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Sample records for acetanilides

  1. The deuteration of acetanilides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, S.K.; Collier, R.; Hutchinson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    The base-catalysed exchange of a proton of the methyl groups in acetanilides can be used to incorporate deuterium into these amides. 4'-Hydroxyl-2[ 2 H]acetanilide (acetaminophen, paracetamol) can be prepared by the demethylation with boron tribromide of 4'-methoxy-2[ 2 H] acetamide obtained by this base-catalysed exchange. (author)

  2. Deuteration of acetanilides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, S.K.; Collier, R.; Hutchinson, D.W. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (UK). Dept. of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences)

    1982-09-01

    The base-catalysed exchange of a proton of the methyl groups in acetanilides can be used to incorporate deuterium into these amides. 4'-Hydroxyl-2(/sup 2/H)acetanilide (acetaminophen, paracetamol) can be prepared by the demethylation with boron tribromide of 4'-methoxy-2(/sup 2/H) acetamide obtained by this base-catalysed exchange.

  3. Polarons in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alwyn C.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnston, Clifford T.

    1989-06-01

    The best available data are presented of the integrated intensity of the 1650-cm-1 band in crystalline acetanilide as a function of temperature. A concise theory of polaron states is presented and used to interpret the data.

  4. Radioselective tritiation of acetanilide and para-substituted acetanilides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Aoyama, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Acetanilide and para-substituted acetanilides were tritiated by heating with HTO in the presence of RhCl 3 .3H 2 O as a catalyst in an N,N-dimethylformamide solution at 105-107 deg C for 18 h. Under such conditions, tritium introduced into the anilide molecules was found at the adjacent ortho positions to the acetamido group with virtually 100% regioselectivity. The substituent effect on the rate of tritiation was observed. (author) 13 refs

  5. Preparation of Acetanilide from Nitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wilkins; Lowe, Valerie C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an improved technique for synthesizing acetanilide from nitrobenzene by reducing nitrobenzene with iron powder and hydrochloric acid. This experiment has been used successfully with 2,000 students during two semesters. (Author/SA)

  6. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons

  7. Effect of halogenated benzenes on acetanilide esterase, acetanilide hydroxylase and procaine esterase in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, G P; Dziezak, J D; Johnson, K M

    1979-07-01

    1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, 1,2,4-tribromobenzene, 1,3,5-tribromobenzene and hexabromobenzene were compared for their abilities to induce acetanilide esterase, acentailide hydroxylase and procaine esterase. Except for hexabromobenzene all induced acetanilide esterase whereas the hydroxylation of acetanilide was seen only with the fully halogenated benzenes and with 1,3,5-tribromobenzene. Hepatic procaine esterase activity was increased by the three chlorinated benzenes and 1,2,4-tribromobenzene.

  8. Acetanilide 4-hydroxylase and acetanilide 2-hydroxylase activity in hepatic microsomes from induced mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, M; Chui, Y C; Levi, P; Hodgson, E

    1991-02-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation of 14C-labelled acetanilide, 4-hydroxyacetanilide, 3-hydroxyacetanilide and 2-hydroxyacetanilide was developed using thin-layer chromatography. This separation is the basis for the assay of acetanilide 4-hydroxylase and acetanilide 2-hydroxylase activity in liver microsomes from DBA2/N male mice that had been treated with phenobarbital, 3-methylcholanthrene, isosafrole or n-butylbenzodioxole. Microsomes were incubated with [14C]acetanilide and extracted with benzene and ethyl acetate. The extract was applied to silica gel plates and developed with a hexane/isopropanol/ammonium hydroxide/water solvent system. The radiolabelled phenolic metabolites and the parent compound were detected using a Berthold Automatic TLC Linear Analyzer. Although the 4-hydroxylated metabolite was the primary product detected, this method can be used to detect other phenolic metabolites.

  9. Infrared Absorption in Acetanilide by Solitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Carta, F.

    1983-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of acetanilide shows a new band that is red shifted from the main amide-I maximum by about 15 cm-1, the intensity of which increases at low temperature. It is suggested that this band may arise from the creation of amide-I solitons that are similar (but not identical) to those...

  10. Semiclassical and quantum polarons in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, P.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-08-01

    Crystalline acetanilide is a an organic solid with peptide bond structure similar to that of proteins. Two states appear in the amide I spectral region having drastically different properties: one is strongly temperature dependent and disappears at high temperatures while the other is stable at all temperatures. Experimental and theoretical work over the past twenty five years has assigned the former to a selftrapped state while the latter to an extended free exciton state. In this article we review the experimental and theoretical developments on acetanilide paying particular attention to issues that are still pending. Although the interpretation of the states is experimentally sound, we find that specific theoretical comprehension is still lacking. Among the issues that that appear not well understood is the effective dimensionality of the selftrapped polaron and free exciton states.

  11. Infrared Absorption in Acetanilide by Solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Carta, F.; Gratton, E.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1983-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of acetanilide shows a new band that is red shifted from the main amide-I maximum by about 15 cm-1, the intensity of which increases at low temperature. It is suggested that this band may arise from the creation of amide-I solitons that are similar (but not identical) to those proposed by Davydov for the alpha helix in proteins.

  12. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  13. Quantum vibrational polarons: Crystalline acetanilide revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Peter; Edler, Julian

    2006-03-01

    We discuss a refined theoretical description of the peculiar spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide (ACN). Acetanilide is a molecular crystal with quasi-one-dimensional chains of hydrogen-bonded units, which is often regarded as a model system for the vibrational spectroscopy of proteins. In linear spectroscopy, the CO stretching (amide I) band of ACN features a double-peak structure, the lower of which shows a pronounced temperature dependence which has been discussed in the context of polaron theory. In nonlinear spectroscopy, both of these peaks respond distinctly differently. The lower-frequency band exhibits the anharmonicity expected from polaron theory, while the higher-frequency band responds as if it were quasiharmonic. We have recently related the response of the higher-frequency band to that of a free exciton [J. Edler and P. Hamm, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2415 (2002)]. However, as discussed in the present paper, the free exciton is not an eigenstate of the full quantum version of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian, which is commonly used to describe these phenomena. In order to resolve this issue, we present a numerically exact solution of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian in one dimension (1D) and 3D. In 1D, we find that the commonly used displaced oscillator picture remains qualitatively correct, even for relatively large exciton coupling. However, the result is not in agreement with the experiment, as it fails to explain the free-exciton band. In contrast, when taking into account the 3D nature of crystalline acetanilide, certain parameter regimes exist where the displaced oscillator picture breaks down and states appear in the spectrum that indeed exhibit the characteristics of a free exciton. The appearance of these states is a speciality of vibrational polarons, whose source of exciton coupling is transition dipole coupling which is expected to have opposite signs of interchain and intrachain coupling.

  14. Far-infrared spectra of acetanilide revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spire, A.; Barthes, M.; Kellouai, H.; De Nunzio, G.

    2000-03-01

    A new investigation of the temperature dependence of the far-infrared spectra of acetanilide and some isotopomers is presented. Four absorption bands are considered at 31, 42, 64, and 80 cm-1, and no significant change of their integrated intensity is observed when reducing the temperature. The temperature induced frequency shift values and other properties of these bands are consistent with an assignment as anharmonic lattice phonons. These results rule out the assignment of the 64, 80, and 106 cm-1 bands as normal modes of the polaronic excitation, as previously suggested.

  15. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1998, USEPA published a Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) of 50 chemicals and 10 microorganisms. "Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide herbicide degradation products" is listed on the the 1998 CCL. Acetanilide degradation products are generally more water soluble...

  16. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  17. Microbial conversion of acetanilide to 2'-hydroxyacetanilide and 4'-hydroxyacetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriault, R J; Longfield, T H

    1967-11-01

    Approximately 700 cultures of various types were examined for their ability to hydroxylate acetanilide. The major product formed by unidentified Streptomyces species RJTS-539 was identified as 4'-hydroxyacetanilide (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol). This culture gave a peak yield of 405 mg per liter from 1,000 mg of acetanilide per liter. Considerably lower yields of 4'-hydroxyacetanilide were isolated from S. cinnamoneus NRRLB-1285. The major conversion product of acetanilide formed by Amanita muscaria F-6 was identified as 2'-hydroxyacetanilide, with a peak yield of 433 mg per liter from 1,000 mg per liter of substrate. A small amount of 4'-hydroxyacetanilide was also formed. Six other Streptomyces cultures formed small amounts of one or two products identical or similar to 2'-hydroxyacetanilide or 4'-hydroxyacetanilide as determined by thin-layer chromatography and ultraviolet spectra.

  18. Acetanilide oxidation in phenylbutazone-associated hypoplastic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J L; Leyland, M J; Delamore, I W; Evans, D A

    1974-08-03

    Acetanilide like phenylbutazone is paraoxidized by the liver endoplasmic reticulum as a primary biotransformation step. Both compounds were given at different times to each of 10 healthy volunteer subjects and the plasma disappearances measured. Correlation was shown between plasma clearance values of the two compounds (r = + 0.7067; P acetanilide were measured in this group of patients and compared with those of a group of 30 healthy volunteer controls. There was a significant decrease in clearance (P acetanilide and there was no significant difference between the results in these patients and those in the control group.It is suggested that relatively poor paraoxidation of phenylbutazone producing high blood concentrations on a given dose may be a factor responsible for the drug-associated hypoplasia even though it does not explain the similar pattern of adverse reactions reported in association with oral administration of the metabolite oxyphenbutazone.

  19. catalysed ortho-carboxylation of acetanilide with CO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The mechanism of palladium(II)-catalysed carboxylation of acetanilide with CO has been investi- gated using density functional theory calculation done at the B3LYP/6-31G(d, p)(SDD for Pd) level of theory. Solvent effects on these reactions have been explored by calculation that included a polarizable continuum.

  20. The measurement of acetanilide in plasma by spectrophotometric and selected ion monitoring methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, J D; Playfer, J; Evans, D A; Lamb, J

    1977-08-01

    Plasma samples from volunteers who had received an oral dose of acetanilide have been analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ultraviolet absorption techniques. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry method involved extraction of the plasma and analysis of the acetanilide using selected ion monitoring with a deuterated internal standard. In the ultraviolet method the plasma was hydrolysed with acid to convert the acetanilide to aniline, and this compound was diazotized and coupled with N-1-naphthylethylene-diamine. The absorbance of the resulting complex was read at 550 nm. Acetanilide levels in plasma determined by the selected ion monitoring method were significantly lower than those measured by spectrophotometry. Pharmacokinetic data calculated from the results obtained using these two assays are very different and illustrate the need for an accurate and specific method of analysis. The major metabolites of acetanilide are shown not to interfere with these assays and the results suggest the possible presence of a new metabolite of acetanilide.

  1. Spectroscopy of the amide-I modes of acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigio, I.J.; Scott, A.C.; Johnston, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Raman measurements were made on acetanilide (N-phenyl-acetamide). Data are presented of the integrated intensity of the 1650 cm -1 band as a function of temperature. The experimental procedures and data reduction were highly rigorous and are believed to be to most reliable data available. A concise theory of polaron states is presented and used to interpret the data. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. ir overtone spectrum of the vibrational soliton in crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.; Careri, G.

    1985-01-01

    The self-trapping (soliton) theory which was recently developed to account for the anomalous amide-I band at 1650 cm -1 in crystalline acetanilide (a model system for protein) has been extended to predict the anharmonicity constant of the overtone spectrum. These infrared-active overtones which have been detected at 3250, 4803, and 6304 cm -1 yield an anharmonicity constant that is in good agreement with the theory

  3. Age related differences in the disposition of acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playfer, J R; Baty, J D; Lamb, J; Powell, C; Price-Evans, D A

    1978-01-01

    1 The metabolism of fifteen elderly hospital in-patients and fifteen young people was studied, using a gas chromatography mass spectrometer method. 2 The results suggest that there is no significant change in hepatic oxidation of acetanilide with age. 3 The concentrations of metabolites were however, significantly elevated in the older group. 4 These results illustrate the importance of the decline in renal function with age in the disposition of drugs. PMID:728323

  4. ir overtone spectrum of the vibrational soliton in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.; Careri, G.

    1985-10-01

    The self-trapping (soliton) theory which was recently developed to account for the anomalous amide-I band at 1650 cm-1 in crystalline acetanilide (a model system for protein) has been extended to predict the anharmonicity constant of the overtone spectrum. These infrared-active overtones which have been detected at 3250, 4803, and 6304 cm-1 yield an anharmonicity constant that is in good agreement with the theory.

  5. Phonons, defects and optical damage in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosic, Thomas J.; Hill, Jeffrey R.; Dlott, Dana D.

    1986-04-01

    Intense picosecond pulses cause accumulated optical damage in acetanilide crystals at low temperature. Catastrophic damage to the irradiated volume occurs after an incubation period where defects accumulate. The optical damage is monitored with subanosecond time resolution. The generation of defects is studied with damage-detected picosecond spectroscopy. The accumulation of defects is studied by time-resolved coherent Raman scattering, which is used to measure optical phonon scattering from the accumulating defects.

  6. NOVEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND CARBON SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION OF ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the U.S. Over the past several years, ethanesufonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradatoin products of these acetanilide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. "Alachlor ESA and ...

  7. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  8. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Physics Department, FCT, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Freedman, Holly [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  9. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  10. Statistical Thermodynamic Approach to Vibrational Solitary Waves in Acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Mesquita, Marcus V.; Luzzi, Roberto

    1998-03-01

    We analyze the behavior of the macroscopic thermodynamic state of polymers, centering on acetanilide. The nonlinear equations of evolution for the populations and the statistically averaged field amplitudes of CO-stretching modes are derived. The existence of excitations of the solitary wave type is evidenced. The infrared spectrum is calculated and compared with the experimental data of Careri et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 51, 104 (1983)], resulting in a good agreement. We also consider the situation of a nonthermally highly excited sample, predicting the occurrence of a large increase in the lifetime of the solitary wave excitation.

  11. Dynamical test of Davydov-type solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, Wunshain; Rothberg, Lewis; Roberson, Mark; Benson, Steve; Madey, John; Etemad, Shahab; Austin, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Picosecond infrared excitation experiments on acetanilide, an α-helix protein analog, indicate that the anomalous 1650-cm-1 band which appears on cooling of acetanilide crystals persists for at least several microseconds following rapid pulsed heating. The ground-state recovery time is 15+/-5 psec, consistent with a conventional mode strongly coupled to the phonon bath. We therefore suggest that the unusual temperature-dependent spectroscopy of acetanilide can be accounted for by slightly nondegenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the crystal.

  12. Biodegradation of Para Amino Acetanilide by Halomonas sp. TBZ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Nader; Sefidi Heris, Youssof; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Vallipour, Javad; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Golabi, Sayyed Mahdi; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2015-09-01

    Aromatic compounds are known as a group of highly persistent environmental pollutants. Halomonas sp. TBZ3 was isolated from the highly salty Urmia Lake of Iran. In this study, characterization of a new Halomonas isolate called Halomonas sp. TBZ3 and its employment for biodegradation of para-amino acetanilide (PAA), as an aromatic environmental pollutant, is described. This study aimed to characterize the TBZ3 isolate and to elucidate its ability as a biodegradative agent that decomposes PAA. Primarily, DNA-DNA hybridization between TBZ3, Halomonas denitrificans DSM18045T and Halomonas saccharevitans LMG 23976T was carried out. Para-amino acetanilide biodegradation was assessed using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Parameters effective on biodegradation of PAA were optimized by the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between isolate TBZ3, H. denitrificans and H. saccharevitans revealed relatedness levels of 57% and 65%, respectively. According to GC-MS results, TBZ3 degrades PAA to benzene, hexyl butanoate, 3-methyl-1-heptanol and hexyl hexanoate. Temperature 32.92°C, pH 6.76, and salinity 14% are the optimum conditions for biodegradation with a confidence level of 95% (at level α = 0.05). According to our results, Halomonas sp. TBZ3 could be considered as a biological agent for bioremediation of PAA and possibly other similar aromatic compounds.

  13. Comparative metabolism and elimination of acetanilide compounds by rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, K L; Larsen, G L; Feil, V J

    1994-10-01

    1. 14C-labelled propachlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, methoxypropachlor and some of their mercapturic acid pathway metabolites (MAP) were given to rat either by gavage or by perfusion into a renal artery. MAP metabolites were isolated from bile and urine. 2. Rat gavaged with propachlor and methoxypropachlor eliminated 14C mostly in urine, whereas rat gavaged with alachlor, butachlor and metolachlor eliminated 14C about equally divided between urine and faeces. When bile ducts were cannulated, the gavaged rat eliminated most of the 14C in bile for all compounds. The amount of 14C in bile from the propachlor-gavaged rat was less than that for the other acetanilides, with the difference being in the urine. 3. The mercapturic acid metabolites 2-methylsulphinyl-N-(1-methylhydroxyethyl)-N-phenylacetam ide and 2-methylsulphinyl-N-(1-methylmethoxyethyl)-N-phenylacetam ide were isolated from the urine and bile of the methoxypropachlor-gavaged rat. 4. Bile was the major route for 14C elimination when MAP metabolites of alachlor, butachlor and metolachlor were perfused into a renal artery. Urine was the major route for 14C elimination when MAP metabolites of propachlor and methoxypropachlor were perfused. Mercapturic acid conjugates were major metabolites in bile and urine when MAP metabolites were perfused. 5. We conclude that alkyl groups on the phenyl portion of the acetanilide causes biliary elimination to be favoured over urinary elimination.

  14. Biodegradation of the acetanilide herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, D M; Tuovinen, O H

    1998-01-01

    Alachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor are detoxified in biological systems by the formation of glutathione-acetanilide conjugates. This conjugation is mediated by glutathione-S-transferase, which is present in microorganisms, plants, and mammals. Other organic sulfides and inorganic sulfide also react through a nucleophilic attack on the 2-chloro group of acetanilide herbicides, but the products are only partially characterized. Sorption in soils and sediments is an important factor controlling the migration and bioavailability of these herbicides, while microbial degradation is the most important factor in determining their overall fate in the environment. The biodegradation of alachlor and metolachlor is proposed to be only partial and primarily cometabolic, and the ring cleavage seems to be slow or insignificant. Propachlor biodegradation has been reported to proceed to substantial (> 50%) mineralization of the ring structure. Reductive dechlorination may be one of the initial breakdown mechanisms under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic and anaerobic transformation products vary in their polarity and therefore in soil binding coefficient. A catabolic pathway for chloroacetanilide herbicides has not been presented in the literature because of the lack of mineralization data under defined cultural conditions.

  15. X-ray investigations of sulfur-containing fungicides. IV. 4'-[[Benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, W M

    2001-09-01

    The conformations of the two approximately isomorphous structures 4'-[[benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(22)H(18)ClN(3)O(4)S, and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(23)H(21)N(3)O(5)S, are stabilized by resonance-assisted intramolecular hydrogen bonds linking the hydrazone moieties and sulfonyl groups. The stronger bond is observed in the former compound. The difference in electronic properties between the Cl atom and the methoxy group is too small to significantly alter the non-bonding interactions of the sulfonyl and beta-carbonyl groups.

  16. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  17. Incoherent neutron scattering in acetanilide and three deuterated derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Mariette; Almairac, Robert; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Moret, Jacques; Currat, Roland; Dianoux, José

    1991-03-01

    Incoherent-neutron-scattering measurements of the vibrational density of states of acetanilide and three deuterated derivatives are presented. These data allow one to identify an intense maximum, assigned to the N-H out-of-plane bending mode. The data display the specific behavior of the methyl torsional modes: large isotopic shift and strong low-temperature intensity; confirm our previous inelastic-neutron-scattering studies, indicating no obvious anomalies in the range of frequency of the acoustic phonons. In addition, the data show the existence of thermally activated quasielastic scattering above 100 K, assigned to the random diffusive motion of the methyl protons. These results are discussed in the light of recent theoretical models proposed to explain the anomalous optical properties of this crystal.

  18. On the unconventional amide I band in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea

    1987-04-01

    We developed a new model to study the molecular dynamics of the acetanilide (ACN) crystal by computer simulation. Low-frequency oscillations of the molecules as a whole were considered with high-frequency vibrations of the amidic degrees of freedom involved in hydrogen bonding. The low-temperature power spectrum has two peaks, shifted by 15 cm -1, in the region of the amide I band: one of them corresponds to the so-called anomalous amide I band in the IR and Raman spectra of ACN. We found that this peak is due to the coupling of the low-frequency motion in the chain of molecules with the motion of the hydrogen-bonded protons, at variance with current suggestions.

  19. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained.

  20. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  1. Pd-Catalyzed C-H activation/oxidative cyclization of acetanilide with norbornene: concise access to functionalized indolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Huang, Yubing; Wu, Wanqing; Huang, Kefan; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-08-07

    An efficient Pd-catalyzed oxidative cyclization reaction for the synthesis of functionalized indolines by direct C-H activation of acetanilide has been developed. The norbornylpalladium species formed via direct ortho C-H activation of acetanilides is supposed to be a key intermediate in this transformation.

  2. Novel chromatographic separation and carbon solid-phase extraction of acetanilide herbicide degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Jody A

    2002-01-01

    One acetamide and 5 acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the United States. Over the past several years, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradation products of these acetanilide/acetamide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide degradation products are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 1998 Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List. Consequently, EPA is interested in obtaining national occurrence data for these contaminants in drinking water. EPA currently does not have a method for determining these acetanilide degradation products in drinking water; therefore, a research method is being developed using liquid chromatography/negative ion electrospray/mass spectrometry with solid-phase extraction (SPE). A novel chromatographic separation of the acetochlor/alachlor ESA and OA structural isomers was developed which uses an ammonium acetate-methanol gradient combined with heating the analytical column to 70 degrees C. Twelve acetanilide degradates were extracted by SPE from 100 mL water samples using carbon cartridges with mean recoveries >90% and relative standard deviations < or =16%.

  3. The relation of age to the acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, H A; Mutch, E; Williams, F M; James, O F; Rawlins, M D; Woodhouse, K W

    1989-03-01

    The activity of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes, the mono-oxygenases, can be inhibited by an acute dose of ethanol. We set out to determine whether age has any relation to the degree of inhibition produced by ethanol, using acetanilide as a model substrate. Eight healthy young subjects (mean age 26 years) and eight healthy elderly subjects (mean age 72 years) were studied on two occasions, once receiving acetanilide alone and once acetanilide with 75 ml vodka (30 g ethanol). The clearance of acetanilide was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the elderly subjects at 27 +/- 3 l/h compared to 38 +/- 2 l/h in young subjects. No age-related differences in peak blood ethanol concentrations or ethanol elimination rates were noted. After ethanol, acetanilide clearance fell 18% to 31 +/- 3 l/h in young subjects (p = 0.05) and by 15% to 23 +/- 2 l/h in elderly subjects (p = 0.08). This suggests that the elderly do not suffer greater impairment of drug oxidation after acute ethanol ingestion than do the young.

  4. Three-parameter modeling of the soil sorption of acetanilide and triazine herbicide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mirlaine R; Matias, Stella V B G; Macedo, Renato L G; Freitas, Matheus P; Venturin, Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Herbicides have widely variable toxicity and many of them are persistent soil contaminants. Acetanilide and triazine family of herbicides have widespread use, but increasing interest for the development of new herbicides has been rising to increase their effectiveness and to diminish environmental hazard. The environmental risk of new herbicides can be accessed by estimating their soil sorption (logKoc), which is usually correlated to the octanol/water partition coefficient (logKow). However, earlier findings have shown that this correlation is not valid for some acetanilide and triazine herbicides. Thus, easily accessible quantitative structure-property relationship models are required to predict logKoc of analogues of the these compounds. Octanol/water partition coefficient, molecular weight and volume were calculated and then regressed against logKoc for two series of acetanilide and triazine herbicides using multiple linear regression, resulting in predictive and validated models.

  5. Microbial Conversion of Acetanilide to 2′-Hydroxyacetanilide and 4′-Hydroxyacetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriault, Robert J.; Longfield, Thomas H.

    1967-01-01

    Approximately 700 cultures of various types were examined for their ability to hydroxylate acetanilide. The major product formed by unidentified Streptomyces species RJTS-539 was identified as 4′-hydroxyacetanilide (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol). This culture gave a peak yield of 405 mg per liter from 1,000 mg of acetanilide per liter. Considerably lower yields of 4′-hydroxyacetanilide were isolated from S. cinnamoneus NRRLB-1285. The major conversion product of acetanilide formed by Amanita muscaria F-6 was identified as 2′-hydroxyacetanilide, with a peak yield of 433 mg per liter from 1,000 mg per liter of substrate. A small amount of 4′-hydroxyacetanilide was also formed. Six other Streptomyces cultures formed small amounts of one or two products identical or similar to 2′-hydroxyacetanilide or 4′-hydroxyacetanilide as determined by thin-layer chromatography and ultraviolet spectra. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16349759

  6. Chemoproteomic Profiling of Acetanilide Herbicides Reveals Their Role in Inhibiting Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Jessica L; Duckering, Megan; Dalvie, Esha; Ku, Wan-Min; Bateman, Leslie A; Fisher, Karl J; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-17

    Acetanilide herbicides are among the most widely used pesticides in the United States, but their toxicological potential and mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we have used chemoproteomic platforms to map proteome-wide cysteine reactivity of acetochlor (AC), the most widely used acetanilide herbicide, in vivo in mice. We show that AC directly reacts with >20 protein targets in vivo in mouse liver, including the catalytic cysteines of several thiolase enzymes involved in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. We show that the fatty acids that are not oxidized, due to impaired fatty acid oxidation, are instead diverted into other lipid pathways, resulting in heightened free fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters, and other lipid species in the liver. Our findings show the utility of chemoproteomic approaches for identifying novel mechanisms of toxicity associated with environmental chemicals like acetanilide herbicides.

  7. The effect of age and frailty upon acetanilide clearance in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, H A; Cope, L H; James, O F; Rawlins, M D; Woodhouse, K W

    1989-11-01

    Six healthy young subjects (aged 23-32 years), six healthy elderly subjects (over 60 years) and six hospitalized long-stay geriatric subjects over 60 years received single oral doses of acetanilide. Acetanilide clearance was similar in the fit and frail elderly subjects at 26.4 +/- 2.5 and 26.3 +/- 3.6 l/h and significantly lower (p less than 0.05) than in the young subjects at 39.0 +/- 1.9 l/h. Liver volumes, measured by ultrasound, were significantly less in the elderly than in the young subjects, whether expressed in absolute terms or per unit body weight (p less than 0.05). When acetanilide clearance was expressed per unit volume of liver, no change occurred with age or frailty. These results suggest that a reduced liver size may be an important contributor to the reduced elimination of capacity limited drugs in elderly man.

  8. Inapplicability of small-polaron model for the explanation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of small-polaron model for the interpretation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide has been critically reexamined. It is shown that the energy difference between the normal and anomalous peak, calculated by means of small-polaron theory, displays pronounced temperature dependence which is in drastic contradiction with experiment. It is demonstrated that self-trapped states, which are recently suggested to explain theoretically the experimental absorption spectrum in protein, cannot cause the appearance of the peaks in absorption spectrum for acetanilide.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of acetanilide by quinquevalent vanadium in acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of acetanilide with vanadium(V) in sulphuric acid medium at constant ionic strength has been studied. The reaction is first order with oxidant. The order of reaction in acetanilide varies from one to zero. The reaction follows an acid catalyzed independent path, exhibiting square dependence in H + . A Bunnett plot indicates that the water acts as a nucleophile. The thermodynamic parameters have been computed. A probable reaction mechanism and rate law consistent with these data are given. (Author)

  10. Positronium formation studies in crystalline molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide - Acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Guerra, L. D. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Windmöller, D.; Santos, G. C.; Fernandes, N. G.; Yoshida, M. I.; Donnici, C. L.; Magalhães, W. F.; Machado, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen bond formation in the triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), acetanilide (ACN) supramolecular heterosynton system, named [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5], has been studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques. In toluene solution, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) presented a 1:1 stoichiometry and indicated that the complexation process is driven by entropy, with low enthalpy contribution. X-ray structure determination showed the existence of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, allowing also the confirmation of the existence of a 1:1 crystalline molecular complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complex are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors, leading to a higher positronium formation probability at [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5]. These weak interactions in the complex enhance the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is higher. Through the present work is shown that PALS is a sensible powerful tool to investigate intermolecular interactions in solid heterosynton supramolecular systems.

  11. Femtosecond study of self-trapped vibrational excitons in crystalline acetanilide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, Peter; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2002-01-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy of delocalized NH excitations of crystalline acetanilide confirms that self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded peptide units exists and does stabilize the excitation. Two phonons with frequencies of 48 and 76 cm(-1) are identified as the major degrees of freedom that mediate...

  12. On the Dielectric Constant for Acetanilide: Experimental Measurements and Effect on Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, G.; Compatangelo, E.; Christiansen, P. L.; Halding, J.; Skovgaard, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the dielectric constant for crystalline acetanilide powder for temperatures ranging from - 140°C to 20°C and for different hydration levels are presented. A Davydov-soliton computer model predicts dramatic changes in the energy transport and storage for typically increased values of the dielectric constant.

  13. Acetanilide interaction with hydriodic acid in aqueous solutions at 20 and 40 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkasov, R.Sh.; Nurakhmetov, N.I.

    1990-01-01

    Isothermal method was used to study acetanilide solubility in aqueous solutions of hydriodic acid at 20 and 40 deg C. formation of two new anhydrous compounds of 2:1 and 1:1 compositions (anilide: acid molar ratio) was established. Temperature and concentration boundaries of solid phase formation were established for these compounds. Their IR spectroscopic investigation was conducted

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants resistant to urea inhibition of growth on acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoriou, M; Brown, P R; Tata, R

    1977-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI 3 was able to grow in medium containing acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide) as a carbon source when NH4+ was the nitrogen source but not when urea was the nitrogen source. AIU mutants isolated from strain AI 3 grew on either medium. Urease levels in bacteria grown in the presence of urea were 10-fold lower when NH4+ or acetanilide was also in the medium, but there were no apparent differences in urease or its synthesis between strain AI 3 and mutant AIU 1N. The first metabolic step in the acetanilide utlization is catalyzed by an amidase. Amidases in several AIU strains showed altered physiochemical properties. Urea inhibited amidase in a time-dependent reaction, but the rates of the inhibitory reaction with amidases from the AIU mutants were slower than with AI 3 amidase. The purified amidase from AIU 1N showed a marked difference in its pH/activity profile from that obtained with purified AI 3 amidase. These observations indicate that the ability of strain AIU 1N and the other mutants to grow on acetanilide/urea medium is associated with a mutation in the amidase structural gene; this was confirmed for strain AIU 1N by transduction.

  15. Reactions of the ionized enol tautomer of acetanilide: elimination of HNCO via a novel rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Lisa N; Carter, Lynn M; Bowen, Richard D; Terlouw, Johan K

    2003-01-01

    The reactions of ionised acetanilide, C(6)H(5)NH(=O)CH(3)(.+), and its enol, C(6)H(5)NH(OH)=CH(2)(.+), have been studied by a combination of tandem mass spectrometric and computational methods. These two isomeric radical cations have distinct chemistries at low internal energies. The keto tautomer eliminates exclusively CH(2)=C=O to give ionised aniline. In contrast, the enol tautomer loses H-N=C=O, via an unusual skeletal rearrangement, to form predominantly ionised methylene cyclohexadiene. Hydrogen atom loss also occurs from the enol tautomer, with the formation of protonated oxindole. The mechanisms for H-N=C=O and hydrogen atom loss both involve cyclisation; the former proceeds via a spiro transition state formed by attachment of the methylene group to the ipso position, whereas the latter entails the formation of a five-membered ring by attachment to the ortho position. The behaviour of labelled analogues reveals that these two processes have different site selectivities. Hydrogen atom loss involves a reverse critical energy and is subject to an isotope effect. Surprisingly, attempts to promote the enolisation of ionised acetanilide by proton-transport catalysis were unsuccessful. In a reversal of the usual situation for ionised carbonyl compounds, ionised acetanilide is actually more stable than its enol tautomer. The enol tautomer was resistant to proton-transport catalysed ketonisation to ionised acetanilide, possibly because the favoured geometry of the encounter complex with the base molecule is inappropriate for facilitating tautomerisation.

  16. Different structure of the complexes of two cytochrome P-450 isozymes with acetanilide by 1H-NMR relaxation and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldman YaYu; Weiner, L M; Lyakhovich, V V

    1993-05-28

    The functional and spectral characteristics of the interaction of acetanilide with phenobarbital- and methylcholanthrene- induced rat liver microsomes, as well as with corresponding major isozymes (cytochromes P-450b and P-450c) have been compared. The magnitude of the reverse 1st type binding spectra proved to be negatively correlated with the acetanilide oxidation on isozymes under study. The data on paramagnetic relaxation of acetanilide protons in the presence of P-450 have shown the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex to be different for two isozymes, acetanilide molecule being closer to Fe ion in the active site in the case of P-450c, which is active towards acetanilide oxidation. For the P-450c-acetanilide complex the group oxidized (phenyl) is the closest to Fe ion.

  17. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  18. Chemical basis for the phytotoxicity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Héctor R; Villarroel, Elisa; Copaja, Sylvia V; Argandoña, Victor H

    2008-01-01

    Germination inhibition activity of N-aryl hydroxamic acids and acetanilide analogues was measured on lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa). Lipophilicity of the compounds was determined by HPLC. A correlation between lipophilicity values and percentage of germination inhibition was established. A model mechanism of action for auxin was used for analyzing the effect of the substituent at the alpha carbon atom (Ca) on the polarization of hydroxamic and amide functions in relation to the germination inhibition activity observed. Results suggest that the lipophilic and acidic properties play an important role in the phytotoxicity of the compounds. A test with the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was used to evaluate the potential herbicide activity of the hydroxamic acids and acetanilides.

  19. Polarizability of acetanilide and RDX in the crystal: effect of molecular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.; Smith, P. J.; Popelier, P. L. A.

    2004-10-01

    Density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level is used to calculate the dipole moment and the static polarizability for acetanilide and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) in their in-crystal structures. For acetanilide the dipole moment is 2{1}/{2}% larger than for the gas-phase structure and for RDX (where there is a gross geometry change) it is 15% larger. The polarizability for the in-crystal structure is smaller than for the gas-phase structure by 3% for both species, whereas the in-crystal effective optical polarizability is larger than the gas-phase static polarizability for both crystals. Hence, effects in addition to the molecular geometry change in the crystal must be considered in order to interpret the effective polarizability completely.

  20. Synthesis of oxindole from acetanilide via Ir(iii)-catalyzed C-H carbenoid functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pitambar; Borah, Gongutri

    2016-12-22

    Herein we disclose the first report on the synthesis of oxindole derivatives from acetanilide via Ir(iii)-catalyzed intermolecular C-H functionalization with diazotized Meldrum's acid. A broad range of substituted anilides were found to react smoothly under the Ir(iii)-catalytic system to afford the corresponding N-protected oxindoles. The N-protecting groups, such as Ac, Bz or Piv, can be easily removed to furnish the oxindole. Various synthetic applications of the synthesized oxindole were also demonstrated.

  1. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  2. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: A F.D.S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthes, M.; Moret, J.; Eckert, J.; Johnson, S.W.; Swanson, B.I.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C 6 H 5 NHCOCH 3 , or ACN), remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons nonlinear vibrational coupling, or ''polaronic'' localized modes. An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies. In this paper we report some new results on the anomalous vibrational modes in ACN that were obtained by inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (INS)

  3. Vibrational Spectra and Density functional calculation of Organic Nonlinear Optic Crystal p-Amino Acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saja, D; Joe, I Hubert; Jayakumar, V S [Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram-695015, Kerala (India)

    2006-01-01

    The NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR spectral analysis of potential NLO material P-Amino Acetanilide is carried out by density functional computations. The optimized geometry shows that NH2 and NHCOCH3 groups substituted in para position of phenyl ring are non-planar which predicts maximum conjugation of molecule with donor and acceptor groups. Vibrational analysis reveals that simultaneous IR and Raman activation of the phenyl ring modes also provide evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donors and the acceptor can make the molecule highly polarized and the intra molecular charge transfer interaction must be responsible for the NLO properties of PAA.

  4. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: a F.D.S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juergen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C6H5NHCOCH3, or ACN)(1) , remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons (2) nonlinear vibrational coupling (3), or "polaronic" localized modes (4)(5). An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed (6) and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations (7) in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies.

  5. Vibrational Spectra and Density functional calculation of Organic Nonlinear Optic Crystal p-Amino Acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saja, D; Joe, I Hubert; Jayakumar, V S

    2006-01-01

    The NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR spectral analysis of potential NLO material P-Amino Acetanilide is carried out by density functional computations. The optimized geometry shows that NH2 and NHCOCH3 groups substituted in para position of phenyl ring are non-planar which predicts maximum conjugation of molecule with donor and acceptor groups. Vibrational analysis reveals that simultaneous IR and Raman activation of the phenyl ring modes also provide evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donors and the acceptor can make the molecule highly polarized and the intra molecular charge transfer interaction must be responsible for the NLO properties of PAA

  6. The two conformers of acetanilide unraveled using LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Caminati, W.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    Acetanilide has been investigated by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy. The rotational spectrum of both trans and cis conformers have been analyzed to determine the rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling the constants. The spectrum of the less abundant cis conformer has been assigned for the first time. The doublets observed for this conformer have been interpreted in terms of the tunneling motion between two equivalent non-planar conformations through a small barrier in which the acetamide group and phenyl ring plane are perpendicular. The results are compared with those of the related formanilide.

  7. sup(1)H-NMR study of restricted rotation in dithiophosphoromethyl acetanilides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zs.

    1985-01-01

    sup(1)H-NMR spectra of a series of dithiophosphoromethyl acetanilide derivatives were investigated. The presence of an ortho substituted aryl group bonded to the nitrogen atom of the amide group allowed the observation of restricted internal rotation around the aryl-nitrogen bond. Coalescence temperature and the values of the free energy of activation were determined from the temperature dependent NMR behaviour of these molecules. The possibility of cis-trans isomerism about the nitrogen carbonyl bond was also studied, and the assignment of the conformation of the existing isomer was also made using the aromatic solvent induced shift. (author)

  8. Femtosecond Study of Self-Trapped Vibrational Excitons in Crystalline Acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.; Scott, A. C.

    2002-02-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy of delocalized NH excitations of crystalline acetanilide confirms that self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded peptide units exists and does stabilize the excitation. Two phonons with frequencies of 48 and 76 cm -1 are identified as the major degrees of freedom that mediate self-trapping. After selective excitation of the free exciton, self-trapping occurs within a few 100 fs. Excitation of the self-trapped states disappears from the spectral window of this investigation on a 1 ps time scale, followed by a slow ground state recovery of the hot ground state within 18 ps.

  9. High-yield nitration of benzene in the synthesis of sup 15 N-labelled nitrobenzene, acetanilide, and diphenylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konior, R.J.; Ling Yang; Walter, R.I. (Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-11-01

    Labelled H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} was used as the least-cost source of nitrogen label to prepare nitrobenzene by reaction of acetyl nitrate with excess benzene. This labelled product was subsequently converted to acetanilide-{sup 15}N and diphenylamine-{sup 15}N. (author).

  10. The acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition in normal subjects, and in patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, J; Rawlings, M D; Cobden, I; James, O F

    1982-10-01

    1 The effects of single doses (25 g and 50 g) oral ethanol on the disposition of acetanilide (50 mg/kg metabolic active mass) has been studied in normal subjects, and in patients with chronic non-alcoholic liver disease. 2 In normal subjects, ethanol produced a dose-dependent increase in acetanilide half-life, and a decrease in acetenilide clearance. There was a significant correlation (rs = 0.71, P less than 0.01) between the 90 min blood ethanol concentration and the reduction in acetanilide clearance. 3 In patients with liver disease, ethanol produced a similar proportional change in acetanilide half-life and clearance, but these were less consistent. Moreover, liver disease itself was associated with an increase in acetenilide half-life, and a reduction in clearance. 4 It is concluded that single oral doses of ethanol, comparable to those consumed during social drinking, may inhibit some forms of microsomal oxidation and thus have important clinical implications.

  11. Possibility of observation of polaron normal modes at the far-infrared spectrum of acetanilide and related organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalosakas, G.; Aubry, S.; Tsironis, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    We use a stationary and normal mode analysis of the semiclassical Holstein model in order to connect the low-frequency linear polaron modes to low-lying far-infrared lines of the acetanilide spectrum and through parameter fitting we comment on the validity of the polaron results in this system.

  12. Influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding on the geometry, atomic charges, and spectral modes of acetanilide: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binoy, J.; Prathima, N. B.; Murali Krishna, C.; Santhosh, C.; Hubert Joe, I.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    Acetanilide, a compound of pharmaceutical importance possessing pain-relieving properties due to its blocking the pulse dissipating along the nerve fiber, is subjected to vibrational spectral investigation using NIR FT Raman, FT-IR, and SERS. The geometry, Mulliken charges, and vibrational spectrum of acetanilide have been computed using the Hartree-Fock theory and density functional theory employing the 6-31G (d) basis set. To investigate the influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding, the geometry, charge distribution, and vibrational spectrum of the acetanilide dimer have been computed at the HF/6-31G (d) level. The computed geometries reveal that the acetanilide molecule is planar, while twisting of the secondary amide group with respect to the phenyl ring is found upon hydrogen bonding. The trans isomerism and “amido” form of the secondary amide, hyperconjugation of the C=O group with the adjacent C-C bond, and donor-acceptor interaction have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of the phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation, and hyperconjugation. A decrease in the NH and C=O bond orders and increase in the C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction can be observed in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the flat orientation of the molecule on the adsorption plane is preferred.

  13. High-yield nitration of benzene in the synthesis of 15N-labelled nitrobenzene, acetanilide, and diphenylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konior, R.J.; Ling Yang; Walter, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    Labelled H 15 NO 3 was used as the least-cost source of nitrogen label to prepare nitrobenzene by reaction of acetyl nitrate with excess benzene. This labelled product was subsequently converted to acetanilide- 15 N and diphenylamine- 15 N. (author)

  14. Anion-assisted trans-cis isomerization of palladium(II) phosphine complexes containing acetanilide functionalities through hydrogen bonding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Hau-San; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Wong, Jenny Ka-Yan; Zhu, Nianyong; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2005-03-28

    The anion-assisted shift of trans-cis isomerization equilibrium of a palladium(II) complex containing acetanilide functionalities brought about by allosteric hydrogen bonding interactions has been established by UV/Vis, 1H NMR, 31P NMR and ESI-MS studies.

  15. Temperature dependence of the vibrational spectra of acetanilide: Davydov solitons or Fermi coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, C.T.; Swanson, B.I.

    1985-03-15

    The unusual temperature dependence of the amide-I region in the IR spectrum of acetanilide (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/NHCOCH/sub 3/) has recently been attributed to a self-trapped Davydov-like soliton. The temperature dependence of the single-crystal Raman scattering from acetanilide and its N-D and /sup 13/C-O substituted analogs in the phonon and internal mode regions has now been studied. The behavior of the amide-I region in the Raman spectra of the normal isotopic species is similar to that observed earlier in infrared studies. However, on the basis of results obtained from the N-D and /sup 13/C-O substituted species the unusual temperature dependence in the 1650 cm/sup -1/ region has been attributed to Fermi coupling of the amide-I fundamental and a combination band involving the in-plane N-H deformation and a low-frequency torsional mode. As temperature is lowered, the strong blue-shift of the torsional mode results in a commensurate blue-shift in the combination level thereby increasing the Fermi coupling. Temperature tuning of the Fermi coupling results in the anomalous intensity changes observed in the IR and Raman spectra of the amide-I region for the normal isotopic species. 20 references, 3 figures.

  16. Dynamics of crystalline acetanilide: Analysis using neutron scattering and computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.; Wanderlingh, U.; Smith, J. C.

    1995-04-01

    The unusual temperature dependence of several optical spectroscopic vibrational bands in crystalline acetanilide has been interpreted as providing evidence for dynamic localization. Here we examine the vibrational dynamics of crystalline acetanilide over a spectral range of ˜20-4000 cm-1 using incoherent neutron scattering experiments, phonon normal mode calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. A molecular mechanics energy function is parametrized and used to perform the normal mode analyses in the full configurational space of the crystal i.e., including the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. One- and multiphonon incoherent inelastic neutron scattering intensities are calculated from harmonic analyses in the first Brillouin zone and compared with the experimental data presented here. Phonon dispersion relations and mean-square atomic displacements are derived from the harmonic model and compared with data derived from coherent inelastic neutron scattering and neutron and x-ray diffraction. To examine the temperature effects on the vibrations the full, anharmonic potential function is used in molecular dynamics simulations of the crystal at 80, 140, and 300 K. Several, but not all, of the spectral features calculated from the molecular dynamics simulations exhibit temperature-dependent behavior in agreement with experiment. The significance of the results for the interpretation of the optical spectroscopic results and possible improvements to the model are discussed.

  17. Temperature dependence of the vibrational spectra of acetanilide: Davydov solitons or Fermi coupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Clifford T.; Swanson, Basil I.

    1985-03-01

    The unusual temperature dependence of the amide-I region in the IR spectrum of acetanilide (C 6H 5NHCOCH 3) has recently been attributed to a self-trapped Davydov-like soliton. The temperature dependence of the single-crystal Raman scattering, from acetanilide and its ND and 13CO substituted analogs in the phonon and internal mode regions has now been studied. The behavior of the amide-I region in the Raman spectra of the normal isotopic species is similar to that observed earlier in infrared studies. However, on the basis of results obtained from the ND and 13CO substituted species the unusual temperature dependence in the 1650 cm -1 region has been attributed to Fermi coupling of the amide-I fundamental and a combination band involving the in-plane NH deformation and a low-frequency torsional mode. As temperature is lowered, the strong blue-shift of the torsional mode results in a commensurate blue-shift in the combination level thereby increasing the Fermi coupling. Temperature tuning of the Fermi coupling results in the anomalous intensity changes observed in the IR and Raman spectra of the amide-I region for the normal isotopic species.

  18. Research strategies for design and development of NSAIDs: clue to balance potency and toxicity of acetanilide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A K; Sen, S; Ghosh, S; Bera, A K; Bhattacharya, S; Chakraborty, S; Banerjee, A

    2001-08-01

    Despite the fact that many modern drug therapies are based on the concept of enzyme inhibition, inhibition of several enzymes leads to pathological disorders. Clinically used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) bind to the active site of the membrane protein, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, the mediators for causing inflammation. At the same time, inhibition of hepatic cysteine proteases by some NSAID metabolites like NAPQI is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity. As a part of our efforts to develop new effective NSAIDs, a comprehensive investigation starting from synthesis to the study of the final metabolism of acetanilide group of compound has been envisaged with appropriate feedback from kinetic studies to enhance our knowledge and technical competency to feed the know-how to the medicinal chemist to screen out and design new acetanilide derivatives of high potency and low toxicity. Structure-function relationship based on the interaction of acetanilide with its cognate enzyme, cyclooxygenase has been studied critically with adequate comparison with several other available crystal structures of COX-NSAID complexes. Furthermore, to make the receptor based drug design strategy a novel and comprehensive one, both the mechanism of metabolism of acetanilide and structural basis of inhibition of cysteine proteases by the reactive metabolite (NAPQI) formed by cytochrome P450 oxidation of acetanilide have been incorporated in the study. It is hoped that this synergistic approach and the results obtained from such consorted structural investigation at atomic level may guide to dictate synthetic modification with judicious balance between cyclooxygenase inhibition and hepatic cysteine protease inhibition to enhance the potential of such molecular medicine to relieve inflammation on one hand and low hepatic toxicity on the other.

  19. [Synthesis of two new acetanilide derivatives and their effect on the serum antioxidant vitamins (A, E, and C) and the MDA level in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, F; Cansiz, A; Kara, H; Karatepe, M; Koparir, M

    2005-01-01

    Acetanilide derivatives, 2,2'-thiobis[N-(4-nitrophenyl)acetamide] and 2,2'-thiobis[N-(4-chlorophenyl)acetamide], were synthesized and characterized. They were shown to cause a considerable oxidative stress in rats.

  20. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide: Fermi resonance, conformational substates, or vibrational self-trapping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.

    2003-08-01

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy is applied to investigate acetanilide, a molecular crystal consisting of quasi-one-dimensional hydrogen bonded peptide units. The amide-I band exhibits a double peak structure, which has been attributed to different mechanisms including vibrational self-trapping, a Fermi resonance, or the existence of two conformational substates. The 2D-IR spectrum of crystalline acetanilide is compared with that of two different molecular systems: (i) benzoylchloride, which exhibits a strong symmetric Fermi resonance and (ii) N-methylacetamide dissolved in methanol which occurs in two spectroscopically distinguishable conformations. Both 2D-IR spectra differ significantly from that of crystalline acetanilide, proving that these two alternative mechanisms cannot account for the anomalous spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide. On the other hand, vibrational self-trapping of the amide-I band can naturally explain the 2D-IR response.

  1. Thermodynamic study of the transfer of acetanilide and phenacetin from water to different organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Yolima; Pinzón, Jorge A; Barbosa, Helber J; Martínez, Fleming

    2005-06-01

    The molar (K(C)(o/w)) and rational (K(X)(o/w)) partition coefficients in the octanol/buffer, i-propyl myristate/buffer, chloroform/buffer, and cyclohexane/buffer systems were determined for acetanilide and phenacetin at 25.0, 30.0, 35.0, and 40.0 degrees C. In all cases except for cyclohexane, the K(C)(o/w) and K(X)(o/w) values were greater than unity. This demonstrates that these two drugs have predominantly lipophilic behavior. Gibbs and van't Hoff thermodynamic analyses have revealed that the transfer of these drugs from water to organic solvents is spontaneous and that it is mainly driven enthalpically for i-propyl myristate and chloroform, and entropy-driven for octanol and cyclohexane.

  2. Discovery of novel acetanilide derivatives as potent and selective beta3-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tatsuya; Onda, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Masahiko; Matsui, Tetsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2009-06-01

    In the search for potent and selective human beta3-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists as potential drugs for the treatment of obesity and noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, a novel series of acetanilide-based analogues were prepared and their biological activities were evaluated at the human beta3-, beta2-, and beta1-ARs. Among these compounds, 2-pyridylacetanilide (2f), pyrimidin-2-ylacetanilide (2u), and pyrazin-2-ylacetanilide (2v) derivatives exhibited potent agonistic activity at the beta3-AR with functional selectivity over the beta1- and beta2-ARs. In particular, compound 2u was found to be the most potent and selective beta3-AR agonist with an EC(50) value of 0.11 microM and no agonistic activity for either the beta1- or beta2-AR. In addition, 2f, 2u, and 2v showed significant hypoglycemic activity in a rodent diabetic model.

  3. Vibron Solitons and Soliton-Induced Infrared Spectra of Crystalline Acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, S.

    1986-01-01

    Red-shifted infrared spectra at low temperatures of amide I (C=O stretching) vibrations of crystalline acetanilide measured by Careri et al. are shown to be due to vibron solitons, which are nonlinearity-induced localized modes of vibrons arising from their nonlinear interactions with optic-type phonons. A nonlinear eigenvalue equation giving the eigenfrequency of stationary solitons is solved approximately by introducing lattice Green's functions, and the obtained result is in good agreement with the experimental result. Inclusion of interactions with acoustic phonons yields the Debye-Waller factor in the zero-phonon line spectrum of vibron solitons, in a manner analogous to the case of impurity-induced localized harmonic phonon modes in alkali halides.

  4. Fast thermal cycling of acetanilide and magnesium chloride hexahydrate for indoor solar cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Amir, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Faidah, Adel S.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Solar cookers are broadly divided into a direct or focusing type, indirect or box-type and advanced solar cookers. The focusing and box-type solar cookers are for outdoor applications. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast cycling of the commercial grade acetanilide C 8 H 9 NO (T m = 116 deg. C) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate MgCl 2 .6H 2 O (T m = 116.7 deg. C) on their thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as storage media inside solar cookers. Five hundred cycles have been performed. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. The compatibility of the selected phase change materials (PCMs) with the containing material is also studied via the surface investigation, using the SIM technique, of aluminum and stainless steel samples embedded in the PCM during cycling. It is inferred that acetanilide is a promising PCM for cooking indoors and during law intensity solar radiation periods with good compatibility with aluminum as a containing material. However, MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not stable during its thermal cycling (even with the extra water principle) due to the phase segregation problem; therefore, it is not recommended as a storage material inside solar cookers for cooking indoors. It is also indicated that MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not compatible with either aluminum or stainless steel.

  5. Drug delivery system prepared by ionizing radiation of the N,N-dimethyl acrylamide with acryloyloxy-acetanilide copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellini, Flavia; Higa, Olga Z.; Queiroz, Alvaro A.A. de; Rodighiero, Paolo

    1995-01-01

    Radiation induced polymerization has been used in biomaterials used in systems which such as drug delivery (DDS). This work describes the copolymerization of the monomers by gamma rays N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and acryloyloxy-acetanilide (AOA) for the immobilization of paracetamol, an analgesic and anti thermic drug. Dimethylformamide solutions were used in two concentrations of DMAA and AOA (F DMAA/AOA = 0,85/015 and 0,70/0,30, where F = molar fraction in the monomer feed). The samples were irradiated in the dose range of 30-800 Gy. The copolymer poly(DMAA-co-AOA) characterization was carried out by FTIR and 1 HRMN. The hydrolysis was studied considering the formation of sodium salts of 4-hydroxy acetanilide at different times of treatment using colorimetric assay. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  6. Extraction of acetanilides in rice using ionic liquid-based matrix solid phase dispersion-solvent flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Changyuan; Li, Zuotong; Zhao, Changjiang; Zhang, Hanqi; Zhang, Dongjie

    2018-04-15

    Ionic liquid-based matrix solid phase dispersion-solvent flotation coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of the acetanilide herbicides, including metazachlor, propanil, alachlor, propisochlor, pretilachlor, and butachlor in rice samples. Some experimental parameters, including the type of dispersant, the mass ratio of dispersant to sample, pH of sample solution, the type of extraction solvent, the type of ionic liquid, flotation time, and flow rate of N 2 were optimized. The average recoveries of the acetanilide herbicides at spiked concentrations of 50, 125, and 250 µg/kg ranged from 89.4% to 108.7%, and relative standard deviations were equal to or lower than 7.1%, the limits of quantification were in the range of 38.0 to 84.7 µg/kg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deuteration of acetanilides and other substituted aromatics using [Ir(COD)(Cy3P)(Py)]PF6 as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesk, D.; Das, P.R.; Evans, B.

    1995-01-01

    Deuterium exchange labelling using [Ir(COD)(Cy 3 P)(Py)]PF 6 as catalyst and deuterium gas was studied on a number of substituted acetanilides. In most cases products containing deuterium ortho to the anilide group were obtained with a high degree of enrichment. With one exception no evidence for meta, para or anilide methyl labelling was seen. The catalyst was also effective in the ortho deuteration of acetophenone, benzophenone and the β-lactam containing compound Sch 48461. (Author)

  8. In vivo hydroxylation of 3H-acetanilide--evaluation of a new radiospirometric method in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutoungi, M; Bieri, H U; Huguenin, P; Karlaganis, G; Zeng, T T; Bircher, J

    1983-12-01

    The proposed in vivo methodology for the investigation of hydroxylation rates consists of of the i.v. administration of tritiated substrates and the collection of tritiated water (HTO) from exhaled air as a measure of HTO accumulation in body water. Specifically, HTO was assessed in exhaled water after i.v. administration of 3H-acetanilide. Over a wide range the half lives of accumulation of HTO in exhaled water (T50) were almost identical with the half lives of elimination of 3H-acetanilide in blood, evaluated by an inverse isotope dilution method (r = 0.96, N = 18). Average T50 amounted to 29 min in controls, was reduced to 20 min after enzyme induction by phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene, and prolonged to 45, 46 and 66 min after bile duct ligation, portacaval shunt and a single dose of ethanol, respectively. It is concluded that the chosen pharmacokinetic approach corrects for the NIH-shift and the results adequately reflect changes in acetanilide hydroxylation related to enzyme induction or inhibition and to liver pathology.

  9. Identification of the urinary metabolites of 4-bromoaniline and 4-bromo-[carbonyl-13C]-acetanilide in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, G B; Nicholson, J K; Lindon, J C; Wilson, I D; Taylor, S; Clayton, E; Wright, B

    2002-04-01

    1. The urinary excretion of 4-bromoaniline and its [carbonyl-(13)C]-labelled N-acetanilide, together with their corresponding metabolites, have been investigated in the rat following i.p. administration at 50 mg kg(-1). 2. Metabolite profiling was performed by reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection, whilst identification was performed using a combination of enzymic hydrolysis and directly coupled HPLC-NMR-MS analysis. The urinary metabolite profile was quantitatively and qualitatively similar for both compounds with little of either excreted unchanged. 3. The major metabolite present in urine was 2-amino-5-bromophenylsulphate, but, in addition, a number of metabolites with modification of the N-acetyl moiety were identified (from both the [(13)C]-acetanilide or produced following acetylation of the free bromoaniline). 4. For 4-bromoacetanilide, N-deacetylation was a major route of metabolism, but despite the detection of the acetanilide following the administration of the free aniline, there was no evidence of reacetylation (futile deacetylation). 5. Metabolites resulting from the oxidation of the acetyl group included a novel glucuronide of an N-glycolanilide, an unusual N-oxanilic acid and a novel N-acetyl cysteine conjugate.

  10. Fast thermal cycling of acetanilide and magnesium chloride hexahydrate for indoor solar cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Amir, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Faidah, Adel S.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S. [Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, King Abdul Aziz Univ., P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-12-15

    Solar cookers are broadly divided into a direct or focusing type, indirect or box-type and advanced solar cookers. The focusing and box-type solar cookers are for outdoor applications. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast cycling of the commercial grade acetanilide C{sub 8}H{sub 9}NO (T{sub m} = 116 C) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O (T{sub m} = 116.7 C) on their thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as storage media inside solar cookers. Five hundred cycles have been performed. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. The compatibility of the selected phase change materials (PCMs) with the containing material is also studied via the surface investigation, using the SIM technique, of aluminum and stainless steel samples embedded in the PCM during cycling. It is inferred that acetanilide is a promising PCM for cooking indoors and during low intensity solar radiation periods with good compatibility with aluminum as a containing material. However, MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O is not stable during its thermal cycling (even with the extra water principle) due to the phase segregation problem; therefore, it is not recommended as a storage material inside solar cookers for cooking indoors. It is also indicated that MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O is not compatible with either aluminum or stainless steel. (author)

  11. Characterization of acetanilide herbicides degrading bacteria isolated from tea garden soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yei-Shung; Liu, Jian-Chang; Chen, Wen-Ching; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2008-04-01

    Three different green manures were added to the tea garden soils separately and incubated for 40 days. After, incubation, acetanilide herbicides alachlor and metolachlor were spiked into the soils, separately, followed by the isolation of bacteria in each soil at designed intervals. Several bacterial strains were isolated from the soils and identified as Bacillus silvestris, B. niacini, B. pseudomycoides, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. simplex, B. megaterium, and two other Bacillus sp. (Met1 and Met2). Three unique strains with different morphologies were chosen for further investigation. They were B. megaterium, B. niacini, and B. silvestris. The isolated herbicide-degrading bacteria showed optimal performance among three incubation temperatures of 30 degrees C and the best activity in the 10 to 50 microg/ml concentration of the herbicide. Each bacterial strain was able to degrade more than one kind of test herbicides. After incubation for 119 days, B. cereus showed the highest activity to degrade alachlor and propachlor, and B. thuringiensis to degrade metolachlor.

  12. Vibrational properties of the amide group in acetanilide: A molecular-dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1987-09-01

    A simplified classical model of acetanilide crystal is built in order to study the mechanisms of vibrational energy transduction in a hydrogen-bonded solid. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is modeled by an electrostatic interaction between neighboring excess charges on hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The intramolecular interaction in the peptide group is provided by a dipole-charge interaction. Forces are calculated up to second-order terms in the atomic displacements from equilibrium positions; the model is thus a chain of nonlinear coupled oscillators. Numerical molecular-dynamics experiments are performed on chain segments of five molecules. The dynamics is ordered, at all temperatures. Energy is widely exchanged between the stretching and the bending of the N-H bond, with characteristic times of the order of 0.2 ps. Energy transduction through the H bond is somewhat slower and of smaller amplitude, and is strongly reduced when the energies of the two bound molecules are very different: This could reduce the dissipation of localized energy fluctuations.

  13. Investigations of interhydrogen bond dynamical coupling effects in the polarized IR spectra of acetanilide crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flakus, Henryk T; Michta, Anna

    2010-02-04

    This Article presents the investigation results of the polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in acetanilide (ACN) crystals measured in the frequency range of the proton and deuteron stretching vibration bands, nu(N-H) and nu(N-D). The basic spectral properties of the crystals were interpreted quantitatively in terms of the "strong-coupling" theory. The model of the centrosymmetric dimer of hydrogen bonds postulated by us facilitated the explanation of the well-developed, two-branch structure of the nu(N-H) and nu(N-D) bands as well as the isotopic dilution effects in the spectra. On the basis of the linear dichroic and temperature effects in the polarized IR spectra of ACN crystals, the H/D isotopic "self-organization" effects were revealed. A nonrandom distribution of hydrogen isotope atoms (H or D) in the lattice was deduced from the spectra of isotopically diluted ACN crystals. It was also determined that identical hydrogen isotope atoms occupy both hydrogen bonds in the dimeric systems, where each hydrogen bond belongs to a different chain. A more complex fine structure pattern of nu(N-H) and nu(N-D) bands in ACN spectra in comparison with the spectra of other secondary amides (e.g., N-methylacetamide) can be explained in terms of the "relaxation" theory of the IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded systems.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their oxanilic and sulfonic acid metabolites in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, S A; Aga, D S; Hany, R; Müller, S R

    2000-02-15

    This paper describes a procedure for simultaneous enrichment, separation, and quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their major ionic oxanilic acid (OXA) and ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in groundwater and surface water using Carbopack B as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) material. The analytes adsorbed on Carbopack B were eluted selectively from the solid phase in three fractions containing the parent compounds (PCs), their OXA metabolites, and their ESA metabolites, respectively. The complete separation of the three compound classes allowed the analysis of the neutral PCs (acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor) and their methylated OXA metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The ESA compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The use of Carbopack B resulted in good recoveries of the polar metabolites even from large sample volumes (1 L). Absolute recoveries from spiked surface and groundwater samples ranged between 76 and 100% for the PCs, between 41 and 91% for the OXAs, and between 47 and 96% for the ESAs. The maximum standard deviation of the absolute recoveries was 12%. The method detection limits are between 1 and 8 ng/L for the PCs, between 1 and 7 ng/L for the OXAs, and between 10 and 90 ng/L for the ESAs.

  15. High-pressure Raman study of vibrational spectra in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masamichi; Kuroda, Noritaka; Nishina, Yuichiro

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effect of pressure on the low-frequency lattice modes and the amide-I (N-CO stretching) vibrational modes in crystalline acetanilide (C6H5NHCOCH3) in the temperature range 80-300 K by means of Raman spectroscopy. The Raman intensity of the 1650-cm-1 band, which appears upon cooling, is enhanced by applying pressure. The energy difference between the amide-I phonon (Ag mode) and the 1650-cm-1 bands does not change appreciably under pressure up to at least 4 GPa. These results are analyzed in terms of the self-trapped model in which a single lattice mode couples with the amide-I excitation by taking into account the effect of pressure on the low-frequency lattice modes and on the dipole-dipole interactions associated with the amide-I vibration. A band is observed at 30 cm-1 below the amide-I phonon band at low temperatures with a pressure above ~2 GPa.

  16. "Anomalous" excitation in hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals - a Raman scattering study of specifically deuterated acetanilide (C 6D 5-CONH-CD 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvajol, J. L.; De Nunzio, G.; Almairac, R.; Moret, J.; Barthés, M.; Bataillon, Place E.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of experimental and theoretical works about crystalline Acetanilide has been the "anomalous" temperature-dependent ir absorption and Raman peaks at about 1650 cm -1 and the multiband structure in the N-H stretch region. A lively discussion about the assignment of these "anomalous" bands has arisen and is still in progress. The present Raman experiments should be placed in this context as an attempt to identify the molecular degrees of freedom which originate the "anomalous" bands. In this aim Raman experiments have been performed on specifically deuterated Acetanilide [C 6D 5-CONH-CD 3] single crystal in the low-frequency (phonon) and C=O stretching regions. On cooling a distinct band at about 1495 cm -1 increases in intensity. We assign this peak to the equivalent of the 1650 cm -1 band in Acetanilide. The temperature dependence of this Raman line was studied. The results are discussed in the light of the models proposed to explain the anomalous behaviour of the 1650 cm -1 Raman line in Acetanilide.

  17. Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of solvation of drug molecules: a thermodynamic approach by crystal lattice energy, sublimation, and solubility exemplified by paracetamol, acetanilide, and phenacetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, German L; Volkova, Tatyana V; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2006-10-01

    Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure for the monoclinic modification of paracetamol (acetaminophen), acetanilide, and phenacetin (acetophenetidin) were measured and thermodynamic functions of sublimation calculated (paracetamol: DeltaGsub298=60.0 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=117.9+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=190+/-2 J/mol.K; acetanilide: DeltaGsub298=40.5 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=99.8+/-0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=197+/-2 J/mol.K; phenacetin: DeltaGsub298=52.3 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=121.8+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=226+/-2 J/mol.K). Analysis of packing energies based on geometry optimization of molecules in the crystal lattices using diffraction data and the program Dmol3 was carried out. Parameters analyzed were: (a) energetic contribution of van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding to the total packing energy; (b) contributions of fragments of the molecules to the packing energy. The fraction of hydrogen bond energy in the packing energy increases as: phenacetin (17.5%)acetanilide (20.4%)acetanilide and phenacetin, entropy driven. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  18. Acetanilide and paracetamol pharmacokinetics before and during phenytoin administration: genetic control of induction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J L; Evans, D A

    1981-01-01

    1 Steady state plasma concentrations (SSPCs) of acetanilide (AA) and its metabolite, paracetamol (PL), were studied in 27 healthy volunteer subjects before and at the end of an 11-day exposure to phenytoin (DPH). Plasma concentrations of DPH were estimated. Plasma concentrations of DPH varied from 5.1 to 20.4 microgram ml-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean 12.2 +/- 0.9). 2 The SSPC of AA before exposure to DPH varied from 0.06 to 0.67 microgram ml-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean 0.24 +/- 0.02), and following exposure from 0.03 to 0.47 microgram ml-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean 0.15 +/- 0.02). 3 The SSPC of PL before exposure to DPH varied from 1.2 to 4.4 microgram ml-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean 2.7 +/- 0.13), and following exposure from 1.1 to 3.8 microgram ml-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean 2.2 +/- 0.13). 4 SSPCs of AA and of PL decreased significantly during DPH administration (P less than 0.01 for AA, P less than 0.001 for PL). 5 Correlations were observed between the SSPCs of the drugs measured, suggesting a common influence on their kinetics. 6 Similarity was observed between the changes in plasma levels of AA and PL following DPH ingestion. There was, however, wide inter-subject variability in this regard. In some subjects no change was observed even though they had DPH demonstrable in their plasma. Consequently it may be speculated that the effects of DPH may be under genetic control. PMID:7272175

  19. Molecular structure, spectroscopic studies and first-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities of p-amino acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jose P.; Sajan, D.; Joe, I. Hubert; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2008-11-01

    The infrared absorption, Raman spectra and SERS spectra of p-amino acetanilide have been analyzed with the aid of density functional theory calculations at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. The electric dipole moment ( μ) and the first hyperpolarizability ( β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculation results also show that the synthesized molecule might have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values. Computed geometries reveal that the PAA molecule is planar, while secondary amide group is twisted with respect to the phenyl ring is found, upon hydrogen bonding. The hyperconjugation of the C dbnd O group with adjacent C-C bond and donor-acceptor interaction associated with the secondary amide have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation and hyperconjugation. The existence of intramolecular C dbnd O⋯H hydrogen bonded have been investigated by means of the natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis. The influence of the decrease of N-H and C dbnd O bond orders and increase of C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction has been identified in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the large enhancement of in-plane bending, out of plane bending and ring breathing modes in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrum indicates that the molecule is adsorbed on the silver surface in a 'atleast vertical' configuration, with the ring perpendicular to the silver surface.

  20. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  1. Role of cytochrome P450 IA2 in acetanilide 4-hydroxylation as determined with cDNA expression and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Gelboin, H V; Myers, M J

    1991-02-01

    The role of P450 IA2 in the hydroxylation of acetanilide was examined using an inhibitory monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1-7-1 and vaccinia cDNA expression producing murine P450 IA1 (mIA1), murine P450 IA2 (mIA2), or human P450 IA2 (hIA2). Acetanilide hydroxylase (AcOH) activity was measured using an HPLC method with more than 500-fold greater sensitivity than previously described procedures. This method, which does not require the use of radioactive acetanilide, was achieved by optimizing both the gradient system and the amount of enzyme needed to achieve detection by uv light. MAb 1-7-1 inhibits up to 80% of the AcOH activity in both rat liver microsomes and cDNA expressed mouse and human P450 IA2. MAb 1-7-1, which recognizes both P450 IA1 and P450 IA2, completely inhibits the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity of cDNA expressed in IA1. The inhibition of only 80% of the AHH activity present in MC liver microsomes by MAb 1-7-1 suggests that additional P450 forms are contributing to the overall AHH activity present in methylcholanthrene (MC)-liver microsomes as MAb 1-7-1 almost completely inhibits the AHH activity of expressed mIA1. Maximal inhibition of IA2 by 1-7-1 results in an 80% decrease in acetanilide hydroxylase activity in both liver microsomes and expressed mouse and human IA2. The capacity of MAb 1-7-1 to produce identical levels of inhibition of acetanilide hydroxylase activity in rat MC microsomes (80%) and in expressed mouse (81%) and human P450 IA2 (80%) strongly suggests that P450 IA2 is the major and perhaps the only enzyme responsible for the metabolism of acetanilide. These results demonstrate the complementary utility of monoclonal antibodies and cDNA expression for defining the contribution of specific P450 enzymes to the metabolism of a given substrate. This complementary approach allows for a more precise determination of the inhibitory capacity of MAb with respect to the metabolic capacity of the target P450.

  2. Exploration of acetanilide derivatives of 1-(ω-phenoxyalkyl)uracils as novel inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Andrea; Ozerov, Alexander A; Tunitskaya, Vera L; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T; Wahid, Ahmed; Pirisi, Mario; Simmonds, Peter; Ivanov, Alexander V; Novikov, Mikhail S; Patel, Arvind H

    2016-07-12

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major public health problem worldwide. While highly efficacious directly-acting antiviral agents have been developed in recent years, their high costs and relative inaccessibility make their use limited. Here, we describe new 1-(ω-phenoxyalkyl)uracils bearing acetanilide fragment in 3 position of pyrimidine ring as potential antiviral drugs against HCV. Using a combination of various biochemical assays and in vitro virus infection and replication models, we show that our compounds are able to significantly reduce viral genomic replication, independently of virus genotype, with their IC50 values in the nanomolar range. We also demonstrate that our compounds can block de novo RNA synthesis and that effect is dependent on a chemical structure of the compounds. A detailed structure-activity relationship revealed that the most active compounds were the N(3)-substituted uracil derivatives containing 6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl or 8-(4-bromophenoxy)octyl fragment at N(1) position.

  3. Ab initio molecular orbital and infrared spectroscopic study of the conformation of secondary amides: derivatives of formanilide, acetanilide and benzylamides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, S.; Hadjieva, B.; Galabov, B.

    1999-09-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at HF/4-31G level and infrared spectroscopic data for the frequencies are applied to analyse the grouping in a series model aromatic secondary amides: formanilide; acetanilide; o-methylacetanilide; 2,6-dimethylformanilide, 2,6-dimethylacetanilide; N-benzylacetamide and N-benzylformamide. The theoretical and experimental data obtained show that the conformational state of the molecules studied is determined by the fine balance of several intramolecular factors: resonance effect between the amide group and the aromatic ring, steric interaction between various substituents around the -NH-CO- grouping in the aromatic ring, conjugation between the carbonyl bond and the nitrogen lone pair as well as direct field influences inside the amide group.

  4. Predicting the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol mixtures via molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, Andrew S.; Parameswaran, Sreeja; Liu, Shuai; Kolavennu, Anasuya; Mobley, David L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a general framework to predict the excess solubility of small molecular solids (such as pharmaceutical solids) in binary solvents via molecular simulation free energy calculations at infinite dilution with conventional molecular models. The present study used molecular dynamics with the General AMBER Force Field to predict the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol solvents. The simulations are able to predict the existence of solubility enhancement and the results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The accuracy of the predictions in addition to the generality of the method suggests that molecular simulations may be a valuable design tool for solvent selection in drug development processes.

  5. Methyl group dynamics in paracetamol and acetanilide: probing the static properties of intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed by peptide groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. R.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Neumann, M. A.; Kearley, G. J.; Wilson, C. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements of tunnelling and librational excitations for the methyl group in paracetamol and tunnelling excitations for the methyl group in acetanilide are reported. In both cases, results are compared with molecular mechanics calculations, based on the measured low temperature crystal structures, which follow an established recipe. Agreement between calculated and measured methyl group observables is not as good as expected and this is attributed to the presence of comprehensive hydrogen bond networks formed by the peptide groups. Good agreement is obtained with a periodic quantum chemistry calculation which uses density functional methods, these calculations confirming the validity of the one-dimensional rotational model used and the crystal structures. A correction to the Coulomb contribution to the rotational potential in the established recipe using semi-emipircal quantum chemistry methods, which accommodates the modified charge distribution due to the hydrogen bonds, is investigated.

  6. Modulational instabilities in acetanilide taking into account both the N-H and the C=O vibrational self-trappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, E.

    2005-10-01

    A model of crystalline acetanilide, ACN accounting for the C=O and N-H vibrational self-trappings is presented. We develop a fully discrete version of ACN. We show that acetanilide can be described by a set of two coupled discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equations. Modulational instabilities (MI) are studied both theoretically and numerically. Dispersion laws for the wave numbers and frequencies of the linear modulation waves are determined. We also derived the criterion for the existence of MI. Numerical simulations are carried out for a variety of selected wave amplitudes in the unstable zone. It is shown that instabilities grow as the wave numbers and amplitudes of the modulated waves increase. MI grow faster in the N-H mode than in the C=O mode. Temporal evolution of the density probabilities of the vibrational excitons are obtained by the numerical integration of the coupled DNLS equations governing the ACN molecule. These investigations confirm the generation of localized modes by the phenomenon of MI and the predominance of the N-H vibrational mode in the MI process of the acetanilide. (author)

  7. Comparison of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and acetanilide 4-hydroxylase induction by polycyclic aromatic compounds in human and mouse cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, A K; Nebert, D W; Eisen, H W

    1985-08-01

    The human MCF-7 and the mouse Hepa-1 cell culture lines were compared for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and acetanilide 4-hydroxylase inducibility by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and benzo[a]anthracene (BA) and TCDD- and BA-specific binding in the cytosol and nucleus. The effective concentration of BA in the growth medium required to induce either enzyme to 50% of its maximally inducible activity (EC50) was the same (5-11 microM) in both MCF-7 and Hepa-1 cells. On the other hand, the EC50 for TCDD in MCF-7 cells (5-25 nM) was more than 40-fold greater than that in Hepa-1 cells (0.4 to 0.6 nM). P1-450- and P3-450-specific mouse cDNA probes were used to quantitate mRNA induction in the Hepa-1 cell line. P1-450 mRNA was induced markedly by TCDD and benzo[a] anthracene, whereas P3-450 mRNA was induced negligibly. A P1-450-specific human cDNA probe was used to quantitate P1-450 mRNA induction in the MCF-7 cell line. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducibility by TCDD or BA always paralleled P1-450 mRNA inducibility in either the mouse or human line. Although the cytosolic Ah receptor in Hepa-1 cells was easily detected by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, gel permeation chromatography, and anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, the cytosolic receptor cannot be detected in MCF-7 cells. Following in vivo exposure of cultures to radiolabeled TCDD, the intranuclear concentration of inducer-receptor complex was at least fifty times greater in Hepa-1 than MCF-7 cultures. The complete lack of measurable cytosolic receptor and almost totally absent inducer-receptor complex in the nucleus of MCF-7 cells was, therefore, out of proportion to its capacity for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and acetanilide 4-hydroxylase inducibility. This MCF-7 line should provide an interesting model for a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug-metabolizing enzyme induction by polycyclic aromatic compounds, including the Ah receptor-mediated mechanism.

  8. Solar Cooker Study under Oman Conditions for Late Evening Cooking Using Stearic Acid and Acetanilide as PCM Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an alternative source of nonrenewable energy in Oman. Sultanate of Oman government showed initiation into utilization of solar energy for domestic applications. Conversion of solar radiation into useful heat is the simplest application of solar energy, in which it can be used for late evening cooking. In this context, present work highlighted the design and development of solar cooker for Oman climatic conditions. The current work signifies usage of solar cooker for late evening cooking using stearic acid and acetanilide as phase change materials (PCM. Solar cooker parts are developed in-house and connected to water heating system compounded with evacuated tubes solar collector and storage tank. The circumference of cooker unit is incorporated with spiral stainless steel heat exchanger and annulus area of the pot is filled with PCM material. PCM releases heat at late evening and effective cooking up to 7:30 PM is noticed. The experimental results indicated the cooker efficiency of 30% and collector efficiency of 60–65% during the study. Overall, experiments showed satisfactory performance on the developed cooker.

  9. Ionization-induced solvent migration in acetanilide-methanol clusters inferred from isomer-selective infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Martin; Nakamura, Takashi; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Dopfer, Otto; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki

    2012-12-07

    We present the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization, infrared-ultraviolet hole burning (IR-UV HB), and IR dip spectra of the trans-acetanilide-methanol (AA-MeOH) cluster in the S(0), S(1), and cationic ground state (D(0)) in a supersonic jet. The IR-UV HB spectra demonstrate the co-existence of two isomers in S(0,1), in which MeOH binds either to the NH or the CO site of the peptide linkage in AA, denoted as AA(NH)-MeOH and AA(CO)-MeOH. When AA(CO)-MeOH is selectively ionized, its IR spectrum in D(0) is the same as that measured for AA(+) (NH)-MeOH. Thus, photoionization of AA(CO)-MeOH induces migration of MeOH from the CO to the NH site with 100% yield. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  11. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  12. Modulational instabilities in acetanilide taking into account both the N H and the C=O vibrational self-trappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Elie

    2007-02-01

    A model of crystalline acetanilide, ACN accounting for the C=O and N-H vibrational self-trappings is presented. We develop a fully discrete version of ACN. We show that ACN can be described by a set of two coupled discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equations. Modulational instabilities (MI) are studied both theoretically and numerically. Dispersion laws for the wavenumbers and frequencies of the linear modulation waves are determined. We also derived the criterion for the existence of MI. Numerical simulations are carried out for a variety of selected wave amplitudes in the unstable zone. It is shown that instabilities grow as the wavenumbers and amplitudes of the modulated waves increase. MI grow faster in the N-H mode than in the C=O mode. Temporal evolution of the density probabilities of the vibrational excitons are obtained by the numerical integration of the coupled DNLS equations governing the ACN molecule. These investigations confirm the generation of localized modes by the phenomenon of MI and the predominance of the N-H vibrational mode in the MI process of the ACN.

  13. Biological evaluation of 99m Tc-N-(3-bromo-trimethyl-acetanilide)-iminodiacetic acid (99mTc mebrofenin) as hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    Technetium-99 m-N-(3-bromo-2,4,6-trimethyl acetanilide) iminodiacetic acid ( 99m Tc-Mebrofenin) has been described as having optimal properties as hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical. This paper describes the synthesis, radiopharmaceutical preparation and biological distribution of new labeled compound. The biodistribution study of 99m Tc-Mebrofenin- was carried out in normal mice. The specificity for hepatobiliary excretion blood clearance and cumulative biliary excretion were evaluated in normal and cirrhotic rats. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  14. N-Acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol), N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide in urine samples from the general population, individuals exposed to aniline and paracetamol users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierkes, Georg; Weiss, Tobias; Modick, Hendrik; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest associations between the use of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) during pregnancy and increased risks of reproductive disorders in the male offspring. Previously we have reported a ubiquitous urinary excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population. Possible sources are (1) direct intake of paracetamol through medication, (2) paracetamol residues in the food chain and (3) environmental exposure to aniline or related substances that are metabolized into N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. In order to elucidate the origins of the excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in urine and to contribute to the understanding of paracetamol and aniline metabolism in humans we developed a rapid, turbulent-flow HPLC-MS/MS method with isotope dilution for the simultaneous quantification of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol and two other aniline related metabolites, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide. We applied this method to three sets of urine samples: (1) individuals with no known exposure to aniline and also no recent paracetamol medication; (2) individuals after occupational exposure to aniline but no paracetamol medication and (3) paracetamol users. We confirmed the omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. Additionally we revealed an omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-2-aminophenol. In contrast, acetanilide was only found after occupational exposure to aniline, not in the general population or after paracetamol use. The results lead to four preliminary conclusions: (1) other sources than aniline seem to be responsible for the major part of urinary N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population; (2) acetanilide is a metabolite of aniline in man and a valuable biomarker for aniline in occupational settings; (3) aniline baseline levels in the general population measured after chemical hydrolysis do not seem to originate from acetanilide and hence not from a direct exposure to aniline itself and (4) N-acetyl-2-aminophenol does not seem to be

  15. Synthesis and SAR of 1-acetanilide-4-aminopyrazole-substituted quinazolines: selective inhibitors of Aurora B kinase with potent anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kevin M; Mortlock, Andrew A; Heron, Nicola M; Jung, Frédéric H; Hill, George B; Pasquet, Georges; Brady, Madeleine C; Green, Stephen; Heaton, Simon P; Kearney, Sarah; Keen, Nicholas J; Odedra, Rajesh; Wedge, Stephen R; Wilkinson, Robert W

    2008-03-15

    A new class of 1-acetanilide-4-aminopyrazole-substituted quinazoline Aurora kinase inhibitors has been discovered possessing highly potent cellular activity. Continuous infusion into athymic mice bearing SW620 tumors of the soluble phosphate derivative 2 led to dose-proportional exposure of the des-phosphate compound 8 with a high-unbound fraction. The combination of potent cell activity and high free-drug exposure led to pharmacodynamic changes in the tumor at low doses, indicative of Aurora B-kinase inhibition and a reduction in tumor volume.

  16. A COMPARISON OF THE METABOLISM OF METHOXYRESORUFIN, ACETANILIDE AND CAFFIENE IN RAT AND HUMAN CYP1A2 SUPERSOMES AND THEIR INHIBITION BY 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A COMPARISON OF THE METABOLISM OF METHOXYRESORUFIN, ACETANILIDE AND CAFFIENE IN RAT AND HUMAN CYP1A2 SUPERSOMES AND THEIR INHIBITION BY 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD). DF Staskal1, DG Ross2, LS Birnbaum2 and MJ DeVito2 1Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill ...

  17. Gene transcription in Daphnia magna: effects of acute exposure to a carbamate insecticide and an acetanilide herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana Luísa; Hill, Christopher J; Sibly, Richard M; Bolshakov, Viacheslav N; Gonçalves, Fernando; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Callaghan, Amanda

    2010-05-05

    Daphnia magna is a key invertebrate in the freshwater environment and is used widely as a model in ecotoxicological measurements and risk assessment. Understanding the genomic responses of D. magna to chemical challenges will be of value to regulatory authorities worldwide. Here we exposed D. magna to the insecticide methomyl and the herbicide propanil to compare phenotypic effects with changes in mRNA expression levels. Both pesticides are found in drainage ditches and surface water bodies standing adjacent to crops. Methomyl, a carbamate insecticide widely used in agriculture, inhibits acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme in nerve transmission. Propanil, an acetanilide herbicide, is used to control grass and broad-leaf weeds. The phenotypic effects of single doses of each chemical were evaluated using a standard immobilisation assay. Immobilisation was linked to global mRNA expression levels using the previously estimated 48h-EC(1)s, followed by hybridization to a cDNA microarray with more than 13,000 redundant cDNA clones representing >5000 unique genes. Following exposure to methomyl and propanil, differential expression was found for 624 and 551 cDNAs, respectively (one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction, P

  18. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  19. Enthalpy-entropy compensation for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures: paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid in dioxane-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, P; Romero, S; Pena, A; Escalera, B; Reillo, A

    1998-12-01

    In earlier work, a nonlinear enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the solubility of phenacetin in dioxane-water mixtures. This effect had not been earlier reported for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures. To gain insight into the compensation effect, the behavior of the apparent thermodynamic magnitudes for the solubility of paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid is studied in this work. The solubility of these drugs was measured at several temperatures in dioxane-water mixtures. DSC analysis was performed on the original powders and on the solid phases after equilibration with the solvent mixture. The thermal properties of the solid phases did not show significant changes. The three drugs display a solubility maximum against the cosolvent ratio. The solubility peaks of acetanilide and nalidixic acid shift to a more polar region at the higher temperatures. Nonlinear van't Hoff plots were observed for nalidixic acid whereas acetanilide and paracetamol show linear behavior at the temperature range studied. The apparent enthalpies of solution are endothermic going through a maximum at 50% dioxane. Two different mechanisms, entropy and enthalpy, are suggested to be the driving forces that increase the solubility of the three drugs. Solubility is entropy controlled at the water-rich region (0-50% dioxane) and enthalpy controlled at the dioxane-rich region (50-100% dioxane). The enthalpy-entropy compensation analysis also suggests that two different mechanisms, dependent on cosolvent ratio, are involved in the solubility enhancement of the three drugs. The plots of deltaH versus deltaG are nonlinear, and the slope changes from positive to negative above 50% dioxane. The compensation effect for the thermodynamic magnitudes of transfer from water to the aqueous mixtures can be described by a common empirical nonlinear relationship, with the exception of paracetamol, which follows a separate linear relationship at dioxane ratios above 50%. The

  20. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  1. An isoperibol micro-bomb calorimeter for measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of organic compounds. Application to the study of succinic acid and acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Aaron. E-mail: arojas@mail.cinvestav.mx; Valdes, Alejandro

    2003-08-01

    A micro static-bomb combustion calorimeter, developed from a 1107 Parr semi-micro bomb, has been provided with a new micro-bomb and calorimetric bucket. In the best conditions of operation, the energy equivalent of this calorimetric arrangement is just {epsilon}(calor)=(731.82 {+-} 0.22) J {center_dot} K{sup -1}, which means an uncertainty of 0.03 per cent for the calibration with benzoic acid NIST 39j. This combustion calorimeter has been used in the measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of the succinic acid and acetanilide, giving -(1489.3 {+-} 1.6) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and -(4222.5 {+-} 1.1) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively, for these substances.

  2. Discovery of a potent and orally available acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor as an anti-atherosclerotic agent: (4-phenylcoumarin)acetanilide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Masaki; Fukui, Seiji; Nakada, Yoshihisa; Tokunoh, Ryosuke; Itokawa, Shigekazu; Kakoi, Yuichi; Nishimura, Satoshi; Sanada, Tsukasa; Fuse, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Kazuki; Wada, Takeo; Marui, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an intracellular enzyme that catalyzes cholesterol esterification. ACAT inhibitors are expected to be potent therapeutic agents for the treatment of atherosclerosis. A series of potent ACAT inhibitors based on an (4-phenylcoumarin)acetanilide scaffold was identified. Evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of a substituent on this scaffold, with an emphasis on improving the pharmacokinetic profile led to the discovery of 2-[7-chloro-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl]-N-[4-chloro-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acetamide (23), which exhibited potent ACAT inhibitory activity (IC50=12 nM) and good pharmacokinetic profile in mice. Compound 23 also showed regressive effects on atherosclerotic plaques in apolipoprotein (apo)E knock out (KO) mice at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg per os (p.o.).

  3. An isoperibol micro-bomb calorimeter for measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of organic compounds. Application to the study of succinic acid and acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Aaron.; Valdes, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    A micro static-bomb combustion calorimeter, developed from a 1107 Parr semi-micro bomb, has been provided with a new micro-bomb and calorimetric bucket. In the best conditions of operation, the energy equivalent of this calorimetric arrangement is just ε(calor)=(731.82 ± 0.22) J · K -1 , which means an uncertainty of 0.03 per cent for the calibration with benzoic acid NIST 39j. This combustion calorimeter has been used in the measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of the succinic acid and acetanilide, giving -(1489.3 ± 1.6) kJ · mol -1 and -(4222.5 ± 1.1) kJ · mol -1 , respectively, for these substances

  4. Studies on Synthesis of Some Novel Heterocyclic Chalcone, Pyrazoline, Pyrimidine - 2 - One, Pyrimidine - 2 - Thione, para-Acetanilide Sulphonyl and Benzoyl Derivatives and their Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh N. Mistry

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available 1, 2 - Dichloro benzene on chlorosulphonation by chlorosulphonic acid gives 1, 2 - [dichloro] - benzene sulphonyl chloride which on condensation with p –amino acetophenone gives 1-[acetyl] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative. This derivative undergo condensation with 2,4- dichloro benzaldehyde gives 1- [3” - (sub. phenyl - 2” - propene - 1” - one] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative which on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate and glacial acetic acid gives 1-[acetyl]-3- [1’ , 2’ - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] -5 - [2” , 4” - dichloro phenyl] - 2 - pyrazoline derivative. This derivative reacts with various substituted aldehydes to give corresponding substituted chalcone derivatives [1(a-j]. Now, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on condensation with urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine - 2 - one derivatives [2(a-j] and on condensation with thio-urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine- 2 -thione derivatives [3(a-j]. Further, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate gives 1 - [1’ - (H - 5’ - (sub. phenyl - 2’ - pyrazoline]- 3 - [1” , 2” - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] - 5 - [2’’’ , 4’’’ - dichloro phenyl]-2- pyrazoline derivatives [4(a-j] as an intermediate compounds, which on condensation with p-acetanilide sulphonyl chloride gives corresponding substituted p - acetanilide sulphonyl derivatives [5(a-j] and on condensation with benzoyl chloride gives corresponding substituted benzoyl derivatives [6(a-j]. Structure elucidation of synthesised compounds has been made on the basis of elemental analysis, I.R. spectral studies and 1H N.M.R. spectral studies. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesised compounds has been studied against the cultures “Staphylococcus aureus”, “Escherichia coli” and “Candela albicans”.

  5. Drug delivery system prepared by ionizing radiation of the N,N-dimethyl acrylamide with acryloyloxy-acetanilide copolymerization; Sistema de liberacao de droga obtido via radiacao ionizante pela copolimerizacao do N,N-dimetilacrilamida com 4-acriloiloxiacetanilida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martellini, Flavia; Higa, Olga Z. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Alvaro A.A. de [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Rodighiero, Paolo [Universidade de Padova (Italy). Inst. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    1995-12-31

    Radiation induced polymerization has been used in biomaterials used in systems which such as drug delivery (DDS). This work describes the copolymerization of the monomers by gamma rays N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and acryloyloxy-acetanilide (AOA) for the immobilization of paracetamol, an analgesic and anti thermic drug. Dimethylformamide solutions were used in two concentrations of DMAA and AOA (F{sub DMAA/AOA} = 0,85/015 and 0,70/0,30, where F = molar fraction in the monomer feed). The samples were irradiated in the dose range of 30-800 Gy. The copolymer poly(DMAA-co-AOA) characterization was carried out by FTIR and {sup 1}HRMN. The hydrolysis was studied considering the formation of sodium salts of 4-hydroxy acetanilide at different times of treatment using colorimetric assay. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Modulational instabilities in acetanilide taking into account both the N-H and the C=O vibrational self-trappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, Elie

    2007-01-01

    A model of crystalline acetanilide, ACN accounting for the C=O and N-H vibrational self-trappings is presented. We develop a fully discrete version of ACN. We show that ACN can be described by a set of two coupled discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equations. Modulational instabilities (MI) are studied both theoretically and numerically. Dispersion laws for the wavenumbers and frequencies of the linear modulation waves are determined. We also derived the criterion for the existence of MI. Numerical simulations are carried out for a variety of selected wave amplitudes in the unstable zone. It is shown that instabilities grow as the wavenumbers and amplitudes of the modulated waves increase. MI grow faster in the N-H mode than in the C=O mode. Temporal evolution of the density probabilities of the vibrational excitons are obtained by the numerical integration of the coupled DNLS equations governing the ACN molecule. These investigations confirm the generation of localized modes by the phenomenon of MI and the predominance of the N-H vibrational mode in the MI process of the ACN

  7. Synthesis, Spectral and Magnetic Studies of Newly Mixed-Ligand Complexes of 4-Formyl-Acetanilide Thiosemicarbazone and 3,4-Dihydrocinnamic Acid with Some Metal Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayma A. Shaker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New complexes with thiosemicarbazone derivative and 3, 4-dihydrocinnamic acid were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, determination of metal, IR, 1H NMR, electronic spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The thiosemicarbazone derivative forms bidentate ligand complexes of the general formula, [M(Thz(Caf] where Thz = 4-formyl- acetanilide thiosemicarbazone, Caf = 3,4-dihydrocinnamic acid and M=Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+. The IR and 1H NMR spectra indicates that the (Thz was coordinated with the metal ions through the N and S atoms and the (Caf was negatively charged bidentat ligand and was coordinated with the metal ions through the two O atoms. Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements of the solid complexes indicates the tetrahedral geometry around the Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and irregular tetrahedral geometry around Pb2+ ion while the Cu2+ complex has squar planer geometry.

  8. Modulational instabilities in acetanilide taking into account both the N-H and the C=O vibrational self-trappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simo, Elie [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Yaoune I, B.P. 812 Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2007-02-15

    A model of crystalline acetanilide, ACN accounting for the C=O and N-H vibrational self-trappings is presented. We develop a fully discrete version of ACN. We show that ACN can be described by a set of two coupled discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equations. Modulational instabilities (MI) are studied both theoretically and numerically. Dispersion laws for the wavenumbers and frequencies of the linear modulation waves are determined. We also derived the criterion for the existence of MI. Numerical simulations are carried out for a variety of selected wave amplitudes in the unstable zone. It is shown that instabilities grow as the wavenumbers and amplitudes of the modulated waves increase. MI grow faster in the N-H mode than in the C=O mode. Temporal evolution of the density probabilities of the vibrational excitons are obtained by the numerical integration of the coupled DNLS equations governing the ACN molecule. These investigations confirm the generation of localized modes by the phenomenon of MI and the predominance of the N-H vibrational mode in the MI process of the ACN.

  9. Reversible formation of intermediates during H3O+-catalyzed hydrolysis of amides. Observation of substantial 18O exchange accompanying the hydrolysis of acetanilide and N-cyclohexylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Brown, R.S.; Olekszyk, J.

    1987-01-01

    Careful mass spectrometric analysis of the 18 O content of ∼ 50% enriched acetanilide (2) and N-cyclohexylacetamide (3) recovered from acidic media during the course of hydrolysis reveals that both species suffer 18 O loss. The percent of 18 O exchange per t/sub 1/2/ of hydrolysis increases as [H 3 O + ] decreases. For 2 at 72 0 C the amount of exchange increases from 0.5 +/- 0.5% (per t/sub 1/2/) in 1 M HCl to 9.4 +/- 0.5% in glycine buffer, [H 3 O + ] = 0.003 M. For 3 at 100 0 C the exchange is 1.05 +/- 0.3% (per t/sub 1/2/) at 1 M HCl and 9.0 +/- 0.4% in 0.01 M HCl. When these data are used to compute k/sub ex/ (the exchange rate constant), it shows a first-order dependence on [H 3 O + ] followed by a plateau at high [H 3 O + ] for both 2 and 3

  10. Metabolite kinetics: formation of acetaminophen from deuterated and nondeuterated phenacetin and acetanilide on acetaminophen sulfation kinetics in the perfused rat liver preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, K.S.; Waller, L.; Horning, M.G.; Chan, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    The role of hepatic intrinsic clearance for metabolite formation from various precursors on subsequent metabolite elimination was was investigated in the once-through perfused rat liver preparation. Two pairs of acetaminophen precursors: [ 14 C] phenacetin-d5 and [ 3 H] phenacetin-do, [ 14 C] acetanilide and [ 3 H] phenacetin were delivered by constant flow (10 ml/min/liver) either by normal or retrograde perfusion to the rat liver preparations. The extents of acetaminophen sulfation were compared within the same preparation. The data showed that the higher the hepatocellular activity (intrinsic clearance) for acetaminophen formation, the greater the extent of subsequent acetaminophen sulfation. The findings were explained on the basis of blood transit time and metabolite duration time. Because of blood having only a finite transit time in liver, the longer the drug requires for metabolite formation, the less time will remain for metabolite sulfation and the less will be the degree of subsequent sulfation. Conversely, when the drug forms the primary metabolite rapidly, a longer time will remain for the metabolite to be sulfated in liver to result in a greater degree of metabolite sulfation. Finally, the effects of hepatic intrinsic clearances for metabolite formation and zonal distribution of enzyme systems for metabolite formation and elimination in liver are discussed

  11. Determination of acetanilide herbicides in cereal crops using accelerated solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping; Yang, Jun; Shi, Ronghua; Su, Qingde; Yao, Li; Li, Panpan

    2011-07-01

    A method was developed to determine eight acetanilide herbicides from cereal crops based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) analysis. During the ASE process, the effect of four parameters (temperature, static time, static cycles and solvent) on the extraction efficiency was considered and compared with shake-flask extraction method. After extraction with ASE, four SPE tubes (graphitic carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA), GCB, Florisil and alumina-N) were assayed for comparison to obtain the best clean-up efficiency. The results show that GCB/PSA cartridge gave the best recoveries and cleanest chromatograms. The analytical process was validated by the analysis of spiked blank samples. Performance characteristics such as linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), precision and recovery were studied. At 0.05 mg/kg spiked level, recoveries and precision values for rice, wheat and maize were 82.3-115.8 and 1.1-13.6%, respectively. For all the herbicides, LOD and LOQ ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 μg/kg and from 2.4 to 5.3 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed analytical methodology was applied for the analysis of the targets in samples; only three herbicides, propyzamid, metolachlor and diflufenican, were detected in two samples. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Photoionization-induced water migration in the amide group of trans-acetanilide-(H2O)1 in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Kenji; Harada, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Yuiga; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-02-10

    IR-dip spectra of trans-acetanilide-water 1:1 cluster, AA-(H(2)O)(1), have been measured for the S(0) and D(0) state in the gas phase. Two structural isomers, where a water molecule binds to the NH group or the CO group of AA, AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) and AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1), are identified in the S(0) state. One-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization, (1 + 1) RE2PI, of AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) via the S(1)-S(0) origin generates [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+) in the D(0) state, however, photoionization of [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)] does not produce [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)](+), leading to [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+). This observation explicitly indicates that the water molecule in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+) migrates from the CO group to the NH group in the D(0) state. The reorganization of the charge distribution from the neutral to the D(0) state of AA induces the repulsive force between the water molecule and the CO group of AA(+), which is the trigger of the water migration in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+).

  13. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures.

  14. Simultaneous determination of multiresidual phenyl acetanilide pesticides in different food commodities by solid-phase cleanup and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Wang, Meiling; Yan, Hongfei; Fu, Shanliang; Dai, Hua

    2013-03-01

    An efficient and sensitive multiresidue method has been developed for quantification and confirmation of 25 phenyl acetanilide pesticides in a wide variety of food commodities including maize, spinach, mushroom, apple, soybean, chestnut, tea, beef, cattle liver, chicken, fish, and milk. Analytes were extracted with acetone-n-hexane (1:2, v/v) followed by cleanup using SPE. Several types of adsorbents were evaluated. Neutral aluminum and graphitized carbon black cartridge showed good cleanup efficiency. The extract was determined by GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode using one target and two qualitative ions for each analyte. The limits of detection were 0.01 mg/kg for all analytes. The average recoveries ranged from 66.9 to 110.6% (mean 88.8%) and RSDs were in the range 2.0-19% (mean 10.5%) across three fortification levels. The proposed method was successfully applied to real samples in routine analysis and a satisfactory result was obtained. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  16. Energy of charged states in the acetanilide crystal: Trapping of charge-transfer states at vacancies as a possible mechanism for optical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Calculations for the acetanilide crystal yield the effective polarizability (16.6 Å3), local electric field tensor, effective dipole moment (5.41 D), and dipole-dipole energy (-12.8 kJ/mol). Fourier-transform techniques are used to calculate the polarization energy P for a single charge in the perfect crystal (-1.16 eV); the charge-dipole energy WD is zero if the crystal carries no bulk dipole moment. Polarization energies for charge-transfer (CT) pairs combine with the Coulomb energy EC to give the screened Coulomb energy Escr; screening is nearly isotropic, with Escr≈EC/2.7. For CT pairs WD reduces to a term δWD arising from the interaction of the charge on each ion with the change in dipole moment on the other ion relative to the neutral molecule. The dipole moments calculated by density-functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level are 3.62 D for the neutral molecule, changing to 7.13 D and 4.38 D for the anion and cation, relative to the center of mass. Because of the large change in the anion, δWD reaches -0.9 eV and modifies the sequence of CT energies markedly from that of Escr, giving the lowest two CT pairs at -1.98 eV and -1.41 eV. The changes in P and WD near a vacancy are calculated; WD changes for the individual charges because the vacancy removes a dipole moment and modifies the crystal dielectric response, but δWD and EC do not change. A vacancy yields a positive change ΔP that scatters a charge or CT pair, but the change ΔWD can be negative and large enough to outweigh ΔP, yielding traps with depths that can exceed 150 meV for single charges and for CT pairs. Divacancies yield traps with depths nearly equal to the sum of those produced by the separate vacancies and so they can exceed 300 meV. These results are consistent with a mechanism of optical damage in which vacancies trap optically generated CT pairs that recombine and release energy; this can disrupt the lattice around the vacancy, thereby favoring

  17. Microsolvation of the acetanilide cation (AA(+)) in a nonpolar solvent: IR spectra of AA(+)-L(n) clusters (L = He, Ar, N2; n ≤ 10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmies, Matthias; Patzer, Alexander; Schütz, Markus; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2014-05-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of mass-selected cluster ions of acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide), AA(+)-Ln, with the ligands L = He (n = 1-2), Ar (n = 1-7), and N2 (n = 1-10) are recorded in the hydride stretch (amide A, νNH, νCH) and fingerprint (amide I-III) ranges of AA(+) in its (2)A'' ground electronic state. Cold AA(+)-Ln clusters are generated in an electron impact ion source, which predominantly produces the most stable isomer of a given cluster ion. Systematic vibrational frequency shifts of the N-H stretch fundamentals (νNH) provide detailed information about the sequential microsolvation process of AA(+) in a nonpolar (L = He and Ar) and quadrupolar (L = N2) solvent. In the most stable AA(+)-Ln clusters, the first ligand forms a hydrogen bond (H-bond) with the N-H proton of trans-AA(+) (t-AA(+)), whereas further ligands bind weakly to the aromatic ring (π-stacking). There is no experimental evidence for complexes with the less stable cis-AA(+) isomer. Quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level confirm the cluster growth sequence derived from the IR spectra. The calculated binding energies of De(H) = 720 and 1227 cm(-1) for H-bonded and De(π) = 585 and 715 cm(-1) for π-bonded Ar and N2 ligands in t-AA(+)-L are consistent with the observed photofragmentation branching ratios of AA(+)-Ln. Comparison between charged and neutral AA((+))-L dimers indicates that ionization switches the preferred ion-ligand binding motif from π-stacking to H-bonding. Electron removal from the HOMO of AA(+) delocalized over both the aromatic ring and the amide group significantly strengthens the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond and weakens the N-H bond of the amide group.

  18. Discovery of a novel acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor: the synthesis, biological evaluation, and reduced adrenal toxicity of (4-phenylcoumarin)acetanilide derivatives with a carboxylic acid moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Masaki; Nakada, Yoshihisa; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Itokawa, Shigekazu; Nishimura, Satoshi; Sanada, Tsukasa; Satomi, Tomoko; Kita, Shunbun; Kubo, Kazuki; Marui, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    As a part of our research for novel potent and orally available acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors that can be used as anti-atherosclerotic agents, we recently reported the discovery of the (4-phenylcoumarine)acetanilide derivative 1. However, compound 1 showed adrenal toxicity in animal models. In order to search for safer ACAT inhibitors that do not have adrenal toxicity, we examined the inhibitory activity of ACAT in human macrophage and adrenal cells. The introduction of a carboxylic acid moiety on the pendant phenyl ring and the adjustment of the lipophilicity led to the discovery of (2E)-3-[7-chloro-3-[2-[[4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]-2-oxoethyl]-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-4-yl]phenyl]acrylic acid (21e), which showed potent ACAT inhibitory activity in macrophages and a selectivity of around 30-fold over adrenal cells. In addition, compound 21e showed high adrenal safety in guinea pigs.

  19. Effect of (R)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-4'-{2-[(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)amino]ethyl} acetanilide (YM178), a novel selective beta3-adrenoceptor agonist, on bladder function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Toshiyuki; Ukai, Masashi; Sato, Shuichi; Matsui, Tetsuo; Nagase, Itsuro; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Sasamata, Masao; Miyata, Keiji; Uchida, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2007-05-01

    We evaluated the pharmacological characteristics of (R)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-4'-{2-[(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)amino]-ethyl} acetanilide (YM178). YM178 increased cyclic AMP accumulation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human beta3-adrenoceptor (AR). The half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) value was 22.4 nM. EC50 values of YM178 for human beta1- and beta2-ARs were 10,000 nM or more, respectively. The ratio of intrinsic activities of YM178 versus maximal response induced by isoproterenol (nonselective beta-AR agonist) was 0.8 for human beta3-ARs, 0.1 for human beta1-ARs, and 0.1 for human beta2-ARs. The relaxant effects of YM178 were evaluated in rats and humans bladder strips precontracted with carbachol (CCh) and compared with those of isoproterenol and 4-[3-[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one hydrochloride (CGP-12177A) (beta3-AR agonist). EC50 values of YM178 and isoproterenol in rat bladder strips precontracted with 10(-6) M CCh were 5.1 and 1.4 microM, respectively, whereas those in human bladder strips precontracted with 10(-7) M CCh were 0.78 and 0.28 microM, respectively. In in vivo study, YM178 at a dose of 3 mg/kg i.v. decreased the frequency of rhythmic bladder contraction induced by intravesical filling with saline without suppressing its amplitude in anesthetized rats. These findings suggest the suitability of YM178 as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of symptoms of overactive bladder such as urinary frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence.

  20. Physical stability of amorphous acetanilide derivatives improved by polymer excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tamaki; Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio

    2006-08-01

    Crystallization rates of drug-polymer solid dispersions prepared with acetaminophen (ACA) and p-aminoacetanilide (AAA) as model drugs, and polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as model polymers were measured in order to further examine the significance of drug-polymer interactions. The crystallization of AAA and ACA was inhibited by mixing those polymers. The most effective inhibition was observed with solid dispersions of AAA and PAA. The combination of AAA and PAA showed a markedly longer enthalpy relaxation time relative to drug alone as well as a higher T(g) than predicted by the Gordon-Taylor equation, indicating the existence of a strong interaction between the two components. These observations suggest that crystallization is effectively inhibited by combinations of drug and polymer that show a strong intermolecular interaction due to proton transfer between acidic and basic functional groups.

  1. 2'-Fluoro-3',5'-dimethoxy-acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Lou, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Jin; Zhao, Qing-Jie; Wei, Ya-Bing

    2008-12-24

    Mol-ecules of the title compound, C(10)H(12)FNO(3), are nearly planar considering all non-H atoms with a mean deviation of 0.0288 Å. Mol-ecules are linked through inter-molecular N-H⋯O and N-H⋯F hydrogen bonds.

  2. Host-guest complexes between cucurbit[n]urils and acetanilides having aminopropyl units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaki-Sogo, Mireia; Montes-Navajas, Pedro; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2013-06-01

    2-(Propylamino)acetamide of aniline (1a), and bis-2-(propylamino)acetamide of ortho- (1b) and para-(1c) phenylenediamine form host-guest complexes with CB[6], CB[7] and CB[8] as evidenced by the variations in the (1)H NMR spectroscopy chemical shifts and observation in MALDI-TOF-MS and ESI-MS of ions at the corresponding mass. Binding constants for the 1:1 complexes were estimated from fluorescence titrations and were in the range 10(5)-10(6)M(-1). Models based on molecular mechanics for these supramolecular complexes are provided. In spite of the different geometries arising from the ortho- or para-substitution, phenylenediamides form complexes of similar strength in which the hydrophobic alkyl chains are accommodated inside the host cavity. Formation of these host-guest complexes in the solid state was also achieved by modifying an aminopropyl silica with chloroacetanilides and preparing three silica having analogues of compounds 1a-c anchored to the solid particles. Titrations showed, however, that these solids can adsorb a large percentage of CBs by unselective interactions that are not related to the formation of inclusion complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystallographic characterization of single-ortho, N-substituted acetanilide derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeyens, J.C.A.; Denner, L.; Painter, S.; Staskun, B.

    1987-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the three single-ortho, N-substituted amide derivatives, acet-2'-bromo-N-(p-nitrobenzyl)anilide, 3',5'-dimethyl-N-ethyl-2,2,2',4'-tetrachlorobenzoylacetanilide, and difluoro[(1-phenyl-2-(o-ethylphenyl-N-benzylcarbamoyl)vinyl)oxy]borane, have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. In each case, the amide carbonyl group was found in the exo-conformation, independent of the nature of the acyl group. The observed conformations correlate well with solution structures, inferred from n.m.r. data

  4. Scaffold hopping: exploration of acetanilide-containing uracil analogues as potential NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkov, Denis A; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T; Paramonova, Maria P; Ozerov, Alexander A; Ivanov, Alexander V; Chizhov, Alexander O; Khandazhinskaya, Anastasia L; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Balzarini, Jan; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L; Novikov, Mikhail S

    2015-03-01

    In order to identify novel nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase two series of amide-containing uracil derivatives were designed as hybrids of two scaffolds of previously reported inhibitors. Subsequent biological evaluation confirmed acetamide uracil derivatives 15a-k as selective micromolar NNRTIs with a first generation-like resistance profile. Molecular modeling of the most active compounds 15c and 15i was employed to provide insight on their inhibitory properties and direct future design efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acetanilide and bromoacetyl-lysine derivatives as activators for human histone deacetylase 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Yusif M; Huang, Yajun; Liu, Jiajia; Chen, Di; Zheng, Weiping

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, seven compounds (i.e. 1-7) were found to be novel activators for the N ε -acetyl-lysine deacetylation reaction catalyzed by human histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). When assessed with the commercially available HDAC8 peptide substrate Fluor-de-Lys®-HDAC8 that harbors the unnatural 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC) residue immediately C-terminal to the N ε -acetyl-lysine residue to be deacetylated, our compounds exhibited comparable activation potency to that of TM-2-51, the strongest HDAC8 activator reported in the current literature. However, when assessed with an AMC-less peptide substrate derived from the native HDAC8 non-histone substrate protein Zinc finger protein ZNF318, while our compounds were all found to be able to activate HDAC8 deacetylation reaction, TM-2-51 was found not to be able to. Our compounds also seemed to be largely selective for HDAC8 over other classical HDACs. Moreover, treatment with the strongest activator among our compounds (i.e. 7) was found to decrease the K M of the above AMC-less HDAC8 substrate, while nearly maintaining the k cat of the HDAC8-catalyzed deacetylation on this substrate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Benzoyl-m-nitro-acetanilide as a gravimetric reagent for cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, P.K.; Das, J.

    1977-01-01

    Cadmium (14-23 mg) has been quantitatively precipitated with benzyol-m-nitroacetanilide and the highly insoluble yellow-coloured bis complex has been dried at 110 0 for weighing. The conversion factor is 0.1656. The relative standard deviation is +- 0.14%. Separation from Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , Mn 2+ , Pb 2+ , Mg 2+ , Al 3+ , In 3+ and Cr 3+ was possible using sodium or magnesium-EDATA as the masking agent. Thermogravimetric studies indicated the complex to be stable upto 410 0 . (author)

  7. Eleven-year trend in acetanilide pesticide degradates in the Iowa River, Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J; Vecchia, Aldo V; Capel, Paul D; Meyer, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Trends in concentration and loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor and their ethanasulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OXA) acid degradates were studied from 1996 through 2006 in the main stem of the Iowa River, Iowa and in the South Fork Iowa River, a small tributary near the headwaters of the Iowa River. Concentration trends were determined using the parametric regression model SEAWAVE-Q, which accounts for seasonal and flow-related variability. Daily estimated concentrations generated from the model were used with daily streamflow to calculate daily and yearly loads. Acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and their ESA and OXA degradates were generally present in >50% of the samples collected from both sites throughout the study. Their concentrations generally decreased from 1996 through 2006, although the rate of decrease was slower after 2001. Concentrations of the ESA and OXA degradates decreased from 3 to about 23% yr. The concentration trend was related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period. Decreasing concentrations and constant runoff resulted in an average reduction of 10 to >3000 kg per year of alachlor and metolachlor ESA and OXA degradates being transported out of the Iowa River watershed. Transport of acetochlor and metolachlor parent compounds and their degradates from the Iowa River watershed ranged from <1% to about 6% of the annual application. These trends were related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period, but the year-to-year variability cannot explain changes in loads based on herbicide use alone. The trends were also affected by the timing and amount of precipitation. As expected, increased amounts of water moving through the watershed moved a greater percentage of the applied herbicides, especially the relatively soluble degradates, from the soils into the rivers through surface runoff, shallow groundwater inflow, and subsurface drainage. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Biochar characteristics produced from rice husks and their sorption properties for the acetanilide herbicide metolachlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lan; Huang, Yufen; Li, Yanliang; Huang, Lianxi; Mar, Nyo Nyo; Huang, Qing; Liu, Zhongzhen

    2017-02-01

    Rice husk biochar (RHBC) was prepared for use as adsorbents for the herbicide metolachlor. The characteristics and sorption properties of metolachlor adsorbed by the RHBC prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures were determined by analysis of physico-chemical characteristics, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Boehm titration, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermodynamics and kinetics adsorption. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the RHBC surface area greatly increased (from 2.57 to 53.08 m 2  g -1 ). RHBC produced at the highest temperature (750 °C) had the greatest surface area; SEM also showed the formation of a porous surface on RH-750 biochar. The sorption capacity of RHBC also increased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature and was characterized by the Freundlich constant K f for the adsorption capacity increasing from 125.17-269.46 (pyrolysis at 300 °C) to 339.94-765.24 (pyrolysis at 750 °C). The results indicated that the surface area and pore diameter of RHBC produced with high pyrolysis temperature (i.e., 750 °C) had the greatest impact on the adsorption of metolachlor. The FTIR, Boehm titration, and SEM analysis showed that the greatest number of surface groups were on RHBC produced at the lowest temperature (300 °C). The biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had different mechanisms of adsorbing metolachlor, which exhibited a transition from hydrogen bonds dominant at low pyrolytic temperature to pore-filling dominant at higher pyrolytic temperature.

  9. Influence of herbicide structure, clay acidity, and humic acid coating on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Gan, Jianying; Yates, Scott R

    2002-07-03

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption decreased in the order metolachlor > acetochlor > alachlor > propachlor on Ca(2+)- or Mg(2+)-saturated clays and in the order metolachlor > alachlor > acetachlor > propachlor on Al(3+)- or Fe(3+)-saturated clays. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in bonding. For the same herbicide, adsorption of alachlor, acetachlor, and metolachlor on clay followed the order Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) < Al(3+) < or = Fe(3+), which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Adsorption of propachlor, however, showed an opposite dependence, suggesting a different governing interaction. In clay and humic acid mixtures, herbicide adsorption was less than that expected from independent additive adsorption by the individual constituents, and the deviation was dependent on the clay-to-humic acid ratio, with the greatest deviation consistently occurring at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio.

  10. 78 FR 3377 - Notice of Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... acetanilide) and its metabolites containing either the 2-ethyl-6-methylaniline (EMA) or the 2-(1-hydroxyethyl... inadvertent residues of the herbicide acetochlor (2-chloro-2'-methyl- 6'-ethyl-N-ethoxymethyl acetanilide) and...

  11. 40 CFR 141.40 - Monitoring requirements for unregulated contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting level b 5—Sampling location c 6—Period during which monitoring to be completed Acetanilide... μg/L EPTDS 1/1/2008-12/31/2010 Acetanilide Pesticide Parent Compounds Acetochlor 34256-82-1 EPA 525.2... preserve each sample separately. Samples collected for the analysis of Acetanilide “parent” pesticides and...

  12. BINDING EFFICACY AND ELUCIDATION OF QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF ACETANILIDE AND ITS DERIVATIVES WITH BOVINE SERUM ALBUMIN AND THEIR INHIBITION AGAINST COX1

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Violet Dhayabaran et al

    2012-01-01

    Serum albumins are the most abundant proteins in plasma with many physiological functions. Among them, BSA has a wide range of functions involving the binding, transport and delivery of fatty acids, porphyrins, bilirubin, steroids, etc and it is home to specific binding sites for metals, pharmaceuticals and dyes. Recently, nanotechnology has become a popular term in the current science and technology. Nanotechnology has been introduced for the food and drug industry, including encapsulations ...

  13. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  14. Adsorption of acetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. II. Adsorption and catalytic hydrolysis of diethatyl-ethyl on saturated Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-, and Mg(2+)-montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W P; Fang, Z; Liu, H J; Yang, W C

    2001-04-01

    Adsorption and catalytic hydrolysis of the herbicide diethatyl-ethyl [N-chloroacetyl-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)glycine ethyl ester] on homoionic Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-, and Mg(2+)-montmorillonite clays were investigated in water solution. The Freundlich adsorption coefficient, Ki, got from isotherms on clay followed the order of Na+ approximately K+ > Mg2+ approximately Ca2+. Analysis of FT-IR spectra of diethatyl-ethyl adsorbed on clay suggests probable bonding at the carboxyl and amide carbonyl groups of the herbicide. The rate of herbicide hydrolysis in homoionic clay suspensions followed the same order as that for adsorption, indicating that adsorption may have preceded and thus caused hydrolysis. Preliminary product identification showed that hydrolysis occurred via nucleophilic substitution at the carboxyl carbon, causing the cleavage of the ester bond and formation of diethatyl and its dechlorinated derivative, and at the amide carbon, yielding an ethyl ester derivative and its acid. These pathways also suggest that hydrolysis of diethatyl-ethyl was catalyzed by adsorption on the clay surface.

  15. Biotransformations with plant tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, D P; Bainbridge, T

    1976-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus, Apocynum cannabinum and Conium maculatum were examined for their capacity to transform aniline, anisole, acetanilide, benzoic acid and coumarin. None of the cultures transformed acetanilide but each produced acetanilide when fed aniline. All three cultures converted benzoic acid to its para-hydroxy derivative. Coumarin was selectively hydroxylated at the 7-position by Catharanthus and Conium and anisole was O-demethylated only by older Catharanthus tissue.

  16. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACENTANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propa...

  17. Study on Properties of Energy Spectra of the Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    The energy-spectra of nonlinear vibration of molecular crystals such as acetanilide have been calculated by using discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation appropriate to the systems, containing various interactions. The energy levels including higher excited states are basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide. We further give the features of distribution of the energy-spectra for the acetanilide. Using the energy spectra we also explained well experimental results obtained by Careri et al..

  18. New Micro-Method for Prediction of Vapor Pressure of Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Sigma Aldrich (for calorimetric determination) Adipic acid Mettler certified thermometric standard Anthraquinone Mettler certified thermometric standard...Naphthalene Mettler certified thermometric standard Caffeine Arthur R Thomas Co thermometric standard Acetanilide Arthur R Thomas Co thermometric

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Bromination of acetanilide provides a good example to study orientation of the ... methods to generate bromine in situ have been developed [4, 5]. In acidic medium ... difficulties and to make bromination a safe procedure for students, we report ...

  20. Properties of Energy Spectra of Molecular Crystals Investigated by Nonlinear Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    We calculate the quantum energy spectra of molecular crystals, such as acetanilide, by using discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing various interactions, appropriate to the systems. The energy spectra consist of many energy bands, in each energy band there are a lot of energy levels including some higher excited states. The result of energy spectrum is basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide and can also explain some experimental results obtained by Careri et al. Finally, we further discuss the influences of variously characteristic parameters on the energy spectra of the systems.

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 123637 II Pentachlorophenol 87865 III Pentaerythritol 115775 I Peracetic acid 79210 II Perchloromethyl... 83329 V Acetal 105577 V Acetaldehyde 75070 II Acetamide 60355 II Acetanilide 103844 II Acetic acid 64197... Acetonitrile 75058 I Acetophenone 98862 I Acrolein 107028 IV Acrylamide 79061 I Acrylic acid 79107 IV...

  2. Sulfonium Salts as Alkylating Agents for Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Ortho Alkylation of Anilides and Aromatic Ureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkó, Dániel Cs; Elekes, Péter; Pázmándi, Vivien; Novák, Zoltán

    2018-02-02

    A novel method for the ortho alkylation of acetanilide and aromatic urea derivatives via C-H activation was developed. Alkyl dibenzothiophenium salts are considered to be new reagents for the palladium-catalyzed C-H activation reaction, which enables the transfer of methyl and other alkyl groups from the sulfonium salt to the aniline derivatives under mild catalytic conditions.

  3. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    acetanilide on concentration. The sample of gossypol-acetic acid had all the properties mentioned in the literature. It gave no tests for nitrogen and yielded acetic acid vapours on heating and after a final recrystallisation from acetic acid petroleum ether or ether-petroleum ether, yielded correct results by combustion analysis.

  4. Tilting after Dutch windmills: probably no long-lived Davydov solitons in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austin, R. H.; Xie, A. H.; Fu, D.; Warren, W.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a summary of picosecond pump-probe and photon echo experiments in the mid-IR at 6 mu m on the protein myoglobin. The intriguing temperature dependence of the amide I band in Mb is rather similar to the temperature dependence of the amide I band of acetanilide, the molecule that launched

  5. Modeling the Solid-Liquid Equilibrium in Pharmaceutical-Solvent Mixtures: Systems with Complex Hydrogen Bonding Behvaior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Economou, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    simpler molecules of similar chemical structure and/or are fitted to Hansen's partial solubility parameters. The methodology is applied to modeling the solubility of three pharmaceuticals, namely acetanilide, phenacetin, and paracetamol, using the nonrandom hydrogen bonding (NRHB) EoS. In all cases...

  6. Hepatic blood flow determination. A comparison of 99mTc-diethyl-IDA and indocyanine green as hepatic blood flow indicators in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Winkler, K

    1987-01-01

    99mTc-diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) was compared with indocyanine green (ICG) as an indicator of hepatic blood flow (HBF). Twelve subjects (8 with cirrhosis, 2 with fatty liver, one with pancreatitis, and one with intestinal angina) were studied during hepatic vein catheterization...

  7. CLORAÇÃO MECANOQUÍMICA DA ACETANILIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Cunha

    Full Text Available We described herein a solvent-free synthesis of 4-chloroacetanilide both under hand grinding and mechanical grinding of stoichiometric amounts of acetanilide with trichloroisocyanuric acid. The synthetic approach was developed in the context of undergraduate organic chemistry and is the greener preparation of this compound already described.

  8. Generalized cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation and oxygenation reactions in aromatic substrates with activated N-H, O-H, C-H, or S-H substituents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koymans, L.; Donné-Op den Kelder, G M; te Koppele, J.M.; Vermeulen, N P

    1. The general mechanism of metabolic oxidation of substrates by cytochromes P450 (P450s) appears to consist of sequential one-electron oxidation steps rather than of a single concerted transfer of activated oxygen species from P450 to substrates. 2. In case of the acetanilides paracetamol (PAR),

  9. IMPROVING STRUCTURE-LINKED ACCESS TO PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CHEMICAL TOXICITY INFORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatotoxicity of the Herbicide Alachlor Associated with Glutathione Depletion, Oxidative Damage and Protein S-Cysteinyl Adduction.Toxicity of the herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethtl-N-[methoxtmethtl]-acetanilide) has been attributed to cytochrome P450-dependent me...

  10. METHOD 535: MEASUREMENT OF CHLOROACETANILIDE AND CHLOROACETAMIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATES IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY (LC/MS/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past several years, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradation products of acetanilide/acetamide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. The substitution of the sulfonic acid or the carbonic acid for the chlorine atom great...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF METHOD 535 FOR THE DETERMINATION OF CHLOROACETANILIDE AND OTHER ACETAMIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATES IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Method 535 has been developed in order to provide a method for the analysis of "Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide degradation products" which are listed on U.S. EPA's 1998 Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List. Method 535 uses solid phase extraction with a nonporous gr...

  12. facile, mild and convenient preparation and characterization of some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    salicylaldehyde with synthetic diamines in methanol solution under mild conditions. ... (11 g, 0.19 mol) potassium hydroxide in 30 mL of water and 10 mL hydrazine ... A mixture of glacial acetic acid (100 mL), 5.8 g of p-amino acetanilide, 8 g of ...

  13. Degradation mechanism of alachlor during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Chao; Dong, Bingzhi; Zhang, Yalei

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of alachlor by direct ozonation and advanced oxidation process O(3)/H(2)O(2) was investigated in this study with focus on identification of degradation byproducts. The second-order reaction rate constant between ozone and alachlor was determined to be 2.5+/-0.1M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 20 degrees C. Twelve and eight high-molecular-weight byproducts (with the benzene ring intact) from alachlor degradation were identified during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2), respectively. The common degradation byproducts included N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-methyleneamine, 8-ethyl-3,4-dihydro-quinoline, 8-ethyl-quinoline, 1-chloroacetyl-2-hydro-3-ketone-7-acetyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-diacetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide, 2-chloro-2'-acetyl-6'-ethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide, and two hydroxylated alachlor isomers. In direct ozonation, four more byproducts were also identified including 1-chloroacetyl-2,3-dihydro-7-ethyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-ethyl-acetanilide, 2-chloro-2',6'-acetyl-acetanilide and 2-chloro-2'-ethyl-6'-acetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide. Degradation of alachlor by O(3) and O(3)/H(2)O(2) also led to the formation of low-molecular-weight byproducts including formic, acetic, propionic, monochloroacetic and oxalic acids as well as chloride ion (only detected in O(3)/H(2)O(2)). Nitrite and nitrate formation was negligible. Alachlor degradation occurred via oxidation of the arylethyl group, N-dealkylation, cyclization and cleavage of benzene ring. After O(3) or O(3)/H(2)O(2) treatment, the toxicity of alachlor solution examined by the Daphnia magna bioassay was slightly reduced. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Calibration and test of an aneroid mini-bomb combustion calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.; Pilcher, Geoffrey; Santos, Luis M.N.B.F.; Lima, Luis M. Spencer S.

    2007-01-01

    A new mini-bomb combustion calorimeter designed at the University of Lund was improved, installed and calibrated at the University of Porto. This calorimeter is suitable for high precision combustion calorimetry with samples of mass about (10 to 40)mg. The energy equivalent of the calorimeter, ε cal =(1946.45+/-0.11)J.K -1 , was obtained from 15 independent calibration experiments with benzoic acid SRM 39i. Anthracene, succinic acid, acetanilide, and 1,2,4-triazole were used as test compounds, with excellent agreement with the literature values. -Δ c H m o Δ f H m o (cr)kJ.mol -1 kJ.mol -1 Anthracene7062.6+/-2.1124.3+/-2.8Succinic acid1490.2+/-0.7-941.3+/-0.9Acetanilide4226.2+/-1.1-208.2+/-1.61,2, 4-Triazole1326.1+/-0.4110.3+/-0.5

  15. Nanoparticles of ZrPO4 for green catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasulu, Peta; Pendem, Chandrasekhar; Viswanadham, Nagabhatla

    2014-11-01

    Here we report the successful room temperature synthesis of zirconium phosphate nanoparticles (ZPNP) using the P123 tri-co-block polymer for the first time. The samples were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TPD, and BET and were employed for fixation of CO2 on aniline to produce pharmaceutically important acetanilide under mild reaction conditions (150 °C and 150 Psi CO2 pressure).Here we report the successful room temperature synthesis of zirconium phosphate nanoparticles (ZPNP) using the P123 tri-co-block polymer for the first time. The samples were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TPD, and BET and were employed for fixation of CO2 on aniline to produce pharmaceutically important acetanilide under mild reaction conditions (150 °C and 150 Psi CO2 pressure). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, wide angle XRD, EDX, IR spectra, GC data etc. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03209h

  16. Reactions of recoil tritium generated by the 3He(n,p)3H reaction with aromatic compounds -intramolecular tritium distribution and radiochemical yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, Naotake; Oohashi, Kunio; Matuoka, H.; Moki, T.; Moriya, T.

    1986-01-01

    Reactions of recoil tritium with benzoic acid, acetanilide and β-phenethyl alcohol were studied using the 3 He(=n,p) 3 H reaction. The tritium distribution in the aromatic ring is approximately uniform in all the irradiated compounds and the tritium activity per C-H bond in the methyl and ethylene groups is 7 to 8 relative to that of the corresponding ring as standard. These findings are substantially the same as those obtained previously by the 6 Li(n,α) 3 H reactions, suggesting the same mechanism of tritiation for both recoil reactions. The tritiated parent compounds were obtained in high radiochemical yields: 45% for benzoic acid, 30% for acetanilide, 12% for β-phenethyl alcohol. (author)

  17. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y T; Kim, M S; Kwon, J H

    2002-01-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed.

  18. ACETANILIDA: SÍNTESE VERDE SEM SOLVENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Cunha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We described herein a solvent-free synthesis of acetanilide developed in the context of green chemistry. The synthetic approach consisted of the reaction of aniline with acetic anhydride without additives, while using smaller amounts of reagents and water than previously described for this undergraduate experiment. The E Factor was 0.6 by experienced chemists and 0.9 by students.

  19. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Tae; Song, Myong Geun; Kim, Moon Sub; Kwon, Jeong Hee [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed.

  20. Synthesis of 2-azetidinones substituted quinoline derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashelkar Uday C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetanilide is converted into 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline by reacting with DMF-POCl3 at 80-90ºC and then condensed with aromatic primary amines to give Schiff bases (3a-3c. These Schiff bases are then reacted with acid chlorides in the presence of base in toluene to give 1, 3, 4-substituted 2-azetidinones.

  1. Preparation of para-chloroaniline: a simple, fast and inexpensive experiment; Preparo da para-cloroanilina: um experimento simples, rapido e barato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Renato Saldanha; Cunha, Andrea Sousa da; Silva, Lucyane Costa da; Oliveira, Carina Cantelle Pacheco de; Rezende, Claudia M.; Pinto, Angelo C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: bastosrs@ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    Experiments simple, short and efficient for experimental disciplines in undergraduate courses in Chemistry are an excellent opportunity for students to consolidate the learning of theoretical concepts in classical chemical transformations. The use of a safe reagent, of low cost and easy access is the motivation for this communication, that describes the use of trichloroisocyanuric acid - a chlorinating agent used in the treatment of swimming pool water - for the chlorination of acetanilide, an intermediate in the preparation of para-chloroaniline. (author)

  2. Oceurrence of fungi degrading aniline and its derivatives in biocenoses of wastewater treatment systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Słomczyński

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that numerous yeast-like microorganisms from the genera Geotrichum, Trichmporon, Candida, Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces occurring in wastewater treatment systems biocenoses arę able to utilize aniline, p-nitroaniline and acetanilide as a sole C-source. High active in this respect were strains belonging to the species of Geoirichum candidum, G. sericeum and Candida boidinii.

  3. Preparo da para-cloroanilina: um experimento simples, rápido e barato Preparation of para-cloroanilina: a simple, fast and inexpensive experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Saldanha Bastos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments simple, short and efficient for experimental disciplines in undergraduate courses in Chemistry are an excellent opportunity for students to consolidate the learning of theoretical concepts in classical chemical transformations. The use of a safe reagent, of low cost and easy access is the motivation for this communication, that describes the use of trichloroisocyanuric acid - a chlorinating agent used in the treatment of swimming pool water - for the chlorination of acetanilide, an intermediate in the preparation of para-chloroaniline.

  4. N-Chloro and N-bromosaccharins: valuable reagents for halogenation of electron rich aromatics and cohalogenation of alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Soraia P. L. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Chloro- and N-bromosaccharins react with electron rich aromatic compounds (anisole, acetanilide, N,N-dimethylaniline producing halogenated compounds. The reaction with N-bromosaccharin gives para- substituted compounds only, whereas N-chlorosaccharin produces orto and para mixtures (para isomer predominantly, ca. 4-5 : 1. The reactions of the N-halosaccharins with alkenes (cyclohexene, styrene, a-methylstyrene, and 1-hexene give the corresponding halohydrins.

  5. Imaging of irradiated liver with Tc-99m-sulfur colloid and Tc-99m-IDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Saha, S.; Aron, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    In three cases, irradiated regions of liver failed to concentrate Tc-99m-sulfur colloid. In two of these three, imaging with Tc-99m-acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (IDA) agents within five days showed near normal hepatic uptake of this hepatobiliary imaging agent. The hepatic parenchymal cells may be imaged with Tc-99m-IDA in some irradiated regions of liver, despite loss of reticuloendothelial cell function

  6. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tae; Song, Myong Geun; Kim, Moon Sub; Kwon, Jeong Hee

    2002-01-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed

  7. /sup 99m/Tc-IDA imaging in the differential diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, C.; Greenberg, D.; Rosenthall, L.; Arzoumanian, A.; Lisbona, R.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-/sup 99m/-labelled dimethly-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-IDA) hepato-biliary imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in distinguishing acute cholecystitis from acute pancreatitis. In a retrospective review, gallbladders were demonstrated by /sup 99m/Tc-IDA in 13 of 15 patients (87%) with acute pancreatitis. This is significantly higher than reports on the frequency of gallbladder filling with oral and intravenous cholangiography in the presence of acute cholecystitis

  8. Complexes of vanadium (V) oxotrichloride with amides and tertiary amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.C.; Sharma, N.C.; Sahi, Y.P.; Chadha, S.L.; Sharma, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    Vanadium(V) oxotrichloride forms dark brown hygroscopic solid complexes of the composition VOCl 3 .3B and VOCl 3 .2B' where B represents pyridine, α-, β-, and γ-picolines, quinoline, isoquinoline, urea, N-methylformamide or acetanilide while B' represents N, N'-dimethylformamide, N-methylacetamide or dimethylacetamide. These complexes have been characterized on the basis of their analytical and IR spectral data. (author)

  9. Substituent effects on the H abstraction by recoil 38Cl in some organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedgaonkar, V.G.; Mitra, S.; Waghmare, Sunil

    1986-01-01

    Total organic yield following 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl reaction in trichloro solids of acetanilides and anilines is in the range 46-49%. Yield for the dichloro systems is lower: 25%. In general, the organic yields are in the order Ar-OH > Ar-NH 2 > Ar-NHCOCH 3 . Solution state irradiation in various solvents further lower the yield (about 28%) which remains independent of the polarity of the solvents. (author)

  10. Preparation of para-chloroaniline: a simple, fast and inexpensive experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Renato Saldanha; Cunha, Andrea Sousa da; Silva, Lucyane Costa da; Oliveira, Carina Cantelle Pacheco de; Rezende, Claudia M.; Pinto, Angelo C.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments simple, short and efficient for experimental disciplines in undergraduate courses in Chemistry are an excellent opportunity for students to consolidate the learning of theoretical concepts in classical chemical transformations. The use of a safe reagent, of low cost and easy access is the motivation for this communication, that describes the use of trichloroisocyanuric acid - a chlorinating agent used in the treatment of swimming pool water - for the chlorination of acetanilide, an intermediate in the preparation of para-chloroaniline. (author)

  11. Preparo da para-cloroanilina: um experimento simples, rápido e barato

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos,Renato Saldanha; Cunha,Andréa Sousa da; Silva,Lucyane Costa da; Oliveira,Carina Cantelle Pacheco de; Rezende,Cláudia M.; Pinto,Angelo C.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments simple, short and efficient for experimental disciplines in undergraduate courses in Chemistry are an excellent opportunity for students to consolidate the learning of theoretical concepts in classical chemical transformations. The use of a safe reagent, of low cost and easy access is the motivation for this communication, that describes the use of trichloroisocyanuric acid - a chlorinating agent used in the treatment of swimming pool water - for the chlorination of acetanilide, a...

  12. A Simple, Fast, Low Cost, HPLC/UV Validated Method for Determination of Flutamide: Application to Protein Binding Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Sara; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-06-01

    The main goal of this study was development of a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for flutamide quantitation which is applicable to protein binding studies. Ultrafilteration method was used for protein binding study of flutamide. For sample analysis, flutamide was extracted by a simple and low cost extraction method using diethyl ether and then was determined by HPLC/UV. Acetanilide was used as an internal standard. The chromatographic system consisted of a reversed-phase C8 column with C8 pre-column, and the mobile phase of a mixture of 29% (v/v) methanol, 38% (v/v) acetonitrile and 33% (v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (50 mM) with pH adjusted to 3.2. Acetanilide and flutamide were eluted at 1.8 and 2.9 min, respectively. The linearity of method was confirmed in the range of 62.5-16000 ng/ml (r(2) > 0.99). The limit of quantification was shown to be 62.5 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy ranges found to be (0.2-1.4%, 90-105%) and (0.2-5.3 %, 86.7-98.5 %) respectively. Acetanilide and flutamide capacity factor values of 1.35 and 2.87, tailing factor values of 1.24 and 1.07 and resolution values of 1.8 and 3.22 were obtained in accordance with ICH guidelines. Based on the obtained results a rapid, precise, accurate, sensitive and cost-effective analysis procedure was proposed for quantitative determination of flutamide.

  13. /sup 99m/Tc-labelled hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, G.; Maini, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    During the last 15 years many compounds labelled with /sup 99m/Tc have been proposed for use in cholescintigraphy. A short chronological list includes: toluidine blue, penicillamine, tetracycline, dihydrothioctic acid, mercaptoisubutyric acid, pyridoxals, pyridoxylideneaminates, carboxyl-hydroxyquinoline, substituted acetanilide iminodiacetates (so called IDAs), ethylenediamine-N, N-diacetate derivatives (such as sulfonyl-EDDA and benzoyl-EDDA), and orthoiodohippurate analogues. Among all these compounds the IDAs have been those most extensively used for basic and clinical research. A large series of IDA derivatives has been developed, and the properties of 33 of them have recently been tested

  14. Synthesis of disodium [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-(4-chlorophenylthio)methylenediphosphonate, [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-tiludronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Alain; Ellames, G.J. [Alnwick Research Centre (United Kingdom). Dept. of Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics

    1995-12-31

    Disodium [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-(4-chlorophenylithio)methylenediphosphonate, [benzene-{sup 14}C]-Tiludronate, 2, has been prepared in six steps from [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-acetanilide in an overall radiochemical yield of 41%. A key step in this transformation was the efficient conversion of [U-{sup 14}C]-4-chloroaniline to [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-4-chlorophenylthiocyanate, 5, in 83% yield by treatment of the corresponding diazonium salt, 9 with iron(111) thiocyanate. It should be noted that formation of the isomeric [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-4-chlorophenylisothiocyanate, 11, as a byproduct, was observed in only {approx} 1% yield. (author).

  15. Dimethyl (E-2-(N-phenylacetamidobut-2-enedioate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Bin Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H15NO5, was obtained from the reaction of acetanilide with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate in the presence of potassium carbonate. The C=C double bond adopts an E configuration and the geometry around the amide N atom is almost planar rather than pyramidal (mean deviation of 0.0032 Å from the C3N plane. The packing of the molecules in the crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  16. Thermal performance evaluation of a latent heat storage unit for late evening cooking in a solar cooker having three reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddhi, D.; Sharma, A. [Devi Ahilya University, Indore (India). School of Energy and Environmental Studies, Thermal Energy Storage Laboratory; Sharma, S.D. [Mie University, Tsu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering, Department of Architecture

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, a phase change material (PCM) storage unit for a solar cooker was designed and developed to store energy during sunshine hours. The stored energy was utilised to cook food in the late evening. Commercial grade acetanilide (melting point 118.9 {sup o}C, latent heat of fusion 222 kJ/kg) was used as a latent heat storage material. Evening cooking experiments were conducted with different loads and loading times during the winter season. The experimental results showed that late evening cooking is possible in a solar cooker having three reflectors to enhance the incident solar radiation with the PCM storage unit. (author)

  17. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI) with benzoylacetanilide and its nitro derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Gautam Kumar; Das, Jyotirmoy

    1984-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of uranium(VI) chelates of benzoylacetanilide and four of its mononitro derivatives, viz., benzoyl-o-nitroacetanilide, benzoyl-m-nitroacetanilide, benzoyl-p-nitro-acetanilide and p-nitrobenzoylacetanilide from aqueous solution into carbon tetrachloride has been studied. The extractions have also been carried out in the presence of pyridine, α-picoline, β-picoline and γ-picoline. The extraction constants, and the two phase formation constants of the chelates and adducts have been determined. The effects of the nitro substituent in benzoylacetanilide and formation of syngergistic adducts have been discussed. (author)

  18. Calibration and test of an aneroid mini-bomb combustion calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: risilva@fc.up.pt; Pilcher, Geoffrey [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Santos, Luis M.N.B.F. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Lima, Luis M. Spencer S. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2007-05-15

    A new mini-bomb combustion calorimeter designed at the University of Lund was improved, installed and calibrated at the University of Porto. This calorimeter is suitable for high precision combustion calorimetry with samples of mass about (10 to 40)mg. The energy equivalent of the calorimeter, {epsilon}{sub cal}=(1946.45+/-0.11)J.K{sup -1}, was obtained from 15 independent calibration experiments with benzoic acid SRM 39i. Anthracene, succinic acid, acetanilide, and 1,2,4-triazole were used as test compounds, with excellent agreement with the literature values. -{delta}{sub c}H{sub m}{sup o}{delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o}(cr)kJ.mol{sup -1}kJ.mol{sup -1}Anthracene7062.6+/-2.1124.3+/-2.8Succinic acid1490.2+/-0.7-941.3+/-0.9Acetanilide4226.2+/-1.1-208.2+/-1.61,2, 4-Triazole1326.1+/-0.4110.3+/-0.5.

  19. Impact of the interaction with the positive charge in adsorption of benzene and other organic compounds from aqueous solutions on carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Ćwiertnia, Magdalena S.; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A.; Rychlicki, Gerhard; Szymański, Grzegorz S.

    2007-02-01

    We present the results of benzene adsorption at the acidic pH level determined on the series of chemically modified activated carbons and at three temperatures. The influence of carbon surface chemical composition on benzene adsorption is discussed. It is shown that the decrease in the pH level from 7 up to 1.5 increases benzene adsorption and the only exception is carbon modified with gaseous ammonia. Basing on the results of current work and those published previously (for phenol, paracetamol, acetanilide and aniline) and using the results of quantum chemistry calculations (DFT, Gaussian 98) we show, that the value of the energy of interaction with unit positive charge is crucial during the analysis of the influence of pH level on adsorption. Obtained results allow to predict the changes in adsorption of aromatics on carbons with the decrease in the pH level.

  20. Evaluation of butachlor for control of some submerged macrophytes along with its impact on biotic components of freshwater system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chattopadhyay, S. Adhikari, S. P. Adhikary, S. Ayyappan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the efficacy of the herbicide butachlor, (N-butoxymethyl-2 chloro-21, 61 diethyl acetanilide was tested against few common submerged macrophytes namely Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata (L. Royale, Najas (Najas minor All., Nechamandra (Nechamandra alternifolia (Roxb. Thwaites and Ottelia (Ottelia alismoides (L. Pers. of freshwater fish ponds. Almost complete decay of Hydrilla, Nechamandra and Ottelia was achieved at 7.5 L of active ingredient/ha/m butachlor within 15 days while the herbicide showed no negative effect on Najas. However at the same concentration of butachlor, total mortality of zooplankton and water fern Azolla (Azolla caroliniana Lamarck occurred within seven days. In case of few freshwater fish species like Rohu (Labeo rohita, Channa (Channa punctatus, Anabas (Anabas testitudineus and Heteropneustes (Heteropneustes fossilis, total mortality occurred upto 90 days after application of the same dose of butachlor but fish survived beyond 120 days of herbicide application indicating degradation of the herbicides.

  1. Semi-microdetermination of nitrogen in actinide compounds by Dumas method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, M.S.; Ruikar, P.B.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the application of the Dumas method for the semi-micro determination of nitrogen in actinide compounds and actinide complexes with organic ligands. The usual set up has been modified to make it adaptable for glove box operations. The carbon dioxide generator and nitrometer assemblies were located outside the glove box while the reaction tube and combustion furnaces were housed inside. The nitrogen gas collected in the nitrometer was read with the help of a travelling microscope with a vernier attachment fitted in front of the nitrometer burette. The set up was standardised using acetanilide and employed for the determination of nirtogen in various substances such as uranium nitride, and a variety of substituted quinoline and pyrazolone derivatives of actinides as well as some ternary uranium-PMBR-sulphoxide complexes. Full details of the technique and the analytical data obtained are contained in this report. (author)

  2. Acute Toxicity of Butachlor to Rutilus rutilus caspicus and Sander lucioperca in Vivo Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forouhar Vajargah Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides are used to control weeds and are usually targeted to sites that are specific to plants. Butachlor is an herbicide of the acetanilide class, which is widely used in agricultural fields. At the present study, lethal concentration (LC50 of butachlor was calculated for Rutilus rutilus caspicus and Sander lucioperca with a mean weight of 4 ± 1 g (mean ± SD. Our results indicated that LC50 96 h butachlor for R. rutilus caspicus and S. lucioperca were 0.342 and 0.760 ppm respectively. These findings suggest that butachlor is moderately toxic and moderately irritating for these two species. Clinical symptoms included irregular protrusion of the eyes and irregular swimming.

  3. Influence of electropolishing and anodic oxidation on morphology, chemical composition and corrosion resistance of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Maciej; Greń, Katarzyna [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kukharenko, Andrey I. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Korotin, Danila M. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Michalska, Joanna [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego Street 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Mosiałek, Michał [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Żak, Jerzy [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Pamuła, Elżbieta [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza Avenue 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Kurmaev, Ernst Z. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cholakh, Seif O. [Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Simka, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.simka@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-09-01

    The work presents results of the studies performed on electropolishing of pure niobium in a bath that contained: sulphuric acid, hydrofluoric acid, ethylene glycol and acetanilide. After the electropolishing, the specimens were subjected to anodic passivation in a 1 mol dm{sup −3} phosphoric acid solution at various voltages. The surface morphology, thickness, roughness and chemical composition of the resulting oxide layers were analysed. Thusly prepared niobium samples were additionally investigated in terms of their corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution. The electropolished niobium surface was determined to be smooth and lustrous. The anodisation led to the growth of barrier-like oxide layers, which were enriched in phosphorus species. - Highlights: • Pure niobium was electropolished and subsequently anodised in a H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution. • Phosphorus was successfully introduced into the oxide layers after the treatment. • Corrosion resistance of niobium in Ringer's solution was improved after anodising.

  4. Synthesis of a cleavable heterobifunctional photolabelling reagent: ring-labelled 3-((4-azidophenyl)dithio)propionic acid- sup 14 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswami, Varadarajan (Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Tirrell, D.A. (Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (USA). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering)

    1989-08-01

    An efficient synthesis of ring-labelled 3-((4-azidophenyl)dithio)propionic acid-{sup 14}C is described. Chlorosulfonation of uniformly ring-labelled acetanilide-{sup 14}C followed by reductive dimerization of the sulfonyl chloride with HI afforded 4-acetamidophenyl disulfide. Hydrolysis and diazotization then gave 4-azidophenyl disulfide, which was converted to the title compound via the sulfur transfer reagent N-(4-azidophenylthio)phthalimide. The overall yield of 3-((4-azidophenyl)dithio)propionic acid-{sup 14}C was 22%. 3-((4-Azidophenyl)dithio)propionic acid-{sup 14}C is a cleavable heterobifunctional photolabelling reagent of potential utility in studies of biomembrane structure and intermacromolecular interaction. (author).

  5. Research progress in synthetic technology of p-aminophenyl-β-sulfatoethylsulfone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue FENG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The p-aminophenyl-β-sulfatoethylsulfone is one of the most important intermediates of vinyl-sulfone reactive dyes, and the demanded quantity increases gradually. The synthetic routes of p-aminophenyl-β-sulfatoethylsulfone using acetanilide, p-nitrochlorobenzene, etc. as raw materials are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages and improved method of various kinds of synthetic routes are introduced, the objective evaluation is made for each synthetic route, and the esterification for synthesis of the intermediates of β-hydroxyethylsulfone esterification is analyzed. The prospect of p-aminophenyl-β-sulfatoethylsulfone is forecasted: Attaches great importance to the development of new routes, uses clean technology and new technology, develops the competitive products, speeds up the development of dye intermediates, and develops high value-added products.

  6. Synthesis of /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labelled 4-(4-nitrophenyl)aminophenylisothiocyanate (Go 9333/CGP 4540; amoscanate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjaneyulu, B.; Maller, R.K.; Nagarajan, K. (Hindustan Ciba-Geigy Ltd., Bombay (India). Isotope Lab.); Kueng, W.; Wirz, B. (Ciba-Geigy A.G., Basel (Switzerland))

    1985-04-01

    Amoscanate, a broad spectrum anthelmintic, labelled with carbon-14 on the isothiocyanate carbon atom was prepared in an overall yield of 13% at a specific activity of 4.13 ..mu..Ci/mg from potassium (/sup 14/C)thiocyanate. The 4-nitro(U-/sup 14/C)phenyl ring labelled compound was synthesized in 20.4% overall yield from (U-/sup 14/C)aniline at a specific activity of 12.2 ..mu..Ci/mg. The corresponding tritiated compound was prepared from 4-amino(2-/sup 3/H)acetanilide at 112 ..mu..Ci/mg. Labelling with tritium in the aromatic ring bearing the isothiocyanate group was achieved by catalysed halogen-tritium replacement. However, for pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies in experimental animals, the /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labels associated with the phenylisothiocyanate moiety subsequently proved disadvantageous because of the instability of the labels in vivo.

  7. Electronic and steric effects in regioselective tritiation of anilides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OOhashi, Kunio; Udo, Masato (Chiba Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Acetanilide, propionanilide and isobutyranilide were tritiated at the ortho positions with very high regioselectivity by heating with HTO in the presence of RhCl[sub 3][center dot]3H[sub 2]O in N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF). In this reaction for pivalanilide the specific activity alone was determined, because attempts to establish the regioselectivity were unsuccessful. The extent of tritium incorporation decreased with increasing bulkiness of the alkyl groups. Only slight tritium was introduced by the same reaction for trifluoroacetanilide, which would probably be attributed to a strong electron-attracting property of the trifluoromethyl group. The above findings give support to the previous suggestion that the present isotope exchange reaction proceeds via an initial coordination of the nitrogen atom of anilides to the rhodium (III) chloride trihydrate catalyst. (author).

  8. Dielectric relaxation studies of dilute solutions of amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malathi, M.; Sabesan, R.; Krishnan, S

    2003-11-15

    The dielectric constants and dielectric losses of formamide, acetamide, N-methyl acetamide, acetanilide and N,N-dimethyl acetamide in dilute solutions of 1,4-dioxan/benzene have been measured at 308 K using 9.37 GHz, dielectric relaxation set up. The relaxation time for the over all rotation {tau}{sub (1)} and that for the group rotation {tau}{sub (2)} of (the molecules were determined using Higasi's method. The activation energies for the processes of dielectric relaxation and viscous flow were determined by using Eyring's rate theory. From relaxation time behaviour of amides in non-polar solvent, solute-solvent and solute-solute type of molecular association is proposed.

  9. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of BIDA, DISIDA, DTPA and MDP in labelled compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Walt, T.N.; Coetzee, P.P. (Rand Afrikaans Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry); Fourie, P.J. (Atomic Energy Corp. of South Africa (Pty) Ltd., Pretoria (South Africa))

    1989-01-01

    N-(4-(n-butyl)acetanilide)iminodiacetic acid (BIDA), N-(2,6-diisopropylacetanilide)iminodiacetic acid (DISDA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) are used in labelling kits. The contents of BIDA, DISIDA or MDP of the {sup 99m}Tc-labelled compounds can be determined (indirectly) spectrophotometrically with copper, eriochrome cyanine R (ECC) and dodecyl-ethyldimethylammonium bromide (DEDA) in a sodium barbital buffered system at pH 8.5. The calibration curves obey Beer's Law from 0 to 40 {mu}g/25 mL for BIDA and DISIDA, 0 to 60 {mu}g/25 mL for DTPA and 0 to 100 {mu}g/10 mL for MDP. (author).

  10. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of BIDA, DISIDA, DTPA and MDP in labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Walt, T.N.; Coetzee, P.P.

    1989-01-01

    N-(4-(n-butyl)acetanilide)iminodiacetic acid (BIDA), N-(2,6-diisopropylacetanilide)iminodiacetic acid (DISDA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) are used in labelling kits. The contents of BIDA, DISIDA or MDP of the 99m Tc-labelled compounds can be determined (indirectly) spectrophotometrically with copper, eriochrome cyanine R (ECC) and dodecyl-ethyldimethylammonium bromide (DEDA) in a sodium barbital buffered system at pH 8.5. The calibration curves obey Beer's Law from 0 to 40 μg/25 mL for BIDA and DISIDA, 0 to 60 μg/25 mL for DTPA and 0 to 100 μg/10 mL for MDP. (author)

  11. Update on radionuclide imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthall, L.

    1981-01-01

    The recent introduction of technetium Tc 99m-labeled acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-IDA) analogues has facilitated the clincal study of the bile flow pathways. A variety of /sup 99m/Tc-IDA derivaties are under investigation. Basically all are metabolized by the hepatocyte and immediately thereafter excreted unconjugated into the biliary tract. Of the various derivatives tested, e.g., dimethyl (lidofenin), diethyl, paraisopropyl (iprofenin), parabutyl (butilfenin), and diisopropyl (disofenin), the last named is the best universal agent at this time. By serial liver imaging the patency of the cystic duct and the integrity of altered cholangiointestinal anatomy can be assessed, leakage of bile and gastric reflux can be disclosed, and medical and surgical jaundice can be distinguished

  12. Synthesis of 14C- and 3H-labelled 4-(4-nitrophenyl)aminophenylisothiocyanate (Go 9333/CGP 4540; amoscanate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjaneyulu, B.; Maller, R.K.; Nagarajan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Amoscanate, a broad spectrum anthelmintic, labelled with carbon-14 on the isothiocyanate carbon atom was prepared in an overall yield of 13% at a specific activity of 4.13 μCi/mg from potassium [ 14 C]thiocyanate. The 4-nitro[U- 14 C]phenyl ring labelled compound was synthesized in 20.4% overall yield from [U- 14 C]aniline at a specific activity of 12.2 μCi/mg. The corresponding tritiated compound was prepared from 4-amino[2- 3 H]acetanilide at 112 μCi/mg. Labelling with tritium in the aromatic ring bearing the isothiocyanate group was achieved by catalysed halogen-tritium replacement. However, for pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies in experimental animals, the 14 C- and 3 H-labels associated with the phenylisothiocyanate moiety subsequently proved disadvantageous because of the instability of the labels in vivo. (author)

  13. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of acute cholecystitis with /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA cholescintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissmann, H.S.; Frank, M.S.; Bernstein, L.H.; Freeman, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m dimethyl acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) cholescintigraphy was performed on 90 patients with suspected acute cholecytitis. Visualization of the gallbladder established patency of the cystic duct and excluded the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in 50 of 52 patients. Nonvisualization of the gallbladder with visualization of the common bile duct was diagnostic of acute cholecystitis in 38 patients, all subsequently proven at surgery. The observed accuracy of this procedure is 98% and specificity is 100%. The false negative rate is 5% and false positive rate is zero. Technetium-99m-HILDA has many advantages which make it the procedure of choice in evaluating a patient for suspected acute cholecystitis. It is a rapid, simple, safe examination which provides functional as well as anatomic information about the hepatobiliary system in individuals with a serum bilirubin level up to 8 mg/100 ml

  14. Ruthenium-97 hepatobiliary agents for delayed studies of the bilary tract I: Ru-97 PIPIDA: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachner, E.R.; Gil, M.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Som, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Badia, J.; Sacker, D.F.; Fairchild, R.G.; Richards, P.

    1981-01-01

    Failure of early diagnosis of biliary atresia results in the development of cirrhosis and death. Commonly used hepatobiliary agents are not ideal for follow-up studies because of their unfavorable physical properties or short half-life. The excellent physical properties of Ru-97 should overcome these limitations. Therefore, Ru-97 PIPIDA (N,α-(p-isopropyl acetanilide) iminoacetic acid) is being investigated as a potential hepatobiliary agent that would allow an improved diagnosis of the disease. Ruthenium-97 PIPIDA and Tc-99m PIPIDA showed similar blood clearance rates in dogs. Ru-97 PIPIDA scintigrams in dogs showed early uptake in liver and gallbladder and slow excretion through the gastrointestinal tract. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal rats and rats with biliary obstruction. The findings suggest that Ru-97 PIPIDA should be useful for delayed studies ( 1 to 3 days) of the biliary tract

  15. Effects of alachlor on the early development and induction of estrogen-responsive genes in Medaka, Oryzias latipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.; Ryu, J.; Park, S.Y.; Choi, K.; Jeon, S.H.; Na, J.G.; Rhee, D.G. [National Inst. of Environmental Research, Incheon (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    Alachlor is an acetanilide herbicide used to control annual grasses and weeds in field corn, soybeans, and peanuts. It is a selective systemic herbicide, absorbed by germinating shoots and by roots. Although the specific pathways are not exactly understood, the acetanilide herbicides apparently interfere with several physiological processes including biosynthesis of lipids, proteins and flavonoids. These herbicides are widely used in agriculture and are commonly detected in surface water and groundwater. Alachlor has a relatively low acute toxicity, however, repeated exposure has been reported to cause hepatotoxicity, irreversible uveal degeneration and tumour formation in some animals. Besides alachlor is one of the herbicides reported to have endocrine disrupting effects. 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, amitrole and atrazine also belong to these types of herbicides. Alachlor is a strongly suspected endocrine disruptor in that it is listed by EPA and the World Wildlife Fund [WWF] as a potential endocrine disrupting chemical. Many mammalian and aquatic toxicological studies with alachlor were performed under the conditions of acute, subacute and chronic experiment. However, not many studies using fish have been carried out with the purpose of screening and testing of endocrine disrupting effects of alachlor. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of alachlor on the early morphological development of medaka (Oryzias latipes). Embryonic growth, deformation and hatching success were determined to see the effects of this chemical. Also, we tried to measure the estrogenic activity of alachlor using the ELISA and RT-PCR methods. By using these techniques, we evaluated the induction of the estrogen-responsive genes, vitellogenin (precursor of yolk protein) and choriogenin (precursor of egg envelope protein) in male medaka exposed to alachlor.

  16. A urinary metabonomics analysis of long-term effect of acetochlor exposure on rats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longxue; Wang, Maoqing; Chen, Shuhong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    The study was to assess the long-term toxic effects of acetochlor on rats. Two different doses (42.96 and 107.4 mg/kg body weight/day) of acetochlor were administered to Wistar rats through their food for over 24 weeks. Rat urine samples were collected at two time-points for the measurements of the metabonomics profiles with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MSMS). The results of clinical chemistry and histopathology suggested that long-term use of acetochlor in rats caused liver and kidney damage, and dysfunction of antioxidant system. The urinary metabonomics analysis indicated that the high and low-dose exposure of acetochlor could cause alterations of these metabonomics in urine in the rat. Significant changes of the levels of hippuric acid (0.403-fold decrease), citric acid (0.430-fold decrease), pantothenic acid (0.486-fold decrease), uracil (0.419-fold decrease), β-Alanine (0.325-fold decrease), nonanedioic acid (0.445-fold decrease), L-tyrosine (0.410-fold decrease), D-glucuronic acid (8.389-fold increase) and 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide in urine were observed. In addition, it may interfere with the fatty acid synthesis, the pyrimidine degradation and pantothenate biosynthesis. The level of 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide is detected in all treated groups which is not found in the control groups, indicating which can be used as an early, sensitive marker of acetochlor exposure in rat. This study illustrates the important utility of metabonomics approaches to understand the toxicity of long-term exposure of acetochlor. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Development of suspect and non-target screening methods for detection of organic contaminants in highway runoff and fish tissue with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bowen; Lofton, Jonathan M; Peter, Katherine T; Gipe, Alexander D; James, C Andrew; McIntyre, Jenifer K; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Baker, Joel E; Kolodziej, Edward P

    2017-09-20

    Untreated urban stormwater runoff contributes to poor water quality in receiving waters. The ability to identify toxicants and other bioactive molecules responsible for observed adverse effects in a complex mixture of contaminants is critical to effective protection of ecosystem and human health, yet this is a challenging analytical task. The objective of this study was to develop analytical methods using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) to detect organic contaminants in highway runoff and in runoff-exposed fish (adult coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch). Processing of paired water and tissue samples facilitated contaminant prioritization and aided investigation of chemical bioavailability and uptake processes. Simple, minimal processing effort solid phase extraction (SPE) and elution procedures were optimized for water samples, and selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) procedures were optimized for fish tissues. Extraction methods were compared by detection of non-target features and target compounds (e.g., quantity and peak area), while minimizing matrix interferences. Suspect screening techniques utilized in-house and commercial databases to prioritize high-risk detections for subsequent MS/MS characterization and identification efforts. Presumptive annotations were also screened with an in-house linear regression (log K ow vs. retention time) to exclude isobaric compounds. Examples of confirmed identifications (via reference standard comparison) in highway runoff include ethoprophos, prometon, DEET, caffeine, cotinine, 4(or 5)-methyl-1H-methylbenzotriazole, and acetanilide. Acetanilide was also detected in runoff-exposed fish gill and liver samples. Further characterization of highway runoff and fish tissues (14 and 19 compounds, respectively with tentative identification by MS/MS data) suggests that many novel or poorly characterized organic contaminants exist in urban

  18. Comparative sensitivity of Selenastrum capricornutum and Lemna minor to sixteen herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, J.F.; Ruessler, D.S.; Haverland, P.S.; Carlson, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Aquatic plant toxicity tests are frequently conducted in environmental risk assessments to determine the potential impacts of contaminants on primary producers. An examination of published plant toxicity data demonstrates that wide differences in sensitivity can occur across phylogenetic groups of plants. Yet relatively few studies have been conducted with the specific intent to compare the relative sensitivity of various aquatic plant species to contaminants. We compared the relative sensitivity of the algae Selenestrum capricornutum and the floating vascular plant Lemna minor to 16 herbicides (atrazine, metribuzin, simazine, cyanazine, alachlor, metolachlor, chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, triallate, EPTC, trifluralin, diquat, paraquat, dicamba, bromoxynil, and 2,4-D). The herbicides studied represented nine chemical classes and several modes of action and were chosen to represent major current uses in the United States. Both plant species were generally sensitive to the triazines (atrazine, metribuzin, simazine, and cyanazine), sulfonureas (metsulfuron and chlorsulfuron), pyridines (diquat and paraquat), dinitroaniline (trifluralin), and acetanilide (alachlor and metolachlor) herbicides. Neither plant species was uniformly more sensitive than the other across the broad range of herbicides tested. Lemna was more sensitive to the sulfonureas (metsulfuron and chlorsulfuron) and the pyridines (diquat and parequat) than Selenastrum. However Selenastrum was more sensitive than Lemna to one of two thiocarbamates (triallate) and one of the triazines (cyanazine). Neither species was sensitive to selective broadleaf herbicides including bromoxynil, EPTC, dicamba, or 2,4-D. Results were not always predictable in spite of obvious differences in herbicide modes of action and plant phylogeny. Major departures in sensitivity of Selenastrum occurred between chemicals within individual classes of the triazine, acetanilide, and thiocarbamate herbicides. Results indicate that neither

  19. The effect of lycopene on the total cytochrome P450, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Louisa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Some carotenoids such as canthaxantin, astaxanthin and beta apo-8’-carotenal were reported to have modulatoryeffect on the cytochrome P450. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lycopene, a nonprovitamin A carotenoid, on microsomal cytochrome P450, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1.Methods: Total cytochrome P450 levels, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1-catalyzed reactions (acetanilide 4-hydroxylation and p-nitrophenol hydroxylation were studied in the liver microsomes of male Sprague Dawley rats. Microsomes were prepared using differential centrifugation combined with calcium aggregation method. Lycopene was orally administered in the dosages of 0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kgBW/day for 14 days in a repeated fashion. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test.Results: Total cytochrome P450 level and acetanilide 4-hydroxylase activity were unaffected by any of the treatments. The CYP2E1 probe enzyme (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase was significantly reduced by repeated administration of 100mg/ kgBW/day lycopene (7.88 + 2.04 vs 12.26 + 2.77 n mol/min/mg prot.Conclusion: The present results suggest that lycopene does not affect the total cytochrome P450 or CYP1A2 activity but it inhibits the activity of CYP2E1 (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase in the rat. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 233-8Keywords: lycopene, cytochrome P450, CYP1A2, CYP2E1

  20. High performance liquid chromatography of substituted aromatics with the metal-organic framework MIL-100(Fe): Mechanism analysis and model-based prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Silvestre, Martin Eduardo; Li, Yongli; Franzreb, Matthias

    2016-02-05

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-100(Fe) with well-defined thickness was homogenously coated onto the outer surface of magnetic microparticles via a liquid-phase epitaxy method. The as-synthesized MIL-100(Fe) was used as stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and separations of two groups of mixed aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, styrene and p-xylene; acetanilide, 2-nirtoaniline and 1-naphthylamine) using methanol/water as mobile phase were performed to evaluate its performance. Increasing water content of the mobile phase composition can greatly improve the separations on the expense of a longer elution time. Stepwise elution significantly shortens the elution time of acetanilide, 2-nirtoaniline and 1-naphthylamine mixtures, while still achieving a baseline separation. Combining the experimental results and in-depth modeling using a recently developed chromatographic software (ChromX), adsorption equilibrium parameters, including the affinities and maximum capacities, for each analyte toward the MIL-100(Fe) are obtained. In addition, the pore diffusivity of aromatic hydrocarbons within MIL-100(Fe) was determined to be 5×10(-12)m(2)s(-1). While the affinities of MIL-100(Fe) toward the analyte molecules differs much, the maximum capacities of the analytes are in a narrow range with q*MOFmax,toluene=3.55molL(-1), q*MOFmax,styrene or p-xylene=3.53molL(-1), and q*MOFmax,anilines=3.12molL(-1) corresponding to approximately 842 toluene and 838 styrene or p-xylene, and 740 aniline molecules per MIL-100(Fe) unit cell, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of pesticide contamination in soil samples from an intensive horticulture area, using ultrasonic extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, C; Alpendurada, M F

    2005-03-15

    In order to reduce the amount of sample to be collected and the time consumed in the analytical process, a broad range of analytes should be preferably considered in the same analytical procedure. A suitable methodology for pesticide residue analysis in soil samples was developed based on ultrasonic extraction (USE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For this study, different classes of pesticides were selected, both recent and old persistent molecules: parent compounds and degradation products, namely organochlorine, organophosphorous and pyrethroid insecticides, triazine and acetanilide herbicides and other miscellaneous pesticides. Pesticide residues could be detected in the low- to sub-ppb range (0.05-7.0mugkg(-1)) with good precision (7.5-20.5%, average 13.7% R.S.D.) and extraction efficiency (69-118%, average 88%) for the great majority of analytes. This methodology has been applied in a monitoring program of soil samples from an intensive horticulture area in Póvoa de Varzim, North of Portugal. The pesticides detected in four sampling programs (2001/2002) were the following: lindane, dieldrin, endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDD, atrazine, desethylatrazine, alachlor, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos, pendimethalin, procymidone and chlorfenvinphos. Pesticide contamination was investigated at three depths and in different soil and crop types to assess the influence of soil characteristics and trends over time.

  2. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  3. Study On The Synthesis Of Disida Derivatives For Labeling With 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Ngoc Dien; Duong Van Dong; Nguyen Thi Thu; Bui Van Cuong; Mai Phuoc Tho; Vo Cam Hoa

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis method and characterization of 2,6-Diisopropyl acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA). DISIDA is synthesized by replacement reaction of two Clo atoms in chloroacetyl chloride molecule. The synthesis process has two steps. Step1: The synthesis of 2,6-diisopropylacetanilide; Step 2: The synthesis of DISIDA. The good result obtained in the step 1 reaction, it was carried out in the low pH i.e acid medium. The synthesis reaction achieved high performance at room temperature for 2 hours. The product was crystallized completely while adding in mixture reaction amount sodium acetate by drop wise and stir slowly. The step 2 reaction was carried out in medium of alkali (pH = 10-12), reaction temperature was 50 o C - 60 o C, reaction time during 8 hours. After that EtOH was evaporated by vacuum and compound was crystallized with pH = 2-3, in cool medium ( o C ). Raw material was recrystallized many time by cool EtOH. Pure product (DISIDA ) was characterized by IR, LC/MS, HPLC spectroscopy, melting point, crystal picture. Synthesized DISIDA, when tagged with diagnostic radionuclides such as 99m Tc are quite good, 99m Tc-DISIDA Complexes with RC purity and labeling efficiency >98% and above could be prepared by ordinary reaction condition, that reason can apply for valuation of possibility and reality on different purposes. (author)

  4. The synthesis of [U-14C phenyl] LS 840606, an agricultural fungicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madegard, G.; Mestre, P.; Raimond, P.; Noel, J.-P.

    1995-01-01

    2,2',4'-Trichloro-[ring U- 14 C]acetophenone was the key intermediate of this synthesis patterned after the industrial route. An unexpected poor yield was observed during the preparation by the Friedel-Crafts reaction of chloroacetyl chloride with 1,3-dichloro-[U- 14 C]benzene, possibly the result of an isotope effect although this poor yield might be explained by other factors. Two routes were checked for the preparation of 1,3-dichloro-[U- 14 C]benzene. The action of CCl 4 with 1,3-dinitro-[U- 14 C]benzene at 280 o C was entailed with explosions. A safer route started from [U- 14 C]aniline via 2,4-dichloro-[ring U- 14 C]acetanilide. Friedel-Crafts reaction with acetyl chloride gave rise in 52% yield to 2',4'-dichloro-[ring U- 14 C]acetophenone which was brominated to 2-bromo-2',4'-dichloro-[ring U- 14 C]acetophenone; was condensed with 2,2-ethylenedioxy)etylmagnesium bromide to compound, was condensed with 1,2,4-triazole then successively treated with HCl:water:dioxane and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/HCl. Separation of the two diastereomers by medium pressure liquid chromatography. 7% overall radioactivity yield from [U- 14 C]aniline. Radiochemical purity 99%. (author)

  5. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  6. Comparative sensitivity of five species of macrophytes and six species of algae to atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, James F.; Ruessler, Shane; Carlson, A. Ron

    1998-01-01

    This study determined the relative sensitivity of five species of aquatic macrophytes and six species of algae to four commonly used herbicides (atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor). Toxicity tests consisted of 96-h (duckweed and algae) or 14-d (submerged macrophytes) static exposures. The triazine herbicides (atrazine and metribuzin) were significantly more toxic to aquatic plants than were the acetanilide herbicides (alachlor and metolachlor). Toxicity studies ranked metribuzin > atrazine > alachlor > metolachlor in decreasing order of overall toxicity to aquatic plants. Relative sensitivities of macrophytes to these herbicides decreased in the order of Ceratophyllum > Najas > Elodea > Lemna > Myriophyllum. Relative sensitivities of algae to herbicides decreased in the order of Selenastrum > Chlorella > Chlamydomonas > Microcystis > Scenedesmus > Anabaena. Algae and macrophytes were of similar overall sensitivities to herbicides. Data indicated that Selenastrum, a commonly tested green alga, was generally more sensitive compared to other plant species. Lemna minor, a commonly tested floating vascular plant, was of intermediate sensitivity, and was fivefold less sensitive than Ceratophyllum, which was the most sensitive species tested. The results indicated that no species was consistently most sensitive, and that a suite of aquatic plant test species may be needed to perform accurate risk assessments of herbicides.

  7. Motor activity of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract as determinants of enterohepatic circulation. A scintigraphic and manometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, N.

    1995-01-01

    The aims of the study were to describe the dynamics of the enterohepatic circulation in relation to gallbladder and gastrointestinal motility in the interdigestive as well as the postprandial period. Furthermore, to investigate the level of circulating cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin and bile acids in relation to gallbladder motility and MMC during the interdigestive period. All investigations were carried out on healthy male volunteers aged 18-40 years. The most suitable method for studying various characteristics of the enterohepatic circulation, and especially gallbladder motility in humans, is scintigraphy. It is non-invasive, and allows a continuing dynamic investigation of the partitioning of the radioactive marker between the various compartment. Two entirely different pharmacological substances may be use. HIDA (diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid) which is semisynthetic and closely related to lidocaine forms a chelate with 99m Tc for intravenous administration only. The transport of 99m Tc-HIDA across the hepatocyte is a carrier-mediated organic anion pathway, similar to the hepatic handling of bilirubin. Homocholic-acid-taurine (HCAT) is a synthetic bile acid analogue, corresponding to the naturally occurring bile acid cholic acid-taurine. It is marked with 75 Se and is available for peroral use only. The 75 SeHCAT is adsorbed in the same manner as the naturally occurring conjugated trihydroxy bile acids, involving specific carrier systems for absorption and secretion, i.e. with a high first pass extraction and a secretory rate proportional to the blood concentration. (EG) 24 refs

  8. Partial molar volumes of some drug and pro-drug substances in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manin, Alex N.; Shmukler, Liudmila E.; Safonova, Liubov P.; Perlovich, German L.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with measuring the densities of phenol, acetanilide, benzamide, benzoic acid, phenacetin, i-(acetylamino)-benzoic acid, i-hydroxy-benzamide, and i-acetaminophen (where i = 1, 2, 3) in 1-octanol in the wide concentration interval at T = 298.15 K. It also concerns the evaluation of apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V 2 0 -bar as well as comparative analysis of the free volumes per molecule in the octanolic solutions, V 2 free , and in the crystal lattices, V 2 free (cr), from the nature and position of the substitutes. Also described is the evaluation of the increments of V 2 0 -bar andV 2 free for the unsubstituted molecules and isomers and the methods to obtain partial molar volumes for various functional groups at infinite dilution in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K. Also considered is the limiting partial molar volume of the solutes in terms of the scaled particle theory.

  9. Value of sup(99m)Tc-diethyl-IDA scintigraphy for the diagnosis of biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdelat, D.; Gruel, Y.; Guibert, L.; Babut, J.M. (Hopital Pontchaillou 35 - Rennes (France)); Bourguet, P.; Herry, J.Y. (Centre Eugene Marquis, CHR Pontchaillou, 35 - Rennes (France))

    1983-04-01

    With reference to three cases, the value of cholescintigraphy for the diagnosis of biliary atresia is underscored. With this procedure, surgical indications can be determined in neonates with jaundice persisting beyond the physiologic period. Clolescintigraphy can be repeated as it is easy to perform, safe and well tolerated. sup(99m)Tc-diethyl-IDA (technetium 99m labelled N-(2,6 diethyl-acetanilide)-iminodiacetic acid) scintigraphy was carried out in eight neonates. This procedure helped to outrule the diagnosis of biliary atresia in 5 cases (1 choledochal cyst, 1 alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and 3 neonatal hepatitis'). Scintigraphic images and time/activity curves generated simultaneously from equal surfaces over the heart and liver were analyzed separately. A good uptake by the liver (rapid decrease in the cardiac curve) with subsequent retention (no decrease in the hepatic curve) is suggestive of biliary atresia. No activity is detected in the biliary ducts or intestinal tract. Post-operatively, cholescintigraphy is a useful tool for controling the efficiency of the surgical procedure.

  10. Effects of Alachlor and Metolachlor on Microbial Populations in the Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail, B. S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the impact of two acetanilide herbicides, viz. alachlor and metolachlor on bacterial and fungal populations and biomass in the Sungai Buluh soil series samples was carried out under laboratory conditions. The effects of the two herbicides were monitored for 70 days under ambient conditions. Metolachlor caused greater reduction in bacterial counts than on fungal populations. There was approximately 75% reduction in bacterial counts 14 days after treatment (DAT with 2 µg/g metolachlor. Alachlor however was less toxic to bacterial and fungal populations. Alachlor caused a reduction in bacterial counts at 7 and 14 DAT with 2µg/g or above. Fungal population decreased significantly in the presence of 20 µg/g alachlor at 7 DAT but no further effects were observed as the incubation period was prolonged. The study showed that the microbial biomass immediately decreased significantly in the presence of 2 µg/g or more of metolachlor at 0 and 28 DAT. Alachlor, on the other hands, at the lowest experimental dose of 2 µg/g reduced the microbial biomass almost immediately upon incubation, but had no further effects when the incubation period was prolonged.

  11. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography, infusion tomography of the gall-bladder and sup(99m)Tc-DIDA hepatobiliary scanning in cases of suspected acute cholecystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holst Pedersen, J.; Hancke, S.; Christensen, B.; Gammelgaard, J.; Haubek, A.; Ingemann Jensen, L.; Munck, O.; Wied, U. (Koebenhavns amts sygehus i Herlev, kirurgisk gastroenterologisk afd., Herlev, Denmark)

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonography, infusion tomography of the gall-bladder and sup(99m)Tc-diethyl acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (DIDA) hepatobiliary scanning were compared in a prospective investigation of 45 consecutive patients in whom acute cholecystitis was suspected clinically. The definitive diagosis of acute cholecystitis was established or excluded at operation in 35 patients, by oral cholecystography in five and by intravenous cholangiography in five. The predictive values of positive and negative results of investigation were 100% and 83%. respectively, with ultrasonography and 98% and 88%, respectively, in hepatobiliary scanning. The corresponding values for infusion tomography were 87% and 33%, respectively. It is concluded from these results that ultrasonography and sup(99m)Tc-DIDA hepatobiliary scanning are capable of establishing the diagnosis rapidly and with certainty in cases of suspected acute cholecystitis. A preliminary account of the results of routine employment of sup(99m)Tc-DIDA hepatobiliary scanning in 29 consecutive patients revealed no erroneous diagnoses. In the majority of patients with acute cholecystitis, operation proved possible within 48 hours of admission.

  12. Selective response of Ricinus communis seedlings to soil borne rhizoctonia infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Bittsanszky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of Ricinus communis tolerated soil-borne Rhizoctonia infection in strain dependent manner. There was no connection revealed between pathogenicity of strains and their origin or taxonomic position, however, the castor plant proved to be susceptible to most strains highly pathogenic to other host plants as well. Rhizoctonia zeae (teleomorph: Waitea circinata, a species new for European flora, was less aggressive to R. communis as the most potent R. solani strains. The effect of Rhizoctonia infection on mass accumulation of hypocotyls was more prominent than that on cotyledons. The protein content and glutathione S-transferase (GST activity increased in parallel with evolution of disease syndrome. Metalaxyl, an acetanilide type systemic anti-omycete fungicide induced locally the GST activity in R. communis cotyledons with 24 hours lag phase, and this induction was altered in the seedlings grown in Rhizoctonia infested soil by strain dependent manner. It might be concluded, that the stress response related detoxication mechanisms of plants in tolerant host/parasite pairs take effect at higher level than in highly susceptible relationships.

  13. The Effect of Ultrasound on the Crystallisation of Paracetamol in the Presence of Structurally Similar Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai T. H. Nguyen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sono-crystallisation has been used to enhance crystalline product quality particularly in terms of purity, particle size and size distribution. In this work, the effect of impurities and ultrasound on crystallisation processes (nucleation temperature, yield and crystal properties (crystal size distribution determined by Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM, crystal habit, filtration rate and impurity content in the crystal product by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS were investigated in bulk suspension crystallisation experiments with and without the use of ultrasound. The results demonstrate that ultrasonic intervention has a significant effect on both crystallisation and product crystal properties. It increases the nucleation rate resulting in smaller particles and a narrower Particle Size Distribution (PSD, the yield has been shown to be increase as has the product purity. The effect of ultrasound is to reduce the level acetanilide impurity incorporated during growth from a 2 mol% solution of the selected impurity from 0.85 mol% to 0.35 mol% and likewise ultrasound reduces the uptake of metacetamol from 1.88 mol% to 1.52 mol%.

  14. Synthesis, structural studies and antituberculosis evaluation of new hydrazone derivatives of quinoline and their Zn(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha C. Mandewale

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The quinoline hydrazone ligands were synthesized through multi-step reactions. The 2-hydroxy-3-formylquinoline derivatives (1a–1c were prepared from acetanilide derivatives as starting materials using Vilsmeier–Haack reaction. Then the condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-formylquinoline derivatives with hydrazide derivatives (2a–2c yielded quinoline hydrazone ligands (3a–3i. The synthesis of a new series of Zn(II complexes carried out by refluxing with these quinoline hydrazone ligands (3a–3i is reported. The molecular structures of the ligands (3a–3i and the Zn complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectral studies like FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, MS, UV–Visible and fluorescence. The preliminary results of antituberculosis study showed that most of the Zn(II complexes 4a–4i demonstrated very good antituberculosis activity while the ligands 3a–3i showed moderate activity. Among the tested compounds 4e and 4g were found to be most active with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 8.00μM and 7.42 μM respectively against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37 RV strain ATCC No-27294 which is comparable to “first and second line” drugs used to treat tuberculosis.

  15. Group type analysis of asphalt by column liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Yang, J.; Xue, Y.; Li, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Taiyuan (China)

    2008-07-01

    An improved analysis method for characterization of asphalt was established. The method is based on column chromatography technique. The asphalts were separated into four groups: saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes, quantitatively. About 0.1 g of sample was required in each analysis. About 20 mL of n-heptanes was used to separate out saturates first. Then about 35 mL of n-heptanes/dichloromethane (.5, v/v) mixture was used to separate out aromatics. About 30 mL of dichloromethane/tetrahydrofuran (1/3, v/v) mixture was used to separate out resin. The quality of the separation was confirmed by infrared spectra (IR) and {sup 1}H NMR analysis. The model compounds, tetracosan for saturates, dibenz(o)anthracen for aromatics, and acetanilide for resins were used for verification. The IR and {sup 1}H NMR analysis of the prepared fractions from the column liquid chromatography were in good agreement that of pure reagents.

  16. Numerical heat transfer studies of PCMs used in a box-type solar cooker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.R.; Sharma, Atul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, 949 Da-Wan Road, Yung-Kung City, Tainan Hsien 710 (China); Tyagi, S.K. [Department of Building Services Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (China); Buddhi, D. [Thermal Energy Storage Laboratory, School of Energy and Environmental Studies, Khandwa Road Campus, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452017 (India)

    2008-05-15

    Theoretical investigations on the phase change materials (PCMs) used as the heat storage media for box-type solar cookers have been conducted in this study. The selected PCMs are magnesium nitrate hexahydrate, stearic acid, acetamide, acetanilide and erythritol. For a two-dimensional simulation model based on the enthalpy approach, calculations have been made for the melt fraction with conduction only. Different materials such as glass, stainless steel, tin, aluminum mixed, aluminum and copper are used as the heat exchanger container materials in the numerical calculations. The large value of thermal conductivity of heat exchanger container material did not make a significant contribution on the melt fraction except for at very low thermal conductivities. Based on the theoretical results, stearic acid and acetamide are found to be good compatibility with latent heat storage system. It is also found that the initial temperature of PCM does not have very important effects on the melting time, while the boundary wall temperature plays an important role during the melting and has a strong effect on the melt fraction. The results also show that the effect of thickness of container material on the melt fraction is insignificant. The results obtained in this paper show that in a box-type solar cooker, acetamide and stearic acid should be used as a latent heat storage materials. (author)

  17. Studies on maize inbred lines susceptibility to herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of results obtained during long- term studies on the response of maize inbred lines to herbicides. Under the agroecological conditions of Zemun Polje the response (reaction of maize inbred lines to herbicides of different classes was investigated. Biological tests were performed and some agronomic, morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were determined when the response of maize inbred lines to herbicides was estimated. The use of active ingredients of herbicides from triazine, acetanilide, thiocarbamate to new chemical groups (sulfonylurea etc., have been resulted in changes in weed suppression and susceptibility of inbred lines. Obtained results show that effects of herbicides on susceptible maize genotypes can be different: they can slowdown the growth and development and affect the plant height; they can also affect the stages of the tassel and ear development and at the end they can reduced grain yield of the tested inbreds. Numerous studies confirmed the existence of differences in susceptibility level of maize genotypes in relation to herbicides. According to gained results the recommendations for growers are made on the possibility of the application of new herbicides in the hybrid seed production.

  18. HPLC determination of chlorine in air and water samples following precolumn derivatization to 4-bromoacetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, A. (Rani Durgavati Univ., Jabalpur (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Verma, K.K. (Rani Durgavati Univ., Jabalpur (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    Chlorine has been determined in air and water samples by a rapid and sensitive method entailing precolumn derivatization to 4-bromoacetanilide. A mixed potassium bromide - acetanilide reagent was used as a trapping agent for chlorine in air, and for its derivatization. The 4-bromoacetanilide formed was determined by reversed-phase HPLC on an ODS column, using methanol-water, 65:35 (v/v) as mobile phase; detection was at 240 nm. A rectilinear calibration graph was obtained for the range 0.1-30 [mu]g mL[sup -1] chlorine; the limit of detection found to be 0.01 [mu]g mL[sup -1]. The precolumn derivative has been found to have a shelf-life of at least 21 days; this enables the use of the method for samples transported from the field to the analytical laboratory, or the testing of a variety of conditions for chlorine scrubbing studies without the need for immediate analysis of samples. Humic substances do not cause any interference with the proposed method and the presence of nitrite does not lead to artificially high results and consequent misleading conclusions of the presence of high levels of chlorine. (orig.)

  19. Partial molar volumes of some drug and pro-drug substances in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manin, Alex N.; Shmukler, Liudmila E.; Safonova, Liubov P. [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Perlovich, German L., E-mail: glp@isc-ras.r [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    The article deals with measuring the densities of phenol, acetanilide, benzamide, benzoic acid, phenacetin, i-(acetylamino)-benzoic acid, i-hydroxy-benzamide, and i-acetaminophen (where i = 1, 2, 3) in 1-octanol in the wide concentration interval at T = 298.15 K. It also concerns the evaluation of apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V{sub 2}{sup 0}-bar as well as comparative analysis of the free volumes per molecule in the octanolic solutions, V{sub 2}{sup free}, and in the crystal lattices, V{sub 2}{sup free} (cr), from the nature and position of the substitutes. Also described is the evaluation of the increments of V{sub 2}{sup 0}-bar andV{sub 2}{sup free} for the unsubstituted molecules and isomers and the methods to obtain partial molar volumes for various functional groups at infinite dilution in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K. Also considered is the limiting partial molar volume of the solutes in terms of the scaled particle theory.

  20. Influence of the sign of the coupling on the temperature dependence of optical properties of one-dimensional exciton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, L [CCMAR and FCT, Universidade of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2008-10-14

    A new physical cause for a temperature-dependent double peak in exciton systems is put forward within a thermal equilibrium approach for the calculation of optical properties of exciton systems. Indeed, it is found that one-dimensional exciton systems with only one molecule per unit cell can have an absorption spectrum characterized by a double peak provided that the coupling between excitations in different molecules is positive. The two peaks, whose relative intensities vary with temperature, are located around the exciton band edges, being separated by an energy of approximately 4V, where V is the average coupling between nearest neighbours. For small amounts of diagonal and off-diagonal disorder, the contributions from the intermediate states in the band are also visible as intermediate structure between the two peaks, this being enhanced for systems with periodic boundary conditions. At a qualitative level, these results correlate well with experimental observations in the molecular aggregates of the thiacarbocyanine dye THIATS and in the organic crystals of acetanilide and N-methylacetamide.

  1. The synthesis of [U-{sup 14}C phenyl] LS 840606, an agricultural fungicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madegard, G.; Mestre, P.; Raimond, P.; Noel, J.-P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-12-01

    2,2`,4`-Trichloro-[ring U-{sup 14}C]acetophenone was the key intermediate of this synthesis patterned after the industrial route. An unexpected poor yield was observed during the preparation by the Friedel-Crafts reaction of chloroacetyl chloride with 1,3-dichloro-[U-{sup 14}C]benzene, possibly the result of an isotope effect although this poor yield might be explained by other factors. Two routes were checked for the preparation of 1,3-dichloro-[U-{sup 14} C]benzene. The action of CCl{sub 4} with 1,3-dinitro-[U-{sup 14} C]benzene at 280{sup o}C was entailed with explosions. A safer route started from [U-{sup 14}C]aniline via 2,4-dichloro-[ring U-{sup 14}C]acetanilide. Friedel-Crafts reaction with acetyl chloride gave rise in 52% yield to 2`,4`-dichloro-[ring U-{sup 14}C]acetophenone which was brominated to 2-bromo-2`,4`-dichloro-[ring U-{sup 14}C]acetophenone; was condensed with 2,2-(ethylenedioxy)etylmagnesium bromide to compound, was condensed with 1,2,4-triazole then successively treated with HCl:water:dioxane and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/HCl. Separation of the two diastereomers by medium pressure liquid chromatography. 7% overall radioactivity yield from [U-{sup 14}C]aniline. Radiochemical purity 99%. (author).

  2. Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel Pyrazole Derivatives of Gallic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arunkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a new series of [5-substituted-3-(phenylamino-1H-pyrazol-1yl] (3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl-methanone (4a-j have been synthesized. 3, 4, 5-Trihydroxy benzohydrazide (1 was synthesized from propyl gallate and hydrazine hydrate in presence of ethanol. Chalcones (2a-j were synthesized from acetanilide and various aromatic aldehydes in presence of ethanol and sodium hydroxide solution. By refluxing the compound (1 and compounds (2a-j in presence of ethanol yielded [5-substituted-3-(phenylamino-4.5-dihydropyrazol-1yl] (3,4,5-trihydroxy phenyl-methanone (3a-j. The final compounds [5-substituted-3-(phenylamino-1H-pyrazol-1yl] (3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl-methanone (4a-j were synthesized by treating compounds (3a-j with bromine water. The synthesized compounds have been characterized by IR, 1HNMR and Mass spectral data. The compounds were evaluated for in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan induced paw edema test. In general all compounds were found to exhibit good anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. Polymer matrices obtained by ionizing radiation for using in controlled drug delivery systems; Matrizes polimericas obtidas mediante radiacao ionizante para sua utilizacao como sistemas de liberacao controlada de farmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martellini, Flavia

    1998-07-01

    Two kinds of controlled drug delivery system were obtained by gamma radiation induced polymerization. One of the system was obtained from an acrylic derivative of acetaminophen (40-hydroxyacetanilide), by copolymerization of 4-(acryloyloxy) acetanilide and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in dimethylformamide solution with 0,16 kGy/h dose rate and 54 Gy dose. The values of reactivity rate, r-D{sub MAA} = 0,31 {+-} 0,02 e r{sub AOA} -0,07 {+-} 0,12, were determined by Fineman-Ross method. The acetaminophen hydrolysis was carried out in alkaline and enzymatic (trypsin) media. Another kind of drug delivery system studied was solvent controlled type, being the drug immobilized in the hydrogel,. The hydrogels prepared by radiation polymerization of acryloyl-L-propine methylester (A-Pro-OMe) with 10 Gy dose, showed thermosensible property, swelling or shrinking in water with decreased or increased temperatures. The hydrogels were obtained with different crosslink density, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, and the monomers N, N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and 2-cyanoethyl acrylate to study the influence of the composition in the drug delivery rate. It was verified that the porous size besides being a characteristic of the matrix composition, it was also temperature dependent (thermosensible). The analgesic drug acetaminophen was immobilized by entrapment and by physical adsorption into the hydrogels matrices for 'in vitro' study. The insulin was immobilized by adsorption for 'in vivo' study. (author)

  4. Linear and non-linear infrared response of one-dimensional vibrational Holstein polarons in the anti-adiabatic limit: Optical and acoustical phonon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvo, Cyril

    2018-02-01

    The theory of linear and non-linear infrared response of vibrational Holstein polarons in one-dimensional lattices is presented in order to identify the spectral signatures of self-trapping phenomena. Using a canonical transformation, the optical response is computed from the small polaron point of view which is valid in the anti-adiabatic limit. Two types of phonon baths are considered: optical phonons and acoustical phonons, and simple expressions are derived for the infrared response. It is shown that for the case of optical phonons, the linear response can directly probe the polaron density of states. The model is used to interpret the experimental spectrum of crystalline acetanilide in the C=O range. For the case of acoustical phonons, it is shown that two bound states can be observed in the two-dimensional infrared spectrum at low temperature. At high temperature, analysis of the time-dependence of the two-dimensional infrared spectrum indicates that bath mediated correlations slow down spectral diffusion. The model is used to interpret the experimental linear-spectroscopy of model α-helix and β-sheet polypeptides. This work shows that the Davydov Hamiltonian cannot explain the observations in the NH stretching range.

  5. Mode pumping experiments on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, R.H.; Erramilli, S.; Xie, A.; Schramm, A.

    1995-01-01

    We will explore several aspects of protein dynamics and energy transfer that can be explored by using the intense, picosecond, tunable mid-IR output of the FEL. In order of appearance they are: (1) Saturation recovery and inter-level coupling of the low temperature amide-I band in acetanilide. This is a continuation of earlier experiments to test soliton models in crystalline hydrogen bonded solids. In this experiment we utilize the sub-picosecond time resolution and low repetition rate of the Stanford SCLA FEL to do both T 1 and T 2 relaxation measurements at 1650 cm -1 . (2) Probing the influence of collective dynamics in sensory rhodopsin. In this experiment we use the FIR output of the Stanford FIREFLY FEL to determine the lifetime of collective modes in the photo-active protein sensory rhodopsin, and begin experiments on the influence of collective modes on retinal reaction dynamics. (3) Probing the transition states of enzymes. This experiment, in the initial stages, attempts to use the intense IR output of the FEL to probe and influence the reaction path of a transition state analog for the protein nucleoside hydrolase. The transition state of the inosine substrate is believed to have critical modes softened by the protein so that bond-breaking paths show absorption at approximately 800 cm -1 . A form of action spectrum using FEL excitation will be used to probe this state

  6. Influence of the sign of the coupling on the temperature dependence of optical properties of one-dimensional exciton models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruzeiro, L

    2008-01-01

    A new physical cause for a temperature-dependent double peak in exciton systems is put forward within a thermal equilibrium approach for the calculation of optical properties of exciton systems. Indeed, it is found that one-dimensional exciton systems with only one molecule per unit cell can have an absorption spectrum characterized by a double peak provided that the coupling between excitations in different molecules is positive. The two peaks, whose relative intensities vary with temperature, are located around the exciton band edges, being separated by an energy of approximately 4V, where V is the average coupling between nearest neighbours. For small amounts of diagonal and off-diagonal disorder, the contributions from the intermediate states in the band are also visible as intermediate structure between the two peaks, this being enhanced for systems with periodic boundary conditions. At a qualitative level, these results correlate well with experimental observations in the molecular aggregates of the thiacarbocyanine dye THIATS and in the organic crystals of acetanilide and N-methylacetamide

  7. HPLC determination of chlorine in air and water samples following precolumn derivatization to 4-bromoacetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.; Verma, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    Chlorine has been determined in air and water samples by a rapid and sensitive method entailing precolumn derivatization to 4-bromoacetanilide. A mixed potassium bromide - acetanilide reagent was used as a trapping agent for chlorine in air, and for its derivatization. The 4-bromoacetanilide formed was determined by reversed-phase HPLC on an ODS column, using methanol-water, 65:35 (v/v) as mobile phase; detection was at 240 nm. A rectilinear calibration graph was obtained for the range 0.1-30 μg mL -1 chlorine; the limit of detection found to be 0.01 μg mL -1 . The precolumn derivative has been found to have a shelf-life of at least 21 days; this enables the use of the method for samples transported from the field to the analytical laboratory, or the testing of a variety of conditions for chlorine scrubbing studies without the need for immediate analysis of samples. Humic substances do not cause any interference with the proposed method and the presence of nitrite does not lead to artificially high results and consequent misleading conclusions of the presence of high levels of chlorine. (orig.)

  8. Deuterium isotope effects during formation of phenols by hepatic monoxygenases. Evidence for an alternative to the arene oxide pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaszewski, J.E.; Jerina, D.M.; Daly, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro metabolisms of normal and deuterated aromatic substrates have been investigated in rats. Significant isotope effects (k/ sub H//k/sub D/ equals 1.3-1.75) were associated with in vivo formation of meta-hydroxylated metabolites from 1:1 mixtures of normal and perdeuterio-(arylring) nitrobenzene, methyl phenyl sulfide, and methyl phenyl sulfone. Since isotope effects of this magnitude are incompatible with arene oxides as intermediates in the formation of phenols, the results provide evidence that multiple pathways are responsible for the formation of phenols in mammals. Significant isotope effects were not associated with the formation of the other phenolic isomers of nitrobenzene, methyl phenyl sulfone, or methyl phenyl sulfide or with the formation of phenolic products from anisole, bromobenzene, chlorobenzene, fluorobenzene, benzonitrile, naphthalene, zoxazolamine, acetanilide, biphenyl, diphenylhydantoin, benzene, o- and p-xylene, toluene, and mesitylene. Significant isotope effects might not be observable with the latter substrates if the kinetic parameters for oxidation of substrate change or if the arene oxide pathway greatly predominates. Furthermore, extensive in vivo metabolism of any substrate would make isotope effects unobservable by the procedure employed, namely the analysis of isotope content in metabolites formed from 1:1 mixtures of normal and deuterated substrates. (U.S.)

  9. Synthesis And Characterization Of Mebrofenin For Hepatobiliary Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwoko; Tamat, Swasono R.; Yunita, Fitri; Kristanti, Eti

    2003-01-01

    Mebrofenin labeled with Technetium-99m is a new radiopharmaceutical having superior and ideal characteristic as a hepatobiliary-imaging agent. The synthesis and characterization of Mebrofenin (3-Bromo-2,4,6-trimethyl acetanilido iminodiacetic acid) as IDA derivative has been carried out involving three steps of reaction i.e. : acetyllization of 2,4,6-Trimethyl aniline to get 2,4,6-trimethyl chloro acetanilide which upon bromination gives the intermediate bromotrimethyl derivative and [mally by nucleophilic substitution this intermediate product with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) gives mebrofenin. The acetylation and bromination reactions were carried out in acetic acid condition while the substitution was carried out by reflux for 5 hours in ethanol and water adjusted at pH 11. The ethanol was then removed under low pressure, and the unreacted compound was removed by filtration. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2 - 2.5, and the resulting mebrofenin was isolated by filtration and recrystallized 3 times in ethanol. Characterization of the mebrofenin product was performed by observing its melting point (197-l99 o C), ultra violet and infra red spectra as well as mass spectrometric and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. The results showed that the product was highly pure and the yield was around 20%

  10. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.; Sarel, O.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-01-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed /sup 99m/Tc, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Whereas lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depressed myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures

  11. Plasma clearance of sup(99m)Tc-N/2,4-dimethyl-acetanilido/iminodiacetate complex as a measure of parenchymal liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studniarek, M.; Durski, K.; Liniecki, J.; Akademia Medyczna, Lodz

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-two patients were studied with various diseases affecting liver parenchyma. Any disorders of bile transport were excluded on the basis of dynamic liver scintigraphy using intravenously injected N/2,4-dimethyl acetanilid/iminodiacetate sup(99m)Tc complex (HEPIDA). The activity concentration of sup(99m)Tc-HEPIDA in plasma was measured from 5 through 60 min post injection. Clearance of the substance (Clsub(B)) was calculated from blood plasma disappearance curves and compared with results of 13 laboratory tests used conventionally for assessment of damage of the liver and its functional capacity; age and body weight was also included in the analysis. Statistical relations were studied using linear regression analysis of two variables, multiple regression analysis as well as multidimensional analysis of variance. It was demonstrated that sup(99m)Tc-HEPIDA clearance is a simple, accurate and repeatable measure of liver parenchyma damage. In males, values of Clsub(B) above 245 ml min - 1 /1.73 m 2 exclude hepatic damage with high probability; values below 195 ml min - 1 /1.73 m 2 indicate evident impairment of liver parenchyma function. (orig.) [de

  12. Polymer matrices obtained by ionizing radiation for using in controlled drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellini, Flavia

    1998-01-01

    Two kinds of controlled drug delivery system were obtained by gamma radiation induced polymerization. One of the system was obtained from an acrylic derivative of acetaminophen (40-hydroxyacetanilide), by copolymerization of 4-(acryloyloxy) acetanilide and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in dimethylformamide solution with 0,16 kGy/h dose rate and 54 Gy dose. The values of reactivity rate, r-D MAA = 0,31 ± 0,02 e r AOA -0,07 ± 0,12, were determined by Fineman-Ross method. The acetaminophen hydrolysis was carried out in alkaline and enzymatic (trypsin) media. Another kind of drug delivery system studied was solvent controlled type, being the drug immobilized in the hydrogel,. The hydrogels prepared by radiation polymerization of acryloyl-L-propine methylester (A-Pro-OMe) with 10 Gy dose, showed thermosensible property, swelling or shrinking in water with decreased or increased temperatures. The hydrogels were obtained with different crosslink density, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, and the monomers N, N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and 2-cyanoethyl acrylate to study the influence of the composition in the drug delivery rate. It was verified that the porous size besides being a characteristic of the matrix composition, it was also temperature dependent (thermosensible). The analgesic drug acetaminophen was immobilized by entrapment and by physical adsorption into the hydrogels matrices for 'in vitro' study. The insulin was immobilized by adsorption for 'in vivo' study. (author)

  13. Synthesis of 14C-labelled polychlorobiphenyls derived from the labelled 4-chloro-, 2,5-dichloro-, 3,4-dichloro-, 2,3-dichloro-2,4,5-trichloro- and 2,3,6-trichloroanilines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, A.; Bamford, I.; Wachtmeister, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    [ 14 C]Aniline hydrogen sulphate was acetylated, and the acetanilide obtained was chlorinated with N-chlorosuccinimide to 2-chloro, 4-chloro- and 2,4-dichloroacet[ 14 C]anilide. The labelled 2- and 4-chloroacet[ 14 C]anilides were hydrolyzed and treated with aluminium chloride, hydrogen chloride and chlorine in dry dichloromethane to give the major products 2,5-dichloro-and 3,4-dichloro[ 14 C]aniline. The labelled 2,3-dichloro- and 2,3,6-trichloroanilines were obtained as minor products from the chlorination of 2-chloro[ 14 C]aniline, likewise 2,4,5-trichloroaniline was obtained from 4-chloro[ 14 C]aniline. The [ 14 C]anilines prepared were coupled with benzene, 1,4-dichloro-, 1,2-dichloro- or 1,3-dichlorobenzene to give 4-chloro-, 2,3',4',5-tetrachloro-, 2,3,3',4'-tetrachloro-, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachloro-, 2,2',5,5'-tetrachloro-, 2,2',3,3'-tetrachloro-, 2,2',3,5',6-pentachloro-, 2,2',4,4',5-pentachloro- and 2,3',4,5,5'-pentachloro[ 14 C]biphenyl. 3,4-Dichloro[ 14 C]aniline and biphenyls prepared from this aniline were found to be contaminated by bromoanalogues. The origin of these have been studied. (author)

  14. Distribution of agrochemicals in the lower Mississippi River and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Leiker, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Mississippi River and its tributaries drain extensive agricultural regions of the Mid-Continental United States. Millions of pounds of herbicides are applied annually in these areas to improve crop yields. Many of these compounds are transported into the river from point and nonpoint sources, and eventually are discharged into the Gulf of Mexico. Studies being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey along the lower Mississippi River and its major tributaries, representing a 2000 km river reach, have confirmed that several triazine and acetanilide herbicides and their degradation products are ubiquitous in this riverine system. These compounds include atrazine and its degradation products desethyl and desisopropylatrazine, cyanazine, simazine, metolachlor, and alachlor and its degradation products 2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide, 2-hydroxy-2',6-diethylacetanilide and 2,6-diethylaniline. Loads of these compounds were determined at 16 different sampling stations. Stream-load calculations provided information concerning (a) conservative or nonconservative behavior of herbicides; (b) point sources or nonpoint sources; (c) validation of sampling techniques; and (d) transport past each sampling station.

  15. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-01-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed Tc-99m, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Wheras lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depresses myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures

  16. Biodegradation of Aged Residues of Atrazine and Alachlor in a Mix-Load Site Soil by Fungal Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia E. M. Chirnside

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils from bulk pesticide mixing and loading (mix-load sites are often contaminated with a complex mixture of pesticides, herbicides, and other organic compounds used in pesticide formulations that limits the success of remediation efforts. Therefore, there is a need to find remediation strategies that can successfully clean up these mix-load site soils. This paper examined the degradation of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-S-triazine; AT and alachlor (2-chloro-2, 6-diethyl-N-[methoxymethyl]-acetanilide in contaminated mix-load site soil utilizing an extracellular fungal enzyme solution derived from the white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, grown in a packed bed bioreactor. Thirty-two percent of AT and 54% of AL were transformed in the biometers. The pseudo first-order rate constant for AT and AL biodegradation was 0.0882 d−1 and 0.2504 d−1, respectively. The half-life (1/2 for AT and AL was 8.0 and 3.0 days, respectively. Compared to AT, the initial disappearance of AL proceeded at a faster rate and resulted in a greater amount of AL transformed. Based on the net Co2 evolved from the biometers, about 4% of the AT and AL initially present in the soil was completely mineralized.

  17. Differences in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme induction by pyrazole, chronic ethanol, 3-methylcholanthrene, and phenobarbital in high alcohol sensitivity (HAS) and low alcohol sensitivity (LAS) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D; Ménez, J F; Berthou, F; Cauvin, J M; Deitrich, R A

    1992-10-01

    High and low alcohol sensitivity (HAS and LAS) rats have been selected for their differences in ethanol-induced sleep time. Liver monooxygenase activities were studied in HAS and LAS rats before and after treatments with known inducers such as chronic ethanol, pyrazole, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and phenobarbital (PB) to determine whether the selection procedure also selected for differences in the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) inducibility. This previously has been shown with long sleep (LS) and short sleep (SS) mice, which were selected using a similar criterion. 3-MC and PB, in conjunction with chronic ethanol treatment, were used in order to evaluate the interactions of ethanol with these inducers. Prior to treatment, total P-450 content was slightly lower in LAS than in HAS rats. However, both lines displayed the same microsomal monooxygenase activities related to different P-450 isozymes. This was demonstrated by ethoxyresorufin deethylation (EROD) for cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), acetanilide hydroxylation (ACET) for CYP1A2, pentoxyresorufin dealkylation (PROD) for CYP2B, 1-butanol oxidation (BUTAN) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylation (NDMA) for CYP2E1. After the different treatments, HAS rats did not differ from LAS rats in their CYP2E1 inducibility. However, pyrazole, PB and 3-MC treatment led to differences in CYP1A and CYP2B monooxygenase activities between the two lines. The enhancement of PROD by pyrazole treatment was less prominent in LAS (1.7-fold of the control value) than in HAS rats (3.8-fold).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Enantioselective Degradation and Chiral Stability of Metalaxyl-M in Tomato Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Wang, Peng; Liu, Donghui; Qi, Yanli; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Metalaxyl is an important chiral acetanilide fungicide, and the activity almost entirely originates from the R-enantiomer. Racemic metalaxyl has been gradually replaced by the enantiopure R-enantiomer (metalaxyl-M). In this study a chiral residue analysis method for metalaxyl and the metabolite metalaxyl acid was set up based on high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS/MS). The enantioselective degradation and chiral stability of metalaxyl-M in tomato fruits in two geographically distinct regions of China (Heilongjiang and Hunan Province) were evaluated and the enantioselectivity of metalaxyl acid was also investigated. Tomato plants grew under field conditions with a one-time spray application of metalaxyl-M wettable powder. It was found that R-metalaxyl was not chirally stable and the inactive S-metalaxyl was detected in tomato fruits. At day 40, S-metalaxyl derived from R-metalaxyl accounted for 32% and 26% of the total amount of metalaxyl, respectively. The metabolites R-metalaxyl acid and S-metalaxyl acid were both observed in tomato, and the ratio of S-metalaxyl acid to the sum of S- and R-metalaxyl acid was 36% and 28% at day 40, respectively. For both metalaxyl and metalaxyl acid, the half-life of the S-enantiomer was longer than the R-enantiomer. The results indicated that the enantiomeric conversion should be considered in the bioactivity evaluation and environmental pollution assessment. Chirality 28:382-386, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Motor activity of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract as determinants of enterohepatic circulation. A scintigraphic and manometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, N. [Odense University Hospital, Dept. of Surgical Gastroenterology and Clinical Physiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    1995-12-31

    The aims of the study were to describe the dynamics of the enterohepatic circulation in relation to gallbladder and gastrointestinal motility in the interdigestive as well as the postprandial period. Furthermore, to investigate the level of circulating cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin and bile acids in relation to gallbladder motility and MMC during the interdigestive period. All investigations were carried out on healthy male volunteers aged 18-40 years. The most suitable method for studying various characteristics of the enterohepatic circulation, and especially gallbladder motility in humans, is scintigraphy. It is non-invasive, and allows a continuing dynamic investigation of the partitioning of the radioactive marker between the various compartment. Two entirely different pharmacological substances may be use. HIDA (diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid) which is semisynthetic and closely related to lidocaine forms a chelate with {sup 99m}Tc for intravenous administration only. The transport of {sup 99m}Tc-HIDA across the hepatocyte is a carrier-mediated organic anion pathway, similar to the hepatic handling of bilirubin. Homocholic-acid-taurine (HCAT) is a synthetic bile acid analogue, corresponding to the naturally occurring bile acid cholic acid-taurine. It is marked with {sup 75}Se and is available for peroral use only. The {sup 75}SeHCAT is adsorbed in the same manner as the naturally occurring conjugated trihydroxy bile acids, involving specific carrier systems for absorption and secretion, i.e. with a high first pass extraction and a secretory rate proportional to the blood concentration. (EG) 24 refs.

  20. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-01-01

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr"1"3"6 and Thr"3"3"0) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys"8"4 as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser"1"8"7 nucleophile in the catalytic triad. - Highlights: • We determined the first structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13). • Structure revealed spatially distinct architecture of the substrate-binding pocket. • Hydrogen-bonding with Tyr"1"3"6 and Thr"3"3"0 mediates ligand-binding and substrate.

  1. Selective synthesis, structural studies and antitumor evaluation of some novel unsymmetrical 1-hetaryl-4-(2-chloroquinolin-3-ylazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Bondock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel unsymmetrical 1-hetaryl-4-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl azines 4–9 was selectively synthesized in a three-step procedure starting from acetanilide (1. The molecular structures of 4–9 were established by elemental analyses, spectral data, hybrid density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT calculations. Molecular conformation analysis for compounds 4–9, performed using DFT calculations utilizing the energy functional 3-Parameter (Exchange, Lee, Yang and Parr (B3LYP and the full-electron basis set Density Gauss double-zeta with polarization functions (DGDZVP, on the synthesized azines considering the torsion angles (θ1, θ2, θ3 revealed 8 plausible conformers for each compound. Electronic and thermodynamic properties including the dipole moment and the thermodynamic energy values of the Frontier occupied and virtual molecular orbitals, HOMO and LUMO, respectively, were calculated for the most stable conformer for each compound. Furthermore, TD-DFT calculations coupled with the polarizable conductor calculation model (PCM, performed on the most stable conformers in DMF to account for the solvent effect, revealed that the optical properties including λmax and oscillator strength performed on the most stable conformers were in excellent agreement with the experimental λmax and molar extinction coefficient, which clearly validate the most stable molecular conformers identified for compounds 4–9. Comparison of the biological results to the calculated electronic and thermodynamic properties showed that the cytotoxicity is dependent on the low-lying ELUMO because compound 8 has the lowest ELUMO value and exhibited the greatest antitumor activity.

  2. Decadal-scale changes of pesticides in ground water of the United States, 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexfield, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pesticide data for ground water sampled across the United States between 1993-1995 and 2001-2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program were evaluated for trends in detection frequency and concentration. The data analysis evaluated samples collected from a total of 362 wells located in 12 local well networks characterizing shallow ground water in agricultural areas and six local well networks characterizing the drinking water resource in areas of variable land use. Each well network was sampled once during 1993-1995 and once during 2001-2003. The networks provide an overview of conditions across a wide range of hydrogeologic settings and in major agricultural areas that vary in dominant crop type and pesticide use. Of about 80 pesticide compounds analyzed, only six compounds were detected in ground water from at least 10 wells during both sampling events. These compounds were the triazine herbicides atrazine, simazine, and prometon; the acetanilide herbicide metolachlor; the urea herbicide tebuthiuron; and an atrazine degradate, deethylatrazine (DEA). Observed concentrations of these compounds generally were spikes. In wells yielding detectable concentrations of atrazine, DEA, and prometon, concentrations were significantly lower (?? = 0.1) in 2001-2003 than in 1993-1995, whereas detection frequency of these compounds did not change significantly. Trends in atrazine concentrations at shallow wells in agricultural areas were found to be consistent overall with recent atrazine use data. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  3. Pesticides in rain in four agricultural watersheds in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.R.; Majewski, M.S.; Capel, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall samples were collected during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons at four agricultural locales across the USA in Maryland, Indiana, Nebraska, and California. The samples were analyzed for 21 insecticides, 18 herbicides, three fungicides, and 40 pesticide degradates. Data from all sites combined show that 7 of the 10 most frequently detected pesticides were herbicides, with atrazine (70%) and metolachlor (83%) detected at every site. Dacthal, acetochlor, simazine, alachlor, and pendimethalin were detected in more than 50% of the samples. Chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and diazinon were the only insecticides among the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Of the remaining pesticide parent compounds, 18 were detected in fewer than 30% of the samples, and 13 were not detected. The most frequently detected degradates were deethylatrazine; the oxygen analogs (OAs) of the organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion; and 1-napthol (degradate of carbaryl). Deethylatrazine was detected in nearly 70% of the samples collected in Maryland, Indiana, and Nebraska but was detected only once in California. The OAs of chlorpyrifos and diazinon were detected primarily in California. Degradates of the acetanilide herbicides were rarely detected in rain, indicating that they are not formed in the atmosphere or readily volatilized from soils. Herbicides accounted for 91 to 98% of the total pesticide mass deposited by rain except in California, where insecticides accounted for 61% in 2004. The mass of pesticides deposited by rainfall was estimated to be less than 2% of the total applied in these agricultural areas. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  4. Conformers and non-covalent interactions studied by laser spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Susanne

    2001-07-01

    The model peptides, formanilide and acetanilide, and their weakly bound complexes were studied in the gas-phase using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) and zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Both, cis- and trans-isomers of formanilide, were observed under molecular beam conditions. Trans-formanilide displayed predominantly in-plane vibrational excitation indicative of a planar geometry with modest geometry changes upon excitation and ionisation. In cis-formanilide the side-chain is twisted compared to the phenyl plane in the S{sub 0} state, but planar in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states, revealed in characteristic side-chain torsional and out-of-plane bending excitations. Additionally, the ZEKE spectra provide evidence that excess cationic charge is delocalised from the aromatic ring to the side chain. The work on trans-formanilide was extended to its van der Waals complex with Argon with the purpose of investigating the torsional potential of the side-chain and probing charge delocalisation. Complexation of amides with water is of considerable interest since water is not only present as a bulk solvent surrounding a peptide but also attached to specific binding sites in its interior. Evidence was found for the existence of a NH- and CO-bound isomer of trans-formanilide in the neutral, S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}, states, with the ZEKE spectrum of the cationic 'CO-bound' complex indicating a strong preference for the NH binding site. (author)

  5. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye-Yeon [Protein Structure Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Ochang, Chungbuk, 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung Heon [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Geol, E-mail: igchoi@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr{sup 136} and Thr{sup 330}) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys{sup 84} as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser{sup 187} nucleophile in the catalytic triad. - Highlights: • We determined the first structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13). • Structure revealed spatially distinct architecture of the substrate-binding pocket. • Hydrogen-bonding with Tyr{sup 136} and Thr{sup 330} mediates ligand-binding and substrate.

  6. TRPV1 in brain is involved in acetaminophen-induced antinociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Mallet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen, the major active metabolite of acetanilide in man, has become one of the most popular over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic agents, consumed by millions of people daily. However, its mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We have previously shown that acetaminophen is further metabolized to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z -eicosatetraenamide (AM404 by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH in the rat and mouse brain and that this metabolite is a potent activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV(1 in vitro. Pharmacological activation of TRPV(1 in the midbrain periaqueductal gray elicits antinociception in rats. It is therefore possible that activation of TRPV(1 in the brain contributes to the analgesic effect of acetaminophen.Here we show that the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen at an oral dose lacking hypolocomotor activity is absent in FAAH and TRPV(1 knockout mice in the formalin, tail immersion and von Frey tests. This dose of acetaminophen did not affect the global brain contents of prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2 and endocannabinoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of AM404 produced a TRPV(1-mediated antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPV(1 in the brain by intracerebroventricular capsazepine injection abolished the antinociceptive effect of oral acetaminophen in the same test.This study shows that TRPV(1 in brain is involved in the antinociceptive action of acetaminophen and provides a strategy for developing central nervous system active oral analgesics based on the coexpression of FAAH and TRPV(1 in the brain.

  7. Dietary supplementation with cysteine prevents adverse metabolic outcomes of repeated cures with paracetamol in old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Carole; Pourpe, Charlène; Voyard, Guillaume; Rémond, Didier; Migné, Carole; Centeno, Delphine; Dardevet, Dominique; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Papet, Isabelle

    2017-12-01

    Cysteine (Cys), a conditionally indispensable amino acid, is required for the detoxification of paracetamol (acetaminophen, N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, 4-hydroxy-acetanilide, APAP), a drug of widespread use in older persons. We recently reported that repeated APAP cures could worsen sarcopenia in old rats, likely to be due to the impairment of Cys/GSH homoeostasis. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a dietary Cys supplementation during APAP cures could improve Cys/GSH homoeostasis and thus preserve skeletal muscle. Male 21·5-month-old Wistar rats received three 2-week-long cures of APAP (1 % of diet) alone or with extra Cys (0·5 % of diet), intercalated with washout periods of 2 weeks (APAP and APAP-Cys groups, respectively). They were compared with untreated control rats (CT group). CT and APAP-Cys groups were pair-fed to the APAP group. Dietary Cys supplementation was efficient to prevent increase in liver mass (P<0·0001), decrease in liver GSH (P<0·0001), increase in blood GSH concentration (P<0·0001), and to some extent, decrease in plasma free Cys concentration (P<0·05), all induced by repeated APAP cures. The addition of Cys to APAP cures decreased plasma alanine transaminase (P<0·05), the fractional synthesis rate of liver proteins (P<0·01), and increased masses of extensor digitorum longus (P<0·01), and soleus (P<0·05), compared with the APAP group. Cys supplementation prevented alteration in Cys/GSH homoeostasis and increased some muscle masses in old rats under repeated cures with a non-toxic dose of APAP.

  8. Evaluation of toxic equivalency factors for induction of cytochromes P450 CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity by dioxin-like compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Walker, Nigel J.; Bailer, A. John; Portier, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) method has been used to characterize the toxicity of human mixtures of dioxin-like compounds and is being considered for use with other classes of potentially toxic agents. TEFs are estimated by examining the relative potencies of the various congeners for a series of biological and toxicological effects. In this paper, we consider changes in activity for two enzymes, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1)-associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and CYP1A2-associated acetanilide-4-hydroxylase (A4H) activity, resulting from exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) or a mixture of these agents. The ratio of median effective dose (ED 50 ) is one way to estimate the relative potencies, especially for gene expression and protein endpoints. ED 50 's were estimated with a nonlinear regression model in which dose-related changes in mean responses are described by a Hill function. ED 50 's along with other model parameters were estimated by fitting this model to a given data set. Significant differences in estimated model parameters were tested by likelihood ratio methods. The estimated parameters indicated that congener-specific dose-response shapes were significantly different, that additivity failed for these congeners, and that the ratios of ED 50 's did not predict the response seen for the mixture. These results indicate that for some biological responses, the use of a single relative potency factor (RPF) is not appropriate for the comparison of the dose response behavior of different dioxin-like congeners

  9. Effect of systemic herbicides on N2-fixing and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms in relation to availability of nitrogen and phosphorus in paddy soils of West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amal Chandra; Debnath, Anjan

    2006-11-01

    A field experiment has been conducted with four systemic herbicides viz., butachlor [N-(butoxymethyl)-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-acetanilide], fluchloralin [N-(2-chloroethyl)-(2,6-dinitro-N-propyl-4-trifluoromethyl) aniline], oxadiazon [5-terbutyl-3-(2,4-dichloro-5-isopro poxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-one] and oxyfluorfen [2-chloro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene] at their recommended field rates (2.0, 1.5, 0.4 and 0.12kga.i.ha(-1), respectively) to investigate their effects on growth and activities of aerobic non-symbiotic N(2)-fixing bacteria and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms in relation to availability of nitrogen and phosphorus in the rhizosphere soils as well as yield of the rice crop (Oryza sativa L cv. IR-36). Application of herbicides, in general, highly stimulated the population and activities of the target microorganisms, which resulted in a greater amount of atmospheric nitrogen fixation and phosphate solubilization in the rhizosphere soils of the test crop. The greater microbial activities subsequently augmented the mineralization and availability of nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil solution, which in turn increased the yield of the crop. Among the herbicides, oxyfluorfen was most stimulative followed by fluchloralin and oxadiazon in augmenting the microbial activities in soil. Butachlor also accentuated the mineralization and availability of nitrogen due to higher incitement of non-symbiotic N(2)-fixing bacteria in paddy soil. The grain and straw yields of the crop were also significantly increased due to the application of oxyfluorfen (20.2% and 21%) followed by fluchloralin (13.1% and 15.4%) and butachlor (9.1% and 10.2%), respectively.

  10. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1 C YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+) s evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  12. Evaluating the combined effects of pretilachlor and UV-B on two Azolla species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Kumar, Sushil; Parihar, Parul; Singh, Anita; Singh, Rachana

    2016-03-01

    The present study assessed the comparative responses of two agronomic species of Azolla (A.microphylla and A. pinnata) exposed to man-made and natural stressors by evaluating biomass accumulation, pigments (chlorophyll a and b and carotenoid contents), photosynthetic activity and nitrogen metabolism. The study was carried out in field where two species of Azolla were cultured and treated with various concentrations (5, 10 and 20 μg ml(-1)) of herbicide; pretilachlor [2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(2-propoxyethyl) acetanilide] and enhanced levels (UV-B1: ambient +2.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1) and UV-B2: ambient +4.4 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) of UV-B, alone as well as in combination. Biomass accumulation, photosynthetic pigments; chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids, photosynthetic oxygen yield and photosynthetic electron transport activities i.e. photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I) in both the species declined with the increasing doses of pretilachlor and UV-B radiation, which further declined when applied in combination. The lower doses (5 and 10 μg ml(-1)) of pretilachlor and UV-B (UV-B1 and UV-B2) alone, damaged mainly the oxidation side of PS II, whereas higher dose (20 μg ml(-1)) of pretilachlor alone and in combination with UV-B1 and UV-B2 caused damage to PS II reaction centre and beyond this towards the reduction side. A significant enhancement in respiration was also noticed in fronds of both the Azolla species following pretilachlor and UV-B treatment, hence indicating strong damaging effect. The nitrate assimilating enzymes - nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase and ammonium assimilating enzymes - glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were also severely affected when treated either with pretilachlor and/or UV-B while glutamate dehydrogenase exhibited a stimulatory response. The study suggests that both the species of Azolla showed considerable damage under pretilachlor and UV-B treatments alone, however, in combination the effect was more intense. Further, in

  13. Water and bed-material quality of selected streams and reservoirs in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, 1988-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, C.J.; Treece, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    greater than all other site categories. Phosphorus was significantly greater than for reservoir sites or headwater streams. Few concentrations of trace metals were greater than the minimum reporting limit, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards were rarely exceeded. Detections, when they occurred, were most frequent for sites below urban areas and wastewater-treatment plant effluents. A small number of samples for analysis of acetanilide, triazine, carbamate, and chlorophenoxy acid pesticides indicate that some of these compounds are generally present in area waters in small concentrations. Organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides are ubiquitous in the study area in very small concentrations. Trihalomethanes were detected at sites below urban areas and wastewater-treatment plants. Otherwise, volatile organic compounds and semivolatile compounds were generally not detected. Suspended-sediment, nitrogen, phosphorus, lead, and zinc loads into Falls Lake, Jordan Lake, University Lake, Cane Creek Reservoir, Little River Reservoir, and Lake Michie were calculated. In general, reservoirs act as traps for suspended sediment and constituents associated with suspended sediments. During 1989-94, annual suspended-sediment load to Falls Lake ranged from 29,500 to 88,200 tons. Because Lake Michie trapped from 83 to 93 percent of the suspended sediment delivered by Flat River, Flat River is a minor contributor of suspended sediment to Falls Lake. Yields of suspended sediment from Little River, Little Lick Creek, and Flat River Basins were between 184 and 223 tons per square mile and appear to have increased increased slightly from yields reported in a study for the period 1970-79. Annual suspended-sediment load to Jordan Lake ranged from 271,000 to 622,000 tons from 1989 through 1994 water years. The Haw River contributed more than 75 percent of the tota load to Jordan Lake. The suspended-sediment yields for Haw River and Northeast Cree

  14. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes; Receptores calixarenicos en la separacion selectiva de alaclor. Caracterizacion de los complejos separados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, M C

    2004-07-01

    while 165 h were necessary with H{sub n}bL{sup n} in dilute as concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and {pi}-{pi} interactions. Species formed with H{sub n}bL{sup n} stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH{sub 2}-Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-{pi}-{pi}-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the

  15. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes; Receptores calixarenicos en la separacion selectiva de alaclor. Caracterizacion de los complejos separados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, M.C

    2004-07-01

    while 165 h were necessary with H{sub n}bL{sup n} in dilute as concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and {pi}-{pi} interactions. Species formed with H{sub n}bL{sup n} stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH{sub 2}-Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-{pi}-{pi}-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the

  16. Negative cross resistance in atrazine resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona (L. Link populations in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Elahifard

    2018-01-01

    -resistance to other photosystem-II inhibitors, such as bentazon and pyridate; triazine-resistant weeds can also exhibit negative cross-resistance to herbicides that do not affect photosystem II. Negative cross resistance may be the major reason that atrazine resistance did not evolve where herbicide mixtures were used, when the mixed herbicide (usually a non-PS II inhibiting acetanilide also controlled triazine-sensitive weeds. The value of negative cross-resistance linked with the general lack of fitness of almost all triazine-resistant weeds may be greater than we measured herein. The competition exerted by a crop in the field may further accentuate and exacerbate the lack of fitness and further lower the RI.

  17. Biotransformation of pesticides in saturated-zone materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Blythe L.; Arthur, Ellen L.

    Many studies have been conducted to evaluate pesticide contamination of groundwater in the United States, but investigations of pesticide biotransformation in saturated zones are much less numerous than in surface soils. Because results of studies using soils are not directly applicable to the subsurface, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate examples of pesticide biotransformation in saturated-zone materials. Although it must be considered with caution, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) "Pesticides in Ground Water Database" was used to focus the discussion on the biotransformation potential of dibromoethane (EDB), atrazine, acetanilide herbicides, and aldicarb, all of which have been detected in groundwater in the United States. Results of more than two dozen studies indicate that a biotransformation potential for these pesticides exists in saturated-zone materials, although for any given pesticide substantial differences in biotransformation occurred. These variations were due both to differences in experimental methods and to heterogeneities in the subsurface materials under investigation. However, because biotransformation mechanisms were not well investigated, it is generally not possible to extrapolate predictions of biotransformation potential beyond the specific sites investigated. These results highlight the need to better understand microbial genetic regulation of biotransformation processes so that genetic information may be effectively incorporated into future investigations of biotransformation potential in the subsurface. Résumé De nombreuses études ont été réalisées pour évaluer le degré de pollution des aquifères par les pesticides aux États-Unis, mais les recherches concernant la biotransformation des pesticides dans les eaux souterraines sont beaucoup moins nombreuses que dans les sols. Du fait que les résultats des études concernant les sols ne sont pas directement applicables au milieu souterrain, le propos de cet

  18. Calixarene receptors in the selective separation of alachlor. Characterization of the separated complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    in dilute as concentrate solutions, solvents as chloroform and acetonitrile did not interfere in the formation of the species. At the same time and based on the structure of the reactants and information from the scientific literature related to this particular topic, using the M M3, CONFLEX and MOPAC/PM5/COSMO procedures, we calculated the optimized geometry which rendered the most stable molecular structures of reactants and products, this means those with the lowest minimum energies, the lowest energies of the most stable conformers and the heat of formation of the most stable conformational structures of the calixarene-substrate species. The latter were those formed by hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions. Species formed with H n bL n stabilized by hydrogen bonding through CH 2 -Cl interaction of alachlor with OH groups of the calixarenes. Concerning the phosphinoylated calixarenes, the P=O groups immobilize the alachlor by hydrogen bonding with the benzyl of the acetanilide. However, the species formed with alachlor and parents or functionalized calixarenes demanded a second interaction between calixarene phenyl-π-π-benzyl-alachlor to be stabilised. Heat of formation of reactants and products allowed to calculate the heat o reaction associated to the formation of the hosts...guest species, these results were surprising in line with the experimental results. Based on the solution and computational results we synthesized and isolated the calixarene---alachlor complexes in sizeable amounts. The latter were characterized by spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-Vis, luminescence and elemental analysis. The results from the solution and solid studies of the reagents and products as molar absorption coefficients, the features of the luminescence and IR spectra, luminescence lifetimes and minimum formulae of the isolated complexes are in good agreement with the parameters and tendencies of the minimum energies of the geometrical and conformational structures found