatment costs were $43,000 per year and $1.08 per m 3, but could be decreased to $22,000 and $0.51 per m3 by decreasing labor use and by onsite sludge handling. These results confirm the utility of the new process in treatment of acid impaired waters that were

  15. Assessing the concentration, speciation, and toxicity of dissolved metals during mixing of acid-mine drainage and ambient river water downstream of the Elizabeth Copper Mine, Vermont, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Seal, R.R., II; Piatak, N.M.; Paul, B.

    2007-01-01

    The authors determine the composition of a river that is impacted by acid-mine drainage, evaluate dominant physical and geochemical processes controlling the composition, and assess dissolved metal speciation and toxicity using a combination of laboratory, field and modeling studies. Values of pH increase from 3.3 to 7.6 and the sum of dissolved base metal (Cd + Co + Cu + Ni + Pb + Zn) concentrations decreases from 6270 to 100 ??g/L in the dynamic mixing and reaction zone that is downstream of the river's confluence with acid-mine drainage. Mixing diagrams and PHREEQC calculations indicate that mixing and dilution affect the concentrations of all dissolved elements in the reach, and are the dominant processes controlling dissolved Ca, K, Li, Mn and SO4 concentrations. Additionally, dissolved Al and Fe concentrations decrease due to mineral precipitation (gibbsite, schwertmannite and ferrihydrite), whereas dissolved concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn decrease due to adsorption onto newly formed Fe precipitates. The uptake of dissolved metals by aquatic organisms is dependent on the aqueous speciation of the metals and kinetics of complexation reactions between metals, ligands and solid surfaces. Dissolved speciation of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the mixing and reaction zone is assessed using the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and results of speciation calculations using the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM). Data from open and restricted pore DGT units indicate that almost all dissolved metal species are inorganic and that aqueous labile or DGT available metal concentrations are generally equal to total dissolved concentrations in the mixing zone. Exceptions occur when labile metal concentrations are underestimated due to competition between H+ and metal ions for Chelex-100 binding sites in the DGT units at low pH values. Calculations using the BLM indicate that dissolved Cd and Zn species in the mixing and reaction zone are predominantly inorganic

  16. Mine Drainage and Oil Sand Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinchao; Wolfe, F Andrew; Li, Yanjun

    2015-10-01

    Mine drainage from the mining of mineral resources (coal, metals, oil sand, or industrial minerals) remains as a persistent environmental problem. This review summarizes the scientific literature published in 2014 on the technical issues related to mine drainage or mine water in active and abandoned coal/hard rock mining sites or waste spoil piles. Also included in this review is the water from oil sand operations. This review is divided into the four sections: 1) mine drainage characterization, 2) prediction and environmental impact, 3) treatment technologies, 4) oil sand water. Many papers presented in this review address more than one aspect and different sections should not be regarded as being mutuallyexclusive or all-inclusive.

  17. Application of horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor for bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R P; Vich, D V; Garcia, M L; Varesche, M B A; Zaiat, M

    2016-06-01

    The production of low-pH effluent with sulfate and metals is one of the biggest environmental concerns in the mining industry. The biological process for sulfate reduction has the potential to become a low-cost solution that enables the recovery of interesting compounds. The present study analyzed such a process in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactor, employing ethanol as the carbon and energy source. Results showed that a maximal efficiency in the removal of sulfate and ethanol could only be obtained by reducing the applied sulfate load (225.1 ± 38 g m(-3) d(-1)). This strategy led to over 75% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulfate removal. Among the COD/SO4(2-) studied ratios, 0.67 showed the most promising performance. The effluent's pH has naturally remained between 6.8 and 7.0 and the complete oxidation of the organic matter has been observed. Corrections of the influent pH or effluent recirculation did not show any significant effect on the COD and sulfate removal efficiency. Species closely related to strains of Clostridium sp. and species of Acidaminobacter hydrogenomorfans and Fusibacter paucivorans that can be related to the process of sulfate reduction were found in the HAIB reactors when the initial pH was 5 and the COD/SO4(2-) ratio increased to 1.0. PMID:27280606

  18. Novel nickel resistance genes from the rhizosphere metagenome of plants adapted to acid mine drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Mirete, Salvador; González de Figueras, Carolina; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Metal resistance determinants have traditionally been found in cultivated bacteria. To search for genes involved in nickel resistance, we analyzed the bacterial community of the rhizosphere of Erica andevalensis, an endemic heather which grows at the banks of the Tinto River, a naturally metal-enriched and extremely acidic environment in southwestern Spain. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of rhizosphere DNA revealed the presence of members of five phylogenetic groups of Bacteria and the two m...

  19. Mineral-microorganism interactions in Acid Mine Drainage environments: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Cristina; Zotti, Mirca; Pozzolini, Marina; Giovine, Marco; Di Piazza, Simone; Mariotti, Mauro; Lucchetti, Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Minerals play a key role in controlling the mobility and distribution of metals and metalloids of environmental concern in supergenic environments. These are involved in a variety of processes, spanning the alteration of primary minerals to the formation of secondary authigenic phases and can represent a source or a trap for Potentially Ecotoxic Elements (PTEs). Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a reservoir of a unusual bacteria and fungi well adapted to these toxic environments. Classical studies of biotic weathering have mainly focused on water-mineral interaction and on the ability of microorganism to influence the soil solution chemical composition. In this work, we analyzed two different representative ochreous and greenish-blue AMD colloidal precipitates in order to i) characterize the biota population present in these colloidal minerals and ii) verify the bioaccumulation of PTEs into the fungi and the potential impact of bacteria in the geochemistry of the system. The samples are composed by nanocrystalline goethite which contains high amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni and woodwardite that is characterized by Cu, Zn, Ni, Y, and Ce. These precipitates were examined in order to evaluate the presence of fungal strains and to extract bacteria DNA. The preliminary results of fungi characterization show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains was isolated in pure culture. Most of them belong to the genus Mucor and Penicillium. It is worth noting the presence of Trametes versicolor, a macrofungal lignicolous species already known for heavy metal biosorption capability from aqueous solution (Gülay et al 2003). The same colloidal precipitates have been processed to extract bacteria DNA, using a specific procedure developed for DNA extraction from sediments. The results gave a good yield of nucleic acids and the positive PCR

  20. Tracing the interaction of acid mine drainage with coal utilization byproducts in a grouted mine: Strontium isotope study of the inactive Omega Coal Mine, West Virginia (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ameliorate acidic discharge, the inactive Omega Coal Mine, West Virginia was partially filled by injection of a grout consisting of 98% coal utilization byproducts (CUB), including fluidized bed combustion ash and fly ash, and 2% Portland cement. In this study, discharge chemistry and Sr isotope ratios were determined to identify and quantify the extent of interaction between mine waters and the CUB-cement grout. Eight sampling sites were monitored around the downdip perimeter of the mine. The major and trace element chemistry of the discharges was generally not sufficient to distinguish between discharges that interacted with grout and those that did not. Elements that showed the most separation include K and As, which were elevated in some waters that interacted with CUB-cement grout. In contrast, the Sr isotope ratios clearly distinguished discharges from grouted and non-grouted areas. Discharges that bypassed the grouted portions had 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.71510 to 0.71594, while two discharges that interacted with grout had ratios in the range of 0.71401-0.71456. The Treatment Inlet, which includes both grouted and ungrouted discharges, yielded intermediate isotopic ratios. Leaching experiments on CUB-cement grout, coal and surrounding rocks are consistent with the isotopic trends observed in the discharges. Based on these results, waters that interacted with grout received 30-40% of their Sr from the CUB-cement grout material. These results suggest that the grout material is chemically eroding at a rate of approximately 0.04% per year. This novel application of the Sr isotope system illustrates its ability to sensitively track and quantify fluid interaction with coal and CUB-based grout.

  1. Major and trace-element analyses of acid mine waters in the Leviathan Mine drainage basin, California/Nevada; October, 1981 to October, 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Water issuing from the inactive Leviathan open-pit sulfur mine has caused serious degradation of the water quality in the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin which drains into the East Fork of the Carson River. As part of a pollution abatement project of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic and water quality data for the basin during 1981-82. During this period a comprehensive sampling survey was completed to provide information on trace metal attenuation during downstream transport and to provide data for interpreting geochemical processes. This report presents the analytical results from this sampling survey. Sixty-seven water samples were filtered and preserved on-site at 45 locations and at 3 different times. Temperature, discharge, pH, and Eh and specific conductance were measured on-site. Concentrations of 37 major and trace constituents were determined later in the laboratory on preserved samples. The quality of the analyses was checked by using two or more techniques to determine the concentrations including d.c.-argon plasma emission spectrometry (DCP), flame and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. Additional quality control was obtained by comparing measured to calculated conductance, comparing measured to calculated Eh (from Fe-2 +/Fe-3+ determinations), charge balance calculations and mass balance calculations for conservative constituents at confluence points. Leviathan acid mine waters contain mg/L concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, T1, V and Zn, and hundreds to thousands of mg/L concentrations of Al, Fe, and sulfate at pH values as low as 1.8. Other elements including Ba, B, Be, Bi, Cd , Mo, Sb, Se and Te are elevated above normal background concentrations and fall in the microgram/L range. The chemical and 34 S/32 S isotopic analyses demonstrate that these

  2. Using environmental isotopes to characterize hydrologic processes of the Nelson Tunnel acid mine drainage site, West Willow Creek watershed, Creede, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupicka, A.; Williams, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage continues to be a pressing ecological issue across the Mountain West. Traditional remediation strategies usually involve the installation of an expensive and unsightly “end-of-pipe” water treatment plant without a full understanding of the overall hydrology of the system. In this study we show how applying water chemistry techniques to investigate water sources, ages, flow paths and residence times in a watershed affected by acid mine drainage can lead to alternative, less expensive methods of reclamation. We use both radiogenic (3H and 14C) and stable (18O and D) environmental isotopes to age waters and characterize the level of surface and groundwater interaction. Tritium content for waters collected in the tunnel was largely found to be 0-3 TU, indicating an age of greater than 50 years. This was supported by 14C values of DIC in tunnel samples that indicated ages and a hydraulic residence time on the order of hundreds to thousands of years. Stable isotopes 18O and D plotted closely to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). Combined with the heavy faulting and dominant welded volcanic tuffs of the region, this all indicates a system with very little surface-ground water interaction and a long, deep, likely channelized flow path. A future up-gradient pumping test would help confirm these findings and further elucidate the location and mechanism of the system’s primary recharge to the mine workings.

  3. Overall hydrochemical characterization of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Main acid mine drainage-generating sources (Huelva, SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, J. A.; de la Torre, M. L.; Cerón, J. C.; Beltrán, R.; Gómez, T.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryAMD is an anthropogenic process caused by sulfide mineralization and the increase in the contact surface due to mining activity and grain-size reduction. In Spain, the contamination comes from the metal sulfide mines in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Spreading over an area 230 km long and approximately 50 km wide, it is one of the largest metallogenic regions in the world, with massive sulfide reserves of about 1700 Mt. In the present study we will characterize AMD contamination processes in the IPB, especially by As, by identifying the sources responsible for these processes (active mines and effluents from mines and slag heaps) in the basins of the Tinto and Odiel rivers. It is also the aim of this study to discover the mineral associations of the deposits. The study of the AMD process generating source is complemented with hydrochemical characterization of the effluents produced, which will be carried out by means of sample-taking and subsequent chemical analysis and statistical treatment (cluster analysis). Characteristics in common with samples taken in other AMD-affected watercourses are observed in the seven zones defined in the study area. With respect to the samples studied, obvious differences can also be found. These differences are inherent to the mineral associations, watershed and distance to the generating source and, ultimately, to the affected area, and the type, intensity and duration of the mine treatment process developed in the acid-producing area.

  4. Range of drainage effect of surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sozanski, J.

    1978-03-01

    This paper discusses methods of calculating the range of effects of water drainage from surface coal mines and other surface mines. It is suggested that methods based on test pumping (water drainage) are time consuming, and the results can be distorted by atmospheric factors such as rain fall or dry period. So-called empirical formulae produce results which are often incorrect. The size of a cone shaped depression calculated on the basis of empirical formulae can be ten times smaller than the size of the real depression. It is suggested that using a formula based on the Dupuit formula is superior to other methods of depression calculation. According to the derived formulae the radius of the depresion cone is a function of parameters of the water bearing horizons, size of surface mine working and of water depression. The proposed formula also takes into account the influence of atmospheric factors (water influx caused by precipitation, etc.). (1 ref.) (In Polish)

  5. Metal partitioning in sediments and mineralogical controls on the acid mine drainage in Ribeira da Água Forte (Aljustrel, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Southern Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the geochemical processes taking place in the acid drainage in the Ribeira da Água Forte, located in the Aljustrel mining area in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. The approach involved water and stream sediment geochemical analyses, as well as other techniques such as sequential extraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Ribeira da Água Forte is a stream that drains the area of the old mine dumps of the Aljustrel mine, which have for decades been a source of acid waters. This stream flows to the north for a little over than 10 km, but mixes with a reduced, organic-rich, high pH waste water from the municipal waste water pools of the village. This water input produces two different results in the chemistry of the stream depending upon the season: (i) in the winter season, effective water mixing takes place, and the flux of acid water from the mine dumps is continuous, resulting in the immediate precipitation of the Fe from the acid waters; (ii) during the summer season, acid drainage is interrupted and only the waste water feeds the stream, resulting in the reductive dissolution of Fe hydroxides and hydroxysulfates in the stream sediments, releasing significant quantities of metals into solution. Throughout the year, water pH stays invariably within 4.0–4.5 for several meters downstream of this mixing zone even when the source waters come from the waste water pools, which have a pH around 8.4. The coupled interplay of dissolution and precipitation of the secondary minerals (hydroxides and sulfates), keeps the system pH between 3.9 and 4.5 all along the stream. In particular, evidence suggests that schwertmannite may be precipitating and later decomposing into Fe hydroxides to sustain the stream water pH at those levels. While Fe content decreases by 50% from solution, the most important trace metals are only slightly attenuated before the solution mixes with the Ribeira do Rôxo stream waters. Concentrations of As are the only ones

  6. Heavy metals removal from acid mine drainage water using biogenic hydrogen sulphide and effluent from anaerobic treatment: Effect of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, A.M. [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide. Carretera de Utrera, km 1. 41013 Sevilla (Spain); Duran-Barrantes, M.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Sevilla, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez, s/n, 41071 Sevilla (Spain); Borja, R., E-mail: rborja@cica.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Instituto de la Grasa, Avda. Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Sanchez, E.; Colmenarejo, M.F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, C/Serrano, 115-duplicado, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Raposo, F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Instituto de la Grasa, Avda. Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Four alternatives (runs A, B, C and D) for heavy metals removal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Al) from acid mine drainage water (AMDW) produced in the mining areas of the Huelva Province, Spain, were evaluated. In run A, the anaerobic effluent from the treatment of acid mine drainage water (cheese whey added as a source of carbon) was mixed with the raw AMDW. The pH increased to 3.5 with the addition of KOH. In run B, biogas with around 30% of hydrogen sulphide obtained in the anaerobic reactor was sparged to the mixture obtained in run A, but in this case at a pH of 5.5. In run C, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 3.5 by the addition of KOH solution. Finally, in run D, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 5.5 by the addition of KOH solution and further biogas was sparged under the same conditions as in run A. It was found that heavy metal removal was a function of pH. At a pH of 3.5 most of the iron was removed while Zn and Cu were partially removed. At a pH of 5.5 the removal of all metals increased considerably. The best results were obtained in run B where the percentages of removal of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al achieved values of 91.3, 96.1, 79.0 and 99.0%, respectively. According to the experimental results obtained tentative schemas of the flow diagram of the processes were proposed.

  7. Feasibility study of a self-remediation system for mine drainage using its thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chamteut; Cheong, Youngwook; Yim, Giljae; Ji, Sangwoo

    2016-04-01

    Mine drainage is defined as the water which is discharged to the ground surface through shafts and/or cracks formed by mining activities. Typically, mine drainage features high concentration of acidity and metals since it passes through the underground. Therefore, for the purpose of protecting the surrounding natural environment, mine drainage should be remediated before being discharged to nature. Mine drainage, due to its nature of being retained underground, shows constant temperature which is independent from the temperature of the atmosphere above ground. This condition allows mine drainage to become a promising renewable energy source since energy can be recovered from water with constant temperature. In this research, a self-remediation system is proposed which remediates the mine drainage through electrochemical reactions powered by the thermal energy of mine drainage. High energy efficiency is able to be achieved by shortening the distance between the energy source and consumption, and therefore, this system has a strong advantage to be actualized. A feasibility study for the system was conducted in this research where the thermal energy of mine drainage over time and depth was calculated as energy supply and the required electrical energy for remediating the mine drainage was measured as energy consumption. While the technology of converting thermal energy directly into electrical energy is yet to be developed, energy balance analysis results showed that the proposed self-remediation system is theoretically possible.

  8. Determination of in situ speciation of manganese in treated acid mine drainage water by using multiple diffusive gradients in thin films devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes F de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Pedrobom, Jorge H. [Centro de Estudos Ambientais - CEA, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Avenida 24-A, 1515, CEP 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Menegário, Amauri A., E-mail: amenega@rc.unesp.br [Centro de Estudos Ambientais - CEA, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Avenida 24-A, 1515, CEP 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Domingos, Roberto N. [Centro de Estudos Ambientais - CEA, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Avenida 24-A, 1515, CEP 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Py, Delcy A. [INB - Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil, Estrada Poços – Andradas Km 20,6, CEP 37780-000 Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kiang, Chang Hung [Laboratório de Estudos de Bacias - LEBAC, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas - IGCE, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Avenida 24-A, 1515, CEP 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In situ speciation of Mn by using multiple DGT devices was evaluated. •Chelex resin, DE81 and P81 membranes were used as binding phases in the DGT devices. •The proposed approach was applied to analyze treated acid mine drainage. •Good results were found for speciation of Mn in site containing <40 mg Ca L{sup −1}. DGT speciation were in agreement with speciation by software and by on site SPE. -- Abstract: Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a serious environmental problem that creates acidic solution with high Mn concentrations. The speciation of residual Mn from AMD after an active treatment involving the addition of a neutralizing agent can reliably evaluate the treatment efficiency and provide knowledge of the Mn species being inputted into the environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ lability and speciation of Mn using the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique with treated drainage water from a uranium mine (TAMD). DGT devices with different binding phases (Chelex-100 and P81 and DE81membranes) were used to perform the in situ speciation of Mn. A comparison of the results from deploying DGT in the laboratory and in situ shows that the speciation of Mn in TAMD should be performed in situ. Linear deployment curves (from in situ experiments) indicate that the DGT device containing the Chelex-100 binding phase can be used to evaluate Mn lability in TAMD. The labile Mn fraction (from in situ measurements) obtained using the device containing the Chelex-100 resin ranged from 63 to 81% of the total Mn concentration and, when compared to the speciation obtained using the CHEAQS software, indicated that this device was capable of uptaking the free Mn{sup 2+} and a portion of the MnSO{sub 4(aq)}. The values obtained using the DGT technique were compared to those from on site solid phase extraction, and a good agreement was found between the results. The amount of negative Mn species sampled by DE81

  9. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence - phase II - small scale field demonstration. Topical report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Head, W.J.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Sack, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that a mix made from fly and bottom ash from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed coal combusters (FBC ash), water, and stabilizers be injected from the surface into abandoned room and pillar coal mines through boreholes. Besides ash disposal, this process would prevent subsidence and acid mine drainage. Such a mix (called `grout`) needs to be an adequately stable and flowable suspension for it to spread and cover large areas in the mine. This is necessary as the drilling of the boreholes will be an expensive operation and the number such holes should be minimized. Addition of bentonite was found to be needed for this purpose. A suitable grout mix was tested rheologically to determine its fluid flow properties. Finding little published information on such materials, tests were performed using a commercial rotational viscometer with a T-bar rotor and a stand which produced a helical rotor path. Existing mixer viscometer test methods were modified and adapted to convert the measurements of torque vs. angular speed to the material properties appearing in several non-Newtonian constitutive equations. Yield stress was measured by an independent test called the vane method. The rheological behavior was a close fit to the Bingham fluid model. Bleed tests were conducted to ascertain the stability of the mixtures. Spread tests were conducted to compare the flowability of various mixes. Using the flow parameters determined in the laboratory, numerical simulations of grout flow were performed and compared with the results of scale model and field tests. A field injection of this grout was performed at the Fairfax mines in Preston county, W.V.. The observations there proved that this FBC ash grout flows as desired, is a very economical way of disposing the environmentally menacing ash, while also preventing the subsidence and acid mine drainage of the mines.

  10. Characterisation of the arsenic resistance genes in Bacillus sp. UWC isolated from maturing fly ash acid mine drainage neutralised solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Cowan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An arsenic resistant Bacillus sp. UWC was isolated from fly ash acid mine drainage (FA-AMD neutralised solids. A genomic library was prepared and screened in an arsenic sensitive mutant Escherichia coli strain for the presence of arsenic resistance (ars genes. Sequence analysis of a clone conferring resistance to both sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate revealed homologues to the arsR (regulatory repressor, arsB (membrane located arsenite pump, arsC (arsenate reductase, arsD (second regulatory repressor and a metallochaperone and arsA (ATPase genes from known arsenic resistance operons. The Bacillus sp. UWC arsRBCDA genes were shown to be arranged in an unusual manner with the arsDA genes immediately downstream of arsC.

  11. Spatio-temporal detection of the Thiomonas population and the Thiomonas arsenite oxidase involved in natural arsenite attenuation processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eHovasse

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acid mine drainage (AMD impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on pyrosequencing and FISH, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of acid mine drainage in Minas Gerais State, Brazil Avaliação preliminar de drenagem ácida no estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Wilson Vargas de Mello

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining in the State of Minas Gerais-Brazil is one of the activities with the strongest impact on the environment, in spite of its economical importance. Amongst mining activities, acid drainage poses a serious environmental problem due to its widespread practice in gold-extracting areas. It originates from metal-sulfide oxidation, which causes water acidification, increasing the risk of toxic element mobilization and water resource pollution. This research aimed to evaluate the acid drainage problem in Minas Gerais State. The study began with a bibliographic survey at FEAM (Environment Foundation of Minas Gerais State to identify mining sites where sulfides occur. Substrate samples were collected from these sites to determine AP (acidity potential and NP (neutralization potential. The AP was evaluated by the procedure of the total sulfide content and by oxygen peroxide oxidation, followed by acidity titration. The NP was evaluated by the calcium carbonate equivalent. Petrographic thin sections were also mounted and described with a special view to sulfides and carbonates. Based on the chemical analysis, the acid-base accounting (ABA was determined by the difference of AP and NP, and the acid drainage potential obtained by the ABA value and the total volume of material at each site. Results allowed the identification of substrates with potential to generate acid drainage in Minas Gerais state. Altogether these activities represent a potential to produce between 3.1 to 10.4 billions of m³ of water at pH 2 or 31.4 to 103.7 billions of m³ of water at pH 3. This, in turn, would imply in costs of US$ 7.8 to 25.9 millions to neutralize the acidity with commercial limestone. These figures are probably underestimated because some mines were not surveyed, whereas, in other cases, surface samples may not represent reality. A more reliable state-wide evaluation of the acid drainage potential would require further studies, including a larger number of

  13. Effects of discharging acid-mine drainage into evaporation ponds lined with clay on chemical quality of the surrounding soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapanda, F.; Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamangara, J.; Wuta, M.

    Compacted clay layers are commonly used as liners to limit acid-mine drainage (AMD) percolation into the surrounding environment from containment areas or ponds. In the long term, this practical and sometimes economical means of AMD disposal has often presented other considerable environmental challenges. The chemical quality of soil, river water and groundwater surrounding evaporation ponds lined with clay was determined at Iron-Duke Mine in Glendale, Zimbabwe. At this mine over 150 m 3/d of wastewater containing AMD were discharged daily for over a decade. The soils located downslope in relation to the ponds and closer to the ponds were acidified (pH 2.8-4.4) and enriched with salts. The level of contamination was highest within 15 m from the ponds and at 2-6 m depths from the surface. The variability in soil pH and electrical conductivity with position, distance from the ponds and depth from surface was attributed to the vertical and lateral flow of contaminated groundwater containing leachates from the ponds. The groundwater and river water surrounding the ponds were contaminated with arsenic (As), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), sulphate, salts and acidity, and the level of contamination increased with proximity to the ponds. Potential public health hazards from consumption of the groundwater and river water were high. It was concluded that discharging of AMD into the ponds has not been an environmentally effective means of AMD containment and disposal. There was need for better AMD disposal means, particularly those that would improve the containment of AMD to reduce its seepage.

  14. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  16. Modelling reactive transport of acid mine drainage in groundwater : Effect of geochemical processes spatially variable flow source location and distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Tekelu Geberetsadike, Tegenne

    2004-01-01

    Impacts from mining waste deposits on groundwater resources have been recognized invarious parts of the world; though varied in scale depending on the composition of mineralsbeing mined, the level of technology employed and environmental commitment of thedevelopers. Mining activities usually involve milling, concentrating, and processing of oreswhich will result in a huge amount of waste, called tailings, usually deposited inimpoundments as a slurry, composed of fine grained geological materi...

  17. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierro, A. [Department of Physics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Olías, M., E-mail: manuel.olias@dgyp.uhu.es [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Cánovas, C.R. [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Martín, J.E.; Bolivar, J.P. [Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  18. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  19. Mobility of Po and U-isotopes under acid mine drainage conditions: an experimental approach with samples from Río Tinto area (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions, the solubilities and mobilities of many elements are vastly different from conditions prevailing in most natural waters. Studies are underway in the Río Tinto area (Iberian Pyrite Belt), in order to understand the behavior and mobility of long-lived U-series radionuclides under AMD conditions. A set of leaching experiments utilizing typical country rocks from the Tinto River basin, waste rock pile composite materials, iron-rich riverbed sediments and gossan (weathered naturally rock) were performed towards this purpose. Initial leaching experiments using distilled water kept in contact with solid material for 300, 100, 50 and 1 h resulted in very low concentrations of U with 234U/238U activity ratios close to equilibrium and activity concentrations of 210Po < 0.03 mBq/g. Leaching experiments performed with sulfuric acid media (0.1 and 0.01 M), and contact times between the solid and solution for 24 h were conducted to quantify the amount of U-isotopes and 210Po leached, and the radioactive disequilibria generated between the radionuclides in the leachate. These experiments show that Po mobility in acidic conditions (pH around 1–2) is very low, with 210Po activity in the leachate to be 6% in average for the solid sample. By contrast, mobility of U-isotopes is higher than that of Po, around 1.2%

  20. Rare-earth-element fractionation patterns in estuarine sediments as a consequence of acid mine drainage: A case study in SW Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes of seawater dilution and acid neutralization cause significant effects upon REE fractionation between the aqueous solution and sediments. This study describes the results of a recent investigation into such processes in the sediments of the Tinto and Odiel estuary. The results show differences in behaviour between light REEs (LREEs) and middle and heavy REEs (MREEs and HREEs). A relative depletion in La is observed as a consequence of the low pH values, which prevents the separation of LREEs from solution to the suspended matter. When acid neutralization occurs, on the other hand, an increase in the La content is related to the preferential separation of LREEs compared to MREEs and HREEs. Under these conditions three main fractionation patterns were distinguished: the first shows a slightly MREEenriched shape in sediments deposited in the fluvial zone; the second displays significant depletion in LREEs and a nearly flat tendency in MREEs and HREEs towards the estuarine mixing zone; and the third is enriched in total REEs and shows a relative increase in LREEs and MREEs. The evolution of these patterns reveals that pH is the key variable controlling REE fractionation in environments affected by acid mine drainage. (Author) 55 refs.

  1. Distribution and migration of heavy metals in soil and crops affected by acid mine drainage: Public health implications in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianbo; Wen, Zewei; Ru, Xuan; Chen, Jundong; Wu, Haizhen; Wei, Chaohai

    2016-02-01

    Acid mine drainages (AMD) contain high concentrations of heavy metals, and their discharges into streams and rivers constitute serious environmental problems. This article examines the effects of AMD on soil, plant and human health at Dabaoshan mine in Guangdong Province, China. Although the large scale mining was stopped in 2011, the heavy metal pollution in soil continues to endanger crops and human health in that region. The objectives of this study were to elucidate distribution and migration of Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Pb and associated health implications to local inhabitants. We collected and analyzed 74 crop samples including 28 sugarcane, 30 vegetables, 16 paddy rice and the corresponding soil samples, used correlation and linear relationship for transformation process analysis, and applied carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk for hazard evaluation. Results showed that the local soils were heavily polluted with Cd, Cu and As (especially for Cd) and the mean Igeo value was as high as 3.77. Cadmium, Cu, and Zn in rice and vegetables were comparable with those found four years ago, while As and Pb in edible parts were 2 to 5 times lower than before. The root uptake of Cd and Zn contributed mainly to their high concentrations in crops due to high exchangeable fraction of soil, while leafy vegetables accumulated elevated As and Pb contents mainly due to the atmospheric deposition. Metal concentrations in sugarcane roots were higher than those in rice and vegetable roots. The risk assessment for crops consumption showed that the hazard quotients values were of 21 to 25 times higher than the threshold level for vegetables and rice, indicating a potential non-carcinogenic risk to the consumers. The estimated mean total cancer risk value of 0.0516 more than 100 times exceeded the USEPA accepted risk level of 1×10(-4), indicating unsuitability of the soil for cultivating the food crops. Therefore, the local agricultural and the land-use policies need to be reevaluated

  2. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  3. Distribution and migration of heavy metals in soil and crops affected by acid mine drainage: Public health implications in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianbo; Wen, Zewei; Ru, Xuan; Chen, Jundong; Wu, Haizhen; Wei, Chaohai

    2016-02-01

    Acid mine drainages (AMD) contain high concentrations of heavy metals, and their discharges into streams and rivers constitute serious environmental problems. This article examines the effects of AMD on soil, plant and human health at Dabaoshan mine in Guangdong Province, China. Although the large scale mining was stopped in 2011, the heavy metal pollution in soil continues to endanger crops and human health in that region. The objectives of this study were to elucidate distribution and migration of Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Pb and associated health implications to local inhabitants. We collected and analyzed 74 crop samples including 28 sugarcane, 30 vegetables, 16 paddy rice and the corresponding soil samples, used correlation and linear relationship for transformation process analysis, and applied carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk for hazard evaluation. Results showed that the local soils were heavily polluted with Cd, Cu and As (especially for Cd) and the mean Igeo value was as high as 3.77. Cadmium, Cu, and Zn in rice and vegetables were comparable with those found four years ago, while As and Pb in edible parts were 2 to 5 times lower than before. The root uptake of Cd and Zn contributed mainly to their high concentrations in crops due to high exchangeable fraction of soil, while leafy vegetables accumulated elevated As and Pb contents mainly due to the atmospheric deposition. Metal concentrations in sugarcane roots were higher than those in rice and vegetable roots. The risk assessment for crops consumption showed that the hazard quotients values were of 21 to 25 times higher than the threshold level for vegetables and rice, indicating a potential non-carcinogenic risk to the consumers. The estimated mean total cancer risk value of 0.0516 more than 100 times exceeded the USEPA accepted risk level of 1×10(-4), indicating unsuitability of the soil for cultivating the food crops. Therefore, the local agricultural and the land-use policies need to be reevaluated.

  4. Recycling Facilities - Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Recycling Project Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Reclamation Locations are clean-up projects that are working to eliminate some form of abandoned mine. The following sub-facility types...

  5. Seventh symposium on coal mine drainage research. NCA/BCR coal conference and Expo IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    The Seventh Symposium on Coal Mine Drainage Research, sponsored by the National Coal Association and Bituminous Coal Research, Inc., was held at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center, Louisville, Kentucky, October 18-20, 1977. Seventeen papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Topics covered include chemical reactions of pyrite oxidation and acid formation in spoil banks, abandoned mines, etc., formation of small acid lakes from the drainage and their neutralization by natural and other neutralization measures, trace elements in acid mine drainage, ground water contamination, limnology, effects of surface mined ground reclamation and neutralization, water purification and treatment, mining and coal preparation plant waste disposal, ash and fly ash disposal (to minimize leaching from the wastes), runoff from large coal storage stockpiles during storms (prevention of environmental effects by collection and neutralization by passing through an ash pond). (LTN)

  6. Effect of neutralized solid waste generated in lime neutralization on the ferrous ion bio-oxidation process during acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenwu; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lixiang; Zhang, Shasha; Liu, Lanlan; Wang, Ming

    2015-12-15

    Bio-oxidation of ferrous ions prior to lime neutralization exhibits great potential for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment, while slow ferrous ion bio-oxidation or total iron precipitation is a bottleneck in this process. In this study, neutralized solid waste (NSW) harvested in an AMD lime neutralization procedure was added as a crystal seed in AMD for iron oxyhydroxysulfate bio-synthesis. The effect of this waste on ferrous ion oxidation efficiency, total iron precipitation efficiency, and iron oxyhydroxysulfate minerals yield during ferrous ion bio-oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was investigated. Ferrous ion oxidation efficiency was greatly improved by adding NSW. After 72 h incubation, total iron precipitation efficiency in treatment with 24 g/L of NSW was 1.74-1.03 times higher than in treatment with 0-12 g/L of NSW. Compared with the conventional treatment system without added NSW, the iron oxyhydroxysulfate minerals yield was increased by approximately 21.2-80.9% when 3-24 g/L of NSW were added. Aside from NSW, jarosite and schwertmannite were the main precipitates during ferrous ion bio-oxidation with NSW addition. NSW can thus serve as the crystal seed for iron oxyhydroxysulfate mineral bio-synthesis in AMD, and improve ferrous ion oxidation and total iron precipitation efficiency significantly.

  7. Using fluorescence-based microplate assay to assess DOM-metal binding in reactive materials for treatment of acid mine drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmen Mihaela Neculita; Yves Dudal; Gerald J Zagury

    2011-01-01

    One potential drawback of compost-based passive bioreactors, which is a promising biotechnology for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment, is the transport of dissolved organic matter (DOM)-metal complexes in surface waters.To address this problem, the objective of this study was to assess the maximum capacity of organic substrates to release soluble DOM-metal complexes in treated water.The reactivities of DOM in maple wood chips and sawdust, composted poultry manure, and leaf compost were quantified toward Cd2+, Ni2+, Fe2+, and Cu2+ using fluorescence quenching.The DOM showed the highest reactivity toward Fe, but a limited number of available sites for sorption, whereas DOM-Cd complexes exhibited the lowest fluorescence quenching.Overall, the DOM from a mixture of wastes formed higher concentrations of DOM-metal complexes relative to sole substrates.Among DOM-metal complexes, the concentrations of DOM-Ni complexes were the highest.After reaching steady-state, low concentrations of DOM-metal complexes were released in treated water, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions based on geochemical modeling.Therefore, in addition to physicochemical characterization, fluorescence quenching technique is recommended for the substrate selection of bioreactors.

  8. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors.

  9. Regeneration of barium carbonate from barium sulphide in a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor and utilization for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulopo, J; Zvimba, J N; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L T; Maree, J

    2012-01-01

    Batch regeneration of barium carbonate (BaCO(3)) from barium sulphide (BaS) slurries by passing CO(2) gas into a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of BaCO(3) recovery in the Alkali Barium Calcium (ABC) desalination process and its use for sulphate removal from high sulphate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The effect of key process parameters, such as BaS slurry concentration and CO(2) flow rate on the carbonation, as well as the extent of sulphate removal from AMD using the recovered BaCO(3) were investigated. It was observed that the carbonation reaction rate for BaCO(3) regeneration in a bubbling column reactor significantly increased with increase in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) flow rate whereas the BaS slurry content within the range 5-10% slurry content did not significantly affect the carbonation rate. The CO(2) flow rate also had an impact on the BaCO(3) morphology. The BaCO(3) recovered from the pilot-scale bubbling column reactor demonstrated effective sulphate removal ability during AMD treatment compared with commercial BaCO(3). PMID:22233912

  10. Jarosite versus Soluble Iron-Sulfate Formation and Their Role in Acid Mine Drainage Formation at the Pan de Azúcar Mine Tailings (Zn-Pb-Ag, NW Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Murray

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary jarosite and water-soluble iron-sulfate minerals control the composition of acid mine waters formed by the oxidation of sulfide in tailings impoundments at the (Zn-Pb-Ag Pan de Azúcar mine located in the Pozuelos Lagoon Basin (semi-arid climate in Northwest (NW Argentina. In the primary zone of the tailings (9.5 wt % pyrite-marcasite precipitation of anglesite (PbSO4, wupatkite ((Co,Mg,NiAl2(SO44 and gypsum retain Pb, Co and Ca, while mainly Fe2+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, As3+/5+ and Cd2+ migrate downwards, forming a sulfate and metal-rich plume. In the oxidation zone, jarosite (MFe3(TO42(OH6 is the main secondary Fe3+ phase; its most suitable composition is M = K+, Na+, and Pb2+and TO4 = SO42−; AsO42−. During the dry season, iron-sulfate salts precipitate by capillary transport on the tailings and at the foot of DC2 (tailings impoundment DC2 tailings dam where an acid, Fe2+ rich plume outcrops. The most abundant compounds in the acid mine drainage (AMD are SO42−, Fe2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, Cu2+, As3+/5+, Cd2+. These show peak concentrations at the beginning of the wet season, when the soluble salts and jarosite dissolve. The formation of soluble sulfate salts during the dry season and dilution during the wet season conform an annual cycle of rapid metals and acidity transference from the tailings to the downstream environment.

  11. Technology of gas drainage and utilization in Huaibei mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; XU Rui

    2009-01-01

    With the characteristics of coal seam geology and gas occurrence, a "ground-underground" integrated gas drainage method was formed, which can relieve gas pressure and increase permeability by mining the protection seams in conditional regions. After coal seam gas drainage, high gas outburst seam was converted to low gas safety seam. In the coal face mining process, safety and high efficient coal mining were realized by the measure of gas-suction over mining. In addition to the drainage gas for civil gas and gas power generation, the Huaibei Mining Group has actively carried out research on the utilization technology of methane drainage by ventilation. On the one hand, it can save precious energy; on the other hand, it can protect the environment for people's survival. In 2007, the amount of coal mine gas drainage was 120 hm3; the rate of coal mine gas drainage was 44%. Compared with the year 2002, the amount of coal mine gas drainage increased by two times. Meanwhile, the utilization rate of gas increased rapidly.

  12. Sorption studies of Zn(II) and Cu(II) onto vegetal compost used on reactive mixtures for in situ treatment of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Oriol; de Pablo, Joan; Cortina, José Luis; Ayora, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of the sulphate reducing bacteria-based in situ treatment of acid mine drainage is often limited by the low degradability of the current carbon sources, typically complex plant-derived materials. In such non-sulphate-reducing conditions, field and laboratory experiences have shown that mechanisms other than sulphide precipitation should be considered in the metal removal, i.e. metal (oxy)hydroxides precipitation, co-precipitation with these precipitates, and sorption onto the organic matter. The focus of the present paper was to present some laboratory data highlighting the Zn and Cu sorption on vegetal compost and to develop a general and simple model for the prediction of their distribution in organic-based passive remediation systems. The model considers two kinds of sorption sites ( succeeds SO(2)H(2)) and the existence of monodentate and bidentate metal-binding reactions, and it assumes that only free M(2+) species can sorb onto the compost surface. The acid-base properties of the compost were studied by means of potentiometric titrations in order to identify the nature of the involved surface functional groups and their density. The distribution coefficient (K(D)) for both Zn and Cu were determined from batch experiments as a function of pH and metal concentration. The model yielded the predominant surface complexes at the experimental conditions, being succeeds SO(2)Zn for Zn and succeeds SO(2)HCu(+) and ( succeeds SO(2)H)(2)Cu for Cu, with log K(M) values of -2.10, 3.36 and 4.65, respectively. The results presented in this study have demonstrated that the proposed model provides a good description of the sorption process of Zn and Cu onto the vegetal compost used in these experiments.

  13. Assessment, water-quality trends, and options for remediation of acidic drainage from abandoned coal mines near Huntsville, Missouri, 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    Water from abandoned underground coal mines acidifies receiving streams in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin near Huntsville, Missouri. A 4.35-kilometer (2.7-mile) reach of Sugar Creek has been classified as impaired based on Missouri's Water Quality Standards because of small pH values [water quality in Sugar Creek. Metal and sulfate loads increased and pH decreased immediately downstream from Sugar Creek's confluence with the Calfee Slope and Huntsville Gob drainages that discharge AMD into Sugar Creek. Similar effects were observed in the Mitchell Mine drainage that receives AMD from a large mine spring. Comparisons of water-quality samples from this study and two previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1987-1988 and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources in 2000-2002 indicate that AMD generation in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin is declining, but the data are insufficient to quantify any trends or time frame. AMD samples from the largest mine spring in the Calfee Slope subbasin indicated a modest but significant increase in median pH from 4.8 to 5.2 using the Wilcoxan rank-sum test (p water or sewage effluent can further increase pH as indicated by geochemical modeling, but will not totally achieve water-quality goals because of limited discharges. A combination of treatments including settling ponds, oxic or anoxic limestone drains, and possibly successive alkalinity producing systems to remediate AMD will likely be required in the Sugar Creek Basin and Mitchell Mine Basin to consistently meet Missouri's Water Quality Standards.

  14. THE EXTENT OF MINE DRAINAGE INTO STREAMS OF THE CENTRAL APPALACHIAN AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runoff and drainage from active and inactive mines are contaminating streams throughout the United States with acidic and metal contaminated waters and sediments. The extent of mining impacts on streams of the coal bearing region of the Central Appalachians and the metal bearing...

  15. Development of a biotechnological process for the treatment of acid mine drainages. Final report; Entwicklung eines biotechnischen Verfahrens zur Behandlung saurer, sulfat- und metallhaltiger Waesser. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommerdich, D.; Pfeifer, F.; Schacht, S. [DMT-Inst. fuer Chemische Umwelttechnologie, Essen (Germany)

    1992-05-01

    This project was to develop a biotechnological process for the simultaneous removal of metals and sulfate from acid mine drainage. The metabolic capability of sulfate reducing bacteria was used to convert sulfates to sulfides which will induce the precipitation of metal ions as metal sulfides. Stages of the developed water treatment process should be characterized and proved for application with original waste water in laboratory scale. A sulfate reducing consortium was enriched and characterized due to its relevant growth requirements like substrate spectrum of complex and defined carbon sources, pH and temperature optimum and sulfide tolerance. The stoichiometric quotient of substrate conversion to sulfate reduction which is an important cost factor was estimated in batch and continuous cultures. For continuous cultivation a fixed bed reactor with external loop was used. The pH-shift formed during growth of the sulfate reducing bacteria was used to develop a pH auxostatic regulation system which improves process safety of continuous cultivation. As a method for biomass estimation a new enzymatic assay based on bioluminescent estimation of APS-reductase, a key enzyme of desulfuricants, was developed and tested for its applicability. Precipitation of metals was carried out in a separate reactor stage. The precipitation was preferentially efficient using gaseous H{sub 2}S rather than Na{sub 2}S as reactant resulting in a better flocculation and crystallization of the product. The complete configuration of bioreactor and precipitation stage was tested with original acid drainage from an old coal mining field. With lactic acid as carbon source and a hydraulic retention time of 7.6 h a sulfate reduction rate of 9 g/l/d was obtained. The sediment contained 30% of solid phase which after drying could be characterized as machinavite. [Deutsch] Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens war die Entwicklung eines biotechnischen Verfahrens, in welchem Sulfat durch mikrobielle Reduktion zu

  16. Ecological response of benthic foraminifera to the acid drainage from mine areas. An example from the Gromolo torrent mouth (Eastern Ligurian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, Luisa; Capello, Marco; Carbone, Cristina; Magno, Maria Celia; Consani, Sirio; Cutroneo, Laura; Ferraro, Luciana; Pierfranceschi, Giancarlo; Romano, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages react in short time to natural and anthropogenic environmental changes and, for this, they are considered as reliable indicators of environmental quality. An interesting application of these indicators is the study of their response to environmental changes in coastal marine areas, affected by dismissed mines and dump areas. The Libiola Fe-Cu sulphide mine was intensively exploited in 19th and 20th centuries, and the activity ended in 1962. The sulphide mineral assemblages consist of pyrite and chalcopyrite, with minor sphalerite and pyrrhotite, in a gangue of quartz and chlorite. The sulphide ore occurs within the Jurassic ophiolites of the Northern Apennines which were subjected to metamorphic and tectonic processes during the subsequent Apennine orogenesis. Waters circulating in the Libiola mine area, and discharging in the adjacent streams and creeks, are strongly polluted due to the diffuse occurrence of Acid Mine Drainage processes. The Gromolo torrent collects these acidic waters enriched of heavy metals which flow into Ligurian Sea. The study area is characterised by a shelf with a gentle slope, mainly constituted by sediment supplied by Entella torrent. The general circulation has trend from East to West and the coastal drift is generally eastwards. A total of 15 marine sediment samples (upper 2 cm) were collected by means of Van Veen grab in the coastal zone close to the Gromolo mouth and analyzed for living (rose Bengal stained) and dead benthic foraminifera, together with grain size, metals and trace elements, and metal fractioning. Quantitative foraminiferal parameters, like as abundance, species diversity, heterogeneity and assemblage composition, were determined and evaluated for environmental purpose. Additionally, possible increase above the natural background level of deformed specimens was considered as indicative of metal contamination. The grain-size analyses highlighted mainly sandy sediments, characterized by

  17. Superficial drainage studies in open-pit mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drainage studies concerning large open-pit mining projects can be of vital importance throughout the mining activity itself as they may assist in avoiding activity interruptions due to drainage problems, therefore representing substantial savings. These studies should, in fact, be carried out from the initial activity stages and shall be considered in operational, project and planning decisions in order to optimize results and reduce costs. This specific study presents a drainage study systematization proposal, enphasazing economic decision criteria. The authors comment on studies of this nature developed at the Caldas uranium mine - NUCLEBRAS. (D.J.M.)

  18. Aluminium (Al) fractionation and speciation; getting closer to describing the factors influencing Al(3+) in water impacted by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamier, Jessica; Wicht, Merrill; Cyster, Lilburne; Ndindi, Nosintu P

    2015-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) severely impacts the water chemistry of a receiving resource, changing the occurrence, speciation and toxicity of metals such as Aluminium (Al). The toxicity of Al is determined by its speciation represented by the labile monomer Al fraction or Al(3+). The purpose of the study was to combine fractionation and Visual MINTEQ speciation to calculate the effect of AMD altered water chemistry on Al speciation and Al(3+) concentration. Water in rivers impacted by AMD presented with monomeric Al (Almon) concentrations between 0.35 and 15.37mgL(-)(1) which existed almost exclusively in the toxic labile form (98%). For the reference site, Almon was less than 2% (10μgL(-1)), suggesting significantly lower Al toxicity. Principal component analysis plots illustrated that labile Al was directly related to the total Al and iron concentrations and strongly influenced by parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. Visual MINTEQ modelling was used to determine the primary Al species distribution. The dominant form of Al in AMD impacted water was AlSO4(+), which increased proportionally with the sulphate and Al(3+) concentration. Heavily impacted areas, presented with an average of 1mgmL(-)(1) Al(3+), which poses a potential human health risk. A novel centrifugal ultrafiltration method was investigated as an alternative to determining Almon to simplify the speciation of Al. Monomeric and centrifugal ultrafiltrated (<10kD) Al fractions were significantly similar (p=0.74), suggesting that ultrafiltration may present a time, energy and cost saving alternative to organic extraction of Almon.

  19. Aluminium (Al) fractionation and speciation; getting closer to describing the factors influencing Al(3+) in water impacted by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamier, Jessica; Wicht, Merrill; Cyster, Lilburne; Ndindi, Nosintu P

    2015-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) severely impacts the water chemistry of a receiving resource, changing the occurrence, speciation and toxicity of metals such as Aluminium (Al). The toxicity of Al is determined by its speciation represented by the labile monomer Al fraction or Al(3+). The purpose of the study was to combine fractionation and Visual MINTEQ speciation to calculate the effect of AMD altered water chemistry on Al speciation and Al(3+) concentration. Water in rivers impacted by AMD presented with monomeric Al (Almon) concentrations between 0.35 and 15.37mgL(-)(1) which existed almost exclusively in the toxic labile form (98%). For the reference site, Almon was less than 2% (10μgL(-1)), suggesting significantly lower Al toxicity. Principal component analysis plots illustrated that labile Al was directly related to the total Al and iron concentrations and strongly influenced by parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. Visual MINTEQ modelling was used to determine the primary Al species distribution. The dominant form of Al in AMD impacted water was AlSO4(+), which increased proportionally with the sulphate and Al(3+) concentration. Heavily impacted areas, presented with an average of 1mgmL(-)(1) Al(3+), which poses a potential human health risk. A novel centrifugal ultrafiltration method was investigated as an alternative to determining Almon to simplify the speciation of Al. Monomeric and centrifugal ultrafiltrated (<10kD) Al fractions were significantly similar (p=0.74), suggesting that ultrafiltration may present a time, energy and cost saving alternative to organic extraction of Almon. PMID:25747302

  20. Recognition of a Biofilm at the Sediment-Water Interface of AN Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Stream, and its Role in Controlling Iron Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boult, Stephen; Johnson, Nicholas; Curtis, Charles

    1997-03-01

    Material collected over a month on plates attached to the bed of the Afon Goch, Anglesey, a stream highly contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD), was either examined intact by electron microscopy or suspended and cultured to reveal the presence of microbiota. Certain of the aerobic microbiota were identified, the genus Pseudomonas formed the commonest isolate and cultures of Serratia plymuthica were grown in order to compare the biofilms formed with the material collected in the Afon Goch. The material at the sediment-water interface of the Afon Goch was of similar underlying morphology to that of the cultured biofilms. However, the former had a superficial granular coating of equidimensional (60-100 nm) and evenly spaced iron rich particles (determined by X-ray microanalysis). The sediment-water interface of this AMD-contaminated stream is therefore best described as a highly contaminated biofilm. Evidence from previous work suggests that the streambed is active in iron removal from the water column. The intimate association of iron with microbiota at the streambed, therefore, implies that iron flux prediction may not be possible from physical and chemical data alone but requires knowledge of biofilm physiology and ecology.Microbially mediated metal precipitation, both by single bacteria and by biofilms, has been reported elsewhere but mass balance considerations suggest that this explanation cannot hold good for the large amounts of iron hydroxide depositing from waters of the prevalent pH and redox status. Filtered stream water analyses indicate the presence of colloidal iron hydroxide and also its removal downstream where ochreous (iron hydroxide rich) material accumulates. The process of iron immobilization is likely to be the attraction and physical trapping of colloidal iron hydroxide by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which constitute the matrix of biofilms.

  1. The impact of acid mine drainage on the methylmercury cycling at the sediment-water interface in Aha Reservoir, Guizhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianrong; Zhu, Yuzhen; Yin, Deliang; Luo, Guangjun; An, Yanlin; Yan, HaiYu; Qian, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    The methylmercury (MeHg) cycling at water-sediment interface in an acid mine drainage (AMD)-polluted reservoir (Aha Reservoir) and a reference site (Hongfeng Reservoir) were investigated and compared. Both reservoirs are seasonal anoxic and alkaline. The concentrations of sulfate, sulfide, iron, and manganese in Aha Reservoir were enriched compared to the reference levels in Hongfeng reservoir due to the AMD input. It was found that the MeHg accumulation layer in Aha Reservoir transitioned from the top sediment layer in winter to the water-sediment interface in spring and then to the overlying water above sediment in summer. It supported the assumption that spring methylation activity may start in sediments and migrate into the water column with seasonal variation. The weaker methylation in sediment during spring and summer was caused by the excessive sulfide (∼15-20 μM) that reduced the bioavailability of mercury, while sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in the overlying water. This led to a transport flux of MeHg from water to sediment in spring and summer. In contrast, such inversion of MeHg accumulation layer did not occur in Hongfeng Reservoir. The sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in top sediment, and dissolved MeHg was positively related to sulfide in pore water of Hongfeng Reservoir (r = 0.67, p water and cycling of MeHg at sediment-water interface associate with some sensitive environmental factors, such as sulfur.

  2. Deciphering the role of Paenibacillus strain Q8 in the organic matter recycling in the acid mine drainage of Carnoulès

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The recycling of the organic matter is a crucial function in any environment, especially in oligotrophic environments such as Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs). Polymer-degrading bacteria might play an important role in such ecosystem, at least by releasing by-products useful for the rest of the community. In this study, physiological, molecular and biochemical experiments were performed to decipher the role of a Paenibacillus strain isolated from the sediment of Carnoulès AMD. Results Even though Paenibacillus sp. strain Q8 was isolated from an oligotrophic AMD showing an acidic pH, it developed under both acidic and alkaline conditions and showed a heterotrophic metabolism based on the utilization of a broad range of organic compounds. It resisted to numerous metallic stresses, particularly high arsenite (As(III)) concentrations (> 1,800 mg/L). Q8 was also able to efficiently degrade polymers such as cellulose, xylan and starch. Function-based screening of a Q8 DNA-library allowed the detection of 15 clones with starch-degrading activity and 3 clones with xylan-degrading activity. One clone positive for starch degradation carried a single gene encoding a "protein of unknown function". Amylolytic and xylanolytic activities were measured both in growing cells and with acellular extracts of Q8. The results showed the ability of Q8 to degrade both polymers under a broad pH range and high As(III) and As(V) concentrations. Activity measurements allowed to point out the constitutive expression of the amylase genes and the mainly inducible expression of the xylanase genes. PACE demonstrated the endo-acting activity of the amylases and the exo-acting activity of the xylanases. Conclusions AMDs have been studied for years especially with regard to interactions between bacteria and the inorganic compartment hosting them. To date, no study reported the role of microorganisms in the recycling of the organic matter. The present work suggests that the strain Q8 might play

  3. Deciphering the role of Paenibacillus strain Q8 in the organic matter recycling in the acid mine drainage of Carnoulès

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavat François

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recycling of the organic matter is a crucial function in any environment, especially in oligotrophic environments such as Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs. Polymer-degrading bacteria might play an important role in such ecosystem, at least by releasing by-products useful for the rest of the community. In this study, physiological, molecular and biochemical experiments were performed to decipher the role of a Paenibacillus strain isolated from the sediment of Carnoulès AMD. Results Even though Paenibacillus sp. strain Q8 was isolated from an oligotrophic AMD showing an acidic pH, it developed under both acidic and alkaline conditions and showed a heterotrophic metabolism based on the utilization of a broad range of organic compounds. It resisted to numerous metallic stresses, particularly high arsenite (As(III concentrations (> 1,800 mg/L. Q8 was also able to efficiently degrade polymers such as cellulose, xylan and starch. Function-based screening of a Q8 DNA-library allowed the detection of 15 clones with starch-degrading activity and 3 clones with xylan-degrading activity. One clone positive for starch degradation carried a single gene encoding a "protein of unknown function". Amylolytic and xylanolytic activities were measured both in growing cells and with acellular extracts of Q8. The results showed the ability of Q8 to degrade both polymers under a broad pH range and high As(III and As(V concentrations. Activity measurements allowed to point out the constitutive expression of the amylase genes and the mainly inducible expression of the xylanase genes. PACE demonstrated the endo-acting activity of the amylases and the exo-acting activity of the xylanases. Conclusions AMDs have been studied for years especially with regard to interactions between bacteria and the inorganic compartment hosting them. To date, no study reported the role of microorganisms in the recycling of the organic matter. The present work suggests that

  4. Multiple injected and natural conservative tracers quantify mixing in a stream confluence affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemel, L.E.; Cox, M.H.; Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    The acidic discharge from Cement Creek, containing elevated concentrations of dissolved metals and sulphate, mixed with the circumneutral-pH Animas River over a several hundred metre reach (mixing zone) near Silverton, CO, during this study. Differences in concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, and SO42- between the creek and the river were sufficiently large for these analytes to be used as natural tracers in the mixing zone. In addition, a sodium chloride (NaCl) tracer was injected into Cement Creek, which provided a Cl- 'reference' tracer in the mixing zone. Conservative transport of the dissolved metals and sulphate through the mixing zone was verified by mass balances and by linear mixing plots relative to the injected reference tracer. At each of seven sites in the mixing zone, five samples were collected at evenly spaced increments of the observed across-channel gradients, as determined by specific conductance. This created sets of samples that adequately covered the ranges of mixtures (mixing ratios, in terms of the fraction of Animas River water, %AR). Concentrations measured in each mixing zone sample and in the upstream Animas River and Cement Creek were used to compute %AR for the reference and natural tracers. Values of %AR from natural tracers generally showed good agreement with values from the reference tracer, but variability in discharge and end-member concentrations and analytical errors contributed to unexpected outlier values for both injected and natural tracers. The median value (MV) %AR (calculated from all of the tracers) reduced scatter in the mixing plots for the dissolved metals, indicating that the MV estimate reduced the effects of various potential errors that could affect any tracer.

  5. Benthic metal fluxes and sediment diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage: A laboratory experiment and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E.; Ayora, C.; Jiménez-Arias, J. L.; García-Robledo, E.; Papaspyrou, S.; Corzo, A.

    2014-08-01

    Reservoirs are one of the primary water supply sources. Knowledge of the metal fluxes at the water-sediment interfaces of reservoirs is essential for predicting their ecological quality. Redox oscillations in the water column are promoted by stratification; turnover events may significantly alter metal cycling, especially in reservoirs impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). To study this phenomenon, an experiment was performed under controlled laboratory conditions. Sediment cores from an AMD-affected reservoir were maintained in a tank with reservoir water for approximately two months and subjected to alternating oxic-hypoxic conditions. A detailed metal speciation in solid phases of the sediment was initially performed by sequential extraction, and pore water was analyzed at the end of each redox period. Tank water metals concentrations were systematically monitored throughout the experiment. The experimental results were then used to calibrate a diffusion-reaction model and quantify the reaction rates and sediment-water fluxes. Under oxic conditions, pH, Fe and As concentrations decreased in the tank due to schwertmannite precipitation, whereas the concentrations of Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co increased due to Al(OH)3 and sulfide dissolution. The reverse trends occurred under hypoxic conditions. Under oxic conditions, the fluxes calculated by applying Fick’s first law to experimental concentration gradients contradicted the fluxes expected based on the evolution of the tank water. According to the reactive transport calculations, this discrepancy can be attributed to the coarse resolution of sediment sampling. The one-cm-thick slices failed to capture effectively the notably narrow (1-2 mm) concentration peaks of several elements in the shallow pore water resulting from sulfide and Al(OH)3 dissolution. The diffusion-reaction model, extended to the complete year, computed that between 25% and 50% of the trace metals and less than 10% of the Al that precipitated under

  6. Emprego de coberturas secas no controle da drenagem ácida de mina: estudos em campo Use of dry cover systems to control acid mine drainage: field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luciano Galatto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available No sul catarinense, cristais de pirita associados a rejeitos de beneficiamento de carvão mineral, quando alterados, desencadeiam o processo conhecido como drenagem ácida de mina (DAM. Este trabalho objetivou avaliar a eficiência de três sistemas de coberturas secas sobre estes rejeitos, como uma opção para o controle da DAM. Agentes neutralizantes da DAM como a cinza pesada e o calcário foram misturados com os rejeitos ou dispostos acima destes. Para reduzir a infiltração de água e difusão de oxigênio no meio, foi empregada uma camada de 50 cm de solo silte-argiloso compactado. Os experimentos foram monitorados por um ano, sendo analisados nos lixiviados alguns parâmetros indicadores da DAM, além da presença de bactérias ferro-oxidantes e sulfato-redutoras. Os resultados obtidos indicaram uma boa eficiência na prevenção da DAM de dois dos três sistemas de coberturas pesquisados.In the southern of the Santa Catarina state, the weathering and oxidation of pyrite-containing coal has been the major agent of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD production. The purpose of this study was to verify the efficiency of three different cover systems to inhibit AMD. Experiments were built in field lysimeters with alkaline agents - bottom ash and limestone - placed over or mixed with fresh coal waste. To reduce the water infiltration rates and oxygen diffusion 50 cm of compact mud soil layer was put over waste. The top cover was constituted by 10 cm of the same soil, mixed with bottom ash. During one year, these experiments have been monitored through chemical (pH, Eh, Fe2+, Fe total, Al, Ca, Mg, Zn, Pb and Mn and microbiological (Thiobacilus ferroxidans presence composition of effluents. The results indicated that two of three cover systems employed were efficient on AMD prevention.

  7. Acid drainage at the inactive Santa Lucia mine, western Cuba: Natural attenuation of arsenic, barium and lead, and geochemical behavior of rare earth elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Francisco Martin, E-mail: fmrch@geologia.unam.mx [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Prol-Ledesma, Rosa Maria; Canet, Carles [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alvares, Laura Nunez; Perez-Vazquez, Ramon [Facultad de Geologia y Mecanica, Universidad de Pinar del Rio (Cuba)

    2010-05-15

    A detailed geochemical study was conducted at the inactive Zn-Pb mine of Santa Lucia, in western Cuba. The studied mine-wastes are characterized by high total concentrations of potentially toxic elements (PTE), with average values of 17.4% Fe, 5.47% Ba, 2.27% Pb, 0.83% Zn, 1724 mg/kg As and 811 mg/kg Cu. Oxidation of sulfide minerals in mine-waste dumps and in the open pit produces acid mine effluents (pH = 2.5-2.6) enriched in dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (up to 6754 mg/L), Fe (up to 4620 mg/L) and Zn (up to 2090 mg/L). Low pH values (2.5-2.8) and high dissolved concentrations of the same PTE were found in surface waters, up to 1500 m downstream from the mine. Nevertheless, concentrations of As, Ba and Pb in acid mine effluents and impacted surface waters are relatively low: 0.01-0.3 mg/L As, 0.002-0.03 mg/L Ba and 0.3-4.3 mg/L Pb. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy revealed the occurrence of lead-bearing barite and beudantite and the more common solid phases, reported elsewhere in similar environments including Fe-oxyhydroxides, jarosite, anglesite and plumbojarosite. Because the reported solubilities for barite and beudantite are very low under acidic conditions, these minerals may serve as the most important control in the mobility of As, Ba and Pb. In contrast, Fe-oxyhydroxides are relatively soluble under acidic conditions and, therefore, they may have a less significant role in PTE on-site immobilization. Mine-wastes and stream sediments show a light REE (LREE) and middle REE (MREE) enrichment relative to heavy REE (HREE). In contrast, acid mine effluents and surface waters are enriched in HREE relative to LREE. These results suggest that the LREE released during the oxidation of sulfides are captured by secondary (weathering) minerals, while the MREE are removed from the altered rocks. The low concentrations of LREE in acid stream water suggest that these elements can be retained in the sediments more strongly than HREE and MREE. One

  8. Remediação de drenagem ácida de mina usando zeólitas sintetizadas a partir de cinzas leves de carvão Remediation of acid mine drainage using zeolites synthesized from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Alves Fungaro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Zeolitic material was synthesized from coal fly ashes (baghouse filter fly ash and cyclone filter fly ash by hydrothermal alkaline activation. The potential application of the zeolitic product for decontamination of waters from acid mine drainage was evaluated. The results showed that a dose of 30 g L-1 of zeolitic material allowed the water to reach acceptable quality levels after treatment. Both precipitation and cation-exchange processes accounted for the reduction in the pollutant concentration in the treated waters.

  9. Operational Lessons Learned During Bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sul...

  10. Operational Lessons Leaned During bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sulf...

  11. An empirical method for estimating instream pre-mining pH and dissolved Cu concentration in catchments with acidic drainage and ferricrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimick, D.A.; Gurrieri, J.T.; Furniss, G.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for assessing natural background water quality of streams affected by historical mining are vigorously debated. An empirical method is proposed in which stream-specific estimation equations are generated from relationships between either pH or dissolved Cu concentration in stream water and the Fe/Cu concentration ratio in Fe-precipitates presently forming in the stream. The equations and Fe/Cu ratios for pre-mining deposits of alluvial ferricrete then were used to reconstruct estimated pre-mining longitudinal profiles for pH and dissolved Cu in three acidic streams in Montana, USA. Primary assumptions underlying the proposed method are that alluvial ferricretes and modern Fe-precipitates share a common origin, that the Cu content of Fe-precipitates remains constant during and after conversion to ferricrete, and that geochemical factors other than pH and dissolved Cu concentration play a lesser role in determining Fe/Cu ratios in Fe-precipitates. The method was evaluated by applying it in a fourth, naturally acidic stream unaffected by mining, where estimated pre-mining pH and Cu concentrations were similar to present-day values, and by demonstrating that inflows, particularly from unmined areas, had consistent effects on both the pre-mining and measured profiles of pH and Cu concentration. Using this method, it was estimated that mining has affected about 480 m of Daisy Creek, 1.8 km of Fisher Creek, and at least 1 km of Swift Gulch. Mean values of pH decreased by about 0.6 pH units to about 3.2 in Daisy Creek and by 1-1.5 pH units to about 3.5 in Fisher Creek. In Swift Gulch, mining appears to have decreased pH from about 5.5 to as low as 3.6. Dissolved Cu concentrations increased due to mining almost 40% in Daisy Creek to a mean of 11.7 mg/L and as much as 230% in Fisher Creek to 0.690 mg/L. Uncertainty in the fate of Cu during the conversion of Fe-precipitates to ferricrete translates to potential errors in pre-mining estimates of as much as 0.25 units

  12. Treating coal mine drainage with an artificial wetland. [USA - Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennessy, M.S.; Mitsch, W.J. (Ohio State University Columbus, OH (USA). School of Natural Resources)

    A 0.22-ha constructed wetland dominated by Typha latofolia was evaluated for its ability to treat approximately 340 L/min of coal mine drainage from an underground seep in eastern Ohio. Loading of mine drainage to the wetland ranged from 15 to 35 cm/d. Conductivity, pH, manganese, and sulfate were little changed by the wetland. Iron decreased by 50 to 60%, with slightly higher decreases during the growing season. Comparisons are made to a volunteer Typha marsh receiving mine drainage where iron was found to decrease by approximately 89%. Design considerations of loading rates of created wetlands suggest that improved treatment of mine drainage is correlated with longer retention times and lower iron loading rates. Preliminary design criteria for construction of these types of Typha wetlands for removal of iron are suggested as 5 cm/d hydrologic loading and 2 to 40 g Fe/m{sup 2}.d for iron loading, depending on the treatment desired. 34 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Molybdenum and zinc stable isotope variation in mining waste rock drainage and waste rock at the Antamina mine, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skierszkan, E K; Mayer, K U; Weis, D; Beckie, R D

    2016-04-15

    The stable isotope composition of molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn) in mine wastes at the Antamina Copper-Zn-Mo mine, Peru, was characterized to investigate whether isotopic variation of these elements indicated metal attenuation processes in mine drainage. Waste rock and ore minerals were analyzed to identify the isotopic composition of Mo and Zn sources, namely molybdenites (MoS2) and sphalerites (ZnS). Molybdenum and Zn stable isotope ratios are reported relative to the NIST-SRM-3134 and PCIGR-1 Zn standards, respectively. δ(98)Mo among molybdenites ranged from -0.6 to +0.6‰ (n=9) while sphalerites showed no δ(66)Zn variations (0.11±0.01‰, 2 SD, n=5). Mine drainage samples from field waste rock weathering experiments were also analyzed to examine the extent of isotopic variability in the dissolved phase. Variations spanned 2.2‰ in δ(98)Mo (-0.1 to +2.1‰) and 0.7‰ in δ(66)Zn (-0.4 to +0.3‰) in mine drainage over a wide pH range (pH2.2-8.6). Lighter δ(66)Zn signatures were observed in alkaline pH conditions, which was consistent with Zn adsorption and/or hydrozincite (Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2) formation. However, in acidic mine drainage Zn isotopic compositions reflected the value of sphalerites. In addition, molybdenum isotope compositions in mine drainage were shifted towards heavier values (0.89±1.25‰, 2 SD, n=16), with some overlap, in comparison to molybdenites and waste rock (0.13±0.82‰, 2 SD, n=9). The cause of heavy Mo isotopic signatures in mine drainage was more difficult to resolve due to isotopic heterogeneity among ore minerals and a variety of possible overlapping processes including dissolution, adsorption and secondary mineral precipitation. This study shows that variation in metal isotope ratios are promising indicators of metal attenuation. Future characterization of isotopic fractionation associated to key environmental reactions will improve the power of Mo and Zn isotope ratios to track the fate of these elements in mine drainage

  14. 40 CFR 434.40 - Applicability; description of the alkaline mine drainage subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alkaline mine drainage subcategory. 434.40 Section 434.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., BCT LIMITATIONS AND NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Alkaline Mine Drainage § 434.40 Applicability; description of the alkaline mine drainage subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  15. Hydrogeochemistry of groundwater seepage into an acidic mining lake

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Lessmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    In the Lusatian Lignite Mining District 259 mining lakes (ML) are originating from abandoned mines. They show significant differences in their morphometry and are mostly strong acidic (HEMM et al. 2002). The oxidation of sedimentary pyrite in aerated dump sediments (tertiary sands) forms acid mine drainage rich in iron and sulphate which is still present after filling the pit and has decisive influence on matter flux, biocoenotic development and possible uses, e.g. recreation or water supply ...

  16. Abatement of acid mine drainage by encapsulation of acid-producing geological material. Final research report, 1 August 1990-31 October 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel coating technology was developed to prevent pyrite oxidation and acid production in coal waste. The mechanism underlying this technology involves leaching coal waste with a coating solution composed of H2O2, KH2PO4, and sodium acetate (NaAC). During the leaching process, H2O2 oxidizes pyrite and produces Fe3+ so that iron phosphate precipitates as a coating on pyrite surfaces. The purpose of NaAC in the coating solution is to eliminate the inhibitory effect of the protons, produced during pyrite oxidation, on the precipitation of iron phosphate. In the study, it was shown that iron phosphate coatings on pyrite surfaces could be established by consuming 5% to 10% of the available pyrite, under a wide range of conditions. It was also demonstrated in the study that iron phosphate coatings on pyrite surfaces could prevent pyrite oxidation and acid production in coal waste

  17. Use of wetlands for the treatment of acidic mining drainage: the processes in the wetland; Utilizacion de humedales para el tratamiento de aguas acidas de mina: procesos que tienen lugar en el humedal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Lastra, M.; Loredo Perez, J. [Departamento de Explotacion y Prospeccion de Minas. Escuela de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain)

    1995-04-01

    Wetlands constitute an alternative method for the treatment of acidic mining drainage, through the utilization of some plant species complex physico-chemical and biological processes take place, producing and improvement of the quality of waters moving through. The inherent characteristics of a wetland in operation will originate an horizontal zonation as for the quality of waters due to their progressive ameliorations of pH increase and heavy metals concentration decreases, anyway a vertical zonation, giving rise to oxidation and reduction zones on the wetland. From the different physical processes occurring on the wetland, the plant roots filtering, the dilution of effluents with superficial and underground waters and aeration phenomena can be considered very important. Oxidation, hydrolysis and sulphate reduction constitute important chemical processes leading to the removal of heavy metals from contaminated effluents. Wetlands have plants as sphagnum, typha and algae advantageous for the treatment of acidic waters provided that they retain heavy metals in their tissues and the contribute furthermore to modify the substrate conditions favoring the creation of reduction zones. The aerobic-anaerobic mixed systems are from the different wetland types those are prevailing because of the advantages of sulphate reduction as contrasted with oxides precipitation for the removal of heavy metals. Wetlands although are not the panacea for the treatment of acidic mining waters they offer advantages and some disadvantages too, over other treatment methods, and they constitute a real alternative for the conventional methods of chemical neutralization. (Author)

  18. Characterization of anthropogenic and natural sources of acid rock drainage at the Cinnamon Gulch abandoned mine land inventory site, Summit County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Colorado's Cinnamon Gulch releases acid rock drainage (ARD) from anthropogenic and natural sources. In 2001, the total discharge from Cinnamon Gulch was measured at 1.02 cfs (29 L/s) at base flow and 4.3 cfs (122 L/s) at high flow (spring runoff). At base flow, natural sources account for 98% of the discharge from the watershed, and about 96% of the chemical loading. At high flow, natural sources contribute 96% of discharge and 92 to 95% of chemical loading. The pH is acidic throughout the Cinnamon Gulch watershed, ranging from 2.9 to 5.4. At baseflow, nearly all of the trace metals analyzed in the 18 samples exceeded state hardness-dependent water quality standards for aquatic life. Maximum dissolved concentrations of selected constituents included 16 mg/ L aluminum, 15 mg/L manganese, 40 mg/L iron, 2 mg/L copper, 560 ??g/L lead, 8.4 mg/L zinc, and 300 mg/L sulfate. Average dissolved concentrations of selected metals at baseflow were 5.5 mg/L aluminum, 5.5 mg/L manganese, 14 ??g/L cadmium, 260 ??g/L copper, 82 ??g/L lead, and 2.8 mg/L zinc.

  19. Mining drainage treatment from the horizon 830 in mine Sasa by simulation anaerobic wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovska, Marija; Golomeova, Mirjana; Golomeov, Blagoj; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    The results of measurements of the quality of mining drainage from the active horizon 830 in Mine SASA show increased concentrations of heavy and toxic metals. The paper shows results of mining drainage treating samples from horizon 830 by simulation anaerobic wetland. Used two types of limestone, one of which is the content of CaCO3 - 93-95%, and the other > 98% CaCO3. As organic matter is used a fractured surrounding forest. The results show that the application of this type of treatmen...

  20. Assessment of metal loads in watersheds affected by acid mine drainage by using tracer injection and synoptic sampling: Cement Creek, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.; Walton-Day, K.; Bencala, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    Watersheds in mineralized zones may contain many mines, each of which can contribute to acidity and the metal load of a stream. In this study the authors delineate hydrogeologic characteristics determining the transport of metals from the watershed to the stream in the watershed of Cement Creek, Colorado. Combining the injection of a chemical tracer, to determine a discharge, with synoptic sampling, to obtain chemistry of major ions and metals, spatially detailed load profiles are quantified. Using the discharge and load profiles, the authors (1) identified sampled inflow sources which emanate from undisturbed as well as previously mined areas; (2) demonstrate, based on simple hydrologic balance, that unsampled, likely dispersed subsurface, inflows are significant; and (3) estimate attenuation. For example, along the 12-km study reach, 108 kg per day of Zn were added to Cement Creek. Almost half of this load came from 10 well-defined areas that included both mined and non-mined parts of the watershed. However, the combined effect of many smaller inflows also contributed a substantial load that could limit the effectiveness of remediation. Of the total Zn load, 58.3 kg/day came from stream segments with no visible inflow, indicating the importance of contributions from dispersed subsurface inflow. The subsurface inflow mostly occurred in areas with substantial fracturing of the bedrock or in areas downstream from tributaries with large alluvial fans. Despite a pH generally less than 4.5, there was 58.4 kg/day of Zn attenuation that occurred in mixing zones downstream from inflows with high pH. Mixing zones can have local areas of pH that are high enough for sorption and precipitation reactions to have an effect. Principal component analysis classified inflows into 7 groups with distinct chemical signatures that represent water-rock interaction with different mineral-alteration suites in the watershed. The present approach provides a detailed snapshot of metal load

  1. Characteristics of the eukaryotic community structure in acid mine drainage lake in Anhui Province, China%安徽某铁矿酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽娜; 郝春博; 王丽华; 李思远; 冯传平

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构特征以及群落结构与环境因子之间的关系.[方法]利用分子生物学方法,通过构建18S rRNA基因克隆文库进行系统发育分析;利用典范对应分析(CCA)方法解析环境因子对真核生物群落结构的影响.[结果]系统发育分析表明:子囊菌门(Ascomycota)普遍存在于4个样品中,并在样品1和样品3中占统治地位,而绿藻门(Chlorophyta)和担子菌门(Basidiomycota)分别为样品2和样品4的优势类群.该酸性矿山废水中的克隆与许多已知的耐酸耐重金属真核生物亲缘关系较近,如Sarcinomyces petricola、Penicillium janthinellum、Coniochaeta velutina、Trichoderma viride、Chlorella protothecoides var.acidicola、Ochromonas sp.等.此外,样品中还存在大量的已知人类病原菌,如Lecythophora hoffmannii、Cryptococcus neoformans.CCA分析表明:TN、SO24-、Fe2+、Eh是影响真核生物群落空间分布的主要因素.[结论]所研究的酸性矿山废水中真核生物的群落结构在时间和空间上均有较大差异,这可能与水体的理化性质有关;高含量人类致病菌的存在是之前研究所未发现的;酸性环境中真核生物的生态学研究有助于开发高效处理酸性矿山废水的方法.%[Objective] We characterized eukaryotic community structure and the relationship between the community structure and environmental factors in acidic mine drainage (AMD) lake of a sulfide mine in Anhui Province, China. [Methods] The 18S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed by using molecular biology techniques to analyze the eukaryotic phylogenetic relationships, and the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyze the relationship between the community structure and environmental factors. [Results] The phylogenetic analysis shows that Ascomycota is widespread in the four samples and dominated in the AMD-1 and AMD-3 clone libraries, whereas Chlorophyta and

  2. Regional gas drainage techniques in Chinese coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Haifeng; Cheng Yuanping; Wang Lei

    2012-01-01

    China's rapid economic development has increased the demand for coal.These results in Chinese coal mines being extended to deeper levels.The eastern Chinese,more economical developed,regions have a long history of coal mining and many coal mines have now started deep mining at a depth from 800 to 1500 m.This increase in mining depth,geostresses,pressures,and gas content of the coal seam complicates geologic construction conditions.Lower permeability and softer coal contribute to increasing numbers of coal and gas outburst,and gas explosion,disasters.A search on effective methods of preventing gas disasters has been provided funds from the Chinese government since 1998.The National Engineering Research Center of Coal Gas Control and the Huainan and Huaibei Mining Group have conducted theoretical and experimental research on a regional gas extraction technology.The results included two important findings.First,grouped coal seams allow adoption of a method where a first,key protective layer is mined to protect upper and lower coal seams by increasing permeability from 400 to 3000 times.Desorption of gas and gas extraction in the protected coal seam of up to 60%,or more,may be achieved in this way.Second,a single seam may be protected by using a dense network of extraction boreholes consisting of cross and along-bed holes.Combined with this is increased use of water that increases extraction of coal seam gas by up to 50%.Engineering practice showed that regional gas drainage technology eliminates regional coal and gas outburst and also enables mining under low gas conditions.These research results have been adopted into the national safety codes of production technology.This paper systematically introduces the principles of the technology,the engineering methods and techniques,and the parameters of regional gas drainage.Engineering applications are discussed.

  3. Exploration drilling for pre-mining gas drainage in coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High natural gas content in coal seams and low gas drainage efficiency are the basic issues to be addressed in order to ensure coal mining safety. A great number of wells being drilled within various gas drainage techniques significantly increase the costs of coal mining and do not reduce the gas content levels within the coal beds up to the required parameters in a short period of time. The integrated approach toward exploration well spacing applied at the stage of project development could make it possible to consider coal seam data to provide more effective gas drainage not only ahead of mining but also during further gas content reduction and commercial production of methane. The comparative analysis of a closely spaced grid of exploration program compiled in accordance with the recommendations on applying mineral reserves classification and inferred resources of coal and shale coal deposits and currently effective stimulation radius proves the necessity and possibility to consider exploration well data for gas drainage. Pre-mining gas drainage could ensure the safety of mining operations

  4. Chemical and mineralogical changes of waste and tailings from the Murgul Cu deposit (Artvin, NE Turkey): implications for occurrence of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Emine Selva; Akçay, Miğraç

    2016-04-01

    Being one of the largest copper-producing resources in Turkey, the Murgul deposit has been a source of environmental pollution for very long time. Operated through four open pits with an annual production of about 3 million tons of ore at an average grade of about 0.5 % Cu, the deposit to date has produced an enormous pile of waste (exceeding 100 million tons) with tailings composed of 36 % SiO2, 39 % Fe2O3 and 32 % S, mainly in the form of pyrite and quartz. Waters in the vicinity of the deposit vary from high acid-acid (2.71-3.85) and high-extremely metal rich (34.48-348.12 mg/l in total) in the open pits to near neutral (6.51-7.83) and low metal (14.39-973.52 μg/l in total) in downstream environments. Despite low metal contents and near neutral pH levels of the latter, their suspended particle loads are extremely high and composed mainly of quartz and clay minerals with highly elevated levels of Fe (3.5 to 24.5 % Fe2O3; 11 % on average) and S (0.5 to 20.6 % S; 7 % on average), showing that Fe is mainly in the form of pyrite and lesser hematite. They also contain high concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Waters collected along the course of polluted drainages are supersaturated with respect to Fe phases such as goethite, hematite, maghemite, magnetite, schwertmannite and ferrihydrite. Secondary phases such as Fe-sulphates are only found near the pits, but not along the streams due to neutral pH conditions, where pebbles are covered and cemented by Fe-oxides and hydroxides indicating that oxidation of pyrite has taken place especially at times of low water load. It follows, then, that the pyrite-rich sediment load of streams fed by the waste of the Murgul deposit is currently a big threat to the aquatic life and environment and will continue to be so even after the closure of the deposit. In fact, the oxidation will be enhanced and acidity increased due to natural conditions, which necessitates strong remedial actions to be taken. PMID:26637995

  5. EVALUATION OF A METHOD USING COLLOIDAL GAS APHRONS TO REMEDIATE METALS-CONTAMINATED MINE DRAINAGE WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Williams Grimes

    2002-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in which three selected metals-contaminated mine drainage water samples were treated by chemical precipitation followed by flotation using colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs) to concentrate the precipitates. Drainage water samples used in the experiments were collected from an abandoned turn-of-the-century copper mine in south-central Wyoming, an inactive gold mine in Colorado's historic Clear Creek mining district, and a relatively modern gold mine near Rapid City, South Dakota. The copper mine drainage sample was nearly neutral (pH 6.5) while the two gold mine samples were quite acidic (pH {approx}2.5). Metals concentrations ranged from a few mg/L for the copper mine drainage to several thousand mg/L for the sample from South Dakota. CGAs are emulsions of micrometer-sized soap bubbles generated in a surfactant solution. In flotation processes the CGA microbubbles provide a huge interfacial surface area and cause minimal turbulence as they rise through the liquid. CGA flotation can provide an inexpensive alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). The CGA bubbles are similar in size to the bubbles typical of DAF. However, CGAs are generated at ambient pressure, eliminating the need for compressors and thus reducing energy, capital, and maintenance costs associated with DAF systems. The experiments involved precipitation of dissolved metals as either hydroxides or sulfides followed by flotation. The CGAs were prepared using a number of different surfactants. Chemical precipitation followed by CGA flotation reduced contaminant metals concentrations by more than 90% for the copper mine drainage and the Colorado gold mine drainage. Contaminant metals were concentrated into a filterable sludge, representing less than 10% of the original volume. CGA flotation of the highly contaminated drainage sample from South Dakota was ineffective. All of the various surfactants used in this study generated a large sludge volume and none provided a

  6. Quantification of Tinto River sediment microbial communities: importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their role in attenuating acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Amils, Ricardo; Sanz, José Luis

    2012-07-01

    Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is a natural acidic rock drainage (ARD) environment produced by the bio-oxidation of metallic sulfides from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. This study quantified the abundance of diverse microbial populations inhabiting ARD-related sediments from two physicochemically contrasting sampling sites (SN and JL dams). Depth profiles of total cell numbers differed greatly between the two sites yet were consistent in decreasing sharply at greater depths. Although catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization with domain-specific probes showed that Bacteria (>98%) dominated over Archaea (important differences were detected at the class and genus levels, reflecting differences in pH, redox potential, and heavy metal concentrations. At SN, where the pH and redox potential are similar to that of the water column (pH 2.5 and +400 mV), the most abundant organisms were identified as iron-reducing bacteria: Acidithiobacillus spp. and Acidiphilium spp., probably related to the higher iron solubility at low pH. At the JL dam, characterized by a banded sediment with higher pH (4.2 to 6.2), more reducing redox potential (-210 mV to 50 mV), and a lower solubility of iron, members of sulfate-reducing genera Syntrophobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Desulfurella were dominant. The latter was quantified with a newly designed CARD-FISH probe. In layers where sulfate-reducing bacteria were abundant, pH was higher and redox potential and levels of dissolved metals and iron were lower. These results suggest that the attenuation of ARD characteristics is biologically driven by sulfate reducers and the consequent precipitation of metals and iron as sulfides.

  7. Processos físico-químicos em drenagem ácida de mina em mineração de carvão no sul do Brasil Physico-chemical processes in acid mine drainage in coal mining, south Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Polvani Campaner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage generated from coal mine showed a pH of 3.2, high concentrations of SO4(2-, Al, Fe, Mn, Zn and minor As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb. The major reduction in the concentration occurred for Al, As, Cr, Fe and Pb after the treatment with CaO. The evolution of these acid waters within the tributary stream showed decreasing concentration for all soluble constituents, except Al. This natural attenuation was controlled by pH (6.4 to 10.8 as a result of concurrent mixing with tributary stream and reaction with local bedrock that contains limestone. Aluminum increasing concentration during this evolution seems to be related to an input of Al-enriched waters due to the leaching of silicate minerals in alkaline conditions.

  8. Acid drainages of the pyritic sterile from the Pocos de Caldas uranium mine: environmental interpretation and implications; Drenagens acidas do esteril piritoso da mina de uranio de Pocos de Caldas: interpretacao e implicacoes ambientais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vicente Paulo de

    1995-12-01

    Considering the planned closure of the first uranium mine and milling plant operating in Brazil, located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, in the State of Minas Gerais, in the next two years, there is the need to obtain basic information for its decommissioning. Special attention has been directed to the following critical areas: open pit, tailing, dam and waste rock piles, because these are the main sources of acid drainage generation. These waters cannot be allowed to flow in the external environment because in addition to sulphuric acid, there is a number of elements in concentration above those allowed by regulations. Among the waste piles (bota-foras BF) two of them BF-4 and BF-8, are in a process of acid generation, thus requiring more attention. The objective of this work was to simulate at the laboratory scale the oxidation and the reduction zones of BF-4. The experiments were conducted in acrylic columns, where the waste sample was kept under aerated and saturated conditions, in different columns. The control of the chemical (solubilized chemical species), physico-chemical (redox potential, pH, conductivity) and biological (bacterial activity) parameters has been carried out on the acid solutions generated by the chemical and biological reactions that occur at the waste. Although the results refer to a four month period, some relevant points can be highlighted, which will serve as a basis for further research. The mineralogical characterization identified the existence of other sulphides associated to pyrite with lower oxidation potential than the latter. The results obtained with the biological characterization for the two conditions studied revealed that the bacterial activity is more intense in the region in contact with air, than in saturated region. (author) 30 refs., 29 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Inorganic pigments made from the recycling of coal mine drainage treatment sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcello, R.R.; Galato, S.; Peterson, M.; Riella, H.G.; Bernardin, A.M. [Bairro University, Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    2008-09-15

    Coal has been used in Brazil as a solid fuel for thermoelectric generators for several years. However, coal exploitation affects the environment intensely mainly because Brazilian coal contains excess ash and pyrite (iron disulfide). According to the local coal industry syndicate, the average annual coal run per mine is 6 million ton/year: 3.5 million ton/year are rejected and disposed of in landfills. Besides pyrite, Brazilian coal contains Mn, Fe, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ge, Se, and Co. Additionally, the water used for coal beneficiation causes pyrite oxidation, forming an acid mine drainage (AMD). This drainage solubilizes the metals, transporting them into the environment, making treatment a requirement. This work deals with the use of sedimented residue from treated coal mine drainage sludge to obtain inorganic pigments that could be used in the ceramic industry. The residue was dried ground and calcined (around 1250{sup o}C). The calcined pigment was then micronized (D-50 similar to 2 {mu} m). Chemical (XRF), thermal (DTA/TG), particle size (laser), and mineralogical (XRD) analyses were carried out on the residue. After calcination and micronization, mineralogical analyses (XRD) were used to determine the pigment structure at 1250{sup o}C. Finally, the pigments were mixed with transparent glaze and fired in a laboratory roller kiln (1130{sup o}C, 5 min). The results were promising, showing that brown colors can be obtained with pigments made by residues.

  10. Inorganic pigments made from the recycling of coal mine drainage treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcello, R R; Galato, S; Peterson, M; Riella, H G; Bernardin, A M

    2008-09-01

    Continuous industrial development increases energy consumption and, consequently, the consumption of fossil fuels. Coal mineral has been used in Brazil as a solid fuel for thermoelectric generators for several years. However, coal exploitation affects the environment intensely, mainly because Brazilian coal contains excess ash and pyrite (iron disulfide). According to the local coal industry syndicate, the average annual coal run per mine is 6 million ton/year; 3.5 million ton/year are rejected and disposed of in landfills. Besides pyrite, Brazilian coal contains Mn, Fe, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ge, Se, and Co. Additionally, the water used for coal beneficiation causes pyrite oxidation, forming an acid mine drainage (AMD). This drainage solubilizes the metals, transporting them into the environment, making treatment a requirement. This work deals with the use of sedimented residue from treated coal mine drainage sludge to obtain inorganic pigments that could be used in the ceramic industry. The residue was dried, ground and calcined ( approximately 1250 degrees C). The calcined pigment was then micronized (D(50) approximately 2mum). Chemical (XRF), thermal (DTA/TG), particle size (laser), and mineralogical (XRD) analyses were carried out on the residue. After calcination and micronization, mineralogical analyses (XRD) were used to determine the pigment structure at 1250 degrees C. Finally, the pigments were mixed with transparent glaze and fired in a laboratory roller kiln (1130 degrees C, 5min). The results were promising, showing that brown colors can be obtained with pigments made by residues. PMID:17703872

  11. Data from a solute transport experiment in the Leviathan Mine drainage, Alpine County, California, October 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, M.R.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A twenty-four hour injection of chloride and sodium was made into Leviathan Creek, Alpine County, California to aid interpretation of the coupled interactions between physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. Leviathan Creek was chosen because it receives acid mine drainage from Leviathan Mine, an abandoned open-pit sulfur mine. Water samples were collected at 15 sites along a 4.39 kilometer reach and analyzed for chloride, sodium, sulfate and fluoride. Dissolved concentrations are presented in tabular format and time-series plots. Duplicate samples were analyzed by two laboratories: the Central Laboratory, Denver, Colorado and a research laboratory in Menlo Park, California. A tabular comparison of the analyses and plots of the differences between the two laboratories is presented. Hydrographs and instantaneous discharge measurements are included. (USGS)

  12. Gas drainage from different mine areas:optimal placement of drainage systems for deep coal seams with high gas emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Lu; Ping Li; Jian Chen; Chuijin Zhang; Junhua Xue; Tao Yu

    2015-01-01

    The techniques of stress relief mining in low-permeability coal seams and pillarless gob side retained roadway entry using Y-type ventilation and gas drainage systems were developed to control gas outbursts and applied successfully. However, as the mining depth increasing, parts of the gas drainage system are not suitable for mines with high gas emissions. Because larger mining depths cause higher ground stresses, it becomes extremely difficult to maintain long gob side roadways. The greater deformation suffered by the roadway is not favorable for borehole drilling for continuous gas drainage. To solve these problems, Y-type ventilation and gas drainage systems installed from a roof roadway were designed for drainage optimization. This system was designed based on a gas-enrichment zone analysis developed from mining the 11-2 coal seam in the Zhuji Mine at Huainan, Anhui Province, China. The method of Y-type gas extraction from different mine areas was applied to the panel 1112(1) in the Zhuji Mine. The absolute gas emission rate was up to 116.3 m3/min with an average flow of 69.1 m3/min at an average drainage concentration of nearly 85%. After the Y-type method was adopted, the concentration of gas in the return air was 0.15%–0.64%, averaging 0.39%with a ventilation rate of 2100–2750 m3/min. The gas management system proved to be efficient, and the effective gas control allowed safe production to continue.

  13. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  14. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  15. COMPOST-FREE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE, TECHNICAL EVALUATION BULLETIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  16. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE - TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  17. Geochemical Characterization of Mine Waste, Mine Drainage, and Stream Sediments at the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Adams, Monique; Anthony, Michael W.; Briggs, Paul H.; Jackson, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site in the Vermont copper belt consists of the abandoned Smith, Eureka, and Union mines, all of which exploited Besshi-type massive sulfide deposits. The site was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004 due to aquatic ecosystem impacts. This study was intended to be a precursor to a formal remedial investigation by the USEPA, and it focused on the characterization of mine waste, mine drainage, and stream sediments. A related study investigated the effects of the mine drainage on downstream surface waters. The potential for mine waste and drainage to have an adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems, on drinking- water supplies, and to human health was assessed on the basis of mineralogy, chemical concentrations, acid generation, and potential for metals to be leached from mine waste and soils. The results were compared to those from analyses of other Vermont copper belt Superfund sites, the Elizabeth Mine and Ely Copper Mine, to evaluate if the waste material at the Pike Hill Copper Mine was sufficiently similar to that of the other mine sites that USEPA can streamline the evaluation of remediation technologies. Mine-waste samples consisted of oxidized and unoxidized sulfidic ore and waste rock, and flotation-mill tailings. These samples contained as much as 16 weight percent sulfides that included chalcopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and sphalerite. During oxidation, sulfides weather and may release potentially toxic trace elements and may produce acid. In addition, soluble efflorescent sulfate salts were identified at the mines; during rain events, the dissolution of these salts contributes acid and metals to receiving waters. Mine waste contained concentrations of cadmium, copper, and iron that exceeded USEPA Preliminary Remediation Goals. The concentrations of selenium in mine waste were higher than the average composition of eastern United States soils. Most mine waste was

  18. The treatment possibility of mining drainage from horizon 830 in the Sasa Mine, Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Stojanovska, Marija; Krstev, Boris; Golomeov, Blagoj; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The drainage system on mining area Sasa consists of surface water from the rivers Crvena, Svinja and Kozja which are flowing from field of ore deposit, and with other small mountain tributaries that flow into the River Kamenichka. The results of the measurements show that in all samples from surface waters are detected increased concentrations of heavy and toxic metals, except for the water of the River Crvena. These increased concentrations are a consequence of historical anthropoge...

  19. In-situ treatment of mine drainage water using porous reactive walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blowes, D.W.; Ptacek, C.J.; Waybrant, K.R.; Bain, J.G. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Waterloo Centre for Groundwater Research

    1995-01-01

    The purpose is to describe research on porous reactive walls, which are installed in the path of plumes of ground water from tailings, to determine their suitability for prevention and remediation of acid mine drainage and dissolved metals release. The method involves removal of a portion of the aquifer in the ground water plume path and its replacement by a permeable reactive mixture. Experiments under way and preliminary results are described for laboratory batch and column experiments and for a small scale field experiment using reactive walls containing organic carbon and sulphate-reducing bacteria. The results suggest that the method is effective and economically viable. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Application of water flow and geochemical models to support the remediation of acid rock drainage from the uranium mining site of Pocos de Caldas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper discusses the use of two numerical models (HYDRUS-2D and STEADQL-v4) for simulating water flow and relevant geochemical processes in one of the waste rock piles of the first uranium mine in Brazil, in order to facilitate the selection of appropriate remediation strategies. The long time scale required for the oxidation of sulfidic wastes (at least 600 years) implies the need to implement permanent remediation actions. The best remediation scheme should depend on the water flow regime inside the waste pile and on the geochemical processes that occur as a result of the interactions between water and the waste (especially oxidative dissolution of pyrite). Accurate modeling of the waste site, which contains a wide range of grain and rock sizes at different degrees of water saturation and is subject to reactive multicomponent transport, entails considerable physical, mathematical and numerical challenges. This paper describes the approach used to obtain a detailed representation of the system involving both unsaturated/ saturated flow (most of the physical properties of the waste were estimated from measured data) and the geochemical network reactions (including equilibrium and kinetics reactions). (authors)

  1. Discussion on Acidic Mining Drainage Production and Prevention in Carbonate Rock Area%碳酸盐岩地区矿山酸性排水的产生及其防治初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗远红; 雷良奇; 常耀辉; 马于涛

    2011-01-01

    The sulphide in tailings produces acidic mining drainage(AMD) after a series of physical and chemical reactions with air,water,microorganisms.People once have considered that the tailings in carbonate rock areas will not cause acid pollutions because the carbonate minerals in tailings and surrounding rocks have neutralization effect.But there are serious acid pollutions in typical carbonate rock areas like Dachang of Guangxi province,Fankou and Dabaoshan of Guangdong province,Niujiaotang of Guizhou province,etc.The main cause is that in the process of carbonate mineral neutralization,the secondary minerals precipitate and adhere to the surface of carbonate minerals and stop further response,so the actual neutralization dose can not meet the theoretical value.Acidic mining drainage carries large amounts of metal ions which could bring serious damage to ecological environment and mine engineering facilities in carbonate rock areas.According to the characteristics of tailings in carbonate rock areas,the most efficient method for acidification of tailings is to adopt covering method for new tailings and permeable reactive barriers for acidified tailings.%尾矿中的硫化物在空气、水、微生物等的作用下,发生一系列的物理化学反应,形成矿山酸性排水(AMD)。在碳酸盐岩地区,由于尾矿和围岩中都含有大量对酸具有中和效应的碳酸盐矿物,于是人们一直认为碳酸盐岩地区的尾矿不存在酸污染。而如广西大厂、广东凡口及大宝山、贵州牛角塘等碳酸盐岩地区矿山的尾矿却存在着严重的酸污染,其主要原因是碳酸盐矿物在中和酸水过程中,表面会形成阻止反应进一步进行的次生包壳,碳酸盐矿物的实际中和量达不到其理论值。矿山酸性排水携带大量的重金属离子,对碳酸盐岩地区的生态环境及矿山工程设施带来严重的危害。针对碳酸盐岩地区尾矿自身的特殊性,对新建尾矿堆采用覆盖

  2. Wetlands as a means to reduce the environmental impact of mine drainage waters

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöblom, Åsa

    2003-01-01

    In many mining regions of the world, pollution of surface water and groundwater by drainage water originating from mines aiming waste poses either a serious threat to the environment, or a severe environmental problem. During the last two and a half decades, treatment of mine drainage water in constructed and natural wetlands has emerged as an alternative to more conventional methods to handle the problem. In this thesis, the major biogeochemical processes behind metal immobilization in wetla...

  3. Analysis of Microbial Community Composition in Obturating Acid Mine Drainage%封闭环境下酸性矿坑水中微生物生态多样性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍强; 刘晰; 刘文斌; 谢建平; 刘新星

    2009-01-01

    Tong Lushan Copper Mine has the longest exploitation time span in the world. Many disused mines produce a large amount of environmental detrimental acid mine drainage (AMD). The microbial community in obturating AMD samples,which collected from Tong Lushan Copper Mine,was identified by the technology of the restriction fragment length polymorphisma (RFLP) analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA clone libraries. The bacterial and archaeal richness of acidophilic communities in this acidic and high-ion-concentration AMD were lower when compared with other extremophile and non-extremophile assemblages. The result of RFLP analysis and phylogenetic anlysis show that the majority of the bacterial clones were A. ferrooxidans belonging to the gamma-Proteobacteria and L. ferrooxidans belonging to the Nitospira while the majority of the archaeal clones were affiliated with Thermoplasma.Archaeal clones related to uncultured methanogenic archaeon were first found in obturating AMD environment and accounted for more than a quarter of the total archaeal clones. This microbial community structure composed by both bacteria and archaea contributed much to the generation of AMD.%铜绿山铜矿是世界开采时间最长的矿井之一,在开采过程中有许多矿井被废弃,许多废弃的矿井内产生了大量的对环境有害的酸性矿坑水.酸性矿坑水取自铜绿山铜矿某废弃矿井,利用限制性酶切片断多样性分析(RFLP分析)对酸性矿坑水中的微生物生态多样性进行了研究.研究表明,酸性矿坑水呈酸性,相对于其他极端与非极端生态环境,酸性矿坑水中的细菌与古菌的群落多样性较低.RFLP分析与系统发育分析表明,酸性矿坑水中细菌主要由A.fcrrooxidans(属于gamma-Proteobacteria)和L.ferrooxidans(属于Nitospira)成;古菌主要由Thermoplasma相关古菌组成.在这种封闭环境的酸性矿坑水中首次发现了类似于产甲烷古菌的克隆片断,其占古菌种群的四分

  4. Neutralization Sediment Treatment of Minim Harmful Heavy Metal Elements in Acid Mine Drainage%矿山酸性废水中微量有害重金属元素的中和沉淀去除

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李笛; 张发根; 曾振祥

    2012-01-01

    Although treating the acid mine drainage by the neutralization method of limestone and lime is the most common practice, few researches have done to analyze the removal effects on those minimal a-mounts of toxic heavy metal elements in it. In our series of experiments the acid mine drainage of some py-rite excavating plant has been treated by neutralization of lime and limestone. And the sedimentation performance and removal effects on those minim harmful heavy metal ions are studied carefully. The experiments show that in terms of most heavy metal ions, the greater the pH values are, the better sedimentation removal effects will be. But if the metal ion will produce amphoteric compound deposits, there will be a better pH value which will result the best removal effect. The neutralization method of limestone has better removal effects to those metallic ions produced in acid conditions and has better sedimentation performance. But the highest pH value required by this method is 6, and its removal effects to other kinds of metal ions are not so satisfactory. In contrast, the neutralization of lime can have more flexible pH value ranges and its removal effects are better than limestone. The experiments further discover that the two stage neutralization of limestone and lime can reduce about a third lime dozing quantity and sediment, causing better sedimentation performance and lower water ratio in produced sediment compared with lime treatment method. Since the sedimentation performance and removal effects of those minim harmful heavy metal elements are closely related to the pH value, the accurate operation of equipment, the feeding pattern and feeding quantity of neutralizer are critical besides the careful design of processing. These study results provide valid basis for establishing optimum technology and process controlling conditions in treating the acid mine drainage by the neutralization sediment treatment of limestone and lime.%石灰中和及其衍生方法

  5. 生物成因次生铁矿物对酸性矿山废水中三价砷的吸附%THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS OF ADSORPTION OF ARSENITE IN ACID MINING DRAINAGE BY BIOGENIC SECONDARY IRON MINERALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢越; 周立祥

    2012-01-01

    Schwertmannite, jarosite and goethite are common secondary iron minerals found in acid mining drainage. They were formed biological under normal temperature and pressure with the aid of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in this study. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted under three different temperatures ( 15℃ , 25℃ and 35℃) to explore arse-nite adsorption behaviors of the three biogenic secondary iron minerals in simulated acid mining drainage ( pH3. 0) . It was found that arsenite adsorption of the three biogenic minerals were of the second order of reaction and could well be described by the Lagergren pseudo-second order rate equation, with correlation coefficient being 0. 94. Their adsorption enthalpy was 11.76 , 18.40 and 9. 34 kJ mol-1, separately for the three different minerals and their △G's were all <0. The adsorption of arsenite was a kind of endothemnic spontaneous process.%在常温常压条件下,利用嗜酸性氧化亚铁硫杆菌的促进作用,生物合成了酸性矿山废水中常见的三种次生铁矿物:施氏矿物(schwertmannite)、黄钾铁矾(jarosite)和针铁矿(goethite).在15℃、25℃、35℃三个不同温度下,通过序批式吸附试验研究,在pH3.0的模拟酸性矿山废水条件下,3种生物成因次生铁矿物对As(Ⅲ)的吸附性能.结果表明:3种生物成因的次生矿物对As(Ⅲ)的吸附属于拟二级反应,可以用Lagergren 拟二级速率方程进行拟合,相关系数均在0.97以上.吸附速率常数K分别为施氏矿物0.094 g mg-1 min-1,针铁矿0.042 g mg-1 min-1,黄钾铁矾0.02 g mg-1 min-1.3种生物成因铁矿物对As(Ⅲ)的吸附等温线符合Langmuir方程和Freundlich方程,相关系数均在0.94以上.吸附反应的焓变Δ/分别为11.76、18.40和9.34 kJ mol-1,ΔG均小于0,吸附过程属于吸热的自发反应.

  6. Application of maghemite nanoparticles as sorbents for the removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) ions from aqueous solution in acid mine drainage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etale, Anita; Tutu, Hlanganani; Drake, Deanne C.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorptive removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) by maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions to assess NP potential for remediating AMD-contaminated water. The effects of time, NP and metal concentration, as well as manganese and sulphate ions were quantified at pH 3. Adsorption of all three ions was rapid, and equilibrium was attained in 5 min or less. 56 % of Cu, 53 % of Mn and 49 % of U were adsorbed. In addition, adsorption efficiencies were enhanced by ≥10 % in the presence of manganese and sulphate ions, although Cu sorption was reduced in 1:2 Cu-to-Mn solutions. Adsorption also increased with pH: 86 % Cu, 62 % Mn and 77 % U were removed from solution at pH 9 and increasing initial metal concentrations. Increasing NP concentrations did not, however, always increase metal removal. Kinetics data were best described by a pseudo-second-order model, implying chemisorption, while isotherm data were better fitted by the Freundlich model. Metal removal by NPs was then tested in AMD-contaminated surface and ground water. Removal efficiencies of up to 46 % for Cu and 54 % for Mn in surface water and 8 % for Cu and 50 % for Mn in ground water were achieved, confirming that maghemite NPs can be applied for the removal of these ions from AMD-contaminated waters. Notably, whereas sulphates may increase adsorption efficiencies, high Mn concentrations in AMD will likely inhibit Cu sorption.

  7. ExperimentaI research on maifan stone+scrape iron process for treating acidic mine drainage%麦饭石+铁屑处理煤矿酸性废水试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄军贞; 江富; 朱志涛; 戴男男; 郭旭颖

    2015-01-01

    针对多组分煤矿酸性废水(AMD)污染程度严重、治理费用高的特点,选取麦饭石、铁屑作为AMD井下原位处理的试验材料,开展了动态土柱试验研究。试验结果表明,由麦饭石及铁屑复合组成的1#柱对AMD的去除效果明显好于仅由麦饭石组成的2#柱,其对 Fe2+、Mn2+、SO42-、COD 的平均去除率分别为99.9%、64.5%、60.0%、53.8%,出水pH为8.0。该方法为AMD的井下原位廉价处理及麦饭石的新应用提供了参考。%Aimed at the acidic mine drainage (AMD) characteristics,such as serious contamination and expensive treatment cost,a dynamic pillar study has been executed by using maifan stone and scrape iron as materials for the in-situ treatment of AMD under the shaft. The experiments show that Column 1 which consists of maifan stone and scrap iron has obviously better removing capacity than Column 2 which consists of maifan stone alone. In Column 1 , the average removing rates of Fe2+,Mn2+,SO42-,COD are 99.9%,64.5%,60.0%,53.8%,respectively,and the effluent pH is 8.0. This method provides references for the treatment of AMD in-situ at a low cost,and new applications of maifan stone.

  8. Geochemistry and stable sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of the Podwisniowka pit pond water generated by acid mine drainage (Holy Cross Mountains, south-central Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migaszewski, Zdzislaw M. [Jan Kochanowski University (Pedagogical University), Institute of Chemistry, Geochemistry and the Environment Division, 15G Swietokrzyska Street, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)], E-mail: zmig@ujk.kielce.pl; Galuszka, Agnieszka [Jan Kochanowski University (Pedagogical University), Institute of Chemistry, Geochemistry and the Environment Division, 15G Swietokrzyska Street, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Halas, Stanislaw [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Institute of Physics, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, 1 Maria Curie-Sklodowska Square, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Dolegowska, Sabina [Jan Kochanowski University (Pedagogical University), Institute of Chemistry, Geochemistry and the Environment Division, 15G Swietokrzyska Street, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Dabek, Jozef [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Institute of Physics, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, 1 Maria Curie-Sklodowska Square, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Starnawska, Ewa [Electron Microscope Laboratory, Polish Geological Institute, 4 Rakowiecka Street, 00-975 Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-12-15

    The paper presents the results of a geochemical and isotopic study of acidic pond water in the abandoned Podwisniowka quarry (Poland). The scope of investigations also encompassed mineralogical and isotopic studies of pyrite and related supergene minerals. Compared to similar sites throughout the world, the pit pond water examined is characterized by a very low pH averaging 2.64 {+-} 0.33 and simultaneously very low concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (geometric mean of 237 {+-} 57 mg L{sup -1}), Fe(II) (4.8 {+-} 3.4 mg L{sup -1}), Fe(III) (10.0 {+-} 6.2 mg L{sup -1}) and other trace elements. This acidity has been generated by complex processes of As-rich pyrite oxidation combined primarily with hydrolysis, precipitation, and transformation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates and oxyhydroxides into goethite. The specific mineralogy of ore and gangue minerals, but especially the lack of acid-buffering constituents, has additionally contributed to the very low pH and element concentrations. Of the toxic elements, the high content of As (1111-1879 mg kg{sup -1}) in the western part of pit pond sediment may be of great concern, especially when using lime as a neutralizing agent of the acidic water. The {delta}{sup 34}S of soluble SO{sub 4} varied from -19.8 per mille to -11.1 per mille and was different from that of efflorescent sulfates (-25.7 per mille to -25.4 per mille ) and host pyrite (-25.4 {+-} 2.5 per mille ). The comparison of the {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (-2.0 {+-} 1.2 per mille ) and {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O (-6.2 {+-} 3.5 per mille ) values indicated that the pyrite underwent bacterially catalyzed oxidation by two natural oxidants, primarily by Fe{sup 3+} and to a lesser extent O{sub 2}.

  9. Sustainable Remediation of Legacy Mine Drainage: A Case Study of the Flight 93 National Memorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emili, Lisa A.; Pizarchik, Joseph; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2016-03-01

    Pollution from mining activities is a global environmental concern, not limited to areas of current resource extraction, but including a broader geographic area of historic (legacy) and abandoned mines. The pollution of surface waters from acid mine drainage is a persistent problem and requires a holistic and sustainable approach to addressing the spatial and temporal complexity of mining-specific problems. In this paper, we focus on the environmental, socio-economic, and legal challenges associated with the concurrent activities to remediate a coal mine site and to develop a national memorial following a catastrophic event. We provide a conceptual construct of a socio-ecological system defined at several spatial, temporal, and organizational scales and a critical synthesis of the technical and social learning processes necessary to achieving sustainable environmental remediation. Our case study is an example of a multi-disciplinary management approach, whereby collaborative interaction of stakeholders, the emergence of functional linkages for information exchange, and mediation led to scientifically informed decision making, creative management solutions, and ultimately environmental policy change.

  10. Sustainable Remediation of Legacy Mine Drainage: A Case Study of the Flight 93 National Memorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emili, Lisa A; Pizarchik, Joseph; Mahan, Carolyn G

    2016-03-01

    Pollution from mining activities is a global environmental concern, not limited to areas of current resource extraction, but including a broader geographic area of historic (legacy) and abandoned mines. The pollution of surface waters from acid mine drainage is a persistent problem and requires a holistic and sustainable approach to addressing the spatial and temporal complexity of mining-specific problems. In this paper, we focus on the environmental, socio-economic, and legal challenges associated with the concurrent activities to remediate a coal mine site and to develop a national memorial following a catastrophic event. We provide a conceptual construct of a socio-ecological system defined at several spatial, temporal, and organizational scales and a critical synthesis of the technical and social learning processes necessary to achieving sustainable environmental remediation. Our case study is an example of a multi-disciplinary management approach, whereby collaborative interaction of stakeholders, the emergence of functional linkages for information exchange, and mediation led to scientifically informed decision making, creative management solutions, and ultimately environmental policy change. PMID:26440656

  11. Sustainable Remediation of Legacy Mine Drainage: A Case Study of the Flight 93 National Memorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emili, Lisa A; Pizarchik, Joseph; Mahan, Carolyn G

    2016-03-01

    Pollution from mining activities is a global environmental concern, not limited to areas of current resource extraction, but including a broader geographic area of historic (legacy) and abandoned mines. The pollution of surface waters from acid mine drainage is a persistent problem and requires a holistic and sustainable approach to addressing the spatial and temporal complexity of mining-specific problems. In this paper, we focus on the environmental, socio-economic, and legal challenges associated with the concurrent activities to remediate a coal mine site and to develop a national memorial following a catastrophic event. We provide a conceptual construct of a socio-ecological system defined at several spatial, temporal, and organizational scales and a critical synthesis of the technical and social learning processes necessary to achieving sustainable environmental remediation. Our case study is an example of a multi-disciplinary management approach, whereby collaborative interaction of stakeholders, the emergence of functional linkages for information exchange, and mediation led to scientifically informed decision making, creative management solutions, and ultimately environmental policy change.

  12. Acid rock drainage and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall events cause both increases and decreases in acid and metals concentrations and their loadings from mine wastes, and unmined mineralized areas, into receiving streams based on data from 3 mines sites in the United States and other sites outside the US. Gradual increases in concentrations occur during long dry spells and sudden large increases are observed during the rising limb of the discharge following dry spells (first flush). By the time the discharge peak has occurred, concentrations are usually decreased, often to levels below those of pre-storm conditions and then they slowly rise again during the next dry spell. These dynamic changes in concentrations and loadings are related to the dissolution of soluble salts and the flushing out of waters that were concentrated by evaporation. The underlying processes, pyrite oxidation and host rock dissolution, do not end until the pyrite is fully weathered, which can take hundreds to thousands of years. These observations can be generalized to predict future conditions caused by droughts related to El Ni??o and climate change associated with global warming. Already, the time period for dry summers is lengthening in the western US and rainstorms are further apart and more intense when they happen. Consequently, flushing of inactive or active mine sites and mineralized but unmined sites will cause larger sudden increases in concentrations that will be an ever increasing danger to aquatic life with climate change. Higher average concentrations will be observed during longer low-flow periods. Remediation efforts will have to increase the capacity of engineered designs to deal with more extreme conditions, not average conditions of previous years.

  13. DESIGN JUSTIFICATION DRAINAGE PROTECTION AT ELEVATED GROUNDWATER LEVELS GROUNDWATER DUE TO INFILTRATION MINE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishtchenko A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the design study for construction of a drainage system on the territory of gardening association «Zarya» in the region of Gukovo in Krasnosulinsky district of Rostov region. Construction of a drainage system is a prerequisite for reducing the groundwater level caused by the infiltration of the drainage complex mine called Burgustinskaya. The results of the calculations determined the value of the total infiltration groundwater feeding; inflow rate to each of the 6 drains per unit length, water flow ability of a horizontal pipe drainage, as well as a diameter of drainage pipes

  14. Oxycline formation induced by Fe(II) oxidation in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage modeled using a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality model - CE-QUAL-W2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ester; Galván, Laura; Cánovas, Carlos Ruiz; Soria-Píriz, Sara; Arbat-Bofill, Marina; Nardi, Albert; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-08-15

    The Sancho reservoir is an acid mine drainage (AMD)-contaminated reservoir located in the Huelva province (SW Spain) with a pH close to 3.5. The water is only used for a refrigeration system of a paper mill. The Sancho reservoir is holomictic with one mixing period per year in the winter. During this mixing period, oxygenated water reaches the sediment, while under stratified conditions (the rest of the year) hypoxic conditions develop at the hypolimnion. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was calibrated for the Sancho Reservoir to predict the thermocline and oxycline formation, as well as the salinity, ammonium, nitrate, phosphorous, algal, chlorophyll-a, and iron concentrations. The version 3.7 of the model does not allow simulating the oxidation of Fe(II) in the water column, which limits the oxygen consumption of the organic matter oxidation. However, to evaluate the impact of Fe(II) oxidation on the oxycline formation, Fe(II) has been introduced into the model based on its relationship with labile dissolved organic matter (LDOM). The results show that Fe oxidation is the main factor responsible for the oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion of the Sancho Reservoir. The limiting factors for green algal growth have also been studied. The model predicted that ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate were not limiting factors for green algal growth. Light appeared to be one of the limiting factors for algal growth, while chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen concentrations could not be fully described. We hypothesize that dissolved CO2 is one of the limiting nutrients due to losses by the high acidity of the water column. The sensitivity tests carried out support this hypothesis. Two different remediation scenarios have been tested with the calibrated model: 1) an AMD passive treatment plant installed at the river, which removes completely Fe, and 2) different depth water extractions. If no Fe was introduced into the reservoir, water quality would significantly improve in only two years

  15. Oxycline formation induced by Fe(II) oxidation in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage modeled using a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality model - CE-QUAL-W2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ester; Galván, Laura; Cánovas, Carlos Ruiz; Soria-Píriz, Sara; Arbat-Bofill, Marina; Nardi, Albert; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-08-15

    The Sancho reservoir is an acid mine drainage (AMD)-contaminated reservoir located in the Huelva province (SW Spain) with a pH close to 3.5. The water is only used for a refrigeration system of a paper mill. The Sancho reservoir is holomictic with one mixing period per year in the winter. During this mixing period, oxygenated water reaches the sediment, while under stratified conditions (the rest of the year) hypoxic conditions develop at the hypolimnion. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was calibrated for the Sancho Reservoir to predict the thermocline and oxycline formation, as well as the salinity, ammonium, nitrate, phosphorous, algal, chlorophyll-a, and iron concentrations. The version 3.7 of the model does not allow simulating the oxidation of Fe(II) in the water column, which limits the oxygen consumption of the organic matter oxidation. However, to evaluate the impact of Fe(II) oxidation on the oxycline formation, Fe(II) has been introduced into the model based on its relationship with labile dissolved organic matter (LDOM). The results show that Fe oxidation is the main factor responsible for the oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion of the Sancho Reservoir. The limiting factors for green algal growth have also been studied. The model predicted that ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate were not limiting factors for green algal growth. Light appeared to be one of the limiting factors for algal growth, while chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen concentrations could not be fully described. We hypothesize that dissolved CO2 is one of the limiting nutrients due to losses by the high acidity of the water column. The sensitivity tests carried out support this hypothesis. Two different remediation scenarios have been tested with the calibrated model: 1) an AMD passive treatment plant installed at the river, which removes completely Fe, and 2) different depth water extractions. If no Fe was introduced into the reservoir, water quality would significantly improve in only two years

  16. DESIGN JUSTIFICATION DRAINAGE PROTECTION AT ELEVATED GROUNDWATER LEVELS GROUNDWATER DUE TO INFILTRATION MINE WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ishtchenko A. V.; Kosichenko Y. M.; Baev O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the design study for construction of a drainage system on the territory of gardening association «Zarya» in the region of Gukovo in Krasnosulinsky district of Rostov region. Construction of a drainage system is a prerequisite for reducing the groundwater level caused by the infiltration of the drainage complex mine called Burgustinskaya. The results of the calculations determined the value of the total infiltration groundwater feeding; inflow rate to each of the 6 drains ...

  17. Characterization of the core microbiota of the drainage and surrounding soil of a Brazilian copper mine

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Bianca Pereira; Renato Vicentini; Laura M. M. Ottoboni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The core microbiota of a neutral mine drainage and the surrounding high heavy metal content soil at a Brazilian copper mine were characterized by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. The core microbiota of the drainage was dominated by the generalist genus Meiothermus. The soil samples contained a more heterogeneous bacterial community, with the presence of both generalist and specialist bacteria. Both environments supported mainly heterotrophic bacteria, including organisms resistant to heavy m...

  18. Structure and reactivity of As(III)- and As(V)-rich schwertmannites and amorphous ferric arsenate sulfate from the Carnoulès acid mine drainage, France: Comparison with biotic and abiotic model compounds and implications for As remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Fabien; Morin, Guillaume; Juillot, Farid; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Wang, Yuheng; Lebrun, Sophie; Aubry, Emmanuel; Vlaic, Gilberto; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-03-01

    Poorly ordered nanocrystalline hydroxysulfate minerals of microbial origin, such as schwertmannite, Fe8O8(OH)6SO4, are important arsenic scavengers in sulfate-rich acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. However, despite the fact that As(III) and As(V) have been shown to sorb on schwertmannite, little is known about the actual mechanism of arsenic scavenging processes after microbial Fe(II) oxidation in AMD environments. The major focus of the present study is to determine the molecular-level structure of poorly ordered As(III) and As(V) bearing Fe oxyhydroxysulfate minerals from the Carnoulès AMD, France, which exhibits exceptional As(III) concentrations. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy were used to compare field samples with a large set of synthetic analogs prepared via biotic or abiotic pathways, with As/Fe ratios typical of minerals and mineraloids ranging from nanocrystalline schwertmannite to amorphous hydroxysulfate compounds. Our results yield further evidence for the poisoning effect of As(V) in limiting the nucleation of schwertmannite. For initial dissolved As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios ⩾0.2, amorphous Fe(III)-As(V) hydroxysulfate forms, with a local structure consistent with that of amorphous ferric arsenate. EXAFS data for this amorphous material are consistent with corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra to which AsO4 tetrahedra attach via double-corner 2C linkages. For As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios lower than 0.2, As(V) binds to schwertmannite via 2C surface complexes. In contrast with the As(V)-containing samples, As(III) has a lower affinity for schwertmannite following its nucleation, as this mineral phase persists up to an initial As(III)/Fe(III) molar ratio of 0.6. EXAFS data indicate that during the precipitation process, As(III) forms dominantly 2C surface complexes on schwertmannite surfaces, likely on the sides of double-chains of Fe(III)(O,OH)6 octahedra, with a smaller proportion of edge

  19. Microbial exoenzymes as bioindicators of acid rock drainage impacts in the Finniss River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples were collected from several sites along the East Branch of the Finniss River during the dry season (June, 1999), when the East Branch is drying into a series of ponds. The sites included those upstream from the Rum Jungle mine site (EB8A, EB8B, FCA, FCB), a site receiving acid leachate from the waste rock (WO), sites downstream from the mine that are impacted by acid and metal contamination (EB6, TCP, EB5D, EB4U, EB2) and reference sites not subject to acid rock drainage (HS, EB4S, LFRB). Exoenzyme activities were measured with a spectrofluorometric technique that involved measuring the increase in fluorescence when an artificial fluorogenic substrate (that mimics the natural substrate) is hydrolysed to a highly fluorescent product. The present findings indicate that the acid rock drainage impacted sediments contain acidophilic, heterotrophic microorganisms, bacteria and/or fungi, producing extracellular enzymes adapted to the acid conditions. This study has demonstrated that measurements of extracellular enzyme activities in river sediments provide a rapid, sensitive technique for determining microbial activity and productivity. In aquatic ecosystems some exoenzymes, particularly leucine-aminopeptidase, could be used as bioindicators of pollution from acid rock drainage

  20. Changes in the bacterial community of soil from a neutral mine drainage channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Bianca Pereira

    Full Text Available Mine drainage is an important environmental disturbance that affects the chemical and biological components in natural resources. However, little is known about the effects of neutral mine drainage on the soil bacteria community. Here, a high-throughput 16S rDNA pyrosequencing approach was used to evaluate differences in composition, structure, and diversity of bacteria communities in samples from a neutral drainage channel, and soil next to the channel, at the Sossego copper mine in Brazil. Advanced statistical analyses were used to explore the relationships between the biological and chemical data. The results showed that the neutral mine drainage caused changes in the composition and structure of the microbial community, but not in its diversity. The Deinococcus/Thermus phylum, especially the Meiothermus genus, was in large part responsible for the differences between the communities, and was positively associated with the presence of copper and other heavy metals in the environmental samples. Other important parameters that influenced the bacterial diversity and composition were the elements potassium, sodium, nickel, and zinc, as well as pH. The findings contribute to the understanding of bacterial diversity in soils impacted by neutral mine drainage, and demonstrate that heavy metals play an important role in shaping the microbial population in mine environments.

  1. The Metal And Sulphate Removal From Mine Drainage Waters By Biological-Chemical Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenčárová Jana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mine drainage waters are often characterized by high concentrations of sulphates and metals as a consequence of the mining industry of sulphide minerals. The aims of this work are to prove some biological-chemical processes utilization for the mine drainage water treatment. The studied principles of contamination elimination from these waters include sulphate reduction and metal bioprecipitation by the application of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. Other studied process was metal sorption by prepared biogenic sorbent. Mine drainage waters from Slovak localities Banská Štiavnica and Smolník were used to the pollution removal examination. In Banská Štiavnica water, sulphates decreased below the legislative limit. The elimination of zinc by sorption experiments achieved 84 % and 65 %, respectively.

  2. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  3. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems With Elevated Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H.; Zhang, G.; Burgos, W.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment samples were collected from two coal mine drainage treatment sites in western Pennsylvania. Both of the sites use constructed limestone beds to passively treat acidic coal mine drainage containing elevated manganese (Mn). Site #1 has influent manganese of 150 mg/L and effluent manganese between 40-100 mg/L. Site #2 has influent manganese of 20 mg/L and effluent manganese of less than 0.5 mg/L. Large quantities of black crusts were deposited throughout the beds at both sites. X-ray diffraction showed these crusts constituted of buserite, which is a layered structure manganese oxide mineral. Both culture-dependent and nucleic acid- based techniques were used to characterize the bacterial and fungal communities in these beds. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that bacterial communities were very diverse and included Cyanobacter, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidete, Planctomyceta, Acidobacter, Actinobacter and Gemmatimonade taxa. The archaeal diversity was lower and most sequences were related to uncultivated species. Two Mn-oxidizing fungi strains were isolated from one of the sites. One of the fungi is capable of oxidizing Mn(II) at both low and netural pH (3-7) while the other fungi can only oxidze Mn(II) at circumneutral pH. 18S rRNA gene analysis showed the low pH Mn-oxidizing fungus was closely related to Menispora tortuosa, Chaetosphaeria curvispora and Kionochaeta spissa, and the circumneutral Mn-oxidizing fungus was closely related to Myrothecium verrucaria, Didymostilbe echinofibrosa and Myrothecium roridum.

  4. Study on the treatment of simulated acid mine drainage using air cathode microbial fuel cell%空气阴极微生物燃料电池处理模拟酸性矿井水的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚甫长; 蔡昌凤; 江林; 李祝宁

    2014-01-01

    酸性矿井水因 pH 值低、重金属离子含量高,难以直接采用硫酸盐还原菌生化处理.试验构建了空气阴极微生物燃料电池系统来处理酸性矿井水,有效处理废水 H +和重金属离子,同时还能产电.构建的空气阴极微生物燃料电池系统(污泥量40 mL,硫酸盐还原菌30 mL,阳极材料为碳布,室温)的最大功率密度达到82.24 mW/m2,最大电压为332.2 mV;硫酸根的最大去除率达到41.6,对 Zn2+、Cu2+、Cd2+和 Fe2+的去除率分别达到83.7%、77.4%、84.2%和66.8%,化学需氧量的最大去除率达到60.9%.分析认为,空气阴极微生物燃料电池有效处理废水 H +,弱化了 H 2 S 的生物抑制作用,强化了硫酸盐还原菌还原产生的 S2-与重金属离子生成硫化物,并经能谱分析加以验证.%Acid mine drainage (AMD)with low pH and high metal ions is difficult and costly to treat by sulfate reducing bacteria .Air cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC)is constructed to treat AMD and re-move H + .It can treat wastewater while producing electricity.The maximum power density was 82.24 mW/m2 ,maximum voltage was 332.2 mV;maximum removal of sulfate was 41.6%,Zn2 + , Cu2 + ,Cd2 + and Fe2 + removal rates were 83.7%,77.4%,84.2% and 66.8% respectively and maximum percent removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD)60.9% are obtained in MFC (activated sludge 40 mL,SRB 30 mL,carbon cloth as anode material,room temperature).It is conclnded that air cathode microbial fuel cell can effectively remove H + ,weaken the inhabitation of H 2 S on the bacteria and strengthen the forming of sulfide using metal ions,which are tested and proved by Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  5. Impact of AMD on water quality in critical watershed in the Hudson River drainage basin: Phillips Mine, Hudson Highlands, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, S.; Gates, A.; Szabo, Z.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    A sulfur and trace element enriched U-Th-laced tailings pile at the abandoned Phillips Mine in Garrison, New York, releases acid mine drainage (AMD, generally pH iron hydroxides which act as sinks for metals, indicating progressive sequestration that correlates with dilution and sharp rise in pH when mine water mixes with tributaries. Seasonal variations in metal concentrations were partly attributable to dissolution of the efflorescent salts with their sorbed metals and additional metals from surging acidic seepage induced by precipitation.

  6. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  7. Variation in gas drainage rate from a coal seam during mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Gang; Qi; Qingxin; Li; Hongyan; Fan; Xisheng

    2012-01-01

    Gas flow patterns during draining of gas from a coal seam during mining are discussed.The coal seam is treated as a dual medium with both pores and cracks.The seepage,diffusion,and desorption processes are treated using a gas flow equation that describes flow around drill holes.MATLAB is used to solve the differential equations.The permeability tracer test results from a mined coal seam are used to study the variation in gas drainage from a coal seam during mining.The results show that mining can increase the permeability of a coal seam,which then increases the gas drainage.There are inflection points in this variation over time.A close relationship between this variation and the rate of change in coal seam permeability is observed.

  8. Assessment of preferential flow processes in a forest-reclaimed lignitic mine soil by multicell sampling of drainage water and three tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangen, E.; Gerke, H. H.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2005-03-01

    Predictions of the long-term development of newly established forest-reclaimed ecosystems are required for land use planning of post-mining landscapes. The geological and mineralogical composition, the small-distance heterogeneity and inclined structures of the mine spoil's overburden sediment mixtures, as well as the physical and chemical properties of acidic and lignitic mine soil components, have raised questions about the water flow and solute transport processes in these soils. The objective of this study was to quantify preferential flow processes and spatially resolved solute transport in order to better distinguish between dominating processes for such soils. The experimental study was carried out by determining spatially resolved rates of throughfall, drainage and tracer leaching from underneath a 110 cm deep mine soil block. Drainage water was collected using 45 contiguous suction cells of 27 cm edge length. A tracer cocktail consisting of bromide, terbuthylazine, and deuterium was applied at the soil surface and subjected to natural infiltration. Tracer concentrations in drainage waters were analysed for a period of about 10 months. Then, the mine soil block was sampled completely in the form of 225 cubes of about 27 cm edge length to determine the residual bromide content. Tracer-labelled drainage in 110 cm depth occurred in spring 2001 over about 71% and in autumn 2001 over 35% of the total cross-sectional drainage area, respectively. Local drainage maxima shifted from spring to autumn, but also within drainage periods by 1-2 cell lengths. Bromide concentrations of drainage effluents varied by a factor of 4 between individual cells. Bypass-type preferential flow seems not to be a dominating transport mechanism since terbuthylazine in drainage waters occurred only singularly in spring with concentrations just above the detection limit. Perhaps the dilution in relatively large cells was too effective to detect modest contributions of tracer through

  9. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT REMOTE MINE SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    After completing extensive bench-scale testing to determine optimum treatment approaches, the technology has been taken to the field. Preliminary results show that calcium hydroxide precipitates the bulk of the arsenic and zinc; the granular ferric hydroxide removes the rest of ...

  10. Assessing the utility of mixed organic materials for removal of metals in mine drainage impacted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Neculita, C.; Lee, G.; Jeong, J.; Cho, D.; Chang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The use of natural organic materials in bioreactors is one of the most sustainable technologies for treatment of metals in mine-impacted waters. Several natural organic substrates including mushroom compost, cow manure, sawdust, wood chips, and cut rice straw were characterized and used in combination for treating mine drainage with acidic (pH 3) and moderate pH (pH 6). Bench-scale batch experiments were performed for 35-day period to evaluate the performance of organic substrates in removing dissolved metals. Overall results indicated that mixtures of different substrates showed satisfactory performances in removing metals (Al > Fe > Mn) (up to 100%), generating alkalinity, and reducing sulfate at both pH conditions. The mixture of sawdust and cow manure was found as the most effective whereas the mixture containing 40% cut rice straw gave limited efficiency, suggesting organic carbon released from this substrate is not readily available for biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. The mushroom compost based bioreactors released significant amount of sulfate, which may raise a concern upon the start-up of field-scale bioreactors. Collectively, the substrate mixtures had comparable performances to the mushroom compost, the most commonly used material in field bioreactors, in terms of metal removal, pH neutralization, and sulfate reduction, except for the reactors containing rice straw. Especially, the mixture of sawdust and cow manure was the most efficient substrate for treatment of mine-impacted waters. The correlation between the extent of sulfate reduction and dissolved organic carbon/SO42- ratio was weak and this indicates the type of DOC plays more important role in sulfate reduction than the absolute concentration and that the ratio is not sensitive enough to properly describe the relative effectiveness of substrate mixtures.

  11. Applicability of surface directional wells for upper Silesia Basin coal seams’ drainage ahead of mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jura Bartłomiej; Skiba Jacek; Wierzbinski Krystian

    2014-01-01

    Methods of exploitation drainage, which is presently applied in polish hard coal mines in Upper Silesian Coal Basin (Poland), are not effective enough, high risk of methane hazard can be observed, and produc-tion capacity of the mining plant is not fully used. Methane hazard, which may occur during planned coal exploitation, is presented in this paper. Following parameters are taken into consideration in the fore-casts:coal extraction parameters, geological and mining conditions, deposit’s methane saturation degree and impact of coal exploitation on the degasification coefficient of the seams, which are under the influ-ence of relaxation zone. This paper presents the results of the analysis aiming to verify applicability of drainage ahead of mining of the coal seams by using surface directional wells. Based on the collected data (coal seams’ structural maps, profiles of the exploratory wells, geological cross-sections), the lab tests of drilling cores and direct wells’ tests, static model of the deposit was constructed and suitable grid of directional wells from the surface was designed. Comparison of forecasted methane emission volume between the two methods is investigated. The results indicated the necessity of performing appropriate deposit’s stimulations in order to increase effectiveness of drainage ahead of mining.

  12. Metal mobility in river and sea sediments affected by mine drainage (Sestri Levante, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consani, Sirio; Capello, Marco; Cutroneo, Laura; Vagge, Greta; Zuccarelli, Andrea; Carbone, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    The Gromolo Torrent is a metal-polluted Apennine streamflow located near Sestri Levante (Liguria, Italy). It springs from the Monte Rocca Grande (850 m a.s.l.), and flows for 11.5 km through the Gromolo Valley before flowing into the Ligurian Sea. Inside the Gromolo basin is located the abandoned Fe-Cu mine of Libiola, which was the most important sulfide deposit of the Ligurian Apennines. In this mining site, extensive Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) processes are active, both inside the mine tunnels and in the sulfide rich waste-rock dumps; the solutions generated are characterised by low pH values and high amounts of dissolved SO42-, Fe, and other chemical elements such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Al, Co, and Ni. Moreover, exstensively precipitation of Fe and Cu-rich secondary minerals occurs both as soft crusts inside the mine adits and as loose suspensions associated with overland flow of mine drainage. AMD waters flowed into the uncontaminated Gromolo Torrent where abundant precipitation of amorphous Fe(III)-oxy-hydroxides occurred. The marine study area is characterised by the presence of the headland of Sestri Levante with two bays, the western one named "Baia delle Favole". The dynamics of the area is dominated by a permanent north-westward off-shore current flowing approximately along isobath, and an eastward counter-current along the north coast with a resulting drift of the coastal materials from the West to Est towards "Baia delle Favole". The bottom sediment are principally characterised by coarse materials, mostly consisting of fine sand, with a percentage of the fine sediment increasing inside the bay, where the dynamics is low. The aims of this work are to 1) evaluate the metal mobility of colloidal river precipitates for about 7 km up to its mouth in the Ligurian Sea; 2) verify the contamination state of the marine bottom sediments off the mouth of the Gromolo Torrent ("Baia delle Favole" of Sestri Levante), and 3) identify the main sources and diffusion ways of

  13. Hydrogeologic setting and simulation of groundwater flow near the Canterbury and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnels, Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Minsley, Burke; Dupree, Jean A.

    2011-01-01

    -current resistivity field survey was performed to evaluate the geologic structure of the study area. The results show that the Canterbury Tunnel is located in a downthrown structural block that is not in direct physical connection with the Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. The presence of this structural discontinuity implies there is no direct groundwater pathway between the tunnels along a laterally continuous bedrock unit. Water-quality results for pH and major-ion concentrations near the Canterbury Tunnel showed that acid mine drainage has not affected groundwater quality. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water indicate that snowmelt is the primary source of groundwater recharge. On the basis of chlorofluorocarbon and tritium concentrations and mixing ratios for groundwater samples, young groundwater (groundwater recharged after 1953) was indicated at well locations upgradient from and in a fault block separate from the Canterbury Tunnel. Samples from sites downgradient from the Canterbury Tunnel were mixtures of young and old (pre-1953) groundwater and likely represent snowmelt recharge mixed with older regional groundwater that discharges from the bedrock units to the Arkansas River valley. Discharge from the Canterbury Tunnel contained the greatest percentage of old (pre-1953) groundwater with a mixture of about 25 percent young water and about 75 percent old water. A calibrated three-dimensional groundwater model representing high-flow conditions was used to evaluate large-scale flow characteristics of the groundwater and to assess whether a substantial hydraulic connection was present between the Canterbury Tunnel and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. As simulated, the faults restrict local flow in many areas, but the fracture-damage zones adjacent to the faults allow groundwater to move along faults. Water-budget results indicate that groundwater flow across the lateral edges of the model controlled the majority of flow in and out of the aquifer (79 percent and

  14. Evaluation of design factors for a cascade aerator to enhance the efficiency of an oxidation pond for ferruginous mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Cheong, Youngwook; Yim, Giljae; Hong, Ji-Hye

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the optimum design of a cascade aerator to enhance the efficiency of an oxidation pond in a passive treatment system for remediating ferruginous mine drainage. For this purpose, various aeration experiments with aerators of different drop heights (0-4 m) and formations (types A and B) were executed on mine drainage. Type A simply drops the mine drainage into the oxidation pond while type B sprays the mine drainage and retains it for 8 min in each step. The efficiency enhancement of the oxidation pond was strongly dependent on the increase in pH and DO of the mine drainage discharged into the pond. The water quality improved with the increase in drop height but especially showed better effect with type B. The reasons for this result were attributed to the increase of contact surface and retention time of the mine drainage. The cascade aerator, therefore, should be designed to be as high as possible with the assistance of spraying form and retention time of the mine drainage to maximize the efficiency of the oxidation pond. These effects could be evaluated by calculating required areas of the oxidation pond for 95% of Fe(2+) oxidation. PMID:26936197

  15. Microbial communities in acid water environments of two mines, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Shengmu; Xie Xuehui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Liu Jianshe [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha (China)], E-mail: xiaoshengmu@gmail.com

    2009-03-15

    To understand the compositions and structures of microbial communities in different acid-aqueous environments, a PCR-based cloning approach was used. A total of five samples were collected from two mines in China. Two samples, named as G1 and G2, were acid mine drainage (AMD) samples and from Yunfu sulfide mine in Guangdong province, China. The rest of the three samples named as D1, DY and D3, were from three sites undertaking bioleaching in Yinshan lead-zinc mine in Jiangxi province, China. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that bacteria in the five samples fell into six putative divisions, which were {alpha}-Proteobacteria, {beta}-Proteobacteria, {gamma}-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Nitrospira. Archaea was only detected in the three samples from Yinshan lead-zinc mine, which fell into two phylogenentic divisions, Thermoplsma and Ferroplasma. In addition, the results of principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that more similar the geochemical properties in samples were, more similar microbial community structures in samples were. - Microbial community compositions in acid-aqueous environments from Chinese mines were studied, and the relationship with geochemical properties was obtained.

  16. Microbial communities in acid water environments of two mines, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the compositions and structures of microbial communities in different acid-aqueous environments, a PCR-based cloning approach was used. A total of five samples were collected from two mines in China. Two samples, named as G1 and G2, were acid mine drainage (AMD) samples and from Yunfu sulfide mine in Guangdong province, China. The rest of the three samples named as D1, DY and D3, were from three sites undertaking bioleaching in Yinshan lead-zinc mine in Jiangxi province, China. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that bacteria in the five samples fell into six putative divisions, which were α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Nitrospira. Archaea was only detected in the three samples from Yinshan lead-zinc mine, which fell into two phylogenentic divisions, Thermoplsma and Ferroplasma. In addition, the results of principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that more similar the geochemical properties in samples were, more similar microbial community structures in samples were. - Microbial community compositions in acid-aqueous environments from Chinese mines were studied, and the relationship with geochemical properties was obtained

  17. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) use of rock drainage channels on reclaimed mines in southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamblin, H.D.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) currently receive protected status throughout their range due to population declines. Threats associated with habitat fragmentation (e.g., introduced predators, disease, and habitat loss) may explain why Allegheny woodrats are no longer found in many areas where they existed just 25 y ago. In southern West Virginia, surface coal mining is a major cause of forest fragmentation. Furthermore, mountaintop mining, the prevalent method in the region, results in a loss of rock outcrops and cliffs within forested areas, typical habitat of the Allegheny woodrat. To determine the extent that Allegheny woodrats make use of reclaimed mine land, particularly rock drainages built during reclamation, we sampled 24 drainage channels on reclaimed surface mines in southern West Virginia, collected habitat data at each site and used logistic regression to identify habitat variables related to Allegheny woodrat presence. During 187 trap nights, 13 adult, 2 subadult and 8 juvenile Allegheny woodrats were captured at 13 of the 24 sites. Percent of rock as a groundcover and density of stems {gt} 15 cm diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) were related to Allegheny woodrat presence and were significantly greater at sites where Allegheny woodrats were present than absent. Sites where Allegheny woodrats were present differed substantially from other described habitats in West Virginia, though they may simulate boulder piles that occur naturally. Our findings suggest the need for additional research to examine the dynamics between Allegheny woodrat populations inhabiting rock outcrops in forests adjacent to mines and populations inhabiting constructed drainage channels on reclaimed mines. However, if Allegheny woodrats can use human-created habitat, our results will be useful to surface mine reclamation and to other mitigation efforts where rocky habitats are lost or disturbed.

  18. Environmental risk assessment of acid rock drainage under uncertainty: The probability bounds and PHREEQC approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrie, Getnet D; Sadiq, Rehan; Nichol, Craig; Morin, Kevin A; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2016-01-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a major environmental problem that poses significant environmental risks during and after mining activities. A new methodology for environmental risk assessment based on probability bounds and a geochemical speciation model (PHREEQC) is presented. The methodology provides conservative and non-conservative ways of estimating risk of heavy metals posed to selected endpoints probabilistically, while propagating data and parameter uncertainties throughout the risk assessment steps. The methodology is demonstrated at a minesite located in British Columbia, Canada. The result of the methodology for the case study minesite shows the fate-and-transport of heavy metals is well simulated in the mine environment. In addition, the results of risk characterization for the case study show that there is risk due to transport of heavy metals into the environment.

  19. Pretreatment of highly turbid coal mine drainage by a chemical agent free filtration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chunhui; He Xiong; Li Kaihe; Wu Dongsheng; Guo Yanrong; Wang Can

    2012-01-01

    A filtration system used without chemical agents for the pretreatment of turbid coal mine drainage is described in this paper.The influence of different aperture sizes and different motor speeds was investigated during the study.The experimental results show that for aperture diameters of 0.4,0.6,or 0.8 mm smaller apertures provide more complete filtration.Rotations of 12,20,28,or 40 r/min show that higher speeds give more efficient filtration.Suspended solids decreased in both particle size and concentration after the filtration.The separated slime can be directly reused as a fuel.Efficient filtration pretreatment systems for coal mine drainage were investigated and the economic feasibility is analyzed in this article.

  20. Isotopic composition of water from a mine drainage site in Creede County in south central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R. L.; Williams, M. W.; Krupicka, A.; Wireman, M.; Graves, J.

    2011-12-01

    Creede County in South Central Colorado was an active area of silver mining beginning in the early 1890s. To relieve flooding in some of the mines, the Nelson Tunnel was built in the late 1890s. This tunnel still exists and acid mine drainage from the tunnel eventually flows into the Willow Creek Watershed which eventually flows into the Upper Rio Grande. The water coming out of the tunnel is high in toxic metals and the area has become part of an EPA Superfund site in an effort to find a suitable method to remediate the metal problems. Among the approaches used in the program is the use of isotopes of water and carbon to identify sources and estimate ages of the water in the drainage. Samples were collected for analysis of isotopic ratios and tritium concentrations at a series of sites within the tunnel complex from 2008-2010. In 2009 samples were also collected for analysis of isotopes in groundwater and surface water. In 2010 sampling was expanded to include four precipitation and one snow sample. Tritium concentrations in precipitation and snowfall in 2010 ranged from 3-6 tritium units with the lowest concentration found in the snow sample. The 18O isotopic ratios in precipitation for this site ranged from an average of -8.9 o/oo in summer to about -19 o/oo in winter. The six groundwater samples collected in 2009 had an average 18O isotopic concentration of -15 o/oo and tritium concentrations ranging from 7.4-9.3 TU. These results suggest that the groundwater sampled is composed largely of a mixture of summer and winter precipitation with the latter source being dominant. The tritium concentrations in groundwater exceed recent precipitation concentrations, suggesting the presence of water from the bomb-tritium transient and an age of a decade or more for the groundwater. Eight sites in the tunnel were sampled I from 2008-2010, although not all sites were sampled every year. The sampling sites included waters seeping into the tunnel as well as the outlet water

  1. Hydrogeologic setting and simulation of groundwater flow near the Canterbury and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnels, Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Minsley, Burke; Dupree, Jean A.

    2011-01-01

    -current resistivity field survey was performed to evaluate the geologic structure of the study area. The results show that the Canterbury Tunnel is located in a downthrown structural block that is not in direct physical connection with the Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. The presence of this structural discontinuity implies there is no direct groundwater pathway between the tunnels along a laterally continuous bedrock unit. Water-quality results for pH and major-ion concentrations near the Canterbury Tunnel showed that acid mine drainage has not affected groundwater quality. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water indicate that snowmelt is the primary source of groundwater recharge. On the basis of chlorofluorocarbon and tritium concentrations and mixing ratios for groundwater samples, young groundwater (groundwater recharged after 1953) was indicated at well locations upgradient from and in a fault block separate from the Canterbury Tunnel. Samples from sites downgradient from the Canterbury Tunnel were mixtures of young and old (pre-1953) groundwater and likely represent snowmelt recharge mixed with older regional groundwater that discharges from the bedrock units to the Arkansas River valley. Discharge from the Canterbury Tunnel contained the greatest percentage of old (pre-1953) groundwater with a mixture of about 25 percent young water and about 75 percent old water. A calibrated three-dimensional groundwater model representing high-flow conditions was used to evaluate large-scale flow characteristics of the groundwater and to assess whether a substantial hydraulic connection was present between the Canterbury Tunnel and Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel. As simulated, the faults restrict local flow in many areas, but the fracture-damage zones adjacent to the faults allow groundwater to move along faults. Water-budget results indicate that groundwater flow across the lateral edges of the model controlled the majority of flow in and out of the aquifer (79 percent and

  2. Geophysical delineation of acidity and salinity in the Central Manitoba gold mine tailings pile, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycholiz, C.; Ferguson, I. J.; Sherriff, B. L.; Cordeiro, M.; Sri Ranjan, R.; Pérez-Flores, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Surface electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods can map enhanced electrical conductivity caused by acid mine drainage in mine tailings piles. In this case study, we investigate quantitative relationships between geophysical responses and the electrical conductivity, acidity and salinity of tailing samples at the Central Manitoba Mine tailings in Manitoba, Canada. Previous electromagnetic surveys at the site identified zones of enhanced conductivity that were hypothesized to be caused by acid mine drainage. In the present study, high-resolution EM31 and DC-resistivity measurements were made on a profile through a zone of enhanced conductivity and laboratory measurements of salinity and pH were made on saturation paste extracts from an array of tailing samples collected from the upper 2 m of tailings along the profile. Observed spatial correlation of pH and pore-fluid salinity in the tailings samples confirms that the enhanced conductivity in the Central Manitoba Mine tailings is due to acid mine drainage. Contoured cross-sections of the data indicate that the acid mine drainage is concentrated near the base of the oxidized zone in the thicker parts of the tailings pile. The zone of increased acidity extends to the surface on sloping margins causing an increase in apparent conductivity in shallow penetrating geophysical responses. The quantitative relationship between measured pH and salinity shows that the conductivity increase associated with the acid mine drainage is due only in part to conduction by ions produced from dissociation of sulfuric acid. Comparison of the observations with fluid conductivity estimates based on statistical relationships of pH and ion concentrations in water samples from across the tailings pile shows that Ca2 + and Mg2 + ions also make significant contributions to the conductivity at all values of pH and Cu2 +, Al3 + and Fe3 + ions make additional contributions at low pH. Variability in the measured conductivity at constant

  3. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Oxygen Seepage in Coal Mine Goaf with Gas Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qing Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mine fires mainly arise from spontaneous combustion of coal seams and are a global issue that has attracted increasing public attention. Particularly in china, the closure of coal workfaces because of spontaneous combustion has contributed to substantial economic loss. To reduce the occurrence of mine fires, the spontaneous coal combustion underground needs to be studied. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed for coal spontaneous combustion under goaf gas drainage conditions. The CFD model was used to simulate the distribution of oxygen in the goaf at the workface in a fully mechanized cave mine. The goaf was treated as an anisotropic medium, and the effects of methane drainage and oxygen consumption on spontaneous combustion were considered. The simulation results matched observational data from a field study, which indicates CFD simulation is suitable for research on the distribution of oxygen in coalmines. The results also indicated that near the workface spontaneous combustion was more likely to take place in the upper part of the goaf than near the bottom, while further from workface the risk of spontaneous combustion was greater in the lower part of the goaf. These results can be used to develop firefighting approaches for coalmines.

  5. Field application of selective precipitation for recovering Cu and Zn in drainage discharged from an operating mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chamteut; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Jin Hee; Bok, Songmin; Cheong, Youngwook; Yim, Giljae; Ji, Sangwoo

    2016-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) generated from mining activities has been recognized as a serious problem due to its increased acidity and high concentration of heavy metals. In this research, a feasibility test of the selective precipitation (SP) process was performed using AMD discharged from a currently operating mine in Korea for the purpose of minimizing the environmental impact of AMD. For the SP process, a pilot scale equipment (100L reaction tank) was used in field and among various metals, Cu and Zn were the target metals. Through the research, it was confirmed that AMD from an operating mine has two disadvantages of being applied to the SP: altering water quality and unexpected inclusion of clay debris. Despite unfavorable conditions, Cu and Zn precipitate of 80% purity with 90% precipitation rate was able to be obtained from 1.4L/min (2.0tons/day) AMD. The recovered precipitates were identified as amorphous CuS and ZnS with small amounts of impurities (Si minerals, CuFeS2, and Fe/Al hydroxide). The strategies to reduce these impurities were also discussed. Recovery rate, which is the amount of precipitate collected per unit volume of AMD, was proposed as an indicator to evaluate the working efficiency of the SP process. It was confirmed that the recovery rate was strongly dependent on flow rate and dose of coagulant. The results of this study may be helpful in reducing the potential complications which occurs when SP is applied on field. PMID:26994808

  6. A cost comparison study of open pit mining vs. in situ assisted gravity drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twin-well steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process has resulted in breakthrough technology to access previously uneconomical deep-seated oil sands reserves in Alberta, and to provide a very cost-effective and environmentally acceptable method for extracting bitumen from reserves having a minimum of 30 m overburden. In the evaluation of new or improved bitumen recovery technologies for its new North Mine, Syncrude Canada has recognized that SAGD was a potential alternate to the current open pit mining and hot water extraction process. A study was conducted to compare and evaluate bitumen recovery by the two schemes at the North Mine site, scheduled to begin operations in 1996, for the reserves under Syncrude's tailings pond, and at a new grassroots area. Study description and analysis of results are presented for the grassroots case. The assumptions and mining/recovery processes used for the mining or SAGD method are detailed and the advantages and drawbacks of each scheme are noted. Results show that the SAGD unit supply costs are projected to be proportionately lower than the corresponding open pit mining/hot water extraction (OP/X) cost, using a 20-y project life. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the SAGD process is more sensitive to natural gas costs, while the OP/X scheme is more sensitive to power costs. The SAGD process is much less labor-intensive than OP/X and has obvious advantages in terms of tailings disposal and post-mining reclamation. In addition, the underground nature of SAGD operation eliminates adverse effects of the weather on working conditions. 11 figs

  7. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  8. Treatment of antimony mine drainage: challenges and opportunities with special emphasis on mineral adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Hu, Xiaoxian; Ren, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    The present article summarizes antimony mine distribution, antimony mine drainage generation and environmental impacts, and critically analyses the remediation approach with special emphasis on iron oxidizing bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria. Most recent research focuses on readily available low-cost adsorbents, such as minerals, wastes, and biosorbents. It is found that iron oxides prepared by chemical methods present superior adsorption ability for Sb(III) and Sb(V). However, this process is more costly and iron oxide activity can be inhibited by plenty of sulfate in antimony mine drainage. In the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria, sulfate can be reduced to sulfide and form Sb(2)S(3) precipitates. However, dissolved oxygen and lack of nutrient source in antimony mine drainage inhibit sulfate reducing bacteria activity. Biogenetic iron oxide minerals from iron corrosion by iron-oxidizing bacteria may prove promising for antimony adsorption, while the micro-environment generated from iron corrosion by iron oxidizing bacteria may provide better growth conditions for symbiotic sulfate reducing bacteria. Finally, based on biogenetic iron oxide adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria followed by precipitation, the paper suggests an alternative treatment for antimony mine drainage that deserves exploration.

  9. A Sustainable Approach for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment using Clinoptilolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Y.; Xu, W.; Grace, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Problems related to acid rock drainage (ARD) occur along many highways of British Columbia. The ARD problem at Pennask Creek along Highway 97C in the Thompson-Okanagan region is an ideal site for pilot study to investigate a possible remediation solution. The highway was opened in 1991. An ARD problem was identified in 1997. Both sides of Highway 97C are producing acidified runoff from both cut rock surface and a fractured ditch. This runoff eventually enters Pennask Creek, the largest spawning source of rainbow trout in British Columbia. The current remediation technique using limestone for ARD treatment appears to be unnecessarily expensive, to generate additional solid waste and to not be optimally effective. A soil mineral natural zeolite - clinoptilolite - which is inexpensive and locally available, has a high metal adsorption capacity and a significant buffering capacity. Moreover, the clinoptilolite materials could be back-flushed and reused on site. An earlier batch adsorption study from our laboratory demonstrated that clinoptilolite has a high adsorption capacity for Cu, Zn, Al, with adsorption concentrations 131, 158 and 215 mg/kg clinoptilolite, respectively, from ARD of pH 3.3. Removal of metals from the loaded clinoptilolite by back-flushing was found to depend on the pH, with an optimum pH range for extraction of 2.5 to 4.0 for a contact time of one hour. The rank of desorption effectiveness was EDTA > NaCl > NaNO3 > NaOAC > NaHCO3 > Na2CO3 > NaOH > Ca(OH)2. A novel process involving cyclic adsorption on clinoptilolite followed by regeneration of the sorbent by desorption is examined for the removal of heavy metals from acid rock drainage. Experimental results show that the adsorption of zinc and copper depends on the pH and on external mass transfer. Desorption is assisted by adding NaCl to the water. A slurry bubble column was able to significantly reduce the time required for both adsorption and desorption in batch tests. XRD analysis indicated

  10. Behavior of uranium isotopes along a tidal cycle in a study affected by acid mine drainage; Comportamiento de los isotopos de uranio a lo largo de un ciclo mareal en un estuario afectado por denaje acido de minas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierro, A.; Martin, J. e.; Olias, M.; Garcia, C.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    The Tinto and Odiel rivers converge in an estuarine system known as the Ria de Huelva, which is an ecosystem of great interest, conditioned by hydrochemical facts. The main objective of this study was to analyze the behavior of uranium isotopes in the waters of the Red River estuary in a tidal cycle under hydrochemical conditions of high gradients of salinity and pH generated by the acidic waters of the Rio Tinto and seawater. (Author)

  11. Characterization of Green Liquor Dregs, Potentially Useful for Prevention of the Formation of Acid Rock Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mäkitalo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using alternative materials such as residual products from other industries to mitigate the negative effects of acid rock drainage would simultaneously solve two environmental problems. The main residual product still landfilled by sulphate paper mills is the alkaline material green liquor dregs (GLD. A physical, mineralogical and chemical characterization of four batches of GLD was carried out to evaluate the potential to use it as a sealing layer in the construction of dry covers on sulphide-bearing mine waste. GLD has relatively low hydraulic conductivity (10−8 to 10−9 m/s, a high water retention capacity (WRC and small particle size. Whilst the chemical and mineralogical composition varied between the different batches, these variations were not reflected in properties such as hydraulic conductivity and WRC. Due to relatively low trace element concentrations, leaching of contaminants from the GLD is not a concern for the environment. However, GLD is a sticky material, difficult to apply on mine waste deposits and the shear strength is insufficient for engineering applications. Therefore, improving the mechanical properties is necessary. In addition, GLD has a high buffering capacity indicating that it could act as an alkaline barrier. Once engineering technicalities have been overcome, the long-term effectiveness of GLD should be studied, especially the effect of aging and how the sealing layer would be engineered in respect to topography and climatic conditions.

  12. Characterization and resource recovery potential of precipitates associated with abandoned coal mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairies, C.L.; Watzlaf, G.R.; Hedin, R.S.; Capo, R.C. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science

    2001-07-01

    Sludge samples from untreated and passively treated coal mine drainage discharges were characterized using NAA, ICP-AES, XRD and SEM. Iron content ranges from 25 to 68 dry wt%, and goethite is the dominant mineral (40-90 dry wt%). The majority of particles have a spiky spherical morphology (0.5-2.0 {mu}m diameter). Within several passive treatment systems, iron content remains relatively constant, and concentrations of Mn, Co, Ni and Zn increase, while As concentration decrease. Initial findings indicate that some sludges are suitable for industrial and manufacturing uses although high concentrations of trace elements such as As may prevent use in cosmetics or foods. These associations could be related to the depositional environment of the coal seam from which the discharge originates. Subsurface cation exchange and sorption processes can influence the trace elements that accumulate in the sludge. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Reducing soluble phosphorus in dairy effluents through application of mine drainage residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Penn, Chad J.; Hedin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Three different dairy manure wastewater effluent samples were amended with mine drainage residuals (MDR) to evaluate the suitability of MDR for sequestration of phosphorus (P). Geochemical modeling of the manure wastewater compositions indicated that partially soluble P-bearing minerals including hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate, and vivianite were all oversaturated in each of the manure wastewater samples. Initial MDR amendment test results indicated that these partially soluble P minerals suspended in the wastewater replenished P in the water phase as it was sorbed by the MDR samples. Further investigations revealed that the MDR samples were effective in decreasing soluble P when the amended manure was tested using the water-extractable P procedure. Under these conditions, up to 90 percent of the soluble P in the manure was converted to a sorbed, water-insoluble state. Water contamination and large-scale validation tests of the process were also conducted.

  14. Isotopic evidence of enhanced carbonate dissolution at a coal mine drainage site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shikha; Sack, Andrea; Adams, James P.; Vesper, Dorothy; J Capo, Rosemary C.; Hartsock, Angela; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to determine the sources and fate of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in the circumneutral pH drainage from an abandoned bituminous coal mine in western Pennsylvania. The C isotope signatures of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) were intermediate between local carbonate and organic C sources, but were higher than those of contemporaneous Pennsylvanian age groundwaters in the region. This suggests a significant contribution of C enriched in {sup 13}C due to enhanced carbonate dissolution associated with the release of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} from pyrite oxidation. The Sr isotopic signature of the drainage was similar to other regional mine waters associated with the same coal seam and reflected contributions from limestone dissolution and cation exchange with clay minerals. The relatively high δ{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and δ{sup 18}O{sub SO4} isotopic signatures of the mine drainage and the presence of presumptive SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria suggest that SO{sub 4} reduction activity also contributes C depleted in {sup 13}C isotope to the total DIC pool. With distance downstream from the mine portal, C isotope signatures in the drainage increased, accompanied by decreased total DIC concentrations and increased pH. These data are consistent with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} dissolution of carbonate rocks, enhanced by cation exchange, and C release to the atmosphere via CO{sub 2} outgassing.

  15. Treatment of mine drainage generated by lead-zinc concentration plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾科; 覃文庆; 焦芬; 何名飞; 孔令强

    2014-01-01

    The purification efficiency in the treatment of the mine drainage generated by the mineral processing industry in Mengzi, Yunnan Project, China, was investigated, and the influences of the treated drainage on the mineral electrodes’ electrochemical behaviors were tested. Experiments with different doses of polyacrylamide (PAM) and polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) at different pH values were carried out, and the advanced purification by activated carbon (AC) was conducted. Compared with PFS, the better coagulant for removal efficiency is PAM, under the optimal conditions, the removals of Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+and COD reduction from solution were 94.8%, 79.9%, 87.6% and 85%, respectively. In the advanced purification, the particle size of activated carbon and agitation time played important roles in the removal efficiency. Each pollute concentration could meet the emission standard of pollutants for lead and zinc industry (GB25466-2010). The wastewater without treatment affected galena and sphalerite electrochemical behaviors greatly, after treatment by the technology, the effects disappeared, which proved the reliability of the technology for wastewater treatment.

  16. Coal acid mine drainage treatment using cement kiln dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Alberto Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Los sulfuros están presentes en distintas rocas. Durante las actividades mineras y el proceso de remoción de sulfuros se pueden producir Drenajes Ácidos de Minería (DAM, con iones de sulfato (SO4-2. Los DAMs son fuente de polución en las actividades mineras y en Colombia su descarga en los cuerpos de agua debe cumplir las regulaciones nacionales (pH entre 5 y 9. Polvo de horno cementero (CKD, con carbonato de calcio principalmente, de una planta de Cementos Argos S.A. fue usado para neutralizar un DAM generado en la biodesulfurización de carbón. Los DAMs neutralizados tuvieron pHs entre 7,72 y 8,05 y la eliminación de sulfatos entre 67% a 70%. El precipitado se secó y analizó para determinar su composición química y mineralógica. Se encontró humedad entre 69% y 81%; yeso con un 50% de pureza aproximadamente y carbonato de calcio. Esta composición lo hace adecuado para uso en la producción de cemento.

  17. Acid leaching of uranium present in a residue from mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braulio, Walace S.; Ladeira, Ana C.Q. [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Mineral Technology

    2011-07-01

    The acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental problems associated with mining of ores containing sulfides. The treatment of these acid effluents, which contains high concentrations of dissolved metals and anions, is generally by liming. The wastes generated in the liming process may present significant toxicity and their storage in inappropriate places waiting for treatment is a common issue that requires solution. Osamu Utsumi Mine located in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, has been facing this problem. The residue of this mine consists of an alkaline sludge generated from the neutralization of the pH of acid mine drainage and is rich in various metals, including uranium. The main concern is the long term stability of this residue, which is in permanent contact with the acid water in the open pit. The recovery of uranium by hydrometallurgical techniques, such as acid leaching, can be a viable alternative on the reuse of this material. This study aimed at establishing a specific leaching process for the recovery of uranium present in the sludge from Caldas uranium mine. Some parameters such as solid/liquid ratio (0.09 to 0.17), time of leaching (1 to 24 hours) and concentration of sulfuric acid (pH from 0 to 3.0) were assessed. The results showed that it is possible to extract 100% of uranium present in the sludge. The concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the residue was 0.25%, similar to the content of the vein ores which is around 0.20% to 1.0%. The best experimental leaching condition is solid/liquid ratio of 0.17, pH 1.0 and 2 hours of reaction at room temperature (25 deg C). The content of uranium in the liquor is around 440 mgL{sup -1}. The recovery of the uranium from the liquor is under investigation by ionic exchange. (author)

  18. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  19. The monitoring system of the pipeline safety of the coal mine gas drainage based on the optic fiber sensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-fang; Wei, Yubin; Zhang, Tingting; Zhao, Yanjie; Lv, Lei; Liu, Tong-yu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the technology of the spectrum absorption and the FBG, the monitoring system realize on line detection of the concentration of methane and oxygen, the temperature and the pressure of the gas in pipeline, and in order to improve the accuracy of the gas detection, we induce the compensation to the gas concentration using the data of the temperature and the pressure. In order to have a effective utilization of the methane in the coal mine gas drainage system, we have to have a accurate measurements of the concentration, the temperature and the pressure of the gas in pipeline. At the same time the dynamic monitoring of the concentration of Oxygen is a sign of the leakage of the pump. This paper gave some data detected in the field of the coal mine gas drainage system.

  20. 铜陵重金属富集的尾矿废弃地酸性废水中细菌及古菌的多样性%Archaeal and bacterial communities in acid mine drainage from metal-rich abandoned tailing ponds, Tongling, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 李杨; 孙庆业

    2014-01-01

    To expand knowledge on microbial communities of various metal-rich levels of mine drainage environments in Anhui province, China, the archaeal and bacterial diversities were examined using a PCR-based cloning approach. Eight acid mine water samples were collected from five areas in Tongling. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacteria mainly fell into ten divisions, which wereBetaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Nitrospira, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi.Archaea fell into three phylogenetic divisions,Thermoplasma, FerroplasmaandThermogymnomonas. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) cluster analysis based on the microbial communities’ compositions revealed that five samples shared similarity with the dominance ofMeiothermus and Thermomonas. Two samples had the preponderant existence ofAcidithiobacillus andLeptospirillum. The remaining sample owned higher microbial communities’ diversity with the Shannon-WeaverH up to 2.91. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) suggested that microbial community structures had great association with pH and the concentration of Hg2+, Pb2+, Fe3+, Cl-, SO42-in water.%为了加深对安徽省铜陵市不同重金属富集程度的尾矿附近酸性废水中微生物多样性的了解,运用PCR-16S rDNA克隆文库技术对酸性废水中细菌及古菌的群落结构进行研究。在铜陵的5个样点采集了8个水样。系统发育分析结果表明,酸性废水中的细菌主要是Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Nitrospira, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi,古菌是Thermoplasma, Ferroplasma 以及Thermogymnomonas。根据细菌和古菌的组成对样品进行聚类分析,结果表明,5个样品由于优势菌株 Thermomonas 和 Meiothermus 拥有较高的相似度。2个样品由于 Acidithiobacillus

  1. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams. PMID:27443453

  2. 地面抽采与井下抽采煤层气成本分析研究%Study on Cost Analysis of Coal Bed Methane from Surface Borehole Gas Drainage and Underground Mine Gas Drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    为对比研究地面抽采煤层气成本与井下抽采瓦斯成本,以焦坪矿区下石节井田地面煤层气试验井储层测试参数和历史排采数据为基础,利用目前国际上较为先进的煤层气储层数值模拟软件CBM-SIM,对煤层气井的产能和抽采效果进行了预测分析,进而研究分析了在达到同样抽采效果的前提下,地面抽采与井下抽采煤层气的成本费用.结果显示:为了使瓦斯含量降至1 m3/t以下,地面抽采需要12.5a,成本9.09元/t;井下抽采成本16元/t,地面抽采成本远远低于井下抽采.%In order to compare and study the cost of the coal bed methane from the surface borehole gas drainage and the underground mine gas drainage,based on the reservoir measured parameters of the surface coal bed methane test well and the historical gas drainage data of Xiashijie Minefield in Jiaoping Mining Area as a base,with the application of the international advanced coal bed methane reservoir numerical simulation software CBM-SIM,a prediction analysis was conducted on the production capacity and the gas drainage effect of the coal bed methane well.On the premise of same gas drainage effect reached,the cost of the surface borehole gas drainage and underground mine gas drainage were studied and analyzed.The results showed that in order to make the gas content reduced to below 1 m3/t,the surface gas drainage would need 12.5 year,the cost would be 9.09 RMB/t.The underground mine gas drainage cost would be 16 RMB/t and the surface gas drainage cost would be far less than the underground mine gas drainage cost.

  3. Impact assessment of mine drainage water and municipal wastewater on the surface water in the vicinity of Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardić Vojka R.

    2015-01-01

    impact on the environment. The study included the following sources of pollution: mining waste and drainage water originating from the active mine (Bor pit , field 1 Krivelj large tailings, flotation tailings in Bor RTH, metallurgical water, as well as the drainage water from the flotation tailings, which are no longer in operation (field 2 flotation tailings Great Krivelj, drainage water from the old Bor flotation tailings, the old inactive landfill mine gangue (Saraka landfill, Veliki planir - tailings from the old Bor mine, landfill mine gangue from mine RTH and the city - urban waste water, which are discharged without treatment directly into the watercourse Bor River. Wastewater directly pollute Bor River and Krivalj River.

  4. Natural decrease of dissolved arsenic in a small stream receiving drainages of abandoned silver mines in Guanajuato, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Yann Rene Ramos; Muñoz, Alma Hortensia Serafín; Barrientos, Eunice Yanez; Huerta, Irais Rodriguez; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic release from the abandoned mines and its fate in a local stream were studied. Physicochemical parameters, metals/metalloids and arsenic species were determined. One of the mine drainages was found as a point source of contamination with 309 μg L(-1) of dissolved arsenic; this concentration declined rapidly to 10.5 μg L(-1) about 2 km downstream. Data analysis confirmed that oxidation of As(III) released from the primary sulfide minerals was favored by the increase of pH and oxidation reduction potential; the results obtained in multivariate approach indicated that self-purification of water was due to association of As(V) with secondary solid phase containing Fe, Mn, Ca.

  5. Efficient inhibition of heavy metal release from mine tailings against acid rain exposure by triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Beini; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Dang, Zhi; Ruan, Bo; Kang, Chunxi

    2016-11-15

    The potential application of triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt) in mine tailings treatment and AMD (acid mine drainage) remediation was investigated with batch experiments. The structural and morphological characteristics of TETA-Mt were analyzed with XRD, FTIR, DTG-TG and SEM. The inhibition efficiencies of TETA-Mt against heavy metal release from mine tailings when exposed to acid rain leaching was examined and compared with that of triethylenetetramine (TETA) and Mt. Results showed that the overall inhibition by TETA-Mt surpassed that by TETA or Mt for various heavy metal ions over an acid rain pH range of 3-5.6 and a temperature range of 25-40°C. When mine tailings were exposed to acid rain of pH 4.8 (the average rain pH of the mining site where the mine tailings were from), TETA-Mt achieved an inhibition efficiency of over 90% for Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) release, and 70% for Pb(2+) at 25°C. It was shown that TETA-Mt has a strong buffering capacity. Moreover, TETA-Mt was able to adsorb heavy metal ions and the adsorption process was fast, suggesting that coordination was mainly responsible. These results showed the potential of TETA-Mt in AMD mitigation, especially in acid rain affected mining area. PMID:27450331

  6. GIS-based environmental database for assessing the mine pollution : a case study of an abandoned mine site in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, A.; Hanich, L.; Hakkou, R.; Lepage, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Morocco with important mining activities is increasingly concerned about impacts of mining on the environment. In Morocco, there are approximately 200 abandoned mine sites which vary from small scale underground mines to large scale open-pit mines. Some of these mines, with reactive tailings and waste rocks, are problematic. Indeed, Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) pollution from abandoned mines is responsible for soil and water contamination, land resources degradation, changes in landscapes, habita...

  7. Multibiomarker toxicity characterization of uranium mine drainages to the fish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, M L; Antunes, S C; Pereira, R; Gonçalves, F J M; Nunes, B

    2016-07-01

    The release of acidic effluents, naturally enriched in metals and radionuclides, is the main legacy of uranium mines. Generally, metals dissolved by these acidic effluents can cause significant alterations in exposed organisms, with distinct toxicological outcomes. In this study, 72 individuals of the freshwater fish species Carassius auratus were exposed in situ for different periods (8, 16, 24, and 48 h) to water from a pond (treatment pond (TP)) with a chemically treated effluent and a reference pond (PRP), in the vicinity of the Cunha Baixa uranium mine (Portugal). Comparing the water of the two ponds, the PRP pond was characterized by higher pH and oxygen values and lower conductivity and hardness values. Regarding total metal concentrations, among others, magnesium (56,000 μg/L), sodium (17,400 μg/L), zinc (86 μg/L), manganese (6340 μg/L), and uranium (1380 μg/L) concentrations in the TP pond were above the values obtained for the PRP pond. The values of manganese and uranium exceeded the values of quality criteria established for surface waters for cyprinids and for irrigation purposes. After exposure to pond water, significant differences were recorded for several biomarkers: (i) between ponds for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with higher activities for animals from the PRP and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities that were particularly enhanced in animals from the TP pond; (ii) between ponds and exposure periods for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, since organisms from PRP pond presented always higher values than those from the TP pond, and among these, organisms exposed for the longer period presented a further depression in LDH activity; and (iii) between exposure periods for erythrocyte micronucleus. GSTs and LDH were the most sensitive biomarkers within the timeframe of the in situ assay performed. Despite the alleged efficacy of the chemical treatment (evidenced by a significantly lower pH), some metals persisted in the treated

  8. Comparison of microbial communities in three different mine drainages and their bioleaching efficiencies to low grade of chalcopyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hua-qun; QIU Guan-zhou; WANG Dian-zuo; CAO Lin-hui; DAI Zhi-min; WANG Jie-wei; LIU Xue-duan

    2007-01-01

    Microbial community diversities in the drainage from three mines (Dexing Copper Mine, Qibaoshan Copper Mine and Yaogangxian Tungsten Mine, China) were analyzed using 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP approach. The efficiencies of chalcopyrite bioleaching were compared using enrichment of the three cultures. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the dominant microorganisms are clustered with the Proteobacteria, the remaining is affiliated with Nitrospira, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria.At the genus level, Acidithiobacillus is the dominant group in both YTW and QBS samples, while Spingomonas is dominant in YGX sample. Moreover, the principal component analysis (PCA) reveals that QBS and YTW have similar geochemical character and microbial communities. The results also show that pH value and tungsten concentration play a key role in microbial community distribution and relative abundance. The bioleaching efficiency of the enrichment cultures from YTW and QBS is similar. After 15 d,the bioleaching rates of low grade chalcopyrite (0.99%) are both up to 99.5% when using 10 g/L pulp density due to the similar microbial composition of YTW and QBS. Moreover, the leaching efficiencies of enrichment cultures containing multiple bioleaching microorganisms are higher than that of pure culture Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

  9. Zn(Ⅱ)对生物质碳源处理酸性矿山排水中厌氧微生物活性影响%Effect of Zn(II) on Microbial Activity in Anaerobic Acid Mine Drainage Treatment System with Biomass as Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎少杰; 陈天虎; 周跃飞; 岳正波; 金杰; 刘畅

    2012-01-01

    通过厌氧批实验的方法,探讨了在硫酸盐还原菌(SRB)法处理模拟酸性矿山排水(AMD)的过程中,以油菜秸秆为碳源时,Zn2+浓度对SRB活性的影响.结果表明,在60 d实验中,以油菜秸秆为碳源时,当Zn2+初始浓度在73.7~196.8 mg·L-1范围时,SRB具有良好活性,实验结束时,pH从初始的5.0上升至中性范围,硫酸根还原率达到96%以上,同时Zn2+浓度降至0.05 mg·L-1以下.Tessier固体形态分类、场发射扫描电镜(FE-SEM)和X射线衍射仪(XRD)分析发现,Zn以有机物及硫化物的形态被固定,其中硫化物主要为闪锌矿(ZnS).当Zn2+初始浓度为262.97 mg·L-1时,SRB的活性受到强烈的抑制,实验结束时,pH从初始的5.0降至4.0左右,硫酸根还原率只有27%,Zn2+维持在较高浓度范围(25 mg·L-1).油菜秸秆可以作为SRB法长期处理AMD的缓释碳源, 能为微生物生长繁殖提供物质和能量; 秸秆的吸附性可降低Zn2+的生物毒性,使得SRB可以适应高浓度的Zn2+; SRB可以通过形成硫化物矿物的形式固定元素Zn.%In this study, with rape straw as carbon source, anaerobic batch experiments were executed to investigate the effect of Zn(Ⅱ) on the activity of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) in the microbial treatment of simulative acid mine drainage (AMD). The results showed that during the 60 experimental days, when initial Zn2+ concentrations were in the range of 73.7 to 196.8 mg·L-1, SRB had high culturalbility. At the end of these experiments, pH values rose from initial 5.0 to neutral, about 96% of sulphate was reduced and the concentrations of Zn2+ reduced to 0.05 mg·L-1. The results of Tessier sequential extraction, field emission scanning electron microscope(FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD) showed that Zn was found to be fixed through forming organic and sulphide (mainly sphalerite) compounds. For the experiment with high Zn2+ concentration (262

  10. 大型矿井排水设备选型计算%Calculation and selection in drainage equipment for oversize coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔淑云; 李德臣

    2014-01-01

    排水设备选型的优劣不仅直接影响矿井初期投资和运转费用,而且影响安全生产。根据现代化大型煤矿-红庆梁矿井正常涌水量及最大涌水量,给出了矿井排水设备选型与计算方法。通过计算水泵排水能力、管路阻力系数、工况点参数、排水管路壁厚、电耗,确定主排水设备和应急排水系统选型结果,为大型矿井的排水设备选型提供参考。%Selection of drainage equipment not only directly affect the merits of the initial mine investment and operating costs, but also affect the safety in production. The method of calculation and selection for main mine drainage equipment is given in this paper based on a new modern coal mine such as Hong Qing Liang mine that normal water gushing and the largest water inlfow. the selection results of determine the main drainage equipment and emergency drainage system provide a reference for a large mine drainage equipment selection by calculating the drainage capacity, pipeline drag coefifcient, pump operating conditions parameters, drain line wall thickness and power consumption.

  11. Proceedings of the 15. annual national meeting of the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation. Mining -- Gateway to the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 124 papers of these proceedings are arranged under the following topical sections: Minerals education; Hydrology--Characterization and monitoring; Tailings--Reclamation; Reforestation; Mine drainage--Biogeochemical processes; Mine drainage--Treatment, general; Mine drainage--Passive treatment, wetlands; Mine drainage--Prediction and monitoring; Acid soils--Reclamation practices; Wildlife and fisheries habitat; Subsidence--Engineering practices and environmental effects; OSM acid forming materials mini workshops; RUSLE--Erosion prediction techniques on mined construction and reclaimed lands; IDNR wetlands technology transfer program; Mine planning and postmining land use; Vegetation establishment--Principles and practices; Vegetation establishment--Warm season grasses; Coal combustion by-products--General; Coal combustion by-products--Mine drainage treatment; and Prime farmland reclamation and mine soils management. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  12. A sequential approach to control gas for the extraction of multi-gassy coal seams from traditional gas well drainage to mining-induced stress relief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The gas reservoirs characteristics are measured and analyzed. • A sequential approach to control gas of multi-gassy coal seams is proposed. • The design of gas drainage wells has been improved. • The utilization ways of different concentrations of gas production are shown. - Abstract: As coal resources become exhausted in shallow mines, mining operations will inevitably progress from shallow depth to deep and gassy seams due to increased demands for more coal products. However, during the extraction process of deeper and gassier coal seams, new challenges to current gas control methods have emerged, these include the conflict between the coal mine safety and the economic benefits, the difficulties in reservoirs improvement, as well as the imbalance between pre-gas drainage, roadway development and coal mining. To solve these problems, a sequential approach is introduced in this paper. Three fundamental principles are proposed: the mining-induced stress relief effect of the first-mined coalbed should be sufficient to improve the permeability of the others; the coal resource of the first-mined seams must be abundant to guarantee the economic benefits; the arrangement of the vertical wells must fit the underground mining panel. Tunlan coal mine is taken as a typical example to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The approach of integrating surface coalbed methane (CBM) exploitation with underground gas control technologies brings three major benefits: the improvement of underground coal mining safety, the implementation of CBM extraction, and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This practice could be used as a valuable example for other coal mines having similar geological conditions

  13. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT REMOTE MINE SITES (SLIDES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    After completing extensive bench-scale testing to determine optimum treatment approaches, the technology has been taken to the field. Preliminary results show that calcium hydroxide precipitates the bulk of the arsenic and zinc; the granular ferric hydroxide removes the rest of ...

  14. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Tecbnology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

  15. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA BULLETIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evaluat...

  16. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA CAPSULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

  17. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  18. Management of mining-related damages in abandoned underground coal mine areas using GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining-related damages such as ground subsidence, acid mine drainage (AMD), and deforestation in the abandoned underground coal mine areas become an object of public concern. Therefore, the system to manage the mining-related damages is needed for the effective drive of rehabilitation activities. The management system for Abandoned Underground Coal Mine using GIS includes the database about mining record and information associated with the mining-related damages and application programs to support mine damage prevention business. Also, this system would support decision-making policy for rehabilitation and provide basic geological data for regional construction works in abandoned underground coal mine areas. (authors)

  19. Effects of Abandoned Coal-Mine Drainage on Streamflow and Water Quality in the Mahanoy Creek Basin, Schuylkill, Columbia, and Northumberland Counties, Pennsylvania, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    This report assesses the contaminant loading, effects to receiving streams, and possible remedial alternatives for abandoned mine drainage (AMD) within the Mahanoy Creek Basin in east-central Pennsylvania. The Mahanoy Creek Basin encompasses an area of 157 square miles (407 square kilometers) including approximately 42 square miles (109 square kilometers) underlain by the Western Middle Anthracite Field. As a result of more than 150 years of anthracite mining in the basin, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments have been adversely affected. Leakage from streams to underground mines and elevated concentrations (above background levels) of acidity, metals, and sulfate in the AMD from flooded underground mines and (or) unreclaimed culm (waste rock) degrade the aquatic ecosystem and impair uses of the main stem of Mahanoy Creek from its headwaters to its mouth on the Susquehanna River. Various tributaries also are affected, including North Mahanoy Creek, Waste House Run, Shenandoah Creek, Zerbe Run, and two unnamed tributaries locally called Big Mine Run and Big Run. The Little Mahanoy Creek and Schwaben Creek are the only major tributaries not affected by mining. To assess the current hydrological and chemical characteristics of the AMD and its effect on receiving streams, and to identify possible remedial alternatives, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a study in 2001, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Schuylkill Conservation District. Aquatic ecological surveys were conducted by the USGS at five stream sites during low base-flow conditions in October 2001. Twenty species of fish were identified in Schwaben Creek near Red Cross, which drains an unmined area of 22.7 square miles (58.8 square kilometers) in the lower part of the Mahanoy Creek Basin. In contrast, 14 species of fish were identified in Mahanoy Creek near its mouth at Kneass, below Schwaben Creek. The diversity and abundance of fish

  20. Enhancing the natural removal of As in a reactive fluvial confluence receiving acid drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G.; Montecinos, M.; Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial confluences are natural reactors that can determine the fate of contaminants in watersheds receiving acid drainage. Hydrological, hydrodynamic and chemical factors determine distinct conditions for the formation of suspended particles of iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides. The chemical and physical properties of these particle assemblages (e.g. particle size, chemical composition) can vary according to inflow mixing ratios, hydrodynamic velocity profiles, and chemical composition of the flows mixing at the confluence. Due to their capacity to sorb metals, it is important to identify the optimal conditions for removing metals from the aqueous phase, particularly arsenic, a contaminant frequently found in acid drainage. We studied a river confluence in the Lluta watershed, located in the arid Chilean Altiplano. We performed field measurements and laboratory studies to find optimal mixing ratio for arsenic sorption onto oxyhydroxide particles at the confluence between the Azufre (pH=2, As=2 mg/L) and the Caracarani river (pH=8, Asplants could be used to engineer such intervention.Acknowledgements: Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936 and Proyecto CONICYT FONDAP 15110020

  1. The effects of ferulic acid on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats after biliary drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Haigang Li,1,2 Yang Wang,1 Rong Fan,1 Huiying Lv,3 Hua Sun,4 Haitang Xie,4 Tao Tang,1 Jiekun Luo,1 Zian Xia1 1Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 2Department of Pharmacy, Changsha Medical University, 3Hunan Agricultural Product Processing Institute, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Changsha, 4Anhui Provincial Centre for Drug Clinical Evaluation, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: According to previous research studies, warfarin can be detected in human bile after oral administration. Ferulic acid (FA is the main bioactive component of many Chinese herbs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. To elucidate the effects of FA on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats after biliary drainage is necessary. Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (WN: healthy rats after the administration of warfarin sodium, Group 2 (WO: a rat model of biliary drainage after the administration of warfarin sodium, Group 3 (WFN: healthy rats after the administration of warfarin sodium and FA, and Group 4 (WFO: a rat model of biliary drainage after the administration of warfarin sodium and FA. Blood samples were collected at different time points after administration. The concentrations of blood samples were determined by ultraperformance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Comparisons between groups were performed according to the main pharmacokinetic parameters calculated by the DAS 2.1.1 software. The pharmacokinetic parameters showed a significant difference between the WN and WO groups, the WO group showed a decrease of 51% and 41.6% in area under the curve from 0 to time (AUC0–t and peak plasma concentration (Cmax, respectively, whereas time to Cmax (Tmax was delayed 3.27 folds. There were significant differences between the WFO and WFN groups, the WFO

  2. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Danny M; Webb, John A; Taylor, Jeff

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by approximately 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is approximately 2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, approximately 4.5, approximately 5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. PMID:16570625

  3. Bioaccumulation trends of arsenic and antimony in a freshwater ecosystem affected by mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovick, Meghan A.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Arkle, Robert .; Pilliod, David

    2016-01-01

    We compared As and Sb bioaccumulation and biomagnification when these metalloids co-occurred at varying environmental concentrations in a stream and wetlands near a contaminated mine site in Idaho (USA). We measured As and Sb concentrations in water and substrate samples, and in tissues of organisms representing several trophic levels. Bioaccumulation of both As and Sb was observed in stream organisms with the following trend of bio-diminution with increasing trophic level: primary producers>tadpoles>macroinvertebrates>trout. We also note reductions in metalloid concentrations in one of two stream remediation reaches engineered within the past 17 years to ameliorate metalloid contamination in the stream. Several wetlands contained thick microbial mats and were highly populated with boreal toad tadpoles that fed on them. The mats were extremely contaminated (up to 76 564 mg kg-1 As and 675 mg kg-1 Sb) with amorphous As- and Sb-bearing minerals that we interpret as biogenic precipitates from geomicrobiological As- and Sb-cycling. Ingested mat material provided a direct source of metalloids to tadpoles, and concentrations of 3867 mg kg-1 (As) and 375 mg kg-1 (Sb) reported here represent the highest whole body As and Sb levels ever reported in living tadpoles. The bulk of tadpole metalloid burden remained in the gut despite attempts to purge the tadpoles prior to analysis. This study adds to a number of recent investigations reporting bioaccumulation, but not biomagnification, of As and Sb in food webs. Moreover, our results suggest that tadpoles, in particular, may be more resistant to metalloid contamination than previously assumed.

  4. Contamination by uranium mine drainages affects fungal growth and interactions between fungal species and strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Verónica; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia; Pratas, João; Canhoto, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The presence of aquatic hyphomycetes has been reported for several heavy metal-contaminated waters. Tolerance probably is one adaptation to coping with heavy metals. To help clarify this issue strains of two species of aquatic hyphomycetes (Tricladium splendens Ingold and Varicosporium elodeae Kegel) were isolated from a reference stream and a stream contaminated with heavy metals and grown on malt extract agar prepared with reference and contaminated water to characterize colony morphology, growth rate, growth inhibition and interaction among species and strains. In V. elodeae the morphology of colonies differed between strains. Colony diameter increased linearly over time with growth rates being lower for strains isolated from contaminated than from reference streams (mostly for V. elodeae). Strains from the contaminated stream grew faster in medium prepared with contaminated water than in medium prepared with reference water, while for strains from the reference stream there was no significant difference in growth rates on the two media. In interacting isolates radial growth toward the opposing colony was generally lower than toward the dish edge. Percentage growth inhibition was higher for isolates in intraspecific interactions (13-37%) than in interspecific interactions (3-27%). However differences in growth inhibition experienced by interacting isolates were observed only in three cases out of 16. The difference between the percentage inhibition caused and experienced by a given isolate was highest in interactions involving isolates with distinct growth rates. Our results suggest that strains from the reference stream tolerate heavy metals while strains from the contaminated stream seem to be adapted to contaminated waters. We hypothesize that in natural environments fungal species-specific limits of tolerance to metal contamination might determine an abrupt or gradual response of the original fungal community to mine pollution giving origin to a poorer

  5. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ66Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰ ± 0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ66Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰ ± 0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. - Highlights: ► Zinc isotopes of water were measured in samples

  6. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  7. Study on the Drainage Monitoring System in Coal Mines%煤矿井下排水监控系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申向东

    2012-01-01

    针对煤矿井下排水的现状,提出了一种以可编程控制器为核心的排水监控系统的设计方案,实现了相关数据的实时采集和排水系统的在线监控,同时可对液位、水压等数据进行实时记录、图表显示和历史查询,对煤矿安全生产起到了一定的推动作用。%Concerning the drainage situation in coal mines,the paper proposes a design of drainage monitoring system based on programmable controllers,realizing real-time acquisition of data and online monitoring of the drainage system,and at the same time enabling real-time recording,graphic display and historical inquiry of the liquid level and water pressure,which may promote the safe production in coal mines.

  8. Prediction of the acid generating potential of coal mining spoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterroso, C.; Macias, F. [Universidad de Santiago, Santiago (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    1998-07-01

    The sulfide oxidation impact on mined land reclamation makes it necessary for mine spoils to be classified according to their acidifying potential. In this paper predictions were made of the acid generating potential of sulfide-containing spoils from the Puentes lignite mine (Galicia, NW Spain), and the limits of sulfur contents allowable for their storage in aerobic conditions, were established. Using samples of fresh spoils, analyses were made of the content and speciation of sulfur, pH was measured after oxidation of the sample with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (pH of oxidation = pH{sub OX}), and titration of the oxidation extract with 0.1N NaOH to pH = 7 was carried out (Net Acid Production = NAP). The total sulfur content (S{sub T}) varied between {lt} 0.01% and {gt} 3%, with pyritic-S being the most common form ({gt} 80%). pH{sub OX} varied between 1.6 and 6.4 and NAP between 1.2 and 85.0 Kg-CaCO{sub 3}t{sup -1}. A high correlation was found between the NAP and the S{sub T}(r-0.98, p{lt} 0.001). Spoils with S{sub T} {gt} 0.15% cause high risks of mine-soil acidification, and create the need for large doses of CaCO{sub 3} to be used on final surface of the mine dump. Use of fly ash, produced from the combustion of lignite, as an alternative to commercial lime is more effective in the control of acidity generated by spoils with high S{sub T}. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mine Waste Disposal and Managements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Young-Wook; Min, Jeong-Sik; Kwon, Kwang-Soo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    This research project deals with: Analysis and characterization of mine waste piles or tailings impoundment abandoned in mining areas; Survey of mining environmental pollution from mine waste impounds; Modelling of pollutants in groundwater around tailings impoundment; Demonstration of acid rock drainage from coal mine waste rock piles and experiment of seeding on waste rock surface; Development of a liner using tailings. Most of mine wastes are deposited on natural ground without artificial liners and capping for preventing contamination of groundwater around mine waste piles or containments. In case of some mine waste piles or containments, pollutants have been released to the environment, and several constituents in drainage exceed the limit of discharge from landfill site. Metals found in drainage exist in exchangeable fraction in waste rock and tailings. This means that if when it rains to mine waste containments, mine wastes can be pollutant to the environment by release of acidity and metals. As a result of simulation for hydraulic potentials and groundwater flow paths within the tailings, the simulated travel paths correlated well with the observed contaminant distribution. The plum disperse, both longitudinal and transverse dimensions, with time. Therefore liner system is a very important component in tailings containment system. As experimental results of liner development using tailings, tailings mixed with some portion of resin or cement may be used for liner because tailings with some additives have a very low hydraulic conductivity. (author). 39 refs.

  10. Influences of wetland plants on weathered acidic mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of Carex rostrata, Eriophorum angustifolium and Phragmites australis on weathered, acidic mine tailings (pH ∼3) and their effect on pH in tailings were investigated in a field experiment. The amendments, sewage sludge and an ashes-sewage sludge mixture, were used as plant nutrition and their influence on the metal and As concentrations of plant shoots was analysed. An additional experiment was performed in greenhouse with E. angustifolium and sewage sludge as amendments in both weathered and unweathered tailings. After one year, plants grew better in amendments containing ashes in the field, also in those plants the metal and As shoot concentrations were generally lower than in other treatments. After two years, the only surviving plants were found in sewage sludge mixed with ashes. No effect on pH by plants was found in weathered acidic mine tailings in either field- or greenhouse experiment. - Wetland plant establishment on acidic mine tailings may contribute to a reduced metal release and a stabilisation of pH

  11. Adequate drainage system design for heap leaching structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Abbas; Amini, Mehdi; Nasab, Saeed Karimi

    2007-08-17

    The paper describes an optimum design of a drainage system for a heap leaching structure which has positive impacts on both mine environment and mine economics. In order to properly design a drainage system the causes of an increase in the acid level of the heap which in turn produces severe problems in the hydrometallurgy processes must be evaluated. One of the most significant negative impacts induced by an increase in the acid level within a heap structure is the increase of pore acid pressure which in turn increases the potential of a heap-slide that may endanger the mine environment. In this paper, initially the thickness of gravelly drainage layer is determined via existing empirical equations. Then by assuming that the calculated thickness is constant throughout the heap structure, an approach has been proposed to calculate the required internal diameter of the slotted polyethylene pipes which are used for auxiliary drainage purposes. In order to adequately design this diameter, the pipe's cross-sectional deformation due to stepped heap structure overburden pressure is taken into account. Finally, a design of an adequate drainage system for the heap structure 2 at Sarcheshmeh copper mine is presented and the results are compared with those calculated by exiting equations. PMID:17321044

  12. Nitrogen removal and spatial distribution of denitrifier and anammox communities in a bioreactor for mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Roger B; Winbjörk, Harry; Hellman, Maria; Hallin, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Mine drainage water may contain high levels of nitrate (NO3(-)) due to undetonated nitrogen-based explosives. The removal of NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) in cold climates through the microbial process of denitrification was evaluated using a pilot-scale fixed-bed bioreactor (27 m(3)). Surface water was diverted into the above-ground bioreactor filled with sawdust, crushed rock, and sewage sludge. At hydraulic residence times of ca.15 h and with the addition of acetate, NO3(-) and NO2(-) were removed to below detection levels at a NO3(-) removal rate of 5-10 g N m(-3) (bioreactor material) d(-1). The functional groups contributing to nitrogen removal in the bioreactor were studied by quantifying nirS and nirK present in denitrifying bacteria, nosZI and nosZII genes from the nitrous oxide - reducing community, and a taxa-specific part of the16S rRNA gene for the anammox community. The abundances of nirS and nirK were almost 2 orders of magnitude greater than the anammox specific 16S rRNA gene, indicating that denitrification was the main process involved in nitrogen removal. The spatial distribution of the quantified genes was heterogeneous in the bioreactor, with trends observed in gene abundance as a function of depth, distance from the bioreactor inlet, and along specific flowpaths. There was a significant relationship between the abundance of nirS, nirK, and nosZI genes and depth in the bioreactor, such that the abundance of organisms containing these genes may be controlled by oxygen diffusion and substrate supply in the partially or completely water-saturated material. Among the investigated microbial functional groups, nirS and anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes exhibited a systematic trend of decreasing and increasing abundance, respectively, with distance from the inlet, which suggested that the functional groups respond differently to changing environmental conditions. The greater abundance of nirK along central flowpaths may indicate that the bioreactor

  13. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A., III

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and alkalinity; the initial Fe2+ concentration of 16.4 mg/L decreased to less than 0.5 mg/L within 24 h; pH values increased rapidly from 5.8 to 7.2, ultimately attaining a steady-state value of 7.5. The increased pH coincided with a rapid decrease in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from an initial value of 10 -1.1atm to a steady-state value of 10-3.1atm. From these results, a staged aerobic treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent remained elevated (10-2.4 to 10-1.7atm). The elevated PCO 2 maintained the pH within the system at values less than 7 and hence slowed the rate

  14. Proceedings of the 2010 International Mine Water Association symposium : mine water and innovative thinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolkersdorfer, C. [Cape Breton Univ., Sydney, NS (Canada); Freund, A. [CBU Press, Sydney, NS (Canada)] (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is causing pollution in many waterways and ground water tables throughout the world. Hosted by the International Mine Water Association, this symposium examined issues related to acid mine drainage and explored various water treatment and water removal technologies and mine water chemistry analysis methods. Issues concerning the remediation and monitoring of abandoned mines were explored and recent innovations in geochemistry and geological engineering were presented. Water management issues in various types of geologic formations were included. The conference themes were: mine water issues and innovative mining methods; mine water engineering; mine water treatment, active systems; mine water treatment, passive systems; mine water geothermal, geochemistry and biochemistry uses; analysis of mine water and its chemistry; underground and surface coal mining; mine closures; legal and social aspects of mine water; mine tailings; the Cape Breton Development Corporation legacy; and the concept of a zero waste mine. The symposium featured 155 presentations, of which 32 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  15. A study on the environmental and safety problems and their remediation around mining areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jeong Sik; Cheong, Young Wook; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    This study focused on the survey for environmental impacts and hazard occurred in the abandoned metallic mines and their countermeasures. Major issues in the inactive metal mines were mine drainage, tailings, waste rock dump, abandoned facilities, in which acid mine drainage was a principal factor to deteriorate the environment around the abandoned mines. Chemical analysis shown that mine drainage was very acidic and were very acidic and were contaminated by toxic elements such as As, Pb, Cd, Mn, Fe, Cu and S etc. In addition, soil near the tailings impoundment was contaminated by heavy metals such as As, Pb, Cd, and cyanide. An column test was carried out to develop the passive treatment system for amelioration of the acid mine drainage with heavy metals. The experimental results revealed that composite mixed with the saw dust and cow manure was evaluated as the best substrate to have good permeability and to have enough food necessary for sulfate reduction bacteria. Small scaled anoxic wetland had been operated to confirm the capabilities of acid mine drainage treatment. The demonstration of the system revealed that the system neutralized acid mine drainage and also eliminated some metals such as Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn etc up to by 98%. (author). 28 refs., 50 tabs., 115 figs.

  16. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  17. Advances in the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a plethora of research related to the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters and associated tailings and waste-rock waters. Numerous books, reviews, technical papers, and proceedings have been published that examine the complex bio-geochemical process of sulfide mineral oxidation, develop and apply geochemical models to site characterization, and characterize the microbial ecology of these environments. This review summarizes many of these recent works, and provides references for those investigating this field. Comparisons of measured versus calculated Eh and measured versus calculated pH for water samples from several field sites demonstrate the reliability of some current geochemical models for aqueous speciation and mass balances. Geochemical models are not, however, used to predict accurately time-dependent processes but to improve our understanding of these systems and to constrain possible processes that contribute to actual or potential water quality issues. Microbiological studies are demonstrating that there is much we have yet to learn about the types of different microorganisms and their function and ecology in mine-waste environments. A broad diversity of green algae, bacteria, archaea, yeasts, and fungi are encountered in acid mine waters, and a better understanding of their ecology and function may potentially enhance remediation possibilities as well as our understanding of the evolution of life.

  18. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  19. Evaluation of water treatment sludge for ameliorating acid mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rensburg, L.; Morgenthal, T.L. [Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education, Potchefstroom (South Africa). School for Environmental Science & Development

    2003-10-01

    This study investigated the liming effect of water treatment sludge on acid mine spoils. The study was conducted with sludge from a water purification plant along the Vaal River catchments in South Africa. The optimum application rate for liming acid spoils and the speed and depth with which the sludge reacted with the mine waste were investigated. Chemical analysis indicated that the sludge is suitable as a liming agent because of its alkaline pH (8.08), high bicarbonate concentration (183.03 mg L{sup -1}), and low salinity (electrical conductivity = 76 mS m(-1)). The high cation exchange capacity of 15.47 cmol{sub c} kg{sup -1} and elevated nitrate concentration (73.16 mg L{sup -1}) also increase its value as an ameliorative material. The soluble concentrations for manganese, aluminum, lead, and selenium were high at a pH of 5 although only selenium (0.83 mg L{sup -1}) warranted some concern. According to experimental results, the application of 10 Mg ha{sup -1} of sludge to acid gold tailings increased the leach water pH from 4.5 to more than 7.5 and also increased the medium pH from 2.4 to 7.5. The addition of sludge further reduced the solubility of iron, manganese, copper, and zinc in the ameliorated gold tailings, but increased the electrical conductivity. The liming tempo was highest in the coal discard profile that had a coarse particle size distribution and took the longest to move through the gold tailings that had a fine particle size distribution. Results from this study indicate that the water treatment sludge investigated is suitable as a liming agent for rehabilitation of acid mine waste.

  20. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 5. Well installation, water-level data, and surface- and ground-water geochemistry in the Straight Creek drainage basin, Red River Valley, New Mexico, 2001-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Cheryl A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Donohoe, Lisa C.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, Roger H.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Environment Department, is investigating the pre-mining ground-water chemistry at the Molycorp molybdenum mine in the Red River Valley, northern New Mexico. The primary approach is to determine the processes controlling ground-water chemistry at an unmined, off-site, proximal analog. The Straight Creek drainage basin, chosen for this purpose, consists of the same quartz-sericite-pyrite altered andesitic and rhyolitic volcanic rock of Tertiary age as the mine site. The weathered and rugged volcanic bedrock surface is overlain by heterogeneous debris-flow deposits that interfinger with alluvial deposits near the confluence of Straight Creek and the Red River. Pyritized rock in the upper part of the drainage basin is the source of acid rock drainage (pH 2.8-3.3) that infiltrates debris-flow deposits containing acidic ground water (pH 3.0-4.0) and bedrock containing water of circumneutral pH values (5.6-7.7). Eleven observation wells were installed in the Straight Creek drainage basin. The wells were completed in debris-flow deposits, bedrock, and interfingering debris-flow and Red River alluvial deposits. Chemical analyses of ground water from these wells, combined with chemical analyses of surface water, water-level data, and lithologic and geophysical logs, provided information used to develop an understanding of the processes contributing to the chemistry of ground water in the Straight Creek drainage basin. Surface- and ground-water samples were routinely collected for determination of total major cations and selected trace metals; dissolved major cations, selected trace metals, and rare-earth elements; anions and alkalinity; and dissolved-iron species. Rare-earth elements were determined on selected samples only. Samples were collected for determination of dissolved organic carbon, mercury, sulfur isotopic composition (34S and 18O of sulfate), and water isotopic composition (2H and 18O) during

  1. Application of KJ30 Type Gas Drainage Monitoring System in Coal Mine%KJ30型瓦斯抽放监控系统在煤矿中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹斌

    2014-01-01

    The construction of gas drainage monitoring system,is to provide comprehensive control of coal mine gas, one of the basis of the implementation of coal mine safety production system. This paper KJ30 type gas drainage monitoring system in shanxi Tiandiwang Slope Coal Co.,LTD.,the application of detailed introduces the working principle and main function of the system. Mine in the future construction of gas drainage monitoring system has certain reference significance.%本文结合KJ30型瓦斯抽放监控系统在山西天地王坡煤业有限公司的应用情况,详细介绍了该系统的工作原理、主要功能以及取得的效果。

  2. Chapter 5. Uranium extraction technology from mine and drainage waters of uranium industry wastes. 5.4. Sorbent selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to sorbent selection. In sulfuric solutions, the uranium is found as [UO2(SO4)2 ]4-, which is produced in result of uranium ores leaching by sulfuric acid and the ratio depends on SO42-, UO22+ concentration and on the ph medium. Thus, the mine waters of Kiik-Tal settlement and the technical waters of Taboshar settlement also contain ions SO42- and UO22+. In principle, uranium can be absorbed from sulfuric solutions either by cation exchangers or by anion exchangers, which has been proved by practice. Component extraction sorption effectiveness, in case of uranium, is determined by its extraction degree (%), cleaning and concentration. These are the main sorption tasks. The basic requirements for the process are: maximum sorbent capacity and selectivity by good kinetic sorption indicators and uranium regeneration. Minimum required parameters which should be of interest to a production engineer are: sorption capacity, number of sorption stages, one-time sorbent loading, solution contact duration, desorption conditions. All these parameters are directly or indirectly related and reflect the basic physicochemical regularities of sorption statics and kinetics, and also depend a lot on the apparatus process design. Taking all this into account, apricot shells as sorbent was used. Apricot shells are a cheap and accessible material - canning plants' waste in the North of Tajikistan, which compiles hundred tons every year. The swelling ability of shell is 17%. A number of tests were carried out for optimal sorption regime determination.

  3. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  4. Conservation value of post-mining headwaters: drainage channels at a lignite spoil heap harbour threatened stream dragonflies

    OpenAIRE

    TICHÁNEK, Filip

    2016-01-01

    In the work, we studied the biodiversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) at 53 sections (30 m) of an extraordinarily dense system of drainage ditches at a large lignite spoil heap in the Czech Republic. Using generalized linear models and canonical correspondence analyses we identified crucial factors affecting dragonfly communities and suggested implications for restoration ecology practise.

  5. Coal mine site reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Coal mine sites can have significant effects on local environments. In addition to the physical disruption of land forms and ecosystems, mining can also leave behind a legacy of secondary detrimental effects due to leaching of acid and trace elements from discarded materials. This report looks at the remediation of both deep mine and opencast mine sites, covering reclamation methods, back-filling issues, drainage and restoration. Examples of national variations in the applicable legislation and in the definition of rehabilitation are compared. Ultimately, mine site rehabilitation should return sites to conditions where land forms, soils, hydrology, and flora and fauna are self-sustaining and compatible with surrounding land uses. Case studies are given to show what can be achieved and how some landscapes can actually be improved as a result of mining activity.

  6. Assessment of Phytostabilization Success in Metalliferous Acid Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Root, R. A.; Hammond, C.; Amistadi, M. K.; Maier, R. M.; Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Legacy mine tailings are a significant source of metal(loid)s due to wind and water erosion, especially in the arid southwest, and exposure to fugative dusts presents a health risk to surrounding populations. Compost assisted phytostabilization has been implemented to reduce off site emissions at the Iron King Mine U.S. Superfund Site in central Arizona, concurrent with a greenhouse mesocosm study for detailed study of subsurface mechanisms. Quantification of plant available toxic metal(loid)s in the amended tailings was accessed with a targeted single extraction of diethylenetriaminepentaactic acid (DTPA). Greenhouse mesocosms (1m dia, 0.4 m deep), run in triplicate, mimicked field treatments with: i) tailings only control (TO), ii) tailings plus 15 wt% compost (TC), iii) TC + quailbush seeds (TCA), and iv) TC + buffalo grass seeds (TCB). Core samples collected at 3-month intervals for 1 year were dissected by depth (10 cm each) for analysis. DTPA results indicated that compost treated samples decreased plant availability of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb but increased Mn and Zn compared with TO. TCB decreased plant available metal(loid)s at all depths, whereas TCA plant available Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn increased in the deeper 20-30cm and 30-40 cm relative to TCB. Samples from the greenhouse were compared to tailings from both the field site and tailings impacted soils used to grow vegetables. Mineral transformations and metal complexation, in the pre- and post-extracted tailings were analyzed by synchrotron transmission XRD and FTIR spectroscopy. The temporal change in plant available metal(loid)s in response to phytostabilization indicates mineralogical alteration that improves soil quality by reducing plant available metal(loid)s. These results will aid in the understanding and efficacy of phytostabilization as a means of remediating and reducing toxicity on mine tailings as well as providing information on health risk management in the region.

  7. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, J.R.; Scott, W.E.; Evans, William C.; Jorgenson, J.; McGimsey, R.G.; Wang, B.

    2008-01-01

    A mass of snow and ice 400-m-wide and 105-m-thick began melting in the summit crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between November 2004 and early May 2005, presumably owing to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system, or possibly from magma intrusion and degassing. In early May 2005, an estimated 3.8??106 m3 of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water, with an accompanying acidic aerosol component, exited the crater through a tunnel at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 km downstream, the acidic waters of the flood inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying Mother Goose Lake from surface to depth (approximately 0.5 km3 in volume at a pH of 2.9 to 3.1), killing all aquatic life, and preventing the annual salmon run. Over 2 months later, crater lake water sampled 8 km downstream of the outlet after considerable dilution from glacial meltwater was a weak sulfuric acid solution (pH = 3.2, SO4 = 504 mg/L, Cl = 53.6 mg/L, and F = 7.92 mg/L). The acid flood waters caused severe vegetation damage, including plant death and leaf kill along the flood path. The crater lake drainage was accompanied by an ambioructic flow of acidic aerosols that followed the flood path, contributing to defoliation and necrotic leaf damage to vegetation in a 29 km2 area along and above affected streams, in areas to heights of over 150 m above stream level. Moss species killed in the event contained high levels of sulfur, indicating extremely elevated atmospheric sulfurcontent. The most abundant airborne phytotoxic constituent was likely sulfuric acid aerosols that were generated during the catastrophic partial crater lake drainage event. Two mechanisms of acidic aerosol formation are proposed: (1) generation of aerosol mist through turbulent flow of acidic water and (2) catastrophic gas exsolution. This previously undocumented phenomenon of simultaneous vegetationdamaging acidic aerosols accompanying drainage of an acidic crater

  8. Evaluation of seepage and acid generation potential from evaporation ponds, Iron Duke Pyrite Mine, Mazowe Valley, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravengai, Seedwel; Owen, Richard; Love, David

    Iron Duke Pyrite Mine lies in the Mazowe Valley of northern Zimbabwe. Several urban areas and commercial farmers are major water users in the catchment. Accordingly, managing the impact of mining operations on water quality in the Mazowe Valley must be a major priority for sustainable development in this area. The mine disposes of its waste water via evaporation ponds. Some of the water in the ponds evaporates and some is lost through seepage to groundwater. Results of a water budget analysis of the ponds showed that 160.5 m 3 per day of acidic effluent with a pH of 2 and elevated levels of iron and sulphate was being lost through seepage. As the wastewater evaporates, the secondary minerals melanterite and hexahydrite precipitate. The solid material in the pond was found to contain 20% iron and 14% sulphate, which is far more than was found dissolved within the pond water. Despite this, the pond water is undersaturated with respect to both iron and sulphate. Acid generation tests on the solid material in the pond indicate a minimum of 540,000 mol and a maximum of 1,610,309 mol of acid are generated. The variation can be related to exposure to oxygen: material near the edges of the pond is more exposed to oxygen and has already reacted further than material from the centre of the pond; accordingly less acid can be generated. The acidity generated by the pond is due to the unreacted pyrite that is found in fine particles suspended in mine waters. Based on these results, between 20 and 60 metric tonnes of lime are required for complete neutralisation of the sediments in the pond. Although the ponds were decommissioned after the conclusion of this study, it is necessary to prevent formation of further acid mine drainage from existing sediments in the evaporation pond. This could be done by the use of reactive covers, whose compositions affect the chemistry of infiltrating water. A good reactive cover could be constructed from lime, overlain by topsoil rich in organic

  9. Drainage, liming and fertilization of organic soils. 1. Long-term effects on acid/base relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braekke, F.H. [Norges Landbrukshoegskole, Aas (Norway). Dept. of Forest Sciences

    1999-06-01

    Long-term changes of the acid/base relations of organic soils after drainage, fertilization and/or liming at three experimental sites - two ombrogenous and one soligenous - in south-central Norway are discussed. These sites were drained, fertilized and/or limed in 1953-1956 and sampled in 1991-1992. Drainage at the ombrogenous sites caused: insignificant shifts of pH, higher bulk densities to 40 cm depth, higher ash percentage, higher contents of N and P to 20 cm depth and reduced concentrations of total Ca, K, Mg, Na, Al and Fe in soil layers deeper than 20 cm. The soligenous site was not effectively drained; despite this, pH dropped about 0.5 unit in the surface and subsurface soil layers of the control plots, while small changes were measured for most other soil variables. The suggested reason for the pH drop is limited sulphide oxidation in the upper 20 cm drained layer. Base saturation at actual soil pH, when all treatments were included, was estimated with good precision by four regressors: pH, extractable Al, extractable Fe and extractable Ca (R{sup 2} = 0.90-0.95). Similar models explained 97-99% of the variation in base saturation at soil pH = 7.0. The lime effects at the properly drained oligotrophic sites were proportional to applied doses; for pH to 40 cm, base saturation to 60 cm, and Ca concentration to 60 cm depth. At the less well-drained soligenous site, effects were limited to the upper 30 cm layer. Both drainage and liming caused higher cation exchange capacities and proper drainage seems to be a prerequisite for the liming effect. Estimated recovery of calcium to 60 cm depth was 64-79% at the ombrogenous sites and 42-46% at the soligenous site 28 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  10. Study on the law of methane seepage in the wall of drainage roadway in mining seam-group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian; LUO Yong; LIU Ze-gong; SHI Bi-ming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the equation of the gas flow continuity and state, Darcy law and Langmuir equation, the law of methane seepage in the wall of drainage roadway was studied. The governing equation of methane one-way seepage in the seam was founded.By solving the equation, the calculation of methane seepage velocity in the coal wall was worked out. The result has really applied worth and will give beneficial references to related research, it provides preventing coal and gas outbursts with theoretical gist.

  11. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Ester; Ayora, Carlos; Canovas, C. R.;

    2013-01-01

    mm of sediment due to organic matter and sulfide oxidation. Below the oxic layer, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction peaks developed concomitantly and the resulting Fe(II) and S(II) were removed as sulfides and probably as S linked to organic matter. During the oxic season, schwertmannite precipitated...

  12. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water-Quality Investigation 22 - Ground-Water Budget for the Straight Creek Drainage Basin, Red River Valley, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAda, Douglas P.; Naus, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) began a cooperative study to infer the pre-mining ground-water chemistry at the Molycorp molybdenum mine site in the Red River Valley. The Molycorp mine has been in operation since the 1920s. Because ground-water conditions prior to mining are not available, sites analogous to the pre-mining conditions at the mine site must be studied to infer those pre-mining conditions. The Straight Creek drainage basin (watershed) was selected as the primary analog site for this study because of its similar terrain and geology to the mine site, accessibility, potential for well construction, and minimal anthropogenic activity. The purpose of this report is to present results of a water-budget analysis of the debris-flow aquifer in the Straight Creek watershed. The water budget is based on mean annual conditions and is assumed to be steady state. For this study, the Straight Creek watershed was divided into sub-watersheds on the basis of locations of seismic lines, which were used to calculate cross-section area through the Straight Creek debris-flow deposits and underlying fractured and weathered bedrock (regolith). Water-budget components were calculated for areas upstream from and between the seismic lines. Components of the water budget were precipitation, evapotranspiration, surface-water flow, and ground-water flow under a steady-state mean annual condition. Watershed yield, defined as precipitation minus evapotranspiration, was separated into surface-water flow, ground-water flow through the debris-flow deposits and regolith, and ground-water flow through fractured bedrock. The approach to this calculation was to use Darcy?s Law to calculate the flow through the cross-section area of the saturated debris-flow deposits and underlying regolith as defined by the interpreted seismic data. The amount of watershed yield unaccounted for through this section then was attributed to

  13. REE behavior and effect factors in AMD-type acidic groundwater at sulfide tailings pond, BS nickel mine, W.A.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Liang-qi; SONG Ci-an; XIE Xiang-li; LI Yan-hong

    2008-01-01

    AMD(Acid Mine Drainage)-type acidic groundwater (pH<4) from oxidizing sulfide tailings in BS nickel mine (Western Australia) is of higher total rare earth element(REE) contents and Ce enrichment (PAAS normalization), different from setting groundwater (pH>6.5, with lower total REE contents, Ce depletion). While the AMD contaminated groundwater (pH=4.0-6.5) around tailings pond is characterized by transition from acidic to setting groundwater in total REE content, and associated with Ce depletion (like setting groundwater). The light REE in all type groundwater shows up depletion, but its depleted extent in acidic groundwater is more remarkable. This work indicates that REE behavior in AMD-type acidic groundwater is controlled mainly by pH value and metal (Al, Mn and Fe) contents. And the critical pH value that affects REE behavior in ground acidic water would be 4, lower than the previous value (pH=5) that has been believed prevalently in surface acidic waters. The pH could affect REE behavior in groundwater by controlling the solubility of metal (Al, Mn and Fe) hydroxides and the valence of cerium. Finally, light REE depletion in acidic groundwater may due to element affinity. High content Al (affinity with heavy REE) and low content Fe (affinity with light REE) may lead to heavy REE enrichment while light REE relative depletion in water.

  14. Socio-economic Impacts of Acid Mine Drainage: A Caste Study of the San Sebastian Mine in Eastern El Salvador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco Cueva, Vladimir

    Sebastian in eastern El Salvador. Using an ecosystems services approach, the book estimates the costs of having to replace water that would otherwise have been obtained from local natural sources at little or no charge. The results show that households in San Sebastian use a high proportion of their incomes...

  15. Development and Application of Mine-used Wind Power Automatic Liquid Level Control Drainage Switch%矿用风动力液位自控排水开关的研制与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦加增; 玄登程

    2014-01-01

    Mine submersible pump is widely used in the coal mine drainage, but over setting of submersible pump has caused huge waste of mine power supply, equipment using and the energy consumption. In order to achieve the multi-win goal of mine drainage, safety in production and energy conservation, the submersible pump wind power automatic liquid level control drainage switch is designed, and its principle and structure are introduced.%矿井潜水泵广泛使用于煤矿井下排水,过多的布置使用给矿井供电、设备使用和能源消耗造成极大的浪费。为达到矿井排水与安全生产和能源节约的多项共赢,设计制作了潜水泵风动力液位自控排水开关,并介绍其原理和结构。

  16. 基于PLC的煤矿井下自动排水系统%Automatic Drainage System Underground Mine Based on PLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭凤仪; 郭长娜; 王爱军; 张凤龙

    2012-01-01

    Research the automatic drainage system underground mine based on PLC and configuration,center controller use PLC of S7-200 for SIEMENS,the parameters are collected by sensors,energy saving optimal drainage process as avoid peak and automatic rotation are completed by software programming, it has the failure monitoring and protection function, including over-voltage、flow、leakage protection、pump leaking protection,flow、pressure protection. PC operates use configuration,realizes remote monitoring, real-time display information,improve the production efficiency,save energy consumption,reduce the cost of production.%基于PLC和组态软件提出了煤矿井下水泵房自动排水方案,中心控制器采用S7-200系列PLC,经过传感器对各参数的采集,利用软件编程等完成了避峰就谷、自动轮换等节能优化排水过程,具有故障监测和保护功能,主要包括过压、过流、漏电保护,水泵漏水保护,流量、压力保护.上位机使用组态进行操作,可实现远程监控,实时显示信息,提高了生产效率,节省能耗,降低了生产成本.

  17. Relative importance of plant uptake and plant associated denitrification for removal of nitrogen from mine drainage in sub-arctic wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Sara; Hellman, Maria; Choudhury, Maidul I; Ecke, Frauke

    2015-11-15

    Reactive nitrogen (N) species released from undetonated ammonium-nitrate based explosives used in mining or other blasting operations are an emerging environmental problem. Wetlands are frequently used to treat N-contaminated water in temperate climate, but knowledge on plant-microbial interactions and treatment potential in sub-arctic wetlands is limited. Here, we compare the relative importance of plant uptake and denitrification among five plant species commonly occurring in sub-arctic wetlands for removal of N in nitrate-rich mine drainage in northern Sweden. Nitrogen uptake and plant associated potential denitrification activity and genetic potential for denitrification based on quantitative PCR of the denitrification genes nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII were determined in plants growing both in situ and cultivated in a growth chamber. The growth chamber and in situ studies generated similar results, suggesting high relevance and applicability of results from growth chamber experiments. We identified denitrification as the dominating pathway for N-removal and abundances of denitrification genes were strong indicators of plant associated denitrification activity. The magnitude and direction of the effect differed among the plant species, with the aquatic moss Drepanocladus fluitans showing exceptionally high ratios between denitrification and uptake rates, compared to the other species. However, to acquire realistic estimates of N-removal potential of specific wetlands and their associated plant species, the total plant biomass needs to be considered. The species-specific plant N-uptake and abundance of denitrification genes on the root or plant surfaces were affected by the presence of other plant species, which show that both multi- and inter-trophic interactions are occurring. Future studies on N-removal potential of wetland plant species should consider how to best exploit these interactions in sub-arctic wetlands.

  18. A simplified method for estimation of jarosite and acid-forming sulfates in acid mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Smart, Roger St C; Schumann, Russell C; Gerson, Andrea R; Levay, George

    2007-02-01

    In acid base accounting (ABA) estimates of acid mine wastes, the acid potential (AP) estimate can be improved by using the net carbonate value (NCV) reactive sulfide S method rather than total S assay methods but this does not give recovery of potentially acid producing ferrous and ferric sulfates present in many wastes. For more accurate estimation of AP, an effective, site-specific method to quantify acid sulfate salts, such as jarosite and melanterite, in waste rocks has been developed and tested on synthetic and real wastes. The SPOCAS (acid sulfate soils) methods have been modified to an effective, rapid method to speciate sulfate forms in different synthetic waste samples. A three-step sequential extraction procedure has been established. These steps are: (1) argon-purged water extraction (3 min) to extract soluble Fe(II) salts (particularly melanterite), epsomite and gypsum (1 wt.% S) as copper sulfides, the second step of roasting needs to be excluded from the procedure with an increased time of 4 M HCl extraction to 16 h for jarosite determination.

  19. Mine waste disposal and managements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Young Wook; Min, Jeong Sik; Kwon, Kwang Soo; Kim, Ok Hwan; Kim, In Kee; Song, Won Kyong; Lee, Hyun Joo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) is the product formed by the atmospheric oxidation of the relatively common pyrite and pyrrhotite. Waste rock dumps and tailings containing sulfide mineral have been reported at toxic materials producing ARD. Mining in sulphide bearing rock is one of activity which may lead to generation and release of ARD. ARD has had some major detrimental affects on mining areas. The purpose of this study was carried out to develop disposal method for preventing contamination of water and soil environment by waste rocks dump and tailings, which could discharge the acid drainage with high level of metals. Scope of this study was as following: environmental impacts by mine wastes, geochemical characteristics such as metal speciation, acid potential and paste pH of mine wastes, interpretation of occurrence of ARD underneath tailings impoundment, analysis of slope stability of tailings dam etc. The following procedures were used as part of ARD evaluation and prediction to determine the nature and quantities of soluble constituents that may be washed from mine wastes under natural precipitation: analysis of water and mine wastes, Acid-Base accounting, sequential extraction technique and measurement of lime requirement etc. In addition, computer modelling was applied for interpretation of slope stability od tailings dam. (author). 44 refs., 33 tabs., 86 figs.

  20. 高抽巷在五轮山煤矿瓦斯治理中的应用%Application of High Drainage Roadway in Gas Control of Wulunshan Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚志虎; 周栓柱; 翟文杰; 石必明

    2015-01-01

    根据五轮山煤矿8煤的高变质煤质特征和瓦斯突出情况,采用顺层钻孔预抽本煤层瓦斯、采空区埋管抽采和高抽巷抽采上临近层及采空区瓦斯的治理措施,对各抽采措施的对比分析表明,高抽巷和穿层钻孔对采空区和裂隙区以及上邻近层卸压瓦斯的抽采是最有效的瓦斯治理措施。高抽巷的抽采浓度是顺层钻孔的3倍左右,而抽采纯量远高于其他抽采措施。高抽巷抽采瓦斯是高变质低透气性煤层瓦斯治理的最佳措施。%According to the characteristics of high metamorphic coal and gas outburst in NO. 8 coal mine of Wulunshan mine, control measures are used, including advanced draining along the boreholes in the coal seam, gob drainage tube, and the high drainage road-way drilling through strata contrast. The results show that the measures of high drainage roadway and boreholes are the most effective measures to extract the gas of the gob and the upper layer. Extraction concentration of high drainage roadway is about 3 times to the bed-ding drilling, and the extraction of pure was much higher than other drainage measures. High drainage roadway is the effective measures in gas control of high metamorphic and low permeability coal seam.

  1. Isolation and characterization of bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine and its behaviour on pyrite; Aislamiento y caracterizacion de bacterias en aguas de la mina de ratones y su comportamiento con pirita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino, J. L.; Saez, R. M.

    1974-07-01

    This paper describes some of the studies made about iron and sulfur oxidizing bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine. Different liquid and solid media were utilized as well as some energy sources, ferrous sulphate, thiosulfate and sulfur. Some experiment were al so realized on museum grade pyrite aimed at determining the possibilities of applying the mentioned bacteria on the leaching of pyrite and subsequently on the leaching of uranium ores. (Author) 27 refs.

  2. An overview of a uranium acidic mining lake (Caldas, Brazil): composition of the zooplankton community and limno-chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, H.; Ferrari, C.; Roque, C.V.; Nascimento, M.R. [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission/Pocos de Caldas Laboratory (Brazil); Wisniewski, M.J. [Alfenas Federal University/Limnology Laboratory (Brazil); Rodgher, S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho/Science and Technology Laboratory (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This research represents an attempt to fill a gap in the information on the zooplankton composition and limno-chemical aspects of the uranium pit lake (Osamu Utsumi Pit, Brazil), affected by acid mine drainage. In the present study water samples were collected three-monthly, for a period of one year (2008-2009). The water samples from the uranium pit lake showed moderately acidic pH values (3.6 to 4.1), high values of the electrical conductivity, sulfate, uranium, fluoride, zinc, manganese and aluminum concentrations. The Rotifera cephalodella sp., Keratella americana, K. cochlearis, Bdelloidea order and the Cladocera Bosminopsis deitersi, Bosmina sp., were registered in the samples from the uranium pit lake with ADM. Of the species registered the Bdelloidea order was the most important in terms of density (17,500 - 77,778 ind m{sup -3}), since it occurred throughout the whole sampling period. In this study, probably the combined effect of moderately acid pH values and other potentially co-stressors factors, for example the high concentrations of stable and radioactive chemical species, could have influenced this richness and also the composition of the zooplankton species in the water samples from the uranium pit lake. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  3. An overview of a uranium acidic mining lake (Caldas, Brazil): composition of the zooplankton community and limno-chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research represents an attempt to fill a gap in the information on the zooplankton composition and limno-chemical aspects of the uranium pit lake (Osamu Utsumi Pit, Brazil), affected by acid mine drainage. In the present study water samples were collected three-monthly, for a period of one year (2008-2009). The water samples from the uranium pit lake showed moderately acidic pH values (3.6 to 4.1), high values of the electrical conductivity, sulfate, uranium, fluoride, zinc, manganese and aluminum concentrations. The Rotifera cephalodella sp., Keratella americana, K. cochlearis, Bdelloidea order and the Cladocera Bosminopsis deitersi, Bosmina sp., were registered in the samples from the uranium pit lake with ADM. Of the species registered the Bdelloidea order was the most important in terms of density (17,500 - 77,778 ind m-3), since it occurred throughout the whole sampling period. In this study, probably the combined effect of moderately acid pH values and other potentially co-stressors factors, for example the high concentrations of stable and radioactive chemical species, could have influenced this richness and also the composition of the zooplankton species in the water samples from the uranium pit lake. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  4. The use of alkali-activated fly ash grouts for the remediation of AMD from underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for a field demonstration, laboratory studies were conducted using several fly ash grout formulations to determine the optimum grout for an underground mine environment. This paper discusses the portion of the overall project designed to examine grout-acid mine drainage (AMD) interactions including neutralization, leaching and armoring of the grouts. Leaching tests were performed to study the effects of fly ash grout on AMD, including the effects of armoring. The goal of this project is to study the feasibility of in-situ acid mine drainage treatment by injecting alkali-activated fly ash grout into an underground mine

  5. CBM Layered Drainage Analysis in Yangquan Mining Area, Shanxi%山西阳泉矿区煤层气分层排采分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄绪强

    2014-01-01

    煤层气开发过程中,由于各煤层及其顶底板之间物性特征等方面的差异,易导致层间干扰,影响煤层气产能。阳泉矿区煤层气资源储量丰富,主要可采煤层有3#、8#、9#、15#煤层,其中3#煤层为局部可采煤层。以该区YQ-191和YQ-359井为例,通过分析8#、9#、15#煤层在渗透率、储层压力、煤层厚度、含气量、埋藏深度、水文地质条件的差异,发现,YQ-191井8#、9#的各项参数较为接近,层间干扰小,适宜合层开采;YQ-359井8#、15#煤层渗透率与储层压力相差较大,层间干扰严重,合层开采严重影响15#煤层的产能,该井8#、15#煤层不适宜合层开采。%During CBM exploitation process, owing to physical property characteristic differences between coal seams, roofs and floors are easy to produce interlayer interference and impact CBM production capacity. The Yangquan mining area possesses of abundant CBM resources and reserves, main mineable coal seams have Nos.3, 8, 9 and 15, in which, No.3 is locally mineable. Taking the wells YQ-191 and YQ-359 as examples, through analyses of coal Nos.8, 9 and 15 differences in permeability, reservoir pressure, coal seam thickness, methane content, buried depth and hydrogeological condition have found that coal Nos.8 and 9 in well YQ-191 are relatively in close proximity, thus small interlayer interference, thus adaptable for commingled drainage. While coal Nos. 8 and 15 in well YQ-359 have larger differences in permeability and reservoir pressure, thus serious interlayer interference and impact production capacity, adverse to coal No.15 drainage.

  6. Significance of Microbial Communities and Interactions in Safeguarding Reactive Mine Tailings by Ecological Engineering▿†

    OpenAIRE

    N̆ancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D. Barrie

    2011-01-01

    Pyritic mine tailings (mineral waste generated by metal mining) pose significant risk to the environment as point sources of acidic, metal-rich effluents (acid mine drainage [AMD]). While the accelerated oxidative dissolution of pyrite and other sulfide minerals in tailings by acidophilic chemolithotrophic prokaryotes has been widely reported, other acidophiles (heterotrophic bacteria that catalyze the dissimilatory reduction of iron and sulfur) can reverse the reactions involved in AMD genes...

  7. Revegetation of extremely acid mine soils based on aided phytostabilization: A case study from southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Xiang; Liao, Bin; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Chai, Li-Yuan; Li, Jin-Tian

    2016-08-15

    Acidification is a major constraint for revegetation of sulphidic metal-contaminated soils, as exemplified by the limited literature reporting the successful phytostabilization of mine soils associated with pHacidification potential. In this study, a combination of ameliorants (lime and chicken manure) and five acid-tolerant plant species has been employed in order to establish a self-sustaining vegetation cover on an extremely acid (pHacidification potential. The results from the first two-year data showed that the addition of the amendments and the establishment of a plant cover were effective in preventing soil acidification. Net acid-generating potential of the mine soil decreased steadily, whilst pH and acid neutralization capacity increased over time. All the five acid-tolerant plants colonized successfully in the acidic metal-contaminated soil and developed a good vegetation cover within six months, and subsequent vegetation development enhanced organic matter accumulation and nutrient element status in the mine soil. The two-year remediation program performed on this extremely acid metalliferous soil indicated that aided phytostabilization can be a practical and effective restoration strategy for such extremely acid mine soils. PMID:27100018

  8. The flotation tailings of the former Pb-Zn mine of Touiref (NW Tunisia): mineralogy, mine drainage prediction, base-metal speciation assessment and geochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Mohamed Ali; Souissi, Fouad; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Bussière, Bruno; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Benzaazoua, Mostafa

    2015-02-01

    The underground extraction of Pb-Zn mineralization in the Touiref area stopped in 1958. A large volume of flotation tailings (more than 500 Mt) containing sulfides were deposited in a tailings impoundment. The goals of this study are to evaluate the neutralization capacity of the unoxidized and oxidized tailings, to assess the speciation of metals between the different components of the tailings material, and to assess the mobility of metals and the secondary minerals' precipitation in pore waters using geochemical modeling. To accomplish these objectives, representative samples from both fresh and oxidized zones were collected along a vertical profile through the tailings pile. Physical, chemical (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization (X-ray diffraction (XRD), reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM)) of these samples was performed. Grain size analysis shows that the tailings are dominated by silt- to sand-sized fractions. The microscopic observation highlights the presence of pyrite, marcasite, galena, and sphalerite as primary minerals in a carbonated matrix. The study reveals also the presence of secondary minerals represented by cerussite, smithsonite, anglesite, and Fe oxi-hydroxides as important scavengers for trace elements. The static tests show that the presence of calcite in the tailing samples ensures acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), which is significantly greater than the acidity potential (PA). The geochemical characterization of the unoxidized samples shows higher Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the oxidized samples containing the highest values for Fe and SO4. Sequential extraction tests show that significant percentages of metals are distributed between the acid-soluble fractions (Cd, Pb, and Zn) and the reducible one (Zn). Pore water analysis indicates that Ca is the dominant cation (8,170 and 6,200 mg L(-1), respectively), whereas sulfate is the principal anion (6,900 and 5,100 mg L(-1), respectively). Saturation

  9. The flotation tailings of the former Pb-Zn mine of Touiref (NW Tunisia): mineralogy, mine drainage prediction, base-metal speciation assessment and geochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Mohamed Ali; Souissi, Fouad; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Bussière, Bruno; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Benzaazoua, Mostafa

    2015-02-01

    The underground extraction of Pb-Zn mineralization in the Touiref area stopped in 1958. A large volume of flotation tailings (more than 500 Mt) containing sulfides were deposited in a tailings impoundment. The goals of this study are to evaluate the neutralization capacity of the unoxidized and oxidized tailings, to assess the speciation of metals between the different components of the tailings material, and to assess the mobility of metals and the secondary minerals' precipitation in pore waters using geochemical modeling. To accomplish these objectives, representative samples from both fresh and oxidized zones were collected along a vertical profile through the tailings pile. Physical, chemical (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization (X-ray diffraction (XRD), reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM)) of these samples was performed. Grain size analysis shows that the tailings are dominated by silt- to sand-sized fractions. The microscopic observation highlights the presence of pyrite, marcasite, galena, and sphalerite as primary minerals in a carbonated matrix. The study reveals also the presence of secondary minerals represented by cerussite, smithsonite, anglesite, and Fe oxi-hydroxides as important scavengers for trace elements. The static tests show that the presence of calcite in the tailing samples ensures acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), which is significantly greater than the acidity potential (PA). The geochemical characterization of the unoxidized samples shows higher Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the oxidized samples containing the highest values for Fe and SO4. Sequential extraction tests show that significant percentages of metals are distributed between the acid-soluble fractions (Cd, Pb, and Zn) and the reducible one (Zn). Pore water analysis indicates that Ca is the dominant cation (8,170 and 6,200 mg L(-1), respectively), whereas sulfate is the principal anion (6,900 and 5,100 mg L(-1), respectively). Saturation

  10. Validity of manganese as a surrogate of heavy metals removal in constructed wetlands treating acidic mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of manganese as a surrogate for heavy metal behavior in two wetland treatment systems receiving acidic coal mine drainage in central Pennsylvania was investigated. The use of manganese as an indicator is based on physical/chemical treatment processes quite different from wetland treatment. The treatment systems represented one anoxic, subsurface flow system and one oxic surface flow system. Water quality parameters measured included pH, alkalinity, acidity, and a suite of metals. Correlation and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the ability of a candidate predictor variable (indicator) to predict heavy metal concentrations and removal. The use of manganese as a predictor of effluent quality proved to be poor in both wetland treatment systems, as evidenced by low linear R2 values and negative correlations. Zinc emerged as the best predictor of the detectable heavy metals at the anoxic wetland. Zinc exhibited positive strong linear correlations with copper, cobalt, and nickel (R2 values of 0.843, 0.881, and 0.970, respectively). Effluent pH was a slightly better predictor of effluent copper levels in the anoxic wetland. Iron and cobalt effluent concentrations showed the only strong relationship (R2 value = 0.778) in the oxic system. The lack of good correlations with manganese strongly challenges its appropriateness as a surrogate for heavy metals in these systems

  11. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 per thousand heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  12. Assessment of waste oyster shells and coal mine drainage sludge for the stabilization of As-, Pb-, and Cu-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Chang, Yoon-Young; Hyun, Seunghun; Ok, Yong Sik; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2016-02-01

    A novel treatment mix was designed for the simultaneous immobilization of As, Cu, and Pb in contaminated soils using natural (waste oyster shells (WOS)) and industrial (coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS)) waste materials. The treatments were conducted using the standard U.S. sieve size no. 20 (0.85 mm) calcined oyster shells (COS) and CMDS materials with a curing time of 1 and 28 days. The As immobilization treatments were evaluated using the 1-N HCl extraction fluid, whereas the Pb and Cu immobilization treatments were evaluated using the 0.1-N HCl extraction fluid based on the Korean leaching standards. The treatment results showed that the immobilization of As, Cu, and Pb was best achieved using a combination mix of 10 wt% COS and 10 wt% CMDS. This treatment mix was highly effective leading to superior leachability reductions for all three target contaminants (>93 % for As and >99 % for Cu and Pb) for a curing period of 28 days. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) results showed that As was present in the form of As(V) in the control sample and that no changes in As speciation were observed following the COS-CMDS treatments. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) sample treated with 10 wt% COS and 10 wt% CMDS indicated that As immobilization may be associated with the formation of Ca-As and Fe-As precipitates while Pb and Cu immobilization was most probably linked to calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) and calcium aluminum hydrates (CAHs). PMID:26411449

  13. Effects of winter temperature on phytoplankton development in acidic mining lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Lessmann, Dieter; Hofmann, Hilmar; Beulker, Camilla; Nixdorf, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Mining lakes are within the focus of limnological and public interest in many countries because they have unusal mineral content and can comprise a great portion of standing waters in certain areas. Due to pyrite oxidation, many mining lakes are extremely acidic and therefore differ considerably from natural circumneutral lakes in their chemical and biological characteristics (GELLER et al. 1998, LESSMANN & NIXDORF 2000). In central Europe deep lakes are usually regarded as dimictic. A presup...

  14. Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairullah Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Opinion mining is an interesting area of research because of its applications in various fields. Collecting opinions of people about products and about social and political events and problems through the Web is becoming increasingly popular every day. The opinions of users are helpful for the public and for stakeholders when making certain decisions. Opinion mining is a way to retrieve information through search engines, Web blogs and social networks. Because of the huge number of reviews in the form of unstructured text, it is impossible to summarize the information manually. Accordingly, efficient computational methods are needed for mining and summarizing the reviews from corpuses and Web documents. This study presents a systematic literature survey regarding the computational techniques, models and algorithms for mining opinion components from unstructured reviews.

  15. Recent Developments in Microbiological Approaches for Securing Mine Wastes and for Recovering Metals from Mine Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barrie Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining of metals and coals generates solid and liquid wastes that are potentially hazardous to the environment. Traditional methods to reduce the production of pollutants from mining and to treat impacted water courses are mostly physico-chemical in nature, though passive remediation of mine waters utilizes reactions that are catalysed by microorganisms. This paper reviews recent advances in biotechnologies that have been proposed both to secure reactive mine tailings and to remediate mine waters. Empirical management of tailings ponds to promote the growth of micro-algae that sustain populations of bacteria that essentially reverse the processes involved in the formation of acid mine drainage has been proposed. Elsewhere, targeted biomineralization has been demonstrated to produce solid products that allow metals present in mine waters to be recovered and recycled, rather than to be disposed of in landfill.

  16. Characterization of microorganisms in the acidic mine water of the former uranium mine Koenigstein; Charakterisierung der Mikroorganismen im sauren Grubenwasser des ehemaligen Uranbergwerks Koenigstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, Isabel

    2015-06-29

    The thesis on the characterization of microorganisms in the acidic mine water of the former uranium mine Koenigstein covers the following issues: Introduction: (1) Environmental rehabilitation of the uranium mine by the Wismut GmbH, microorganisms in the acidic mine waters, influence of microorganisms on the mobility of metals and radionuclides, biofilms and their influence on the mobility of metals and radionuclides, biodiversity of the mine Koenigstein before flooding; (2) Scope of the work. (3) Materials and methods: Site characterization, biofilm systems, sampling of water and biofilms, sample transport and storage, chemical analysis, speciation diagrams, catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in-situ hybridization, quantitative microbiological methods, classical microbiological cultivation methods, molecular biological methods, bioinformatics - sequence analysis, statistics, optical microscopy, biofilms. (4) Results and discussion: chemo-physical parameters before and after flooding, quantification of microorganisms, characterization of prokaryotes, characterization of eukaryotes, biofilms.

  17. The assessment of mine rebound and decanting in deeper coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, P.D.; Dennis, I. [Inst. for Groundwater Studies, Bloemfontein (South Africa)

    2010-07-01

    This groundwater and monitoring study of 7 interlinked deep coal collieries in South Africa was conducted to develop analytical and numerical decant models of individual collieries suitable for integration into a single large model. The model will be used to prevent acid mine drainage after mining activities have stopped. The models considered interconnectivity between the mines, the geology of the overburden, the type of mining conducted at each mine, the topography and depth of the mining activities, and the piezometric levels of the mines and involved aquifers. The overburden formations in the studied region consisted of sandstone, shale, interbedded siltstone, mudstone and coal seams. Removal of the coal seams has resulted in the caving of the overlying strata into mined voids. The mining disruptions have resulted in subsidence and recharges of between 5 and 7 percent. The conceptual decant model predicted that piezometric levels of the mine will rise with the storage coefficient value of the mine. The flux from the overlying aquifers will decrease as water levels even out. Any polluted water will need to overcome 4 bar of pressure to to decant. Excess water above the weathered zone in the mines will seep out as normal unpolluted springs at lower points. Results of the numerical modelling study showed that it is unlikely that the collieries will decant, as the piezometric level of the mines will rise with the storage coefficient value of the mine. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Gas drainage technology of high gas and thick coal seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Tian-cai; LI Hai-gui; ZHANG Hai-jun

    2009-01-01

    Gas drainage in Jincheng Mining Group Co., Ltd. was introduced briefly and the importance of gas drainage in gas control was analyzed. Combined with coal-bed gas oc-currence and gas emission, the double system of gas drainage was optimized and a pro-gressive gas drainage model was experimented on. For guaranteed drainage, excavation and mining and realization of safety production and reasonable exploitation of gas in coal seams, many drainage methods were adopted to solve the gas problem of the working face.

  19. Phytoremediation of Cu and Zn by vetiver grass in mine soils amended with humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carmen; Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Moliner, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated mine soils requires the use of fast-growing, deep-rooted, high-biomass, and metal-tolerant plants with the application of soil amendments that promote metal uptake by plants. A pot experiment was performed to evaluate the combined use of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) and humic acid for phytoremediation of Cu and Zn in mine soils. Vetiver plants were grown in soil samples collected from two mine sites of Spain mixed with a commercial humic acid derived from leonardite at doses of 0, 2, 10, and 20 g kg(-1). Plant metal concentrations and biomass were measured and metal bioavailability in soils was determined by a low molecular weight organic acid extraction. Results showed that humic acid addition decreased organic acid-extractable metals in soil. Although this extraction method is used to estimate bioavailability of metals, it was not a good estimator under these conditions due to competition with the strong chelators in the added humic acid. High doses of humic acid also promoted root growth and increased Cu concentrations in plants due to formation of soluble metal-organic complexes, which enhanced removal of this metal from soil and its accumulation in roots. Although humic acid was not able to improve Zn uptake, it managed to reduce translocation of Zn and Cu to aerial parts of plants. Vetiver resulted unsuitable for phytoextraction, but our study showed that the combined use of this species with humic acid at 10-20 g kg(-1) could be an effective strategy for phytostabilization of mine soils. PMID:27030238

  20. Foam drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Transient drainage from a column of persistent foam has been analyzed theoretically. Gravity-driven flow was assumed to occur through an interconnected network of Plateau borders that define the edges of foam cells taken to be regular pentagonal dodecahedrons. A small liquid volume fraction and monodisperse cell size distribution were assumed. In the basic model, it is assumed that all liquid is contained in Plateau borders that are bounded by rigid gas-liquid interfaces. The predicted half life, the time required for one half of the liquid to drain from the foam, is inversely proportional to the square of the cell diameter, illustrating the importance of foam structure in drainage. Liquid hold up in the films separating adjacent cells, nonuniform initial liquid volume fraction distribution and interfacial mobility are explored. Border suction due to reduced pressure in the Plateau borders provides a mechanism for film drainage. Simultaneous film drainage and flow through the Plateau borders are analyzed. Sufficient conditions for neglecting film drainage kinetics are obtained. The results indicate that improved foam stability is related to small cells, liquid hold up in the films and slow film drainage kinetics.

  1. Weathering of sulfidic shale and copper mine waste: Secondary minerals and metal cycling in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Jackson, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Metal cycling via physical and chemical weathering of discrete sources (copper mines) and regional (non-point) sources (sulfide-rich shale) is evaluated by examining the mineralogy and chemistry of weathering products in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA. The elements in copper mine waste, secondary minerals, stream sediments, and waters that are most likely to have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems are aluminum, copper, zinc, and arsenic because these elements locally exceed toxicity guidelines for surface waters or for stream sediments. Acid-mine drainage has not developed in streams draining inactive copper mines. Acid-rock drainage and chemical weathering processes that accompany debris flows or human disturbances of sulfidic rocks are comparable to processes that develop acid-mine drainage elsewhere. Despite the high rainfall in the mountain range, sheltered areas and intermittent dry spells provide local venues for development of secondary weathering products that can impact aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Biological treatment of acid mine water: selection of a biomass population enriched in sulphate-reducing bacteria; Tratamiento biologico de aguas acidas de mineria: seleccion de una poblacion bacteriana enriquecida en bacterias sulfatoreductoras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran Barrantes, M. M.; Jimenez Rodriguez, A. M.; Martel Villagran, F. J.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the biological sulphate reduction. AYESA (Aguas y Estructuras, S. A.) is developing the technical attendance. This study is being demonstrated under the Acid Water Treatment Program, conducted by the Consejeria del Medio Ambiente (Junta de Andalucia). Acid mine drainage is one of the most serious environmental problems facing the metal mining industry. This wastewater is formed when sulphide ores undergo chemical and biological oxidation processes and is characterized by low pH-values and high levels of sulphate and metals. The effect of stimuling bacteria sulphate reduction in such systems in order to improve water quality was examined in a laboratory scale experiment, in 250 mL, magnetically stirred, batch, anaerobic reactors, to 25 degree centigree. (Author) 11 refs.

  3. An integrated approach to planning and rehabilitation for the future: proceedings of the 2. mining and the environment conference - Sudbury '99: volume three: mining and society and new technology - old problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsack, D. [ed.] [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, ON (Canada). Centre in Mining and Mining Environment Research; Belzile, P. [ed.] [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Yearwood, P. [ed.] [Inco Ltd., Copper Cliff, ON (Canada). Environmental Control and Occupational Health; Hall, G. [ed.] [Falconbridge Ltd., Falconbridge, ON (Canada). Technology Centre

    1999-07-01

    The volume includes a total of 46 papers presented on such topics as closure planning, environmental monitoring of mine effluents, innovations for oxidation of waste rock and biotechnology for acid mine drainage abatement. Papers on public-private partnerships, including a waste to energy facility, and assessing the suitability of paste as a medium for plant growth in oilsand reclamation operations are abstracted separately.

  4. Geochemistry of highly acidic mine water following disposal into a natural lake with carbonate bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisskirchen, Christian, E-mail: ChristianWisskirchen@web.de [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dold, Bernhard [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Instituto de Geologia Economica Aplicada, Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Friese, Kurt [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Lake Research, D-39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Spangenberg, Jorge E. [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Morgenstern, Peter [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Glaesser, Walter [Institute of Geophysics and Geology, University of Leipzig, D-04211 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Mean lake water element composition did not differ greatly from discharged AMD. {yields} Most elements showed increasing concentrations from the surface to lake bottom. {yields} Jarosite formed in the upper part, settled, and dissolved in the deeper part of the lake. {yields} Elements migrated into the underlying carbonates in the sequence As< Pb {approx} Cu < Cd < Zn = Mn. {yields} Gypsum and hydroxide precipitation had not resulted in complete clogging of the lake bedrocks. - Abstract: Acid mine drainage (AMD) from the Zn-Pb(-Ag-Bi-Cu) deposit of Cerro de Pasco (Central Peru) and waste water from a Cu-extraction plant has been discharged since 1981 into Lake Yanamate, a natural lake with carbonate bedrock. The lake has developed a highly acidic pH of {approx}1. Mean lake water chemistry was characterized by 16,775 mg/L acidity as CaCO{sub 3}, 4330 mg/L Fe and 29,250 mg/L SO{sub 4}. Mean trace element concentrations were 86.8 mg/L Cu, 493 mg/L Zn, 2.9 mg/L Pb and 48 mg/L As, which did not differ greatly from the discharged AMD. Most elements showed increasing concentrations from the surface to the lake bottom at a maximal depth of 41 m (e.g. from 3581 to 5433 mg/L Fe and 25,609 to 35,959 mg/L SO{sub 4}). The variations in the H and O isotope compositions and the element concentrations within the upper 10 m of the water column suggest mixing with recently discharged AMD, shallow groundwater and precipitation waters. Below 15 m a stagnant zone had developed. Gypsum (saturation index, SI {approx} 0.25) and anglesite (SI {approx} 0.1) were in equilibrium with lake water. Jarosite was oversaturated (SI {approx} 1.7) in the upper part of the water column, resulting in downward settling and re-dissolution in the lower part of the water column (SI {approx} -0.7). Accordingly, jarosite was only found in sediments from less than 7 m water depth. At the lake bottom, a layer of gel-like material ({approx}90 wt.% water) of pH {approx}1 with a

  5. LA SPECTRORADIOMÉTRIE, OUTIL D'ÉTUDE DES IMPACTS DES REJETS MINIERS SUR L'ENVIRONNEMENT : Application aux rejets de la mine de Jalta (Tunisie)

    OpenAIRE

    Gannouni, Sonia; Ben Mammou, Abdallah; Belghith, Abderrazek; Abd Eljaoued, Saadi

    2010-01-01

    International audience The mine of Jalta (exploited from 1900 to 1986) is located 83km from Tunis city in the North -Western part of Tunisia. Large dumps result from the accumulation of solid mining wastes after the processing of the Pb-Zn ore within the borders of the mining area. Exposed to different meteoric factors, sulphides from the tailings dams and wastes are oxidized thus generating acid mining drainage (AMD) capable to mobilize and release heavy metals associated to sulphides. In...

  6. Study of toxicity and distribution of Mine tailing in Arid/semiarid clime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 69 soil samples around a sulphur mine of Trovador (Almeria, Spain) were studied. The samples were divided into three sectors. Sector 1 represents the mine waste. Sector 2 the drainage zones (ramblas), and Sector 3 the limestone high relief. The mining waste registered a very acidic pH, without carbonates, with low cation-exchange capacity, high electrical conductivity of the saturation extract. (Author)

  7. Acidity removal from Lusatian mining lakes through eutrophication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyson, A.; Nixdorf, B.; Steinberg, C.F.W. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The flooded, disused lignite pits of Lusatia in north-eastern Germany are characterised by low pH (2 - 3.5) and high concentrations of iron which contribute to high acidity. Removal of acidity from these lakes using low-cost, environmentally acceptable technologies is being investigated. One option is the enhancement of biologically mediated, alkalinity generating processes, through controlled eutrophication to sustainably increase nutrient cycling and carbon inputs. Although the primary production of these waters is potentially high and diverse algae grow in these lakes, the growth of autotrophic organisms is usually limited by extremely low concentrations of P and inorganic C. Theoretical considerations and laboratory mesocosm results are used to demonstrate the potential productivity of these acid waters and the direct and indirect role of controlled eutrophication in removing acidity. Such data are being used to generate self-sustaining, environmentally friendly, affordable remediation strategies to develop these lakes for recreation and wildlife. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Investigation into the use of cement kiln dust in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential to replace lime with cement kiln dust (CKD) in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). The bench-scale study used two water samples: AMD sampled from a lead-zinc mine with high concentrations of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and arsenic (As) (Fe/Zn-AMD) and a synthetic AMD solution (Syn-AMD) spiked with ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3). Arsenic was found to be significantly reduced with CKD-HDS treatment of Fe/Zn-AMD compared to lime-HDS treatment, to concentrations below the stringent mine effluent discharge regulation of 0.10 mg As/L (i.e., 0.04 ± 0.02 mg/L). Both CKD- and lime-HDS treatment of the two AMD samples resulted in settled water Fe concentrations above the stringent discharge guideline of 0.3 mg Fe/L. CKD addition in the HDS process also resulted in high settled water turbidity, above typical discharge guidelines of 15 mg TSS/L. CKD-HDS treatment was found to result in significantly improved settled solids (i.e., sludge) quality compared to that generated in the lime-HDS process. HDS treatment with CKD resulted in 25-88% lower sludge volume indices, 2 to 9 times higher % wet solids, and 10 to 20 times higher % dry solids compared to lime addition. XRD and XPS testing indicated that CKD-HDS sludge consisted of mainly CaCO3 and SiO2 with Fe(3+) precipitates attached at particle surfaces. XRD and XPS testing of the lime-HDS generated sludge showed that it consisted of non-crystalline Fe oxides typical of sludge formed from precipitates with a high water concentration. Increased sedimentation rates were also found for CKD (1.3 cm/s) compared to lime (0.3 cm/s). The increased solids loading with CKD addition compared to lime addition in the HDS process was suggested to both promote surface complexation of metal precipitates with insoluble CKD particles and increase compression effects during Type IV sedimentation. These mechanisms collectively contributed to the reduced water content of

  9. Monitoring, field experiments, and geochemical modeling of Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in a stream dominated by net-alkaline coal-mine drainage, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Watershed-scale monitoring, field aeration experiments, and geochemical equilibrium and kinetic modeling were conducted to evaluate interdependent changes in pH, dissolved CO2, O2, and Fe(II) concentrations that typically take place downstream of net-alkaline, circumneutral coal-mine drainage (CMD) outfalls and during aerobic treatment of such CMD. The kinetic modeling approach, using PHREEQC, accurately simulates observed variations in pH, Fe(II) oxidation, alkalinity consumption, and associated dissolved gas concentrations during transport downstream of the CMD outfalls (natural attenuation) and during 6-h batch aeration tests on the CMD using bubble diffusers (enhanced attenuation). The batch aeration experiments demonstrated that aeration promoted CO2 outgassing, thereby increasing pH and the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was accurately estimated by the abiotic homogeneous oxidation rate law −d[Fe(II)]/dt = k1·[O2]·[H+]−2·[Fe(II)] that indicates an increase in pH by 1 unit at pH 5–8 and at constant dissolved O2 (DO) concentration results in a 100-fold increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Adjusting for sample temperature, a narrow range of values for the apparent homogeneous Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (k1′) of 0.5–1.7 times the reference value of k1 = 3 × 10−12 mol/L/min (for pH 5–8 and 20 °C), reported by Stumm and Morgan (1996), was indicated by the calibrated models for the 5-km stream reach below the CMD outfalls and the aerated CMD. The rates of CO2 outgassing and O2ingassing in the model were estimated with first-order asymptotic functions, whereby the driving force is the gradient of the dissolved gas concentration relative to equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere. Although the progressive increase in DO concentration to saturation could be accurately modeled as a kinetic function for the conditions evaluated, the simulation of DO as an instantaneous equilibrium process did not affect the

  10. Tailings management: problems and solutions in the mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The text is largely concerned with the biogeochemical and metallurgical aspects of tailings management. Beginning with a description of the problems generated by mining, the regulations and guidelines necessary for maintaining a desired environment, the text proceeds through site selection, impoundment design, disposal methods, water management, monitoring, sampling and analysis. Sections are included on control and prevention of acid mine drainage. Each chapter contains many references

  11. Phytostabilisation : use of wetland plants to treat mine tailings

    OpenAIRE

    Stoltz, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Mine tailings can be rich in sulphide minerals and may form acid mine drainage (AMD) through reaction with atmospheric oxygen and water. AMD contains elevated levels of metals and arsenic (As) that could be harmful to animals and plants. An oxygen-consuming layer of organic material and plants on top of water-covered tailings would probably reduce oxygen penetration into the tailings and thus reduce the formation of AMD. However, wetland plants have the ability to release oxygen through the r...

  12. Chapter 5. Uranium extraction technology from mine and drainage waters of uranium industry wastes. 5.1. Uranium migration in the system 'drainage waters-soil' on the territory of tailings №1-2, Taboshar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to uranium migration in the system 'drainage waters-soil' on the territory of tailings №1-2, Taboshar. Radionuclides' activity change intervals in water (Bq/m3, 104), which are currently used for different needs by Taboshar residents was measured. The annual public exposure doses due to water-use from contaminated water resources in Taboshar was estimated. The uranium content in samples of №1-2 tailing in Taboshar was defined.

  13. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 24. Seismic Refraction Tomography for Volume Analysis of Saturated Alluvium in the Straight Creek Drainage and Its Confluence With Red River, Taos County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a research effort directed by the New Mexico Environment Department to determine pre-mining water quality of the Red River at a molybdenum mining site in northern New Mexico, we used seismic refraction tomography to create subsurface compressional-wave velocity images along six lines that crossed the Straight Creek drainage and three that crossed the valley of Red River. Field work was performed in June 2002 (lines 1-4) and September 2003 (lines 5-9). We interpreted the images to determine depths to the water table and to the top of bedrock. Depths to water and bedrock in boreholes near the lines correlate well with our interpretations based on seismic data. In general, the images suggest that the alluvium in this area has a trapezoidal cross section. Using a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation model grid of surface elevations of this region and the interpreted elevations to water table and bedrock obtained from the seismic data, we generated new models of the shape of the buried bedrock surface and the water table through surface interpolation and extrapolation. Then, using elevation differences between the two grids, we calculated volumes of dry and wet alluvium in the two drainages. The Red River alluvium is about 51 percent saturated, whereas the much smaller volume of alluvium in the tributary Straight Creek is only about 18 percent saturated. When combined with average ground-water velocity values, the information we present can be used to determine discharge of Straight Creek into Red River relative to the total discharge of Red River moving past Straight Creek. This information will contribute to more accurate models of ground-water flow, which are needed to determine the pre-mining water quality in the Red River.

  14. Monitoring the rehabilitated waste rock dumps at the Rum Jungle mine site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid drainage and the release of heavy metals create a major environmental problem at many mine sites and the problem can continue long after mine operations cease. The long term control of these pollutants is essential for the acceptance of mining as a temporary land use. There is a need to compare the advantages, disadvantages and costs of various rehabilitation techniques. This paper describes measurements on two dumps of pyritic mine wastes from open cut mining before and after rehabilitation of the dumps. The effectiveness of the rehabilitation is discussed

  15. Limnology of extremely acidic mining lakes in Lusatia (Germany) and their fate between acidity and eutrophication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixdorf, B.; Lessmann, D.; Gruenewald, U.; Uhlmann, W. [Brandenburg Technical University of Cottbus, Bad Saarow (Germany). Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The research estimated the development of water quality in geogenically acidified lakes under various flooding regimes and the success of neutralization methods. The study examines the chemistry and biology of 30 lakes resulting from surface lignite mining. Study sites, chemical and biological classification of mining lakes in Lusatia, trophic conditions and phytoplankton development, and the limnological potential of acidified lakes and the risk of excess eutrophication due to phosphorus loading are discussed. 21 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Application of Gas Pre-drainage Using Layer-through Borehole Technology from Strip Mining Region in Zhaozhuang Coal Mine%穿层钻孔预抽煤巷条带煤层瓦斯在赵庄矿的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李付涛

    2015-01-01

    According to the coal seam permeability difference and the not -ideal drainage effect, pre -drainage based an drilling through the floor roadway is used in Zhaozhuang Mine.analysis and study of the effecs gas drainage,including the bottom layer selec-tion, borehole layout and hole sealing technology,confirmed the feasibility and good gas treatment effect of this measure, which provi-ding security for the long-term development of the coal mine.%针对煤层透气性差、抽采效果不理想的问题,赵庄矿应用了底板岩巷穿层钻孔预抽措施。通过对底抽巷的层位选择、穿层钻孔的布置、封孔工艺等影响瓦斯抽采效果的各个环节的分析研究,验证了采用底抽巷实施穿层钻孔预抽煤巷条带煤层瓦斯掩护巷道掘进的可行性和良好的瓦斯治理效果,为矿井的长远发展提供了安全保障。

  17. Extremely acidic mine lake ecosystems in Lusatia (Germany) : characterisation and development of sustainable, biology-based acidity removal technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyson, A. [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus, (Germany)]|[Inst. of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin (Germany); Deneke, R.; Nixdorf, B. [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus, (Germany); Steinberg, C.E.W. [Inst. of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    There are approximately 500 infilled open-cast lignite pits in Germany that are extremely acidic because of high concentrations of dissolved metals, mostly iron and aluminium. The mining lakes have pH values of 2.4 to 3.4 and also have high sulphate concentrations. Efforts are being made to neutralize the lakes for recreational purposes. The acidity can be removed from the lakes in an economical and environmentally sustainable manner by flooding through diversion of neutral, nutrient-rich river water. This paper described the living conditions of the acidic mining lakes in the Lausitz region of Germany and summarized the benefits of the controlled eutrophication approach to enhance natural, self-sustaining processes for acid neutralization. Compared to infilling with river water, eutrophication increases lake productivity and removes acidity through sediment bound and water column biologically-mediated processes. The study involved basic research on particle transport in streams and lakes, pelagic food web interactions and submerged macrophyte metabolism. It also looked at the role of wetlands, bacterial interactions at the water-sediment interface, and modelling. It was shown that the addition of phosphorus and carbon to the water column can enhance primary production. Future studies will examine environmentally acceptable treatment strategies that offer an alternative to chemical treatment. 20 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  18. Extremely acidic mine lake ecosystems in Lusatia (Germany) : characterisation and development of sustainable, biology-based acidity removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are approximately 500 infilled open-cast lignite pits in Germany that are extremely acidic because of high concentrations of dissolved metals, mostly iron and aluminium. The mining lakes have pH values of 2.4 to 3.4 and also have high sulphate concentrations. Efforts are being made to neutralize the lakes for recreational purposes. The acidity can be removed from the lakes in an economical and environmentally sustainable manner by flooding through diversion of neutral, nutrient-rich river water. This paper described the living conditions of the acidic mining lakes in the Lausitz region of Germany and summarized the benefits of the controlled eutrophication approach to enhance natural, self-sustaining processes for acid neutralization. Compared to infilling with river water, eutrophication increases lake productivity and removes acidity through sediment bound and water column biologically-mediated processes. The study involved basic research on particle transport in streams and lakes, pelagic food web interactions and submerged macrophyte metabolism. It also looked at the role of wetlands, bacterial interactions at the water-sediment interface, and modelling. It was shown that the addition of phosphorus and carbon to the water column can enhance primary production. Future studies will examine environmentally acceptable treatment strategies that offer an alternative to chemical treatment. 20 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  19. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  20. Effects of Multiple Soil Conditioners on a Mine Site Acid Sulfate Soil for Vetiver Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chu-Xia; LONG Xin-Xian; XU Song-Jun; CHU Cheng-Xing; MAI Shao-Zhi; JIANG Dian

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of various soil treatments on the growth of vetiver grass ( Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) with the objective of formulating appropriate soil media for use in sulfide-bearing mined areas. An acidic mine site acid sulfate soil (pH 2.8) was treated with different soil conditioner formula including hydrated lime, red mud (bauxite residues), zeolitic rock powder, biosolids and a compound fertilizer. Soils treated with red mud and hydrated lime corrected soil acidity and reduced or eliminated metal toxicity enabling the establishment of vetiver grass.Although over-liming affected growth, some seedlings of vetiver survived the initial strong alkaline conditions. Addition of appropriate amounts of zeolitic rock powder also enhanced growth, but over-application caused detrimental effects. In this experiment, soil medium with the best growth performance of vetiver was 50 g of red mud, 10 g of lime, 30 g of zeolitic rock powder and 30 g of biosolids with 2000 g of mine soils (100% survival rate with the greatest biomass and number of new shoots), but adding a chemical fertilizer to this media adversely impacted plant growth. In addition, a high application rate of biosolids resulted in poorer growth of vetiver, compared to a moderate application rate.

  1. The persistence of lead from past gasoline emissions and mining drainage in a large riparian system: Evidence from lead isotopes in the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, C.E.; Alpers, C.N.; Bouse, R.; Taylor, H.E.; Unruh, D.M.; Flegal, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Lead concentrations and isotope ratios measured in river water colloids and streambed sediment samples along 426 km of the Sacramento River, California reveal that the influence of lead from the historical mining of massive sulfide deposits in the West Shasta Cu-mining district (at the headwaters of the Sacramento River) is confined to a 60 km stretch of river immediately downstream of that mining region, whereas inputs from past leaded gasoline emissions and historical hydraulic Au-mining in the Sierra Nevadan foothills are the dominant lead sources in the remaining 370 km of the river. Binary mixing calculations suggest that more than 50% of the lead in the Sacramento River outside of the region of influence of the West Shasta Cu-mining district is derived from past depositions of leaded gasoline emissions. This predominance is the first direct documentation of the geographic extent of gasoline lead persistence throughout a large riparian system (>160,000 km2) and corroborates previous observations based on samples taken at the mouth of the Sacramento River. In addition, new analyses of sediment samples from the hydraulic gold mines of the Sierra Nevada foothills confirm the present-day fluxes into the Sacramento River of contaminant metals derived from historical hydraulic Au-mining that occurred during the latter half of the 19th and early part of the 20th centuries. These fluxes occur predominantly during periods of elevated river discharge associated with heavy winter precipitation in northern California. In the broadest context, the study demonstrates the potential for altered precipitation patterns resulting from climate change to affect the mobility and transport of soil-bound contaminants in the surface environment. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 1. Depth to Bedrock Determinations Using Shallow Seismic Data Acquired in the Straight Creek Drainage Near Red River, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2004-01-01

    In late May and early June of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired four P-wave seismic profiles across the Straight Creek drainage near Red River, New Mexico. The data were acquired to support a larger effort to investigate baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality in the Red River basin (Nordstrom and others, 2002). For ground-water flow modeling, knowledge of the thickness of the valley fill material above the bedrock is required. When curved-ray refraction tomography was used with the seismic first arrival times, the resulting images of interval velocity versus depth clearly show a sharp velocity contrast where the bedrock interface is expected. The images show that the interpreted buried bedrock surface is neither smooth nor sharp, but it is clearly defined across the valley along the seismic line profiles. The bedrock models defined by the seismic refraction images are consistent with the well data.

  3. Acid mine-water and agriculture pollution in a river skirting the Donana National Park (Guadiamar River, South West Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, F.; Toca, C.G.; Diaz, E.; De Arambarri, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Agrio river receives the drainage waters from Aznalcollar opencast-worked polymetallic sulfide deposits and the old mine spoil heaps. Some 7 km downstream, the Agrio river joins the Guadiamar river, which is the last tributary on the right of the Guadalquivir river. Drainage waters from the mine and old spoil heaps are the source of high concentrations of heavy metals in the water and sediments of the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers. When river flows increase because of heavy rains or reservoir discharges, sediments are resuspended and transported downstream. The presence of other effluents rich in organic matter with active chelating agents facilitates the dissolution and transport of the metals. Consequently, 30 km downstream from the mine heavy metal concentrations in Guadiamar river are still higher than those in other unpolluted rivers of this zone. Pollution by olive mill effluents (alpechines) is important during the grinding season, causing increases in the K, P and organic matter, and decreases in dissolved oxygen. Nitrogen and P fertilization of rice fields at present does not produce abnormal increases in the concentration of these elements in the water. Concentrations of herbicides in rice field canals and Donana National Park waters reach values considered as the limit of safety for aquatic life. 37 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  4. Biogenic hydroxyapatite (Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign ) dissolution kinetics and metal removal from acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, J. [Department of Mining Engineering and Natural Resources, Politechnical University of Catalunya, Bases de Manresa 61-73, Manresa 08242, Catalonia (Spain); Cama, J., E-mail: jordi.cama@idaea.csic.es [Department of Geosciences, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, IDAEA, CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, Barcelona 08034, Catalonia (Spain); Cortina, J.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Politechnical University of Catalunya, Avinguda Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028, Catalonia (Spain); Ayora, C. [Department of Geosciences, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, IDAEA, CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, Barcelona 08034, Catalonia (Spain); De Pablo, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Politechnical University of Catalunya, Avinguda Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028, Catalonia (Spain)

    2012-04-30

    Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign is a biogenic hydroxyapatite (expressed as Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4})OH) derived from fish bone. Using grains of Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign with a fraction size between 250 and 500 {mu}m, batch and flow-through experiments were carried out to (1) determine the solubility constant for the dissolution reaction Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH) Left-Right-Double-Arrow 5Ca{sup 2+} + 3PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} + OH{sup -}, (2) obtain steady-state dissolution rates over the pH range between 2.22 and 7.14, and (3) study the Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign 's mechanisms to remove Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} from metal polluted water as it dissolves. The log K{sub S} value obtained was -50.8 {+-} 0.82 at 25 Degree-Sign C. Far-from-equilibrium fish-bone hydroxyapatite dissolution rates decrease by increasing pH. Assuming that the dissolution reaction is controlled by fast adsorption of a proton on a specific surface site that dominates through the pH range studied, probably {identical_to}P-O{sup -}, followed by a slow hydrolysis step, the dissolution rate dependence is expressed in mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} as Rate{sub 25 Degree-Sign C}=-8.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Multiplication-Sign (9.96 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} Multiplication-Sign a{sub H{sup +}})/(1+9.96 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} Multiplication-Sign a{sub H{sup +}}) where a{sub H{sup +}} is the proton activity in solution. Removal of Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} was by formation of phosphate-metal compounds on the Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign substrate, whereas removal of Cd{sup 2+} was by surface adsorption. Increase in pH enhanced the removal of aqueous heavy metals. Using the kinetic parameters obtained (e.g., dissolution rate and pH-rate dependence law), reactive transport simulations reproduced the experimental variation of pH and concentrations of Ca, P and toxic divalent metal in a column experiment filled with Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign that was designed to simulate the Apatite II Trade-Mark-Sign -metal polluted water interaction.

  5. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe2+ with H2O2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe2+ with H2O2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  6. Effects of Resources Exploitation on Water Quality: case studies in Salt Water Intrusion and Acid Mine Drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Kralj, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world, pressures on water resources are increasing, mainly as a result of human activity. Because of their accessibility, groundwater and surface water are the most used reservoirs. The evaluation of the water quality requires the identification of the interconnections among the water reservoirs, natural landscape features, human activities and aquatic health. This study focuses on the estimation of the water pollution linked to two different environmental issues: salt water...

  7. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard Remko;

    2014-01-01

    H ∼2) in three distinct compartments: two from a stratified streamer (uppermost oxic and lowermost anoxic sediment-attached strata) and one from a submerged anoxic non-stratified mat biofilm. The communities colonising pyrite and those in the mature formations appear to be populated by the greatest...... a massive carbon source, enabling non-typical acidophiles to develop more easily. Only 1 of 39 species were shared, suggesting a high metabolic heterogeneity in local microenvironments, defined by the O2 concentration, spatial location and biofilm architecture. The suboxic mats, compositionally most similar...

  8. POST-MORTEM FINDINGS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ENGINEERED SRB FIELD-BIOREACTORS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to immobilize dissolved metals by precipitating them as sulphides, provided that a favourable biochemical environment is created. Such an environment includes the presence of sulphate, anaerobic conditions and the availability of...

  9. Draft genome sequence of extremely acidophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans DLC-5 isolated from acid mine drainage in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans type strain DLC-5, isolated from Wudalianchi in Heihe of Heilongjiang Province, China. Here, we present the draft genome of strain DLC-5 which contains 4,232,149 bp in 2745 contigs with 57.628% GC content and includes 32,719 protein-coding genes and 64 tRNA-encoding genes. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. JNNH00000000.1.

  10. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, T.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) >> Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), AI(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand (14 mg/L). Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 ??g/L (40 nM) using GFAAS and 20 ??g/L (0.4 ??M) by colorimetry.A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II)???Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes

  11. Recovery of Zn from acid mine water and electric arc furnace dust in an integrated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Francisco; Romero, Rafael; Mazuelos, Alfonso; Iglesias, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the purification of acid mine water and the treatment of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) are integrated into one process with the aim of recovering the Zn content of both effluent and waste. Zinc recovery can reduce the cost of their environmental management: purified acid mine water is discharged after removing all metals; EAFD ceases to be hazardous waste; and Zn is valorised. The process consists of the recovery of Zn as zinc oxide and its purification into commercial products. First, EAFD is leached with acid water and the dissolved metals are selectively precipitated as hydroxides. After EADF leaching, ferrous iron is bio-oxidized and Fe and Al are then precipitated; in the following stage, Cu, Ni, Co and Cd are cemented and finally Zn is precipitated as ZnO. In order to purify water that finally is discharged to a river, lime is used as the neutralizing agent, which results in a precipitate of mainly gypsum, MnO, and ZnO. From the impure zinc oxide produced, various alternatives for the attainment of commercial products, such as basic zinc carbonate and electrolytic zinc, are studied in this work.

  12. Recovery of Zn from acid mine water and electric arc furnace dust in an integrated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Francisco; Romero, Rafael; Mazuelos, Alfonso; Iglesias, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the purification of acid mine water and the treatment of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) are integrated into one process with the aim of recovering the Zn content of both effluent and waste. Zinc recovery can reduce the cost of their environmental management: purified acid mine water is discharged after removing all metals; EAFD ceases to be hazardous waste; and Zn is valorised. The process consists of the recovery of Zn as zinc oxide and its purification into commercial products. First, EAFD is leached with acid water and the dissolved metals are selectively precipitated as hydroxides. After EADF leaching, ferrous iron is bio-oxidized and Fe and Al are then precipitated; in the following stage, Cu, Ni, Co and Cd are cemented and finally Zn is precipitated as ZnO. In order to purify water that finally is discharged to a river, lime is used as the neutralizing agent, which results in a precipitate of mainly gypsum, MnO, and ZnO. From the impure zinc oxide produced, various alternatives for the attainment of commercial products, such as basic zinc carbonate and electrolytic zinc, are studied in this work. PMID:26433358

  13. Proceedings of the 33. annual British Columbia mine reclamation symposium : selenium, reclamation of coal mines and general aspects of mine reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual conference fostered the exchange of information on mine reclamation and related issues affecting coal mining in British Columbia and oil sand mining in Alberta. The Technical and Research Committee on Reclamation (TRCR) was launched in the early 1970 to address the need for greater communication between industry and government regarding environmental protection and mine reclamation in order to minimize the environmental damages and impacts to wildlife posed by resource development. The Acid Mine Drainage Task Force was recently amalgamated with the TRCR to ensure that acid rock drainage issues are fully addressed. The conference was attended by members of the mining industry, consultants, students, all levels of government, non government organizations, and other interested parties from within British Columbia and around the world. The environmental impacts of mine development and land rehabilitation were discussed along with new remedial methods for soil conservation, water protection and carbon sequestration. The conference featured 22 presentations, of which 12 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Proceedings of the 33. annual British Columbia mine reclamation symposium : selenium, reclamation of coal mines and general aspects of mine reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, W.; Gardner, W.; McLaren, G.; Bittman, K.; Fraser, C.; Wambolt, T.; Stewart, C.; Pomeroy, K.; Howe, D.; Howell, C. (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    This annual conference fostered the exchange of information on mine reclamation and related issues affecting coal mining in British Columbia and oil sand mining in Alberta. The Technical and Research Committee on Reclamation (TRCR) was launched in the early 1970 to address the need for greater communication between industry and government regarding environmental protection and mine reclamation in order to minimize the environmental damages and impacts to wildlife posed by resource development. The Acid Mine Drainage Task Force was recently amalgamated with the TRCR to ensure that acid rock drainage issues are fully addressed. The conference was attended by members of the mining industry, consultants, students, all levels of government, non government organizations, and other interested parties from within British Columbia and around the world. The environmental impacts of mine development and land rehabilitation were discussed along with new remedial methods for soil conservation, water protection and carbon sequestration. The conference featured 22 presentations, of which 12 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) much-gt Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Al(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand. Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 microg/L using GFAAS and 20 microg/L by colorimetry

  16. Signatures of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolic Activity in Enrichment Cultures from a Sulphur Oxidizing Acid Mine Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G. F.; Bernier, L.; Cowie, B. R.; Warren, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Delineating the role of microorganisms in geochemical processes of interest in natural environments requires the development of tools that provide the ability to distinguish amongst microbial activity associated with different metabolic guilds. The gap between phylogenetic characterization and phenotypic understanding remains, underscoring the need to consider alternative methods. Compound specific analysis of cellular components has the potential to differentiate between active metabolic processes supporting microbial communities and may be especially useful in extreme environments. The goal of this study was to determine whether the phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) distribution and isotopic signatures associated with autotrophs and heterotrophs enriched from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system differed, and further whether natural consortial autotrophic isolates showed similar signatures to autotrophic pure strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans. Two distinct initial enrichments with tetrathionate and CO2 yielded primarily autotrophic (95%) Acidithiobaccillus spp. sulphur oxidizing communities. The remaining microbial members of theses enrichments (subculture of the consortial isolates in a medium amended with glucose but without tetrathionate selectively resulted in their visible growth. PLFA profiles and δ13C signatures from autotrophic (1) natural enrichments, pure cultures of (2) A. ferrooxidans and (3) A. thiooxidans were similar, but collectively differed from those of the natural heterotrophic enrichment cultures. The PLFA profiles for the heterotrophic communities were made up of primarily (88-99%) C16:0 and two isomers of C18:1. In contrast, the autotrophic communities had high proportions of C16:1 (up to 18%) as well as cyclo C17 and cyclo C19 PLFA that combined comprised 18 to 58% of the observed PLFA. The δ13C signatures of the PLFA also differed strongly between the two trophic levels. The δ13C of the autotrophic PLFA, - 24 to

  17. The principal origin of lake acidity: underground mines, minespoil or buried gob?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, K.B.; Turney, D.C. [Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A project was initiated to investigate the previously accepted hypothesis explaining the cause of poor quality water in Howard Williams Lake in southeastern Ohio (USA). The poor Lake water quality (pH 3, acidity of 300 mg/l as CaCO{sub 3}) was presumably caused by underground coal mine complexes in unreclaimed regions of the watershed and a buried gob pit in the reclaimed region of the watershed. After a two year investigation, the hypothesis was rejected. In both reclaimed and unreclaimed regions, the heterogeneous sandstone/shale spoil is responsible for the degradation of water quality. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Exploration of remediation of acid rock drainage with clinoptilolite as sorbent in a slurry bubble column for both heavy metal capture and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Heping; Li, Loretta Y; Grace, John R

    2006-10-01

    Preliminary work was carried out to explore a novel process for high-efficiency high-capacity remediation of acid rock drainage. Zn and other metal ions were adsorbed and desorbed in a laboratory Plexiglas slurry bubble column with natural clinoptilolite particles as sorbent. The results indicate that both adsorption and desorption in this medium have considerable advantages over those in the packed beds and rotating columns, leading to faster batch adsorption and desorption, as well as greater uptake of zinc. The adsorption order of clinoptilolite particles to different metal ions appeared to be Fe>Al>Cu>Zn>Mg>Mn on the basis of normalized concentrations. Smaller particles had significantly higher capacity and rates of the adsorption than larger particles for the same operating conditions. PMID:16962631

  19. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide: Experimental mixing of acid rock drainage and ambient river water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide is examined in experimental mixtures of metal-rich acid rock drainage and relatively pure river water and during batch adsorption experiments using synthetic ferrihydrite. A diverse set of Cu- and Zn-bearing solutions was examined, including natural waters, complex synthetic acid rock drainage, and simple NaNO3 electrolyte. Metal adsorption data are combined with isotopic measurements of dissolved Cu (65Cu/63Cu) and Zn (66Zn/64Zn) in each of the experiments. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes occurs during adsorption of the metal onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide. The adsorption data are modeled successfully using the diffuse double layer model in PHREEQC. The isotopic data are best described by a closed system, equilibrium exchange model. The fractionation factors (??soln-solid) are 0.99927 ?? 0.00008 for Cu and 0.99948 ?? 0.00004 for Zn or, alternately, the separation factors (??soln-solid) are -0.73 ?? 0.08??? for Cu and -0.52 ?? 0.04??? for Zn. These factors indicate that the heavier isotope preferentially adsorbs onto the oxyhydroxide surface, which is consistent with shorter metal-oxygen bonds and lower coordination number for the metal at the surface relative to the aqueous ion. Fractionation of Cu isotopes also is greater than that for Zn isotopes. Limited isotopic data for adsorption of Cu, Fe(II), and Zn onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide suggest that isotopic fractionation is related to the intrinsic equilibrium constants that define aqueous metal interactions with oxyhydroxide surface sites. Greater isotopic fractionation occurs with stronger metal binding by the oxyhydroxide with Cu > Zn > Fe(II).

  20. Selective extraction of metals from products of mine acidic water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on possibility of processing of foam products prepared during flotation purification of mine acidic waters for the purpose of selective extraction of non-ferrous (Co, Ni) and rare earth elements (REE) and their separation from the basic macrocomponent of waters-iron. Optimal conditions of selective metal extraction from foam flotation products are the following: T=333 K, pH=3.0-3.5, ratio of solid and liquid phase - 1:4-1:7, duration of sulfuric acid leaching - 30 min. Rare earth extraction under such conditions equals 87.6-93.0%. The degree of valuable component concentration equals ∼ 10. Rare earths are separated from iron by extraction methods

  1. Coal mining and water quality: Criciuma's case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    abandoned mines (mainly after 1990, year of the implantation of the free trade for the coal sector), that did not finish their reclamation works. These sites are still producing acid drainage; n the sub-basins of the rivers Mae Luzia and Sangao there are several dumping tailings, probably connected to abandoned mines. These tailings are permanent fonts of sulfuric acid; even the mines in operation, in accordance with the official regulations, drain to the rivers, eventually, acid mine drainage, with no previous treatment. (author)

  2. Phytostabilization of mine tailings covered with fly ash and sewage sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Neuschütz, Clara

    2009-01-01

    Establishing plant communities is essential for the restoration of contaminated land. As potential cover materials, fly ash and sewage sludge can prevent formation of acid mine drainage from sulfidic mine waste. The aim of the thesis was to i) screen for plants that can be established in, and prevent leakage of metals and nutrients from sludge on top of ash and tailings, and ii) investigate root growth into sealing layers of ash and sludge. Analyses were performed under laboratory, greenhouse...

  3. Dynamic prediction of ground deformation and drainage design for shallow thick coal seam mining%浅埋厚煤层开采地表变形动态预测与排水设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺峰; 胡瑞林; 武雄

    2012-01-01

    以山西平朔井东矿浅埋厚煤层4201,4301,4302,4303及4401工作面开采为例,运用FLAC3D数值模拟软件对各工作面依次开采后的地表沉降量、沉陷影响半径及导水断裂带发育高度进行了动态预测,得出各工作面最大沉降量为6.4 ~10.3 m,沉陷影响半径为80.5 ~106.6 m,垮落带与导水断裂带最大发育高度为140.5 m.在此基础上,结合矿区地形地貌特征,进行了地表动态填挖与截水排水设计,有效预防了地表径流汇聚于沉陷洼地,再经由断裂带进入矿井造成的矿坑突水灾害,并为后期矿山环境修复治理提供依据.%Took the shallow thick coal seam 4201,4301,4302,4303 and 4401 workfaces of Jingdong mine area in Pingshuo for example, predicted the range of ground subsidence, settlement and the height of water flowing fracture zone dynamically after workface mining with the FLAC3D numerical modeling software. The calculation results are that the maximum settlement is 6. 4-10. 3 m,the average radium of ground subsidence is 80. 5-106. 6 m and the maximum height of the two zones is 140. 5 m. On the basis of the results above and combined with geomorphic characteristics of the mine area,come out the surface dynamical fill-cut and drainage design. It can effectively prevent water bursting disaster caused by the surface runoff which influxes to the subsidence area and then flows to roadway through fractured zone. It also can provide data for ecological environment restoration of the coal mine.

  4. Mercury Methylation and Environmental Effects of Inactive Mercury Mines in the Circum-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J. E.

    2001-05-01

    Mercury mines worldwide contain of some the highest concentrations of mercury on earth, and as a result of local mercury contamination, these mines represent areas of environmental concern when mine-drainage enters downstream aquatic systems. The most problematic aspect of mine site mercury contamination is the conversion of inorganic mercury to highly toxic organic mercury compounds, such as methylmercury, and their subsequent uptake by aquatic organisms in surrounding ecosystems. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations were measured in sediment and water samples collected from several inactive mercury mines in Nevada, Alaska, and the Philippines, which are part of the circum-Pacific mineral belt. The mines studied represent different mercury deposit types and sizes, and climatic settings. Geochemical data collected from these mines indicate that areas surrounding hot-springs type mercury deposits generally have lower methylmercury concentrations than silica-carbonate mercury deposits. In hot-springs mercury deposits in Nevada and Alaska, ore is dominantly cinnabar with few acid-water generating minerals such as pyrite, and as a result, mine-water drainage has near neutral pH in which there is low solubility of mercury. Conversely, silica-carbonate deposits, such as Palawan, Philippines, contain abundant cinnabar and pyrite, and the resultant acidic-mine drainage generally has higher concentrations of mercury and methylmercury. Additional factors such as the proximity of mercury mines to wetlands, climatic effects, or mine wastes containing highly soluble mercury compounds potentially enhance mercury methylation. The Palawan mercury mine may be a unique example where several adverse environmental factors produced local mercury contamination, high mercury methylation, fish contamination, and mercury poisoning of humans that consumed these contaminated fish.

  5. Biological recovery of metals, sulfur and water in the mining and metallurgical industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.; Copini, C.F.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Schultz, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Metals of particular interest in acid mine drainage and industrial wastewaters include copper, zinc, cadmium, arsenic, manganese, aluminum, lead, nickel, silver, mercury, chromium, uranium and iron, in a concentration that can range from 106 to 102 g/l. The composition of such wastewater reflects th

  6. Iron-hydroxide, iron-sulfate and hydrous-silica coatings in acid-mine tailings facilities: A comparative study of their trace-element composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durocher, J.L. [Department of Earth Sciences, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Schindler, M., E-mail: mschindler@laurentian.ca [Department of Earth Sciences, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Distribution and concentration of trace elements in rock coatings in Acid-Mine-Drainage systems. > Coatings occur along ponds and lakes of different pH and composition and are composed of Fe-hydroxides, Fe-sulfates and hydrous silica. > Silica-rich coatings have higher or similar trace-elements concentrations to Fe-rich coatings. > High trace-metal concentrations in Si-rich coatings are the result of the formation of jarosite-type phases in a silica-rich matrix. > Jarosite-type phases nucleate in silica-rich coatings via mixing of Fe-sulfate-rich solutions with trace-elements of underlying rock. - Abstract: Surface alteration-layers often coat minerals in acid-mine drainage systems and the characterization of their chemical composition is required to understand the uptake or release of potentially toxic elements. Samples with micrometer-thick rock coatings were collected from bedrock in contact with three acidic tailings ponds and a small lake, all located within the Copper Cliff mine tailings disposal area in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Distribution and concentration of trace-metals in the rock coatings were characterized with Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The rock coatings are composed of goethite, ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, jarosite and amorphous silica. The latter phase is a product of the non-stoichiometric weathering of the underlying siliceous rock. Layers within the coatings are distinguished on the basis of their atomic Fe:Si ratios: FeO{sub x} coatings have Fe:Si > 4:1, Si-FeO{sub x} coatings have Fe:Si = 4:1 to 1:1 and SiO{sub x} coatings have Si > Fe. Iron-rich coatings (FeO{sub x}) in contact with acidic tailings ponds (pH < 3.5) have lower trace-metal concentrations than their Si-rich counterparts, whereas FeO{sub x} in contact with lake water at near neutral pH have similar trace-metal concentrations than Si-FeO{sub x} and SiO{sub x}, most likely the result of

  7. Environmental management in North American mining sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Zunaira; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and management practices in the mining sector in the North America. The sustainable measures on waste management are recognized as one of the most serious environmental concerns in the mining industry. For mining activities, it will be no surprise that the metal recovery reagents and acid effluents are a threat to the ecosystem as well as hazards to human health. In addition, poor air quality and ventilation in underground mines can lead to occupational illness and death of workers. Electricity usage and fuel consumption are major factors that contribute to greenhouse gases. On the other hand, many sustainability challenges are faced in the management of tailings and disposal of waste rock. This paper aims to highlight the problems that arise due to poor air quality and acid mine drainage. The paper also addresses some of the advantages and limitations of tailing and waste rock management that still have to be studied in context of the mining sector. This paper suggests that implementation of suitable environmental management tools like life cycle assessment (LCA), cleaner production technologies (CPTs), and multicriteria decision analysis (MCD) are important as it ultimately lead to improve environmental performance and enabling a mine to focus on the next stage of sustainability. PMID:26527335

  8. Application of remote-sensing techniques to hydrologic studies in selected coal-mine areas of southeastern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, J.F.; McCauley, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Disturbances resulting from intensive coal mining in the Cherry Creek basin of southeastern Kansas were investigated using color and color-infrared aerial photography in conjunction with water-quality data from simultaneously acquired samples. Imagery was used to identify the type and extent of vegetative cover on strip-mined lands and the extent and success of reclamation practices. Drainage patterns, point sources of acid mine drainage, and recharge areas for underground mines were located for onsite inspection. Comparison of these interpretations with water-quality data illustrated differences between the eastern and western parts of the Cherry Creek basin. Contamination in the eastern part is due largely to circulation of water from unreclaimed strip mines and collapse features through the network of underground mines and subsequent discharge of acidic drainage through seeps. Contamination in the western part is primarily caused by runoff and seepage from strip-mined lands in which surfaces have frequently been graded and limed but are generally devoid of mature stands of soil-anchoring vegetation. The successful use of aerial photography in the study of Cherry Creek basin indicates the potential of using remote-sensing techniques in studies of other coal-mined regions. (USGS)

  9. Using airborne thermal infrared imagery and helicopter EM conductivity to locate mine pools and discharges in the Kettle Creek watershed, north-central Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, E. (Shaw Environmental, Monroeville, PA); Hammack, R.W.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Sams, J.I.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.

    2005-11-01

    The Kettle Creek watershed contains 50–100-year-old surface and underground coal mines that are a continuing source of acid mine drainage (AMD). To characterize the mining-altered hydrology of this watershed, an airborne reconnaissance was conducted in 2002 using airborne thermal infrared imagery (TIR) and helicopter-mounted electromagnetic (HEM) surveys. TIR uses the temperature differential between surface water and groundwater to locate areas where groundwater emerges at the surface. TIR anomalies located in the survey included seeps and springs, as well as mine discharges. In a follow-up ground investigation, hand-held GPS units were used to locate 103 of the TIR anomalies. Of the sites investigated, 26 correlated with known mine discharges, whereas 27 were previously unknown. Seven known mine discharges previously obscured from TIR imagery were documented. HEM surveys were used to delineate the groundwater table and also to locate mine pools, mine discharges, and groundwater recharge zones. These surveys located 12 source regions and flow paths for acidic, metal-containing (conductive) mine drainage; areas containing acid-generating mine spoil; and areas of groundwater recharge and discharge, as well as identifying potential mine discharges previously obscured from TIR imagery by nondeciduous vegetation. Follow-up ground-based electromagnetic surveys verified the results of the HEM survey. Our study suggests that airborne reconnaissance can make the remediation of large watersheds more efficient by focusing expensive ground surveys on small target areas.

  10. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina por resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-07-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO{sub 4}/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  11. Assessment Of Inocula To Enhance Startup Of Ethanol-Fed And Solid-Phase Organic Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors For The National Tunnel Drainage, Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to construct an Anaerobic Passive Treatment System (APTS) to treat acid mine drainage from the National Tunnel in North Clear Creek near the City of Blackhawk, Colorado. North Clear Creek is part of the Clear Creek/Centr...

  12. Assessment Of Inocula To Enhance Startup Of Ethanol-Fed And Solid-Phase Organic Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors For The National Tunnel Drainage, Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to construct an Anaerobic Passive Treatment System (APTS) to treat acid mine drainage from the National Tunnel in North Clear Creek near the City of Blackhawk, Colorado. North Clear Creek is part of the Clear Creek/Centr...

  13. Mesocosm studies to assess acidity removal from acidic mine lakes through controlled eutrophication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flooded lignite pits (Tagebaurestseen) in Lusatia, Germany, are acidic (pH 2.5-4) with high concentrations of iron. Mesocosms (total volume 20 l) were set up with water and sediment from a Tagebaurestsee to assess the effects of phosphate and organic amendments under natural light and low temperature. Chemical and biological parameters were observed over a 9-month period. Phosphate rock addition resulted in sustained reduction in acidity in the water column and induced the growth of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae) near the water surface and Lepocinclis teres (Euglenophyceae) in a band above the sediment. Addition of potatoes to mesocosms resulted in the generation of near-anoxic conditions above the sediment, and phosphorus, ammonium and carbon (organic and inorganic) were released as the potatoes decomposed. A pH > 6 was attained with 5.1 g (dry weight) of potatoes and pH > 8 with 34 g (dry weight). In both mesocosms, more than 90% of total acidity was removed

  14. Mesocosm studies to assess acidity removal from acidic mine lakes through controlled eutrophication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyson, A.; Nixdorf, B.; Kalin, M.; Steinberg, C.E.W. [Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-06-30

    Flooded lignite pits (Tagebaurestseen) in Lusatia, Germany, are acidic (pH 2.5-4) with high concentrations of iron. Mesocosms (total volume 20 l) were set up with water and sediment from a Tagebaurestsee to assess the effects of phosphate and organic amendments under natural light and low temperature. Chemical and biological parameters were observed over a 9-month period. Phosphate rock addition resulted in sustained reduction in acidity in the water column and induced the growth of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae) near the water surface and Lepocinclis teres (Euglenophyceae) in a band above the sediment. Addition of potatoes to mesocosms resulted in the generation of near-anoxic conditions above the sediment, and phosphorus, ammonium and carbon (organic and inorganic) were released as the potatoes decomposed. A pH {gt} 6 was attained with 5.1 g (dry weight) of potatoes and pH {gt} 8 with 34 g (dry weight). In both mesocosms, more than 90% of total acidity was removed.

  15. 多工艺钻进技术在塔山煤矿瓦斯抽采钻孔中的应用%Application of Multi-process Drilling Technology in Gas Drainage Borehole of Tashan Coal Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新; 杨卫东; 战启帅; 刘伟; 王天放

    2014-01-01

    大同煤矿集团公司塔山煤矿4号瓦斯抽排孔终孔口径为1200 mm,孔深423畅66 m,孔底位移≯2 m。孔径大、钻孔深、精度高是本工程的主要难点。钻进施工中采用了气动潜孔锤、双壁钻杆气举反循环及组合牙轮多级扩孔等多种工艺,提高了钻进效率,保证了孔身质量,取得了良好的经济效益和社会效益。%The terminal diameter and depth are 1200mm and 423.66m respectively in 4#gas drainage borehole of Tashan coal mine of Datong Coalmine Group Company with displacement less than 2m.The main difficult points in this project are large borehole diameter, deep drilling and high precisiom.Multi-process of pneumatic DTH hammer, double-wall drill pipe air lift reverse circulation and combined cone multilevel reaming were adopted to improve drilling efficiency, ensure well-bore quality, and achieve good economic and social benefits.

  16. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  17. Definition of redox and pH influence in the AMD mine system using a fuzzy qualitative tool (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, M L; Grande, J A; Valente, T; Perez-Ostalé, E; Santisteban, M; Aroba, J; Ramos, I

    2016-03-01

    Poderosa Mine is an abandoned pyrite mine, located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt which pours its acid mine drainage (AMD) waters into the Odiel river (South-West Spain). This work focuses on establishing possible reasons for interdependence between the potential redox and pH, with the load of metals and sulfates, as well as a set of variables that define the physical chemistry of the water-conductivity, temperature, TDS, and dissolved oxygen-transported by a channel from Poderosa mine affected by acid mine drainage, through the use of techniques of artificial intelligence: fuzzy logic and data mining. The sampling campaign was carried out in May of 2012. There were a total of 16 sites, the first inside the tunnel and the last at the mouth of the river Odiel, with a distance of approximately 10 m between each pair of measuring stations. While the tools of classical statistics, which are widely used in this context, prove useful for defining proximity ratios between variables based on Pearson's correlations, in addition to making it easier to handle large volumes of data and producing easier-to-understand graphs, the use of fuzzy logic tools and data mining results in better definition of the variations produced by external stimuli on the set of variables. This tool is adaptable and can be extrapolated to any system polluted by acid mine drainage using simple, intuitive reasoning.

  18. Extraction concentration and atomic emission determination of controlled elements in acid mine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, B.I.; Oshchepkova, A.P. (Permskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1984-09-01

    Exchange reactions between metal (Cd, Zn, Co, Hg, etc.) dithizonates and diantipyrylmethane (DAM) salts in non-aqueous solutions have been examined. Metal ions forming stable thiocyanate or iodide complexes (Cd(SCN)/sub 4//sup 2 -/, CdI/sub 4//sup 2 -/) pass from the dithizonates to form anionic complexes and then ion pairs with protonated DAM. Addition of DAM salts to organic extracts is an effective method of decomposition of dithizonates and preconcentration of elements in a microphase formed due to extract separation into two phases. A combination of preconcentration of microelements in a th