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Sample records for acetylcarnitine

  1. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals fiber-specific distribution of acetylcarnitine and contraction-induced carnitine dynamics in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Masuda, Kazumi; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine is well recognized as a key regulator of long-chain fatty acyl group translocation into the mitochondria. In addition, carnitine, as acetylcarnitine, acts as an acceptor of excess acetyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here, we provide a new methodology for accurate quantification of acetylcarnitine content and determination of its localization in skeletal muscles. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to visualize acetylcarnitine distribution in rat skeletal muscles. MALDI-IMS and immunohistochemistry of serial cross-sections showed that acetylcarnitine was enriched in the slow-type muscle fibers. The concentration of ATP was lower in muscle regions with abundant acetylcarnitine, suggesting a relationship between acetylcarnitine and metabolic activity. Using our novel method, we detected an increase in acetylcarnitine content after muscle contraction. Importantly, this increase was not detected using traditional biochemical assays of homogenized muscles. We also demonstrated that acetylation of carnitine during muscle contraction was concomitant with glycogen depletion. Our methodology would be useful for the quantification of acetylcarnitine and its contraction-induced kinetics in skeletal muscles.

  2. Transplacental exposure to AZT induces adverse neurochemical and behavioral effects in a mouse model: protection by L-acetylcarnitine.

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    Anna Rita Zuena

    Full Text Available Maternal-fetal HIV-1 transmission can be prevented by administration of AZT, alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs to pregnant HIV-1-infected women and their newborns. In spite of the benefits deriving from this life-saving prophylactic therapy, there is still considerable uncertainty on the potential long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on exposed children. Clinical and experimental studies have consistently shown the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress following prenatal treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and clinical evidence suggests that the developing brain is one of the targets of the toxic action of these compounds possibly resulting in behavioral problems. We intended to verify the effects on brain and behavior of mice exposed during gestation to AZT, the backbone of antiretroviral therapy during human pregnancy. We hypothesized that glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in excitotoxicity and behavioral plasticity, could be one of the major actors in AZT-induced neurochemical and behavioral alterations. We also assessed the antioxidant and neuroprotective effect of L-acetylcarnitine, a compound that improves mitochondrial function and is successfully used to treat antiretroviral-induced polyneuropathy in HIV-1 patients. We found that transplacental exposure to AZT given per os to pregnant mice from day 10 of pregnancy to delivery impaired in the adult offspring spatial learning and memory, enhanced corticosterone release in response to acute stress, increased brain oxidative stress also at birth and markedly reduced expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes and GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in the hippocampus. Notably, administration during the entire pregnancy of L-acetylcarnitine was effective in preventing/ameliorating the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral adverse effects induced by AZT in the offspring. The present preclinical findings provide a

  3. L-Acetylcarnitine in dysthymic disorder in elderly patients: a double-blind, multicenter, controlled randomized study vs. fluoxetine

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    Giuseppe Bersania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. L-Acetylcarnitine (LAC, the acetyl ester of carnitine naturally present in the central nervous system and involved in several neural pathways, has been demonstrated to be active in various animal experimental models resembling some features of human depression. The aim of the study is to verify whether LAC can have an antidepressant action in a population of elderly patients with dysthymic disorder in comparison with a traditional antidepressant such as fluoxetine.Methods. Multicentric, double-blind, double-dummy, controlled, randomized study based on a observation period of 7 weeks. 80 patients with DSM-IV diagnosis of dysthymic disorder were enrolled in the study and subdivided into 2 groups. Group A patients received LAC plus placebo; group B patients received fluoxetine 20 mg/die plus placebo. Clinical assessment was performed through several psychometric scales at 6 different moments.Results. Group A patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the following scales: HAM-D, HAM-A, BDI and Touluse–Pieron Test. Comparison between the two groups, A and B, generally showed very similar clinical progression.Discussion. The results obtained with LAC and fluoxetine were equivalent. As the subjects in this study were of senile age, it is possible to hypothesize that the LAC positive effect on mood could be associated with improvement in subjective cognitive symptomatology. The difference in the latency time of clinical response (1 week of LAC treatment, compared with the 2 weeks' latency time with fluoxetine suggests the existence of different mechanisms of action possibly in relation to the activation of rapid support processes of neuronal activity.

  4. ATP-ases of synaptic plasma membranes in striatum: enzymatic systems for synapses functionality by in vivo administration of L-acetylcarnitine in relation to Parkinson's Disease.

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    Villa, R F; Ferrari, F; Gorini, A

    2013-09-17

    The maximum rate (Vmax) of some enzymatic activities related to energy consumption was evaluated in synaptic plasma membranes from rat brain striatum, the synaptic energy state being a crucial factor in neurodegenerative diseases etiopathogenesis. Two types of synaptic plasma membranes were isolated from rats subjected to in vivo treatment with L-acetylcarnitine at two different doses (30 and 60 mg × kg(-1) i.p., 28 days, 5 days/week). The following enzyme activities were evaluated: acetylcholinesterase (AChE); Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+)-ATP-ase; ouabain insensitive Mg(2+)-ATP-ase; Na(+), K(+)-ATP-ase; direct Mg(2+)-ATP-ase; Ca(2+), Mg(2+)-ATP-ase; and low- and high-affinity Ca(2+)-ATP-ase. In control (vehicle-treated) animals, enzymatic activities are differently expressed in synaptic plasma membranes type I (SPM1) with respect to synaptic plasma membranes type II (SPM2), the evaluated enzymatic activities being higher in SPM2. Subchronic treatment with L-acetylcarnitine decreased AChE on SPM1 and SPM2 at the dose of 30 mg × kg(-1). Pharmacological treatment decreased ouabain insensitive Mg(2+)-ATP-ase activity and high affinity Ca(2+)-ATP-ase activity at the doses of 30 and 60 mg × kg(-1) respectively on SPM1, while it decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATP-ase, direct Mg(2+)-ATP-ase and Ca(2+), Mg(2+)-ATP-ase activities at the dose of 30 mg × kg(-1) on SPM2. These results suggest that the sensitivity to drug treatment is different between these two populations of synaptic plasma membranes from the striatum, confirming the micro-heterogeneity of these subfractions, possessing different metabolic machinery with respect to energy consumption and utilization and the regional selective effect of L-acetylcarnitine on cerebral tissue, depending on the considered area. The drug potential effect at the synaptic level in Parkinson's Disease neuroprotection is also discussed with respect to acetylcholine and energy metabolism.

  5. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Potential of Acetyl-L-carnitine against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

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    Alotaibi, Salman A; Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Bakheet, Saleh A; Alharbi, Naif O; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in mice. To evaluate the prophylactic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were supplemented with acetylcarnitine (2 mmol/kg/day per oral (p.o.) for 5 days) before a single dose of acetaminophen (350 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)). Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen injection. Acetaminophen significantly increased the markers of liver injury, hepatic reactive oxygen species, and nitrate/nitrite, and decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation resulted in reversal of all biochemical parameters toward the control values. To explore the therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were given a single dose of acetylcarnitine (0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/kg p.o.) 1.5 h after acetaminophen. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen. Acetylcarnitine administration resulted in partial reversal of liver injury only at 2 mmol/kg p.o. At equimolar doses, N-acetylcystiene was superior as therapeutic agent to acetylcarnitine. However, acetylcarnitine potentiated the effect of N-acetylcystiene in the treatment of acetaminophen toxicity.

  6. Metabolomic profiles of colostrum and milk from lactating sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtasu, Mihai Victor; Theil, Peter Kappel; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2016-01-01

    -acetylcarnitine, 2-metylbutyroylcarnitine), glycerophosphocholine, and betaine. l-Acetylcarnitine and 2-metylbutyroylcarnitine, involved in the metabolism and transport of fatty acids, decreased in milk compared to colostrum, whereas l-carnitine presented an opposite trend (P ..., glycerophosphocholine and choline decreased from colostrum to milk, whereas betaine showed higher values in milk compared to colostrum. The use of liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry metabolomics as a hypothesis generator tool opens up new questions with regard to the origin and function of mammary gland...

  7. Investigation of metabolic changes in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koellisch, Ulrich; Laustsen, Christoffer; Nørlinger, Thomas S;

    2015-01-01

    In the metabolism of acetate several enzymes are involved, which play an important role in free fatty acid oxidation. Fatty acid metabolism is altered in diabetes patients and therefore acetate might serve as a marker for pathological changes in the fuel selection of cells, as these changes occur...... in diabetes patients. Acetylcarnitine is a metabolic product of acetate, which enables its transport into the mitochondria for energy production. This study investigates whether the ratio of acetylcarnitine to acetate, measured by noninvasive hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]acetate magnetic resonance spectroscopy......, could serve as a marker for myocardial, hepatic, and renal metabolic changes in rats with Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in vivo. We demonstrate that the conversion of acetate to acetylcarnitine could be detected and quantified in all three organs of interest. More interestingly, we found...

  8. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    postweaning was observed with a principal components analysis (PCA) scores plot, and the data for day 11 were located between those for day 0 and day 4 postweaning. The plasma levels of proline, taurine, and carnitine were higher, whereas those of betaine, creatine, L-arginine and acetylcarnitine were lower...

  9. Plasma carnitine ester profile in adult celiac disease patients maintained on long-term gluten free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judit Bene; Katalin Komlósi; Beáta Gasztonyi; Márk Juhász; Zsolt Tulassay; Béla Melegh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the fasting plasma carnitine ester in patients with celiac disease.METHODS: We determined the fasting plasma carnitine ester profile using ESI triple quadrupol mass spectrometry in 33 adult patients with biopsy-confirmed maturity onset celiac disease maintained on long term gluten free diet.RESULIS: The level of free camitine did not differ as the celiac disease patients were compared with the healthy controls, whereas the acetylcarnitine level was markedly reduced (4.703 ± 0.205 vs 10.227 ± 0.368 nmol/mL,P<0.01). The level of propionylcarnitine was 61.5%,butyrylcarnitine 56.9%, hexanoylcarnitine 75%,octanoylcarnitine 71.1%, octenoylcarnitine 52.1%,decanoylcarnitine 73.1%, cecenoylcarnitine 58.3%,lauroylcarnitine 61.5%, miristoylcarnitine 66.7%,miristoleylcarnitine 62.5% and oleylcarnitine 81.1%in the celiac disease patients compared to the control values, respectively (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: The marked decrease of circulating acetylcarnitine with 50-80 % decrease of 11 other carnitine esters shows that the carnitine ester metabolism can be influenced even in clinically asymptomatic and well being adult celiac disease patients, and gluten withdrawal alone does not necessarily normalize all elements of the disturbed carnitine homeostasis.

  10. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

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    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  11. Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Amino Acids and Lipids across Healthy Pregnancy.

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    Karen L Lindsay

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is characterized by a complexity of metabolic processes that may impact fetal development and ultimately, infant health outcomes. However, our understanding of whole body maternal and fetal metabolism during this critical life stage remains incomplete. The objective of this study is to utilize metabolomics to profile longitudinal patterns of fasting maternal metabolites among a cohort of non-diabetic, healthy pregnant women in order to advance our understanding of changes in protein and lipid concentrations across gestation, the biochemical pathways by which they are metabolized and to describe variation in maternal metabolites between ethnic groups. Among 160 pregnant women, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediates, keto-bodies and non-esterified fatty acids were detected by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, while polar lipids were detected through flow-injected mass spectrometry. The maternal plasma concentration of several essential and non-essential amino acids, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins significantly decreased across pregnancy. Concentrations of several TCA intermediates increase as pregnancy progresses, as well as the keto-body β-hydroxybutyrate. Ratios of specific acylcarnitines used as indicators of metabolic pathways suggest a decreased beta-oxidation rate and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 enzyme activity with advancing gestation. Decreasing amino acid concentrations likely reflects placental uptake and tissue biosynthesis. The absence of any increase in plasma non-esterified fatty acids is unexpected in the catabolic phase of later pregnancy and may reflect enhanced placental fatty acid uptake and utilization for fetal tissue growth. While it appears that energy production through the TCA cycle increases as pregnancy progresses, decreasing patterns of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine as

  12. Metabolomics Study of Resina Draconis on Myocardial Ischemia Rats Using Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography/Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Combined with Pattern Recognition Methods and Metabolic Pathway Analysis

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    Yunpeng Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resina draconis (bright red resin isolated from Dracaena cochinchinensis, RD has been clinically used for treatment of myocardial ischemia (MI for many years. However, the mechanisms of its pharmacological action on MI are still poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize the plasma metabolic profiles of MI and investigate the mechanisms of RD on MI using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics combined with pattern recognition methods and metabolic pathway analysis. Twenty metabolite markers characterizing metabolic profile of MI were revealed, which were mainly involved in aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan biosynthesis, vascular smooth muscle contraction, sphingolipid metabolism, and so forth. After RD treatment, however, levels of seven MI metabolite markers, including phytosphingosine, sphinganine, acetylcarnitine, cGMP, cAMP, L-tyrosine, and L-valine, were turned over, indicating that RD is likely to alleviate MI through regulating the disturbed vascular smooth muscle contraction, sphingolipid metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism, and BCAA metabolism. To our best knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the mechanisms of RD for treating MI, from a metabolomics point of view. Our findings are very valuable to gain a better understanding of MI metabolic profiles and provide novel insights for exploring the mechanisms of RD on MI.

  13. Muscle and liver-specific alterations in lipid and acylcarnitine metabolism after a single bout of exercise in mice.

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    Hoene, Miriam; Li, Jia; Li, Yanjie; Runge, Heike; Zhao, Xinjie; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Weigert, Cora

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular lipid pools are highly dynamic and tissue-specific. Physical exercise is a strong physiologic modulator of lipid metabolism, but most studies focus on changes induced by long-term training. To assess the acute effects of endurance exercise, mice were subjected to one hour of treadmill running, and (13)C16-palmitate was applied to trace fatty acid incorporation in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle and liver. The amounts of carnitine, FFA, lysophospholipids and diacylglycerol and the post-exercise increase in acetylcarnitine were pronouncedly higher in soleus than in gastrocnemius. In the liver, exercise increased the content of lysophospholipids, plasmalogens and carnitine as well as transcript levels of the carnitine transporter. (13)C16-palmitate was detectable in several lipid and acylcarnitine species, with pronounced levels of tracer-derived palmitoylcarnitine in both muscles and a strikingly high incorporation into triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine in the liver. These data illustrate the high lipid storing activity of the liver immediately after exercise whereas in muscle, fatty acids are directed towards oxidation. The observed muscle-specific differences accentuate the need for single-muscle analyses as well as careful consideration of the particular muscle employed when studying lipid metabolism in mice. In addition, our results reveal that lysophospholipids and plasmalogens, potential lipid signalling molecules, are acutely regulated by physical exercise. PMID:26916151

  14. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity.

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    Breit, Marc; Netzer, Michael; Weinberger, Klaus M; Baumgartner, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars) were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID) for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs) in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2), showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P modeling approach demonstrates high potential for dynamic biomarker identification and the investigation of kinetic mechanisms in disease or pharmacodynamics studies using MS data from longitudinal cohort studies.

  15. Metabolic Signatures of Kidney Yang Deficiency Syndrome and Protective Effects of Two Herbal Extracts in Rats Using GC/TOF MS.

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    Zhao, Linjing; Wu, Hongbing; Qiu, Mingfeng; Sun, Wei; Wei, Runmin; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Yang, Yiting; Xin, Xue; Zou, Haimiao; Chen, Tianlu; Liu, Jiajian; Lu, Lina; Su, Jing; Ma, Chungwah; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Kidney Yang Deficiency Syndrome (KDS-Yang), a typical condition in Chinese medicine, shares similar clinical signs of the glucocorticoid withdrawal syndrome. To date, the underlying mechanism of KDS-Yang has been remained unclear, especially at the metabolic level. In this study, we report a metabolomic profiling study on a classical model of KDS-Yang in rats induced by hydrocortisone injection to characterize the metabolic transformation using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. WKY1, a polysaccharide extract from Astragalus membranaceus and Lycium barbarum, and WKY2, an aqueous extract from a similar formula containing Astragalus membranaceus, Lycium barbarum, Morinda officinalis, Taraxacum mongolicum, and Cinnamomum cassia presl, were used separately for protective treatments of KDS-Yang. The changes of serum metabolic profiles indicated that significant alterations of key metabolic pathways in response to abrupt hydrocortisone perturbation, including decreased energy metabolism (lactic acid, acetylcarnitine), lipid metabolism (free fatty acids, 1-monolinoleoylglycerol, and cholesterol), gut microbiota metabolism (indole-3-propionic acid), biosynthesis of catecholamine (norepinephrine), and elevated alanine metabolism, were attenuated or normalized with different degrees by the pretreatment of WKY1 or WKY2, which is consistent with the observations in which the two herbal agents could ameliorate biochemical markers of serum cortisone, adrenocorticotropic (ACTH), and urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS). PMID:24159348

  16. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

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    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle.

  17. Compartmentation of Metabolism of the C12-, C9-, and C5-n-dicarboxylates in Rat Liver, Investigated by Mass Isotopomer Analysis: ANAPLEROSIS FROM DODECANEDIOATE.

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    Jin, Zhicheng; Bian, Fang; Tomcik, Kristyen; Kelleher, Joanne K; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Brunengraber, Henri

    2015-07-24

    We investigated the compartmentation of the catabolism of dodecanedioate (DODA), azelate, and glutarate in perfused rat livers, using a combination of metabolomics and mass isotopomer analyses. Livers were perfused with recirculating or nonrecirculating buffer containing one fully (13)C-labeled dicarboxylate. Information on the peroxisomal versus mitochondrial catabolism was gathered from the labeling patterns of acetyl-CoA proxies, i.e. total acetyl-CoA, the acetyl moiety of citrate, C-1 + 2 of β-hydroxybutyrate, malonyl-CoA, and acetylcarnitine. Additional information was obtained from the labeling patterns of citric acid cycle intermediates and related compounds. The data characterize the partial oxidation of DODA and azelate in peroxisomes, with terminal oxidation in mitochondria. We did not find evidence of peroxisomal oxidation of glutarate. Unexpectedly, DODA contributes a substantial fraction to anaplerosis of the citric acid cycle. This opens the possibility to use water-soluble DODA in nutritional or pharmacological anaplerotic therapy when other anaplerotic substrates are impractical or contraindicated, e.g. in propionic acidemia and methylmalonic acidemia.

  18. Metabolic Signatures of Kidney Yang Deficiency Syndrome and Protective Effects of Two Herbal Extracts in Rats Using GC/TOF MS

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    Linjing Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney Yang Deficiency Syndrome (KDS-Yang, a typical condition in Chinese medicine, shares similar clinical signs of the glucocorticoid withdrawal syndrome. To date, the underlying mechanism of KDS-Yang has been remained unclear, especially at the metabolic level. In this study, we report a metabolomic profiling study on a classical model of KDS-Yang in rats induced by hydrocortisone injection to characterize the metabolic transformation using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. WKY1, a polysaccharide extract from Astragalus membranaceus and Lycium barbarum, and WKY2, an aqueous extract from a similar formula containing Astragalus membranaceus, Lycium barbarum, Morinda officinalis, Taraxacum mongolicum, and Cinnamomum cassia presl, were used separately for protective treatments of KDS-Yang. The changes of serum metabolic profiles indicated that significant alterations of key metabolic pathways in response to abrupt hydrocortisone perturbation, including decreased energy metabolism (lactic acid, acetylcarnitine, lipid metabolism (free fatty acids, 1-monolinoleoylglycerol, and cholesterol, gut microbiota metabolism (indole-3-propionic acid, biosynthesis of catecholamine (norepinephrine, and elevated alanine metabolism, were attenuated or normalized with different degrees by the pretreatment of WKY1 or WKY2, which is consistent with the observations in which the two herbal agents could ameliorate biochemical markers of serum cortisone, adrenocorticotropic (ACTH, and urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS.

  19. Muscle-specific deletion of carnitine acetyltransferase compromises glucose tolerance and metabolic flexibility.

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    Muoio, Deborah M; Noland, Robert C; Kovalik, Jean-Paul; Seiler, Sarah E; Davies, Michael N; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Stevens, Robert D; Kheterpal, Indu; Zhang, Jingying; Covington, Jeffrey D; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Ravussin, Eric; Kraus, William; Koves, Timothy R; Mynatt, Randall L

    2012-05-01

    The concept of "metabolic inflexibility" was first introduced to describe the failure of insulin-resistant human subjects to appropriately adjust mitochondrial fuel selection in response to nutritional cues. This phenomenon has since gained increasing recognition as a core component of the metabolic syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, we identify an essential role for the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), in regulating substrate switching and glucose tolerance. By converting acetyl-CoA to its membrane permeant acetylcarnitine ester, CrAT regulates mitochondrial and intracellular carbon trafficking. Studies in muscle-specific Crat knockout mice, primary human skeletal myocytes, and human subjects undergoing L-carnitine supplementation support a model wherein CrAT combats nutrient stress, promotes metabolic flexibility, and enhances insulin action by permitting mitochondrial efflux of excess acetyl moieties that otherwise inhibit key regulatory enzymes such as pyruvate dehydrogenase. These findings offer therapeutically relevant insights into the molecular basis of metabolic inflexibility. PMID:22560225

  20. Quantitative analysis of amino acids and acylcarnitines combined with untargeted metabolomics using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

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    Roy, Cynthia; Tremblay, Pierre-Yves; Bienvenu, Jean-François; Ayotte, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Metabolomics is an "omic" technique being increasingly used in epidemiological and clinical studies. We developed a method combining untargeted metabolomics with the quantitative determination of eight amino acids (AA) and eight acylcarnitines (AC) in plasma using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), electrospray ionization (ESI) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). Separation of metabolites is performed by ion-pair reverse phase UHPLC using a HSS T3 column (2.1×100mm, 100Å, 1.8μm particle size) and formic acid-ammonium acetate-heptafluorobutyric acid in water and formic acid-ammonium acetate in methanol as mobile phases. Metabolite identification and quantification are achieved using a QTOFMS operating in ESI-positive and full-scan mode along with MS(E) acquisition of fragmentation patterns. Targeted metabolites are quantified using the appropriate labeled standards and include branched-chain AA (leucine, isoleucine, valine), aromatic AA (phenylalanine, tyrosine) as well as acetylcarnitine and propionylcarnitine, which have been identified as biomarkers of future cardiometabolic disease risk. The inter-day precision (relative standard deviation) for the targeted method was <15% for all but one metabolite and accuracy (bias) of amino acids ranged from 0.5% to 13.9% using SRM 1950 as the external standard. Untargeted metabolomics in 30 plasma samples from the general Canadian population revealed 5018 features, of which 48 metabolites were identified using the MZmine 2.19 software including 23 by our in-house library that comprises 671 annotated metabolites. SRM 1950 analysis revealed 11,684 features, among which 154 metabolites were identified. Our method is currently applied in several epidemiological studies to better characterize cardiometabolic diseases and identify new biomarkers for disease prevention. PMID:27240302

  1. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Breit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2, showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P < 0.001. In the class of amino acids, highest values were shown for alanine (MFC = 1.42, P < 0.001, classified as late marker and strong predictor. Glucose yields a delayed response pattern, similar to a hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001. These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling

  2. Development of a metabolomic radiation signature in urine from patients undergoing total body irradiation.

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    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Mak, Tytus D; Anizan, Sebastien; Amundson, Sally A; Barker, Christopher A; Wolden, Suzanne L; Brenner, David J; Fornace, Albert J

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of the threat of radiological terrorism and other radiological incidents has led to the need for development of fast, accurate and noninvasive methods for detection of radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to extend radiation metabolomic biomarker discovery to humans, as previous studies have focused on mice. Urine was collected from patients undergoing total body irradiation at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 4-6 h postirradiation (a single dose of 1.25 Gy) and 24 h (three fractions of 1.25 Gy each). Global metabolomic profiling was obtained through analysis with ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Prior to further analyses, each sample was normalized to its respective creatinine level. Statistical analysis was conducted by the nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Fisher's exact test and markers were validated against pure standards. Seven markers showed distinct differences between pre- and post-exposure samples. Of those, trimethyl-l-lysine and the carnitine conjugates acetylcarnitine, decanoylcarnitine and octanoylcarnitine play an important role in the transportation of fatty acids across mitochondria for subsequent fatty acid β-oxidation. The remaining metabolites, hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid are the final products of the purine catabolism pathway, and high levels of excretion have been associated with increased oxidative stress and radiation induced DNA damage. Further analysis revealed sex differences in the patterns of excretion of the markers, demonstrating that generation of a sex-specific metabolomic signature will be informative and can provide a quick and reliable assessment of individuals in a radiological scenario. This is the first radiation metabolomics study in human urine laying the foundation for the use of metabolomics in biodosimetry and providing confidence in biomarker

  3. Clinical features andMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic acidemia:identifi cation of ten novel allelic variants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Shu Han; Zhuo Huang; Feng Han; Jun Ye; Wen-Juan Qiu; Hui-Wen Zhang; Yu Wang; Zhu-Wen Gong; Xue-Fan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to studyMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic academia (MMA) and their clinical features for the potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Methods: Forty-three patients were diagnosed with isolated MMA by elevated blood propionylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine to acetylcarnitine ratio, and urine methylmalonate without hyperhomocysteinemia. The MUT gene was amplifi ed by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Those patients with at least one variant allele were included. The novel missense mutations were assessed by bioinformatic analysis and screened against alleles sequenced from 50 control participants. Results: Among the 43 patients, 38 had typical clinical presentations, and the majority (30/38) experienced early-onset MMA. Eight patients died and seven were lost to follow-up. Twenty patients had poor outcomes and eight showed normal development. The 43 identifi edMUT gene mutations had at least one variant allele, whereas 35 had two mutant alleles. Of the 33 mutations reported before, eight recurrent mutations were identified in 32 patients, and c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most common (12/78) in the mutant alleles. Of the 10 novel mutations, six were missense mutations and four were premature termination codon mutations. The six novel missense mutations seemed to be pathogenic. Conclusions: A total of 10 novelMUT mutations were detected in the Chinese population. c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most frequent mutation. A genotype-phenotype correlation could not be found, but the genotypic characterization indicated the need of genetic counseling for MMA patients and early prenatal diagnoses for high-risk families.

  4. Systematic review of pharmacological treatments in fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejada Maria-Isabel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS is considered the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. Affected people have mental impairment that can include Attention Deficit and/or Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, autism disorder, and speech and behavioural disorders. Several pharmacological interventions have been proposed to treat those impairments. Methods Systematic review of the literature and summary of the evidence from clinical controlled trials that compared at least one pharmacological treatment with placebo or other treatment in individuals with diagnosis of FXS syndrome and assessed the efficacy and/or safety of the treatments. Studies were identified by a search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Databases using the terms fragile X and treatment. Risk of bias of the studies was assessed by using the Cochrane Collaboration criteria. Results The search identified 276 potential articles and 14 studies satisfied inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 studies on folic acid (9 with crossover design, only 1 of them with good methodological quality and low risk of bias did not find in general significant improvements. A small sample size trial assessed dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD and found some improvements in those taking methylphenidate, but the length of follow-up was too short. Two studies on L-acetylcarnitine, showed positive effects and no side effects in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD. Finally, one study on patients with an additional diagnosis of autism assessed ampakine compound CX516 and found no significant differences between treatment and placebo. Regarding safety, none of the studies that assessed that area found relevant side effects, but the number of patients included was too small to detect side effects with low incidence. Conclusion Currently there is no robust evidence to support recommendations on pharmacological treatments in patients with

  5. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sugiharto Sugiharto; Mette SHedemann; Charlotte Lauridsen

    2014-01-01

    Background:The processes of weaning and exposure to pathogenic bacteria induce stress responses, which may alter the metabolism. In this study, we investigated the changes in plasma metabolites and immune responses in piglets in response to the stress induced by weaning and Escherichia coli challenge. Results:Fecal dry matter decreased (P=0.003) and nearly half (44.4%) the piglets developed diarrhea on day 2 and 3 postweaning. The concentration of plasma immunoglobulin A was higher (P<0.001) on day 11 postweaning than on day 0 or 4 postweaning. The levels of white blood cells increased continuously (P<0.001) from day 0 to day 11 postweaning. Differences in the percentages of neutrophils (P=0.029) and lymphocytes (P=0.022) were seen, but the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio did not differ in the period after weaning. A clear separation of the metabolomic profile data for day 0 and day 4 postweaning was observed with a principal components analysis (PCA) scores plot, and the data for day 11 were located between those for day 0 and day 4 postweaning. The plasma levels of proline, taurine, and carnitine were higher, whereas those of betaine, creatine, L-arginine and acetylcarnitine were lower on day 4 postweaning than on day 0. Levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine were either higher or lower after weaning, depending on the chain lengths or characters of these metabolites. Conclusions:Our results show a clear separation in the plasma metabolomic profiles of piglets that corresponded to the fecal responses to stress on the piglets induced by weaning or exposure to a pathogen (E. coli). These plasma metabolite profiles suggest that the challenges induced proinflammatory responses in the piglets, resulting in postweaning diarrhea, which was associated with higher concentrations of IgA in the plasma.

  6. A UHPLC-TOF/MS method based metabonomic study of total ginsenosides effects on Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yingge; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Ling; Di, Xin; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Bi, Kaishun

    2015-11-10

    A metabonomic method was established to find potential biomarkers and study the metabolism disturbance in Alzheimer disease animal model. Total ginsenosides, as potential agent in neuroprotection and anti-inflammation, was also studied to learn the regulation mechanism to plasma metabolites in model animals. In experiment, amyloid beta 1-42 was occupied to form Alzheimer disease animal model. After drug administration, animals were evaluated by Morris water maze behavior test and sacrificed. Plasma samples were then analyzed using UHPLC-TOF/MS method to determine the endogenous metabolites. Behavior test results revealed that the spatial learning and memory abilities were deficit in model mice, and total ginsenosides could improve cognition abilities in dose-dependent manners. Principal component analysis showed that model and sham were divided into two groups, which means the metabolic network of mice was disturbed after modeling. Accordingly, 19 biomarkers were found and identified. In model group, the levels of proline, valine, tryptophan, LPC (14:0), LPC (15:0), LPC (15:1), LPC (17:0), LPC (18:2), LPC (18:3) and LPC (20:4) were up-regulated, while the levels of acetylcarnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, vaccenylcarnitine, phytosphingosine, N-eicosanoylethanolamine, hexadecenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid and octadecadienoic acid were down-regulated. The levels of these metabolites were recovered in different degrees after total ginsenosides administration. Combining with behavior study results, total ginsenosides could ameliorate both cognition symptoms and metabolic changes in model animals. This metabonomic approach provided a feasible way to understand the endogenous alterations of AD and to study the pharmacodynamic activity of novel agents.

  7. Inflammation in adult women with a history of child maltreatment: The involvement of mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Christina; Koenig, Alexandra Maria; Schury, Katharina; Geiger, Martha Leonie; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Wilker, Sarah; Waller, Christiane; Gündel, Harald; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    The experience of maltreatment during childhood is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pro-inflammatory phenotype remain unclear. Mitochondria were recently found to principally coordinate inflammatory processes via both inflammasome activation and inflammasome-independent pathways. To this end, we hypothesized that alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress might be at the interface between the association of maltreatment experiences during childhood and inflammation. We analyzed pro-inflammatory biomarkers (levels of C-reactive protein, cytokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro, PBMC composition, lysophosphatidylcholine levels), serum oxidative stress levels (arginine:citrulline ratio, l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels) and mitochondrial functioning (respiratory activity and density of mitochondria in PBMC) in peripheral blood samples collected from 30 women (aged 22-44years) with varying degrees of maltreatment experiences in form of abuse and neglect during childhood. Exposure to maltreatment during childhood was associated with an increased ROS production, higher levels of oxidative stress and an increased mitochondrial activity in a dose-response relationship. Moreover, the increase in mitochondrial activity and ROS production were positively associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMC. Decreased serum levels of lysophosphatidylcholines suggested higher inflammasome activation with increasing severity of child maltreatment experiences. Together these findings offer preliminary evidence for the association of alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory phenotype observed in individuals with a history of maltreatment during childhood. The results emphasize that the early prevention of child abuse and neglect warrants more attention, as the

  8. Analysis of acylcarnitine profiles in umbilical cord blood and during the early neonatal period by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vieira Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acylcarnitine profiling by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS is a potent tool for the diagnosis and screening of fatty acid oxidation and organic acid disorders. Few studies have analyzed free carnitine and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots (DBS of umbilical cord blood (CB and the postnatal changes in the concentrations of these analytes. We have investigated these metabolites in healthy exclusively breastfed neonates and examined possible effects of birth weight and gestational age. DBS of CB were collected from 162 adequate for gestational age neonates. Paired DBS of heel-prick blood were collected 4-8 days after birth from 106 of these neonates, the majority exclusively breastfed. Methanol extracts of DBS with deuterium-labeled internal standards were derivatized before analysis by ESI-MS/MS. Most of the analytes were measured using a full-scan method. The levels of the major long-chain acylcarnitines, palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, and oleoylcarnitine, increased by 27, 12, and 109%, respectively, in the first week of life. Free carnitine and acetylcarnitine had a modest increase: 8 and 11%, respectively. Propionylcarnitine presented a different behavior, decreasing 9% during the period. The correlations between birth weight or gestational age and the concentrations of the analytes in DBS were weak (r £ 0.20 or nonsignificant. Adaptation to breast milk as the sole source of nutrients can explain the increase of these metabolites along the early neonatal period. Acylcarnitine profiling in CB should have a role in the early detection of metabolic disorders in high-risk neonates.

  9. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Marc; Netzer, Michael; Weinberger, Klaus M; Baumgartner, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars) were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID) for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs) in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2), showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001). These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling approach demonstrates high potential for dynamic biomarker identification and the investigation of kinetic mechanisms in disease or pharmacodynamics studies using MS data from longitudinal cohort studies. PMID:26317529

  10. Plasma metabolomic profiles reflective of glucose homeostasis in non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic obese African-American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Fiehn

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance progressing to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is marked by a broad perturbation of macronutrient intermediary metabolism. Understanding the biochemical networks that underlie metabolic homeostasis and how they associate with insulin action will help unravel diabetes etiology and should foster discovery of new biomarkers of disease risk and severity. We examined differences in plasma concentrations of >350 metabolites in fasted obese T2DM vs. obese non-diabetic African-American women, and utilized principal components analysis to identify 158 metabolite components that strongly correlated with fasting HbA1c over a broad range of the latter (r = -0.631; p<0.0001. In addition to many unidentified small molecules, specific metabolites that were increased significantly in T2DM subjects included certain amino acids and their derivatives (i.e., leucine, 2-ketoisocaproate, valine, cystine, histidine, 2-hydroxybutanoate, long-chain fatty acids, and carbohydrate derivatives. Leucine and valine concentrations rose with increasing HbA1c, and significantly correlated with plasma acetylcarnitine concentrations. It is hypothesized that this reflects a close link between abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, amino acid catabolism, and efficiency of fuel combustion in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. It is speculated that a mechanism for potential TCA cycle inefficiency concurrent with insulin resistance is "anaplerotic stress" emanating from reduced amino acid-derived carbon flux to TCA cycle intermediates, which if coupled to perturbation in cataplerosis would lead to net reduction in TCA cycle capacity relative to fuel delivery.

  11. The Effect of LC-MS Data Preprocessing Methods on the Selection of Plasma Biomarkers in Fed vs. Fasted Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Kristensen, Mette; Skov, Thomas; Dragsted, Lars O

    2012-01-18

    The metabolic composition of plasma is affected by time passed since the last meal and by individual variation in metabolite clearance rates. Rat plasma in fed and fasted states was analyzed with liquid chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF) for an untargeted investigation of these metabolite patterns. The dataset was used to investigate the effect of data preprocessing on biomarker selection using three different softwares, MarkerLynxTM, MZmine, XCMS along with a customized preprocessing method that performs binning of m/z channels followed by summation through retention time. Direct comparison of selected features representing the fed or fasted state showed large differences between the softwares. Many false positive markers were obtained from custom data preprocessing compared with dedicated softwares while MarkerLynxTM provided better coverage of markers. However, marker selection was more reliable with the gap filling (or peak finding) algorithms present in MZmine and XCMS. Further identification of the putative markers revealed that many of the differences between the markers selected were due to variations in features representing adducts or daughter ions of the same metabolites or of compounds from the same chemical subclasses, e.g., lyso-phosphatidylcholines (LPCs) and lyso-phosphatidylethanolamines (LPEs). We conclude that despite considerable differences in the performance of the preprocessing tools we could extract the same biological information by any of them. Carnitine, branched-chain amino acids, LPCs and LPEs were identified by all methods as markers of the fed state whereas acetylcarnitine was abundant during fasting in rats.

  12. Analysis of acylcarnitine profiles in umbilical cord blood and during the early neonatal period by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Neto, E. [Serviço de Genética Médica, Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratório Diagnósticos Laboratoriais Especializados, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fonseca, A.A.; Almeida, R.F. [Laboratório Diagnósticos Laboratoriais Especializados, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Figueiredo, M.P.; Porto, M.A.S. [Maternidade Escola, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, M.G. [Serviço de Genética Médica, Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    Acylcarnitine profiling by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is a potent tool for the diagnosis and screening of fatty acid oxidation and organic acid disorders. Few studies have analyzed free carnitine and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots (DBS) of umbilical cord blood (CB) and the postnatal changes in the concentrations of these analytes. We have investigated these metabolites in healthy exclusively breastfed neonates and examined possible effects of birth weight and gestational age. DBS of CB were collected from 162 adequate for gestational age neonates. Paired DBS of heel-prick blood were collected 4-8 days after birth from 106 of these neonates, the majority exclusively breastfed. Methanol extracts of DBS with deuterium-labeled internal standards were derivatized before analysis by ESI-MS/MS. Most of the analytes were measured using a full-scan method. The levels of the major long-chain acylcarnitines, palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, and oleoylcarnitine, increased by 27, 12, and 109%, respectively, in the first week of life. Free carnitine and acetylcarnitine had a modest increase: 8 and 11%, respectively. Propionylcarnitine presented a different behavior, decreasing 9% during the period. The correlations between birth weight or gestational age and the concentrations of the analytes in DBS were weak (r ≤ 0.20) or nonsignificant. Adaptation to breast milk as the sole source of nutrients can explain the increase of these metabolites along the early neonatal period. Acylcarnitine profiling in CB should have a role in the early detection of metabolic disorders in high-risk neonates.

  13. Proteomic and metabolomic changes driven by elevating myocardial creatine suggest novel metabolic feedback mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervou, Sevasti; Yin, Xiaoke; Nabeebaccus, Adam A; O'Brien, Brett A; Cross, Rebecca L; McAndrew, Debra J; Atkinson, R Andrew; Eykyn, Thomas R; Mayr, Manuel; Neubauer, Stefan; Lygate, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    Mice over-expressing the creatine transporter have elevated myocardial creatine levels [Cr] and are protected against ischaemia/reperfusion injury via improved energy reserve. However, mice with very high [Cr] develop cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. To investigate these contrasting effects, we applied a non-biased hypothesis-generating approach to quantify global protein and metabolite changes in the LV of mice stratified for [Cr] levels: wildtype, moderately elevated, and high [Cr] (65-85; 100-135; 160-250 nmol/mg protein, respectively). Male mice received an echocardiogram at 7 weeks of age with tissue harvested at 8 weeks. RV was used for [Cr] quantification by HPLC to select LV tissue for subsequent analysis. Two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis identified differentially expressed proteins, which were manually picked and trypsin digested for nano-LC-MS/MS. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed efficient group separation (ANOVA P ≤ 0.05) and peptide sequences were identified by mouse database (UniProt 201203) using Mascot. A total of 27 unique proteins were found to be differentially expressed between normal and high [Cr], with proteins showing [Cr]-dependent differential expression, chosen for confirmation, e.g. α-crystallin B, a heat shock protein implicated in cardio-protection and myozenin-2, which could contribute to the hypertrophic phenotype. Nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR at 700 MHz) identified multiple strong correlations between [Cr] and key cardiac metabolites. For example, positive correlations with α-glucose (r² = 0.45; P = 0.002), acetyl-carnitine (r² = 0.50; P = 0.001), glutamine (r² = 0.59; P = 0.0002); and negative correlations with taurine (r² = 0.74; P < 0.0001), fumarate (r² = 0.45; P = 0.003), aspartate (r² = 0.59; P = 0.0002), alanine (r² = 0.66; P < 0.0001) and phosphocholine (r² = 0.60; P = 0.0002). These findings suggest wide-ranging and hitherto unexpected

  14. 甲基丙二酸血症伴同型半胱氨酸血症患儿基因突变分析%Analysis of gene mutations in Chinese patients with methylmalonic acidemia and homocysteinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斐; 顾学范; 韩连书; 胡宇慧; 杨艳玲; 叶军; 邱文娟; 张雅芬; 高晓岚; 王瑜

    2009-01-01

    目的 检测甲基丙二酸血症伴同型半胱氨酸血症患儿的MMACHC基因突变类型及突变频率.方法 依据串联质谱检测血中的酰基肉碱、气相色谱-质谱检测尿甲基丙二酸、血清同型半胱氨酸测定及维生素B12负荷试验等,对28例甲基丙二酸血症伴同型半胱氨酸血症患儿进行诊断;应用聚合酶链反应(PCR)对这些患儿及其部分直系亲属、健康对照组的MMACHC基因外显子进行扩增,通过DNA直接测序进行基因突变分析.结果 在28例患儿中27例检测到突变,共10种,其中2例仪检测到1个杂合突变,3例仅检测到多态性.突变集中在外显子3和4上(91.3%),以609G>A(W203X)最常见,突变频率为53.6%,其中10例为纯合突变,10例为杂合突变,其次为658_660delAAG(K220del),突变频率为8.9%,均为杂合突变.另外检测到6种未报道突变,分别为1A>G、365A>T、658_del660AAG、301-3_327del 30、567_568insT和625_626insT.3种基因多态性分别为-302T>G(rs3748643)、-234A>G(rs3728644)和321G>A(rs2275276).结论 揭示了中国甲基丙二酸血症伴同型半胱氨酸血症患儿的部分基因突变谱,其中609G>A(W203X)可能为热点突变.%Objective Methylmalonic acidemia complicated with homocysteinemia, cblC type, is the most common inborn error of cobalamin metabolism. The gene MMACHC (OM1M 277400) is located on chromosome 1p34.1 with four coding exons and a 5th non-coding exon. It encodes for a protein with 282 amino acid residues. So far, more than 40 mutations have been detected, in which 271dupA(Rg1KfsX14) is the hot spot of MMACHC gene. However, there have not been relevant reports in China. The present study aimed to identify the mutation types of MMACHC gene and analyze the genotype-phenotype correlations in Chinese patients. Method The diagnosis of this disease mainly depends on the measurement of C3 propionylcarnitine, C3/C0 (free carnitine) and C3/C2 (acetylcarnitine) in the blood by tandem mass spectrometry, the