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Sample records for achieving behavioral regularity

  1. Ensemble recordings in awake rats: achieving behavioral regularity during multimodal stimulus processing and discriminative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjeong; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; de Water, Ed; Gerritsen, Hans; Bakker, Mattijs C; Kalwij, Jan A W; van Goudoever, Tjerk; Buster, Wietze H; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2009-07-01

    To meet an increasing need to examine the neurophysiological underpinnings of behavior in rats, we developed a behavioral system for studying sensory processing, attention and discrimination learning in rats while recording firing patterns of neurons in one or more brain areas of interest. Because neuronal activity is sensitive to variations in behavior which may confound the identification of neural correlates, a specific aim of the study was to allow rats to sample sensory stimuli under conditions of strong behavioral regularity. Our behavioral system allows multimodal stimulus presentation and is coupled to modules for delivering reinforcement, simultaneous monitoring of behavior and recording of ensembles of well isolated single neurons. Using training protocols for simple and compound discrimination, we validated the behavioral system with a group of 4 rats. Within these tasks, a majority of medial prefrontal neurons showed significant firing-rate changes correlated to one or more trial events that could not be explained from significant variation in head position. Thus, ensemble recordings can be combined with discriminative learning tasks under conditions of strong behavioral regularity.

  2. Ensemble recordings in awake rats: Achieving behavioral regularity during multimodal stimulus processing and discriminative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, E.; Oliveira-Ferreira, A.I.; de Water, E.; Gerritsen, H.; Bakker, M.C.; Kalwij, J.A.W.; van Goudoever, T.; Buster, W.H.; Pennartz, C.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    To meet an increasing need to examine the neurophysiological underpinnings of behavior in rats, we developed a behavioral system for studying sensory processing, attention and discrimination learning in rats while recording firing patterns of neurons in one or more brain areas of interest. Because

  3. Early family regularity protects against later disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Tiemeier, Henning; Ringoot, Ank P; Ivanova, Masha Y; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Roza, Sabine J

    2016-07-01

    Infants' temperamental anger or frustration reactions are highly stable, but are also influenced by maturation and experience. It is yet unclear why some infants high in anger or frustration reactions develop disruptive behavior problems whereas others do not. We examined family regularity, conceptualized as the consistency of mealtime and bedtime routines, as a protective factor against the development of oppositional and aggressive behavior. This study used prospectively collected data from 3136 families participating in the Generation R Study. Infant anger or frustration reactions and family regularity were reported by mothers when children were ages 6 months and 2-4 years, respectively. Multiple informants (parents, teachers, and children) and methods (questionnaire and interview) were used in the assessment of children's oppositional and aggressive behavior at age 6. Higher levels of family regularity were associated with lower levels of child aggression independent of temperamental anger or frustration reactions (β = -0.05, p = 0.003). The association between child oppositional behavior and temperamental anger or frustration reactions was moderated by family regularity and child gender (β = 0.11, p = 0.046): family regularity reduced the risk for oppositional behavior among those boys who showed anger or frustration reactions in infancy. In conclusion, family regularity reduced the risk for child aggression and showed a gender-specific protective effect against child oppositional behavior associated with anger or frustration reactions. Families that ensured regularity of mealtime and bedtime routines buffered their infant sons high in anger or frustration reactions from developing oppositional behavior.

  4. Verbal Behavior in Resource and Regular Elementary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Jerry B.

    1983-01-01

    Behaviors of 42 elementary resource teachers and 57 regular elementary teachers were analyzed. Resource teachers spent more time than elementary teachers in accepting students' feelings, praising/encouraging students, and accepting student ideas. In general, verbal behavior of teachers in the two settings was not significantly different. (CL)

  5. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  6. Student prosocial behavior and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasenović Vera Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers correlation between student prosocial behavior and academic achievement. Attention first focuses on the issue of prosocial behavior defining, making it operational and measuring it. Next consideration is given to the ways that prosocial behavior contributes to academic achievement. It is thought that prosocial behavior can produce indirect effects on student prosocial behavior because it is bound to certain academically relevant forms of behavior leading to successful learning and work. Also, correlation is interpreted by means of teacher’s preferences of prosocial students, which is reflected in teacher expectations and behavior towards students but in evaluating their work too. In addition, prosocial behavior may produce direct effects, for it is through peer prosocial interactions that positive intellectual exchange is performed, which contributes to more successful mastering of teaching content. The paper provides a survey of investigations whose results indicate that there exists correlation between student prosocial behavior and academic achievement. Also, consideration is given to possible methods and treatments for encouraging prosocial behavior in school context, especially the role of teacher in the process and the importance of the program for promoting student prosocial skills.

  7. Home Media and Children's Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferth, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a national picture of the time American 6- to 12-year-olds spent playing video games, using the computer, and watching TV at home in 1997 and 2003, and the association of early use with their achievement and behavior as adolescents. Girls benefited from computer use more than boys, and Black children benefited more than White…

  8. Early family regularity protects against later disruptive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Rijlaarsdam (Jolien); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.P. Ringoot (Ank); Ivanova, M.Y. (Masha Y.); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); S.J. Roza (Sabine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInfants’ temperamental anger or frustration reactions are highly stable, but are also influenced by maturation and experience. It is yet unclear why some infants high in anger or frustration reactions develop disruptive behavior problems whereas others do not. We examined family

  9. Effective leader behaviors in regularly held staff meetings: Surveyed vs. Videotaped and Video-Coded Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, Marcella; Hoogeboom, Marcella; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; Allen, Joseph A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Rogelberg, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we report on two studies that took an exploratory behavioral approach to leaders in regular staff meetings. The goal of both studies, which used a still rarely deployed observation method, was to identify effective behavioral repertoires of leaders in staff meetings; we specifically

  10. Achievement in mathematics and language is linked to regular physical activity: a population study in Chilean youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Burrows, Paulina; Burrows, Raquel; Orellana, Yasna; Ivanovic, Daniza

    2014-01-01

    We examined the association between the allocation of time to regular physical activity (PA) and achievement in mathematics and language in Chilean adolescents after controlling for confounders. In a random sample of 620 ninth graders (15.6 ± 0.7 years old), we measured regular PA, including physical education and sports extracurricular activities, and academic performance, using national standardised tests. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses modelled the relation between academic and health-related behaviours. Sufficiency and proficiency in mathematics and language were used as outcome variables. Only 18% of adolescents had >4 h·week(-1) of regular PA. Devoting >4 h · week(-1) to regular PA significantly increased the odds of sufficiency and proficiency in both domains. After full adjustment, the odds of sufficiency and proficiency in mathematics increased by 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.5) and 2.7 (95% CI: 1.7-4.3), respectively. Similarly, the odds of sufficiency and proficiency in language increased by 3.3 (95% CI: 1.7-9.7) and 2.6 (95% CI: 1.6-4.1), respectively. Adolescents with the highest allocation of time to regular PA performed much better in mathematics and language than inactive students. The academic benefits associated with PA can help to promote sustained behaviour changes regarding lifestyles. They can be more easily perceived as gains than health benefits alone.

  11. Exploring Gains in Reading and Mathematics Achievement among Regular and Exceptional Students Using Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tacksoo; Davison, Mark L.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Chan, Chi-Keung; Heistad, David

    2013-01-01

    Using four-wave longitudinal reading and mathematics data (4th to 7th grades) from a large urban school district, growth curve modeling was used as a tool for examining three research questions: Are achievement gaps closing in reading and mathematics? What are the associations between prior-achievement and growth across the reading and mathematics…

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY FEATURES AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS DOING AND DON’T SPORT REGULARLY

    OpenAIRE

    ERASLAN, Meriç; HEKİM, Mesut; Gizem SAYGILI; Atay, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationship between personality and academic achievement of 8th class students doing and don’t sport. 61 participants doing sport regularly and 153 participants who don’t do sport participated to study. Five-factor Personality Inventory was used as data collection material in research. Significant differences between personality were found as gender and situation of doing licensed sport (p<0,05). Besides, there was significant relationship ...

  13. The role of family factors and school achievement in the progression of adolescents to regular smoking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pennanen, M; Vartiainen, E; Haukkala, A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines whether parental smoking and single parenting were related to adolescents' school achievement and anti-smoking parental practices as well as how these factors predicted later smoking...

  14. Critical Behavior of the Annealed Ising Model on Random Regular Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Van Hao

    2017-11-01

    In Giardinà et al. (ALEA Lat Am J Probab Math Stat 13(1):121-161, 2016), the authors have defined an annealed Ising model on random graphs and proved limit theorems for the magnetization of this model on some random graphs including random 2-regular graphs. Then in Can (Annealed limit theorems for the Ising model on random regular graphs, arXiv:1701.08639, 2017), we generalized their results to the class of all random regular graphs. In this paper, we study the critical behavior of this model. In particular, we determine the critical exponents and prove a non standard limit theorem stating that the magnetization scaled by n^{3/4} converges to a specific random variable, with n the number of vertices of random regular graphs.

  15. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to predict pregnant women's intention to engage in regular exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Fang; Chiang, I-Chyun; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Chi, Li-Kang; Lin, Hsien-Ming

    2016-11-01

    the objectives of this study were to use the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in order to determine to what degree pregnant women intended to exercise regularly during pregnancy, and then to evaluate the TPB model fit. this study was based on a cross-sectional survey with a tool which was developed specifically for this study. we identified and invited pregnant women from two medical center hospitals and one certified prenatal center in northern Taiwan to participate. using purposive sampling, we selected participants who were in at least the 12th week of gestation and did not have a high-risk pregnancy. 621 completed the instrument, their mean age was 31.76 (SD=3.87). a self-administered instrument was used to determine the firmness of participants' intention to engage in regular exercise during pregnancy. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software and LISREL 8.72 software. of the pregnant women in our study, 64.2% were found to be likely to exercise regularly up until delivery. The TPB was used to arrive at specific findings with regard to "intention to exercise regularly during pregnancy." Our participants demonstrated a positive intention to exercise regularly, a positive attitude (ATT), positive subjective norms (SN) and positive perceived behavioral controls (PBC) during pregnancy. The most influential factor in determining the participants' positive intention to exercise was found to be PBC (β=0.68, pexercise regularly." KEY CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: the most important factor in determining the participants' intention to exercise regularly was PBC, followed by the SN. Medical staff members should be able to help pregnant women overcome obstacles to regular exercise, for example, by assisting in providing appropriate resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parent-reported problem behavior among children with sensory disabilities attending elementary regular schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, B; Grietens, H

    2004-01-01

    Parent-reported problem behaviors of 94 children with visual and auditory disabilities, attending elementary regular schools, were compared with problems reported in a general population sample of nondisabled children. Both samples were matched by means of a pairwise matching procedure, taking into

  17. The Role of Family Factors and School Achievement in the Progression of Adolescents to Regular Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennanen, M.; Vartiainen, E.; Haukkala, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines whether parental smoking and single parenting were related to adolescents' school achievement and anti-smoking parental practices as well as how these factors predicted later smoking. The sample comprised 1163 Finnish students in Grades 7 through 9. Results show that at the beginning of the seventh grade, parental smoking and…

  18. Factors Related to Regular Undergoing Pap-smear Test: Application of Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Farzad; Emdadi, Shohreh

    2011-11-04

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the world and the most common cancer in developing countries. Pap smear is and effective tool that can prevent death due to cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to doing regular Pap-smear test based on the theory of planned behavior. In this cross-sectional study, conducted in Hamadan County, the west of Iran, during 2009, a total of 400 women's aged 20 to 70 years old, were ran-domly selected to participate voluntarily in the study. Participants filled out a self-administered questionnaire including the expanded theory of planned behavior components. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression statistical tests at 95% significant level. Almost 63.8% of the participants had already done Pap-smear test at least once. About 28.3% of volunteers had followed a regular Pap-smear pro-gram. There was a significant correlation (PPap-smear test. In addition, there was a significant correlation (PPap-smear test. The best predictor for regular Pap-smear testing was subjective norms with odds ratio estimate of 1.14 [95% CI: 1.04, 1.23]. Based on our findings, subjective norms may be one of the most effective factors among women for doing regular Pap-smear test.

  19. Behavioral Regulation and Early Academic Achievement in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Shannon B.; McClelland, Megan M.; Acock, Alan C.; Chen, Fu-Mei; Chen, Jo-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: Behavioral regulation (the integration of attention, working memory, and inhibitory control) is critical for school readiness and early academic achievement. In Taiwan, however, where academic success is highly valued, there is a dearth of assessments available to measure young children's behavioral regulation. The present study…

  20. When Children Move: Behavior and Achievement Outcomes during Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleras, Christy; McKillip, Mary

    2017-01-01

    School moves are common during elementary school in the United States. The authors address whether changing schools and residences affects the academic and behavioral development of young students. Utilizing data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, the regression analyses show that, after controlling for prior achievement and behavior,…

  1. Excusing Elementary School Students from Regular Classroom Activities for the Study of Instrumental Music: The Effect on Sixth-Grade Reading, Language, and Mathematics Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvet, Edward J.

    1985-01-01

    No significant difference was found in sixth-grade reading, language, and mathematics achievement between students who were excused from regular classroom activities for the study of instrumental music and students not studying instrumental music. (Author/RM)

  2. Regular college preparatory students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions approach in an academic college preparatory biology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this study was to obtain 9th grade RCP students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions (STAD) approach which allows each member of a team to have a defined role in group work. The research questions addressed 9 th grade RCP students' perceptions of integrated STAD teams. Qualitative data from 6 RCP participants were collected from interviews and observations. Data were analyzed using typological analysis by creating codes and categories. Findings indicated that RCP students retained more content and enhanced their skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. Teachers need to serve as guides to monitor motivation and enhance peer interaction. School administrators are advised to provide professional development opportunities allowing educators to learn how to incorporate cooperation for optimal student learning communication, negotiation, and problem solving.

  3. Gamblers' habits: empirical evidence on the behavior of regulars, newcomers and dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ingo

    2013-06-01

    Electronic gambling offers the opportunity to analyze huge and unbiased data sets of automatically recorded actual gambling behavior. This study refers to data on 2,127,887 poker playing identities from the Online Poker Database of the University of Hamburg (OPD-UHH) to analyze three subgroups of gamblers: regulars, newcomers, and dropouts. Their gambling habits over 6 months are analyzed in total, as well as over time. Regulars show a much higher involvement than non-regulars and increase their playing volume slightly over the observation period. Newcomers have a lower involvement than non-newcomers and most of them decrease their playing volume over time. Still, there is a small group of newcomers which increases their playing volume sharply and is, hence, very interesting for the industry as well as for the early prevention of pathological gambling. Dropouts have a higher gambling involvement than newcomers but play less than players who have not stopped stop gambling. Most dropouts also show a decreasing playing volume before dropping out. An analysis of the correlations between different variables of gambling habits shows that most of them reinforce each other, for example: gamblers with a higher total playing time tend to play at more tables simultaneously. Only playing frequency is a moderating variable of gambling involvement.

  4. Home Media and Children’s Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferth, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a national picture of the time American 6–12 year olds spent playing video games, using the computer, and watching television at home in 1997 and 2003 and the association of early use with their achievement and behavior as adolescents. Girls benefited from computers more than boys and Black children’s achievement benefited more from greater computer use than did that of White children. Greater computer use in middle childhood was associated with increased achievement for White and Black girls and Black boys, but not White boys. Greater computer play was also associated with a lower risk of becoming socially isolated among girls. Computer use does not crowd out positive learning-related activities, whereas video game playing does. Consequently, increased video game play had both positive and negative associations with the achievement of girls but not boys. For boys, increased video game play was linked to increased aggressive behavior problems. PMID:20840243

  5. Feingold Diet Effect on Reading Achievement and Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernick, Eleanor

    The effect of the Feingold diet (elimination of artificial colors, flavors, or foods with natural salicylates to reduce hyperactivity) on the reading achievement scores, behavior, and impulsivity/reflectivity of 13 children (ages 6 to 12 years) was evaluated. Six months after the experimental group adopted the Feingold diet there were no…

  6. Do lambs perceive regular human stroking as pleasant? Behavior and heart rate variability analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Coulon

    Full Text Available Stroking by humans is beneficial to the human-animal relationship and improves welfare in many species that express intraspecific allogrooming, but very few studies have looked at species like sheep that do not express such contact except around parturition. This study investigated the way lambs perceive regular human tactile contact using behavioral and physiological responses. Twenty-four lambs were reared and bucket-fed in groups of four. All were stroked daily by their familiar caregiver. At 8 weeks of age, the lambs were individually tested in their home pen but in a 1×1m open-barred pen after a 15 h period of habituation to physical separation from peers while remaining in visual and auditory contact. Half of the lambs received stroking by their caregiver for 8 min and half were exposed to their caregiver's immobile presence. Heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded and analyzed by 2-min slots over the same interval based on three measures: mean heart rate value (HR, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD and standard deviation of all intervals measured between consecutive sinus beats (SDNN. Behavioral responses (ear postures of the lamb and time spent in contact with the familiar caregiver, on the knees of the familiar caregiver, and moving were recorded throughout the test. Lamb HR decreased continuously while in the presence of their caregiver. Lambs being stroked showed slower HR and higher RMSSD which reflected positive emotional states compared to lambs left unstroked. All behavioral variables were highly correlated with the main component axis of the PCA analyses: the more the animals stayed in contact with their caregiver, the less they moved and the more their ears were hanging. This first component clearly differentiates lambs being stroked or not. Behavioral and physiological observations support the hypothesis that gentle physical contact with the caregiver is perceived positively by lambs.

  7. Society of Behavioral Medicine position statement: elementary school-based physical activity supports academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Kong, Angela; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Bustamante, Eduardo E; Davis, Catherine L; Pate, Russell R; Wilson, Dawn K

    2014-12-01

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) urges elementary schools to provide children with ample opportunities to engage in physical activity during school hours. In addition to promoting overall child health, physical activity also supports academic achievement. In addition to improving their aerobic fitness, regular physical activity improves cognitive function, influences the brain, and improves mood in children. Better aerobic fitness and physical activity are associated with increased grade point averages and standardized test scores. Despite the documented relationship between physical activity, fitness, and academic achievement, few schools have implemented physical activity as a tool to improve academic performance. SBM recommends that elementary schools provide children with the recommended 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during school hours. Further, SBM urges schools to work with the local school districts and state education departments to mandate minimum physical activity time for elementary school physical education.

  8. Differences in Drinking Expectancies and Motives for Regular Education and Special Education High School Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Harbke, Colin R.; Blake, Dawn; Catanzaro, Salvatore J.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancies and drinking motives were compared for regular education students (n = 159) and students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) receiving special education services (n = 51). Differences existed between groups with respect to expected negative social consequences and emotional and physical outcomes associated with drinking.…

  9. Unexpected Regularity in Swimming Behavior of Clausocalanus furcatus Revealed by a Telecentric 3D Computer Vision System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bianco

    Full Text Available Planktonic copepods display a large repertoire of motion behaviors in a three-dimensional environment. Two-dimensional video observations demonstrated that the small copepod Clausocalanus furcatus, one the most widely distributed calanoids at low to medium latitudes, presented a unique swimming behavior that was continuous and fast and followed notably convoluted trajectories. Furthermore, previous observations indicated that the motion of C. furcatus resembled a random process. We characterized the swimming behavior of this species in three-dimensional space using a video system equipped with telecentric lenses, which allow tracking of zooplankton without the distortion errors inherent in common lenses. Our observations revealed unexpected regularities in the behavior of C. furcatus that appear primarily in the horizontal plane and could not have been identified in previous observations based on lateral views. Our results indicate that the swimming behavior of C. furcatus is based on a limited repertoire of basic kinematic modules but exhibits greater plasticity than previously thought.

  10. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Sockalingam (Nachamma); J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem

  11. The Gambling Preferences and Behaviors of a Community Sample of Australian Regular Video Game Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Cameron J; King, Daniel L; Delfabbro, Paul H

    2016-06-01

    Research has noted many similarities between video gaming and gambling activities. It has been suggested that video game players may also be attracted to gambling, although there is limited research on this possibility. The present study examined concurrent video gaming and gambling habits in a sample of regular video game players in Australia (N = 485, 84 % male, M age = 25.8). Gambling involvement was found to be a generally unpopular activity among regular video game players. No significant association between frequency of video game play and frequency of gambling was found. Although significant correlations between gaming 'addiction' scores and gambling frequency were identified, age was the only significant predictor of gambling when controlling for all remaining variables. These findings are critically discussed in the context of past research, and future research directions concerning the link between video gaming and gambling are proposed.

  12. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sockalingam, Nachamma; Rotgans, Jerome; Schmidt, Henk

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem characteristics were: (1) problem clarity, (2) problem familiarity, (3) the extent to which the problem stimulated group discussion, (4) self-study, and (5) identification of learning goals. The results sh...

  13. Achievement goals, perceived motivational climate, and students' self-reported mastery behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Lee, Amelia

    2002-03-01

    Achievement goals and perceived motivational climate are two important constructs in achievement goal theory, and they play critical roles in student motivation and behavior Traditionally, these two constructs have been examined separately. The present study examined relationships between the two constructs and students' self-reported mastery behaviors as well as age-related differences. Three hundred eight students in 4th, 8th, and 11th grades completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals, perceived motivational climate, and perceptions of their mastery behaviors. Results indicated that achievement goals and perceived motivational climate were related to students' self-reported mastery behaviors. However, the relations varied depending on the students' ages. The older students, compared to the younger ones, appeared to be inclined more toward ego orientation and the ego-involved climate. A multiple achievement goals perspective is recommended for future research on relationships among achievement goals, perceived motivational climate and achievement-related cognitions, and behaviors in physical education.

  14. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Nachamma; Rotgans, Jerome I; Schmidt, Henk G

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem characteristics were: (1) problem clarity, (2) problem familiarity, (3) the extent to which the problem stimulated group discussion, (4) self-study, and (5) identification of learning goals. The results showed that problem clarity led to more group discussion, identification of learning goals, and self-study than problem familiarity. On the other hand, problem familiarity had a stronger and direct impact on academic achievement.

  15. Examining the Academic Achievement of Latino Adolescents: The Role of Parent and Peer Beliefs and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, DeMarquis; Blake, Jamilia J.; Darensbourg, Alicia; Castillo, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    The achievement gap between Latino and White youth is well documented. This is of particular concern as children enter middle school because of the decline in school engagement and achievement noted in many students. The impact parent and peer beliefs and behaviors have on academic achievement, engagement, and achievement values of Latino middle…

  16. Systematic Screening for Behavior in K-12 Settings as Regular School Practice: Practical Considerations and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Wendy Peia; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Cantwell, Emily D.; Royer, David J.

    2017-01-01

    There is a priority for schools to address students' social and emotional needs as is done for academic learning. Tiered models of prevention provide a framework for teaching social skills and behavioral expectations, as well as academics, with positive, proactive, evidence-based practices. Central to responding to students' needs is accurate…

  17. Instructional Style, Cognitive Processing, and Achievement Behavior Patterns of Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atasi Mohanty

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the performance characteristics and differences between English and Oriya medium school children on various cognitive processing, reading, academic achievement, and teacher perception measures. The sample consists of 243 schoolchildren, 120 from Grade IV and 123 from Grade VII from three different schools of Cuttack city in Orissa, India. The children were individually administered the Figure-Copying, Raven’s Progressive Matrices, Matching Familiar Figure Task, Serial Recall, Digit-Span, Wechsler’s Intelligence Scale for Children, Block Design, Cloze Reading Comprehension, and Oral Reading tasks. Classroom Achievement scores on different subjects and the teachers’ ratings about their students were also taken. Results revealed that children reading in English medium schools outperformed their Oriya medium counterparts in some cognitive measures such as Figure Copying, MFFT, RPM, and Digit-Span tasks irrespective of levels. However, the children studying in Oriya medium schools scored higher in Reading Comprehension task and commit less error compared with their English medium counterparts. However, in case of academic achievement measures at primary level, the Oriya medium children performed better in social science, whereas the English medium students excelled in first language and mathematics. The teachers of Oriya medium schools also rated their children better in general conduct, motivation, and effort in schoolwork, whereas, at the secondary level, there was no difference between these two groups in academic achievement or teacher perception measures.

  18. Marijuana Use at School and Achievement-Linked Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Kristin V.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana remains one of the most frequently used drugs among adolescents and usage has increased in recent years. In addition to general use, many high school students use marijuana during the school day. The present study focused on achievement-linked correlates of in-school marijuana use by comparing non-users, general users, and school users…

  19. Long-Term Evolution of Email Networks: Statistical Regularities, Predictability and Stability of Social Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Lorite, Antonia; Guimerà, Roger; Sales-Pardo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    In social networks, individuals constantly drop ties and replace them by new ones in a highly unpredictable fashion. This highly dynamical nature of social ties has important implications for processes such as the spread of information or of epidemics. Several studies have demonstrated the influence of a number of factors on the intricate microscopic process of tie replacement, but the macroscopic long-term effects of such changes remain largely unexplored. Here we investigate whether, despite the inherent randomness at the microscopic level, there are macroscopic statistical regularities in the long-term evolution of social networks. In particular, we analyze the email network of a large organization with over 1,000 individuals throughout four consecutive years. We find that, although the evolution of individual ties is highly unpredictable, the macro-evolution of social communication networks follows well-defined statistical patterns, characterized by exponentially decaying log-variations of the weight of social ties and of individuals' social strength. At the same time, we find that individuals have social signatures and communication strategies that are remarkably stable over the scale of several years.

  20. The Decision Tree: A Tool for Achieving Behavioral Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saren, Dru

    1999-01-01

    Presents a "Decision Tree" process for structuring team decision making and problem solving about specific student behavioral goals. The Decision Tree involves a sequence of questions/decisions that can be answered in "yes/no" terms. Questions address reasonableness of the goal, time factors, importance of the goal, responsibilities, safety,…

  1. The Structure of Achievement and Behavior across Middle Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Duncan, Greg J.

    1999-01-01

    Used data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to model developmental trajectories across middle childhood. Found that individual trajectories were extremely diverse in level and sometimes in slope. Compared to girls, boys had heterogeneous slopes for math and behavior problems. Compared to boys, girls showed a significantly higher degree of…

  2. Achieving more with less: Extra milers' behavioral influences in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhao, Helen H; Walter, Sheryl L; Zhang, Xin-An; Yu, Jia

    2015-07-01

    Teams are composed of individual members who collectively contribute to team success. As a result, contemporary team research tends to focus on how team overall properties (e.g., the average of team personality and behavior) affect team processes and effectiveness while overlooking the potential unique influences of specific members on team outcomes. Drawing on minority influence theory (Grant & Patil, 2012), we extend previous teams research by demonstrating that an extra miler (i.e., a team member exhibiting the highest frequency of extra-role behaviors in a team) can influence team processes and, ultimately, team effectiveness beyond the influences of all the other members. Specifically, based on a field study, we report that the extra miler's behavioral influences (i.e., helping and voice) on team monitoring and backup processes and team effectiveness are contingent on his or her network position in the team, such that the member tends to have stronger influence on team outcomes when he or she is in a central position. We also find that even a single extra miler in a vital position plays a more important role in driving team processes and outcomes than do all the other members. Therefore, our research offers an important contribution to the team literature by demonstrating the disproportionate influences of specific team members on team overall outcomes. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Leading in the Middle: Leadership Behaviors of Middle Level Principals that Promote Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minus, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the relationship between middle school principals' instructional leadership behaviors and student achievement. In particular, this study investigated the specific principal leadership behaviors of middle level principals that promote student achievement in school. A secondary variable for consideration was student…

  4. The Effects of Divorce on Achievement, Behavior, and Attendance of Seventh Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy; And Others

    It was hypothesized that the academic achievement, behavior, and school attendance of students affected by parental divorce would be significantly different from the achievement, behavior, and attendance of students from intact families. This study was conducted to determine if seventh grade students from divorced families exhibited more problems…

  5. Computer Gaming and Student Achievement: Investigating Middle School Students’ Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Ibanez; John R. Slate; Cheryl Kelsey

    2008-01-01

    In spite of very little research on the subject, a growing concern exists among professionals that excessive time spent by students on computer gaming may have an undesirable effect in scholastic achievement. In this study, middle grade students self-reported their time spent on computer gaming for a one week time period. These self-reports were related with their GPAs at the end of the semester. Analysis of 114 students’ GPAs in English, Math, and Science indicated the presence of a statisti...

  6. Regular Exposure to Cowbells Affects the Behavioral Reactivity to a Noise Stimulus in Dairy Cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Julia; Masneuf, Sophie; Patt, Antonia; Hillmann, Edna

    2017-01-01

    In alpine regions, cows are often equipped with bells during pasture season to ensure that farmers can locate them. Constant exposure to the chime of a bell may affect cows' acoustic perception in general. The aim of this study is to test whether routine bell exposure affects the reactivity to a noise stimulus and might be associated with hearing impairment in cows. For the assessment, behavioral and cardiac indicators were used as indirect measures of hearing capacity. Cows that were either used to wearing a bell or not were exposed to a playback of low and high amplitude (=varying loudness). In addition, we tested whether wearing earplugs, mimicking hearing impairment, reduced the cows' reactivity toward the playback. On 24 farms, half of them routinely using cowbells, 96 Brown Swiss cows were tested in a 2 × 2 factorial cross-over design (65 or 85 dB, without or with earplugs) in a balanced order. The effects of bell experience, amplitude, and earplugs on the latency to the first behavioral and cardiac response to a 5-s playback were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, considering dependencies within the data set. Cows reacted faster without earplugs and when they were exposed to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. The proportion of cows leaving the feeding rack after onset of the playback was reduced by bell experience and earplugs and was increased when exposed to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. Exposure without earplugs to 85 dB but not to 65 dB increased heart rate. Heart rate and heart rate variability indicated increased sympathetic activation during the exposure to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. In general, behavioral and cardiac indicators did not indicate severe hearing impairment due to routine bell exposure. The 85-dB stimulus increased arousal and avoidance compared with the 65-dB stimulus, with bell experience and earplugs leading to a general decrease in avoidance of the stimulus. This may reflect an altered acoustic perception of the

  7. Regular Exposure to Cowbells Affects the Behavioral Reactivity to a Noise Stimulus in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Johns

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In alpine regions, cows are often equipped with bells during pasture season to ensure that farmers can locate them. Constant exposure to the chime of a bell may affect cows’ acoustic perception in general. The aim of this study is to test whether routine bell exposure affects the reactivity to a noise stimulus and might be associated with hearing impairment in cows. For the assessment, behavioral and cardiac indicators were used as indirect measures of hearing capacity. Cows that were either used to wearing a bell or not were exposed to a playback of low and high amplitude (=varying loudness. In addition, we tested whether wearing earplugs, mimicking hearing impairment, reduced the cows’ reactivity toward the playback. On 24 farms, half of them routinely using cowbells, 96 Brown Swiss cows were tested in a 2 × 2 factorial cross-over design (65 or 85 dB, without or with earplugs in a balanced order. The effects of bell experience, amplitude, and earplugs on the latency to the first behavioral and cardiac response to a 5-s playback were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, considering dependencies within the data set. Cows reacted faster without earplugs and when they were exposed to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. The proportion of cows leaving the feeding rack after onset of the playback was reduced by bell experience and earplugs and was increased when exposed to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. Exposure without earplugs to 85 dB but not to 65 dB increased heart rate. Heart rate and heart rate variability indicated increased sympathetic activation during the exposure to 85 dB compared with 65 dB. In general, behavioral and cardiac indicators did not indicate severe hearing impairment due to routine bell exposure. The 85-dB stimulus increased arousal and avoidance compared with the 65-dB stimulus, with bell experience and earplugs leading to a general decrease in avoidance of the stimulus. This may reflect an altered

  8. Study on Strata Behavior Regularity of 1301 Face in Thick Bedrock of Wei - qiang Coal Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuancheng; Yao, Boyu

    2017-09-01

    In order to ensure the safe and efficient production of the thick bedrock face, the rule of the strata behavior of the thick bedrock face is discussed through the observation of the strata pressure of the 1301 first mining face in Wei qiang coal mine. The initial face is to press the average distance of 50.75m, the periodic weighting is to press the average distance of 12.1m; during the normal mining period, although the upper roof can not be broken at the same time, but the pressure step is basically the same; the working face for the first weighting and periodical weighting is more obvious to the change of pressure step change, when the pressure of the working face is coming, the stent force increased significantly, but there are still part of the stent work resistance exceeds the rated working resistance, low stability, still need to strengthen management.

  9. The dynamics of condom use with regular and casual partners: analysis of the 2006 National Sexual Behavior Survey of Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphichat Chamratrithirong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine factors associated with levels of condom use among heterosexual Thai males in sex with regular partners and in sex with casual partners. METHODS: The data used in this study are from the national probability sample of the 2006 National Sexual Behavior Study, the third nationally representative cross-sectional survey in Thailand. A subtotal of 2,281 men were analyzed in the study, including young (18-24 and older (25-59 adults who were residents of rural areas of Thailand, non-Bangkok urban areas, and Bangkok. Two outcomes of interest for this analysis are reported condom use in the past 12 months by males in relationships with the most recent regular and casual partners who were not sex workers. Chi-square statistics, bivariate regressions and the proportional odds regression models are used in the analysis. RESULTS: Condom use for men with their regular partner is revealed to be positively related to education, knowledge of condom effectiveness, and pro-condom strategy, and negatively related to non-professional employment, status of registered marriage, and short relationship duration. Condom use with casual partner is positively determined by education, condom knowledge, non-professional occupation, short relationship duration, and lack of history of paid sex. CONCLUSION: The national survey emphasized the importance of risk perceptions and condom motivations variables in explaining condom use among men in Thailand. These factors include not only education and knowledge of condom effectiveness and pro-condom strategy but also types of partners and their relationship context and characteristics. Program intervention to promote condom use in Thailand in this new era of predominant casual sex rather than sex with sex workers has to take into account more dynamic partner-based strategies than in the past history of the epidemics in Thailand.

  10. Computer Gaming and Student Achievement: Investigating Middle School Students’ Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ibanez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of very little research on the subject, a growing concern exists among professionals that excessive time spent by students on computer gaming may have an undesirable effect in scholastic achievement. In this study, middle grade students self-reported their time spent on computer gaming for a one week time period. These self-reports were related with their GPAs at the end of the semester. Analysis of 114 students’ GPAs in English, Math, and Science indicated the presence of a statistically significant difference in English GPAs between students in the High Computer Gaming group from students in the Moderate and Low Computer Gaming groups. No differences were yielded for Math or Science GPAs. Implications are discussed.

  11. Individual consistencies in behavior: achievement persistence interactions as personality styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes-Iñesta, Emilio; Contreras, Sagrario

    2007-10-01

    Two experiments were carried out to find within-subject consistencies as well as individual differences in a choice situation involving achievement persistence. Four volunteers, two men (21 and 23 years old) and two women (21 and 22 years old) were exposed twice, with a 1-mo. interval, to a filling-patterns task, to evaluate their choices for two options. For one option, task-time and outcomes for every response were constant. For the other option, task-time decreased in correlation with an increase in earnings for every response. Analyses showed reliable profiles for three of the four subjects when percent of responding to each option was compared in independent experiments. Results are discussed in terms of interactive styles.

  12. Peer Norm Salience for Academic Achievement, Prosocial Behavior, and Bullying: Implications for Adolescent School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Gest, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the significance of classroom-level norm salience, calculated as the within-classroom correlation between a behavior and peer-nominated popularity, by examining the extent to which norm salience moderated the relation of individual classroom behaviors (academic achievement, prosocial behavior, and bullying) with peer…

  13. From inactive to regular jogger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Cramer, Pernille; Brinkmann Løite, Vibeke; Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup

    to translate intention into regular behavior. TTM: Informants expressed rapid progression from the pre-contemplation to the action stage caused by an early shift in the decisional balance towards advantages overweighing disadvantages. This was followed by a continuous improvement in self-efficacy, which...... jogging-related self-efficacy, and deployment of realistic goal setting was significant in the achievement of regular jogging behavior. Cognitive factors included a positive change in both affective and instrumental beliefs about jogging. Expectations from society and social relations had limited effect...... health, and well-being. An experience-driven change in affective beliefs contributed to the shift in the intention. Informants’ initial expectations to own jogging abilities were realistic and modest, which in combination with a GPS-training watch applied sufficient perceived behavioral control...

  14. Relationship between Achievement Goals and Students' Self-Reported Personal and Social Responsibility Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E

    2015-04-21

    This study utilized the 2x2 achievement goal model (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, performance-avoidance goals) to explore the relationships between achievement goals and self-reported personal and social responsibility behaviors in high school physical education settings. Two hundred and twenty one Turkish students completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals, personal and social responsibility behaviors. Results of the one-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among the four achievement goals, F(3, 660) = 137.05, p social responsibility (r = .38, p responsibility behaviors, and b = .41, t(216) = 5.23, p social responsibility behaviors. These findings seem to provide convergent evidence that mastery-approach goals are positively related to positive educational outcomes.

  15. Perception of coaching behaviors, coping, and achievement in a sport competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michel; Gaudreau, Patrick; Franche, Veronique

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between perceived coaching behaviors, coping strategies during a sport competition, and sport achievement. A prospective design was used in which 80 athletes from individual sports completed measures of perceived coaching behaviors two days before a competition (Time 1) and measures of coping and sport achievement within three hours after a sport competition (Time 2). As expected, results of multiple regressions indicated that supportive coaching was a positive predictor of task-oriented coping and sport achievement whereas unsupportive coaching was a positive predictor of disengagement-oriented coping. Both types of coping were significantly associated with sport achievement. Task-oriented coping was a significant partial mediator in the relation between supportive coaching and sport achievement. This study, which contributes to both the coaching and coping literatures, highlights the role of supportive coaching behaviors in the initiation of effective stress management during sport competitions.

  16. Regular figures

    CERN Document Server

    Tóth, L Fejes; Ulam, S; Stark, M

    1964-01-01

    Regular Figures concerns the systematology and genetics of regular figures. The first part of the book deals with the classical theory of the regular figures. This topic includes description of plane ornaments, spherical arrangements, hyperbolic tessellations, polyhedral, and regular polytopes. The problem of geometry of the sphere and the two-dimensional hyperbolic space are considered. Classical theory is explained as describing all possible symmetrical groupings in different spaces of constant curvature. The second part deals with the genetics of the regular figures and the inequalities fo

  17. Self-Regulated Learning Behavior of College Students of Science and Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cuixin

    This study focuses on the relationship between self-regulated learning behavior and their academic achievement of college students of science. For students of science, their involvement in motivational components is closely tied to their performance in the examinations. Cognitive strategies have the strongest influence on scores of the English achievement.

  18. Youth Residing in Out-of-Home Placements: Examination of Behavior and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Calli G.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2016-01-01

    A data set from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II was analyzed to determine if significant relationships existed between participants' internalizing and externalizing scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and their (a) scores on assessments of academic achievement and (b) behavior problems leading to suspension or…

  19. An Analysis of the Relationship of Perceived Principal Instructional Leadership Behaviors and Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Kerry Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship existed between perceived instructional leadership behaviors of high school principals and student academic achievement. A total of 124 principals and 410 teachers representing 75 high school campuses completed the School Leadership Behaviors Survey (SLBS), an instrument…

  20. Regular icosahedron

    OpenAIRE

    Mihelak, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Here are collected properties of regular icosahedron which are useful for students of mathematics or mathematics teachers who can prepare exercises for talented students in elementary or middle school. The initial section describes the basic properties of regular polyhedra: tetrahedron, cube, dodecahedron, octahedron and of course icosahedron. We have proven that there are only five regular or platonic solids and have verified Euler's polyhedron formula for them. Then we focused on selected p...

  1. Teachers' Behavior and Pupils' Achievement Motivation as Determinants of Intended Helping Behavior in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Juha A.; Kokkonen, Marja T.; Telama, Risto K.; Liukkonen, Jarmo O.

    2013-01-01

    The present two-wave longitudinal study examined the extent to which physical education (PE) teachers' democratic and socially supportive behavior, pupils' goal orientations, and the perceived motivational climate in PE explained differences in pupils' intended helping behavior by gender in PE classes. The results of 105 boys and 109 girls based…

  2. [Relationship Between General Cognitive Abilities and School Achievement: The Mediation Role of Learning Behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H M; Rücker, S; Büttner, P; Petermann, F; Daseking, M

    2015-10-01

    General cognitive abilities are still considered as the most important predictor of school achievement and success. Whether the high correlation (r=0.50) can be explained by other variables has not yet been studied. Learning behavior can be discussed as one factor that influences the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school achievement. This study examined the relationship between intelligence, school achievement and learning behavior. Mediator analyses were conducted to check whether learning behavior would mediate the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school grades in mathematics and German. Statistical analyses confirmed that the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school achievement was fully mediated by learning behavior for German, whereas intelligence seemed to be the only predictor for achievement in mathematics. These results could be confirmed by non-parametric bootstrapping procedures. RESULTS indicate that special training of learning behavior may have a positive impact on school success, even for children and adolescents with low IQ. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Maximal ? -regularity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Neerven, J.M.A.M.; Veraar, M.C.; Weis, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we prove maximal regularity estimates in “square function spaces” which are commonly used in harmonic analysis, spectral theory, and stochastic analysis. In particular, they lead to a new class of maximal regularity results for both deterministic and stochastic equations in L p

  4. Effect of Self-Regulated Learning and Motivation to Achieve against Teacher Professional Capability for Student S1 PGSD of Science Field Compared with Regular Student S1 PGSD at UPBJJ Serang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayekti

    2015-01-01

    This study is to know effect of self-regulated learning and motivation to achieve against teacher professional capability for student S1 PGSD of science field compared with regular student S1 PGSD. The student uses grades of Classroom Action Research (CAR) and Stabilization of Professional Capability (SPC) on curriculum of S1 PGSD to see…

  5. Relations between early family risk, children's behavioral regulation, and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sektnan, Michaella; McClelland, Megan M; Acock, Alan; Morrison, Frederick J

    2010-10-01

    This study examined relations among early family risk, children's behavioral regulation at 54 months and kindergarten, and academic achievement in first grade using data on 1,298 children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Family risk was indexed by ethnic minority status, low maternal education, low average family income from 1 - 54 months, and high maternal depressive symptoms from 1 - 54 months. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that minority status, low maternal education, and low family income had significant negative effects on reading, math, and vocabulary achievement in first grade. Modest indirect effects were also found from ethnicity, maternal education, and maternal depressive symptoms, through 54-month and kindergarten behavioral regulation to first-grade achievement. Discussion focuses on the importance of behavioral regulation for school success especially for children facing early risk.

  6. Good character at school: Positive classroom behavior mediates the link between character strengths and school achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eWagner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Character strengths have been found to be substantially related to children’s and adolescents’ well-being. Initial evidence suggests that they also matter for school success (e.g., Weber and Ruch, 2012. The present set of two studies aimed at replicating and extending these findings in two different age groups, primary school students (N = 179; mean age = 11.6 years and secondary school students (N = 199; mean age = 14.4 years. The students completed the VIA-Youth, a self-report measure of the 24 character strengths in the VIA classification. Their teachers rated the students’ positive behavior in the classroom. Additionally, school achievement was assessed: For the primary school students (Study 1, teachers rated the students’ overall school achievement and for the secondary school students (Study 2, we used their grades as a measure of school achievement. We found that several character strengths were associated with both positive classroom behavior and school achievement. Across both samples school achievement was correlated with love of learning, perseverance, zest, gratitude, hope, and perspective. The strongest correlations with positive classroom behavior were found for perseverance, self-regulation, prudence, social intelligence, and hope. For both samples, there were indirect effects of most of the character strengths on school achievement through teacher-rated positive classroom behavior. The converging findings from the two samples support the notion that character strengths contribute to positive classroom behavior, which in turn enhances school achievement. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research and for school interventions based on character strengths.

  7. Good character at school: positive classroom behavior mediates the link between character strengths and school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lisa; Ruch, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Character strengths have been found to be substantially related to children's and adolescents' well-being. Initial evidence suggests that they also matter for school success (e.g., Weber and Ruch, 2012). The present set of two studies aimed at replicating and extending these findings in two different age groups, primary school students (N = 179; mean age = 11.6 years) and secondary school students (N = 199; mean age = 14.4 years). The students completed the VIA-Youth (Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth), a self-report measure of the 24 character strengths in the VIA classification. Their teachers rated the students' positive behavior in the classroom. Additionally, school achievement was assessed: For the primary school students (Study 1), teachers rated the students' overall school achievement and for the secondary school students (Study 2), we used their grades as a measure of school achievement. We found that several character strengths were associated with both positive classroom behavior and school achievement. Across both samples, school achievement was correlated with love of learning, perseverance, zest, gratitude, hope, and perspective. The strongest correlations with positive classroom behavior were found for perseverance, self-regulation, prudence, social intelligence, and hope. For both samples, there were indirect effects of some of the character strengths on school achievement through teacher-rated positive classroom behavior. The converging findings from the two samples support the notion that character strengths contribute to positive classroom behavior, which in turn enhances school achievement. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research and for school interventions based on character strengths.

  8. Psychoticism and disruptive behavior can be also good predictors of school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Widaman, Keith; Mansur-Alves, Marcela; Bacelar, Tatiane Dias; Saldanha, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The relations of Gf (Standard Progressive Matrices Raven), Gc (verbal scale of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Version), personality dimensions (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Junior Version), and disruptive behavior (TDAH scale) with school achievement (measured by TDE test and PISA test) were investigated. Two samples of students (total N = 534) representing a broad range of socioeconomic status (SES) participated in this study. Path models were conducted. The results demonstrated that (1) in both samples no sex differences related to school achievement were found; (2) in the first sample, after controlling for age and SES differences, Gf and psychoticism predicted (.38 and -.13, respectively) school achievement (measured by TDE test); (3) in the second sample, after controlling for SES differences to which additional measures were administered, Gf and Gc positively predicted (.22 and .40, respectively) school achievement (measured by PISA test). In addition, psychoticism and disruptive behavior also predicted school performance (-.14 and -.28, respectively). Some theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  9. The Effect of Perceived Motivational Structure of Classroom on Achievement Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Talepasand

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of perceived motivational structure of classroom on achievement behaviors (the choice of problem, effort, persistence in solving algorithm and flowchart problems. There were 45 high school male students (Mean age = 17 years old in the third grade of computer field in three classes. Classes were divided into two experimental and one control group. Instructional content was given in 10 sessions for 180 minutes. The variables of choice, effort, and persistence were collected by direct as-sessment method. A pre-test and post-test design was used. The Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis of variance. Results indicated that mastery structure had positive effect on the amount of effort and persistence in solving algorithm and flowchart problems in comparison with control group. Mastery structure in comparison with performance structure increased the amount of effort in solving problems significantly. In addition, an interactive effect between previous achieve-ment and perceived structure of classroom was achieved in a mastery level. The amount of persistence in that of students with very weak previous achievement was more than students with average previous achievement. The find-ing of this study is compatible with the theory of achievement goal and illustrates that the mastery structure plays an effective role in forming achievement behaviors.

  10. Contributions of hot and cool self-regulation to preschool disruptive behavior and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Michael; Kupersmidt, Janis; Voegler-Lee, Mare; Bryant, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The construct of self-regulation can be meaningfully distinguished into hot and cool components. The current study investigated self-regulation in a sample of 926 children aged 3-5 years old. Children's performance on self-regulatory tasks was best described by two latent factors representing hot and cool regulation. When considered alone, hot and cool regulation were both significantly correlated with disruptive behavior and academic achievement. When considered together, cool regulation was uniquely associated with academic achievement, while hot regulation was uniquely associated with inattentive-overactive behaviors. Results are discussed with respect to treatment studies that directly target improvement in children's self-regulation.

  11. Mathematics achievement and anxiety and their relation to internalizing and externalizing behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah S; Willcutt, Erik G; Escovar, Emily; Menon, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Although behavioral difficulties are well documented in reading disabilities, little is known about the relationship between math ability and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Here, we use standardized measures to investigate the relation among early math ability, math anxiety, and internalizing and externalizing behaviors in a group of 366 second and third graders. Math achievement was significantly correlated with attentional difficulties and social problems but not with internalizing symptoms. The relation between math achievement and externalizing behavioral problems was stronger in girls than in boys. Math achievement was not correlated with trait anxiety but was negatively correlated with math anxiety. Critically, math anxiety differed significantly between children classified as math learning disabled (MLD), low achieving (LA), and typically developing (TD), with math anxiety significantly higher in the MLD and LA groups compared to the TD group. Our findings suggest that, even in nonclinical samples, math difficulties at the earliest stages of formal math learning are associated with attentional difficulties and domain-specific anxiety. These findings underscore the need for further examination of the shared cognitive, neural, and genetic influences underlying problem solving and nonverbal learning difficulties and accompanying internalizing and externalizing behaviors. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  12. Mathematics Achievement and Anxiety and Their Relation to Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah S.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Escovar, Emily; Menon, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Although behavioral difficulties are well documented in reading disabilities, little is known about the relationship between math ability and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Here, we use standardized measures to investigate the relation among early math ability, math anxiety, and internalizing and externalizing behaviors in a group of 366 second and third graders. Math achievement was significantly correlated with attentional difficulties and social problems but not with internalizing symptoms. The relation between math achievement and externalizing behavioral problems was stronger in girls than in boys. Math achievement was not correlated with trait anxiety but was negatively correlated with math anxiety. Critically, math anxiety differed significantly between children classified as math learning disabled (MLD), low achieving (LA), and typically developing (TD), with math anxiety significantly higher in the MLD and LA groups compared to the TD group. Our findings suggest that, even in nonclinical samples, math difficulties at the earliest stages of formal math learning are associated with attentional difficulties and domain-specific anxiety. These findings underscore the need for further examination of the shared cognitive, neural, and genetic influences underlying problem solving and nonverbal learning difficulties and accompanying internalizing and externalizing behaviors. PMID:23313869

  13. Regular exercise behavior is related to lower extremity muscle strength in patients with type 2 diabetes: Data from the Multicenter Survey of the Isometric Lower Extremity Strength in Type 2 Diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takuo; Ishiguro, Tomoyasu; Ohira, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Yukio

    2017-06-14

    Owing to several contributing factors, continuation of exercise therapy is difficult for patients with type 2 diabetes. One potential factor that has not been well examined is the influence of muscle strength on regular exercise behavior. We examined the relationship between regular exercise behavior and knee extension force (KEF) in 1,442 patients with type 2 diabetes. In sex-specific univariate analysis, KEF was significantly higher in patients who regularly exercised than in patients who did not regularly exercise. However, age, but not exercise behavior, was significantly different between KEF quartiles. Accordingly, KEF and age might strongly influence exercise behavior. In the multivariate analyses using age and other parameters as covariates, KEF was a significant explanatory variable of regular exercise in both men and women, suggesting that muscle strength could influence regular exercise behavior. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. The Effects of Teacher Education Level, Teaching Experience, And Teaching Behaviors On Student Science Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Danhui

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature leaves us unanswered questions about whether teaching behaviors mediate the relationship between teacher education level and experience with student science achievement. This study examined this question with 655 students from sixth to eighth grade and their 12 science teachers. Student science achievements were measured at the beginning and end of 2006-2007 school year. Given the cluster sampling of students nested in classrooms, which are nested in teachers, a two-lev...

  15. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Lee

    Full Text Available Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; however, the precise mechanism underlying the antidepressant action via exercise is unclear. In contrast, the effect of 5-HT on antidepressant activity has not been clarified, in part because the therapeutic response to antidepressant drugs has a time lag in spite of the rapid increase of brain 5-HT upon administration of these drugs. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of brain 5-HT to the antidepressant effect of exercise. Mice were fed a tryptophan-deficient diet and stressed using chronic unpredictable stress (CUS for 4 weeks with or without the performance of either moderate or intense exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week. The findings demonstrated that the onset of depression-like behavior is attributable not to chronic reduction of 5-HT but to chronic stress. Regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents depression-like behavior with an improvement of adult hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and without the recovery of 5-HT. Concomitantly, the mice that exercised showed increased hippocampal noradrenaline. Regular exercise prevents the impairment of not long-term memory but short-term memory in a 5-HT-reduced state. Together, these findings suggest that: (1 chronic reduction of brain 5-HT may not contribute to the onset of depression-like behavior; (2 regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents the onset of chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior independent of brain 5-HT and dependent on brain adrenaline; and (3 regular exercise prevents chronic tryptophan reduction-induced impairment of not long-term but short-term memory.

  16. Aging women with polycystic ovary syndrome who achieve regular menstrual cycles have a smaller follicle cohort than those who continue to have irregular cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, Mariet W.; Kwee, Janet; Korsen, Ted J.M.; Rekers-Mombarg, L.T.M.; Schoemaker, Joop

    2003-01-01

    To examine whether follicle loss due to ovarian aging is responsible for the occurrence of regular menstrual cycles in aging women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the size of the FSH-sensitive follicle cohort was estimated by the exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone ovarian reserve test

  17. Disruptive Behavior and Academic Achievement: The Importance of Psychological and Environment Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço, Abílio A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aimed to study the impact of self-concept and environment of the classroom in disruptive behaviors, as well as the influence of these behaviors on grades in two state schools in the north of Portugal, through 3 questionnaires (PHCSCS-2, APSA and EDEP to 425 students of the compulsory Portuguese schooling. It was found that with the increase of self-concept and improve the environment of the classroom are less frequent disruptive behaviors, increasing thus the academic achievement of students (Portuguese language and mathematics, which stresses the importance of these constructs in the success school. Educational implications are discussed at these levels of education.

  18. USE OF VIDEOGAMES AND COMPUTER GAMES: INFLUENCES ON ATTENTION, MEMORY, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND PROBLEMS BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Germán Rodríguez Celis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify the relationship between video and computergames use on attention, memory, academic performance and problemsbehavior in school children in Bogotá. Memory and attention were assessedusing a set of different scales of ENI Battery (Matute, Rosselli, Ardila, & Ostrosky-Solís, 2007. For Academic performance, school newsletters were used.Behavioral problems were assessed through the CBCL / 6 -18 questionnaire(Child Behavior Checklist of (Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1983. 123 children and99 parents were enrolled in 2 factorial design experimental studies. The resultsdid not support the hypothesis of a significant change in memory tests, orintra-subject selective visual and hearing attention. However, these variablesshowed significant differences among children exposed to habitual videogamesconsumption. No differences were found between the level of regular videogames consumption in school children and academic performance variables orbehavioral problems.

  19. Regular Boardgames

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, Jakub; Sutowicz, Jakub; Szykuła, Marek

    2017-01-01

    We present an initial version of Regular Boardgames general game description language. This stands as an extension of Simplified Boardgames language. Our language is designed to be able to express the rules of a majority of popular boardgames including the complex rules such as promotions, castling, en passant, jump captures, liberty captures, and obligatory moves. The language describes all the above through one consistent general mechanism based on regular expressions, without using excepti...

  20. Early Behavioral Self-Regulation, Academic Achievement, and Gender: Longitudinal Findings from France, Germany, and Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestsdottir, Steinunn; von Suchodoletz, Antje; Wanless, Shannon B.; Hubert, Blandine; Guimard, Philippe; Birgisdottir, Freyja; Gunzenhauser, Catherine; McClelland, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that behavioral self-regulation skills are critical for early school success, but few studies have explored such links among young children in Europe. This study examined the contribution of early self-regulation to academic achievement gains among children in France, Germany, and Iceland. Gender differences in behavioral…

  1. Teachers' Feedback on Homework, Homework-Related Behaviors, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José Carlos; Suárez, Natalia; Rosário, Pedro; Vallejo, Guillermo; Cerezo, Rebeca; Valle, António

    2015-01-01

    The authors intended to (a) identify the association between gender or grade level and teachers' homework (HW) feedback and (b) examine the relationship between teachers' HW feedback, HW-related behaviors (e.g., amount of HW completed), and academic achievement. Four hundred fifty-four students (Grades 5-12) participated in this study. The results…

  2. Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Individuals with a History of ASDs Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Naigles, Letitia; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) suggest that restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are particularly difficult to remediate. We examined present and past RRBs in 34 individuals who achieved optimal outcomes (OOs; lost their ASD diagnosis), 45 high-functioning individuals with ASD (HFA) and 34 typically developing (TD) peers. The OO…

  3. School Board Governance and Student Achievement: School Board Members' Perceptions of Their Behaviors and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plough, Bobbie

    2014-01-01

    The intent of this study is to determine whether there was a difference between school board members' perceptions of their own behaviors and beliefs related to student achievement in California's high-performing poverty districts as opposed to such perceptions in low-performing poverty districts. Due to the findings of this study, the author calls…

  4. Relations between Early Family Risk, Children's Behavioral Regulation, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sektnan, Michaella; McClelland, Megan M.; Acock, Alan; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined relations among early family risk, children's behavioral regulation at 54 months and kindergarten, and academic achievement in first grade using data on 1298 children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Family risk was indexed by ethnic…

  5. Determining the Effects of LMS Learning Behaviors on Academic Achievement in a Learning Analytic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet FIRAT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Two of the most important outcomes of learning analytics are predicting students’ learning and providing effective feedback. Learning Management Systems (LMS, which are widely used to support online and face-to-face learning, provide extensive research opportunities with detailed records of background data regarding users’ behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of undergraduate students’ LMS learning behaviors on their academic achievements. In line with this purpose, the participating students’ online learning behaviors in LMS were examined by using learning analytics for 14 weeks, and the relationship between students’ behaviors and their academic achievements was analyzed, followed by an analysis of their views about the influence of LMS on their academic achievement. The present study, in which quantitative and qualitative data were collected, was carried out with the explanatory mixed method. A total of 71 undergraduate students participated in the study. The results revealed that the students used LMSs as a support to face-to-face education more intensively on course days (at the beginning of the related lessons and at nights on course days and that they activated the content elements the most. Lastly, almost all the students agreed that LMSs helped increase their academic achievement only when LMSs included such features as effectiveness, interaction, reinforcement, attractive design, social media support, and accessibility.

  6. Developmental Trajectories of Academic Achievement in Chinese Children: Contributions of Early Social-Behavioral Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rui; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the developmental trajectories of academic achievement and the contributions of early social behaviors and problems to these trajectories in Chinese children. Data were collected each year in 5 consecutive years from a sample of elementary schoolchildren in China (initially N = 1,146, 609 boys, initial M [subscript age] = 8.33…

  7. English Learning Achievement and EFL Learners' Cheating Attitudes and Cheating Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mehrak; Goli, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was investigating the role of achievement in learning English as a foreign language in EFL learners' cheating attitudes and cheating behaviors. Eight hundred junior high-school students were selected based on random cluster sampling and participated in the study. Their attitudes towards academic dishonesty and their…

  8. Recent Advances in Developmental Pediatrics Related to Achievement and Social Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Wendy S.; Barabas, Gabor

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances related to the achievement and school behavior in children with tic syndromes, seizure disorders, and minor physical anomolies are discussed. The role of the school psychologist as liaison between the pupil's teacher, family, and physician is described, as well as his or her role with the children themselves. (Author/EGS)

  9. The Relation between the Academic Achievement of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders and Teacher Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Adamson, Reesha; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) are less experienced and more likely to have emergency certification than teachers of students with other disabilities. Yet, to date, research has not examined the relation between the academic achievement of students with EBD and characteristics associated with highly qualified…

  10. Relationships among Selected Personality Variables, Academic Achievement and Student Teaching Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, John W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Study investigated relationships among personality and academic achievement measures and supervisors' ratings of student teacher behaviors using undergraduate grade point average (GPA), Preprofessional Skills Test (PPST), Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), and Classroom Procedures Evaluation Form (CPEF). Results indicate significant relationships…

  11. What Leadership Behaviors Were Demonstrated by the Principal in a High Poverty, High Achieving Elementary School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, E. Hayet J.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2016-01-01

    Examined through the lens of leadership, were the behaviors of a principal as perceived by stakeholders. The following themes emerged: (1) Educating the Whole Child, with the subthemes: (a) providing basic needs; (b) academic interventions based on achievement data; (c) an emphasis on reading; (d) extended academic time; and (e) relationships; and…

  12. Relationship between Principals' Sense of Achievement and Teachers' Perceptions of Their Principals' Leadership Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Javaid Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between principals' sense of achievement and teachers' perceptions of their principals' leadership behaviors. This was determined by examining job satisfaction of principals and leadership style using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) and the School District's Climate Survey.…

  13. Socioemotional Behavior and School Achievement in Relation to Extracurricular Activity Participation in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsapelto, Riitta-Leena; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study investigated the associations of student (aged 9 to 10 years at the beginning of the study; n = 281; 51% girls) participation in extracurricular activities with teacher-rated socioemotional behavior and school achievement. MANOVA results showed that, after controlling for the grade level and the initial level of the…

  14. Academic Optimism, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, and Student Achievement at Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvercin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among academic optimism, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors (OCBs), and student achievement in college preparatory charter schools. A purposeful sample of elementary school teachers from college preparatory charter schools (N = 226) in southeast Texas was solicited to complete the…

  15. Communication Satisfaction, Organizational Citizenship Behavior and the Relationship to Student Achievement in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Gayle A.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a correlational design that allowed the researcher to examine the relationship among communication satisfaction, organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and student achievement. High school teachers were surveyed from a convenience sample of 12 school districts in Arizona. Established instruments were used to survey teachers'…

  16. Academic Optimism of High School Teachers: Its Relationship to Organizational Citizenship Behaviors and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Charles A.; DiPaola, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to build on an emergent research base for academic optimism by testing the construct and its relationship to student achievement and organizational citizenship behaviors in schools in a sample of public high schools. All participants in this study were full-time teachers, guidance counselors, and other full-time…

  17. Accountability Pressure and Non-Achievement Student Behaviors. Working Paper 122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, John B.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine how failing to make adequate yearly progress under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), and the accountability pressure that ensues, affects various non-achievement student behaviors. Using administrative data from North Carolina and leveraging a discontinuity in the determination of school failure, we examine the causal impact of…

  18. The Effect of Social Media Usage on Course Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazo, Yazan M.; Nash, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of social media usage as a classroom management tool on students' achievement and their behavior in class. Groups were determined by choosing random samples of different classes. The treatment group included the social media application "whatsapp" which all students and the instructor were asked to…

  19. Teacher Behavior, Task Engagement, and Student Achievement: A Path Analytic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Constance V.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The technique of path analysis was used to test the role of student task engagement as a mediating process variable linking teacher behavior and student achievement in mathematics and social studies classes. Study participants included 40 teacher interns and their respective second-, third-, and fifth-grade classes from a school district served by…

  20. Academic Achievements Control by Monitoring Behavioral Factors in E-learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kosonogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A control model is one or more functional relationships to tie student’s measureable parameters and test tasks to the assessment of the outcomes achieved. The control models are used to measure the level of academic achievements.The article surveys the academic achievement control models used in e-learning systems. It discusses a G. Rasch technique, which allows tracking the academic progress within the scope of the Item Response Theory. In traditional interpretation the G. Rasch model links the level of academic achievements and the level of the test task difficulties to the probability of their correct execution. This approach has been modified. A modified approach, firstly, takes into account the behavioral factors in measuring the level of achievements; secondly, it enables to include nonmonotonic variables in a mathematical G. Rasch model. Behavioral factors are thought of as acts committed by students when working in the e-learning system, for example, access to prompt messages (or tooltips, preview of browsing fragments of the learning content, skip of test tasks, etc. The article introduces quantitative metrics of these factors based on the fuzzy sets. Experiments are conducted to confirm a non-monotonic nature of the impact some behavioral factors have on the level of academic achievements.The results presented in the article are of practical application to measuring the level of academic achievements during e-learning process. Obtaining the objective quantitative assessments of academic achievements allows proceeding to the adaptive learning organization. The work is fulfilled within the framework of the Project RFMEF157714X0135.

  1. Attitudes toward E-Cigarettes, Reasons for Initiating E-Cigarette Use, and Changes in Smoking Behavior after Initiation: A Pilot Longitudinal Study of Regular Cigarette Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Carla J.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Stratton, Erin; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined 1) changes in smoking and vaping behavior and associated cotinine levels and health status among regular smokers who were first-time e-cigarette purchasers and 2) attitudes, intentions, and restrictions regarding e-cigarettes. Methods We conducted a pilot longitudinal study with assessments of the aforementioned factors and salivary cotinine at weeks 0, 4, and 8. Eligibility criteria included being ?18 years old, smoking ?25 of the last 30 days, smoking ?5 cigarettes pe...

  2. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José C; Epstein, Joyce L; Suárez, Natalia; Rosário, Pedro; Vallejo, Guillermo; Valle, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students' prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework), and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support). A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students' prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students' homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students' achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed.

  3. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Núñez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework, and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support. A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students’ prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students’ homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students’ achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed.

  4. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José C.; Epstein, Joyce L.; Suárez, Natalia; Rosário, Pedro; Vallejo, Guillermo; Valle, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework), and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support). A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated that students’ prior academic performance was significantly associated with both of the students’ homework variables, with direct and indirect results linking achievement and homework behaviors with perceived parental control and support behaviors about homework. Low-achieving students, in particular, perceived more parental control of homework in the secondary grades. These results, together with those of previous research, suggest a recursive relationship between secondary school students’ achievement and their perceptions of parental involvement in homework, which represents the process of student learning and family engagement over time. Study limitations and educational implications are discussed. PMID:28798702

  5. Adaptive regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Rasmussen, Carl Edward; Svarer, C.

    1994-01-01

    Regularization, e.g., in the form of weight decay, is important for training and optimization of neural network architectures. In this work the authors provide a tool based on asymptotic sampling theory, for iterative estimation of weight decay parameters. The basic idea is to do a gradient descent...... in the estimated generalization error with respect to the regularization parameters. The scheme is implemented in the authors' Designer Net framework for network training and pruning, i.e., is based on the diagonal Hessian approximation. The scheme does not require essential computational overhead in addition...

  6. A Test of the Reciprocal-Effects Model of Academic Achievement and Academic Self-Concept in Regular Classes and Special Classes for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Schmidt, Isabelle; Stumpf, Eva; Motschenbacher, Monika; Vogl, Katharina; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    According to the reciprocal-effects model (REM), prior academic self-concept (ASC) has a positive effect on subsequent achievement beyond what can be explained in terms of prior achievement and vice versa. The present study investigated the REM for students studying in special classes for the gifted compared to students studying in regular…

  7. The academic achievement of adolescents from immigrant families: the roles of family background, attitudes, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligni, A J

    1997-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the relative impact of family background, parental attitudes, peer support, and adolescents' own attitudes and behaviors on the academic achievement of students from immigrant families. Approximately 1,100 adolescents with Latino, East Asian, Filipino, and European backgrounds reported on their own academic attitudes and behaviors as well as those of their parents and peers. In addition, students' course grades were obtained from their official school records. Results indicated that first and second generation students received higher grades in mathematics and English than their peers from native families. Only a small portion of their success could be attributed to their socioeconomic background; a more significant correlate of their achievement was a strong emphasis on education that was shared by the students, their parents, and their peers. These demographic and psychosocial factors were also important in understanding the variation in academic performance among the immigrant students themselves.

  8. What leadership behaviors were demonstrated by the principal in a high poverty, high achieving elementary school?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hayet J. Woods

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Examined through the lens of leadership, were the behaviors of a principal as perceived by stakeholders. The following themes emerged: (1 Educating the Whole Child, with the subthemes: (a providing basic needs; (b academic interventions based on achievement data; (c an emphasis on reading; (d extended academic time; and (e relationships; and (2 Synergy of Expectations, with the subthemes: (a consistent student expectations; (b increased staff accountability; and (c community involvement. The researchers found that the principal by demonstrating behaviors as a change agent, a creator of vision, and a provider of necessary support and strategies, rather than adopting numerous programs, the school personnel were able to increase and sustain academic achievement of the students of poverty as well as their peers. Implications for principal practices, along with leadership preparatory programs are significant.

  9. Perceptions of Relatedness with Classroom Peers Promote Adolescents' Behavioral Engagement and Achievement in Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Ruzek, Erik A; Hafen, Christopher A; Gregory, Anne; Allen, Joseph P

    2017-11-01

    Secondary school is a vulnerable time where stagnation or declines in classroom behavioral engagement occur for many students, and peer relationships take on a heightened significance. We examined the implications of adolescents' perceptions of relatedness with classroom peers for their academic learning. Participants were 1084 adolescents (53% female) in 65 middle and high school classrooms. Multilevel cross-lagged path analyses found that adolescents' perceived relatedness with classroom peers subsequently predicted their increased self-reported behavioral engagement in that classroom from fall to winter and again from winter to spring. Higher engagement in spring predicted higher end of year objective achievement test scores after statistical control of prior year test scores. Implications are discussed for increasing classroom peer relatedness to enhance adolescents' achievement.

  10. Self-regulated Learning Behavior of College Students of Art and Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cuixin

    This study focuses on the relationship between self-regulated learning behavior and their academic achievement of college students of art. The results show that for students of art, the involvements in self-efficacy, intrinsic value and cognitive strategies are closely tied to their performance in the examination. However, test anxiety, as a negative emotional factor is negatively correlated with academic performance. And among the five variables, self-efficacy has the strongest influence on students of art's academic performance.

  11. How Do Student Prior Achievement and Homework Behaviors Relate to Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework?

    OpenAIRE

    José C. Núñez; Epstein, Joyce L.; Natalia Suárez; Pedro Rosário; Guillermo Vallejo; Antonio Valle

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students’ prior achievement is related to their homework behaviors (i.e., time spent on homework, homework time management, and amount of homework), and to their perceptions of parental involvement in homework (i.e., parental control and parental support). A total of 1250 secondary students from 7 to 10th grade participated in the study. Structural equation models were fitted to the data, compared, and a partial mediation model was chosen. The results indicated tha...

  12. Contributions of Hot and Cool Self-Regulation to Preschool Disruptive Behavior and Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    WILLOUGHBY Michael; Kupersmidt, Janis; Voegler-Lee, Mare; Bryant, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The construct of self-regulation can be meaningfully distinguished into hot and cool components. The current study investigated self-regulation in a sample of 926 children aged 3–5 years old. Children’s performance on self-regulatory tasks was best described by two latent factors representing hot and cool regulation. When considered alone, hot and cool regulation were both significantly correlated with disruptive behavior and academic achievement. When considered together, cool regulation was...

  13. Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior With Adolescent Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Marko T Kantomaa; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpaa, Anna; Kajantie, Eero; Taanila, Anja; Tammelin, Tuija

    2016-01-01

    The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (N?=?8,061) was used to investigated the joint associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with academic achievement. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate how classes formed by latent class analysis (LCA) according to overall physical activity, sports club membership, viewing TV, using a computer, reading books and magazines, other sedentary activities, and sleep were associated with grade?point average. When adjusted for gender...

  14. Participation in regular leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes not meeting Canadian guidelines: the influence of intention, perceived behavioral control, and moral norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, François; Godin, Gaston

    2014-12-01

    Most people with type 2 diabetes do not engage in regular leisure-time physical activity. The theory of planned behavior and moral norm construct can enhance our understanding of physical activity intention and behavior among this population. This study aims to identify the determinants of both intention and behavior to participate in regular leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes who not meet Canada's physical activity guidelines. By using secondary data analysis of a randomized computer-tailored print-based intervention, participants (n = 200) from the province of Quebec (Canada) completed and returned a baseline questionnaire measuring their attitude, perceived behavioral control, and moral norm. One month later, they self-reported their level of leisure-time physical activity. A hierarchical regression equation showed that attitude (beta = 0.10, P leisure-time physical activity (R (2) = 0.22, P leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Development of Robots with Soft Sensor Flesh for Achieving Close Interaction Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Yoshikai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve robots' working around humans, safe contacts against objects, humans, and environments with broad area of their body should be allowed. Furthermore, it is desirable to actively use those contacts for achieving tasks. Considering that, many practical applications will be realized by whole-body close interaction of many contacts with others. Therefore, robots are strongly expected to achieve whole-body interaction behavior with objects around them. Recently, it becomes possible to construct whole-body tactile sensor network by the advancement of research for tactile sensing system. Using such tactile sensors, some research groups have developed robots with whole-body tactile sensing exterior. However, their basic strategy is making a distributed 1-axis tactile sensor network covered with soft thin material. Those are not sufficient for achieving close interaction and detecting complicated contact changes. Therefore, we propose “Soft Sensor Flesh.” Basic idea of “Soft Sensor Flesh” is constructing robots' exterior with soft and thick foam with many sensor elements including multiaxis tactile sensors. In this paper, a constructing method for the robot systems with such soft sensor flesh is argued. Also, we develop some prototypes of soft sensor flesh and verify the feasibility of the proposed idea by actual behavior experiments.

  16. Aggressive behavior and its associations with posttraumatic stress and academic achievement following a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brandon G; Lapré, Genevieve E; Marsee, Monica A; Weems, Carl F

    2014-01-01

    Despite an abundance of evidence linking maltreatment and violence-related trauma exposure to externalizing problems in youth, there is surprisingly little evidence to support a direct link between disaster exposure and youth aggressive behavior. This study tested the theory that there is primarily an indirect association between disaster exposure and aggression via posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The current study also examined the association between aggression and academic achievement. A sample of 191 4th- to 8th-grade minority youth who experienced Hurricane Katrina were assessed for aggressive behavior using the Peer Conflict Scale (PCS), disaster exposure, PTSD symptoms, and academic achievement. Structural equation modeling of the set of associations was consistent with the theory suggesting that there is an indirect link between disaster exposure and aggression through PTSD symptoms. Aggression was negatively associated with academic achievement, and modeling indicated that the set of associations was age and gender invariant. Findings advance the theoretical understanding of the linkage between aggression and disaster exposure. Findings also support the utility of the PCS in disaster research and the link between PCS scores and academic achievement.

  17. Gender-typed behaviors, achievement, and adjustment among racially and ethnically diverse boys during early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Carlos E; Galligan, Kathrine; Pahlke, Erin; Fabes, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the relations between adherence to gender-typed behaviors in boys' friendships, achievement, and self-esteem. Participants were racially and ethnically diverse adolescent boys in grade 8 (Mage  = 13.05; range = 12-14). The study was completed at a public junior high school that offered both single- and mixed-gender classes. Data were collected in 2 waves, the first wave in fall of 2010 and the second in spring of 2011. At each wave, participants completed assessments of gender concepts and self-esteem. Standardized tests scores from the end of the previous academic year and the end of the year of the study were utilized. Results revealed that the boys' adherence to physical toughness behaviors in their friendships was negatively associated with math standardized test scores and self-esteem from Time I to Time II. Indirect effects analyses revealed a relation between boys' adherence to emotional stoicism behaviors in friendships and math achievement and self-esteem via boys' adherence to physical toughness behaviors. Implications of these findings and the links between masculinity, boys' friendships, performance in school, and psychological adjustment are discussed. © 2013 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  18. Student perceptions of their biology teacher's interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade Clay, Jr.

    The primary goals of this dissertation were to determine the relationships between interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes. The instrument used to collect student perceptions of teacher interpersonal teaching behaviors was the Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI). The instrument used to assess student affective learning outcomes was the Biology Student Affective Instrument (BSAI). The interpersonal teaching behavior data were collected using students as the observers. 111 students in an urban influenced, rural high school answered the QTI and BSAI in September 1997 and again in April 1998. At the same time students were pre and post tested using the Biology End of Course Examination (BECE). The QTI has been used primarily in European and Oceanic areas. The instrument was also primarily used in educational stratified environment. This was the first time the BSAI was used to assess student affective learning outcomes. The BECE is a Texas normed cognitive assessment test and it is used by Texas schools districts as the end of course examination in biology. The interpersonal teaching behaviors model was tested to ascertain if predictive power in the USA and in a non-stratified educational environment. Findings indicate that the QTI is an adequate predictor of student achievement in biology. The results were not congruent with the non-USA data and results, this indicates that the QTI is a society/culturally sensitive instrument and the instrument needs to be normed to a particular society/culture before it is used to affect teachers' and students' educational environments.

  19. Attitudes toward E-Cigarettes, Reasons for Initiating E-Cigarette Use, and Changes in Smoking Behavior after Initiation: A Pilot Longitudinal Study of Regular Cigarette Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Dana Boyd; Stratton, Erin; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined 1) changes in smoking and vaping behavior and associated cotinine levels and health status among regular smokers who were first-time e-cigarette purchasers and 2) attitudes, intentions, and restrictions regarding e-cigarettes. Methods We conducted a pilot longitudinal study with assessments of the aforementioned factors and salivary cotinine at weeks 0, 4, and 8. Eligibility criteria included being ≥18 years old, smoking ≥25 of the last 30 days, smoking ≥5 cigarettes per day (cpd), smoking regularly ≥1 year, and not having started using e-cigarettes. Of 72 individuals screened, 40 consented, 36 completed the baseline survey, and 83.3% and 72.2% were retained at weeks 4 and 8, respectively. Results Participants reduced cigarette consumption from baseline to week 4 and 8 (p’s < 0.001); 23.1% reported no cigarette use in the past month at week 8. There was no significant decrease in cotinine from baseline to week 4 or 8 (p’s = ns). At week 8, the majority reported improved health (65.4%), reduced smoker’s cough (57.7%), and improved sense of smell (53.8%) and taste (50.0%). The majority believed that e-cigarettes versus regular cigarettes have fewer health risks (97.2%) and that e-cigarettes have been shown to help smokers quit (80.6%) and reduce cigarette consumption (97.2%). In addition, the majority intended to use e-cigarettes as a complete replacement for regular cigarettes (69.4%) and reported no restriction on e-cigarette use in the home (63.9%) or car (80.6%). Conclusions Future research is needed to document the long-term impact on smoking behavior and health among cigarette smokers who initiate use of e-cigarettes. PMID:25621193

  20. Recognition of long-term behaviors by parsing sequences of short-term actions with a stochastic regular grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanromà, G.; Burghouts, G.J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    Human behavior understanding from visual data has applications such as threat recognition. A lot of approaches are restricted to limited time actions, which we call short-term actions. Long-term behaviors are sequences of short-term actions that are more extended in time. Our hypothesis is that they

  1. Regular polytopes

    CERN Document Server

    Coxeter, H S M

    1973-01-01

    Polytopes are geometrical figures bounded by portions of lines, planes, or hyperplanes. In plane (two dimensional) geometry, they are known as polygons and comprise such figures as triangles, squares, pentagons, etc. In solid (three dimensional) geometry they are known as polyhedra and include such figures as tetrahedra (a type of pyramid), cubes, icosahedra, and many more; the possibilities, in fact, are infinite! H. S. M. Coxeter's book is the foremost book available on regular polyhedra, incorporating not only the ancient Greek work on the subject, but also the vast amount of information

  2. Educational achievement, personality, and behavior: assessment, factor structure and implications for theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Tim W; Perryman, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to first examine the evidence regarding the factor structure of educational achievement tests in the context of two theoretical models of cognitive ability (psychometric g and mutualism) that have been proposed to explain this structure as well as the underlying processes that may be responsible for its emergence in dimensionality studies. Then, the factor structure underlying a sample of the standardized educational achievement tests used by California in its statewide school accountability program was compared to those emerging from a selection of behavioral and personality assessments. As expected, the educational achievement tests exhibited a strong and uniformly positive manifold resulting in greater unidimensionality as evidenced by a dominant general factor in bi-factor analysis then either the personality or behavioral assessments. The implications of these structural differences are discussed with respect to the two theoretical perspective as well as in the context of formative and summative educational inferences in particular, and the school accountability and reform movement in general.

  3. Achievement Goals and Their Relations to Children's Disruptive Behaviors in an After-School Physical Activity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2010-01-01

    This study used a trichotomous achievement goal model to explore and describe what actually happened in terms of students' achievement goals and disruptive behaviors in an after-school physical activity program. Participants included 158 students in grades 3-6. They completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals and disruptive…

  4. Behavior problems and children’s academic achievement: A test of growth-curve models with gender and racial differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kristen P.; Flower, Andrea; Huang, Jin; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between externalizing and internalizing behavior and children’s academic achievement, particularly in terms of whether these variables varied as a function of gender and race. Data pertaining to externalizing and internalizing behavior, academic achievement, gender, and race from three waves of the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 2028) were used. Results indicate that behavior problems had a negative relationship with academic performance and some of these associations endured over time. Externalizing behavior impacted reading scores more negatively for females compared to males at baseline, but the impact of externalizing behavior on long-term reading outcomes did not vary by gender. Externalizing behavior impacted reading scores more negatively for Black children than White children at multiple points in time. Differences between males, females, Black, and White children concerning behavior and achievement are explained. Implications, limitations, and ideas for future research are also presented. PMID:28529397

  5. Residential Mobility and Adolescent Achievement and Behavior: Understanding Timing and Extent of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sara; Leventhal, Tama

    2017-06-01

    Residential mobility is generally viewed as an adverse event for adolescents' development. Less is known about whether moving during adolescence, childhood, or both periods explains this connection and whether the extent of mobility matters. Analytic shortcomings with much of the research call into question extant findings. We examined associations between childhood, adolescent, and child-adolescent mobility and adolescents' achievement (math and reading) and behavior problems (internalizing and externalizing). With a multisite, longitudinal sample (N = 1,056), we employed propensity score methods, which mitigate concerns about selection bias on observed variables, to investigate relationships. Results suggest that multiple, child-adolescent movers had more internalizing problems in adolescence than their stable peers, but did not differ on externalizing problems or achievement. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  6. The Association Between Student Reports of Classmates’ Disruptive Behavior and Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Blank

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Classroom disciplinary climate and its correlation to students’ performance is a widely debated issue. Policy reports tend to assume that classroom disruptions interfere with the learning experience. Empirical evidence for this assumption, however, which carefully distinguishes classroom climate from the school climate in general, is still wanting. This study examines the relation between student reports regarding disciplinary infractions to student achievement, with a special focus on classroom disruptions. Multilevel regressions were used to estimate the contribution of classroom and school disciplinary infractions on eighth-grade students’ test scores. Reports of disruptive behavior proved to correlate negatively with test scores, whereas the effect of other school and classroom characteristics, including teachers’ attitudes and school disciplinary policy, were insignificant (controlling for students’ prior achievements. We conclude that a disruptive classroom climate can hinder the learning process and lower the achievement of the entire class, regardless of the conduct of any particular student. Therefore, a special focus on disruptions in the classroom, in contradistinction with school disciplinary climate in general—which is lacking in most studies—emerges as instrumental to the understanding of how school climate relates to student achievement.

  7. Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior With Adolescent Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kajantie, Eero; Taanila, Anja; Tammelin, Tuija

    2016-09-01

    The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (N = 8,061) was used to investigated the joint associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with academic achievement. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate how classes formed by latent class analysis (LCA) according to overall physical activity, sports club membership, viewing TV, using a computer, reading books and magazines, other sedentary activities, and sleep were associated with grade-point average. When adjusted for gender, self-rated health, and mother's education, physically active adolescents and generally active adolescents were about twice as likely to have high grade-point average compared with sedentary TV viewers.

  8. Relations between Age, Autism Severity, Behavioral Treatment and the Amount of Time in Regular Education Classrooms among Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Tasneem L.

    2012-01-01

    Under federal law, students with disabilities have the right to be educated in classrooms with students without disabilities. For students with autism, social, communication, and behavioral deficits make inclusion difficult. The severity of deficits change over time, and therefore, so too do the effects of these deficits upon inclusion. Although…

  9. Inattention Symptoms Are Associated With Academic Achievement Mostly Through Variance Shared With Intrinsic Motivation and Behavioral Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, André; Martinussen, Rhonda

    2015-06-05

    The main goal of the current study is to investigate whether intrinsic motivation and behavioral engagement mediate the association between inattention symptoms and academic achievement (reading, writing, and mathematics), as well as to document the extent to which inattention symptoms contribute to academic achievement due to variance overlapping with intrinsic motivation and behavioral engagement. Participants were 92 children (Grades 1-4). Data were gathered using a combination of parent and teacher reports as well as objective assessments. Results did not support the mediating role of intrinsic motivation and behavioral engagement. A commonality analysis showed that 77.44% to 82.10% of the variance explained in each academic achievement domains was due to variance shared by inattention symptoms, intrinsic motivation, and behavioral engagement. These results suggest more commonality than differences between inattention symptoms, intrinsic motivation, and behavioral engagement with regard to their association with academic achievement. The implications of these findings are discussed. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  10. Student Perceptions of Their Biology Teacher's Interpersonal Teaching Behaviors and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madike, Victor N.

    Inadequate student-teacher interactions in undergraduate courses have been linked to poor student performance. Researchers have noted that students' perceptions of student-teacher relationships may be an important factor related to student performance. The administration of a Mid-Atlantic community college prioritized increasing undergraduate biology student performance. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the relationship between students' biology achievement and their perceptions of interpersonal teaching behaviors and student-teacher interactions in introductory biology courses. Leary's theory on interpersonal communication and the systems communication theory of Watzlawick, Beavin, and Jackson served as the theoretical foundation. The Wubbel's Likert-scale questionnaire on student-teacher interactions was administered to 318 undergraduate biology students. Non-parametric Spearman's rank correlations revealed a significant direct correlation between students' grades and their perceptions of teachers' interpersonal teaching behaviors. The relationship between student achievement and students' perceptions of student-teacher interactions prompted the recommendation for additional study on the importance of student-teacher interactions in undergraduate programs. A recommendation for local practice included faculty development on strategies for improving student-teacher interactions. The study's implications for positive social change include increased understanding for administrators and instructors on the importance of teacher-student interactions at the community college level.

  11. Online Self-Regulatory Learning Behaviors as a Mediator in the Relationship between Online Course Perceptions with Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Valerie Paton; Lucy Barnard; William Lan

    2008-01-01

    Positive perceptions of online course communication and collaboration have been associated with better academic outcomes, while self-regulatory learning behaviors have also been linked to academic achievement and other positive learning outcomes. In the current study, we examined whether self-regulatory learning behaviors may be considered as mediating the relationship between student perceptions of online course communication and collaboration with academic achievement as measured by grade p...

  12. Effects of the family-school cooperation on student social behavior and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation between a family and school makes provisions for solving problems students face in their interpersonal relations and academic achievement. We are singling out a view of the effects of a micro-system on child's development, which states that immediate interrelations in a micro-system - a family - can effect interrelations in another micro-system -peer groups - or can effect academic achievement. The majority of authors agree that modes and spheres of influences that family exerts are numerous and diverse and that they depend on characteristics of a broader social and cultural community where a child is growing up as well as on parents' abilities and preparations. How successful the family-school cooperation will be is largely determined by teacher's personality and the way he/she is communicating with parents. A joint planning and implementation of decisions reached, identical norms of behavior, commonly adopted goals are a prerequisite for a child's normal development. It is pointed out that school should plan and organize its activities (courses, seminars, forums lectures, discussions, so as to popularize knowledge of pedagogy and psychology among parents as well as teacher training in communication competence.

  13. Evaluating an Adolescent Behavioral Program: Leadership, Education, Achievement, and Development for Adolescent Female Offenders in Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosky, Denise M; Shelton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a pilot study designed to: test the feasibility of implementation, assess implementation barriers, and determine the effectiveness of a modified evidence-based program designed for adolescent female offenders in a women's correctional facility in the United States. A therapeutic expressive arts behavioral program, Leadership, Education, Achievement and Development (LEAD), has been used in community settings as a health promotion program. This behavioral program was adapted to LEAD-Corrections (LEAD-C) and serves incarcerated adolescent female offenders. Results of this pilot study show that it is feasible to offer LEAD-C in a correctional setting. Positive effects were noted on session satisfaction surveys as well as formative and summative evaluations. Implementation of LEAD-C, using therapeutic expressive arts interventions, included coping strategies to help adolescents become confident and self-assured and review better choices. Adolescents were taught to utilize these learned coping strategies in their life, which may help to overcome adversity, enhance resilience, and support youth transition at the time of reentry to the community.

  14. The role of parents in the ontogeny of achievement-related motivation and behavioral choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Sandra D

    2015-06-01

    Parents believe what they do matters. But, how does it matter? How do parents' beliefs about their children early on translate into the choices those children make as adolescents? The Eccles' expectancy–value model asserts that parents' beliefs about their children during childhood predict adolescents' achievement-related choices through a sequence of processes that operate in a cumulative, cascading fashion over time. Specifically, parents' beliefs predict parents' behaviors that predict their children's motivational beliefs. Those beliefs predict children's subsequent choices. Using data from the Childhood and Beyond Study (92% European American; N = 723), we tested these predictions in the activity domains of sports, instrumental music, mathematics, and reading across a 12-year period. In testing these predictions, we looked closely at the idea of reciprocal influences and at the role of child gender as a moderator. The cross-lagged models generally supported the bidirectional influences described in Eccles' expectancy-value model. Furthermore, the findings demonstrated that: (a) these relations were stronger in the leisure domains than in the academic domains, (b) these relations did not consistently vary based on youth gender, (c) parents were stronger predictors of their children's beliefs than vice versa, and (d) adolescents' beliefs were stronger predictors of their behaviors than the reverse. The findings presented in this monograph extend our understanding of the complexity of families, developmental processes that unfold over time, and the extent to which these processes are universal across domains and child gender.

  15. Behaviors of Teachers and Their Students in Schools with and without an Achievement Gap: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Nancy J.; Carroll, Kimberly L.; Jones, Cathy R.; Costner, Richard H.; Sheehan, Heather C.; Hunt, Gilbert H.

    2017-01-01

    This research shares findings from a year-long observational study to determine if there were significant differences in the identified behaviors of teachers and students in fourth and seventh grade classrooms in schools with an achievement gap versus those with no achievement gap. Specific research questions addressed types of instructional…

  16. UNFOLDED REGULAR AND SEMI-REGULAR POLYHEDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONIŢĂ Elena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a presentation unfolding regular and semi-regular polyhedra. Regular polyhedra are convex polyhedra whose faces are regular and equal polygons, with the same number of sides, and whose polyhedral angles are also regular and equal. Semi-regular polyhedra are convex polyhedra with regular polygon faces, several types and equal solid angles of the same type. A net of a polyhedron is a collection of edges in the plane which are the unfolded edges of the solid. Modeling and unfolding Platonic and Arhimediene polyhedra will be using 3dsMAX program. This paper is intended as an example of descriptive geometry applications.

  17. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V.; Onyper, Serge V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. Methods: We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the “Owl-Lark” Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010–2011 through 2013–2014. Results: Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Conclusions: Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. Citation: Thacher PV, Onyper SV. Longitudinal outcomes of start time delay on sleep, behavior, and achievement in high school. SLEEP 2016;39(2):271–281. PMID

  18. Correlation between depression and eating attitudes and behaviors among those who performed regular physical activitiesDüzenli fiziksel aktivite yapan bireylerde depresyon ve yeme tutum ve davranışları ilişkisi

    OpenAIRE

    İrfan Yıldırım; Özkan Işık; Gözde Ersöz; Melek Büyükkök; Güler Zengin; Özge Özel

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at identifying correlational status between depression level and eating attitudes and behaviors among those who performed regular physical activities. The study designed in descriptive model was done with relational screening model. The sample of the study was composed of 294 individuals who performed regular physical activities at least three days a week in Afyonkarahisar Province. The data of the study were collected using a questionnaire consisted of Personal Inform...

  19. The influence of adolescent eating disorders or disordered eating behaviors on socioeconomic achievement in early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabler, Jennifer; Utz, Rebecca L

    2015-09-01

    Much research documents the etiology and health consequences of adolescent eating disorders (ED), but very little is known about the long-term effects of EDs on the transition to adulthood. This study explores gender differences in the influence of EDs or disordered eating behaviors (DEB) on measures of socioeconomic independence in early adulthood. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), this study compares individuals who self-identified as have been diagnosed with an ED or engaged in DEBs in late adolescence to those without ED or DEB on three measures of socioeconomic independence during early adulthood, including educational attainment, income, and likelihood of owning a home. This study uses multiple regression techniques and attempts to account for early-life conditions and health outcomes associated with EDs and DEBs. For females, ED or DEB in late adolescence had a statistically significant, negative association with educational attainment (coefficient = -0.20, p = .05), personal income (coefficient = -0.12, p adulthood. For males, ED or DEB was not associated with socioeconomic attainment. Our findings suggest that EDs and DEBs are negatively associated with socioeconomic achievement during early adulthood for females, but not for males. EDs or DEBs during adolescence may set individuals on a different trajectory whereby they do not have the same life chances or opportunities for success in adulthood. These results confirm the public health message that EDs or DEBs have lasting negative consequences for women. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Male Undergraduates' HPV Vaccination Behavior: Implications for Achieving HPV-Associated Cancer Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lust, Katherine; Vang, Suzanne; Desai, Jay

    2018-02-22

    Despite the availability of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for males, uptake of the vaccine has been low, particularly among young adult males. This study aimed to investigate the levels of HPV vaccination and predictors of HPV vaccine completion in college men ages 18-26. We analyzed data from the 2015 College Student Health Survey, which was administered at 17 post-secondary institutions in Midwest areas. We included only responses from male participants who were ages 18-26 years old, resulting in a sample size of 2516. We used Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization to guide our study design. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine predictors of HPV vaccine receipt. College-aged males in our sample had a HPV vaccine completion rate of 50.0%. Male students who were younger, had at least one parent who held a graduate degree, had initiated sex, and were enrolled at a private 4-year institution were more likely to have been vaccinated. These findings suggest that HPV vaccination in college-aged men are low. Efforts are needed to increase HPV vaccination in male students who are older, from lower socioeconomic statuses, have not initiated sex, and enrolled at public institutions. Findings also indicate important gender disparities in vaccine uptake that must be addressed in order to achieve optimal vaccine uptake in college-aged males.

  1. The Impact of Prolonged Participation in a Pro-Social Cognitive Behavioral Skills Program on Elementary Age Students, with Behavior Related Disorders, Behavior Accelerative, Behavior Reductive, and Return to Regular Classroom Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Ted H.

    2012-01-01

    Overall, pretest-posttest results indicated statistically significant pretest beginning program compared to posttest ending program percentage of behavioral improvement for on task, following directions, and positive interactions outcomes improvement for individual students who completed the elementary grades pro-social cognitive behavioral skills…

  2. Aggressive behavior, protective factors and academic achievement at students inside and outside the system of institutional care

    OpenAIRE

    Maretić Edita; Sindik Joško

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the differences between the aspects of aggressive behavior, their strengths (protective factors) in the prevention of behavioral disorders and academic achievement, in children within and out of institutional forms of education. The study was conducted on a sample of 264 students in seventh and eighth class of elementary school, of whom 134 were in institutional care, while 130 were outside the institutional forms of education. Data were collected by a qu...

  3. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in

  4. Mathematics Achievement and Anxiety and Their Relation to Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah S.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Escovar, Emily; Menon, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Although behavioral difficulties are well documented in reading disabilities, little is known about the relationship between math ability and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Here, we use standardized measures to investigate the relation among early math ability, math anxiety, and internalizing and externalizing behaviors in a group of…

  5. Socioeconomic Context and Emotional-Behavioral Achievement Links: Concurrent and Prospective Associations among Low- and High-Income Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansary, Nadia S.; McMahon, Thomas J.; Luthar, Suniya S.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal associations in the relationship between emotional-behavioral difficulty and academic achievement were explored in 2 samples followed from 6th through 8th grade. The first sample comprised 280 students entering an economically disadvantaged urban middle school and the second comprised 318 students entering an affluent suburban middle…

  6. Principals' Self-Perceived Transformational Leadership Behaviors and Academic Achievement in South Carolina Public Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Je-Nata Kennedy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the relationship between principals' perceptions of their transformational leadership behaviors and academic achievement in the areas of reading, math, science, and social studies in South Carolina public elementary schools. The theoretical framework for this research was provided…

  7. Relationship of Second-Year College Student Wellness Behaviors to Academic Achievement by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate second-year college student wellness behaviors and their relationship to academic achievement. The ten constructs of wellness within Hettler's model of wellness are physical fitness, nutrition, self-care and safety, environmental wellness, social awareness, emotional awareness and sexuality, emotional…

  8. Mindset, Motivation and Metaphor in School and Sport: Bifurcated Beliefs and Behavior in Two Different Achievement Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    The belief that a trait can be cultivated with effort, known as an "incremental theory or growth mindset," promotes behavior that leads to higher levels of achievement, such as the enthusiastic embrace of challenges and resilience to obstacles. Roughly 40% of the general student population in the United States, however, conceptualizes…

  9. Measuring the Relationship between Parent, Teacher, and Student Problem Behavior Reports and Academic Achievement: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kaprea; Hannon, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between academic achievement and reports of student problem behavior from teachers, parents, and child self-reports. Participants included 108 teachers, 113 parents/caregivers, and 129 students from an urban school in the Northeast region of the United States. Results suggest parent and child reports were…

  10. A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Parental Influence on Female Adolescents' Achievement Beliefs and Behaviors in Sport and School Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Jennifer A.; Weiss, Maureen R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about parental socialization processes for youth participants from different cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine parental influence on self-perceptions, task values, and achievement behaviors among female adolescents from two cultures using Eccles' expectancy-value theory (Eccles et al., 1983). Twelve…

  11. Academic Achievements, Behavioral Problems, and Loneliness as Predictors of Social Skills among Students with and without Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Sima; Yazdi-Ugav, Orly; Zeev, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine to what extent academic achievements, learning disorders, behavior problems and loneliness explain the variance of students' social skills. The differences between students diagnosed with learning disorders and students without learning disorders in all four variables were examined. Participants were 733 elementary…

  12. Behavioral Engagement and Reading Achievement in Elementary-School-Age Children: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Sun, Shuyan; Breit-Smith, Allison; Morrison, Frederick J.; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, this study examined the cross-lagged relations between behavioral engagement and reading achievement in elementary school and whether these cross-lagged relations differed between low-socioeconomic status (SES) and mid-…

  13. Dressed for Success? The Effect of School Uniforms on Student Achievement and Behavior. NBER Working Paper No. 17337

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Elisabetta; Imberman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Uniform use in public schools is rising, but we know little about how they affect students. Using a unique dataset from a large urban school district in the southwest United States, we assess how uniforms affect behavior, achievement and other outcomes. Each school in the district determines adoption independently, providing variation over schools…

  14. The Relationship of Participation in Extracurricular Activities to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Student Behavior in a Nebraska School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible relationships between participation in extracurricular activities and student achievement, participation in extracurricular activities and attendance, and participation in extracurricular activities and behavior. The setting for this study was a high school in western Nebraska. Data for 275 of the…

  15. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in adolescents, (2) how do they affect their school performances and (3) are they improved by a Health Promoting School intervention that applies a Whole School Approach? Firstly, it was studied how healt...

  16. The Effect of General Objectives Defined by Behavioral Objectives on Achievement in a College Zoology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushin, John W.; Baller, William

    1981-01-01

    Tests the effect of developmental level objectives on student achievement and efficiency in a zoology course. These objectives were found to have no significant effect on achievement, but they did significantly increase student efficiency in learning the content material of the module. (Author)

  17. The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

    2013-09-30

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

  18. Dimensions of Principal Support Behaviors and Their Relationship to Organizational Citizenship Behaviors and Student Achievement in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed with the primary purpose of identifying the dimensions of principal support perceived by public high school teachers in Virginia and identifying the relationship between principal support and organizational citizenship behaviors. In addition, this study also examined the relationship between principal support and student…

  19. Do health and education agencies in the United States share responsibility for academic achievement and health? A review of 25 years of evidence about the relationship of adolescents' academic achievement and health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly J; Greene, Amy C

    2013-05-01

    The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention monitors health-risk behaviors of adolescents in United States, which include (1) violence; (2) tobacco use; (3) alcohol and other drug use; (4) sexual behaviors contributing to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases; (5) inadequate physical activity; and (6) unhealthy dietary behaviors. We reviewed original research published in peer-reviewed journals between 1985 and 2010 to synthesize evidence about the association of adolescent health-risk behaviors and academic achievement. Using predetermined selection criteria, 122 articles were included that used at least one variable for health-risk behaviors and also for academic achievement. For all six health-risk behaviors, 96.6% of the studies reported statistically significant inverse relationships between health-risk behaviors and academic achievement. With this persuasive evidence about the interrelationship of health-risk behaviors and academic achievement, it is imperative that leaders in education and health act together to make wise investments in our nation's school-age youth that will benefit the entire population. A unified system that addresses both health behavior and academic achievement would have reciprocal and synergistic effects on the health and academic achievement not only of children and adolescents, but also of adults in the United States. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. USE OF VIDEOGAMES AND COMPUTER GAMES: INFLUENCES ON ATTENTION, MEMORY, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND PROBLEMS BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Harold Germán Rodríguez Celis; Marithza Sandoval Escobar

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the relationship between video and computergames use on attention, memory, academic performance and problemsbehavior in school children in Bogotá. Memory and attention were assessedusing a set of different scales of ENI Battery (Matute, Rosselli, Ardila, & Ostrosky-Solís, 2007). For Academic performance, school newsletters were used.Behavioral problems were assessed through the CBCL / 6 -18 questionnaire(Child Behavior Checklist) of (Achenbach & Edelbrock, ...

  1. Is behavioral audiometry achievable in infants younger than 6 months of age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaroche, Monique; Gavilan-Cellié, Isabelle; Maurice-Tison, Sylvie; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Dauman, René

    2011-12-01

    When carried out in addition to objective tests, behavioral audiometry performed in children with the so-called "Delaroche protocol" [IJORL 68 (2004) 1233-1243] enables to determine hearing thresholds by air and bone conduction over the whole auditory frequency range. In the present report, seventy-three hearing-impaired infants with different levels of motor and cognitive development were tested behaviorally before 6 months of age. Reliability of these early determined behavioral thresholds was then after analyzed using: (a) cross-sectional study, and (b) longitudinal study. Cross-sectional study compared click-evoked ABR thresholds in the better ear with binaural high-frequency hearing thresholds. In longitudinal study, early measured binaural hearing thresholds from 500 through 4000 Hz were reassessed at 18 months. In 13% of babies behavioral testing was not fully completed by 6 months of age. Nevertheless, both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies yielded intraclass correlation coefficients above 0.80, suggesting that behavioral testing is applicable to this very young population. Assessment of hearing after newborn screening should not be restricted to objective tests before 5 ½ months. It should also include bone- and air-conduction behavioral tests adjusted to developmental stage and performed in presence of parents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regular Moderate or Intense Exercise Prevents Depression-Like Behavior without Change of Hippocampal Tryptophan Content in Chronically Tryptophan-Deficient and Stressed Mice: e66996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosung Lee; Makoto Ohno; Shigeo Ohta; Toshio Mikami

    2013-01-01

      Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT...

  3. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Hosung; Ohno, Makoto; Ohta, Shigeo; Mikami, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT...

  4. A cross-cultural perspective of parental influence on female adolescents' achievement beliefs and behaviors in sport and school domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Jennifer A; Weiss, Maureen R

    2010-12-01

    Little is known about parental socialization processes for youth participants from different cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine parental influence on self-perceptions, task values, and achievement behaviors among female adolescents from two cultures using Eccles' expectancy-value theory (Eccles et al., 1983). Twelve Anglo Canadian and nine East Indian female adolescents were interviewed about perceptions of parental influence on expectancy-value constructs for sport and academic domains. Inductive and deductive content analyses were performed to identify lower and higher order themes from interview responses. Similarities and differences in perceived parental influence emerged for girls of both cultural groups and in both domains. Our findings support links among expectancy-value constructs and highlight cultural variations in parental socialization of achievement cognitions and behaviors in multiple domains.

  5. The family environment predicts long-term academic achievement and classroom behavior following traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durber, Chelsea M; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how the family environment predicts long-term academic and behavioral functioning in school following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood. Using a concurrent cohort, prospective design, 15 children with severe TBI, 39 with moderate TBI, and 70 with orthopedic injury (OI) who were injured when they were 3-7 years of age were compared on tests of academic achievement and parent and teacher ratings of school performance and behavior on average 6.83 years postinjury. Soon after injury and at the longer term follow-up, families completed measures of parental psychological distress, family functioning, and quality of the home environment. Hierarchical linear regression analyses examined group differences in academic outcomes and their associations with measures of the early and later family environment. The severe TBI group, but not the moderate TBI group, performed worse than did the OI group on all achievement tests, parent ratings of academic performance, and teacher ratings of internalizing problems. Higher quality early and late home environments predicted stronger academic skills and better classroom behavior for children with both TBI and OI. The early family environment more consistently predicted academic achievement, whereas the later family environment more consistently predicted classroom functioning. The quality of the home environment predicted academic outcomes more strongly than did parental psychological distress or family functioning. TBI in early childhood has long-term consequences for academic achievement and school performance and behavior. Higher quality early and later home environments predict better school outcomes for both children with TBI and children with OI. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Quality After-School Programming and Its Relationship to Achievement-Related Behaviors and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Annemarie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between quality social support networks developed through high quality afterschool programming and achievement amongst middle school and high school aged youth. This study seeks to develop a deeper understanding of how quality after-school programs influence a youth's developmental…

  7. Effects of Cooperative Versus Individualized Instruction on Student Prosocial Behavior, Attitudes Toward Learning, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of structuring classroom learning cooperatively or individualistically were compared, and results indicated that cooperative, compared to individualized, learning resulted in greater ability to take the affective perspective of others, more altruism, more positive attitudes toward classroom life, and higher achievement. (Author/BW)

  8. Teacher and Principal Perceptions of How Principal Transformational and Instructional Leadership Behaviors Relate to Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Because of public concern over the effectiveness of our schools, a new evaluation system was put in place to hold principals and teachers directly accountable for student academic achievement. Part of this evaluation included student performance on state assessments. The purpose of this qualitative study sought to examine how the transformation…

  9. The Effective Behaviors and Practices of Administrators in Urban Charter Schools Relating to Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Prima N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this basic qualitative study was to analyze and identify the leadership styles that directly influence student achievement that were used by the school leaders sustaining the schools. A basic qualitative research study was appropriate to acknowledge the leadership style of the principal in demonstrating effective practices that link…

  10. Aggressive behavior, protective factors and academic achievement at students inside and outside the system of institutional care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maretić Edita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the differences between the aspects of aggressive behavior, their strengths (protective factors in the prevention of behavioral disorders and academic achievement, in children within and out of institutional forms of education. The study was conducted on a sample of 264 students in seventh and eighth class of elementary school, of whom 134 were in institutional care, while 130 were outside the institutional forms of education. Data were collected by a questionnaire, which included two measuring instruments: Check-list of advantages and Buss & Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ. The children who live in institutional care showed a higher incidence of aggressive behavior, compared with children who are out of institutional care. Children placed in institutional care have less protective factors for the prevention of behavioral disorders, worse general school success, as well as poorer success in Nature/ Biology, compared to non-institutional children. A negative and statistically significant relationship was found between the incidence of aggressive behaviors and protective factors in the prevention of conduct disorder, as well as between the incidence of aggressive behavior and overall school success. A significant positive correlation was found between the protective factors and success in the English language. The results indicate the necessity to consider alternative forms of care for children without parental care, in close cooperation of all relevant institutions and individuals who take care for children.

  11. Child Perceptions of Teacher Interpersonal Behavior and Associations with Mathematics Achievement in Dutch Early Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Haytske; Wubbels, Theo; Brekelmans, Mieke; Koomen, Helma M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed children's generalized perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior in terms of two dimensions, control and affiliation, referring to the degree of teacher leadership/ management and teacher friendliness friendliness/cooperation in the classroom, respectively. An adapted version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction was…

  12. Connecting Positive Psychology and Organizational Behavior Management: Achievement Motivation and the Power of Positive Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Douglas M.; Geller, E. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Positive psychology is becoming established as a reputable sub-discipline in psychology despite having neglected the role of positive reinforcement in enhancing quality of life. The authors discuss the relevance of positive reinforcement for positive psychology, with implications for broadening the content of organizational behavior management.…

  13. Sexually Harassing Behavior against Adolescent Girls in Rural Bangladesh: Implications for Achieving Millennium Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nurul; Roy, Swapan K.; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the extent and type of sexually harassing behavior or intimidations unmarried adolescent girls experienced on their way to school, college or social visits and type of perpetrators in victims' view in rural Bangladesh using data of the 2004 National Nutrition Programme baseline survey. The survey collected self-reported data on…

  14. Espoused Theoretical Frameworks and the Leadership Behaviors of Principals in Achieving Urban Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson; Reid, Nancy Andrade

    The dominant theoretical frameworks (structural, human resources, political, or cultural) espoused by elementary school principals are studied; and the platforms are compared with data previously collected on leadership behaviors and time usage. Data for 5 principals and 151 teachers in 5 elementary schools in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) on the…

  15. Building School Cultures in Achieving Urban Elementary Schools: The Leadership Behaviors of Principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson; Reid, Nancy Andrade

    Identification of principals' instructional leadership behaviors and the time they spend involved in the process of school improvement is the purpose of this study. A second focus is on the ways in which principals build school cultures. The Principals Instructional Management Rating Scale (PIMRS) (Hallinger 1983), the National Task-Time Survey…

  16. Impact of Attention Training on Academic Achievement, Executive Functioning, and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hannah; Gray, Kylie; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience significant difficulties in attention, learning, executive functions, and behavioral regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that computerized cognitive training may remediate these impairments. In a double blind controlled trial, 76 children with IDD (4-11 years) were…

  17. Exploring Dynamical Assessments of Affect, Behavior, and Cognition and Math State Test Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Maria Ofelia Z.; Snow, Erica L.; Baker, Ryan S.; McNamara, Danielle S.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that fine-grained aspects of student performance and interaction within educational software are predictive of long-term learning. Machine learning models have been used to provide assessments of affect, behavior, and cognition based on analyses of system log data, estimating the probability of a student's particular…

  18. Organizational Citizenship Behavior, Communication and the Relationship to Student Achievement and School Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rebecca R.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational designed study allowed the researcher to examine the relationship between Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) and communication satisfaction on elementary school campuses in one suburban school district in Arizona. Furthermore, this study examined whether differences exists between the level of OCB and communication…

  19. Association between short time in bed, health-risk behaviors and poor academic achievement among Norwegian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stea, T H; Knutsen, T; Torstveit, M K

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence of short time in bed (academic achievement in adolescents. This study included a sample of adolescents (n=2432) aged 15-17 years in the southern part of Norway (participation rate, 98.7%). A self-report questionnaire was used to assess time in bed, body mass index, dietary habits, physical activity habits, sedentary behavior, smoking and snuffing habits, and academic achievement. A total of 32.3% of the students reported short time in bed ( or =60 min for > or =5 days/week (adjusted odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.68); using television/computer >2 h/day (1.63; 1.23-2.17); being a current smoker (2.46; 1.80-3.35) or snuffer (2.11; 1.57-2.85); having an irregular meal pattern (1.33; 1.05-1.68); intake of sweets/candy > or =4 times/week (0.51; 0.32-0.83); and poor academic achievement (1.62; 1.26-2.09). All odds ratios were adjusted for sex, age and parental education. In Norwegian adolescents, short time in bed is associated with several health-risk behaviors and poor academic achievement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Skipping Breakfast is Associated with Academic Achievement, Unhealthy Behaviors, and Sense of Coherence Among Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Midori, Nishiyama; Erina, Suzuki; Michiyo, Hashimoto; Nobuko, Takaoka; Michiyo, Inaba; Nozomu, Tadokoro; Mitsuko, Kumakura; Teruhito, Furuichi; Yuichiro, Kamikawa; Education Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University : Division of Education for Community Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University; Department of Preventive Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine; Education Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University; Education Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University : Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dokkyo Medical University; Education Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University : Department of Home Caring, Dokkyo Medical University School of Nursing; Education Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University : Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine

    2013-01-01

    Few previous studies have examined the relationship between breakfast-skipping and sense of coherence(SOC). This study investigated whether breakfast-skipping was associated with academic achievement, unhealthybehavior, and SOC among medical students. The participants in this cross-sectional one-year cohortstudy were 92 first-year students( 57 men, 35 women;mean age, 19.6±1.6 years) at Dokkyo Medical University.They completed two self-evaluation questionnaires:the first comprised 26 items reg...

  1. FISCAL POLICY OF THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA: ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE FISCAL CONTROL AND ENTITY BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpiu GHERMAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is an actual theme, determined by achievements of tax control in Moldova and its impact on the behaviour of the entity as important elements of fiscal policy. There are examined different methods for differentiating the problem, supplemented by deduction, induction, synthesis, analysis of defining phenomena of fiscal policy and its elements. The methodology used in this study is based on assessments of the theory, studies and interpretations of specialized literature and analyzes the practical activities specific for taxation at national, European and international levels, depending on which some opinions, conclusions and proposals were founded and formulated, to minimize the impact of tax evasion and fraud.

  2. The Behavior of the Renewal Sequence in Case the Tail of the Waiting-Time Distribution Is Regularly Varying with Index -1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.G. Frenk (Hans)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractA second-order asymptotic result for the probability of occurrence of a persistent and aperiodic recurrent event is given if the tail of the distribution of the waiting time for this event is regularly varying with index -1.

  3. Regular Expression Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stubblebine, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This handy little book offers programmers a complete overview of the syntax and semantics of regular expressions that are at the heart of every text-processing application. Ideal as a quick reference, Regular Expression Pocket Reference covers the regular expression APIs for Perl 5.8, Ruby (including some upcoming 1.9 features), Java, PHP, .NET and C#, Python, vi, JavaScript, and the PCRE regular expression libraries. This concise and easy-to-use reference puts a very powerful tool for manipulating text and data right at your fingertips. Composed of a mixture of symbols and text, regular exp

  4. Android worksheet application based on discovery learning on students' achievement for vocational high school: Mechanical behavior of materials topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanto, Dwi; Aini, Anisa Nurul; Mulhayatiah, Diah

    2017-05-01

    This research reports a study of student worksheet based on discovery learning on Mechanical Behavior of Materials topics under Android application (Android worksheet application) for vocational high school. The samples are Architecture class X students of SMKN 4 (a public vocational high school) in Tangerang Selatan City, province of Banten, Indonesia. We made 3 groups based on Intellectual Quotient (IQ). They are average IQ group, middle IQ group and high IQ group. The method of research is used as a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group design. The technique of sampling is purposive sampling. Instruments used in this research are test instruments and non-test instruments. The test instruments are IQ test and test of student's achievement. For the test of student's achievement (pretest and posttest) we provide 25 multiple choice problems. The non-test instruments are questionnaire responses by the students and the teacher. Without IQ categorized, the result showed that there is an effect of Android worksheet application on student's achievement based on cognitive aspects of Revised Bloom's Taxonomy. However, from the IQ groups point of view, only the middle IQ group and the high IQ group showed a significant effect from the Android worksheet application on student's achievement meanwhile for the average IQ group there was no effect.

  5. Regular and conformal regular cores for static and rotating solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha

    2014-03-07

    Using a new metric for generating rotating solutions, we derive in a general fashion the solution of an imperfect fluid and that of its conformal homolog. We discuss the conditions that the stress–energy tensors and invariant scalars be regular. On classical physical grounds, it is stressed that conformal fluids used as cores for static or rotating solutions are exempt from any malicious behavior in that they are finite and defined everywhere.

  6. Fair and just culture, team behavior, and leadership engagement: The tools to achieve high reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Allan S; Leonard, Michael W; Denham, Charles R

    2006-08-01

    Disparate health care provider attitudes about autonomy, teamwork, and administrative operations have added to the complexity of health care delivery and are a central factor in medicine's unacceptably high rate of errors. Other industries have improved their reliability by applying innovative concepts to interpersonal relationships and administrative hierarchical structures (Chandler 1962). In the last 10 years the science of patient safety has become more sophisticated, with practical concepts identified and tested to improve the safety and reliability of care. Three initiatives stand out as worthy regarding interpersonal relationships and the application of provider concerns to shape operational change: The development and implementation of Fair and Just Culture principles, the broad use of Teamwork Training and Communication, and tools like WalkRounds that promote the alignment of leadership and frontline provider perspectives through effective use of adverse event data and provider comments. Fair and Just Culture, Teamwork Training, and WalkRounds are described, and implementation examples provided. The argument is made that they must be systematically and consistently implemented in an integrated fashion. There are excellent examples of institutions applying Just Culture principles, Teamwork Training, and Leadership WalkRounds--but to date, they have not been comprehensively instituted in health care organizations in a cohesive and interdependent manner. To achieve reliability, organizations need to begin thinking about the relationship between these efforts and linking them conceptually.

  7. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V; Onyper, Serge V

    2016-02-01

    To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the "Owl-Lark" Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010-2011 through 2013-2014. Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Regular simplex refinement by regular simplices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado, L.G.; Tóth, B.G.; Hendrix, E.M.T.; García, I.

    2014-01-01

    A naturalway to define branching in Branch-and-Bound for blending problemis to do bisection. The disadvantage of bisectioning is that partition sets are in general irregular. A regular simplex with fixed orientation can be determined by its center and size, allowing storage savings in a Branchand-

  9. Aspectos afetivos e o desempenho acadêmico de escolares Affective behavior and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Vilela Jacob

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se caracterizar através do Desenho da Casa-Árvore-Pessoa (HTP e do Teste das Pirâmides Coloridas de Pfister (TPC o funcionamento afetivo de 50 crianças com idade entre 8 e 12 anos, de ambos os sexos, com nível intelectual médio. Elas foram distribuídas em dois grupos de 25 sujeitos, um deles com atraso escolar, e o outro grupo apresentando desempenho escolar satisfatório e idade compatível à série cursada. Observou-se através destas técnicas que o rendimento escolar rebaixado nas crianças do grupo com atraso escolar pareceu relacionado a sentimentos de fracasso e a uma auto-imagem depreciativa. No grupo de crianças sem atraso escolar predominou, uma melhor utilização dos recursos intelectuais e afetivos, contudo associado a elevado nível de exigência. O estudo das variáveis afetivas e sua associação ao rendimento escolar puderam favorecer uma compreensão mais aprofundada da maneira como as crianças estão experimentando esta etapa do desenvolvimento.Using the House-Tree-Person Drawing (HTP and the Color Pyramid Test (CPT we aimed at characterizing the affective behavior of 50 children of average intellectual level, male and female, aged from 8 to 12 years. Two groups of 25 subjects each were formed: one presenting school delay and another with satisfactory school performance and age compatible with school grade. The used techniques showed that low school performance among the children with school delay seemed to be related to feelings of failure and a low self-esteem. In the group with no school delay prevailed a better use of affective and intellectual resources, but associated to high demand. The study of affective variables and their association with school performance lead to a deeper understanding of the way the children are experiencing their developing stage.

  10. Regular expressions cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Goyvaerts, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This cookbook provides more than 100 recipes to help you crunch data and manipulate text with regular expressions. Every programmer can find uses for regular expressions, but their power doesn't come worry-free. Even seasoned users often suffer from poor performance, false positives, false negatives, or perplexing bugs. Regular Expressions Cookbook offers step-by-step instructions for some of the most common tasks involving this tool, with recipes for C#, Java, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby, and VB.NET. With this book, you will: Understand the basics of regular expressions through a

  11. Regular expression containment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henglein, Fritz; Nielsen, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    * for Kleene-star, and a general coin- duction rule as the only additional rule. Our axiomatization gives rise to a natural computational inter- pretation of regular expressions as simple types that represent parse trees, and of containment proofs as coercions. This gives the axiom- atization a Curry...... to be undecidable. We discuss application of regular expressions as types to bit coding of strings and hint at other applications to the wide-spread use of regular expressions for substring matching, where classical automata-theoretic techniques are a priori inapplicable. Neither regular expressions as types nor...

  12. The effects of private tutoring and parenting behaviors on children's academic achievement in Korea: Are there differences between low- and high-income groups?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bong Joo Lee; Hyun Suk Jwa; Se Hee Lim

    2014-01-01

      This study examines the differences in effects of private tutoring and parenting behaviors on children's academic achievement between low- and high-income groups in Korea, using data from the Korean Welfare Panel Study...

  13. Effectiveness of a behavioral incentive scheme linked to goal achievement: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Julie; Enright, Gemma; Raadsma, Simon; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Innes-Hughes, Christine; Khanal, Santosh; Khanal, Santash; Lukeis, Sarah; Rissel, Chris; Gyani, Alex

    2016-01-16

    Childhood obesity is a concern in Australia and across the world. Community-based weight management programs are an important response to address childhood obesity. However, the scientific literature suggests that their effectiveness could potentially be enhanced by providing a structured incentive scheme. This proposal aims to determine the effectiveness of enhanced goal setting linked to a structured incentive scheme designed to improve the sustained health and wellbeing of overweight/obese children within the context of an existing community-based program. This study is a cluster randomized controlled trial delivered within the context of the existing NSW "Go4Fun" program with a 10-week and 6- and 12-month follow-up (n = 40 sites, 570 participants) that compares the effectiveness of small changes to the program in which children were asked to set goals (supported by text messages) and were given rewards for achieving them (intervention). This will be compared to the standard/existing program (control), which did not have the same structured incentive program. Data will be collected for all participants at baseline, end of program, and at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is a mean change in body mass index (BMI) z score at the 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes include anthropometric measures (body weight, height, and waist circumference) and behavioral measures collected via validated questionnaires. A process evaluation (comprising surveys and focus groups) to determine acceptability and sustainability and to inform downstream translation will also be conducted. This study will inform policy and program delivery as well as the broader evidence base regarding goal achievement and incentive schemes directed at children's health-related behaviors and will provide evidence that is likely to be transferrable across a range of health conditions. ACTRN12615000558527 registered on 29 May 2015.

  14. Distress and academic achievement among adolescents of affluence: a study of externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors and school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansary, Nadia S; Luthar, Suniya S

    2009-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to prospectively examine the relationship between externalizing (substance use and delinquency) and internalizing (depression and anxiety) dimensions and academic achievement (grades and classroom adjustment), as well as continuity over time in these domains, within a sample of wealthy adolescents followed from 10th to 12th grades (n = 256). In both parts of the study, cluster analyses were used to group participants at 10th grade and then group differences were evaluated on adjustment outcomes over time. In Part 1, problem behavior clusters revealed differences on academic indices with the two marijuana using groups--marijuana users and multiproblem youth--exhibiting the worst academic outcomes at all three waves. For Part 2, the two lowest achieving groups reported the highest distress across all externalizing dimensions over time. Stability across the three waves was found for both personal and academic competence as well as the associations between these two domains. Results are discussed in relation to intervention efforts targeting wealthy students at risk.

  15. Regularity extraction from non-adjacent sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Alexandra; Schröger, Erich; Ritter, Walter; Winkler, István

    2012-01-01

    The regular behavior of sound sources helps us to make sense of the auditory environment. Regular patterns may, for instance, convey information on the identity of a sound source (such as the acoustic signature of a train moving on the rails). Yet typically, this signature overlaps in time with signals emitted from other sound sources. It is generally assumed that auditory regularity extraction cannot operate upon this mixture of signals because it only finds regularities between adjacent sounds. In this view, the auditory environment would be grouped into separate entities by means of readily available acoustic cues such as separation in frequency and location. Regularity extraction processes would then operate upon the resulting groups. Our new experimental evidence challenges this view. We presented two interleaved sound sequences which overlapped in frequency range and shared all acoustic parameters. The sequences only differed in their underlying regular patterns. We inserted deviants into one of the sequences to probe whether the regularity was extracted. In the first experiment, we found that these deviants elicited the mismatch negativity (MMN) component. Thus the auditory system was able to find the regularity between the non-adjacent sounds. Regularity extraction was not influenced by sequence cohesiveness as manipulated by the relative duration of tones and silent inter-tone-intervals. In the second experiment, we showed that a regularity connecting non-adjacent sounds was discovered only when the intervening sequence also contained a regular pattern, but not when the intervening sounds were randomly varying. This suggests that separate regular patterns are available to the auditory system as a cue for identifying signals coming from distinct sound sources. Thus auditory regularity extraction is not necessarily confined to a processing stage after initial sound grouping, but may precede grouping when other acoustic cues are unavailable.

  16. An Investigation of the Relationship between the Components of School Climate and Leadership Behaviors on Student Achievement: Urban School Districts in the Mid-Atlantic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karmen J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate the relationship between the components of school climate and leadership behaviors on student achievement in an urban school district in the mid-atlantic region. School climate and leadership behaviors for the participating school districts was determined by the School Climate Survey (Corner…

  17. Students' Big Three Personality Traits, Perceptions of Teacher Interpersonal Behavior, and Mathematics Achievement: An Application of the Model of Reciprocal Causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampous, Kyriakos; Kokkinos, Constantinos M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the application of the Model of Reciprocal Causation (MRC) in examining the relationship between student personality (personal factors), student-perceived teacher interpersonal behavior (environment), and Mathematics achievement (behavior), with the simultaneous investigation of mediating effects…

  18. Regularization by External Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossolini, Elena; Edwards, R.; Glendinning, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Regularization was a big topic at the 2016 CRM Intensive Research Program on Advances in Nonsmooth Dynamics. There are many open questions concerning well known kinds of regularization (e.g., by smoothing or hysteresis). Here, we propose a framework for an alternative and important kind of regula...... of regularization, by external variables that shadow either the state or the switch of the original system. The shadow systems are derived from and inspired by various applications in electronic control, predator-prey preference, time delay, and genetic regulation....

  19. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  20. Physical model of dimensional regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    2016-12-15

    We explicitly construct fractals of dimension 4-ε on which dimensional regularization approximates scalar-field-only quantum-field theory amplitudes. The construction does not require fractals to be Lorentz-invariant in any sense, and we argue that there probably is no Lorentz-invariant fractal of dimension greater than 2. We derive dimensional regularization's power-law screening first for fractals obtained by removing voids from 3-dimensional Euclidean space. The derivation applies techniques from elementary dielectric theory. Surprisingly, fractal geometry by itself does not guarantee the appropriate power-law behavior; boundary conditions at fractal voids also play an important role. We then extend the derivation to 4-dimensional Minkowski space. We comment on generalization to non-scalar fields, and speculate about implications for quantum gravity. (orig.)

  1. The Intricate Relationship between Motivation and Achievement: Examining the Mediating Role of Self-Regulated Learning and Achievement-Related Classroom Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine how motivation is related to academic achievement. The "Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire" (MSLQ) was administered to 1,166 students at a polytechnic in Singapore as a measure for motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning strategies. In addition, students' prior…

  2. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  3. The relationship among teacher classroom management behavior, student engagement, and student achievement of middle and high school science students of varying aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, John R., Jr.; Butts, David P.

    This study was designed to determine the relationship among teacher classroom management behavior, student engagement, and student achievement of middle and high school science students. These variables were investigated across varying levels of academic aptitude. Two week long units were taught by 30 experienced science teachers. During this period of time teacher classroom management behavior, student achievement (n = 570), student engagement (n = 269), and student academic aptitude (n = 649) were measured. Twelve selected management indicators from Georgia Teachers Performance Assessment Indicators (TPAI) were used to measure teacher classroom management behaviors. Regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the variables, and appropriate post hoc procedures were used. Analyses showed that there was a significant relationship among all variables. Post hoc analysis showed that these results were consistent across levels of aptitude. Other relationships found were between student engagement and achievement, student aptitude and achievement, and student aptitude and engagement. Correlation coefficients were obtained for each individual management indicators. Those particular management behaviors which were correlated with achievement and engagement are: identifies students who do not understand directions and helps them individually, maintains learner involvement in lessons, reinforces and encourages the efforts of learners to maintain involvement, attends to routine tasks, uses instructional time efficiently, provides feedback to learners about their behavior, manages disruptive behavior among learners.

  4. Bayesian Selection for the ℓ _2 -Potts Model Regularization Parameter: 1-D Piecewise Constant Signal Denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecon, Jordan; Pustelnik, Nelly; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Wendt, Herwig; Abry, Patrice

    2017-10-01

    Piecewise constant denoising can be solved either by deterministic optimization approaches, based on the Potts model, or by stochastic Bayesian procedures. The former lead to low computational time but require the selection of a regularization parameter, whose value significantly impacts the achieved solution, and whose automated selection remains an involved and challenging problem. Conversely, fully Bayesian formalisms encapsulate the regularization parameter selection into hierarchical models, at the price of high computational costs. This contribution proposes an operational strategy that combines hierarchical Bayesian and Potts model formulations, with the double aim of automatically tuning the regularization parameter and of maintaining computational effciency. The proposed procedure relies on formally connecting a Bayesian framework to a l2-Potts functional. Behaviors and performance for the proposed piecewise constant denoising and regularization parameter tuning techniques are studied qualitatively and assessed quantitatively, and shown to compare favorably against those of a fully Bayesian hierarchical procedure, both in accuracy and in computational load.

  5. The Effects of the Children Having Incarcerated Parents Succeeding Group on Delinquent Behavior, Academic Achievement, Self-Esteem, Attendance and Aggressive Behavior with Seventh and Eighth Grade Students Who Have Incarcerated Parents or Guardians

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-White, Dakota L.

    2012-01-01

    A sample of middle school students was investigated to determine whether an intervention group called Children Having Incarcerated Parents (C.H.I.P.S.; King-White & Lipford-Sanders, 2007) was an effective intervention for delinquent behavior, academic achievement, self-esteem, attendance, and aggressive behavior in children of incarcerated…

  6. Annotation of Regular Polysemy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alonso, Hector

    Regular polysemy has received a lot of attention from the theory of lexical semantics and from computational linguistics. However, there is no consensus on how to represent the sense of underspecified examples at the token level, namely when annotating or disambiguating senses of metonymic words...

  7. Regular gaming behavior and internet gaming disorder in European adolescents: results from a cross-national representative survey of prevalence, predictors, and psychopathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K W; Janikian, M; Dreier, M; Wölfling, K; Beutel, M E; Tzavara, C; Richardson, C; Tsitsika, A

    2015-05-01

    Excessive use of online computer games which leads to functional impairment and distress has recently been included as Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in Section III of the DSM-5. Although nosological classification of this phenomenon is still a matter of debate, it is argued that IGD might be described best as a non-substance-related addiction. Epidemiological surveys reveal that it affects up to 3% of adolescents and seems to be related to heightened psychosocial symptoms. However, there has been no study of prevalence of IGD on a multi-national level relying on a representative sample including standardized psychometric measures. The research project EU NET ADB was conducted to assess prevalence and psychopathological correlates of IGD in seven European countries based on a representative sample of 12,938 adolescents between 14 and 17 years. 1.6% of the adolescents meet full criteria for IGD, with further 5.1% being at risk for IGD by fulfilling up to four criteria. The prevalence rates are slightly varying across the participating countries. IGD is closely associated with psychopathological symptoms, especially concerning aggressive and rule-breaking behavior and social problems. This survey demonstrated that IGD is a frequently occurring phenomenon among European adolescents and is related to psychosocial problems. The need for youth-specific prevention and treatment programs becomes evident.

  8. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  9. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  10. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-04-17

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse structure, we assume that each multimedia object could be represented as a sparse linear combination of all other objects, and combination coefficients are regarded as a similarity measure between objects and used to regularize their ranking scores. Moreover, we propose to learn the sparse combination coefficients and the ranking scores simultaneously. A unified objective function is constructed with regard to both the combination coefficients and the ranking scores, and is optimized by an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two multimedia database retrieval data sets demonstrate the significant improvements of the propose algorithm over state-of-the-art ranking score learning algorithms.

  11. Accelerating regular polygon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Shane

    2010-12-15

    Beams that possess high-intensity peaks that follow curved paths of propagation under linear diffraction have recently been shown to have a multitude of interesting uses. In this Letter, a family of phase-only masks is derived, and each mask gives rise to multiple accelerating intensity maxima. The curved paths of the peaks can be described by the vertices of a regular polygon that is centered on the optic axis and expands with propagation.

  12. Associations between Students' Perceptions of Teacher-Student Relationship Quality, Academic Achievement, and Classroom Behavior: Are They Moderated by Ethnicity, Gender, or Socio Economic Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Khushwinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to explore the correlations between students' perceptions of their relationships with teachers, students' academic achievement and students' classroom behavior. A secondary purpose of the study was to investigate if students' ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status moderate the…

  13. Relationships between Perceived Parental Involvement in Homework, Student Homework Behaviors, and Academic Achievement: Differences among Elementary, Junior High, and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J. C.; Suárez, N.; Rosário, P.; Vallejo, G.; Valle, A.; Epstein, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to produce a deeper understanding of the relationship between perceived parental homework involvement (i.e., parental homework control and parental homework support), student homework behaviors (i.e., time spend on homework completion, time management, and amount of homework completed), and student academic achievement. Using…

  14. Behavior Concerns among Low-Income, Ethnically and Linguistically Diverse Children in Child Care: Importance for School Readiness and Kindergarten Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Suzanne; Winsler, Adam; Manfra, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Recent research and teacher reports have highlighted the importance of early behavior skills for children's school readiness and academic success in elementary school. Significant gaps in school readiness and achievement exist between children in poverty and those more affluent. Low-income children are also more likely to…

  15. Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Improving Cognition, Academic Achievement, Behavior, and Socioemotional Functioning of Primary and Secondary School Students. Campbell Systematic Reviews 2017:5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Solis, Michael R.; Miller, Veronica L.; Brendel, Kristen E.

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in schools have positive effects on cognitive and socio-emotional processes, but do not improve behavior and academic achievement. The use of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in schools has been on the rise. Schools are using MBI's to reduce student stress and anxiety and improve socio-emotional…

  16. The Impact of Parental Support, Behavioral Control, and Psychological Control on the Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem of African American and European American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Roy A.; Bush, Kevin R.; McKenry, Patrick C.; Wilson, Stephan M.

    2003-01-01

    Relationships between adolescent functioning and parent support, behavioral control, and psychological control were examined among European American and African American adolescents. A number of correlations were significant, including maternal support and academic achievement and self-esteem, and paternal psychological control and self-esteem.…

  17. Health Behavior and Academic Achievement among Adolescents: The Relative Contribution of Dietary Habits, Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested a structural equation model to estimate the relationship between health behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and self-esteem and the academic achievement of adolescents. The authors analyzed survey data from the 2000 study of "Youth in Iceland", a population-based, cross-sectional sample of 6,346 adolescents in Iceland.…

  18. An Examination of Successful Leadership Behaviors Exhibited by Middle School Principals in Stimulating and Sustaining African-American Students' Achievement on the California Standards Test in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine leadership behaviors of middle school principals who have been successful in stimulating and sustaining African-American students' mathematics achievement on the California Standards Test. Specifically, this research sought to answer the following questions: 1) How do middle school principal…

  19. The Effects of Maternal Parenting Style and Religious Commitment on Self-Regulation, Academic Achievement, and Risk Behavior among African-American Parochial College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Beau; Carter, Kermit L.; Winsler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    This study explored relations between religiosity, both parent and student, and maternal parenting style and student academic self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior among African-American youth attending a parochial college. Eighty-five students completed self-report survey measures of religiosity, self-regulation, academic…

  20. Regular Single Valued Neutrosophic Hypergraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam Malik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we define the regular and totally regular single valued neutrosophic hypergraphs, and discuss the order and size along with properties of regular and totally regular single valued neutrosophic hypergraphs. We also extend work on completeness of single valued neutrosophic hypergraphs.

  1. The geometry of continuum regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1987-03-01

    This lecture is primarily an introduction to coordinate-invariant regularization, a recent advance in the continuum regularization program. In this context, the program is seen as fundamentally geometric, with all regularization contained in regularized DeWitt superstructures on field deformations.

  2. Long-Term Regular Eccentric Exercise Decreases Neuropathic Pain-like Behavior and Improves Motor Functional Recovery in an Axonotmesis Mouse Model: the Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Daniel F; Martins, Thiago C; Batisti, Ana Paula; Dos Santos Leonel, Larissa; Bobinski, Franciane; Belmonte, Luiz A O; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Santos, Adair R S

    2017-12-18

    Although training programs with regular eccentric (ECC) exercise are more commonly used for improving muscular strength and mobility, ECC exercise effects upon functional recovery of the sciatic nerve has not yet been determined. After sciatic nerve crush, different mice groups were subjected to run on the treadmill for 30 min at a speed of 6, 10, or 14 m/min with - 16° slope, 5 days per week, over 8 weeks. During the training time, neuropathic pain-like behavior (mechanical and cold hyperalgesia) was assessed and functional recovery was determined with the grip strength test and the Sciatic Functional and Static indexes (SFI and SSI). After 9 weeks, triceps surae muscle weight and morphological alterations were assessed. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-1Ra (IL-1Ra), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels, and markers pro- and anti-inflammatory and regeneration, respectively, were quantified in the muscle and sciatic nerve on day 14 post-crushing. Exercised groups presented less neuropathic pain-like behavior and better functional recovery than non-exercised groups. Biochemically, ECC exercise reduced TNF-α increase in the muscle. ECC exercise increased sciatic nerve IGF-1 levels in sciatic nerve crush-subjected animals. These findings provide new evidence indicating that treatment with ECC might be a potential approach for neuropathy induced by peripheral nerve injury.

  3. Language Skills, Mathematical Thinking, and Achievement Motivation in Children with ADHD, Disruptive Behavior Disorders, and Normal Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Janine; Heckmann, Carmen; Meyer, Christine Sandra; Schmid, Marc; Grob, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Recent models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that the association between achievement motivation and school performance may be stronger in children with ADHD than in typically developing children. Therefore, the present study investigated associations between achievement motivation and performance on language skills and…

  4. Modular Regularization Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    an iterative method. The parameter choice method is also used to demonstrate the implementation of the standard-form transformation. We have implemented a simple preconditioner aimed at the preconditioning of the general-form Tikhonov problem and demonstrate its simplicity and effciency. The steps taken...... and used to set up the illposed problems in the toolbox. Hereby, we are able to write regularization algorithms that automatically exploit structure in the ill-posed problem without being rewritten explicitly. We explain how to implement a stopping criteria for a parameter choice method based upon...

  5. Genetics of Regular Exercise and Sedentary Behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.J.C.; Bartels, M.; Kaprio, J.; Lightfoot, J.T.; Thomis, M

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the determinants of physical activity have traditionally focused on social factors and environmental barriers, but recent research has shown the additional importance of biological factors, including genetic variation. Here we review the major tenets of this research to arrive at three

  6. Accreting fluids onto regular black holes via Hamiltonian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Shahzad, M.U. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); University of Central Punjab, CAMS, UCP Business School, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the accretion of test fluids onto regular black holes such as Kehagias-Sfetsos black holes and regular black holes with Dagum distribution function. We analyze the accretion process when different test fluids are falling onto these regular black holes. The accreting fluid is being classified through the equation of state according to the features of regular black holes. The behavior of fluid flow and the existence of sonic points is being checked for these regular black holes. It is noted that the three-velocity depends on critical points and the equation of state parameter on phase space. (orig.)

  7. Marijuana Use and Academic Achievement Among Mexican American School-Age Students: Underlying Psychosocial and Behavioral Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, G. Edward; Yin, Zenong; Katims, David S.; Zapata, Jesse T.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies characteristics related to marijuana use among high and low academic achieving Mexican American students. Results are discussed in terms of psychological risk factors for both males and females. (Author/MKA)

  8. Longitudinal study of relations between school achievement and smoking behavior among secondary school students in Finland: results of the ESFA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennanen, Marjaana; Haukkala, Ari; de Vries, Hein; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore a longitudinal bi-directional relationship between school achievement and smoking behavior. The sample consists of 2,188 Finnish students in grades 7-9. Data were collected at three separate occasions between the years 1998 and 2000. Three hypothesized conceptual models were developed and tested using path analyses by structural equation modeling (SEM). Students that performed poorly at school smoked weekly six times more than those who achieved the highest school grade point averages at the age of 15. Using SEM, the findings suggest that not only does deterioration of school achievement contribute to progression in smoking uptake continuum but also vice versa progression in smoking uptake continuum to deterioration of school achievement over time (CFI = .997). There were no moderating effects of gender or treatment condition in the proposed models. Both deterioration of school achievement and progression in smoking uptake continuum predicted changes in other behavior during the first two years in secondary school in Finland.

  9. Promoting regular testing: an examination of HIV and STI testing routines and associated socio-demographic, behavioral and social-cognitive factors among men who have sex with men in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Philippe C G; de Wit, John B F; Bourne, Christopher P; Knox, Douglas; Purchas, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing rates are amongst the highest in the world among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Australia. However, notable minorities have never tested and many MSM have not tested recently. To examine testing routines and assess covariates of testing, an online survey was conducted among MSM in New South Wales. Five hundred and eighty non-HIV positive MSM (Mean age: 29.33 years) were randomized to answer questions on barriers to testing for HIV or STI. One in five (20.9 %) non-HIV-positive participants had never tested for HIV, 27.2 % had no HIV testing routines, 22.8 % had a moderate HIV testing routines, and 29.1 % had strong HIV testing routines. Similar patterning was observed for STI testing. In multivariate analyses participants' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control were moderately related to HIV and/or STI testing routines and some associations were specific to either HIV or STI testing or to particular routines. Findings highlight that multiple social-cognitive factors each play a role in explaining HIV and STI testing among MSM. To effectively promote regular testing in MSM, programs face the challenge of having to address a range of hurdles, rather than a few major obstacles.

  10. Have Gender Gaps in Math Closed? Achievement, Teacher Perceptions, and Learning Behaviors across Two ECLS-K Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpian, Joseph R.; Lubienski, Sarah T.; Timmer, Jennifer D.; Makowski, Martha B.; Miller, Emily K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K:1999) revealed gender gaps in mathematics achievement and teacher perceptions. However, recent evidence suggests that gender gaps have closed on state tests, raising the question of whether such gaps are absent in the ECLS-K:2011 cohort.…

  11. Sleep Duration, Positive Attitude toward Life, and Academic Achievement: The Role of Daytime Tiredness, Behavioral Persistence, and School Start Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkinson-Gloor, Nadine; Lemola, Sakari; Grob, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Sleep timing undergoes profound changes during adolescence, often resulting in inadequate sleep duration. The present study examines the relationship of sleep duration with positive attitude toward life and academic achievement in a sample of 2716 adolescents in Switzerland (mean age: 15.4 years, SD = 0.8), and whether this relationship is…

  12. Effects of a Gluten-Free Diet on Rate of Achievement in Autistic Children in an Applied Behavioral Analysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Melissa; Chambliss, Catherine

    This study used both between-subjects and within-subjects analyses to examine the effects of a gluten-free diet on the academic achievement of autistic children. The between-subjects analysis included data from eight autistic children (ages 5 to 7) with four on a gluten-free diet and four serving as controls. The number of attempts needed before…

  13. BILINGUAL AND REGULAR CLASS STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihta Liando

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the study investigating the relationship between the students’ attitudes towards English and their English achievements in bilingual and regular classes and investigating the differences. The study was conducted in a junior high school in Manado. There are 30 Year VIII students in each bilingual class and each regular class. The results are as follows. First, there is a significant correlation between the students’ attitudes towards English and their achievements. Second, there is a significant difference in their English achievements between bilingual class students and regular students. Third, female students have higher English achievements than male students. Bilingual class students have more positive attitudes and higher English learning achievements than regular class students.

  14. Math Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Role of Parental Involvement, Teachers' Behavior, and Students' Motivational Beliefs about Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levpuscek, Melita Puklek; Zupancic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Contributions of parental involvement in educational pursuits as well as math teachers' classroom behavior to students' motivation and performance in math were investigated. By the end of the first school term, 365 Slovene eighth graders reported on their parents' academic involvement (pressure, support, and help) and their math teachers' behavior…

  15. Comparison of Four Teacher Training Procedures in Achieving Teacher and Pupil "Translation" Behaviors in Secondary School Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Gregg B.

    A study was designed to determine whether different training procedures could change specific behaviors of 39 intern teachers and their pupils in secondary school social studies classes. Interns were randomly assigned to four training groups each of which received typescripts from the 1953 McCarthy investigations which were to be used the next day…

  16. Naturally Acquired Learned Helplessness: The Relationship of School Failure to Achievement Behavior, Attributions, and Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dona S.

    1981-01-01

    Personality and behavioral consequences of learned helplessness were monitored in children experiencing failure in school. The predictive quality of learned helplessness theory was compared with that of value expectancy theories. Low self-concept was predicted significantly by school failure, internal attributions for failure, and external…

  17. A precision based regularization scheme for slip inversion: Application to the Central Andean Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Culaciati, Francisco; Becerra, Valeria; Simons, Mark; Moreno, Marcos; Ruiz, Javier; Comte, Diana; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Maksymowicz, Andrei; Socquet, Anne; Jara, Jorge; Carrizo, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Imaging subsurface slip behavior from surface observations is essential to increase our level of understanding of the kinematics and physical processes controlling earthquake and tsunami occurrence. As the estimation procedure is an inherently ill-posed problem, the adopted inverse methodology to obtain such estimates, particularly the form of the a priori information, plays a key role in this learning process. There are two general end member approaches to estimate the distribution of slip on a fault that deals with the inherent instability of the inverse problem: An unregularized, computationally expensive, fully Bayesian MCMC approach and a much more expedient but biased optimization approach using some form of regularized least squares. We focus our efforts in the latter approach. On the regularized inversion, the chosen form of a priori information, or regularization scheme, will introduce a bias on fault slip estimates that needs to be well understood to be able to achieve rigorous interpretation of the obtained slip values. Here we discuss the effects that the a priori information implied by commonly used regularization schemes has on slip estimates of fault behavior. Also, we propose a novel regularization scheme, based on the precision of the model parameters in the unregularized problem, that accounts for the spatial variability of the constraints provided by the observations (typically onland). The proposed regularization scheme improves the stability and resolution of the inferred slip distributions of fault behavior. We illustrate our findings by analyzing synthetic cases in the Central Andean subduction megathrust, and apply the methodology to perform an analysis of the seismic cycle in the region.

  18. A regularity-based modeling of oil borehole logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaci, Said; Zaourar, Naima

    2013-04-01

    Multifractional Brownian motions (mBms) are successfully used to describe borehole logs behavior. These local fractal models allow to investigate the depth-evolution of regularity of the logs, quantified by the Hölder exponent (H). In this study, a regularity analysis is carried out on datasets recorded in Algerian oil boreholes located in different geological settings. The obtained regularity profiles show a clear correlation with lithology. Each lithological discontinuity corresponds to a jump in H value. Moreover, for a given borehole, all the regularity logs are significantly correlated and lead to similar lithological segmentations. Therefore, the Hölderian regularity is a robust property which can be used to characterize lithological heterogeneities. However, this study does not draw any relation between the recorded physical property and its estimated regularity degree for all the analyzed logs. Keywords: well logs, regularity, Hölder exponent, multifractional Brownian motion

  19. Very-low-birth-weight children at school age: academic achievement, behavior and self-esteem and relation to risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnström, O; Gäddlin, P O; Leijon, I; Samuelsson, S; Wadsby, M

    2003-08-01

    To investigate school performance, behavior and self-esteem of children with very low birth weight (VLBW). All children with birth weight below 1501 g (VLBW) and normal birth weight controls, born in the south-east region of Sweden during a 15-month period in 1987-88, were enrolled in a prospective follow-up study. At the age of 9 years, 81% and 82%, respectively, were re-examined regarding growth, neurofunctional classification, academic achievement tests, need for special education and behavioral problems. At 12 years, 89% and 76%, respectively, were re-examined regarding growth, neurofunctional classification, visual acuity and self-esteem. VLBW children were shorter and lighter, and differed from the controls with regard to neurological functional classification. They produced poorer results in most academic achievement tests. When the comparison was restricted to children with normal intelligence, almost all the differences in other academic achievements disappeared. VLBW children had more reading difficulties but were less often than expected defined as dyslexics compared to control children. We did not find any major disparity in visual acuity and self-esteem between the groups. Low Apgar scores, intracranial hemorrhage and the need for mechanical ventilation neonatally were associated with poorer results in most outcome measures. Neurofunctional assessments in early childhood were associated with most outcome measures. The mother's education was related to delayed reading skills and need for special education. Although VLBW children performed less well in most academic achievement tests and on some behavioral subscales, those who had a normal intellectual capacity did not differ in any important aspects from the controls.

  20. Adaptive Regularization of Neural Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1997-01-01

    We present a regularization scheme which iteratively adapts the regularization parameters by minimizing the validation error. It is suggested to use the adaptive regularization scheme in conjunction with optimal brain damage pruning to optimize the architecture and to avoid overfitting. Furthermore......, we propose an improved neural classification architecture eliminating an inherent redundancy in the widely used SoftMax classification network. Numerical results demonstrate the viability of the method...

  1. Investigation of Learning Behaviors and Achievement of Vocational High School Students Using an Ubiquitous Physics Tablet PC App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Siska Wati Dewi; Hwang, Wu-Yuin

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we designed and developed an app called Ubiquitous-Physics (U-Physics) for mobile devices like tablet PC or smart phones to help students learn the principles behind a simple pendulum in Physics. The unique characteristic of U-Physics is the use of sensors on mobile devices to collect acceleration and velocity data during pendulum swings. The data collected are transformed to facilitate students' understanding of the pendulum time period. U-Physics helped students understand the effects of pendulum mass, length, and angle in relation to its time period. In addition, U-Physics was equipped with an annotation function such as textual annotation to help students interpret and understand the concepts and phenomena of the simple pendulum. U-Physics also generated graphs automatically to demonstrate the time period during which the pendulum was swinging. Results showed a significant positive correlation between interpreting graphs and applying formula. This finding indicated that the ability to interpret graphs has an important role in scientific learning. Therefore, we strongly recommend that physics teachers use graphs to enrich students' information content and understanding and negative correlation between pair coherence and interpreting graphs. It may be that most of the participants (vocational high school students) have limited skill or confidence in physics problem solving; so, they often seek help from teachers or their high-achieving peers. In addition, the findings also indicated that U-Physics can enhance students' achievement during a 3-week time period. We hope that this app can be globally used to learn physics in the future.

  2. Executive Function Skills of 6 to 8 Year Olds: Brain and Behavioral Evidence and Implications for School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfese, Victoria J; Molfese, Peter J; Molfese, Dennis L; Rudasill, Kathleen M; Armstrong, Natalie; Starkey, Gillian

    2010-04-01

    Academic and social success in school has been linked to children's self-regulation. This study investigated the assessment of the executive function (EF) component of self-regulation using a low-cost, easily administered measure to determine whether scores obtained from the behavioral task would agree with those obtained using a laboratory-based neuropsychological measure of EF skills. The sample included 74 children (37 females; M = 86.2 months) who participated in two assessments of working memory and inhibitory control: Knock-Tap (NEPSY: Korkman, Kirk, and Kemp, 1998), and participation in event-related potential (ERP) testing that included the Directional Stroop Test (Davidson, Cruess, Diamond, O'Craven, & Savoy, 1999). Three main findings emerged. First, children grouped as high versus low performing on the NEPSY Knock-Tap Task were found to performed differently on the more difficult conditions of the DST (the Incongruent and Mixed Conditions), suggesting that the Knock-Tap Task as a low-cost and easy to administer assessment of EF skills may be one way for teachers to identify students with poor inhibitory control skills. Second, children's performance on the DST was strongly related to their ERP responses, adding to evidence that differences in behavioral performance on the DST as a measure of EF skills reflect corresponding differences in brain processing. Finally, differences in brain processing on the DST task also were found when the children were grouped based on Knock-Tap performance. Simple screening procedures can enable teachers to identify children whose distractibility, inattentiveness, or poor attention spans may interfere with classroom learning.

  3. Community-Based Participatory Research Integrates Behavioral and Biological Research to Achieve Health Equity for Native Hawaiians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire K. M. Townsend

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Native Hawaiians bear a disproportionate burden of type-2 diabetes and related complications compared to all other groups in Hawai‘i (e.g., Whites, Japanese, Korean. Distrust in these communities is a significant barrier to participation in epigenetic research studies seeking to better understand disease processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe the community-based participatory research (CBPR approach and research process we employed to integrate behavior and biological sciences with community health priorities. A CBPR approach was used to test a 3-month evidence-based, diabetes self-management intervention (N = 65. To investigate the molecular mechanisms linking inflammation with glucose homeostasis, a subset of participants (n = 16 provided peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Community and academic researchers collaborated on research design, assessment protocols, and participant recruitment, prioritizing participants’ convenience and education and strictly limiting the use of the data collected. Preliminary results indicate significant changes in DNA methylation at gene regions associated with inflammation and diabetes signaling pathways and significant improvements in hemoglobin A1c, self-care activities, and diabetes distress and understanding. This study integrates community, behavioral, and epigenomic expertise to better understand the outcomes of a diabetes self-management intervention. Key lessons learned suggest the studies requiring biospecimen collection in indigenous populations require community trust of the researchers, mutual benefits for the community and researchers, and for the researchers to prioritize the community’s needs. CBPR may be an important tool in providing communities the voice and protections to participate in studies requiring biospecimens.

  4. Existence of connected regular and nearly regular graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan, Ghurumuruhan

    2018-01-01

    For integers $k \\geq 2$ and $n \\geq k+1$, we prove the following: If $n\\cdot k$ is even, there is a connected $k$-regular graph on $n$ vertices. If $n\\cdot k$ is odd, there is a connected nearly $k$-regular graph on $n$ vertices.

  5. Effectiveness of Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy on The Decreasing of Relapse of Addiction to Norcotic In The Collegian Students And It s influence on The Increasing of Their Achievement Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Alavi Langroodi

    2015-05-01

    Results: Results showed that cognitive - behavioral therapy, was effective in reducing the recurrence rate of drug addicted students. Conclusion: With regard to the effective use of effective, cognitive - behavioral therapy in reducing drug relapse and increase the motivation of individuals, Education program aimed at reducing drug relapse and increase the incentive for progress must be made. Keywords: Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy, addiction, achievement motivation.

  6. Deadlock Prevention Policy with Behavioral Optimality or Suboptimality Achieved by the Redundancy Identification of Constraints and the Rearrangement of Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work develops an iterative deadlock prevention method for a special class of Petri nets that can well model a variety of flexible manufacturing systems. A deadlock detection technique, called mixed integer programming (MIP, is used to find a strict minimal siphon (SMS in a plant model without a complete enumeration of siphons. The policy consists of two phases. At the first phase, SMSs are obtained by MIP technique iteratively and monitors are added to the complementary sets of the SMSs. For the possible existence of new siphons generated after the first phase, we add monitors with their output arcs first pointed to source transitions at the second phase to avoid new siphons generating and then rearrange the output arcs step by step on condition that liveness is preserved. In addition, an algorithm is proposed to remove the redundant constraints of the MIP problem in this paper. The policy improves the behavioral permissiveness of the resulting net and greatly enhances the structural simplicity of the supervisor. Theoretical analysis and experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Regularity and Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2012-01-01

    Regularity and Complexity in Dynamical Systems describes periodic and chaotic behaviors in dynamical systems, including continuous, discrete, impulsive,discontinuous, and switching systems. In traditional analysis, the periodic and chaotic behaviors in continuous, nonlinear dynamical systems were extensively discussed even if unsolved. In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of interest in periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems because such dynamical systems are prevalent in engineering. Usually,the smoothening of discontinuous dynamical system is adopted in order to use the theory of continuous dynamical systems. However, such technique cannot provide suitable results in such discontinuous systems. In this book, an alternative way is presented to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems. This book also: Illustrates new concepts and methodology in discontinuous dynamical systems Uses different ideas to describe complicated dynamical...

  8. Women, Motivation, and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Janet Shibley; Kling, Kristen C.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews psychological research on motivation and educational achievement, discussing gender and contributions by feminist researchers. Feminist psychologists note sex bias and methodological flaws in traditional research on achievement motivation, proposing improved models (Eccles' expectancy x value model of achievement behavior). Contrary to…

  9. A criterion for regular sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    D P PATIL1, U STORCH2 and J ST ¨UCKRAD3. 1Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ... For general notations in com- mutative algebra we also refer to [1]. ... Note that every sequence is a strongly regular as well as regular sequence on the zero module. Further, it is clear that a ...

  10. Online co-regularized algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, T. de; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Heskes, T.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an online co-regularized learning algorithm for classification and regression tasks. We demonstrate that by sequentially co-regularizing prediction functions on unlabeled data points, our algorithm provides improved performance in comparison to supervised methods on several UCI benchmarks

  11. Natural selection and mechanistic regularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Lane

    2016-06-01

    In this article, I address the question of whether natural selection operates regularly enough to qualify as a mechanism of the sort characterized by Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000). Contrary to an influential critique by Skipper and Millstein (2005), I argue that natural selection can be seen to be regular enough to qualify as an MDC mechanism just fine-as long as we pay careful attention to some important distinctions regarding mechanistic regularity and abstraction. Specifically, I suggest that when we distinguish between process vs. product regularity, mechanism-internal vs. mechanism-external sources of irregularity, and abstract vs. concrete regularity, we can see that natural selection is only irregular in senses that are unthreatening to its status as an MDC mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polynomial embedding algorithms for controllers in a behavioral framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, H.L.; Zavala Yoe, R.; Praagman, C.; Zavala Yoé, 27772

    2007-01-01

    In this correspondence, we will establish polynomial algorithms for computation of controllers in the behavioral approach to control, in particular for the computation of controllers that regularly implement a given desired behavior and for controllers that achieve pole placement and stabilization

  13. Extreme values, regular variation and point processes

    CERN Document Server

    Resnick, Sidney I

    1987-01-01

    Extremes Values, Regular Variation and Point Processes is a readable and efficient account of the fundamental mathematical and stochastic process techniques needed to study the behavior of extreme values of phenomena based on independent and identically distributed random variables and vectors It presents a coherent treatment of the distributional and sample path fundamental properties of extremes and records It emphasizes the core primacy of three topics necessary for understanding extremes the analytical theory of regularly varying functions; the probabilistic theory of point processes and random measures; and the link to asymptotic distribution approximations provided by the theory of weak convergence of probability measures in metric spaces The book is self-contained and requires an introductory measure-theoretic course in probability as a prerequisite Almost all sections have an extensive list of exercises which extend developments in the text, offer alternate approaches, test mastery and provide for enj...

  14. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARTRAND, RICK [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  15. Regularization with a pruning prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the use of a regularization priorthat we show has pruning properties. Analyses areconducted both using a Bayesian framework and withthe generalization method, on a simple toyproblem. Results are thoroughly compared withthose obtained with a traditional weight decay.......We investigate the use of a regularization priorthat we show has pruning properties. Analyses areconducted both using a Bayesian framework and withthe generalization method, on a simple toyproblem. Results are thoroughly compared withthose obtained with a traditional weight decay....

  16. Commuting Π-regular rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ‎$R$ is called commuting regular ring (resp‎. ‎semigroupif‎ for each $x,y\\in R$ there exists $a\\in R$‎ such that$xy=yxayx$‎. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we introduce the concept of‎‎commuting $\\pi$-regular rings (resp‎. ‎semigroups and‎‎study various properties of them.

  17. Implicit Regularization in Deep Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Neyshabur, Behnam

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand generalization in deep learning, we study several possible explanations. We show that implicit regularization induced by the optimization method is playing a key role in generalization and success of deep learning models. Motivated by this view, we study how different complexity measures can ensure generalization and explain how optimization algorithms can implicitly regularize complexity measures. We empirically investigate the ability of these measures to ...

  18. Electronic Structure of Regular Bacterial Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Denis V.; Danzenbächer, Steffen; Mertig, Michael; Kirchner, Alexander; Pompe, Wolfgang; Dedkov, Yuriy S.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2004-12-01

    We report photoemission and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of the occupied and unoccupied valence electronic states of the regular surface layer of Bacillus sphaericus, which is widely used as the protein template for the fabrication of metallic nanostructures. The two-dimensional protein crystal shows a semiconductorlike behavior with a gap value of ˜3.0 eV and the Fermi energy close to the bottom of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. We anticipate that these results will open up new possibilities for the electric addressability of biotemplated low-dimensional hybrid structures.

  19. Automatic detection of regularly repeating vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellinger, David

    2005-09-01

    Many animal species produce repetitive sounds at regular intervals. This regularity can be used for automatic recognition of the sounds, providing improved detection at a given signal-to-noise ratio. Here, the detection of sperm whale sounds is examined. Sperm whales produce highly repetitive ``regular clicks'' at periods of about 0.2-2 s, and faster click trains in certain behavioral contexts. The following detection procedure was tested: a spectrogram was computed; values within a certain frequency band were summed; time windowing was applied; each windowed segment was autocorrelated; and the maximum of the autocorrelation within a certain periodicity range was chosen. This procedure was tested on sets of recordings containing sperm whale sounds and interfering sounds, both low-frequency recordings from autonomous hydrophones and high-frequency ones from towed hydrophone arrays. An optimization procedure iteratively varies detection parameters (spectrogram frame length and frequency range, window length, periodicity range, etc.). Performance of various sets of parameters was measured by setting a standard level of allowable missed calls, and the resulting optimium parameters are described. Performance is also compared to that of a neural network trained using the data sets. The method is also demonstrated for sounds of blue whales, minke whales, and seismic airguns. [Funding from ONR.

  20. Total Variation Regularization of Matrix-Valued Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddvar Christiansen

    2007-01-01

    Blomgren and Chan in 1998. We treat the diffusion matrix D implicitly as the product D=LLT, and work with the elements of L as variables, instead of working directly on the elements of D. This ensures positive definiteness of the tensor during the regularization flow, which is essential when regularizing DTI. We perform numerical experiments on both synthetical data and 3D human brain DTI, and measure the quantitative behavior of the proposed model.

  1. The Efficacy of Special versus Regular Class Placement for Exceptional Children: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Conrad; Kavale, Kenneth

    1980-01-01

    Fifty primary research studies of special versus regular class placement were selected for use in a meta-analysis. Special classes were found to be significantly inferior to regular class placement for students with below average IQs and significantly superior to regular classes for behaviorally disordered, emotionally disturbed, and learning…

  2. Toric Geometry of the Regular Convex Polyhedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiammetta Battaglia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe symplectic and complex toric spaces associated with the five regular convex polyhedra. The regular tetrahedron and the cube are rational and simple, the regular octahedron is not simple, the regular dodecahedron is not rational, and the regular icosahedron is neither simple nor rational. We remark that the last two cases cannot be treated via standard toric geometry.

  3. Word regularity affects orthographic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Chen; Castles, Anne; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2012-01-01

    Share's self-teaching hypothesis proposes that orthographic representations are acquired via phonological decoding. A key, yet untested, prediction of this theory is that there should be an effect of word regularity on the number and quality of word-specific orthographic representations that children acquire. Thirty-four Grade 2 children were exposed to the sound and meaning of eight novel words and were then presented with those words in written form in short stories. Half the words were assigned regular pronunciations and half irregular pronunciations. Lexical decision and spelling tasks conducted 10 days later revealed that the children's orthographic representations of the regular words appeared to be stronger and more extensive than those of the irregular words.

  4. Vertex-deleted subgraphs and regular factors from regular graph☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei; Bai, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Let k, m, and r be three integers such that 2≤k≤m≤r. Let G be a 2r-regular, 2m-edge-connected graph of odd order. We obtain some sufficient conditions for G−v to contain a k-factor for all v∈V(G). PMID:21984842

  5. Empirical laws, regularity and necessity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsveld, H.

    1973-01-01

    In this book I have tried to develop an analysis of the concept of an empirical law, an analysis that differs in many ways from the alternative analyse's found in contemporary literature dealing with the subject.

    1 am referring especially to two well-known views, viz. the regularity and

  6. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  7. Regularity of conservative inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequentially complete inductive limit of Fréchet spaces is regular, see [3]. With a minor modification, this property can be extended to inductive limits of arbitrary locally convex spaces under an additional assumption of conservativeness.

  8. Regular Matroids with Graphic Cocircuits

    OpenAIRE

    Papalamprou, Konstantinos; Pitsoulis, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the notion of graphic cocircuits and show that a large class of regular matroids with graphic cocircuits belongs to the class of signed-graphic matroids. Moreover, we provide an algorithm which determines whether a cographic matroid with graphic cocircuits is signed-graphic or not.

  9. Interval matrices: Regularity generates singularity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří; Shary, S.P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 540, 1 March (2018), s. 149-159 ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : interval matrix * regularity * singularity * P-matrix * absolute value equation * diagonally singilarizable matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.973, year: 2016

  10. Regularized Statistical Analysis of Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of regularized methods for the statistical analysis of anatomical structures. Focus is on structure-function relationships in the human brain, such as the connection between early onset of Alzheimer’s disease and shape changes of the corpus cal...

  11. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  12. Temporal regularity in speech perception: Is regularity beneficial or deleterious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Eveline; Shattuck-Hufnagel, Stefanie

    2012-04-01

    Speech rhythm has been proposed to be of crucial importance for correct speech perception and language learning. This study investigated the influence of speech rhythm in second language processing. German pseudo-sentences were presented to participants in two conditions: 'naturally regular speech rhythm' and an 'emphasized regular rhythm'. Nine expert English speakers with 3.5±1.6 years of German training repeated each sentence after hearing it once over headphones. Responses were transcribed using the International Phonetic Alphabet and analyzed for the number of correct, false and missing consonants as well as for consonant additions. The over-all number of correct reproductions of consonants did not differ between the two experimental conditions. However, speech rhythmicization significantly affected the serial position curve of correctly reproduced syllables. The results of this pilot study are consistent with the view that speech rhythm is important for speech perception.

  13. Behaviorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, J

    2011-01-01

    .... Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the observational methods common to all sciences...

  14. Math-related career aspirations and choices within Eccles et al.'s expectancy-value theory of achievement-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauermann, Fani; Tsai, Yi-Miau; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2017-08-01

    Which occupation to pursue is one of the more consequential decisions people make and represents a key developmental task. Yet the underlying developmental processes associated with either individual or group differences in occupational choices are still not well understood. This study contributes toward filling this gap, focusing in particular on the math domain. We examined two aspects of Eccles et al.'s (1983) expectancy-value theory of achievement-related behaviors: (a) the reciprocal associations between adolescents' expectancy and subjective task value beliefs and adolescents' career plans and (b) the multiplicative association between expectancies and values in predicting occupational outcomes in the math domain. Our analyses indicate that adolescents' expectancy and subjective task value beliefs about math and their math- or science-related career plans reported at the beginning and end of high school predict each other over time, with the exception of intrinsic interest in math. Furthermore, multiplicative associations between adolescents' expectancy and subjective task value beliefs about math predict math-related career attainment approximately 15 years after graduation from high school. Gender differences emerged regarding career-related beliefs and career attainment, with male students being more likely than female to both pursue and attain math-related careers. These gender differences could not be explained by differences in beliefs about math as an academic subject. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. A Path Analysis of the Effects of Principal Professional Orientation towards Leadership, Professional Teacher Behavior, and School Academic Optimism on School Reading Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne M. Mitchell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effects of the principal’s professional orientation towards leadership/enabling school structure (ESS on two mediating variables, school academic optimism (SAO and professional teacher behavior (PTB, on the outcome variable school reading achievement (RA. Data were drawn from a sample of 54 schools (including 45 elementary schools and nine middle schools; the school was the unit of analysis. Data analysis supported a path to RA in which a structural variable, ESS was the immediate antecedent of SAO and PTB. Two control variables, school level and SES, were included in the model. SES had a significant effect on SAO but not on PTB. School level had a negative effect on both PTB and SAO suggesting that both variables were higher in elementary school and declined in middle school. SES paired with SAO in predicting RA. As expected, SAO had a greater effect on RA than SES. The significance of the findings lies in the confirmation of SAO as an important influence on RA and in demonstrating the importance of ESS in establishing a context in which AO and PTB can flourish.

  16. Recursively-regular subdivisions and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafel Jaume

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We generalize regular subdivisions (polyhedral complexes resulting from the projection of the lower faces of a polyhedron introducing the class of recursively-regular subdivisions. Informally speaking, a recursively-regular subdivision is a subdivision that can be obtained by splitting some faces of a regular subdivision by other regular subdivisions (and continue recursively. We also define the finest regular coarsening and the regularity tree of a polyhedral complex. We prove that recursively-regular subdivisions are not necessarily connected by flips and that they are acyclic with respect to the in-front relation. We show that the finest regular coarsening of a subdivision can be efficiently computed, and that whether a subdivision is recursively regular can be efficiently decided. As an application, we also extend a theorem known since 1981 on illuminating space by cones and present connections of recursive regularity to tensegrity theory and graph-embedding problems.     

  17. How to quantify student's regularity?

    OpenAIRE

    Shirvani Boroujeni, Mina; Sharma, Kshitij; Kidzinski, Lukasz; Lucignano, Lorenzo; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in classroom-based learning context, have consistently shown a positive relation between students' conscientiousness and their academic success. We hypothesize that time management and regularity are main constructing blocks of students' conscientiousness in the context of online education. In online education, despite intuitive arguments supporting on-demand courses as more flexible delivery of knowledge, completion rate is higher in the courses with rigid temporal constr...

  18. Convergence and Fluctuations of Regularized Tyler Estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Abla; Couillet, Romain; Pascal, Ferderic; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-02-01

    This article studies the behavior of regularized Tyler estimators (RTEs) of scatter matrices. The key advantages of these estimators are twofold. First, they guarantee by construction a good conditioning of the estimate and second, being a derivative of robust Tyler estimators, they inherit their robustness properties, notably their resilience to the presence of outliers. Nevertheless, one major problem that poses the use of RTEs in practice is represented by the question of setting the regularization parameter $\\rho$. While a high value of $\\rho$ is likely to push all the eigenvalues away from zero, it comes at the cost of a larger bias with respect to the population covariance matrix. A deep understanding of the statistics of RTEs is essential to come up with appropriate choices for the regularization parameter. This is not an easy task and might be out of reach, unless one considers asymptotic regimes wherein the number of observations $n$ and/or their size $N$ increase together. First asymptotic results have recently been obtained under the assumption that $N$ and $n$ are large and commensurable. Interestingly, no results concerning the regime of $n$ going to infinity with $N$ fixed exist, even though the investigation of this assumption has usually predated the analysis of the most difficult $N$ and $n$ large case. This motivates our work. In particular, we prove in the present paper that the RTEs converge to a deterministic matrix when $n\\to\\infty$ with $N$ fixed, which is expressed as a function of the theoretical covariance matrix. We also derive the fluctuations of the RTEs around this deterministic matrix and establish that these fluctuations converge in distribution to a multivariate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and a covariance depending on the population covariance and the parameter $\\rho$.

  19. Convergence and fluctuations of Regularized Tyler estimators

    KAUST Repository

    Kammoun, Abla

    2015-10-26

    This article studies the behavior of regularized Tyler estimators (RTEs) of scatter matrices. The key advantages of these estimators are twofold. First, they guarantee by construction a good conditioning of the estimate and second, being a derivative of robust Tyler estimators, they inherit their robustness properties, notably their resilience to the presence of outliers. Nevertheless, one major problem that poses the use of RTEs in practice is represented by the question of setting the regularization parameter p. While a high value of p is likely to push all the eigenvalues away from zero, it comes at the cost of a larger bias with respect to the population covariance matrix. A deep understanding of the statistics of RTEs is essential to come up with appropriate choices for the regularization parameter. This is not an easy task and might be out of reach, unless one considers asymptotic regimes wherein the number of observations n and/or their size N increase together. First asymptotic results have recently been obtained under the assumption that N and n are large and commensurable. Interestingly, no results concerning the regime of n going to infinity with N fixed exist, even though the investigation of this assumption has usually predated the analysis of the most difficult N and n large case. This motivates our work. In particular, we prove in the present paper that the RTEs converge to a deterministic matrix when n → ∞ with N fixed, which is expressed as a function of the theoretical covariance matrix. We also derive the fluctuations of the RTEs around this deterministic matrix and establish that these fluctuations converge in distribution to a multivariate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and a covariance depending on the population covariance and the parameter.

  20. Regularized Adaptive Notch Filters for Acoustic Howling Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a method for the suppression of acoustic howling is developed, based on adaptive notch filters (ANF) with regularization (RANF). The method features three RANFs working in parallel to achieve frequency tracking, howling detection and suppression. The ANF-based approach to howling...

  1. Iterated Process Analysis over Lattice-Valued Regular Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2016-01-01

    We present an iterated approach to statically analyze programs of two processes communicating by message passing. Our analysis operates over a domain of lattice-valued regular expressions, and computes increasingly better approximations of each process's communication behavior. Overall the work...

  2. Explicit formulas for regularized products and series

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgenson, Jay; Goldfeld, Dorian

    1994-01-01

    The theory of explicit formulas for regularized products and series forms a natural continuation of the analytic theory developed in LNM 1564. These explicit formulas can be used to describe the quantitative behavior of various objects in analytic number theory and spectral theory. The present book deals with other applications arising from Gaussian test functions, leading to theta inversion formulas and corresponding new types of zeta functions which are Gaussian transforms of theta series rather than Mellin transforms, and satisfy additive functional equations. Their wide range of applications includes the spectral theory of a broad class of manifolds and also the theory of zeta functions in number theory and representation theory. Here the hyperbolic 3-manifolds are given as a significant example.

  3. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  4. Tree games with regular objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Przybyłko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We study tree games developed recently by Matteo Mio as a game interpretation of the probabilistic μ-calculus. With expressive power comes complexity. Mio showed that tree games are able to encode Blackwell games and, consequently, are not determined under deterministic strategies. We show that non-stochastic tree games with objectives recognisable by so-called game automata are determined under deterministic, finite memory strategies. Moreover, we give an elementary algorithmic procedure which, for an arbitrary regular language L and a finite non-stochastic tree game with a winning objective L decides if the game is determined under deterministic strategies.

  5. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  6. Regular nanofabrics in emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jamaa, M Haykel Ben

    2011-01-01

    ""Regular Nanofabrics in Emerging Technologies"" gives a deep insight into both fabrication and design aspects of emerging semiconductor technologies, that represent potential candidates for the post-CMOS era. Its approach is unique, across different fields, and it offers a synergetic view for a public of different communities ranging from technologists, to circuit designers, and computer scientists. The book presents two technologies as potential candidates for future semiconductor devices and systems and it shows how fabrication issues can be addressed at the design level and vice versa. The

  7. Regularization methods in Banach spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kazimierski, Kamil S

    2012-01-01

    Regularization methods aimed at finding stable approximate solutions are a necessary tool to tackle inverse and ill-posed problems. Usually the mathematical model of an inverse problem consists of an operator equation of the first kind and often the associated forward operator acts between Hilbert spaces. However, for numerous problems the reasons for using a Hilbert space setting seem to be based rather on conventions than on an approprimate and realistic model choice, so often a Banach space setting would be closer to reality. Furthermore, sparsity constraints using general Lp-norms or the B

  8. Regular capacities on metrizable spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Cherkovskyi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that for a (not necessarily compact metric space: the metrics on the space of capacities in the sense of Zarichnyi and Prokhorov are equal; completeness of the space of capacities is equivalent to completeness of the original space. It is shown that for the capacities on metrizable spaces the properties of $\\omega$-smoothness and of $\\tau$-smoothness are equivalent precisely on the separable spaces, and the properties of $\\omega$-smoothness and of regularity w.r.t. some (then w.r.t. any admissible metric are equivalent precisely on the compact spaces.

  9. Typed and Unambiguous Pattern Matching on Strings using Regular Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Thomsen, Jakob Grauenkjær

    2010-01-01

    We show how to achieve typed and unambiguous declarative pattern matching on strings using regular expressions  extended with a simple recording operator. We give a characterization of ambiguity of regular expressions that leads to a sound and complete static analysis.  The analysis is capable of......We show how to achieve typed and unambiguous declarative pattern matching on strings using regular expressions  extended with a simple recording operator. We give a characterization of ambiguity of regular expressions that leads to a sound and complete static analysis.  The analysis is...... capable of pinpointing all ambiguities in terms of the structure of the regular expression and report shortest ambiguous strings. We also show how pattern matching can be integrated into statically typed programming languages for deconstructing strings and reproducing typed and structured values. We validate our...... approach by giving a full implementation of the approach presented in this paper.  The resulting tool, reg-exp-rec, adds typed and unambiguous pattern matching to Java in a stand-alone and non-intrusive manner.  We evaluate the approach using several realistic examples....

  10. Project ACHIEVE final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  11. Effects of Student Perceptions of Teachers' Motivational Behavior on Reading, English, and Mathematics Achievement: The Mediating Role of Domain Specific Self-Efficacy and Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sukkyung; Dang, Myley; Lim, Sun Ah

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the Korean educational system, academic achievement is one of the crucial factors in assessing a student's academic ability for postsecondary education. Thus, many researchers have been studying ways to improve students' academic achievement. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between students'…

  12. The Effects of Single-Gender Math Classroom Activities on the Achievement and Behavior Outcomes of Fifth-Grade Girls and Boys at a Public Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussee, Erik P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine single-gender schools and/or classes as a method of improving student achievement and gaining greater satisfaction in school. The paper will further examine the effects of single-gender classes on student achievement, the academic gender gap, and the attitudes of students and teachers. It will also look at…

  13. Modeling polycrystals with regular polyhedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rangel Rios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline structure is of paramount importance to materials science and engineering. It provides an important example of a space-filling irregular network structure that also occurs in foams as well as in certain biological tissues. Therefore, seeking an accurate description of the characteristics of polycrystals is of fundamental importance. Recently, one of the authors (MEG published a paper in which a method was devised of representation of irregular networks by regular polyhedra with curved faces. In Glicksman's method a whole class of irregular polyhedra with a given number of faces, N, is represented by a single symmetrical polyhedron with N curved faces. This paper briefly describes the topological and metric properties of these special polyhedra. They are then applied to two important problems of irregular networks: the dimensionless energy 'cost' of irregular networks, and the derivation of a 3D analogue of the von Neumann-Mullins equation for the growth rate of grains in a polycrystal.

  14. Regularity of Dual Gabor Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Christensen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a construction of dual windows associated with Gabor frames with compactly supported windows. The size of the support of the dual windows is comparable to that of the given window. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exist dual windows with higher regularity than the canonical dual window. On the other hand, there are cases where no differentiable dual window exists, even in the overcomplete case. As a special case of our results, we show that there exists a common smooth dual window for an interesting class of Gabor frames. In particular, for any value of K∈ℕ, there is a smooth function h which simultaneously is a dual window for all B-spline generated Gabor frames {EmbTnBN(x/2}m,n∈ℕ for B-splines BN of order N=1,…,2K+1 with a fixed and sufficiently small value of b.

  15. Bayesian regularization of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Frank; Winkler, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian regularized artificial neural networks (BRANNs) are more robust than standard back-propagation nets and can reduce or eliminate the need for lengthy cross-validation. Bayesian regularization is a mathematical process that converts a nonlinear regression into a "well-posed" statistical problem in the manner of a ridge regression. The advantage of BRANNs is that the models are robust and the validation process, which scales as O(N2) in normal regression methods, such as back propagation, is unnecessary. These networks provide solutions to a number of problems that arise in QSAR modeling, such as choice of model, robustness of model, choice of validation set, size of validation effort, and optimization of network architecture. They are difficult to overtrain, since evidence procedures provide an objective Bayesian criterion for stopping training. They are also difficult to overfit, because the BRANN calculates and trains on a number of effective network parameters or weights, effectively turning off those that are not relevant. This effective number is usually considerably smaller than the number of weights in a standard fully connected back-propagation neural net. Automatic relevance determination (ARD) of the input variables can be used with BRANNs, and this allows the network to "estimate" the importance of each input. The ARD method ensures that irrelevant or highly correlated indices used in the modeling are neglected as well as showing which are the most important variables for modeling the activity data. This chapter outlines the equations that define the BRANN method plus a flowchart for producing a BRANN-QSAR model. Some results of the use of BRANNs on a number of data sets are illustrated and compared with other linear and nonlinear models.

  16. Generalization performance of regularized neural network models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1994-01-01

    Architecture optimization is a fundamental problem of neural network modeling. The optimal architecture is defined as the one which minimizes the generalization error. This paper addresses estimation of the generalization performance of regularized, complete neural network models. Regularization...

  17. EXPRESSÃO REGULAR NUMÉRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Vier Hoffmeister

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article defines the formal definition of the computer program language Numeric Regular Expression. A language concept inspired by Regular Expression syntax, applying your power and flexibility to numeric chains are describe.

  18. Split Dimensional Regularization for the Temporal Gauge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Hsieh, Ron-Jou; Lin, Chilong

    1996-01-01

    A split dimensional regularization, which was introduced for the Coulomb gauge by Leibbrandt and Williams, is used to regularize the spurious singularities of Yang-Mills theory in the temporal gauge. Typical one-loop split dimensionally regularized temporal gauge integrals, and hence the renormalization structure of the theory are shown to be the same as those calculated with some nonprincipal-value prescriptions.

  19. Supervised scale-regularized linear convolutionary filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2017-01-01

    benefit from some form of regularization and, secondly, arguing that the problem of scale has not been taken care of in a very satis- factory manner, we come to a combined resolution of both of these shortcomings by proposing a technique that we coin scale regularization. This regularization problem can...

  20. Novel trace norm regularization method for fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Liu, Jie; An, Yu; Jiang, Shixin; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; He, Kunshan; Zhang, Guanglei; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is developing rapidly in the field of molecular imaging. FMT has been used in surgical navigation for tumor resection and has many potential applications at the physiological, metabolic, and molecular levels in tissues. Due to the ill-posed nature of the problem, many regularized methods are generally adopted. In this paper, we propose a region reconstruction method for FMT in which the trace norm regularization. The trace norm penalty was defined as the sum of the singular values of the matrix. The proposed method adopts a priori information which is the structured sparsity of the fluorescent regions for FMT reconstruction. In order to improve the solution efficiency, the accelerated proximal gradient algorithms was used to accelerate the computation. The numerical phantom experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed trace norm regularization method. The simulation study shows that the proposed method achieves accurate and is able to reconstruct image effectively.

  1. Typed and unambiguous pattern matching on strings using regular expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Thomsen, Jakob G.

    2010-01-01

    We show how to achieve typed and unambiguous declarative pattern matching on strings using regular expressions extended with a simple recording operator. We give a characterization of ambiguity of regular expressions that leads to a sound and complete static analysis. The analysis is capable...... of pinpointing all ambiguities in terms of the structure of the regular expression and report shortest ambiguous strings. We also show how pattern matching can be integrated into statically typed programming languages for deconstructing strings and reproducing typed and structured values. We validate our...... approach by giving a full implementation of the approach presented in this paper. The resulting tool, reg-exp-rec, adds typed and unambiguous pattern matching to Java in a stand-alone and non-intrusive manner. We evaluate the approach using several realistic examples....

  2. Self-regulatory mode (locomotion and assessment), well-being (subjective and psychological), and exercise behavior (frequency and intensity) in relation to high school pupils’ academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmefors, Alexander; Mousavi, Fariba; Adrianson, Lillemor; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation is the procedure implemented by an individual striving to reach a goal and consists of two inter-related strategies: assessment and locomotion. Moreover, both subjective and psychological well-being along exercise behaviour might also play a role on adolescents academic achievement. Method. Participants were 160 Swedish high school pupils (111 boys and 49 girls) with an age mean of 17.74 (sd = 1.29). We used the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire to measure self-regulation strategies (i.e., locomotion and assessment). Well-being was measured using Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scales short version, the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. Exercise behaviour was self-reported using questions pertaining to frequency and intensity of exercise compliance. Academic achievement was operationalized through the pupils’ mean value of final grades in Swedish, Mathematics, English, and Physical Education. Both correlation and regressions analyses were conducted. Results. Academic achievement was positively related to assessment, well-being, and frequent/intensive exercise behaviour. Assessment was, however, negatively related to well-being. Locomotion on the other hand was positively associated to well-being and also to exercise behaviour. Conclusions. The results suggest a dual (in)direct model to increase pupils’ academic achievement and well-being—assessment being directly related to higher academic achievement, while locomotion is related to frequently exercising and well-being, which in turn, increase academic achievement. PMID:25861553

  3. Self-regulatory mode (locomotion and assessment), well-being (subjective and psychological), and exercise behavior (frequency and intensity) in relation to high school pupils' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Jimmefors, Alexander; Mousavi, Fariba; Adrianson, Lillemor; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation is the procedure implemented by an individual striving to reach a goal and consists of two inter-related strategies: assessment and locomotion. Moreover, both subjective and psychological well-being along exercise behaviour might also play a role on adolescents academic achievement. Method. Participants were 160 Swedish high school pupils (111 boys and 49 girls) with an age mean of 17.74 (sd = 1.29). We used the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire to measure self-regulation strategies (i.e., locomotion and assessment). Well-being was measured using Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scales short version, the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. Exercise behaviour was self-reported using questions pertaining to frequency and intensity of exercise compliance. Academic achievement was operationalized through the pupils' mean value of final grades in Swedish, Mathematics, English, and Physical Education. Both correlation and regressions analyses were conducted. Results. Academic achievement was positively related to assessment, well-being, and frequent/intensive exercise behaviour. Assessment was, however, negatively related to well-being. Locomotion on the other hand was positively associated to well-being and also to exercise behaviour. Conclusions. The results suggest a dual (in)direct model to increase pupils' academic achievement and well-being-assessment being directly related to higher academic achievement, while locomotion is related to frequently exercising and well-being, which in turn, increase academic achievement.

  4. Addictive Behaviors Amongst University Students: Contributing Factors, Student's Perception and Addiction Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Houri; Mirvat Hammoud

    2005-01-01

    Factors contributing to addictive behaviors affecting student health are analyzed in this study. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and the use of illegal drugs are assessed in a sample of 290 university students. General averages indicate that 37.2% of students smoke cigarettes, 49.8% drink alcohol regularly, and 17.9% have tried illegal drugs while 4.8% of them use it regularly. Age, academic achievement, gender, religion, family status and financial status were correlated to these addictive beh...

  5. Slimming and regularization of cozero maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mehdi Ebrahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cozero maps are generalized forms of cozero elements. Two particular cases of cozero maps, slim and regular cozero maps, are significant. In this paper we present methods to construct slim and regular cozero maps from a given cozero map. The construction of the slim and the regular cozero map from a cozero map are called slimming and regularization of the cozero map, respectively. Also, we prove that the slimming and regularization create reflector functors, and so we may say that they are the best method of constructing slim and regular cozero maps, in the sense of category theory. Finally, we give slim regularization for a cozero map c:M→L in the general case where A is not a Q-algebra. We use the ring and module of fractions, in this construction process.

  6. Regularized negative correlation learning for neural network ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    2009-12-01

    Negative correlation learning (NCL) is a neural network ensemble learning algorithm that introduces a correlation penalty term to the cost function of each individual network so that each neural network minimizes its mean square error (MSE) together with the correlation of the ensemble. This paper analyzes NCL and reveals that the training of NCL (when lambda = 1) corresponds to training the entire ensemble as a single learning machine that only minimizes the MSE without regularization. This analysis explains the reason why NCL is prone to overfitting the noise in the training set. This paper also demonstrates that tuning the correlation parameter lambda in NCL by cross validation cannot overcome the overfitting problem. The paper analyzes this problem and proposes the regularized negative correlation learning (RNCL) algorithm which incorporates an additional regularization term for the whole ensemble. RNCL decomposes the ensemble's training objectives, including MSE and regularization, into a set of sub-objectives, and each sub-objective is implemented by an individual neural network. In this paper, we also provide a Bayesian interpretation for RNCL and provide an automatic algorithm to optimize regularization parameters based on Bayesian inference. The RNCL formulation is applicable to any nonlinear estimator minimizing the MSE. The experiments on synthetic as well as real-world data sets demonstrate that RNCL achieves better performance than NCL, especially when the noise level is nontrivial in the data set.

  7. Some Biochemical Correlates of Academic Achievement (College Women--Their Eating Habits and Academic Achievement).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    A study was conducted among 332 young women at Harcum Junior College to investigate the relationship between eating patterns and academic achievement. Two groups were compared, one eating two or three regular meals daily (A) and one eating less than two regular meals daily (B). For each student in Group A, one was included in Group B who matched…

  8. Special needs students in regular education: do they affect their classmates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, N.

    2014-01-01

    The impact on regular students is a prominent concern in the inclusive education debate. Recent studies find that the presence of students with special educational needs harms the achievement of regular students. This study investigates inclusive practices in Dutch primary and secondary education,

  9. Influences of an Inquiry-based Ubiquitous Gaming Design on Students' Learning Achievements, Motivation, Behavioral Patterns, and Tendency towards Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hung

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an inquiry-based ubiquitous gaming approach was proposed. The objective of the study was to enhance students' performances in in-field learning activities. To show the advantages of the approach, an experiment was carried out to assess the effects of it on students' learning achievement, motivation, critical thinking, and problem…

  10. Learning Behavior and Achievement Analysis of a Digital Game-Based Learning Approach Integrating Mastery Learning Theory and Different Feedback Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the digital game-based learning approach has the advantage of stimulating students' learning motivation, but simply using digital games in the classroom does not guarantee satisfactory learning achievement, especially in the case of the absence of a teacher. Integrating appropriate learning strategies into a game can…

  11. A generalized regular form for multivariable sliding mode control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Perruquetti

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows how to compute a diffeomorphic state space transformation in order to put the initial mutivariable nonlinear model into an appropriate regular form. This form is an extension of the one proposed by Lukyanov and Utkin [9], and constitutes a guidance for a “natural” choice of the sliding surface. Then stabilization is achieved via a sliding mode strategy. In order to overcome the chattering phenomenon, a new nonlinear gain is introduced.

  12. Hypnotherapy and Test Anxiety: Two Cognitive-Behavioral Constructs. The Effects of Hypnosis in Reducing Test Anxiety and Improving Academic Achievement in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Marty

    A two-group randomized multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to investigate the effects of cognitive-behavioral hypnosis in reducing test anxiety and improving academic performance in comparison to a Hawthorne control group. Subjects were enrolled in a rigorous introductory psychology course which covered an entire text in one…

  13. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-directional influence between peer relationships and academic achievement. In other words, the quality of peer relationships affects academic achievement, and conversely, academic achievement affects the quality of peer relationships. For example, socially accepted children exhibiting prosocial, cooperative and responsible forms of behavior in school most frequently have high academic achievement. On the other hand, children rejected by their peers often have lower academic achievement and are a risk group tending to delinquency, absenteeism and drop out of school. Those behavioral and interpersonal forms of competence are frequently more reliable predictors of academic achievement than intellectual abilities are. Considering the fact that various patterns of peer interaction differently exert influence on students' academic behavior, the paper analyzed effects of (a social competence, (b social acceptance/rejection, (c child's friendships and (d prosocial behavior on academic achievement.

  14. Flip to Regular Triangulation and Convex Hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingcen; Cao, Thanh-Tung; Tan, Tiow-Seng

    2017-02-01

    Flip is a simple and local operation to transform one triangulation to another. It makes changes only to some neighboring simplices, without considering any attribute or configuration global in nature to the triangulation. Thanks to this characteristic, several flips can be independently applied to different small, non-overlapping regions of one triangulation. Such operation is favored when designing algorithms for data-parallel, massively multithreaded hardware, such as the GPU. However, most existing flip algorithms are designed to be executed sequentially, and usually need some restrictions on the execution order of flips, making them hard to be adapted to parallel computation. In this paper, we present an in depth study of flip algorithms in low dimensions, with the emphasis on the flexibility of their execution order. In particular, we propose a series of provably correct flip algorithms for regular triangulation and convex hull in 2D and 3D, with implementations for both CPUs and GPUs. Our experiment shows that our GPU implementation for constructing these structures from a given point set achieves up to two orders of magnitude of speedup over other popular single-threaded CPU implementation of existing algorithms.

  15. Regularities and irregularities in order flow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, Martin; Krause, Sebastian M.; Guhr, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    We identify and analyze statistical regularities and irregularities in the recent order flow of different NASDAQ stocks, focusing on the positions where orders are placed in the order book. This includes limit orders being placed outside of the spread, inside the spread and (effective) market orders. Based on the pairwise comparison of the order flow of different stocks, we perform a clustering of stocks into groups with similar behavior. This is useful to assess systemic aspects of stock price dynamics. We find that limit order placement inside the spread is strongly determined by the dynamics of the spread size. Most orders, however, arrive outside of the spread. While for some stocks order placement on or next to the quotes is dominating, deeper price levels are more important for other stocks. As market orders are usually adjusted to the quote volume, the impact of market orders depends on the order book structure, which we find to be quite diverse among the analyzed stocks as a result of the way limit order placement takes place.

  16. Regularity and approximability of electronic wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Yserentant, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The electronic Schrödinger equation describes the motion of N-electrons under Coulomb interaction forces in a field of clamped nuclei. The solutions of this equation, the electronic wave functions, depend on 3N variables, with three spatial dimensions for each electron. Approximating these solutions is thus inordinately challenging, and it is generally believed that a reduction to simplified models, such as those of the Hartree-Fock method or density functional theory, is the only tenable approach. This book seeks to show readers that this conventional wisdom need not be ironclad: the regularity of the solutions, which increases with the number of electrons, the decay behavior of their mixed derivatives, and the antisymmetry enforced by the Pauli principle contribute properties that allow these functions to be approximated with an order of complexity which comes arbitrarily close to that for a system of one or two electrons. The text is accessible to a mathematical audience at the beginning graduate level as...

  17. Slimming and regularization of cozero maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mehdi Ebrahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cozero maps are generalized forms of cozero elements. Two particular cases of cozero maps, slim and regular cozero maps, are significant. In this paper we present methods to construct slim and regular cozero maps from a given  cozero map. The construction of the slim and the regular cozero map from a cozero map are called slimming and regularization of the cozero map, respectively. Also, we prove that the slimming and regularization create reflector functors, and so we may say that they are the best method of constructing slim and regular cozero maps, in the sense of category theory. Finally, we give slim regularizationfor a cozero map $c:Mrightarrow L$ in the general case where $A$is not a ${Bbb Q}$-algebra. We use the ring and module offractions, in this construction process.

  18. Regularity effect in prospective memory during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Blondelle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regularity effect can affect performance in prospective memory (PM, but little is known on the cognitive processes linked to this effect. Moreover, its impacts with regard to aging remain unknown. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine regularity effect in PM in a lifespan perspective, with a sample of young, intermediate, and older adults. Objective and design: Our study examined the regularity effect in PM in three groups of participants: 28 young adults (18–30, 16 intermediate adults (40–55, and 25 older adults (65–80. The task, adapted from the Virtual Week, was designed to manipulate the regularity of the various activities of daily life that were to be recalled (regular repeated activities vs. irregular non-repeated activities. We examine the role of several cognitive functions including certain dimensions of executive functions (planning, inhibition, shifting, and binding, short-term memory, and retrospective episodic memory to identify those involved in PM, according to regularity and age. Results: A mixed-design ANOVA showed a main effect of task regularity and an interaction between age and regularity: an age-related difference in PM performances was found for irregular activities (older < young, but not for regular activities. All participants recalled more regular activities than irregular ones with no age effect. It appeared that recalling of regular activities only involved planning for both intermediate and older adults, while recalling of irregular ones were linked to planning, inhibition, short-term memory, binding, and retrospective episodic memory. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggest that planning capacities seem to play a major role in remembering to perform intended actions with advancing age. Furthermore, the age-PM-paradox may be attenuated when the experimental design is adapted by implementing a familiar context through the use of activities of daily living. The clinical

  19. The regularization of Old English weak verbs

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Tío Sáenz

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This article deals with the regularization of non-standard spellings of the verbal forms extracted from a corpus. It addresses the question of what the limits of regularization are when lemmatizing Old English weak verbs. The purpose of such regularization, also known as normalization, is to carry out lexicological analysis or lexicographical work. The analysis concentrates on weak verbs from the second class and draws on the lexical database of Old English Nerthus, which has incorporate...

  20. Iterative regularization with minimum-residual methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2006-01-01

    subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES - their success......We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  1. Iterative Regularization with Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2007-01-01

    subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES their success......We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  2. Bit-coded regular expression parsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse; Henglein, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Regular expression parsing is the problem of producing a parse tree of a string for a given regular expression. We show that a compact bit representation of a parse tree can be produced efficiently, in time linear in the product of input string size and regular expression size, by simplifying...... the DFA-based parsing algorithm due to Dub ´e and Feeley to emit the bits of the bit representation without explicitly materializing the parse tree itself. We furthermore show that Frisch and Cardelli’s greedy regular expression parsing algorithm can be straightforwardly modified to produce bit codings...

  3. Adaptive regularization using the entire solution surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S; Shen, X; Geyer, C J

    2009-09-01

    Several sparseness penalties have been suggested for delivery of good predictive performance in automatic variable selection within the framework of regularization. All assume that the true model is sparse. We propose a penalty, a convex combination of the L1- and L∞-norms, that adapts to a variety of situations including sparseness and nonsparseness, grouping and nongrouping. The proposed penalty performs grouping and adaptive regularization. In addition, we introduce a novel homotopy algorithm utilizing subgradients for developing regularization solution surfaces involving multiple regularizers. This permits efficient computation and adaptive tuning. Numerical experiments are conducted using simulation. In simulated and real examples, the proposed penalty compares well against popular alternatives.

  4. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  5. Do the associations of parenting styles with behavior problems and academic achievement vary by culture? Results from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Kauser, Rubina

    2018-01-01

    The study tested whether associations of parenting styles with internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and academic achievement vary between ethnic groups in western countries, between different regions of the globe, and by level of collectivism/individualism of individual countries. A systematic search in electronic databases and cross referencing identified 428 studies that were included in the random-effects meta-analysis. More ethnic and regional similarities than differences were identified. In western countries, associations of authoritative parenting with academic achievement were stronger in non-Hispanic, White families than in Asian minorities. In these countries, associations of authoritarian parenting with academic achievement were less negative in Hispanic families than in non-Hispanic, White families. Authoritative parenting was associated with at least 1 positive child outcome and authoritarian parenting was associated with at least 1 negative outcome in all regions of the globe, with some regional variation. Finally, associations of authoritarian parenting with child outcomes were weaker in countries with a higher individualism score, as were associations of authoritative parenting with academic performance. Parents across the globe could be recommended to behave authoritatively, although authoritarian and permissive parenting is, to some extent, tolerable in a few cultural contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Limits on Achievable Dimensional and Photon Efficiencies with Intensity-Modulation and Photon-Counting Due to Non-Ideal Photon-Counter Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris I.; Farr, William; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    An ideal intensity-modulated photon-counting channel can achieve unbounded photon information efficiencies (PIEs). However, a number of limitations of a physical system limit the practically achievable PIE. In this paper, we discuss several of these limitations and illustrate their impact on the channel. We show that, for the Poisson channel, noise does not strictly bound PIE, although there is an effective limit, as the dimensional information efficiency goes as e[overline] e PIE beyond a threshold PIE. Since the Holevo limit is bounded in the presence of noise, this illustrates that the Poisson approximation is invalid at large PIE for any number of noise modes. We show that a finite transmitter extinction ratio bounds the achievable PIE to a maximum that is logarithmic in the extinction ratio. We show how detector jitter limits the ability to mitigate noise in the PPM signaling framework. We illustrate a method to model detector blocking when the number of detectors is large, and illustrate mitigation of blocking with spatial spreading and altering. Finally, we illustrate the design of a high photon efficiency system using state-of-the-art photo-detectors and taking all these effects into account.

  7. Computer-Based Training in Math and Working Memory Improves Cognitive Skills and Academic Achievement in Primary School Children: Behavioral Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Sánchez-Pérez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Student academic achievement has been positively related to further development outcomes, such as the attainment of higher educational, employment, and socioeconomic aspirations. Among all the academic competences, mathematics has been identified as an essential skill in the field of international leadership as well as for those seeking positions in disciplines related to science, technology, and engineering. Given its positive consequences, studies have designed trainings to enhance children's mathematical skills. Additionally, the ability to regulate and control actions and cognitions, i.e., executive functions (EF, has been associated with school success, which has resulted in a strong effort to develop EF training programs to improve students' EF and academic achievement. The present study examined the efficacy of a school computer-based training composed of two components, namely, working memory and mathematics tasks. Among the advantages of using a computer-based training program is the ease with which it can be implemented in school settings and the ease by which the difficulty of the tasks can be adapted to fit the child's ability level. To test the effects of the training, children's cognitive skills (EF and IQ and their school achievement (math and language grades and abilities were evaluated. The results revealed a significant improvement in cognitive skills, such as non-verbal IQ and inhibition, and better school performance in math and reading among the children who participated in the training compared to those children who did not. Most of the improvements were related to training on WM tasks. These findings confirmed the efficacy of a computer-based training that combined WM and mathematics activities as part of the school routines based on the training's impact on children's academic competences and cognitive skills.

  8. A regularized stationary mean-field game

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xianjin

    2016-04-19

    In the thesis, we discuss the existence and numerical approximations of solutions of a regularized mean-field game with a low-order regularization. In the first part, we prove a priori estimates and use the continuation method to obtain the existence of a solution with a positive density. Finally, we introduce the monotone flow method and solve the system numerically.

  9. Automating InDesign with Regular Expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Kahrel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    If you need to make automated changes to InDesign documents beyond what basic search and replace can handle, you need regular expressions, and a bit of scripting to make them work. This Short Cut explains both how to write regular expressions, so you can find and replace the right things, and how to use them in InDesign specifically.

  10. Regular Event Structures and Finite Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Thiagarajan, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    We present the notion of regular event structures and conjecture that they correspond exactly to finite 1-safe Petri nets. We show that the conjecture holds for the conflict-free case. Even in this restricted setting, the proof is non-trivial and involves a natural subclass of regular event...

  11. On infinite regular and chiral maps

    OpenAIRE

    Arredondo, John A.; Valdez, Camilo Ramírez y Ferrán

    2015-01-01

    We prove that infinite regular and chiral maps take place on surfaces with at most one end. Moreover, we prove that an infinite regular or chiral map on an orientable surface with genus can only be realized on the Loch Ness monster, that is, the topological surface of infinite genus with one end.

  12. A developmental perspective of the relationship of racial-ethnic identity to self-construct, achievement, and behavior in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chaundrissa Oyeshiku; Levine, Douglas W; Smith, Emilie Phillips; Dumas, Jean; Prinz, Ron J

    2009-04-01

    This longitudinal study examines the development of racial-ethnic identity among African American children. Racial preferences were assessed in early elementary school with the Racial Attitudes, Beliefs, and Stereotypes Measure-II, a projective technique using paired comparisons of pictures of African American, Asian, Latino, and Caucasian children. Racial-ethnic identity in 3rd grade was assessed using the Multi-Ethnic Identity Measure Ethnic Belonging subscale. Multilevel models indicated that own-group racial preferences increased with age. Second-grade own-group preferences were positively related to 3rd-grade racial-ethnic identity scores. Third-grade racial-ethnic identity was associated positively with self-esteem variables (scholastic, social, physical appearance, and behavioral) and with academic performance. Identity correlated negatively with parent-rated aggression and externalizing and internalizing behaviors. The findings suggest that children's racial-ethnic identity develops differentially by gender, with girls showing faster growth but lower initial ethnic identity. Racial-ethnic identity was shown to be modestly but statistically significantly associated with various important child outcomes.

  13. Word-level reading achievement and behavioral inattention: exploring their overlap and relations with naming speed and phonemic awareness in a community sample of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Rhonda; Grimbos, Teresa; Ferrari, Julia L S

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the contribution of naming speed and phonemic awareness to teacher inattention ratings and word-level reading proficiency in 79 first grade children (43 boys, 36 girls). Participants completed the cognitive and reading measures midway through the school year. Teacher ratings of inattention were obtained for each child at the same time point. A path analysis revealed that behavioral inattention had a significant direct effect on word reading proficiency as well as significant indirect effects through phonemic awareness and naming speed. For pseudoword reading proficiency, the effects of inattention were indirect only through phonemic awareness and naming speed. A regression analysis indicated that naming speed, but not phonemic awareness, was significantly associated with teacher inattention ratings controlling for word reading proficiency. The findings highlight the need to better understand the role of behavioral inattention in the development of emergent literacy skills and reading proficiency. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Regularity of a renewal process estimated from binary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John D; Strawderman, Robert L; Johnson, Brent A

    2017-10-09

    Assessment of the regularity of a sequence of events over time is important for clinical decision-making as well as informing public health policy. Our motivating example involves determining the effect of an intervention on the regularity of HIV self-testing behavior among high-risk individuals when exact self-testing times are not recorded. Assuming that these unobserved testing times follow a renewal process, the goals of this work are to develop suitable methods for estimating its distributional parameters when only the presence or absence of at least one event per subject in each of several observation windows is recorded. We propose two approaches to estimation and inference: a likelihood-based discrete survival model using only time to first event; and a potentially more efficient quasi-likelihood approach based on the forward recurrence time distribution using all available data. Regularity is quantified and estimated by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the interevent time distribution. Focusing on the gamma renewal process, where the shape parameter of the corresponding interevent time distribution has a monotone relationship with its CV, we conduct simulation studies to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods. We then apply them to our motivating example, concluding that the use of text message reminders significantly improves the regularity of self-testing, but not its frequency. A discussion on interesting directions for further research is provided. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  15. Regularization Techniques for Linear Least-Squares Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Suliman, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Linear estimation is a fundamental branch of signal processing that deals with estimating the values of parameters from a corrupted measured data. Throughout the years, several optimization criteria have been used to achieve this task. The most astonishing attempt among theses is the linear least-squares. Although this criterion enjoyed a wide popularity in many areas due to its attractive properties, it appeared to suffer from some shortcomings. Alternative optimization criteria, as a result, have been proposed. These new criteria allowed, in one way or another, the incorporation of further prior information to the desired problem. Among theses alternative criteria is the regularized least-squares (RLS). In this thesis, we propose two new algorithms to find the regularization parameter for linear least-squares problems. In the constrained perturbation regularization algorithm (COPRA) for random matrices and COPRA for linear discrete ill-posed problems, an artificial perturbation matrix with a bounded norm is forced into the model matrix. This perturbation is introduced to enhance the singular value structure of the matrix. As a result, the new modified model is expected to provide a better stabilize substantial solution when used to estimate the original signal through minimizing the worst-case residual error function. Unlike many other regularization algorithms that go in search of minimizing the estimated data error, the two new proposed algorithms are developed mainly to select the artifcial perturbation bound and the regularization parameter in a way that approximately minimizes the mean-squared error (MSE) between the original signal and its estimate under various conditions. The first proposed COPRA method is developed mainly to estimate the regularization parameter when the measurement matrix is complex Gaussian, with centered unit variance (standard), and independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) entries. Furthermore, the second proposed COPRA

  16. Regular Simple Queues of Protein Contact Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang-Hui; Sun, Lisa Hui; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    A protein fold can be viewed as a self-avoiding walk in certain lattice model, and its contact map is a graph that represents the patterns of contacts in the fold. Goldman, Istrail, and Papadimitriou showed that a contact map in the 2D square lattice can be decomposed into at most two stacks and one queue. In the terminology of combinatorics, stacks and queues are noncrossing and nonnesting partitions, respectively. In this paper, we are concerned with 2-regular and 3-regular simple queues, for which the degree of each vertex is at most one and the arc lengths are at least 2 and 3, respectively. We show that 2-regular simple queues are in one-to-one correspondence with hill-free Motzkin paths, which have been enumerated by Barcucci, Pergola, Pinzani, and Rinaldi by using the Enumerating Combinatorial Objects method. We derive a recurrence relation for the generating function of Motzkin paths with [Formula: see text] peaks at level i, which reduces to the generating function for hill-free Motzkin paths. Moreover, we show that 3-regular simple queues are in one-to-one correspondence with Motzkin paths avoiding certain patterns. Then we obtain a formula for the generating function of 3-regular simple queues. Asymptotic formulas for 2-regular and 3-regular simple queues are derived based on the generating functions.

  17. Completeness and regularity of generalized fuzzy graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sovan; Sarkar, Biswajit; Shin, Dongmin; Pal, Madhumangal

    2016-01-01

    Fuzzy graphs are the backbone of many real systems like networks, image, scheduling, etc. But, due to some restriction on edges, fuzzy graphs are limited to represent for some systems. Generalized fuzzy graphs are appropriate to avoid such restrictions. In this study generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. In this study, matrix representation of generalized fuzzy graphs is described. Completeness and regularity are two important parameters of graph theory. Here, regular and complete generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. Some properties of them are discussed. After that, effective regular graphs are exemplified.

  18. J-regular rings with injectivities

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Liang

    2010-01-01

    A ring $R$ is called a J-regular ring if R/J(R) is von Neumann regular, where J(R) is the Jacobson radical of R. It is proved that if R is J-regular, then (i) R is right n-injective if and only if every homomorphism from an $n$-generated small right ideal of $R$ to $R_{R}$ can be extended to one from $R_{R}$ to $R_{R}$; (ii) R is right FP-injective if and only if R is right (J, R)-FP-injective. Some known results are improved.

  19. Regularized plane-wave least-squares Kirchhoff migration

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2013-09-22

    A Kirchhoff least-squares migration (LSM) is developed in the prestack plane-wave domain to increase the quality of migration images. A regularization term is included that accounts for mispositioning of reflectors due to errors in the velocity model. Both synthetic and field results show that: 1) LSM with a reflectivity model common for all the plane-wave gathers provides the best image when the migration velocity model is accurate, but it is more sensitive to the velocity errors, 2) the regularized plane-wave LSM is more robust in the presence of velocity errors, and 3) LSM achieves both computational and IO saving by plane-wave encoding compared to shot-domain LSM for the models tested.

  20. Comment on "Construction of regular black holes in general relativity"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, Kirill A.

    2017-12-01

    We claim that the paper by Zhong-Ying Fan and Xiaobao Wang on nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity [Phys. Rev. D 94,124027 (2016)], although correct in general, in some respects repeats previously obtained results without giving proper references. There is also an important point missing in this paper, which is necessary for understanding the physics of the system: in solutions with an electric charge, a regular center requires a non-Maxwell behavior of Lagrangian function L (f ) , (f =Fμ νFμ ν) at small f . Therefore, in all electric regular black hole solutions with a Reissner-Nordström asymptotic, the Lagrangian L (f ) is different in different parts of space, and the electromagnetic field behaves in a singular way at surfaces where L (f ) suffers branching.

  1. Lattice-Valued Convergence Spaces: Weaker Regularity and p-Regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingqiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By using some lattice-valued Kowalsky’s dual diagonal conditions, some weaker regularities for Jäger’s generalized stratified L-convergence spaces and those for Boustique et al’s stratified L-convergence spaces are defined and studied. Here, the lattice L is a complete Heyting algebra. Some characterizations and properties of weaker regularities are presented. For Jäger’s generalized stratified L-convergence spaces, a notion of closures of stratified L-filters is introduced and then a new p-regularity is defined. At last, the relationships between p-regularities and weaker regularities are established.

  2. Effect of the energy-environment simulator on achievement, attitudes, and behavior relative to energy-education concepts systematically replicated in higher education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    This study was a systematic replication of a study by Stagliano (1981). Additional hypotheses concerning pretest, student major, and student section variance were tested. Achievement in energy knowledge and conservation attitudes attained by (a) lecture-discussion enriched with the Energy-Environment Simulator and (b) lecture-discussion methods of instruction were measured. Energy knowledge was measured on the Energy Knowledge Assessment Test (EKAT), and attitudes were measured on the Youth Energy Survey (YES), the Lecture-discussion simulation (LDS) used a two hour out-of-class activity in debriefing. The population consisted of 142 college student volunteers randomly selected, and assigned to one of two groups of 71 students for each treatment. Stagliano used three groups (n = 35), one group receiving an energy-game treatment. Both studies used the pretest-posttest true experimental design. The present study included 28 hypotheses, eight of which were found to be significant. Stagliano used 12 hypotheses, all of which were rejected. The present study hypothesized that students who received the LDS treatment would obtain significantly higher scores on the EKAT and the YES instruments. Results showed that significance was found (alpha level .05) on the EKAT and also found on the YES total subscale when covaried for effects of pretest, student major, and student section. When covarying the effects of pretest scores only, significance was found on the EKAT. All YES hypotheses were rejected.

  3. Randomized trial of achieving healthy lifestyles in psychiatric rehabilitation: the ACHIEVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guallar Eliseo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent among persons with serious mental illness. These conditions likely contribute to premature cardiovascular disease and a 20 to 30 percent shortened life expectancy in this vulnerable population. Persons with serious mental illness need effective, appropriately tailored behavioral interventions to achieve and maintain weight loss. Psychiatric rehabilitation day programs provide logical intervention settings because mental health consumers often attend regularly and exercise can take place on-site. This paper describes the Randomized Trial of Achieving Healthy Lifestyles in Psychiatric Rehabilitation (ACHIEVE. The goal of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a behavioral weight loss intervention among persons with serious mental illness that attend psychiatric rehabilitation programs. Participants randomized to the intervention arm of the study are hypothesized to have greater weight loss than the control group. Methods/Design A targeted 320 men and women with serious mental illness and overweight or obesity (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited from 10 psychiatric rehabilitation programs across Maryland. The core design is a randomized, two-arm, parallel, multi-site clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of an 18-month behavioral weight loss intervention to usual care. Active intervention participants receive weight management sessions and physical activity classes on-site led by study interventionists. The intervention incorporates cognitive adaptations for persons with serious mental illness attending psychiatric rehabilitation programs. The initial intensive intervention period is six months, followed by a twelve-month maintenance period in which trained rehabilitation program staff assume responsibility for delivering parts of the intervention. Primary outcomes are weight loss at six and 18 months. Discussion Evidence-based approaches to the high burden

  4. Regularity of optimal transport maps and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Philippis, Guido

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we study the regularity of optimal transport maps and its applications to the semi-geostrophic system. The first two chapters survey the known theory, in particular there is a self-contained proof of Brenier’ theorem on existence of optimal transport maps and of Caffarelli’s Theorem on Holder continuity of optimal maps. In the third and fourth chapter we start investigating Sobolev regularity of optimal transport maps, while in Chapter 5 we show how the above mentioned results allows to prove the existence of Eulerian solution to the semi-geostrophic equation. In Chapter 6 we prove partial regularity of optimal maps with respect to a generic cost functions (it is well known that in this case global regularity can not be expected). More precisely we show that if the target and source measure have smooth densities the optimal map is always smooth outside a closed set of measure zero.

  5. Mixed-norm regularization for brain decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamary, R; Jrad, N; Phlypo, R; Congedo, M; Rakotomamonjy, A

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the use of mixed-norm regularization for sensor selection in event-related potential (ERP) based brain-computer interfaces (BCI). The classification problem is cast as a discriminative optimization framework where sensor selection is induced through the use of mixed-norms. This framework is extended to the multitask learning situation where several similar classification tasks related to different subjects are learned simultaneously. In this case, multitask learning helps in leveraging data scarcity issue yielding to more robust classifiers. For this purpose, we have introduced a regularizer that induces both sensor selection and classifier similarities. The different regularization approaches are compared on three ERP datasets showing the interest of mixed-norm regularization in terms of sensor selection. The multitask approaches are evaluated when a small number of learning examples are available yielding to significant performance improvements especially for subjects performing poorly.

  6. Iterative regularization method in generalized inverse beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifei; Chen, Si; Xu, Zhongming; He, Yansong; Li, Shu

    2017-05-01

    Beamforming based on microphone array is a method to identify sound sources. It can visualize the sound field of the source plane and reveal interesting acoustic information. Generalized inverse beamforming (GIB) is one important branch of beamforming techniques due to its high identification accuracy and computational efficiency. However, in real testing situation, errors caused by measurement noise and configuration problems may seriously reduce the beamforming accuracy. As an inverse problem, the stability of GIB can be improved with regularization methods. We proposed a new iterative regularization method for GIB by iteratively redefining the form of regularization matrix and calculating the corresponding solution. Moreover, the new method is applied to functional beamforming and double-layer antenna beamforming respectively. Numerical simulations and experiments are implemented. The results show that the proposed regularization method leads to more robust beamforming output and higher accuracy in both the two applications.

  7. The regularization of Old English weak verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tío Sáenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the regularization of non-standard spellings of the verbal forms extracted from a corpus. It addresses the question of what the limits of regularization are when lemmatizing Old English weak verbs. The purpose of such regularization, also known as normalization, is to carry out lexicological analysis or lexicographical work. The analysis concentrates on weak verbs from the second class and draws on the lexical database of Old English Nerthus, which has incorporated the texts of the Dictionary of Old English Corpus. As regards the question of the limits of normalization, the solution adopted are, in the first place, that when it is necessary to regularize, normalization is restricted to correspondences based on dialectal and diachronic variation and, secondly, that normalization has to be unidirectional.

  8. Mixed-Norm Regularization for Brain Decoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flamary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the use of mixed-norm regularization for sensor selection in event-related potential (ERP based brain-computer interfaces (BCI. The classification problem is cast as a discriminative optimization framework where sensor selection is induced through the use of mixed-norms. This framework is extended to the multitask learning situation where several similar classification tasks related to different subjects are learned simultaneously. In this case, multitask learning helps in leveraging data scarcity issue yielding to more robust classifiers. For this purpose, we have introduced a regularizer that induces both sensor selection and classifier similarities. The different regularization approaches are compared on three ERP datasets showing the interest of mixed-norm regularization in terms of sensor selection. The multitask approaches are evaluated when a small number of learning examples are available yielding to significant performance improvements especially for subjects performing poorly.

  9. Regularization of B-Spline Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoliang; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2011-01-01

    By a d-dimensional B-spline object (denoted as ), we mean a B-spline curve (d = 1), a B-spline surface (d = 2) or a B-spline volume (d = 3). By regularization of a B-spline object we mean the process of relocating the control points of such that they approximate an isometric map of its definition domain in certain directions and is shape preserving. In this paper we develop an efficient regularization method for , d = 1, 2, 3 based on solving weak form L(2)-gradient flows constructed from the minimization of certain regularizing energy functionals. These flows are integrated via the finite element method using B-spline basis functions. Our experimental results demonstrate that our new regularization method is very effective.

  10. On Comparison of Adaptive Regularization Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2000-01-01

    at the expense of introducing extra bias. The overall objective of adaptive regularization is to tune the amount of regularization ensuring minimal generalization error. Regularization is a supplement to direct model selection techniques like step-wise selection and one would prefer a hybrid scheme; however...... different criteria, e.g., the Bayesian evidence. The evidence expresses basically the probability of the model, which is conceptually different from generalization error; however, asymptotically for large training data sets they will converge. First the basic model definition, training and generalization......Modeling with flexible models, such as neural networks, requires careful control of the model complexity and generalization ability of the resulting model which finds expression in the ubiquitous bias-variance dilemma. Regularization is a tool for optimizing the model structure reducing variance...

  11. Fast and compact regular expression matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Farach-Colton, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study 4 problems in string matching, namely, regular expression matching, approximate regular expression matching, string edit distance, and subsequence indexing, on a standard word RAM model of computation that allows logarithmic-sized words to be manipulated in constant time. We show how to ...... to improve the space and/or remove a dependency on the alphabet size for each problem using either an improved tabulation technique of an existing algorithm or by combining known algorithms in a new way....

  12. Regularity of Tor for weakly stable ideals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Ansaldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that if I and J are weakly stable ideals in a polynomial ring R = k[x_1, . . ., x_n], with k a field, then the regularity of Tor^R_i (R/I, R/J has the expected upper bound. We also give a bound for the regularity of Ext^i_R (R/I, R for I a weakly stable ideal.

  13. Deterministic automata for extended regular expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syzdykov Mirzakhmet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the algorithms to produce deterministic finite automaton (DFA for extended operators in regular expressions like intersection, subtraction and complement. The method like “overriding” of the source NFA(NFA not defined with subset construction rules is used. The past work described only the algorithm for AND-operator (or intersection of regular languages; in this paper the construction for the MINUS-operator (and complement is shown.

  14. Subcortical processing of speech regularities underlies reading and music aptitude in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities supports fundamental human behaviors such as hearing in noise and reading. Although the failure to encode acoustic regularities in ongoing speech has been associated with language and literacy deficits, how auditory expertise, such as the expertise that is associated with musical skill, relates to the brainstem processing of speech regularities is unknown. An association between musical skill and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities would not be surprising given the importance of repetition and regularity in music. Here, we aimed to define relationships between the subcortical processing of speech regularities, music aptitude, and reading abilities in children with and without reading impairment. We hypothesized that, in combination with auditory cognitive abilities, neural sensitivity to regularities in ongoing speech provides a common biological mechanism underlying the development of music and reading abilities. Methods We assessed auditory working memory and attention, music aptitude, reading ability, and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities in 42 school-aged children with a wide range of reading ability. Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities was assessed by recording brainstem responses to the same speech sound presented in predictable and variable speech streams. Results Through correlation analyses and structural equation modeling, we reveal that music aptitude and literacy both relate to the extent of subcortical adaptation to regularities in ongoing speech as well as with auditory working memory and attention. Relationships between music and speech processing are specifically driven by performance on a musical rhythm task, underscoring the importance of rhythmic regularity for both language and music. Conclusions These data indicate common brain mechanisms underlying reading and music abilities that relate to how the nervous system responds to regularities in auditory input

  15. Subcortical processing of speech regularities underlies reading and music aptitude in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Hornickel, Jane; Kraus, Nina

    2011-10-17

    Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities supports fundamental human behaviors such as hearing in noise and reading. Although the failure to encode acoustic regularities in ongoing speech has been associated with language and literacy deficits, how auditory expertise, such as the expertise that is associated with musical skill, relates to the brainstem processing of speech regularities is unknown. An association between musical skill and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities would not be surprising given the importance of repetition and regularity in music. Here, we aimed to define relationships between the subcortical processing of speech regularities, music aptitude, and reading abilities in children with and without reading impairment. We hypothesized that, in combination with auditory cognitive abilities, neural sensitivity to regularities in ongoing speech provides a common biological mechanism underlying the development of music and reading abilities. We assessed auditory working memory and attention, music aptitude, reading ability, and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities in 42 school-aged children with a wide range of reading ability. Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities was assessed by recording brainstem responses to the same speech sound presented in predictable and variable speech streams. Through correlation analyses and structural equation modeling, we reveal that music aptitude and literacy both relate to the extent of subcortical adaptation to regularities in ongoing speech as well as with auditory working memory and attention. Relationships between music and speech processing are specifically driven by performance on a musical rhythm task, underscoring the importance of rhythmic regularity for both language and music. These data indicate common brain mechanisms underlying reading and music abilities that relate to how the nervous system responds to regularities in auditory input. Definition of common biological underpinnings

  16. Subcortical processing of speech regularities underlies reading and music aptitude in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strait Dana L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities supports fundamental human behaviors such as hearing in noise and reading. Although the failure to encode acoustic regularities in ongoing speech has been associated with language and literacy deficits, how auditory expertise, such as the expertise that is associated with musical skill, relates to the brainstem processing of speech regularities is unknown. An association between musical skill and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities would not be surprising given the importance of repetition and regularity in music. Here, we aimed to define relationships between the subcortical processing of speech regularities, music aptitude, and reading abilities in children with and without reading impairment. We hypothesized that, in combination with auditory cognitive abilities, neural sensitivity to regularities in ongoing speech provides a common biological mechanism underlying the development of music and reading abilities. Methods We assessed auditory working memory and attention, music aptitude, reading ability, and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities in 42 school-aged children with a wide range of reading ability. Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities was assessed by recording brainstem responses to the same speech sound presented in predictable and variable speech streams. Results Through correlation analyses and structural equation modeling, we reveal that music aptitude and literacy both relate to the extent of subcortical adaptation to regularities in ongoing speech as well as with auditory working memory and attention. Relationships between music and speech processing are specifically driven by performance on a musical rhythm task, underscoring the importance of rhythmic regularity for both language and music. Conclusions These data indicate common brain mechanisms underlying reading and music abilities that relate to how the nervous system responds to

  17. Asymptotic performance of regularized quadratic discriminant analysis based classifiers

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2017-12-13

    This paper carries out a large dimensional analysis of the standard regularized quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier designed on the assumption that data arise from a Gaussian mixture model. The analysis relies on fundamental results from random matrix theory (RMT) when both the number of features and the cardinality of the training data within each class grow large at the same pace. Under some mild assumptions, we show that the asymptotic classification error converges to a deterministic quantity that depends only on the covariances and means associated with each class as well as the problem dimensions. Such a result permits a better understanding of the performance of regularized QDA and can be used to determine the optimal regularization parameter that minimizes the misclassification error probability. Despite being valid only for Gaussian data, our theoretical findings are shown to yield a high accuracy in predicting the performances achieved with real data sets drawn from popular real data bases, thereby making an interesting connection between theory and practice.

  18. Nonlocal Regularized Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques for MRI: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to revitalize researchers' interest in algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART by expanding their capabilities and demonstrating their potential in speeding up the process of MRI acquisition. Using a continuous-to-discrete model, we experimentally study the application of ART into MRI reconstruction which unifies previous nonuniform-fast-Fourier-transform- (NUFFT- based and gridding-based approaches. Under the framework of ART, we advocate the use of nonlocal regularization techniques which are leveraged from our previous research on modeling photographic images. It is experimentally shown that nonlocal regularization ART (NR-ART can often outperform their local counterparts in terms of both subjective and objective qualities of reconstructed images. On one real-world k-space data set, we find that nonlocal regularization can achieve satisfactory reconstruction from as few as one-third of samples. We also address an issue related to image reconstruction from real-world k-space data but overlooked in the open literature: the consistency of reconstructed images across different resolutions. A resolution-consistent extension of NR-ART is developed and shown to effectively suppress the artifacts arising from frequency extrapolation. Both source codes and experimental results of this work are made fully reproducible.

  19. Manifold regularized multitask feature learning for multimodality disease classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Biao; Zhang, Daoqiang; Cheng, Bo; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-02-01

    Multimodality based methods have shown great advantages in classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, that is, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Recently, multitask feature selection methods are typically used for joint selection of common features across multiple modalities. However, one disadvantage of existing multimodality based methods is that they ignore the useful data distribution information in each modality, which is essential for subsequent classification. Accordingly, in this paper we propose a manifold regularized multitask feature learning method to preserve both the intrinsic relatedness among multiple modalities of data and the data distribution information in each modality. Specifically, we denote the feature learning on each modality as a single task, and use group-sparsity regularizer to capture the intrinsic relatedness among multiple tasks (i.e., modalities) and jointly select the common features from multiple tasks. Furthermore, we introduce a new manifold-based Laplacian regularizer to preserve the data distribution information from each task. Finally, we use the multikernel support vector machine method to fuse multimodality data for eventual classification. Conversely, we also extend our method to the semisupervised setting, where only partial data are labeled. We evaluate our method using the baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data of subjects from AD neuroimaging initiative database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can not only achieve improved classification performance, but also help to discover the disease-related brain regions useful for disease diagnosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A Large Dimensional Analysis of Regularized Discriminant Analysis Classifiers

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2017-11-01

    This article carries out a large dimensional analysis of standard regularized discriminant analysis classifiers designed on the assumption that data arise from a Gaussian mixture model with different means and covariances. The analysis relies on fundamental results from random matrix theory (RMT) when both the number of features and the cardinality of the training data within each class grow large at the same pace. Under mild assumptions, we show that the asymptotic classification error approaches a deterministic quantity that depends only on the means and covariances associated with each class as well as the problem dimensions. Such a result permits a better understanding of the performance of regularized discriminant analsysis, in practical large but finite dimensions, and can be used to determine and pre-estimate the optimal regularization parameter that minimizes the misclassification error probability. Despite being theoretically valid only for Gaussian data, our findings are shown to yield a high accuracy in predicting the performances achieved with real data sets drawn from the popular USPS data base, thereby making an interesting connection between theory and practice.

  1. Conservative regularization of ideal hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    2010-03-01

    Inviscid, incompressible hydrodynamics and incompressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) share many properties such as time-reversal invariance of equations, conservation laws, and certain topological features. In three dimensions, these systems may lead to singular solutions (involving vortex and current sheets). While dissipative (viscoresistive) effects can regularize the equations leading to bounded solutions to the initial-boundary value (Cauchy) problem which presumably exist uniquely, the time-reversal symmetry and associated conservation properties are certainly destroyed. The present work is analogous to (and suggested by) the Korteweg-de Vries regularization of the one-dimensional, nonlinear kinematic wave equation. Thus the regularizations applied to the original equations of hydrodynamics and ideal MHD retain conservation properties and the symmetries of the original equations. Integral invariants which generalize those known for the original systems are shown to imply bounded enstrophy. The regularization developed can also be applied to the corresponding dissipative models (such as the Navier-Stokes equations and the viscoresistive MHD equations) and may imply interesting regularity properties for the solutions of the latter as well. The models developed thus have intrinsic mathematical interest as well as possible applications to large-scale numerical simulations in systems where dissipative effects are extremely small or even absent.

  2. Regularities, Natural Patterns and Laws of Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathis Psillos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available  The goal of this paper is to sketch an empiricist metaphysics of laws of nature. The key idea is that there are regularities without regularity-enforcers. Differently put, there are natural laws without law-makers of a distinct metaphysical kind. This sketch will rely on the concept of a natural pattern and more significantly on the existence of a network of natural patterns in nature. The relation between a regularity and a pattern will be analysed in terms of mereology.  Here is the road map. In section 2, I will briefly discuss the relation between empiricism and metaphysics, aiming to show that an empiricist metaphysics is possible. In section 3, I will offer arguments against stronger metaphysical views of laws. Then, in section 4 I will motivate nomic objectivism. In section 5, I will address the question ‘what is a regularity?’ and will develop a novel answer to it, based on the notion of a natural pattern. In section 6, I will raise the question: ‘what is a law of nature?’, the answer to which will be: a law of nature is a regularity that is characterised by the unity of a natural pattern.

  3. Parameter fitting in three-flavor Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with various regularizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohyama, H. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Kimura, D., E-mail: kimurad@ube-k.ac.jp [General Education, Ube National College of Technology, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Inagaki, T. [Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Core of Research for the Energetic Universe, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We study the three-flavor Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with various regularization procedures. We perform parameter fitting in each regularization and apply the obtained parameter sets to evaluate various physical quantities, several light meson masses, decay constant and the topological susceptibility. The model parameters are adopted even at very high cutoff scale compare to the hadronic scale to study the asymptotic behavior of the model. It is found that all the regularization methods except for the dimensional one actually lead reliable physical predictions for the kaon decay constant, sigma meson mass and topological susceptibility without restricting the ultra-violet cutoff below the hadronic scale.

  4. Fractional Regularization Term for Variational Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Verdú-Monedero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is a widely used task of image analysis with applications in many fields. Its classical formulation and current improvements are given in the spatial domain. In this paper a regularization term based on fractional order derivatives is formulated. This term is defined and implemented in the frequency domain by translating the energy functional into the frequency domain and obtaining the Euler-Lagrange equations which minimize it. The new regularization term leads to a simple formulation and design, being applicable to higher dimensions by using the corresponding multidimensional Fourier transform. The proposed regularization term allows for a real gradual transition from a diffusion registration to a curvature registration which is best suited to some applications and it is not possible in the spatial domain. Results with 3D actual images show the validity of this approach.

  5. Stream Processing Using Grammars and Regular Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ulrik Terp

    In this dissertation we study regular expression based parsing and the use of grammatical specifications for the synthesis of fast, streaming string-processing programs. In the first part we develop two linear-time algorithms for regular expression based parsing with Perl-style greedy...... disambiguation. The first algorithm operates in two passes in a semi-streaming fashion, using a constant amount of working memory and an auxiliary tape storage which is written in the first pass and consumed by the second. The second algorithm is a single-pass and optimally streaming algorithm which outputs...... as much of the parse tree as is semantically possible based on the input prefix read so far, and resorts to buffering as many symbols as is required to resolve the next choice. Optimality is obtained by performing a PSPACE-complete pre-analysis on the regular expression. In the second part we present...

  6. Surface counterterms and regularized holographic complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Run-Qiu; Niu, Chao; Kim, Keun-Young

    2017-09-01

    The holographic complexity is UV divergent. As a finite complexity, we propose a "regularized complexity" by employing a similar method to the holographic renor-malization. We add codimension-two boundary counterterms which do not contain any boundary stress tensor information. It means that we subtract only non-dynamic back-ground and all the dynamic information of holographic complexity is contained in the regularized part. After showing the general counterterms for both CA and CV conjectures in holographic spacetime dimension 5 and less, we give concrete examples: the BTZ black holes and the four and five dimensional Schwarzschild AdS black holes. We propose how to obtain the counterterms in higher spacetime dimensions and show explicit formulas only for some special cases with enough symmetries. We also compute the complexity of formation by using the regularized complexity.

  7. REX XML shallow parsing with regular expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R D

    1999-01-01

    The syntax of XML is simple enough that it is possible to parse an XML document into a list of its markup and text items using a single regular expression. Such a shallow parse of an XML document can be very useful for the construction of a variety of lightweight XML processing tools. However, complex regular expressions can be difficult to construct and even more difficult to read. Using a form of literate programming for regular expressions, this paper documents a set of XML shallow parsing expressions that can be used a basis for simple, correct, efficient, robust and language-independent XML shallow parsing. Complete shallow parser implementations of less than 50 lines each in Perl, JavaScript and Lex/Flex are also given. (0 refs).

  8. Contour Propagation With Riemannian Elasticity Regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Sapru, W.

    2011-01-01

    guided corrections. This study compares manual delineations in replanning CT scans of head-and-neck patients to automatic contour propagation using deformable registration with Riemannian regularization. The potential benefit of locally assigned regularization parameters according to tissue type...... is investigated. Materials/Methods: Planning PET-CT scans plus 2 - 4 subsequent replanning CTs for five head-and-neck cancer patients were obtained. The Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was manually delineated on the planning CT by an experienced clinician and manually propagated by pasting the set of contours from...... the planning CT onto the rescans and correcting to reflect actual anatomical changes. For deformable registration, a free-form, multi-level, B-spline deformation model with Riemannian elasticity, penalizing non-rigid local deformations, and volumetric changes, was used. Regularization parameters was defined...

  9. Generalized inverse beamforming with optimized regularization strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, P. A. G.; De Roeck, W.; Janssens, K.; Arruda, J. R. F.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2011-04-01

    A promising recent development on acoustic source localization and source strength estimation is the generalized inverse beamforming, which is based on the microphone array cross-spectral matrix eigenstructure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional beamforming, including a higher accuracy on the source center localization and strength estimation even with distributed coherent sources. This paper aims to improve the strength estimation of the generalized inverse beamforming method with an automated regularization factor definition. Also in this work, a virtual target grid is introduced, and source mapping and strength estimation are obtained disregarding, as much as possible, the reflections influence. Two simple problems are used to compare the generalized inverse performance with fixed regularization factor to performance obtained using the optimized regularization strategy. Numerical and experimental data are used, and two other strength estimation methods are also evaluated for reference.

  10. Regularization and Migration Policy in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe de Bruycker

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The following pages present, in a general way, the contents of Regularization of illegal immigrants in the European Union, which includes a comparative synthesis and statistical information for each of the eight countries involved; a description of actions since the beginning of the year 2000; and a systematic analysis of the different categories of foreigners, the types of regularization carried out, and the rules that have governed these actions.In relation to regularization, the author considers the political coherence of the actions taken by the member states as well as how they relate to two ever more crucial aspects of immigration policy –the integration of legal resident immigrants and the fight againstillegal immigration in the context of a control of migratory flows.

  11. Regular-fat dairy and human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Bradley, Beth H Rice; Brenna, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014......) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular...

  12. Deconvolution and Regularization with Toeplitz Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian

    2002-01-01

    treatment requires the use of regularization methods. The corresponding computational problem takes the form of structured matrix problem with a Toeplitz or block Toeplitz coefficient matrix. The aim of this paper is to present a tutorial survey of numerical algorithms for the practical treatment...... of these discretized deconvolution problems, with emphasis on methods that take the special structure of the matrix into account. Wherever possible, analogies to classical DFT-based deconvolution problems are drawn. Among other things, we present direct methods for regularization with Toeplitz matrices, and we show...

  13. Shearlet-Wavelet Regularized Semismooth Newton Iteration for Image Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image normally has both dots-like and curve structures. But the traditional wavelet or multidirectional wave (ridgelet, contourlet, curvelet, etc. could only restore one of these structures efficiently so that the restoration results for complex images are unsatisfactory. For the image restoration, this paper adopted a strategy of combined shearlet and wavelet frame and proposed a new restoration method. Theoretically, image sparse representation of dots-like and curve structures could be achieved by shearlet and wavelet, respectively. Under the L1 regularization, the two frame-sparse structures could show their respective advantages and efficiently restore the two structures. In order to achieve superlinear convergence, this paper applied semismooth Newton method based on subgradient to solve objective functional without differentiability. Finally, through numerical results, the effectiveness of this strategy was validated, which presented outstanding advantages for any individual frame alone. Some detailed information that could not be restored in individual frame could be clearly demonstrated with this strategy.

  14. Auditory feedback in error-based learning of motor regularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Floris T; Tillmann, Barbara

    2015-05-05

    Music and speech are skills that require high temporal precision of motor output. A key question is how humans achieve this timing precision given the poor temporal resolution of somatosensory feedback, which is classically considered to drive motor learning. We hypothesise that auditory feedback critically contributes to learn timing, and that, similarly to visuo-spatial learning models, learning proceeds by correcting a proportion of perceived timing errors. Thirty-six participants learned to tap a sequence regularly in time. For participants in the synchronous-sound group, a tone was presented simultaneously with every keystroke. For the jittered-sound group, the tone was presented after a random delay of 10-190 ms following the keystroke, thus degrading the temporal information that the sound provided about the movement. For the mute group, no keystroke-triggered sound was presented. In line with the model predictions, participants in the synchronous-sound group were able to improve tapping regularity, whereas the jittered-sound and mute group were not. The improved tapping regularity of the synchronous-sound group also transferred to a novel sequence and was maintained when sound was subsequently removed. The present findings provide evidence that humans engage in auditory feedback error-based learning to improve movement quality (here reduce variability in sequence tapping). We thus elucidate the mechanism by which high temporal precision of movement can be achieved through sound in a way that may not be possible with less temporally precise somatosensory modalities. Furthermore, the finding that sound-supported learning generalises to novel sequences suggests potential rehabilitation applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Motivation of Online Buyer Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veronika Svatosová

    2013-01-01

    .... The subject matter of this article is an analysis of the features of online buyer behavior compared to the general regularities of buyer behavior, definition of the main motives of online shopping...

  16. On a correspondence between regular and non-regular operator monotone functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibilisco, P.; Hansen, Frank; Isola, T.

    2009-01-01

    We prove the existence of a bijection between the regular and the non-regular operator monotone functions satisfying a certain functional equation. As an application we give a new proof of the operator monotonicity of certain functions related to the Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew information....

  17. Health Risk Behaviors and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information visit www. cdc. gov/ HealthyYouth/ health_ and_ academics or call 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for ...

  18. Orientating Children in Regular Schools towards Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, P. P.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses audio-visual material and other education techniques which eventually may facilitate the integration of children with mental, physical, and sensory impairments in the regular classroom. Films, radio texts, theater plays, and books are considered. Emphasis is on the introduction of impairments to the nonhandicapped population.…

  19. Regular ultrafilters and finite square principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennedy, J.; Shelah, S.; Väänänen, J.

    2008-01-01

    We show that many singular cardinals lambda above a strongly compact cardinal have regular ultrafilters D that violate the finite square principle square(fin)(lambda,D) introduced in [3]. For such ultrafilters D and cardinals lambda there are models of size lambda for which M-lambda/D is not

  20. Broad temperature range antiferroelectric regular mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Roman; Czuprynski, Krzysztof; Gasowska, J.; Oton, Jose; Quintana, Xabier; Castillo, P. L.; Bennis, N.

    2004-09-01

    Tristate regular mixtures with different electro-optical properties such as threshold voltage, saturation voltage, holding ratio and response time are presented. The relation of properties with the structure of compounds is discussed. All of mixtures show only moderate dynamic and static contrast but big gray level scale without hysteresis for positive and negative field driving.

  1. Regular matrix transformation on triple sequence spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal Debnath

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to introduce the necessary and sufficient condition for a particular type of transformation of the form A: (a......  be regular from a triple sequence space to another triple sequence space.

  2. Regular and context-free nominal traces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degano, Pierpaolo; Ferrari, Gian-Luigi; Mezzetti, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of automata are presented, for recognising new classes of regular and context-free nominal languages. We compare their expressive power with analogous proposals in the literature, showing that they express novel classes of languages. Although many properties of classical languages hold ...

  3. On bigraded regularities of Rees algebra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramakrishna Nanduri

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... K-algebra were defined in terms of syzygies [18, Definition 5.4] (also see [10, Defini- tion 1.1.3]). Since R(I) ... way (see Definition 2.3). We also define the Tor bigraded regularities of R; see ...... referee for a thorough reading of the manuscript and suggesting some improvements. References. [1] Aramova A ...

  4. From recreational to regular drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2011-01-01

    to extricate themselves from this pattern. Hence, when regular drug users talk about their future, it is not a future characterised by total abstinence from illegal drugs but a future where they have rolled back their drug use career to the recreational drug use pattern they started out with. Empirically...

  5. On regular riesz operators | Raubenheimer | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The r-asymptotically quasi finite rank operators on Banach lattices are examples of regular Riesz operators. We characterise Riesz elements in a subalgebra of a Banach algebra in terms of Riesz elements in the Banach algebra. This enables us to characterise r-asymptotically quasi finite rank operators in terms of adjoint ...

  6. Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166856.html Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students When erratic snoozers improve shut-eye habits, ... Health and Human Services. More Health News on College Health Healthy Sleep Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics College ...

  7. 28 CFR 540.44 - Regular visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regular visitors. 540.44 Section 540.44... and if there exists no reason to exclude them. (c) Friends and associates. The visiting privilege ordinarily will be extended to friends and associates having an established relationship with the inmate...

  8. Neural Classifier Construction using Regularization, Pruning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintz-Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for construction of feed-forward neural classifiers based on regularization and adaptive architectures. Using a penalized maximum likelihood scheme, we derive a modified form of the entropic error measure and an algebraic estimate of the test error. In conjunction...

  9. Regularization algorithms based on total least squares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; O'Leary, Dianne P.

    1996-01-01

    or truncated {\\em SVD}, are not designed for problems in which both the coefficient matrix and the right-hand side are known only approximately. For this reason, we develop {\\em TLS}\\/-based regularization methods that take this situation into account. Here, we survey two different approaches to incorporation...

  10. Stabilization, pole placement, and regular implementability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belur, MN; Trentelman, HL

    In this paper, we study control by interconnection of linear differential systems. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for regular implementability of a-given linear, differential system. We formulate the problems of stabilization and pole placement as problems of finding a suitable,

  11. Stabilization, Pole Placement, and Regular Implementability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belur, Madhu N.; Trentelman, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study control by interconnection of linear differential systems. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for regular implementability of a given linear differential system. We formulate the problems of stabilization and pole placement as problems of finding a suitable,

  12. A Sim(2 invariant dimensional regularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alfaro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a Sim(2 invariant dimensional regularization of loop integrals. Then we can compute the one loop quantum corrections to the photon self energy, electron self energy and vertex in the Electrodynamics sector of the Very Special Relativity Standard Model (VSRSM.

  13. Annotation of regular polysemy and underspecification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Alonso, Héctor; Pedersen, Bolette Sandford; Bel, Núria

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of an annotation task on regular polysemy for a series of seman- tic classes or dot types in English, Dan- ish and Spanish. This article describes the annotation process, the results in terms of inter-encoder agreement, and the sense distributions obtained with two methods...

  14. Effects of Self-Monitoring Package to Improve Social Skill of Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders in Japanese Regular Classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handa, Ken; Noro, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of a self-monitoring package to improve a targeted social skill and problem behavior of two elementary school students with autism spectrum disorders placed in regular classroom...

  15. Addressing Academic Dishonesty among the Highest Achievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angela D.; Murdock, Tamera B.; Grotewiel, Morgan M.

    2017-01-01

    Although research shows that higher-achieving students report engaging in cheating behaviors less frequently than lower-achieving students, the cheating rates among this population are still startling. Certain aspects of the context of being a high-achieving student support academic dishonesty. We investigate integrity among the highest achievers…

  16. On minimal energy dipole moment distributions in regular polygonal agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Adriano Possebon; Cunha, Francisco Ricardo; Ceniceros, Hector Daniel

    2017-01-01

    distinctive regimes in the magnetization, which corresponds to two very different susceptibilities, in marked contrast to the behavior observed in regular polygonal structures.

  17. Thermal depth profiling of vascular lesions: automated regularization of reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Choi, Bernard; Zhang, Jenny R; Kim, Jeehyun; Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)], E-mail: wverkruy@uci.edu

    2008-03-07

    Pulsed photo-thermal radiometry (PPTR) is a non-invasive, non-contact diagnostic technique used to locate cutaneous chromophores such as melanin (epidermis) and hemoglobin (vascular structures). Clinical utility of PPTR is limited because it typically requires trained user intervention to regularize the inversion solution. Herein, the feasibility of automated regularization was studied. A second objective of this study was to depart from modeling port wine stain PWS, a vascular skin lesion frequently studied with PPTR, as strictly layered structures since this may influence conclusions regarding PPTR reconstruction quality. Average blood vessel depths, diameters and densities derived from histology of 30 PWS patients were used to generate 15 randomized lesion geometries for which we simulated PPTR signals. Reconstruction accuracy for subjective regularization was compared with that for automated regularization methods. The objective regularization approach performed better. However, the average difference was much smaller than the variation between the 15 simulated profiles. Reconstruction quality depended more on the actual profile to be reconstructed than on the reconstruction algorithm or regularization method. Similar, or better, accuracy reconstructions can be achieved with an automated regularization procedure which enhances prospects for user friendly implementation of PPTR to optimize laser therapy on an individual patient basis.

  18. Correlates of regular cigarette smoking in a population-based sample of Australian twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Lynskey, Michael T; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Martin, Nicholas G

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the role of measured risk factors and the influence of genetic and environmental factors on regular cigarette smoking. Design Members of monozygotic and dizygotic, including unlike-sex twin pairs (n = 6257) from a young adult cohort from the Australian Twin Registry. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine whether putative risk factors were significantly associated with regular cigarette smoking. Risk factors were classified into four tiers: tier 1 (parental history, including parental education, alcoholism and cigarette smoking), tier 2 (early home and family influences), tier 3 (early life events, e.g. trauma) and tier 4 (psychiatric symptoms/disorders with onset prior to 14 years), after controlling for gender, zygosity and their interactions. Genetic models were fitted to examine the heritability of smoking behavior before and after controlling for significant covariates from the four tiers. Parental history of cigarette smoking and alcoholism, parental closeness and home environment, as well as incidence of childhood sexual abuse or other trauma, a history of early onset panic attacks and conduct problems were associated with regular cigarette smoking. Important age interactions were found, particularly for family background risk factors. Regular cigarette smoking was moderately heritable, even after accounting for significant covariates. Several measured risk factors are associated with regular smoking. While some of the genetic influences on regular smoking may be shared with these risk factors, a significant proportion of the genetic vulnerability to regular smoking is phenotype-specific.

  19. Regular Magnetic Black Hole Gravitational Lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The Bronnikov regular magnetic black hole as a gravitational lens is studied. In nonlinear electrodynamics, photons do not follow null geodesics of background geometry, but move along null geodesics of a corresponding effective geometry. To study the Bronnikov regular magnetic black hole gravitational lensing in the strong deflection limit, the corresponding effective geometry should be obtained firstly. This is the most important and key step. We obtain the deflection angle in the strong deflection limit, and further calculate the angular positions and magnifications of relativistic images as well as the time delay between different relativistic images. The influence of the magnetic charge on the black hole gravitational lensing is also discussed. Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Education Department of Shannxi Province under Grant No 15JK1077, and the Doctorial Scientific Research Starting Fund of Shannxi University of Science and Technology under Grant No BJ12-02.

  20. Exploring the structural regularities in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Guo, Jia-Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of exploring structural regularities of networks by dividing the nodes of a network into groups such that the members of each group have similar patterns of connections to other groups. Specifically, we propose a general statistical model to describe network structure. In this model, group is viewed as hidden or unobserved quantity and it is learned by fitting the observed network data using the expectation-maximization algorithm. Compared with existing models, the most prominent strength of our model is the high flexibility. This strength enables it to possess the advantages of existing models and overcomes their shortcomings in a unified way. As a result, not only broad types of structure can be detected without prior knowledge of what type of intrinsic regularities exist in the network, but also the type of identified structure can be directly learned from data. Moreover, by differentiating outgoing edges from incoming edges, our model can detect several types of stru...

  1. Regularized algorithm for Raman lidar data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Valery

    2007-08-01

    A regularized algorithm that has the potential to improve the quality of Raman lidar data processing is presented. Compared to the conventional scheme, the proposed algorithm has the advantage, which results from the fact that it is based on a well-posed procedure. That is, the profile of the aerosol backscatter coefficient is computed directly, using the explicit relationships, without numerical differentiation. Thereafter, the profile of the lidar ratio is retrieved as a regularized solution of a first-kind Volterra integral equation. Once these two steps have been completed, the profile of the aerosol extinction coefficient is computed by a straightforward multiplication. The numerical simulations demonstrated that the proposed algorithm provides good accuracy and resolution of aerosol profile retrievals. The error analysis showed that the retrieved profiles are continuous functions of the measurement errors and of the a priori information uncertainties.

  2. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  3. Effort variation regularization in sound field reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanakis, Nick; Jacobsen, Finn; Sarris, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    . Specifically, it is suggested that the phase differential of the source driving signals should be in agreement with the phase differential of the desired sound pressure field. The performance of the suggested method is compared with that of conventional effort regularization, wave field synthesis (WFS......In this paper, active control is used in order to reproduce a given sound field in an extended spatial region. A method is proposed which minimizes the reproduction error at a number of control positions with the reproduction sources holding a certain relation within their complex strengths......), and adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS), both under free-field conditions and in reverberant rooms. It is shown that effort variation regularization overcomes the problems associated with small spaces and with a low ratio of direct to reverberant energy, improving thus the reproduction accuracy...

  4. Basic analysis of regularized series and products

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgenson, Jay A

    1993-01-01

    Analytic number theory and part of the spectral theory of operators (differential, pseudo-differential, elliptic, etc.) are being merged under amore general analytic theory of regularized products of certain sequences satisfying a few basic axioms. The most basic examples consist of the sequence of natural numbers, the sequence of zeros with positive imaginary part of the Riemann zeta function, and the sequence of eigenvalues, say of a positive Laplacian on a compact or certain cases of non-compact manifolds. The resulting theory is applicable to ergodic theory and dynamical systems; to the zeta and L-functions of number theory or representation theory and modular forms; to Selberg-like zeta functions; andto the theory of regularized determinants familiar in physics and other parts of mathematics. Aside from presenting a systematic account of widely scattered results, the theory also provides new results. One part of the theory deals with complex analytic properties, and another part deals with Fourier analys...

  5. Chiral Perturbation Theory With Lattice Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Ouimet, P P A

    2005-01-01

    In this work, alternative methods to regularize chiral perturbation theory are discussed. First, Long Distance Regularization will be considered in the presence of the decuplet of the lightest spin 32 baryons for several different observables. This serves motivation and introduction to the use of the lattice regulator for chiral perturbation theory. The mesonic, baryonic and anomalous sectors of chiral perturbation theory will be formulated on a lattice of space time points. The consistency of the lattice as a regulator will be discussed in the context of the meson and baryon masses. Order a effects will also be discussed for the baryon masses, sigma terms and magnetic moments. The work will close with an attempt to derive an effective Wess-Zumino-Witten Lagrangian for Wilson fermions at non-zero a. Following this discussion, there will be a proposal for a phenomenologically useful WZW Lagrangian at non-zero a.

  6. Testing the Equivalence of Regular Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Almeida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The minimal deterministic finite automaton is generally used to determine regular languages equality. Antimirov and Mosses proposed a rewrite system for deciding regular expressions equivalence of which Almeida et al. presented an improved variant. Hopcroft and Karp proposed an almost linear algorithm for testing the equivalence of two deterministic finite automata that avoids minimisation. In this paper we improve the best-case running time, present an extension of this algorithm to non-deterministic finite automata, and establish a relationship between this algorithm and the one proposed in Almeida et al. We also present some experimental comparative results. All these algorithms are closely related with the recent coalgebraic approach to automata proposed by Rutten.

  7. Regularization in Orbital Mechanics; Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Regularized equations of motion can improve numerical integration for the propagation of orbits, and simplify the treatment of mission design problems. This monograph discusses standard techniques and recent research in the area. While each scheme is derived analytically, its accuracy is investigated numerically. Algebraic and topological aspects of the formulations are studied, as well as their application to practical scenarios such as spacecraft relative motion and new low-thrust trajectories.

  8. Implementing regularization implicitly via approximate eigenvector computation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Michael W.; Orecchia, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Regularization is a powerful technique for extracting useful information from noisy data. Typically, it is implemented by adding some sort of norm constraint to an objective function and then exactly optimizing the modified objective function. This procedure often leads to optimization problems that are computationally more expensive than the original problem, a fact that is clearly problematic if one is interested in large-scale applications. On the other hand, a large body of empirical work...

  9. Regular black hole in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo; Yoon, Myungseok

    2008-01-01

    We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  10. Bifurcations in the regularized Ericksen bar model

    OpenAIRE

    Grinfeld, M.; Lord, G. J. (Gabriel J.)

    2007-01-01

    We consider the regularized Ericksen model of an elastic bar on an elastic foundation on an interval with Dirichlet boundary conditions as a two-parameter bifurcation problem. We explore, using local bifurcation analysis and continuation methods, the structure of bifurcations from double zero eigenvalues. Our results provide evidence in support of M\\"uller's conjecture \\cite{Muller} concerning the symmetry of local minimizers of the associated energy functional and describe in detail the stru...

  11. On bigraded regularities of Rees algebra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For any homogeneous ideal I in K [ x 1 , . . . , x n ] of analytic spread ℓ , we show that for the Rees algebra R ( I ) , r e g ( 0 , 1 ) s y z \\sl ( R ( I ) ) = r e g ( 0 , 1 ) T \\sl ( R ( I ) ) . We compute a formula for the (0, 1)-regularity of R ( I ) , which is a bigraded analog of Theorem1.1 of Aramova and Herzog ( A m . J . M a t h . 122 ( 4 ) ...

  12. Preconditioners for regularized saddle point matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2011), s. 91-112 ISSN 1570-2820 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : saddle point matrices * preconditioning * regularization * eigenvalue clustering Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.533, year: 2011 http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jnma.2011.19.issue-2/jnum.2011.005/jnum.2011.005. xml

  13. A short proof of increased parabolic regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Pankavich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a short proof of the increased regularity obtained by solutions to uniformly parabolic partial differential equations. Though this setting is fairly introductory, our new method of proof, which uses a priori estimates and an inductive method, can be extended to prove analogous results for problems with time-dependent coefficients, advection-diffusion or reaction diffusion equations, and nonlinear PDEs even when other tools, such as semigroup methods or the use of explicit fundamental solutions, are unavailable.

  14. Regularity bounds on Zakharov system evolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colliander

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial regularity properties of certain global-in-time solutions of the Zakharov system are established. In particular, the evolving solution $u(t$ is shown to satisfy an estimate $|u(t|_{H^s} leq C |t|^{(s-1+}$, where $H^s$ is the standard spatial Sobolev norm. The proof is an adaptation of earlier work on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation which reduces matters to bilinear estimates.

  15. Hyperspectral Image Recovery via Hybrid Regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arablouei, Reza; de Hoog, Frank

    2016-09-27

    Natural images tend to mostly consist of smooth regions with individual pixels having highly correlated spectra. This information can be exploited to recover hyperspectral images of natural scenes from their incomplete and noisy measurements. To perform the recovery while taking full advantage of the prior knowledge, we formulate a composite cost function containing a square-error data-fitting term and two distinct regularization terms pertaining to spatial and spectral domains. The regularization for the spatial domain is the sum of total-variation of the image frames corresponding to all spectral bands. The regularization for the spectral domain is the ��������-norm of the coefficient matrix obtained by applying a suitable sparsifying transform to the spectra of the pixels. We use an accelerated proximal-subgradient method to minimize the formulated cost function. We analyse the performance of the proposed algorithm and prove its convergence. Numerical simulations using real hyperspectral images exhibit that the proposed algorithm offers an excellent recovery performance with a number of measurements that is only a small fraction of the hyperspectral image data size. Simulation results also show that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms an accelerated proximal-gradient algorithm that solves the classical basis-pursuit denoising problem to recover the hyperspectral image.

  16. Bypassing the Limits of Ll Regularization: Convex Sparse Signal Processing Using Non-Convex Regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Ankit

    Sparsity has become the basis of some important signal processing methods over the last ten years. Many signal processing problems (e.g., denoising, deconvolution, non-linear component analysis) can be expressed as inverse problems. Sparsity is invoked through the formulation of an inverse problem with suitably designed regularization terms. The regularization terms alone encode sparsity into the problem formulation. Often, the ℓ1 norm is used to induce sparsity, so much so that ℓ1 regularization is considered to be `modern least-squares'. The use of ℓ1 norm, as a sparsity-inducing regularizer, leads to a convex optimization problem, which has several benefits: the absence of extraneous local minima, well developed theory of globally convergent algorithms, even for large-scale problems. Convex regularization via the ℓ1 norm, however, tends to under-estimate the non-zero values of sparse signals. In order to estimate the non-zero values more accurately, non-convex regularization is often favored over convex regularization. However, non-convex regularization generally leads to non-convex optimization, which suffers from numerous issues: convergence may be guaranteed to only a stationary point, problem specific parameters may be difficult to set, and the solution is sensitive to the initialization of the algorithm. The first part of this thesis is aimed toward combining the benefits of non-convex regularization and convex optimization to estimate sparse signals more effectively. To this end, we propose to use parameterized non-convex regularizers with designated non-convexity and provide a range for the non-convex parameter so as to ensure that the objective function is strictly convex. By ensuring convexity of the objective function (sum of data-fidelity and non-convex regularizer), we can make use of a wide variety of convex optimization algorithms to obtain the unique global minimum reliably. The second part of this thesis proposes a non-linear signal

  17. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  18. A multiresolution method for solving the Poisson equation using high order regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel high order multiresolution Poisson solver based on regularized Green's function solutions to obtain exact free-space boundary conditions while using fast Fourier transforms for computational efficiency. Multiresolution is a achieved through local refinement patches and regulari......We present a novel high order multiresolution Poisson solver based on regularized Green's function solutions to obtain exact free-space boundary conditions while using fast Fourier transforms for computational efficiency. Multiresolution is a achieved through local refinement patches...... and regularized Green's functions corresponding to the difference in the spatial resolution between the patches. The full solution is obtained utilizing the linearity of the Poisson equation enabling super-position of solutions. We show that the multiresolution Poisson solver produces convergence rates...

  19. Explicit B-spline regularization in diffeomorphic image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustison, Nicholas J; Avants, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    Diffeomorphic mappings are central to image registration due largely to their topological properties and success in providing biologically plausible solutions to deformation and morphological estimation problems. Popular diffeomorphic image registration algorithms include those characterized by time-varying and constant velocity fields, and symmetrical considerations. Prior information in the form of regularization is used to enforce transform plausibility taking the form of physics-based constraints or through some approximation thereof, e.g., Gaussian smoothing of the vector fields [a la Thirion's Demons (Thirion, 1998)]. In the context of the original Demons' framework, the so-called directly manipulated free-form deformation (DMFFD) (Tustison et al., 2009) can be viewed as a smoothing alternative in which explicit regularization is achieved through fast B-spline approximation. This characterization can be used to provide B-spline "flavored" diffeomorphic image registration solutions with several advantages. Implementation is open source and available through the Insight Toolkit and our Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) repository. A thorough comparative evaluation with the well-known SyN algorithm (Avants et al., 2008), implemented within the same framework, and its B-spline analog is performed using open labeled brain data and open source evaluation tools.

  20. Regularization of parallel MRI reconstruction using in vivo coil sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qi; Otazo, Ricardo; Xu, Jian; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2009-02-01

    Parallel MRI can achieve increased spatiotemporal resolution in MRI by simultaneously sampling reduced k-space data with multiple receiver coils. One requirement that different parallel MRI techniques have in common is the need to determine spatial sensitivity information for the coil array. This is often done by smoothing the raw sensitivities obtained from low-resolution calibration images, for example via polynomial fitting. However, this sensitivity post-processing can be both time-consuming and error-prone. Another important factor in Parallel MRI is noise amplification in the reconstruction, which is due to non-unity transformations in the image reconstruction associated with spatially correlated coil sensitivity profiles. Generally, regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov and SVD-based methods, are applied to reduce SNR loss, at the price of introducing residual aliasing. In this work, we present a regularization approach using in vivo coil sensitivities in parallel MRI to overcome these potential errors into the reconstruction. The mathematical background of the proposed method is explained, and the technique is demonstrated with phantom images. The effectiveness of the proposed method is then illustrated clinically in a whole-heart 3D cardiac MR acquisition within a single breath-hold. The proposed method can not only overcome the sensitivity calibration problem, but also suppress a substantial portion of reconstruction-related noise without noticeable introduction of residual aliasing artifacts.

  1. FPGA-accelerated algorithm for the regular expression matching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russek, P.; Wiatr, K.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an algorithm to support a regular expressions matching system. The goal was to achieve an attractive performance system with low energy consumption. The basic idea of the algorithm comes from a concept of the Bloom filter. It starts from the extraction of static sub-strings for strings of regular expressions. The algorithm is devised to gain from its decomposition into parts which are intended to be executed by custom hardware and the central processing unit (CPU). The pipelined custom processor architecture is proposed and a software algorithm explained accordingly. The software part of the algorithm was coded in C and runs on a processor from the ARM family. The hardware architecture was described in VHDL and implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA). The performance results and required resources of the above experiments are given. An example of target application for the presented solution is computer and network security systems. The idea was tested on nearly 100,000 body-based viruses from the ClamAV virus database. The solution is intended for the emerging technology of clusters of low-energy computing nodes.

  2. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Alexander M; Succi, Sauro

    2011-01-01

    Recent "science of science" research shows common regularities in the publication patterns of scientific papers across time and discipline. Here we analyze the complete publication careers of 300 scientists and find remarkable regularity in the functional form of the rank-citation profile c_{i}(r) for each scientist i =1...300. We find that the rank-ordered citation distribution c_{i}(r) can be approximated by a discrete generalized beta distribution (DGBD) over the entire range of ranks r, which allows for the characterization and comparison of c_{i}(r) using a common framework. The functional form of the DGBD has two scaling exponents, beta_i and gamma_i, which determine the scaling behavior of c_{i}(r) for both small and large rank r. The crossover between two scaling regimes suggests a complex reinforcement or positive-feedback relation between the impact of a scientist's most famous papers and the impact of his/her other papers. Moreover, since two scientists with equivalent Hirsch h-index values may hav...

  3. Preparation of Ionic Silsesquioxanes with Regular Structures and Their Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiro Kaneko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with our recent studies on the preparation of ionic silsesquioxanes (SQs with regular structures. Cationic ladder-like polySQs (PSQs with hexagonally stacked structures were successfully prepared by the sol-gel reactions of amino group-containing organotrialkoxysilanes in strong acid aqueous solutions. Self-organization of an ion pair (a salt prepared from the amino group in the organotrialkoxysilane and an acid is the key factor for the formation of such regular structures of the PSQs. It is also reported that the control of the conformational structure of the PSQs was performed by the introduction of the chiral moieties. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the of acid-catalysts and the structures of SQs prepared by the hydrolytic condensation of amino group-containing organotrialkoxysilane, that is, the use of the superacid aqueous solution resulted in the formation of cage-like octaSQ, while the ladder-like PSQs with hexagonally stacked structures were formed from the strong acid aqueous solutions under the same reaction conditions. Furthermore, anion-exchange behaviors of the cationic ladder-like PSQ were investigated with various organic and inorganic compounds, such as anionic surfactants, a polymer, and layered clay minerals, to obtain the functional hybrid materials.

  4. Regular-, irregular-, and pseudo-character processing in Chinese: The regularity effect in normal adult readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Kai Yan Lau

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Unlike alphabetic languages, Chinese uses a logographic script. However, the pronunciation of many character’s phonetic radical has the same pronunciation as the character as a whole. These are considered regular characters and can be read through a lexical non-semantic route (Weekes & Chen, 1999. Pseudocharacters are another way to study this non-semantic route. A pseudocharacter is the combination of existing semantic and phonetic radicals in their legal positions resulting in a non-existing character (Ho, Chan, Chung, Lee, & Tsang, 2007. Pseudocharacters can be pronounced by direct derivation from the sound of its phonetic radical. Conversely, if the pronunciation of a character does not follow that of the phonetic radical, it is considered as irregular and can only be correctly read through the lexical-semantic route. The aim of the current investigation was to examine reading aloud in normal adults. We hypothesized that the regularity effect, previously described for alphabetical scripts and acquired dyslexic patients of Chinese (Weekes & Chen, 1999; Wu, Liu, Sun, Chromik, & Zhang, 2014, would also be present in normal adult Chinese readers. Method Participants. Thirty (50% female native Hong Kong Cantonese speakers with a mean age of 19.6 years and a mean education of 12.9 years. Stimuli. Sixty regular-, 60 irregular-, and 60 pseudo-characters (with at least 75% of name agreement in Chinese were matched by initial phoneme, number of strokes and family size. Additionally, regular- and irregular-characters were matched by frequency (low and consistency. Procedure. Each participant was asked to read aloud the stimuli presented on a laptop using the DMDX software. The order of stimuli presentation was randomized. Data analysis. ANOVAs were carried out by participants and items with RTs and errors as dependent variables and type of stimuli (regular-, irregular- and pseudo-character as repeated measures (F1 or between subject

  5. Regularity increases middle latency evoked and late induced beta brain response following proprioceptive stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2008-01-01

    as an indication of increased readiness. This is achieved through detailed analysis of both evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Electroencephalography in a 64 channels montage was recorded in four-teen healthy subjects. Two paradigms were explored: A Regular alternation between hand...

  6. A robust regularization algorithm for polynomial networks for machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.

    2011-06-01

    We present an improvement to the fundamental Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) Data Modeling algorithm that overcomes the parameter sensitivity to novel cases presented to derived networks. We achieve this result by regularization of the output and using a genetic weighting that selects intermediate models that do not exhibit divergence. The result is the derivation of multi-nested polynomial networks following the Kolmogorov-Gabor polynomial that are robust to mean estimators as well as novel exemplars for input. The full details of the algorithm are presented. We also introduce a new method for approximating GMDH in a single regression model using F, H, and G terms that automatically exports the answers as ordinary differential equations. The MathCAD 15 source code for all algorithms and results are provided.

  7. Regularized Primal-Dual Subgradient Method for Distributed Constrained Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Deming; Ho, Daniel W C; Xu, Shengyuan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the distributed constrained optimization problem where the objective function is the sum of local convex cost functions of distributed nodes in a network, subject to a global inequality constraint. To solve this problem, we propose a consensus-based distributed regularized primal-dual subgradient method. In contrast to the existing methods, most of which require projecting the estimates onto the constraint set at every iteration, only one projection at the last iteration is needed for our proposed method. We establish the convergence of the method by showing that it achieves an O ( K (-1/4) ) convergence rate for general distributed constrained optimization, where K is the iteration counter. Finally, a numerical example is provided to validate the convergence of the propose method.

  8. Space Alignment Based on Regularized Inversion Precoding in Cognitive Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For a two-tier Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO cognitive network with common receiver, the precoding matrix has a compact relationship with the capacity performance in the unlicensed secondary system. To increase the capacity of secondary system, an improved precoder based on the idea of regularized inversion for secondary transmitter is proposed. An iterative space alignment algorithm is also presented to ensure the Quality of Service (QoS for primary system. The simulations reveal that, on the premise of achieving QoS for primary system, our proposed algorithm can get larger capacity in secondary system at low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR, which proves the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  9. Modified Suboptimal Iterative Decoding for Regular Repeat- Accumulate Coded Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Thamer Nesr

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two algorithms are suggested in order to improve the performance of systematic Repeat-Accumulate ( decoding. The first one is accomplished by the insertion of pilot symbols among the data stream that entering the encoder. The positions where pilots should be inserted are chosen in such a way that to improve the minimum Hamming distance and/or to reduce the error coefficients of the code. The second proposed algorithm includes the utilization of the inserted pilots to estimate scaling (correction factors. Two-dimensional correction factor was suggested in order to enhance the performance of traditional Minimum-Sum decoding of regular repeat accumulate codes. An adaptive method can be achieved for getting the correction factors by calculating the mean square difference between the values of received pilots and the a-posteriori data of bit and check node related to them which created by the minimum-sum ( decoder

  10. Regularity in individual shopping trips: implications for duration models in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Most models for purchase-timing behavior of households do not take into account that many households have regular and non-shopping days. We propose a statistical model for purchase timing that exploits information on the shopping days of households. The model is formulated in a counting process

  11. Impacts of a parent intervention program: their children's academic achievement and classroom behavior / Impactos de uma intervenção com pais: o desempenho acadêmico e comportamento das crianças na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impacts of a parent intervention program on the academic performance and classroom behavior of their children. The participants of the study were either first or second grade students. There were three groups of participants: Experimental Group 1 (EG1 - 29 children whose fathers participated in the intervention program along with the children's teachers; Experimental Group 2 (EG2 - 36 children whose mothers participated in the intervention program along with the children's teachers; and Control Experimental Group (CG - 34 children, whose parents did not participate in the intervention program, and the children's teachers. Before and after the intervention program, the children were evaluated using the Academic Achievement Test (AAT and their teachers completed an open-ended questionnaire as well as the teacher's version of the Social Skills Rating Scale (SSRS-T. In comparison with the pre-test, in the post-test the children in the EG1 and EG2 (but not in the CG obtained: (a higher overall scores in the AAT and in the reading sub-test; (b more positive results in the SSRS-T; and (c were rated by their teachers as presenting a greater number of positive attributes and a smaller number of negative attributes.

  12. Questionnaire-Related Deferrals in Regular Blood Donors in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Reikvam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary donation is a key issue in transfusion medicine. To ensure the safety of blood transfusions, careful donor selection is important. Although new approaches to blood safety have dramatically reduced the risks for infectious contamination of blood components, the quality and the availability of blood components depend on the willingness to donate and the reliability of the information given by the donors about their own health, including risk behavior. As donors who are deferred by the blood bank will be less motivated to return for donation, it is important to reduce the number of deferrals. The aims of the present study were to investigate the reasons for deferral of registered donors coming to the blood bank for donation, in order to identify areas of importance for donor education—as these deferrals potentially could be avoided by better donor comprehension. Deferral related to testing of donors is not included in this study as these deferrals are dependent on laboratory results and cannot be indentified by questionnaire or interview. Data were collected from all blood donors in a period for 18 months who came for blood donation at a large university hospital in Norway. 1 163 of the 29 787 regular donors, who showed up for donation, were deferred (3.9%. The main reasons were intercurrent illness (n=182 (15.6%, skin ulcers (n=170 (14.6%, and risk behaviour (n=127 (10.9%. In a community, intercurrent illnesses, skin ulcers, and potential risk behavior are the most frequent reasons for deferral of regular donors. Strategized effort on donor education is needed, as “failure to donate” reduces donor motivation.

  13. Two-pass greedy regular expression parsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathwohl, Niels Bjørn Bugge; Henglein, Fritz; Nielsen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    We present new algorithms for producing greedy parses for regular expressions (REs) in a semi-streaming fashion. Our lean-log algorithm executes in time O(mn) for REs of size m and input strings of size n and outputs a compact bit-coded parse tree representation. It improves on previous algorithms...... by: operating in only 2 passes; using only O(m) words of random-access memory (independent of n); requiring only kn bits of sequentially written and read log storage, where k

  14. Multichannel image regularization using anisotropic geodesic filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazzini, Jacopo A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends a recent image-dependent regularization approach introduced in aiming at edge-preserving smoothing. For that purpose, geodesic distances equipped with a Riemannian metric need to be estimated in local neighbourhoods. By deriving an appropriate metric from the gradient structure tensor, the associated geodesic paths are constrained to follow salient features in images. Following, we design a generalized anisotropic geodesic filter; incorporating not only a measure of the edge strength, like in the original method, but also further directional information about the image structures. The proposed filter is particularly efficient at smoothing heterogeneous areas while preserving relevant structures in multichannel images.

  15. Regular and Chaotic Dynamics of Flexible Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Awrejcewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics of flexible rectangular plates subjected to the action of longitudinal and time periodic load distributed on the plate perimeter is investigated. Applying both the classical Fourier and wavelet analysis we illustrate three different Feigenbaum type scenarios of transition from a regular to chaotic dynamics. We show that the system vibrations change with respect not only to the change of control parameters, but also to all fixed parameters (system dynamics changes when the independent variable, time, increases. In addition, we show that chaotic dynamics may appear also after the second Hopf bifurcation. Curves of equal deflections (isoclines lose their previous symmetry while transiting into chaotic vibrations.

  16. Spherical Averages on Regular and Semiregular Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Douma, Femke

    2008-01-01

    In 1966, P. Guenther proved the following result: Given a continuous function f on a compact surface M of constant curvature -1 and its periodic lift g to the universal covering, the hyperbolic plane, then the averages of the lift g over increasing spheres converge to the average of the function f over the surface M. In this article, we prove similar results for functions on the vertices and edges of regular and semiregular graphs, with special emphasis on the convergence rate. We also consid...

  17. Equivariant semidefinite lifts of regular polygons

    OpenAIRE

    Fawzi, Hamza; Saunderson, James; Parrilo, Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    Given a polytope P in $\\mathbb{R}^n$, we say that P has a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of size d if one can express P as the linear projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\\mathbf{S}^d_+$. If a polytope P has symmetry, we can consider equivariant psd lifts, i.e. those psd lifts that respect the symmetry of P. One of the simplest families of polytopes with interesting symmetries are regular polygons in the plane, which have played an important role in the stud...

  18. Equivariant semidefinite lifts of regular polygons

    OpenAIRE

    Fawzi, Hamza; Saunderson, J.; Parrilo, PA

    2017-01-01

    Given a polytope P in $\\mathbb{R}^n$, we say that P has a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of size d if one can express P as the linear projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\\mathbf{S}^d_+$. If a polytope P has symmetry, we can consider equivariant psd lifts, i.e. those psd lifts that respect the symmetry of P. One of the simplest families of polytopes with interesting symmetries are regular polygons in the plane, which have played an importan...

  19. Foaming behaviour of organic and regular milk

    OpenAIRE

    Pijnenburg, J.; Sala, G.; Valenberg, van, H.J.F.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organic milk is used more and more by consumers to froth milk that is used e.g. for the preparation of a capuccino. Frequently, organic milk turns out not to foam properly. This report describes a study to find the main couse of this bad foamability of organic milk. The focus of the research was to get insight in the foaming behaviour of a specific brand, indicated as A. The foamability and stability of different milk, both organic and regular, as well as skimmed, semi-skimmed, and full fat, ...

  20. Wave regularity in curve integrable spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Yafet Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    The idea of defining a gravitational singularity as an obstruction to the dynamical evolution of a test field (described by a PDE) rather than the dynamical evolution of a particle (described by a geodesics) is explored. In particular, the concept of wave regularity is introduced which serves to show that the classical singularities in curve integrable spacetimes do not interrupt the well-posedness of the wave equation. The techniques used also provide arguments that can be extended to establish when a classically singular spacetime remains singular in a semi-classical picture.

  1. Strategies for regular segmented reductions on GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus Wriedt; Henriksen, Troels

    2017-01-01

    We present and evaluate an implementation technique for regular segmented reductions on GPUs. Existing techniques tend to be either consistent in performance but relatively inefficient in absolute terms, or optimised for specific workloads and thereby exhibiting bad performance for certain input...... is in the context of the Futhark compiler, the implementation technique is applicable to any library or language that has a need for segmented reductions. We evaluate the technique on four microbenchmarks, two of which we also compare to implementations in the CUB library for GPU programming, as well as on two...

  2. The Effects of Differentiated Instruction Support Inclusion Services on Fifth Grade Reading/Language Arts Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    Using a causal-comparative research design, this study investigated the effectiveness of Differentiated Instruction Support Inclusion Services on fifth grade regular education and gifted students' Reading/Language Arts achievement. The study analyzed and compared the achievement of the regular education students who received no inclusion support…

  3. Supporting Regularized Logistic Regression Privately and Efficiently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfa; Liu, Hongzhe; Yang, Peng; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most popular statistical and machine learning models, logistic regression with regularization has found wide adoption in biomedicine, social sciences, information technology, and so on. These domains often involve data of human subjects that are contingent upon strict privacy regulations. Concerns over data privacy make it increasingly difficult to coordinate and conduct large-scale collaborative studies, which typically rely on cross-institution data sharing and joint analysis. Our work here focuses on safeguarding regularized logistic regression, a widely-used statistical model while at the same time has not been investigated from a data security and privacy perspective. We consider a common use scenario of multi-institution collaborative studies, such as in the form of research consortia or networks as widely seen in genetics, epidemiology, social sciences, etc. To make our privacy-enhancing solution practical, we demonstrate a non-conventional and computationally efficient method leveraging distributing computing and strong cryptography to provide comprehensive protection over individual-level and summary data. Extensive empirical evaluations on several studies validate the privacy guarantee, efficiency and scalability of our proposal. We also discuss the practical implications of our solution for large-scale studies and applications from various disciplines, including genetic and biomedical studies, smart grid, network analysis, etc.

  4. Multiple graph regularized nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2013-10-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) has been widely used as a data representation method based on components. To overcome the disadvantage of NMF in failing to consider the manifold structure of a data set, graph regularized NMF (GrNMF) has been proposed by Cai et al. by constructing an affinity graph and searching for a matrix factorization that respects graph structure. Selecting a graph model and its corresponding parameters is critical for this strategy. This process is usually carried out by cross-validation or discrete grid search, which are time consuming and prone to overfitting. In this paper, we propose a GrNMF, called MultiGrNMF, in which the intrinsic manifold is approximated by a linear combination of several graphs with different models and parameters inspired by ensemble manifold regularization. Factorization metrics and linear combination coefficients of graphs are determined simultaneously within a unified object function. They are alternately optimized in an iterative algorithm, thus resulting in a novel data representation algorithm. Extensive experiments on a protein subcellular localization task and an Alzheimer\\'s disease diagnosis task demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Supporting Regularized Logistic Regression Privately and Efficiently.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfa Li

    Full Text Available As one of the most popular statistical and machine learning models, logistic regression with regularization has found wide adoption in biomedicine, social sciences, information technology, and so on. These domains often involve data of human subjects that are contingent upon strict privacy regulations. Concerns over data privacy make it increasingly difficult to coordinate and conduct large-scale collaborative studies, which typically rely on cross-institution data sharing and joint analysis. Our work here focuses on safeguarding regularized logistic regression, a widely-used statistical model while at the same time has not been investigated from a data security and privacy perspective. We consider a common use scenario of multi-institution collaborative studies, such as in the form of research consortia or networks as widely seen in genetics, epidemiology, social sciences, etc. To make our privacy-enhancing solution practical, we demonstrate a non-conventional and computationally efficient method leveraging distributing computing and strong cryptography to provide comprehensive protection over individual-level and summary data. Extensive empirical evaluations on several studies validate the privacy guarantee, efficiency and scalability of our proposal. We also discuss the practical implications of our solution for large-scale studies and applications from various disciplines, including genetic and biomedical studies, smart grid, network analysis, etc.

  6. Maze navigation by honeybees: learning path regularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Mizutani, A; Srinivasan, M V

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the ability of honeybees to learn mazes of four types: constant-turn mazes, in which the appropriate turn is always in the same direction in each decision chamber; zig-zag mazes, in which the appropriate turn is alternately left and right in successive decision chambers; irregular mazes, in which there is no readily apparent pattern to the turns; and variable irregular mazes, in which the bees were trained to learn several irregular mazes simultaneously. The bees were able to learn to navigate all four types of maze. Performance was best in the constant-turn mazes, somewhat poorer in the zig-zag mazes, poorer still in the irregular mazes, and poorest in the variable irregular mazes. These results demonstrate that bees do not navigate such mazes simply by memorizing the entire sequence of appropriate turns. Rather, performance in the various configurations depends on the existence of regularity in the structure of the maze and on the ease with which this regularity is recognized and learned.

  7. Handicap Labelings of 4-Regular Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kovar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Let G be a simple graph, let f : V(G→{1,2,...,|V(G|} be a bijective mapping. The weight of v ∈ V(G is the sum of labels of all vertices adjacent to v. We say that f is a distance magic labeling of G if the weight of every vertex is the same constant k and we say that f is a handicap magic labeling of G if the weight of every vertex v is l + f(v for some constant l. Graphs that allow such labelings are called distance magic or handicap, respectively. Distance magic and handicap labelings of regular graphs are used for scheduling incomplete tournaments. While distance magic labelings correspond to so called equalized tournaments, handicap labelings can be used to schedule incomplete tournaments that are more challenging to stronger teams or players, hence they increase competition and yield attractive schemes in which every games counts. We summarize known results on distance magic and handicap labelings and construct a new infinite class of 4-regular handicap graphs.

  8. From Regular to Strictly Locally Testable Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Crespi Reghizzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A classical result (often credited to Y. Medvedev states that every language recognized by a finite automaton is the homomorphic image of a local language, over a much larger so-called local alphabet, namely the alphabet of the edges of the transition graph. Local languages are characterized by the value k=2 of the sliding window width in the McNaughton and Papert's infinite hierarchy of strictly locally testable languages (k-slt. We generalize Medvedev's result in a new direction, studying the relationship between the width and the alphabetic ratio telling how much larger the local alphabet is. We prove that every regular language is the image of a k-slt language on an alphabet of doubled size, where the width logarithmically depends on the automaton size, and we exhibit regular languages for which any smaller alphabetic ratio is insufficient. More generally, we express the trade-off between alphabetic ratio and width as a mathematical relation derived from a careful encoding of the states. At last we mention some directions for theoretical development and application.

  9. Words cluster phonetically beyond phonotactic regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautriche, Isabelle; Mahowald, Kyle; Gibson, Edward; Christophe, Anne; Piantadosi, Steven T

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cognitive pressures associated with language acquisition and use could affect the organization of the lexicon. On one hand, consistent with noisy channel models of language (e.g., Levy, 2008), the phonological distance between wordforms should be maximized to avoid perceptual confusability (a pressure for dispersion). On the other hand, a lexicon with high phonological regularity would be simpler to learn, remember and produce (e.g., Monaghan et al., 2011) (a pressure for clumpiness). Here we investigate wordform similarity in the lexicon, using measures of word distance (e.g., phonological neighborhood density) to ask whether there is evidence for dispersion or clumpiness of wordforms in the lexicon. We develop a novel method to compare lexicons to phonotactically-controlled baselines that provide a null hypothesis for how clumpy or sparse wordforms would be as the result of only phonotactics. Results for four languages, Dutch, English, German and French, show that the space of monomorphemic wordforms is clumpier than what would be expected by the best chance model according to a wide variety of measures: minimal pairs, average Levenshtein distance and several network properties. This suggests a fundamental drive for regularity in the lexicon that conflicts with the pressure for words to be as phonologically distinct as possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness and safety of dydrogesterone in regularization of menstrual cycle: a post-marketing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Nilesh; Chauhan, Naveen; Vaidya, Vishal

    2016-08-01

    Oral administration of dydrogesterone during second half of menstrual cycle has been shown to reduce menstrual irregularities. This prospective, observational study aimed to determine continued effectiveness of dydrogesterone (prescribed between 1 and 6 cycles or longer) in menstrual cycle regularization in Indian women aged ≥18 years with irregular menstrual cycle for at least 3 months. Those achieving regular cycles (21 to 35 days, inclusive) during treatment were followed up for 6 months after cessation of dydrogesterone treatment. Of the 910 women completing dydrogesterone treatment, 880 (96.7%) achieved cycle regularization (pcycle regularity (pcycle duration reduced by 16.14 (±24.04) days and mean amount of menstrual bleeding decreased by 0.45 (±1.20) pads/day. While five subjects reported worst pain at baseline, none experienced it at EOT. One serious adverse event (appendicitis) and three non-serious adverse events were reported. Dydrogesterone regularizes and improves the duration of the menstrual cycle, reduces the amount of bleeding, relieves menstrual pain and prevents relapse of irregular cycles at six months after discontinuation of treatment.

  11. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-d...

  12. School Size, Achievement, and Achievement Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. McMillen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the relationship between school size and achievement, a study was conducted using longitudinal achievement data from North Carolina for three separate cohorts of public school students (one elementary, one middle and one high school. Results revealed several interactions between size and student characteristics, all of which indicated that the achievement gaps typically existing between certain subgroups (i.e., more versus less-advantaged, lower versus higher-achieving were larger in larger schools. Results varied across the grade level cohorts and across subjects, but in general effects were more common in mathematics than in reading, and were more pronounced at the high school level. Study results are discussed in the context of educational equity and cost-effectiveness.

  13. Adapting livestock behaviour to achieve management goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using livestock to efficiently achieve management goals requires melding animal behavior with mechanical and electronic equipment. Practices such as autonomously obtaining individual animal liveweight when combined with individual animal electronic identification can produce numerous cost saving ad...

  14. The Existence of Quasi Regular and Bi-Regular Self-Complementary 3-Uniform Hypergraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamble Lata N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A k-uniform hypergraph H = (V ;E is called self-complementary if there is a permutation σ : V → V , called a complementing permutation, such that for every k-subset e of V , e ∈ E if and only if σ(e ∉ E. In other words, H is isomorphic with H′ = (V ; V(k − E. In this paper we define a bi-regular hypergraph and prove that there exists a bi-regular self-complementary 3-uniform hypergraph on n vertices if and only if n is congruent to 0 or 2 modulo 4. We also prove that there exists a quasi regular self-complementary 3-uniform hypergraph on n vertices if and only if n is congruent to 0 modulo 4.

  15. The Generalization of Treatment Gains of Mildly Handicapped Adolescents from Special Education to Regular Education Classrooms Using Peer-Mediated Self-Management Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Deborah J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a self-evaluation procedure paired with a token economy would be effective in reducing the off-task and talk-out behavior of behaviorally disordered and learning disabled high school students in a resource classroom. The study also examined the effects of the seIf evaluation procedures when monitored by regular education peers on target students' behavior in their regular education English class . In addition to improving classroom b...

  16. The Differences of Condom use Among Transgender to Regular Partner and Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septiana Ningtiyas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV prevalence among transgender in Surabaya based STBP in 2011 has reached 24%. The high prevalence in the transgender group caused by risky sexual behavior that is not consistent in using condoms and changing sex partners. Transgender sex couples not only client, but transgender have a regular partner also called a boyfriend or husband. Program at transgender condom use has not been effective or has not reached the target. Condom use among transgender is determined by sex partners. The study aimed to describe the differences of condom use among transgender to regular partner and clients. This study used cross sectional design research descriptive with qualitative approach. There were 9 informants to accomplish this study by purposive sampling with certain criteria such as transgenders prostitutes who are associated with association of transgender in Surabaya (Perwakos that were actively doing prostitution, transgender prostitutes who had a regular partner and transgender prostitutes who performed those sexual activities in Surabaya. The variables studied were knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, condom use. Data were analyzed using transcripts of data, data reduction, data display, verification. The results showed that condom use in regular partner lower than the clients. This is caused by the bad attitude and perception, accompanied domination emotional factors. There were no differences of condom use between regular partner with clients. Therefore necessary to motivate transgender Perwakos to always use a condom during sex with regular partner and clients, as well as increased knowledge of HIV-AIDS and the benefits of condoms to regular partner and transgender clients. Keywords: condom use, transgender, HIV-AIDS, regular partner, clients

  17. Second-order cone programming with probabilistic regularization for robust adaptive beamforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xijing; Miron, Sebastian; Yang, Yixin; Yang, Shi'e

    2017-03-01

    Probabilistic regularization (PR) is introduced to make superdirective array beamforming robust against sensor characteristic mismatches. The objective is to enlarge the directivity while ensuring robustness with high probability. The PR problem is solved via the second-order cone programming where the regularization parameter is chosen through a statistical analysis of the system perturbations, based on Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments are carried out on a miniaturized 3 × 3 uniform rectangular array without calibration. The results show that for this particular array, the PR method is robust to sensor mismatches and achieves a higher level of directivity compared with other robust adaptive beamforming approaches.

  18. Factors associated with regular physical exercise and consumption of fruits and vegetables among Mexican older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Doubova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the factors associated with regular physical exercise and routine consumption of fruits and vegetables, and both healthy behaviors among Mexican older adults. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of the baseline data (2014 of the Study on Obesity, Sarcopenia and Fragility in older adults affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The study included 948 adults who were ≥60 years of age. Multiple Poisson regression was performed. Results Routine consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported by 53.8 % of older adults, 42.7 % reported engaging in regular physical exercise and 23.1 % reported participating in both types of healthy behaviors. Women, adults with a stable income, those with a self-perception of good health and those with a history of physical exercise at the age of 50 years had an increased likelihood of engaging in healthy eating and regular physical activity. Conclusions Many older adults do not routinely consume fruits and vegetables or engage in regular physical exercise despite the fact that most have a fixed income and a social network. It is relevant to conduct research-based interventions that take into account the contextual factors to promote healthy behaviors.

  19. Thermodynamics of regular accelerating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Using the covariant phase space formalism, we compute the conserved charges for a solution, describing an accelerating and electrically charged Reissner-Nordstrom black hole. The metric is regular provided that the acceleration is driven by an external electric field, in spite of the usual string of the standard C-metric. The Smarr formula and the first law of black hole thermodynamics are fulfilled. The resulting mass has the same form of the Christodoulou-Ruffini irreducible mass. On the basis of these results, we can extrapolate the mass and thermodynamics of the rotating C-metric, which describes a Kerr-Newman-(A)dS black hole accelerated by a pulling string.

  20. Generalized equations of state and regular universes

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Felipe; González, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    We found non singular solutions for universes filled with a fluid which obey a Generalized Equation of State of the form $P(\\rho)=-A\\rho+\\gamma\\rho^{\\lambda}$. An emergent universe is obtained if $A=1$ and $\\lambda =1/2$. If the matter source is reinterpret as that of a scalar matter field with some potential, the corresponding potential is derived. For a closed universe, an exact bounce solution is found for $A=1/3$ and the same $\\lambda $. We also explore how the composition of theses universes can be interpreted in terms of known fluids. It is of interest to note that accelerated solutions previously found for the late time evolution also represent regular solutions at early times.

  1. Regularization destriping of remote sensing imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Basnayake

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate the utility of variational destriping for ocean color images from both multispectral and hyperspectral sensors. In particular, we examine data from a filter spectrometer, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS on the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP orbiter, and an airborne grating spectrometer, the Jet Population Laboratory's (JPL hyperspectral Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM sensor. We solve the destriping problem using a variational regularization method by giving weights spatially to preserve the other features of the image during the destriping process. The target functional penalizes the neighborhood of stripes (strictly, directionally uniform features while promoting data fidelity, and the functional is minimized by solving the Euler–Lagrange equations with an explicit finite-difference scheme. We show the accuracy of our method from a benchmark data set which represents the sea surface temperature off the coast of Oregon, USA. Technical details, such as how to impose continuity across data gaps using inpainting, are also described.

  2. Regularization destriping of remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnayake, Ranil; Bollt, Erik; Tufillaro, Nicholas; Sun, Jie; Gierach, Michelle

    2017-07-01

    We illustrate the utility of variational destriping for ocean color images from both multispectral and hyperspectral sensors. In particular, we examine data from a filter spectrometer, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP) orbiter, and an airborne grating spectrometer, the Jet Population Laboratory's (JPL) hyperspectral Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) sensor. We solve the destriping problem using a variational regularization method by giving weights spatially to preserve the other features of the image during the destriping process. The target functional penalizes the neighborhood of stripes (strictly, directionally uniform features) while promoting data fidelity, and the functional is minimized by solving the Euler-Lagrange equations with an explicit finite-difference scheme. We show the accuracy of our method from a benchmark data set which represents the sea surface temperature off the coast of Oregon, USA. Technical details, such as how to impose continuity across data gaps using inpainting, are also described.

  3. Regularization of Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Van Vorst, D. G.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We compare two different methods of computation of a temporally local frequency:1) A stabilized instantaneous frequency using the theory of the analytic signal.2) A temporally variant centroid (or dominant) frequency estimated from a time-frequency decomposition.The first method derives from Taner et al (1979) as modified by Fomel (2007) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method computes the power centroid (Cohen, 1995) of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor or Stockwell Transform. Common to both methods is the necessity of division by a diagonal matrix, which requires appropriate regularization.We modify Fomel's (2007) method by explicitly penalizing the roughness of the estimate. Following Farquharson and Oldenburg (2004), we employ both the L curve and GCV methods to obtain the smoothest model that fits the data in the L2 norm.Using synthetic data, quarry blast, earthquakes and the DPRK tests, our results suggest that the optimal method depends on the data. One of the main applications for this work is the discrimination between blast events and earthquakesFomel, Sergey. " Local seismic attributes." , Geophysics, 72.3 (2007): A29-A33.Cohen, Leon. " Time frequency analysis theory and applications." USA: Prentice Hall, (1995).Farquharson, Colin G., and Douglas W. Oldenburg. "A comparison of automatic techniques for estimating the regularization parameter in non-linear inverse problems." Geophysical Journal International 156.3 (2004): 411-425.Taner, M. Turhan, Fulton Koehler, and R. E. Sheriff. " Complex seismic trace analysis." Geophysics, 44.6 (1979): 1041-1063.

  4. Descriptor Learning via Supervised Manifold Regularization for Multioutput Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiantong; Yu, Mengyang; Islam, Ali; Bhaduri, Mousumi; Chan, Ian; Li, Shuo

    2017-09-01

    Multioutput regression has recently shown great ability to solve challenging problems in both computer vision and medical image analysis. However, due to the huge image variability and ambiguity, it is fundamentally challenging to handle the highly complex input-target relationship of multioutput regression, especially with indiscriminate high-dimensional representations. In this paper, we propose a novel supervised descriptor learning (SDL) algorithm for multioutput regression, which can establish discriminative and compact feature representations to improve the multivariate estimation performance. The SDL is formulated as generalized low-rank approximations of matrices with a supervised manifold regularization. The SDL is able to simultaneously extract discriminative features closely related to multivariate targets and remove irrelevant and redundant information by transforming raw features into a new low-dimensional space aligned to targets. The achieved discriminative while compact descriptor largely reduces the variability and ambiguity for multioutput regression, which enables more accurate and efficient multivariate estimation. We conduct extensive evaluation of the proposed SDL on both synthetic data and real-world multioutput regression tasks for both computer vision and medical image analysis. Experimental results have shown that the proposed SDL can achieve high multivariate estimation accuracy on all tasks and largely outperforms the algorithms in the state of the arts. Our method establishes a novel SDL framework for multioutput regression, which can be widely used to boost the performance in different applications.

  5. Prosocial foundations of children's academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, G V; Barbaranelli, C; Pastorelli, C; Bandura, A; Zimbardo, P G

    2000-07-01

    The present longitudinal research demonstrates robust contributions of early prosocial behavior to children's developmental trajectories in academic and social domains. Both prosocial and aggressive behaviors in early childhood were tested as predictors of academic achievement and peer relations in adolescence 5 years later. Prosocialness included cooperating, helping, sharing, and consoling, and the measure of antisocial aspects included proneness to verbal and physical aggression. Prosocialness had a strong positive impact on later academic achievement and social preferences, but early aggression had no significant effect on either outcome. The conceptual model accounted for 35% of variance in later academic achievement, and 37% of variance in social preferences. Additional analysis revealed that early academic achievement did not contribute to later academic achievement after controlling for effects of early prosocialness. Possible mediating processes by which prosocialness may affect academic achievement and other socially desirable developmental outcomes are proposed.

  6. Peer acceptance/rejection and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasenović Vera Z.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerations of the nature and role of peer relations in child development indicate that peer interaction is an important factor in developing social and cognitive competences. Peer relations not only influence current but also subsequent academic, behavioral and emotional development. Accepted students more often display better academic achievement, whereas the status of rejection is coupled with academic difficulties and lower academic achievement. Peer rejection is a relatively stable characteristic that can be used to predict difficulties in the years to come, such as repeat of a grade, early drop out, unjustified absences, adaptability problems etc. It is considered that correlation between academic achievement and peer group status is mediated by student social behavior at school. The quality of peer relations and academic achievement are mutually influential i.e. peer acceptance serves as a social resource that facilitates academic achievement, but academic achievement has effects on student acceptance. To help students who display difficulties in social relations, various intervention programs have been well thought of so as to contribute to interpersonal efficiency promotion. Concerning interdependence of social behavior, peer status and academic achievement, it is reasonable to expect that positive changes in behavior, frequently leading to the change of rejection status, will produce, directly or indirectly, positive effects on academic achievement too.

  7. The Association between Educational Achievements, Career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tooth brushing frequency, time and replacement time of tooth brush were found to be significantly associated with career aspiration (p=0.007; p=0.002; p=0.00 respectively). Achievement motives did not have statistically significant association with oral hygiene behavior. Conclusion: Educational achievements and career ...

  8. Regular Exercisers Have Stronger Pelvic Floor Muscles than Non-Regular Exercisers at Midpregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Ellstrøm Engh, Marie; Hilde, Gunvor

    2017-12-26

    Today, all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 min of aerobic activity on most days of the week, in addition to perform strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week, and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. To compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥ 30 minutes ≥ 3 times per week) and non-exercisers at mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, to assess whether regular general exercise or pelvic floor muscle strength was associated with urinary incontinence. This was a cross-sectional study at mean gestational week 20.9 (± 1.4) including 218 nulliparous pregnant women, mean age 28.6 years (range 19-40) and pre-pregnancy body mass index 23.9 kg/m 2 (SD 4.0). Vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and pelvic floor muscle endurance were measured by a high precision pressure transducer connected to a vaginal balloon. International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form was used to assess urinary incontinence. Differences between groups were analyzed using Independent Sample T-test. Linear regression analysis was conducted to adjust for pre-pregnancy body mass index, age, smoking during pregnancy and regular pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. P-value was set to ≤ 0.05. Regular exercisers had statistically significant stronger ( mean 6.4 cm H 2 O (95% CI: 1.7, 11.2)) and more enduring ( mean 39.9 cm H 2 Osec (95% CI: 42.2, 75.7)) pelvic floor muscles. Only pelvic floor muscle strength remained statistically significant, when adjusting for possible confounders. Pelvic floor muscle strength and not regular general exercise was associated with urinary continence (adjusted B: -6.4 (95% CI: -11.5, -1.4)). Regular

  9. Task-driven optimization of CT tube current modulation and regularization in model-based iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2017-06-01

    Tube current modulation (TCM) is routinely adopted on diagnostic CT scanners for dose reduction. Conventional TCM strategies are generally designed for filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction to satisfy simple image quality requirements based on noise. This work investigates TCM designs for model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to achieve optimal imaging performance as determined by a task-based image quality metric. Additionally, regularization is an important aspect of MBIR that is jointly optimized with TCM, and includes both the regularization strength that controls overall smoothness as well as directional weights that permits control of the isotropy/anisotropy of the local noise and resolution properties. Initial investigations focus on a known imaging task at a single location in the image volume. The framework adopts Fourier and analytical approximations for fast estimation of the local noise power spectrum (NPS) and modulation transfer function (MTF)—each carrying dependencies on TCM and regularization. For the single location optimization, the local detectability index (d‧) of the specific task was directly adopted as the objective function. A covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) algorithm was employed to identify the optimal combination of imaging parameters. Evaluations of both conventional and task-driven approaches were performed in an abdomen phantom for a mid-frequency discrimination task in the kidney. Among the conventional strategies, the TCM pattern optimal for FBP using a minimum variance criterion yielded a worse task-based performance compared to an unmodulated strategy when applied to MBIR. Moreover, task-driven TCM designs for MBIR were found to have the opposite behavior from conventional designs for FBP, with greater fluence assigned to the less attenuating views of the abdomen and less fluence to the more attenuating lateral views. Such TCM patterns exaggerate the intrinsic anisotropy of the MTF and NPS

  10. Morphisms on infinite alphabets, countable states automata and regular sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie-Meng; Chen, Jin; Guo, Ying-Jun; Wen, Zhi-Xiong

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we prove that a class of regular sequences can be viewed as projections of fixed points of uniform morphisms on a countable alphabet, and also can be generated by countable states automata. Moreover, we prove that the regularity of some regular sequences is invariant under some codings.

  11. Exclusion of children with intellectual disabilities from regular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study investigated why teachers exclude children with intellectual disability from the regular classrooms in Nigeria. Participants were, 169 regular teachers randomly selected from Oyo and Ogun states. Questionnaire was used to collect data result revealed that 57.4% regular teachers could not cope with children with ID ...

  12. Accurate mask-based spatially regularized correlation filter for visual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaodong; Xu, Xinping

    2017-01-01

    Recently, discriminative correlation filter (DCF)-based trackers have achieved extremely successful results in many competitions and benchmarks. These methods utilize a periodic assumption of the training samples to efficiently learn a classifier. However, this assumption will produce unwanted boundary effects, which severely degrade the tracking performance. Correlation filters with limited boundaries and spatially regularized DCFs were proposed to reduce boundary effects. However, their methods used the fixed mask or predesigned weights function, respectively, which was unsuitable for large appearance variation. We propose an accurate mask-based spatially regularized correlation filter for visual tracking. Our augmented objective can reduce the boundary effect even in large appearance variation. In our algorithm, the masking matrix is converted into the regularized function that acts on the correlation filter in frequency domain, which makes the algorithm fast convergence. Our online tracking algorithm performs favorably against state-of-the-art trackers on OTB-2015 Benchmark in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness.

  13. Iron status of regular voluntary blood donors

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    Mahida Vilsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our blood bank is a regional blood transfusion centre, which accepts blood only from voluntary donors. Aim: The aim is to study iron status of regular voluntary donors who donated their blood at least twice in a year. Materials and Methods: Prior to blood donation, blood samples of 220 male and 30 female voluntary donors were collected. Control included 100 each male and female healthy individuals in the 18- to 60-year age group, who never donated blood and did not have any chronic infection. In the study and control groups, about 10% subjects consumed non-vegetarian diet. After investigation, 85 males and 56 females having haemoglobin (Hb levels above 12.5 g/dl were selected as controls. Donors were divided into ≤10, 11-20, 21-50 and> 50 blood donation categories. Majority of the donors in> 50 donation category donated blood four times in a year, whereas the remaining donors donated two to three times per year. Haematological parameters were measured on fully automatic haematology analyzer, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC by biochemical methods, ferritin using ELISA kits and transferrin using immunoturbidometry kits. Iron/TIBC ratio x 100 gave percentage of transferrin saturation value. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was done by mean, standard deviation, pair t -test, χ2 and anova ( F -test. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the iron profile of vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects or controls and the donors donating < 20 times. Significant increase or decrease was observed in mean values of various haematological and iron parameters in donors who donated blood for> 20 times ( P < 0.001, compared to controls. Anaemia, iron deficiency and depletion of iron stores were more prevalent in female donors ( P < 0.05 compared to males and especially in those male donors who donated their blood for more than 20 times. Conclusion: Regular voluntary blood

  14. Applying Behavioral Conditioning to Identify Anticipatory Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Bethany L; Torres, Erika; Chesney, Charlie; Kantoniemi Moon, Veronica; Watters, Jason V

    2017-01-01

    The ability to predict regular events can be adaptive for nonhuman animals living in an otherwise unpredictable environment. Animals may exhibit behavioral changes preceding a predictable event; such changes reflect anticipatory behavior. Anticipatory behavior is broadly defined as a goal-directed increase in activity preceding a predictable event and can be useful for assessing well being in animals in captivity. Anticipation may look different in different animals, however, necessitating methods to generate and study anticipatory behaviors across species. This article includes a proposed method for generating and describing anticipatory behavior in zoos using behavioral conditioning. The article also includes discussion of case studies of the proposed method with 2 animals at the San Francisco Zoo: a silverback gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a red panda (Ailurus fulgens). The study evidence supports anticipation in both animals. As behavioral conditioning can be used with many animals, the proposed method provides a practical approach for using anticipatory behavior to assess animal well being in zoos.

  15. Predicting educational achievement from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzam, S; Krapohl, E; von Stumm, S; O'Reilly, P F; Rimfeld, K; Kovas, Y; Dale, P S; Lee, J J; Plomin, R

    2017-02-01

    A genome-wide polygenic score (GPS), derived from a 2013 genome-wide association study (N=127,000), explained 2% of the variance in total years of education (EduYears). In a follow-up study (N=329,000), a new EduYears GPS explains up to 4%. Here, we tested the association between this latest EduYears GPS and educational achievement scores at ages 7, 12 and 16 in an independent sample of 5825 UK individuals. We found that EduYears GPS explained greater amounts of variance in educational achievement over time, up to 9% at age 16, accounting for 15% of the heritable variance. This is the strongest GPS prediction to date for quantitative behavioral traits. Individuals in the highest and lowest GPS septiles differed by a whole school grade at age 16. Furthermore, EduYears GPS was associated with general cognitive ability (~3.5%) and family socioeconomic status (~7%). There was no evidence of an interaction between EduYears GPS and family socioeconomic status on educational achievement or on general cognitive ability. These results are a harbinger of future widespread use of GPS to predict genetic risk and resilience in the social and behavioral sciences.

  16. Flicker regularity is crucial for entrainment of alpha oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Notbohm

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz in human electroencephalogram (EEG modulate perception via phase-dependent inhibition. If entrained to an external driving force, inhibition maxima and minima of the oscillation appear more distinct in time and make potential phase-dependent perception predictable.There is an ongoing debate about whether visual stimulation is suitable to entrain alpha oscillations. On the one hand, it has been argued that a series of light flashes results in transient event-related responses (ERPs superimposed on the ongoing EEG. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that alpha oscillations become entrained to a series of light flashes if they are presented at a certain temporal regularity. This raises the question under which circumstances a sequence of light flashes causes entrainment, i.e. whether an arrhythmic stream of light flashes would also result in entrainment.Here, we measured detection rates in response to visual targets at two opposing stimulation phases during rhythmic and arrhythmic light stimulation. We introduce a new measure called ‘behavioral modulation depth’ to determine differences in perception. This measure is capable of correcting for inevitable artifacts that occur in visual detection tasks during visual stimulation. The physical concept of entrainment predicts that increased stimulation intensity should produce stronger entrainment. Thus, two experiments with medium (Experiment 1 and high (Experiment 2 stimulation intensity were performed. Data from the first experiment show that the behavioral modulation depth (alpha phase-dependent differences in detection threshold increases with increasing entrainment of alpha oscillations. Furthermore, individual alpha phase delays of entrained alpha oscillations determine the behavioral modulation depth: the largest behavioral modulation depth can be found if targets presented during the minimum of the entrained oscillation

  17. Regularities development of entrepreneurial structures in regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Semenovna Pinkovetskaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Consider regularities and tendencies for the three types of entrepreneurial structures — small enterprises, medium enterprises and individual entrepreneurs. The aim of the research was to confirm the possibilities of describing indicators of aggregate entrepreneurial structures with the use of normal law distribution functions. Presented proposed by the author the methodological approach and results of construction of the functions of the density distribution for the main indicators for the various objects: the Russian Federation, regions, as well as aggregates ofentrepreneurial structures, specialized in certain forms ofeconomic activity. All the developed functions, as shown by the logical and statistical analysis, are of high quality and well-approximate the original data. In general, the proposed methodological approach is versatile and can be used in further studies of aggregates of entrepreneurial structures. The received results can be applied in solving a wide range of problems justify the need for personnel and financial resources at the federal, regional and municipal levels, as well as the formation of plans and forecasts of development entrepreneurship and improvement of this sector of the economy.

  18. Toroidal regularization of the guiding center Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.; Ellison, C. L.

    2017-11-01

    In the Lagrangian theory of guiding center motion, an effective magnetic field B*=B +(m /e )v∥∇× b appears prominently in the equations of motion. Because the parallel component of this field can vanish, there is a range of parallel velocities where the Lagrangian guiding center equations of motion are either ill-defined or very badly behaved. Moreover, the velocity dependence of B* greatly complicates the identification of canonical variables and therefore the formulation of symplectic integrators for guiding center dynamics. This letter introduces a simple coordinate transformation that alleviates both these problems simultaneously. In the new coordinates, the Liouville volume element is equal to the toroidal contravariant component of the magnetic field. Consequently, the large-velocity singularity is completely eliminated. Moreover, passing from the new coordinate system to canonical coordinates is extremely simple, even if the magnetic field is devoid of flux surfaces. We demonstrate the utility of this approach in regularizing the guiding center Lagrangian by presenting a new and stable one-step variational integrator for guiding centers moving in arbitrary time-dependent electromagnetic fields.

  19. Identifying Cognitive States Using Regularity Partitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Ioannis; Pardalos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) data can be used to depict functional connectivity of the brain. Standard techniques have been developed to construct brain networks from this data; typically nodes are considered as voxels or sets of voxels with weighted edges between them representing measures of correlation. Identifying cognitive states based on fMRI data is connected with recording voxel activity over a certain time interval. Using this information, network and machine learning techniques can be applied to discriminate the cognitive states of the subjects by exploring different features of data. In this work we wish to describe and understand the organization of brain connectivity networks under cognitive tasks. In particular, we use a regularity partitioning algorithm that finds clusters of vertices such that they all behave with each other almost like random bipartite graphs. Based on the random approximation of the graph, we calculate a lower bound on the number of triangles as well as the expectation of the distribution of the edges in each subject and state. We investigate the results by comparing them to the state of the art algorithms for exploring connectivity and we argue that during epochs that the subject is exposed to stimulus, the inspected part of the brain is organized in an efficient way that enables enhanced functionality.

  20. Identifying Cognitive States Using Regularity Partitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Pappas

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI data can be used to depict functional connectivity of the brain. Standard techniques have been developed to construct brain networks from this data; typically nodes are considered as voxels or sets of voxels with weighted edges between them representing measures of correlation. Identifying cognitive states based on fMRI data is connected with recording voxel activity over a certain time interval. Using this information, network and machine learning techniques can be applied to discriminate the cognitive states of the subjects by exploring different features of data. In this work we wish to describe and understand the organization of brain connectivity networks under cognitive tasks. In particular, we use a regularity partitioning algorithm that finds clusters of vertices such that they all behave with each other almost like random bipartite graphs. Based on the random approximation of the graph, we calculate a lower bound on the number of triangles as well as the expectation of the distribution of the edges in each subject and state. We investigate the results by comparing them to the state of the art algorithms for exploring connectivity and we argue that during epochs that the subject is exposed to stimulus, the inspected part of the brain is organized in an efficient way that enables enhanced functionality.

  1. Multiparametric tissue abnormality characterization using manifold regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmanghelich, Kayhan; Wu, Xiaoying; Zacharaki, Evangelia; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2008-03-01

    Tissue abnormality characterization is a generalized segmentation problem which aims at determining a continuous score that can be assigned to the tissue which characterizes the extent of tissue deterioration, with completely healthy tissue being one end of the spectrum and fully abnormal tissue such as lesions, being on the other end. Our method is based on the assumptions that there is some tissue that is neither fully healthy or nor completely abnormal but lies in between the two in terms of abnormality; and that the voxel-wise score of tissue abnormality lies on a spatially and temporally smooth manifold of abnormality. Unlike in a pure classification problem which associates an independent label with each voxel without considering correlation with neighbors, or an absolute clustering problem which does not consider a priori knowledge of tissue type, we assume that diseased and healthy tissue lie on a manifold that encompasses the healthy tissue and diseased tissue, stretching from one to the other. We propose a semi-supervised method for determining such as abnormality manifold, using multi-parametric features incorporated into a support vector machine framework in combination with manifold regularization. We apply the framework towards the characterization of tissue abnormality to brains of multiple sclerosis patients.

  2. One-dimensional QCD in thimble regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, F.; Eruzzi, G.

    2018-01-01

    QCD in 0 +1 dimensions is numerically solved via thimble regularization. In the context of this toy model, a general formalism is presented for S U (N ) theories. The sign problem that the theory displays is a genuine one, stemming from a (quark) chemical potential. Three stationary points are present in the original (real) domain of integration, so that contributions from all the thimbles associated to them are to be taken into account: we show how semiclassical computations can provide hints on the regions of parameter space where this is absolutely crucial. Known analytical results for the chiral condensate and the Polyakov loop are correctly reproduced: this is in particular trivial at high values of the number of flavors Nf. In this regime we notice that the single thimble dominance scenario takes place (the dominant thimble is the one associated to the identity). At low values of Nf computations can be more difficult. It is important to stress that this is not at all a consequence of the original sign problem (not even via the residual phase). The latter is always under control, while accidental, delicate cancelations of contributions coming from different thimbles can be in place in (restricted) regions of the parameter space.

  3. Kernel-Regularized ICA for Computing Functional Topography from Resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyan; Shi, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    Topographic regularity is a fundamental property in brain connectivity. In this work, we present a novel method for studying topographic regularity of functional connectivity based on resting-state fMRI (rfMRI), which is widely available and easy to acquire in large-scale studies. The main idea in our method is the incorporation of topographically regular structural connectivity for independent component analysis (ICA). This is enabled by the recent development of novel tractography and tract filtering algorithms that can generate highly organized fiber bundles connecting different brain regions. By leveraging these cutting-edge tractography algorithms, here we develop a kernel-regularized ICA method for the extraction of functional topography with rfMRI signals. In our experiments, we use rfMRI scans of 35 unrelated, right-handed subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) to study the functional topography of the motor cortex. We first demonstrate that our method can generate functional connectivity maps with more regular topography than conventional group ICA. We also show that the components extracted by our algorithm are able to capture co-activation patterns that respect the organized topography of the motor cortex across the hemisphere. Finally, we show that our method achieves improved reproducibility as compared to conventional group ICA.

  4. AN IMPLICIT REGULARIZATION FOR 3D BUILDING ROOFTOP MODELING USING AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sohn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new algorithm to generalize noisy polylines comprising a rooftop model by maximizing a shape regularity (orthogonality, symmetricity and directional simplications. The nature of remotely sensed data including airborne LiDAR often produce errors in localizing salient features (corners, lines and planes due to weak contrast, occlusions, shadows and object complexity. A generalization or regularization process is well known algorithm for eliminating erroneous vertices while preserving significant information on rooftop shapes. Most of existing regularization methods achieves this goal base on a local process such as if-then rules due to lacking global objective functions or mainly focusing on minimising residuals between boundary observations and models. In this study, we implicitly derive rules to generate local hypothetical models. Those hypothesized models produce possible drawings of regular patterns that given rooftop vectors can possibly generate by combining global and local analysis of line directions and their connections. A final optimal model is globally selected through a gradient descent optimization. A BSP (Binary Tree Partitioning-tree was used to produce initial rooftop vectors using ISPRS WGIII/4's benchmarking test sites in Veihngen. The proposed regularization algorithm was applied to reduce modelling errors produced by BSP-tree. An evaluation demonstrates the proposed algorithm is promising for updating of building database.

  5. Finite-Element-Based Discretization and Regularization Strategies for 3D Inverse Electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dafang; Kirby, Robert M.; Johnson, Chris R.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the inverse electrocardiographic problem of computing epicardial potentials from a body-surface potential map. We study how to improve numerical approximation of the inverse problem when the finite element method is used. Being ill-posed, the inverse problem requires different discretization strategies from its corresponding forward problem. We propose refinement guidelines that specifically address the ill-posedness of the problem. The resulting guidelines necessitate the use of hybrid finite elements composed of tetrahedra and prism elements. Also in order to maintain consistent numerical quality when the inverse problem is discretized into different scales, we propose a new family of regularizers using the variational principle underlying finite element methods. These variational-formed regularizers serve as an alternative to the traditional Tikhonov regularizers, but preserves the L2 norm and thereby achieves consistent regularization in multi-scale simulations. The variational formulation also enables a simple construction of the discrete gradient operator over irregular meshes, which is difficult to define in traditional discretization schemes. We validated our hybrid element technique and the variational regularizers by simulations on a realistic 3D torso/heart model with empirical heart data. Results show that discretization based on our proposed strategies mitigates the ill-conditioning and improves the inverse solution, and that the variational formulation may benefit a broader range of potential-based bioelectric problems. PMID:21382763

  6. Evaluation of Leray, LANS and Verstappen regularizations in LES, without and with added SGS modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckelmans, G.; Bourgeois, N.; Collet, Y.; Duponcheel, M.

    2009-11-01

    Regularization approaches (Leray, LANS and Verstappen) for the ``restriction in the production of small-scales'' in turbulence simulations have regained some interest in the LES community, because of their potentially appealing properties due to filtering. Their potential is here investigated using the best possible numerics (dealiased pseudo-spectral code) and on simple problems: transition of the Taylor-Green vortex (TGV) and its ensuing turbulence, developed homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). The filtered velocity field is obtained using discrete filters, also of various orders (2 and 6). Diagnostics include energy, enstrophy, and spectra. The performance of the regularizations on the TGV is first evaluated in inviscid mode (96^3 Euler), then in viscous mode at Re=1600 (256^3 DNS and 48^3 LES). Although they delay the production of small scales, none of the regularizations can perform LES when the flow has become turbulent: the small scales are still too energized, and thus added subgrid-scale (SGS) modeling is required. The combination of regularization and SGS modeling (here using the RVM multiscale model) is then also evaluated. Finally, 128^3 LES of fully developed HIT at very high Re is also investigated, providing the asymptotic behavior. In particular, it is found that the regularization helps increase a bit the true inertial subrange obtained with the RVM model.

  7. The Effect of Three Months Regular Aerobic Exercise on Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Ghanbari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of three-month regular aerobic exercise on the PMS symptoms. Also correlations with age, education, marital status and severity of PMS symptoms were studied.Materials and Methods: A Quasi- Experimental study was conducted on 91 volunteer women with regular menstrual cycle and no history of gynecological, endocrinological and psychological disorders. The study was done during March 2005- March 2007, in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A Modified Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MMDQ was used in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: Non-exercised, they also didn't have any past experience of regular exercise (n= 48 and Exercised (n= 43. The exercise time duration was one hour and was carried out three times per week for three months.  Emotional, behavioral, electrolyte, autonomic, neurovegatative and skin symptoms of PMS were compared between two groups. P value was considered significant at < 0.05.Results: A significant difference was observed for electrolytic, neurovegetative and cognitive symptoms before and after the exercise. Also the severity of skin and neurovegetative symptoms were different in experimental groups with and without past history of doing regular exercise. There was no correlation between age, education, marital status and severity of PMS symptoms.Conclusion: Three months of regular aerobic exercise effectively reduces the severity of PMS symptoms.

  8. Predictability in Pathological Gambling? Applying the Duplication of Purchase Law to the Understanding of Cross-Purchases Between Regular and Pathological Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Desmond; Mizerski, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the gambling participations and game purchase duplication of light regular, heavy regular and pathological gamblers by applying the Duplication of Purchase Law. Current study uses data collected by the Australian Productivity Commission for eight different types of games. Key behavioral statistics on light regular, heavy regular, and pathological gamblers were computed and compared. The key finding is that pathological gambling, just like regular gambling, follows the Duplication of Purchase Law, which states that the dominant factor of purchase duplication between two brands is their market shares. This means that gambling between any two games at pathological level, like any regular consumer purchases, exhibits "law-like" regularity based on the pathological gamblers' participation rate of each game. Additionally, pathological gamblers tend to gamble more frequently across all games except lotteries and instant as well as make greater cross-purchases compared to heavy regular gamblers. A better understanding of the behavioral traits between regular (particularly heavy regular) and pathological gamblers can be useful to public policy makers and social marketers in order to more accurately identify such gamblers and better manage the negative impacts of gambling.

  9. Food-independent tendency to disadvantageous decisions in obese individuals with regular binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; Brandl, Christina; Kiunke, Wibke; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Horbach, Thomas; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether or not obese patients with and without regular binge eating differ with regard to their decision-making abilities. Decision-making was measured by using a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling task (IGT) in 34 obese patients with regular binge eating (BE(+)) and 34 obese individuals without binge eating (BE(-)) matched for age and sex. In addition, computerized versions of the Auditory Verbal Learning Test and the Corsi Block Tapping Test were administered. Participants further answered questionnaires concerning eating disorder symptoms (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale). The BE(+) group reported more eating disorder and depressive symptoms than the BE(-) group but did not differ with regard to BMI, working memory deficits, depressive symptoms, somatic comorbidity (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, sleep apnea, hyperlipidemia, pain disorder), or education. Binge eating participants showed poorer decision-making abilities based on the total IGT net scores. However, they did not differ from those without regular binge eating in improving their choice behavior over the task. The group difference in total IGT net scores suggests more general, food-independent decision making problems in obese individuals with regular binge eating compared to those without. Treatment of obese patients with BED could be enhanced by training them to better control risky decisions, to delay gratification in an effortful way and to activate appropriate alternative behaviors. © 2014.

  10. Social origins of rhythm? Synchrony and temporal regularity in human vocalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Bowling

    Full Text Available Humans have a capacity to perceive and synchronize with rhythms. This is unusual in that only a minority of other species exhibit similar behavior. Study of synchronizing species (particularly anurans and insects suggests that simultaneous signal production by different individuals may play a critical role in the development of regular temporal signaling. Accordingly, we investigated the link between simultaneous signal production and temporal regularity in our own species. Specifically, we asked whether inter-individual synchronization of a behavior that is typically irregular in time, speech, could lead to evenly-paced or "isochronous" temporal patterns. Participants read nonsense phrases aloud with and without partners, and we found that synchronous reading resulted in greater regularity of durational intervals between words. Comparison of same-gender pairings showed that males and females were able to synchronize their temporal speech patterns with equal skill. These results demonstrate that the shared goal of synchronization can lead to the development of temporal regularity in vocalizations, suggesting that the origins of musical rhythm may lie in cooperative social interaction rather than in sexual selection.

  11. Achieving Energy Efficiency Through Real-Time Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-09-01

    Through the careful implementation of simple behavior change measures, opportunities exist to achieve strategic gains, including greater operational efficiencies, energy cost savings, greater tenant health and ensuing productivity and an improved brand value through sustainability messaging and achievement.

  12. The Politics of Achievement Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valant, J.; Newark, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    on achievement gaps have received little attention from researchers, despite playing an important role in shaping policymakers’ behaviors. Drawing on randomized experiments with a nationally representative sample of adults, we explore the public’s beliefs about test score gaps and its support for gap......For decades, researchers have documented large differences in average test scores between minority and White students and between poor and wealthy students. These gaps are a focal point of reformers’ and policymakers’ efforts to address educational inequities. However, the U.S. public’s views......-closing initiatives. We find that Americans are more concerned about—and more supportive of proposals to close—wealth-based achievement gaps than Black-White or Hispanic-White gaps. Americans also explain the causes of wealth-based gaps more readily. © 2016 AERA....

  13. Elementary Particle Spectroscopy in Regular Solid Rewrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trell, Erik

    2008-10-01

    The Nilpotent Universal Computer Rewrite System (NUCRS) has operationalized the radical ontological dilemma of Nothing at All versus Anything at All down to the ground recursive syntax and principal mathematical realisation of this categorical dichotomy as such and so governing all its sui generis modalities, leading to fulfilment of their individual terms and compass when the respective choice sequence operations are brought to closure. Focussing on the general grammar, NUCRS by pure logic and its algebraic notations hence bootstraps Quantum Mechanics, aware that it "is the likely keystone of a fundamental computational foundation" also for e.g. physics, molecular biology and neuroscience. The present work deals with classical geometry where morphology is the modality, and ventures that the ancient regular solids are its specific rewrite system, in effect extensively anticipating the detailed elementary particle spectroscopy, and further on to essential structures at large both over the inorganic and organic realms. The geodetic antipode to Nothing is extension, with natural eigenvector the endless straight line which when deployed according to the NUCRS as well as Plotelemeian topographic prescriptions forms a real three-dimensional eigenspace with cubical eigenelements where observed quark-skewed quantum-chromodynamical particle events self-generate as an Aristotelean phase transition between the straight and round extremes of absolute endlessness under the symmetry- and gauge-preserving, canonical coset decomposition SO(3)×O(5) of Lie algebra SU(3). The cubical eigen-space and eigen-elements are the parental state and frame, and the other solids are a range of transition matrix elements and portions adapting to the spherical root vector symmetries and so reproducibly reproducing the elementary particle spectroscopy, including a modular, truncated octahedron nano-composition of the Electron which piecemeal enter into molecular structures or compressed to each

  14. Internal Accountability and District Achievement: How Superintendents Affect Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Kimberly L.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative survey study was designed to determine whether superintendent accountability behaviors or agreement about accountability behaviors between superintendents and their subordinate central office administrators predicted district student achievement. Hierarchical multiple regression and analyses of covariance were employed,…

  15. An FPGA Implementation of -Regular Low-Density Parity-Check Code Decoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parhi Keshab K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of their excellent error-correcting performance, low-density parity-check (LDPC codes have recently attracted a lot of attention. In this paper, we are interested in the practical LDPC code decoder hardware implementations. The direct fully parallel decoder implementation usually incurs too high hardware complexity for many real applications, thus partly parallel decoder design approaches that can achieve appropriate trade-offs between hardware complexity and decoding throughput are highly desirable. Applying a joint code and decoder design methodology, we develop a high-speed -regular LDPC code partly parallel decoder architecture based on which we implement a -bit, rate- -regular LDPC code decoder on Xilinx FPGA device. This partly parallel decoder supports a maximum symbol throughput of Mbps and achieves BER at 2 dB over AWGN channel while performing maximum decoding iterations.

  16. Scaling Non-Regular Shared-Memory Codes by Reusing Custom Loop Schedules

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Ernest Artiaga; Eduard Ayguadé; Jesús Labarta

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we explore the idea of customizing and reusing loop schedules to improve the scalability of non-regular numerical codes in shared-memory architectures with non-uniform memory access latency. The main objective is to implicitly setup affinity links between threads and data, by devising loop schedules that achieve balanced work distribution within irregular data spaces and reusing them as much as possible along the execution of the program for better memory access locality. This t...

  17. Inverse Problem of Ultrasound Beamforming with Sparsity Constraints and Regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Ece; Vishnevsky, Valeriy; Goksel, Orcun

    2017-09-28

    Ultrasound (US) beamforming is the process of reconstructing an image from acquired echo traces on several transducer elements. Typical beamforming approaches, such as Delay-And-Sum, perform simple projection operations, while techniques using statistical information also exist, e.g. adaptive, phase-coherence, Delay-Multiply-And-Sum, and sparse coding approaches. Inspired by the feasibility and success of inverse problem formulations in several image reconstruction problems, such as computed tomography, we herein devise an inverse problem approach for US beamforming. We define a linear forward model for the synthesis of the beamformed image, and solve its inverse problem thanks to several intuitive and physicsbased constraints and regularization terms proposed. These reflect the prior knowledge about the spectra of carrier signal and spatial coherence of modulated signal. These constraints admit effective formulation through sparse representations. Our proposed method was evaluated for plane-wave imaging (PWI) that transmits unfocused waves, enabling high frame-rates with large field of view at the expense of much lower image quality with conventional beamforming techniques. Results are evaluated in numerical simulations, as well as tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo data provided by Plane-wave Imaging Challenge in Medical UltraSound (PICMUS). The best results achieved by our proposed techniques are 0.39mm full-width at half-maximum for spatial resolution and 16.3 dB contrast-to-noise ratio, using a single plane-wave transmit.

  18. A regularization of the Hartle–Hawking wave function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Gorobey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper puts forward a modification of the no-boundary Hartle–Hawking wave function in which, in the general case, the Euclidean functional integral can be described by an inhomogeneous universe. The regularization of this integral is achieved in arbitrary canonical calibration by abandoning integration over the lapse and shift functions. This makes it possible to ‘correct’ the sign of the Euclidean action corresponding to the scale factor of geometry. An additional time parameter associated with the canonical calibration condition then emerges. An additional condition for the stationary state of the wave function's phase after returning to the Lorentzian signature, serving as the quantum equivalent of the classical principle of the least action, was used to find this time parameter. We have substantiated the interpretation of the modified wave function as the amplitude of the universe's birth from ‘nothing’ with the additional parameter as the time of this process. A homogeneous model of the universe with a conformally invariant scalar field has been considered. In this case, two variants of the no-boundary wave function which are solutions of the Wheeler–DeWitt equation have been found.

  19. Investigation of chaotic and regular dynamics of the asteroids – Venus companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushina, T. Yu; Letner, O. N.

    2017-11-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of regular and chaotic dynamics of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) in the vicinity of resonance 1:1 with Venus. The degree of chaoticity of NEA orbits is determined by analyzing the behavior of parameters MEGNO and OMEGNO. It is shown that the asteroid motion in the resonance vicinity and/or multiple close approaches of NEAs with planets lead to the appearance of dynamical chaoticity.

  20. Formal and Informal Control of Cannabis: Regular Users' Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Serge; Lépine, Patrice; Patenaude, Catherine; Erickson, Patricia

    2018-01-16

    The debate on recreational use of cannabis, recently relaunched by the election of the Liberal Party of Canada that intends to legalize and regulate its use and access, implies a better understanding of social control mechanisms that are in place, and their influence on users' behaviors. This study addresses the issue of formal and informal controls by providing, first, a theoretical perspective of this concept, and, second, by illustrating its operation from the users' perspective. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 164 regular, adult cannabis users recruited in four large Canadian cities (Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax). An initial qualitative analysis based on the principles of grounded theory was conducted. The main categories identified were then used to find and re-code relevant material on the respondents' experience with formal and informal control (secondary analysis). The users' perspective shows that mechanisms of informal control play an important role in defining the social context of their use (when, where, and with whom cannabis is consumed). In contrast, formal control had no deterrent impact on the cessation or reduction of use, but affected their behavior by influencing them to change the context of their practices to avoid criminal legal consequences and stigmatization. Conclusions/Importance: The regulatory controls based in public health that the Canadian government plans to implement (replacing criminal ones), should be based on a better understanding of current practices and patterns of cannabis users, and in accordance with informal controls already in place. Legislative formal controls, in a regulatory model, that are better defined and consistent with social practices, will be more accepted and respected by the user population and thus likely to be more effective in reducing harm.