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Sample records for accumulation fluence monitor

  1. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  2. Calibration of a He accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for a fast reactor dosimetry. The HAFM measurement system was calibrated using He gas and He implanted samples and the measurement accuracy was confirmed to be less than 5%. Based on the preliminary irradiation test in JOYO, the measured He in the {sup 10}B type HAFM agreed well with the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 library. (author)

  3. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  5. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  6. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  7. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k0 INAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M J J; Bacchi, M A; Bode, P; De Nadai Fernandes, E A

    2008-12-01

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter alpha is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and alpha that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  8. Absolute monitoring of DD and DT neutron fluences using the associated-particle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, N. E.; Wehring, B. W.

    1980-06-01

    An associated-particle system was constructed for use with a Texas Nuclear neutron generator. Associated-particle and neutron energy spectra were measured simultaneously using this system and an NE-213 proton recoil spectrometer, respectively. The associated-particle system proved to be not only an accurate monitor of DT neutron fluence, but also an accurate monitor of DD contamination in the DT spectrum. The DD and DT neutron fluences calculated from the measured associated-particle counting rates showed the best agreement with the measured neutron fluences when the laboratory distributions were assumed to be isotropic.

  9. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  10. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k{sub 0} INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.j.koster-ammerlaan@tudelft.nl; Bacchi, M.A. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil); Bode, P. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Nadai Fernandes, E.A. de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter {alpha} is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and {alpha} that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  11. Chloroplasts continuously monitor photoreceptor signals during accumulation movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-07-01

    Under low light conditions, chloroplasts gather at a cell surface to maximize light absorption for efficient photosynthesis, which is called the accumulation response. Phototropin1 (phot1) and phototropin2 (phot2) were identified as blue light photoreceptors in the accumulation response that occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana and Adiantum capillus-veneris with neochrome1 (neo1) as a red light photoreceptor in A. capillus-veneris. However, the signal molecule that is emitted from the photoreceptors and transmitted to the chloroplasts is not known. To investigate this topic, the accumulation response was induced by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam of red, blue and far-red light in A. capillus-veneris gametophyte cells. Chloroplasts moved towards the irradiated region and were able to sense the signal as long as its signal flowed. The signal from neo1 had a longer life than the signal that came from phototropins. When two microbeams with the same wavelength and the same fluence rate were placed 20 μm apart from each other and were applied to a dark-adapted cell, chloroplasts at an equidistant position always moved towards the center (midpoint) of the two microbeams, but not towards either one. This result indicates that chloroplasts are detecting the concentration of the signal but not the direction of signal flow. Chloroplasts repeatedly move and stop at roughly 10 s intervals during the accumulation response, suggesting that they monitor the intermittent signal waves from photoreceptors.

  12. BPW34 Commercial p-i-n Diodes for High-Level 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Moll, M; Saigne, F

    2008-01-01

    The BPW34 p-i-n diode was characterized at CERN in view of its utilization as radiation monitor at the LHC to cover the broad 1-MeV neutron equivalent fluence (Phieq) range expected for the LHC machine and experiments during operation. Electrical measurements for both forward and reverse bias were used to characterize the device and to understand its behavior under irradiation. When the device is powered forward, a sensitivity to fast hadrons for Phieq > 2 times1012 cm-2 has been observed. With increasing particle fluences the forward I- V characteristics of the diode shifts towards higher voltages. At Phieq > 3times1013 cm-2, the forward characteristic starts to bend back assuming a thyristor-like behavior. An explanation for this phenomenon is given in this article. Finally, detailed radiation-response curves for the forward bias-operation and annealing studies of the diode's forward voltage are presented for proton, neutron and gamma irradiation.

  13. Real-time verification of multileaf collimator-driven radiotherapy using a novel optical attenuation-based fluence monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-03-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC)-driven conformal radiotherapy modalities [e.g., such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy] are more subject to delivery errors and dose calculation inaccuracies than standard modalities. Fluence monitoring during treatment delivery could reduce such errors by allowing an independent interface to quantify and assess measured difference between the delivered and planned treatment administration. We developed an optical attenuation-based detector to monitor fluence for the on-line quality control of radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of the current study was to develop the theoretical background of the invention and to evaluate the detector's performance both statistically and in clinical situations. We aligned 60 27-cm scintillating fibers coupled to a photodetector via clear optical fibers in the direction of motion of each of the 60 leaf pairs of a 120 leaves Millenium MLC on a Varian Clinac iX. We developed a theoretical model to predict the intensity of light collected on each side of the scintillating fibers when placed under radiation fields of varying sizes, intensities, and positions. The model showed that both the central position of the radiation field on the fiber (x(c)) and the integral fluence passing through the fiber (phi(int)) could be assessed independently in a single measurement. We evaluated the performance of the prototype by (1) measuring the intrinsic variation of the measured values of x(c) and phi(int), (2) measuring the impact on the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) of random leaf positioning errors introduced into IMRT fields, and (3) comparing the predicted values of x(c) and phi(int) calculated with the treatment planning software to the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) in order to assess the predictive effectiveness of the developed theoretical model. We observed a very low intrinsic dispersion, dominated by Poisson statistics

  14. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  15. Monitoring nitrogen accumulation in mosses in central European forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesch, Roland [Chair of Landscape Ecology, University of Vechta, PO 1553, D-49356 Vechta (Germany)], E-mail: rpesch@iuw.uni-vechta.de; Schroeder, Winfried [Chair of Landscape Ecology, University of Vechta, PO 1553, D-49356 Vechta (Germany)], E-mail: wschroeder@iuw.uni-vechta.de; Schmidt, Gunther [Chair of Landscape Ecology, University of Vechta, PO 1553, D-49356 Vechta (Germany)], E-mail: gschmidt@iuw.uni-vechta.de; Genssler, Lutz [North Rhine-Westphalia State Agency for Nature, Environment and Consumer Protection (Germany)], E-mail: lutz.genssler@lanuv.nrw.de

    2008-10-15

    In order to assess whether nitrogen (N) loads in mosses reflect different land uses, 143 sites in North Rhine-Westphalia, the Weser-Ems Region and the Euro Region Nissa were sampled between 2000 and 2005. The data were analysed statistically with available surface information on land use and forest conditions. N bioaccumulation in mosses in the Weser-Ems Region with high densities of agricultural land use and livestock exceeded the concentrations in the more industrialised Euro Region Nissa. In all three study areas agricultural and livestock spatial densities were found to be positively correlated with N bioaccumulation in mosses. In North Rhine-Westphalia, the N concentrations in mosses was also moderately correlated with N concentrations in leaves and needles of forest trees. The moss method proved useful to assess the spatial patterns of N bioaccumulation due to land use. - Nitrogen accumulation in mosses from forests in central Europe is spatially correlated with the density of agricultural land use.

  16. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  17. Nitrogen accumulation in forests. Exposure monitoring by mosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Roland; Schröder, Winfried; Schmidt, Gunther

    2007-03-21

    At present, there is still little information on nitrogen (N) accumulation in forests contrasting with the crucial importance of N in forest ecosystems. This work analyzes the N bioaccumulation in mosses from forested areas from Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia (two of 16 federal states of Germany), the Weser Ems Region (part of Lower Saxony), and the Euro Region Nissa (covering the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland). The studies involved samples collected from 190 sites between 1998 and 2005. Different spatial scales and regional differences in land use were chosen to assess the factors affecting N bioaccumulation in forested areas. A continuous reduction of N bioaccumulation was found from Lower Saxony (a region where agriculture is most predominant) to North Rhine-Westphalia (mostly urban). The Weser Ems Region (an agricultural region) showed a higher N concentration in mosses than the Euroregion Nissa (a former industrial region). Statistical analyses performed at the different spatial scales revealed that the areas showing greater agricultural and livestock spatial densities favor N bioaccumulation in mosses. N concentration in mosses was moderately correlated with the N concentration in the leaves and needles of the surrounding trees. No significant relationships were found regarding the crown density of forest trees or N deposition estimations from a combination of atmospheric models and deposition measurements.

  18. Nitrogen Accumulation in Forests. Exposure Monitoring by Mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Pesch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is still little information on nitrogen (N accumulation in forests contrasting with the crucial importance of N in forest ecosystems. This work analyzes the N bioaccumulation in mosses from forested areas from Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia (two of 16 federal states of Germany, the Weser Ems Region (part of Lower Saxony, and the Euro Region Nissa (covering the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland. The studies involved samples collected from 190 sites between 1998 and 2005. Different spatial scales and regional differences in land use were chosen to assess the factors affecting N bioaccumulation in forested areas. A continuous reduction of N bioaccumulation was found from Lower Saxony (a region where agriculture is most predominant to North Rhine-Westphalia (mostly urban. The Weser Ems Region (an agricultural region showed a higher N concentration in mosses than the Euroregion Nissa (a former industrial region. Statistical analyses performed at the different spatial scales revealed that the areas showing greater agricultural and livestock spatial densities favor N bioaccumulation in mosses. N concentration in mosses was moderately correlated with the N concentration in the leaves and needles of the surrounding trees. No significant relationships were found regarding the crown density of forest trees or N deposition estimations from a combination of atmospheric models and deposition measurements.

  19. Monitoring of the aquatic environment by species accumulator of pollutants: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar RAVERA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review on the biomonitoring of aquatic environments by animal and plant species accumulators of toxic pollutants ("scavengers". This monitoring is based on the relationship between the pollutant concentration in the organism and that in its environment, and not on alterations produced by pollution on the biota. The latter is the basis of other types of biomonitoring, such as those based on the biotic and diversity indices and saprobic scale. The various aspects of monitoring by pollutant accumulators are illustrated; for example, the uptake and loss of pollutants, the "critical organs" and "tissues", the detoxification mechanisms and the most common factors (C.F., BAF, BSAF for establishing a connection between the pollutant concentration in the organism and that in its environment. Several examples of this monitoring on heavy metals, radioisotopes and organic micropollutants are reported. The advantages of this monitoring, the characteristics of the species to be used as bioaccumulators and some practical suggestions are listed. A close collaboration between the scientific teams working on the biomonitoring based on accumulator organisms and on the chemical monitoring is recommended from the scientific and economic point of view.

  20. Radiation Response of Forward Biased Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski Silicon Detectors of Different Geometry for 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Dusseau, Laurent; Roche, Nicolas Jean-Henri; Saigne, Frederic; Mekki, Julien; Glaser, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at evaluating new options for radiation monitoring sensors in LHC/SLHC experiments, the radiation responses of FZ and MCz custom made silicon detectors of different geometry have been studied up to about 4 x 10(14) n(eq)/cm(2). The radiation response of the devices under investigation is discussed in terms of material type, thickness and active area influence.

  1. Control charts for monitoring accumulating adverse event count frequencies from single and multiple blinded trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A Lawrence

    2016-12-30

    Conventional practice monitors accumulating information about drug safety in terms of the numbers of adverse events reported from trials in a drug development program. Estimates of between-treatment adverse event risk differences can be obtained readily from unblinded trials with adjustment for differences among trials using conventional statistical methods. Recent regulatory guidelines require monitoring the cumulative frequency of adverse event reports to identify possible between-treatment adverse event risk differences without unblinding ongoing trials. Conventional statistical methods for assessing between-treatment adverse event risks cannot be applied when the trials are blinded. However, CUSUM charts can be used to monitor the accumulation of adverse event occurrences. CUSUM charts for monitoring adverse event occurrence in a Bayesian paradigm are based on assumptions about the process generating the adverse event counts in a trial as expressed by informative prior distributions. This article describes the construction of control charts for monitoring adverse event occurrence based on statistical models for the processes, characterizes their statistical properties, and describes how to construct useful prior distributions. Application of the approach to two adverse events of interest in a real trial gave nearly identical results for binomial and Poisson observed event count likelihoods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Design of An Innovative Beam Monitor for Particle Therapy for the Simultaneous Measurement of Beam Fluence and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Monaco, V; Anvar, M Varasteh; Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Turin (Italy); University of Torino, Turin (Italy); Cartiglia, N; Cenna, F; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Turin (Italy); Ferrero, M [University of Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monitoring the prescribed dose in particle therapy is typically carried out by using parallel plate ionization chambers working in transmission mode. The use of gas detectors has several drawbacks: they need to be calibrated daily against standard dosimeters and their dependence on beam quality factors need to be fully characterized and controlled with high accuracy. A detector capable of single particle counting is proposed which would overcome all these limitations. Combined with a gas ionization chamber, it will allow determining the average particle stopping power, thus providing an effective method for the online verification of the selected particle energy and range. Methods: Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGADs) are innovative n-in-p silicon sensors with moderate internal charge multiplication occurring in the strong field generated by an additional p+ doping layer implanted at a depth of a few µm in the bulk of the sensor. The increased signal-to-noise ratio allows designing very thin, few tens of microns, segmented LGADs, called Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD), optimized for very fast signal, which would be suitable for charged particle counting at high rates. A prototype UFSD is being designed for this purpose. Results: Different LGAD diodes have been characterized both in laboratory and beam tests, and the results compared both with those obtained with similar diodes without the gain layer and with a program simulating the signal in the sensors. The signal is found to be enhanced in LGADs, while the leakage current and the noise is not affected by the gain. Possible alternative designs and implementations are also presented and discussed. Conclusion: Thanks to their excellent counting capabilities, UFSD detectors are a promising technology for future beam monitor devices in hadron-therapy applications. Studies are ongoing to better understand their properties and optimize the design in view of this application.

  3. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Thijs; Lager, Ida; Looger, Loren L; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-06-03

    Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage lambda recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo monitoring of sugar levels in prokaryotes, demonstrating

  5. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looger Loren L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. Results An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage λ recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. Conclusion The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo

  6. Damage accumulation in cyclically-loaded glass-ceramic matrix composites monitored by acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D G; Dassios, K G; Kordatos, E Z; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  7. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  8. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  9. Monitoring intracellular polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems by quantitative image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Carvalheira, Mónica; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    A rapid methodology for intracellular storage polyphosphate (poly-P) identification and monitoring in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems is proposed based on quantitative image analysis (QIA). In EBPR systems, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is usually combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate the microbial community. The proposed monitoring technique is based on a QIA procedure specifically developed for determining poly-P inclusions within a biomass suspension using solely DAPI by epifluorescence microscopy. Due to contradictory literature regarding DAPI concentrations used for poly-P detection, the present work assessed the optimal DAPI concentration for samples acquired at the end of the EBPR aerobic stage when the accumulation occurred. Digital images were then acquired and processed by means of image processing and analysis. A correlation was found between average poly-P intensity values and the analytical determination. The proposed methodology can be seen as a promising alternative procedure for quantifying intracellular poly-P accumulation in a faster and less labour-intensive way.

  10. The Living Filter: Monitoring Nitrate Accumulation after 50 Years of Wastewater Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, J.

    2015-12-01

    As global freshwater sources decline due to environmental contamination and a growing population, more sustainable wastewater renovation techniques will need to be applied to ensure freshwater for future generations. One such example of a sustainable solution is called the Living Filter, located on the campus of Pennsylvania State University. For fifty years, Pennsylvania State University has sprayed treated wastewater onto agricultural fields and forest ecosystems, leaving natural processes to further filter the wastewater. This cyclical process is deemed sustainable because the freshwater is recycled, providing drinking water to an increasing university population and nutrients to agricultural crops, without causing major environmental catastrophes such as fish kills, eutrophication or groundwater contamination. At first glance this project seems sustainable and effective, but for how long can this setup continue without nutrient overloading and environmental contamination? To be truly declared sustainable, the hopeful answer to this question is indefinitely. Using a combination of soil core and monitoring tools, ecosystem indicators such as soil nutrient capacities, moisture levels, and soil characteristics were measured. Comparing data from the initial system installation to present data collected from soil cores showed how ecosystems changed over time. Results revealed that nitrate concentrations were elevated through the profile in all land use types, but the concentrations were below EPA threshold. Soil characteristic analysis including particle size distribution, soil elemental composition, and texture yielded inconclusive results regarding which factors control the nitrate accumulation most significantly. The nitrate depth profile findings suggest that spray irrigation at the Living Filter under the current rates of application has not caused the ultimate stage of nitrogen saturation in the spray irrigation site. Variations in land use present interesting

  11. Monitoring Protein and Starch Accumulation in Wheat Grains with Leaf SPAD and Canopy Spectral Reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yong-chao; ZHU yan; CAO Wei-xing; FAN Xue-mei; LIU Xiao-jun

    2003-01-01

    The research was conducted to determine the relationships of protein and starch accumulation dynamics in grains of wheat to post-heading leaf SPAD values and canopy spectral reflectance. The results showed that leaf nitrogen accumulation was exponentially related to leaf SPAD values and linearly related to canopy spectral reflectance, and that there was negative linear relationship between leaf nitrogen accumulation and grain protein accumulation, but positive linear relationship between post-heading leaf nitrogen translocation and grain protein accumulation at maturity. In addition, leaf SPAD values were parabolically related with and ratio indices R(1 500,610) and R(1 220,560) were exponentially related with protein and starch accumulation in grains. These results indicate that leaf SPAD values and canopy spectral reflectance should be good indicators of quality formation dynamics in wheat grains.

  12. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  13. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  14. A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renchao; Min, Zhifang; Song, Enmin; Liu, Hong; Ye, Yinyu

    2010-02-21

    A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints is proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the current objective inside smoothing models. Instead of adding a smoothing item to the objective function, we add the total number of monitor unit (TNMU) requirement directly to the constraints which serves as an important factor to balance the fluence map optimization and leaf sequencing optimization process at the same time. Consequently, we formulate the fluence map optimization models for the trailing (left) leaf synchronized, leading (right) leaf synchronized and the interleaf motion constrained non-synchronized leaf sweeping schemes, respectively. In those schemes, the leaves are all swept unidirectionally from left to right. Each of those models is turned into a linear constrained quadratic programming model which can be solved effectively by the interior point method. Those new models are evaluated with two publicly available clinical treatment datasets including a head-neck case and a prostate case. As shown by the empirical results, our models perform much better in comparison with two recently emerged smoothing models (the total variance smoothing model and the quadratic smoothing model). For all three leaf sweeping schemes, our objective dose deviation functions increase much slower than those in the above two smoothing models with respect to the decreasing of the TNMU. While keeping plans in the similar conformity level, our new models gain much better performance on reducing TNMU.

  15. Monitoring the accumulated water soluble airborne compounds deposited on surfaces of showcases and walls in museums, archives and historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Svensmark, Bo

    2017-01-01

    to implement by curators and conservators, who can the send the flush water to specialized laboratories. Brief summary: A new methodology capable of monitoring the accumulated airborne deposits on surfaces in showcases and historic buildings is presented and tested. The method is cheap and is easy to implement...... themselves. This might make the compounds seem absent from analyses of indoor air samples. Context and purpose of the study: A new method of detecting water soluble pollutants without taking samples from the interior walls or from the CH objects themselves has been developed. The method involves sampling...... the pollutants accumulated on a surface near the CH object, e.g. a nearby wall or an interior glass surface of a showcase. The samples were obtained by gently flushing the surface with deionised water to collect the ions readily removed from the surface. The method was tested on a variety of surfaces. Results...

  16. Accumulation of mercury by aufwuchs in Wisconsin seepage lakes: Implications for monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, W. Gregory; Rada, Ronald G.

    1992-01-01

    We examined temporal variation in the total Hg content of aufwuchs (attached algae) collected from artificial substrates in 11 seepage lakes in north-central Wisconsin and its relation to the Hg content of resident yellow perch Perca flavescens from the lakes. Dry weight concentrations of Hg in aufwuchs varied temporally, as follows: summer/fall 1985 > summer 1985 > spring/summer 1986. Areal concentrations of Hg during the 1985 sampling periods were greater than concentrations during the spring/summer 1986 period, but did not differ from each other. The analyses of aufwuchs do not indicate potential accumulation of Hg in fish in these lakes.

  17. Toxic cyanobacterial breakthrough and accumulation in a drinking water plant: a monitoring and treatment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyadi, Arash; MacLeod, Sherri L; Fan, Yan; McQuaid, Natasha; Dorner, Sarah; Sauvé, Sébastien; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-04-01

    The detection of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins has intensified in recent years in both drinking water sources and the raw water of drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). The objectives of this study were to: 1) estimate the breakthrough and accumulation of toxic cyanobacteria in water, scums and sludge inside a DWTP, and 2) to determine whether chlorination can be an efficient barrier to the prevention of cyanotoxin breakthrough in drinking water. In a full scale DWTP, the fate of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins was studied after the addition of coagulant and powdered activated carbon, post clarification, within the clarifier sludge bed, after filtration and final chlorination. Elevated cyanobacterial cell numbers (4.7 × 10(6)cells/mL) and total microcystins concentrations (up to 10 mg/L) accumulated in the clarifiers of the treatment plant. Breakthrough of cells and toxins in filtered water was observed. Also, a total microcystins concentration of 2.47 μg/L was measured in chlorinated drinking water. Cyanobacterial cells and toxins from environmental bloom samples were more resistant to chlorination than results obtained using laboratory cultured cells and dissolved standard toxins.

  18. Evaluation of pressure vessel fluence computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. H.; Whang, I. S.; Kim, T. G.; Lee, H. C. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, M. H.; Whang, H. R.; Park, W. S.; An, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Insitute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    This study was performed as follows: evaluation of neutron fluence calculational methodology through the analysis of benchmark problem, evaluation of calculational results of Yonggwang 3 and 4 reactor vessel fluence, examination of calculational results against the requirements by 10CFR 50.61 and/or standard review plan. The preservation of reactor vessel integrity throughout the reactor lifetime is directly related to the economical and safe operation of nuclear power plants. In this regard, it is very important to accurately predict and assess the neutron fluence which impacts directly upon the reactor vessel integrity. The accurate. prediction and assessment of the reactor vessel fluence require the use of accurate data as well as systematic methodology. However, it is felt that all of these prerequisites are not sufficient at the moment. It is, therefore, recommended to establish a systematic methodology with sufficient nuclear data library for the reliable licensing review of the reactor vessel safety, by performing R and D to resolve the problems presented in this study and by using the results of this study.

  19. What is an acceptably smoothed fluence? Dosimetric and delivery considerations for dynamic sliding window IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Clivio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study summarised in this report aimed to investigate the interplay between fluence complexity, dose calculation algorithms, dose calculation spatial resolution and delivery characteristics (monitor units, effective field width and dose delivery against dose prediction agreement was investigated. A sample set of complex planning cases was selected and tested using a commercial treatment planning system capable of inverse optimisation and equipped with tools to tune fluence smoothness. Methods A set of increasingly smoothed fluence patterns was correlated to a generalised expression of the Modulation Index (MI concept, in nature independent from the specific planning system used that could therefore be recommended as a predictor to score fluence "quality" at a very early stage of the IMRT QA process. Fluence complexity was also correlated to delivery accuracy and characteristics in terms of number of MU, dynamic window width and agreement between calculation and measurement (expressed as percentage of field area with a γ > 1 (%FA when comparing calculated vs. delivered modulated dose maps. Different resolutions of the calculation grid and different photon dose algorithms (pencil beam and anisotropic analytical algorithm were used for the investigations. Results and Conclusion i MI can be used as a reliable parameter to test different approaches/algorithms to smooth fluences implemented in a TPS, and to identify the preferable default values for the smoothing parameters if appropriate tools are implemented; ii a MI threshold set at MI

  20. Seasonal ERT monitoring of subsurface processes connected to freezing, thawing, snow accumulation and melt cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeminska, Dominika; Starkloff, Torsten; Bloem, Esther; Stolte, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    For a better understanding of processes that influence snowmelt infiltration and runoff, and their consequences on soil erosion during spring periods, we established a long-term winter-spring ERT transect in the Gryteland catchment (Norway). The ERT transect is 71 m long, with 1 m spacing between the electrodes. It covers a depression with a north and south facing slope. The readings are collected once a week and, if needed, after a sudden change in weather conditions. Additionally, the soil transect is equipped with six TDR profiles, which register soil moisture and soil temperature every thirty minutes, at five depths (5, 10, 20, 30, 40 cm), for quantifying the ERT readings. The measurements performed during winter 2014/2015 gave promising results and showed the potential of ERT monitoring for understanding the soil thermal and hydraulic processes occurring during a winter and early spring. Moreover, there are visible differences in temporal trends and spatial variations in observed ERT patterns on the opposite facing slopes, which are of special interest. With the on-going experiment, we are aiming to understand the reoccurrence of the observed processes as well as to quantify soil moisture patterns. Herein, we would like to present the preliminary result of two ERT experiments (2014/2015 and 2015/2016) and discuss the advantages and limitations of our experiments. Moreover, we would like to stimulate the discussion about the potential of ERT for spatial and temporal monitoring of soil hydraulic and thermal processes and indirect measurements of soil water content.

  1. A diaCEST MRI approach for monitoring liposomal accumulation in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Yuan; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Ming; Patel, Himatkumar; Liu, Guanshu; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Bulte, Jeff W M; van Zijl, Peter C M; Hanes, Justin; Zhou, Shibin; McMahon, Michael T

    2014-04-28

    Nanocarrier-based chemotherapy allows preferential delivery of therapeutics to tumors and has been found to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. However, difficulties in tracking nanocarriers and evaluating their pharmacological fates in patients have limited judicious selection of patients to those who might most benefit from nanotherapeutics. To enable the monitoring of nanocarriers in vivo, we developed MRI-traceable diamagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (diaCEST) liposomes. The diaCEST liposomes were based on the clinical formulation of liposomal doxorubicin (i.e. DOXIL®) and were loaded with barbituric acid (BA), a small, organic, biocompatible diaCEST contrast agent. The optimized diaCEST liposomal formulation with a BA-to-lipid ratio of 25% exhibited 30% contrast enhancement at B1=4.7μT in vitro. The contrast was stable, with ~80% of the initial CEST signal sustained over 8h in vitro. We used the diaCEST liposomes to monitor the response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), an agent in clinical trials that increases vascular permeability and uptake of nanocarriers into tumors. After systemic administration of diaCEST liposomes to mice bearing CT26 tumors, we found an average diaCEST contrast at the BA frequency (5ppm) of 0.4% at B1=4.7μT while if TNF-α was co-administered the contrast increased to 1.5%. This novel approach provides a non-radioactive, non-metallic, biocompatible, semi-quantitative, and clinically translatable approach to evaluate the tumor targeting of stealth liposomes in vivo, which may enable personalized nanomedicine.

  2. Natural Radioactivity Accumulated in the Arctic from Long-range Atmospheric Transport - Observations in Canadian Monitoring Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Weihua [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa K1A 1C1 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the environment, the main sources of naturally occurring radionuclides come from radionuclides in the uranium decay series. Activity concentrations of uranium decay series radionuclides may vary considerably from place to place depending on the geological characteristics at the location. Their releases to the atmosphere are mainly through radon ({sup 222}Rn), a radioactive noble gas occurring naturally as an indirect decay product of uranium in soils and rocks. Due to the abundance of uranium, radon continuously emanates from continental land masses. With radon as the main source of naturally occurring radioactivity in the environment, one would think that the Arctic should be an area of low background radiation, because a considerable area of the Arctic is covered by glaciers and permafrost, and radon emanation rate has been reported to be negligible from those glacier and permafrost areas. However, available data have shown the opposite. The elevated level of naturally occurring radioactivity in the Arctic is due to natural sources outside of the Arctic, mainly through long-range atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny. In some cases, natural radioactivity can accumulate to relatively high levels and become a health concern or a limiting factor of country food consumption. By definition, contaminants are undesirable substances which can cause harm to the environment, the biota, and humans. We can call these naturally accumulating radiological burdens to the Arctic 'natural contaminants' to distinguish them from the traditional meaning of contamination, the 'artificial contaminants' which are attributable to industrial or man-made sources. This paper reviews information available in the literature, analyses long-term atmospheric monitoring data in the Canadian high Arctic, sub-Arctic and mid-latitude sites, and provides discussion on research needed to address questions, such as how heavily the Arctic has been impacted by the

  3. NCPDP recommendations for dose accumulation monitoring in the inpatient setting: Acetaminophen case model, version 1.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Best practices and guidance are provided for improved electronic detection and alerting of inadvertent supratherapeutic cumulative doses of acetaminophen and other medications with narrow therapeutic ranges in inpatient settings. Despite the use of medication safety technologies, overdosage and associated sentinel events continue to be serious problems in many inpatient settings. The tools needed to monitor and employ dose alerts, accumulators, and warning systems are available to reduce inadvertent overdose. Required are staff training and the implementation of processes that provide guidance and documentation of the drug reconciliation process from admittance to discharge for safe patient passage through the various transitions of care. Recommendations to achieve optimal patient safety outcomes include the adoption and integration of available technologies with full functionality configured to meet the institution's policies and processes, initial training and retraining of all staff who use these systems, continuing education of the patient care staff on the dosing safety requirements, and assigning a prominent role to the clinical pharmacist in the entire drug-use and reconciliation process. The key factors contributing to inadvertent overdosage in inpatient settings include a lack of recognition of recommended maximum daily dosages; failure to optimally communicate medication information at transitions of care; failure to optimally implement medication safety technologies, particularly dose accumulator calculation features and associated alerts; and alert fatigue and override. Copyright © 2016 by the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP).

  4. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  5. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  6. Effects of laser focusing and fluence on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dario [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Campus Diadema, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Gomes, Marcos da Silva [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Leme, Flavio de Oliveira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco Jose, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    The effects of laser focusing and fluence on LIBS analysis of pellets of plant leaves was evaluated. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (5 ns, 10 Hz, 1064 nm) was used and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD. Data were acquired from the accumulation of 20 laser pulses at 2.0 {mu}s delay and 5.0 {mu}s integration time gate. The emission signal intensities increased with both laser fluence and spot size. Higher sensitivities for Ca, K, Mg, P, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn determinations were observed for fluences in the range from 25 to 60 J cm{sup -2}. Coefficients of variation of site-to-site measurements were generally lower than 10% (n = 30 sites, 20 laser pulses/site) for a fluence of 50 J cm{sup -2} and 750 {mu}m spot size. For most elements, there is an indication that accuracy is improved with higher fluences. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser focusing and fluence affect the quality of LIBS results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improvements on sensitivity and precision were observed for most analytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrix effects can be minimized by choosing the most appropriate fluence.

  7. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K., E-mail: anoop.kiliyanamkandy@unina.it; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, Napoli 80126 (Italy); Polek, M. P. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Harilal, S. S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  8. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  9. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cornelius, I.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Guérin, L.; La Rosa, A.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2004-09-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centres with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.This kind of treatments need high-resolution monitor systems and for this reason we have developed a 256-strip segmented ionisation chamber, each strip being 400 μm wide, with a total sensitive area 13×13 cm2. The Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO) has been operational since 1991 and features a synchrocyclotron used for eye and head and neck tumours with proton beams up to 200 MeV. The monitor system has to work on a large surface and for this purpose we have designed a pixel-segmented ionisation chamber, each pixel being 5×5 mm2, for a total active area of 16×16 cm2. The results obtained with two prototypes of the pixel and strip chambers demonstrate that the detectors allow the measurement of fluence and centre of gravity as requested by clinical specifications.

  10. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  11. Electrochemical monitoring of phytochelatin accumulation in Nicotiana tabacum cells exposed to sub-cytotoxic and cytotoxic levels of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fojta, Miroslav [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: fojta@ibp.cz; Fojtova, Miloslava [Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Havran, Ludek [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Pivonkova, Hana [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Dorcak, Vlastimil [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Sestakova, Ivana [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2006-02-03

    Cadmium belongs to the most dangerous environmental pollutants among the toxic heavy metals seriously affecting vital functions in both animal and plant cells. It has been previously shown that cadmium ions at 50-100 {mu}M concentrations caused tobacco BY-2 (TBY-2) cells to enter apoptosis within several days of exposure. Phytochelatins (PCs), the 'plant metallothioneins', are cysteine-rich peptides involved in detoxification of heavy metals in plants. The PCs are synthesized in response to the heavy metal exposure. In this paper, we utilized electrochemical analysis to monitor accumulation of PCs in the TBY-2 cells exposed to cadmium ions. Measurements of a characteristic PC signal at mercury electrode in the presence of cobalt ions made it possible to detect changes in the cellular PC levels during the time of cultivation, starting from 30 min after exposure. Upon TBY-2 cultivation in the presence of cytotoxic cadmium concentrations, the PC levels remarkably increased during the pre-apoptotic phase and reached a limiting value at cultivation times coinciding with apoptosis trigger. The PC level observed for a sub-cytotoxic cadmium concentration (10 {mu}M) was about three-times lower than that observed for the 50 or 100 {mu}M cadmium ions after 5 days of exposure. We show that using a simple electrochemical analysis, synthesis of PCs in plant cells can be easily followed in parallel with other tests of the cellular response to the toxic heavy metal stress.

  12. Standard Test Method for Measuring Neutron Fluence Rate by Radioactivation of Cobalt and Silver

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a suitable means of obtaining the thermal neutron fluence rate, or fluence, in well moderated nuclear reactor environments where the use of cadmium, as a thermal neutron shield as described in Method E262, is undesirable because of potential spectrum perturbations or of temperatures above the melting point of cadmium. 1.2 This test method describes a means of measuring a Westcott neutron fluence rate (Note 1) by activation of cobalt- and silver-foil monitors (See Terminology E170). The reaction 59Co(n,γ)60Co results in a well-defined gamma emitter having a half-life of 1925.28 days (1). The reaction 109Ag(n,˙γ) 110mAg results in a nuclide with a complex decay scheme which is well known and having a half-life of 249.76 days (1). Both cobalt and silver are available either in very pure form or alloyed with other metals such as aluminum. A reference source of cobalt in aluminum alloy to serve as a neutron fluence rate monitor wire standard is available from the National Institute ...

  13. Monte Carlo fluence simulation for prospective evaluation of interstitial photodynamic therapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) delivers a localized cytotoxic dose that is a function of tissue oxygen availability, photosensitive drug concentration, and light fluence. Providing safe and effective PDT requires an understanding of all three elements and the physiological response to the radicals generated. Interstitial PDT (IPDT) for solid tumours poses particular challenges due to complex organ geometries and the associated limitations for diffusion theory based fluence rate prediction, in addition to restricted access for light delivery and dose monitoring. As a first step towards enabling a complete prospective IPDT treatment-planning platform, we demonstrate use of our previously developed FullMonte tetrahedral Monte Carlo simulation engine for modeling of the interstitial fluence field due to intravesicular insertion of brief light sources. The goal is to enable a complete treatment planning and monitoring work flow analogous to that used in ionizing radiation therapy, including plan evaluation through dose-volume histograms and algorithmic treatment plan optimization. FullMonte is to our knowledge the fastest open-source tetrahedral MC light propagation software. Using custom hardware acceleration, we achieve 4x faster computing with 67x better power efficiency for limited-size meshes compared to the software. Ongoing work will improve the performance advantage to 16x with unlimited mesh size, enabling algorithmic plan optimization in reasonable time. Using FullMonte, we demonstrate significant new plan-evaluation capabilities including fluence field visualization, generation of organ dose-volume histograms, and rendering of isofluence surfaces for a representative bladder cancer mesh from a real patient. We also discuss the advantages of MC simulations for dose-volume histogram generation and the need for online personalized fluence-rate monitoring.

  14. Particle fluence measurements by activation technique for radiation damage studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E; Furetta, C; Leroy, Claude

    1995-01-01

    High-level radiation environment can produce radiation damage in detectors and their associate electronic components. The establishment of a correlation between damage, irradiation level and absorbed dose requires a precise measurement of the fluence of particles causing the damage. The activation technique is frequently used for performing particle fluence measurements. A review of this technique is presented.

  15. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  16. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  17. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case

    CERN Document Server

    Craft, David

    2016-01-01

    In this first paper of a two-paper series, we present a method for optimizing the dynamic delivery of fluence maps in radiation therapy. For a given fluence map and a given delivery time, the optimization of the leaf trajectories of a multi-leaf collimator to approximately form the given fluence map is a non-convex optimization problem. Its general solution has not been addressed in the literature, despite the fact that dynamic delivery of fluence maps has long been a common approach to intensity modulated radiation therapy. We model the leaf trajectory and dose rate optimization as a non-convex continuous optimization problem and solve it by an interior point method from randomly initialized feasible starting solutions. We demonstrate the method on a fluence map from a prostate case and a larger fluence map from a head-and-neck case. While useful for static beam IMRT delivery, our main motivation for this work is the extension to the case of sequential fluence map delivery, i.e. the case of VMAT, which is th...

  18. Electron fluence correction factors for various materials in clinical electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, M; DeBlois, F; Podgorsak, E B; Seuntjens, J P

    2001-08-01

    Relative to solid water, electron fluence correction factors at the depth of dose maximum in bone, lung, aluminum, and copper for nominal electron beam energies of 9 MeV and 15 MeV of the Clinac 18 accelerator have been determined experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure depth doses in these materials. The measured relative dose at dmax in the various materials versus that of solid water, when irradiated with the same number of monitor units, has been used to calculate the ratio of electron fluence for the various materials to that of solid water. The beams of the Clinac 18 were fully characterized using the EGS4/BEAM system. EGSnrc with the relativistic spin option turned on was used to optimize the primary electron energy at the exit window, and to calculate depth doses in the five phantom materials using the optimized phase-space data. Normalizing all depth doses to the dose maximum in solid water stopping power ratio corrected, measured depth doses and calculated depth doses differ by less than +/- 1% at the depth of dose maximum and by less than 4% elsewhere. Monte Carlo calculated ratios of doses in each material to dose in LiF were used to convert the TLD measurements at the dose maximum into dose at the center of the TLD in the phantom material. Fluence perturbation correction factors for a LiF TLD at the depth of dose maximum deduced from these calculations amount to less than 1% for 0.15 mm thick TLDs in low Z materials and are between 1% and 3% for TLDs in Al and Cu phantoms. Electron fluence ratios of the studied materials relative to solid water vary between 0.83+/-0.01 and 1.55+/-0.02 for materials varying in density from 0.27 g/cm3 (lung) to 8.96 g/cm3 (Cu). The difference in electron fluence ratios derived from measurements and calculations ranges from -1.6% to +0.2% at 9 MeV and from -1.9% to +0.2% at 15 MeV and is not significant at the 1sigma level. Excluding the data for Cu, electron

  19. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Gennady; Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay; Ryabinin, Yuriy; Adeev, Valeriy

    2016-02-01

    The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO) which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  20. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodkin Gennady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  1. Target organs of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum for studying metal accumulation and biomarkers in pollution monitoring: laboratory and in-situ transplantation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Eun-Soo; Ra, Kongtae

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the target organs of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum for use in environmental study, the accumulation of trace metals and three biomarkers was measured in different organs. Exposure with Cu and Pb carried out under laboratory conditions revealed a linear uptake of metals throughout the experimental period in each tissue. In particular, significant increase was observed in gills and mantle. The increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species showed the great potential of gills as a target tissue for both Cu and Pb exposure. The highest activity of glutathione S-transferase and their relative increase in activity were also observed in gills. Metallothionein-like protein levels, however, increased greatly in the digestive gland and mantle during Cu and Pb exposure, respectively, although all tissues, except the foot, showed significant changes after 24 h of metal exposure. In the field study, the highest concentration of metals was recorded in the gills and mantle, accounting for over 50 % of the total accumulated metal in all sites. Additionally, Cu and Pb increased significantly in these two organs, respectively. However, the order of accumulation rate in laboratory exposure was not concomitant with those of the lab-based study, suggesting that different routes of metal uptake and exposure duration induce distinct partitioning of metals and regulating system in R. philippinarum. These series of exposure studies demonstrated that gills, mantle, and digestive gland in R. philippinarum are potential target tissues in environmental monitoring study using metal concentrations and biomarkers.

  2. Environmental monitoring to the sources of atmospheric emission by the Trad-MCN bioassay and analysis of the accumulative potential for uranium and fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.F.E., E-mail: alessandra@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Monitoracao Ambiental; Ramos, Monique M.B., E-mail: monique@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Analise de Seguranca; Alves, Edenise S., E-mail: ealves@ibot.sp.gov.b [Instituto de Botanica de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Anatomia

    2009-07-01

    The biomonitoring of the atmospheric contamination constitutes important procedure for adoption of environmental control measures. Biological assays have been employed to evaluate genotoxic agents in the atmosphere. The Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay has been extensively used in environmental monitoring owing to its efficiency in the detection of chromosomic damages in cytological preparations of easy execution. In this study we tested the viability of use of Trad-MCN with Tradescantia pallida cv. Purpurea for environmental monitoring in the Experimental Center Aramar (CEA), in Ipero - SP and its leaf accumulation capacity. The plants were exposed in situ, in flower-beds or flowerpots, established close to the sources of atmospheric emission. The bioassay was accomplished according to the usual protocol. The micronucleus frequencies were compared using the variance Kruskal-Wallis test. The obtained results indicated that the biomonitoring model adopted was not the ideal for the CEA, considering that the plant suffered the influence of climatic condition. However the plant showed to have accumulative potential for uranium. (author)

  3. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps for IMRT and VMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Craft, David

    2017-02-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for dynamically delivered fluence maps. At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. We begin with the single fluence map case and then generalize the model and the solution technique to the delivery of sequential fluence maps. The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. We test our method using a prostate case and a head and neck case, and present the resulting trade-off curves. Analysis of the leaf trajectories reveals that short time plans have larger leaf openings in general than longer delivery time plans. Our method allows one to explore the continuum of possibilities between coarse, large segment plans characteristic of direct aperture approaches and narrow field plans produced by sliding window approaches. Exposing this trade-off will allow for an informed choice between plan quality and solution time. Further research is required to speed up the optimization process to make this method clinically implementable.

  4. A new active method for the measurement of slow-neutron fluence in modern radiotherapy treatment rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F; Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago, 15782-Santiago (Spain); Doblado, F Sanchez [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Radiofisica and Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: faustino.gomez@usc.es

    2010-02-21

    This work focuses on neutron monitoring at clinical linac facilities during high-energy modality radiotherapy treatments. Active in-room measurement of neutron fluence is a complex problem due to the pulsed nature of the fluence and the presence of high photon background, and only passive methods have been considered reliable until now. In this paper we present a new active method to perform real-time measurement of neutron production around a medical linac. The device readout is being investigated as an estimate of patient neutron dose exposure on each radiotherapy session. The new instrument was developed based on neutron interaction effects in microelectronic memory devices, in particular using neutron-sensitive SRAM devices. This paper is devoted to the description of the instrument and measurement techniques, presenting the results obtained together with their comparison and discussion. Measurements were performed in several standard clinical linac facilities, showing high reliability, being insensitive to the photon fluence and EM pulse present inside the radiotherapy room, and having detector readout statistical relative uncertainties of about 2% on measurement of neutron fluence produced by 1000 monitor units irradiation runs.

  5. Monitoring the accumulated water soluble airborne compounds deposited on surfaces of showcases and walls in museums, archives and historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Svensmark, Bo

    2017-01-01

    themselves. This might make the compounds seem absent from analyses of indoor air samples. Context and purpose of the study: A new method of detecting water soluble pollutants without taking samples from the interior walls or from the CH objects themselves has been developed. The method involves sampling...... the pollutants accumulated on a surface near the CH object, e.g. a nearby wall or an interior glass surface of a showcase. The samples were obtained by gently flushing the surface with deionised water to collect the ions readily removed from the surface. The method was tested on a variety of surfaces. Results......-, and SO4 2-. The resulting concentrations were converted to μEq, providing the ionic balance and the relative amounts of the ions and elements present. Ionic balance was observed on smooth and inert surfaces, but in some cases the chemistry of the wall contributed to the flush water. Solid samples of some...

  6. Direct measurement of fluence rate in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rozumenko, Vladimir D.

    1996-01-01

    Fluence rate was measured in normal and cancerous (glioma) human brain samples using a multichannel detector. Detector consisted of 8 isotrope fiber probes positioned around the central irradiating probe. Detecting probes were displaced one from other at a step 0.5 mm along the central irradiating fiber. Bare ends of detecting fibers were coupled with photodiode array. He-Ne (633 nm) or Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers were coupled with irradiating probe. Fluence rate was measured in each of 8 points in the depth range 5 mm. Measured mean penetration depths of 633 nm light were 0.70 mm, 0.50 mm and 0.40 mm for white matter, grey matter and glioma, respectively. For Nd:YAG laser, penetration depth was about 2.3 mm for normal tissue and glioma. Multichannel computerized detector allows to provide a small invasive real-time measurements of fluence rate in different tissues.

  7. Monitoring the biomass accumulation of recombinant yeast cultures: offline estimations of dry cell mass and cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Shane M; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2012-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most important parameters for process optimization, scale-up and control in recombinant protein production experiments. However, a standard unit of biomass remains elusive. Methods of biomass monitoring have increasingly been developed towards online, in situ techniques in order to advance process analysis and control. Offline, ex situ methods, such as dry cell mass determination and direct cell counts, remain the reference for determining cell mass and number, respectively, but this type of analysis is time consuming. In this chapter, protocols are presented for determining these offline measures of the biomass yield of recombinant yeast cultures.

  8. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  9. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  10. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, A.; Wiegert, P.; Blaauw, R.; McCarty, C.; Kingery, A.; Cooke, W.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will experience a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comet's coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. By the time of the close encounter, five operational spacecraft will be present near Mars. Characterizing the coma is crucial for assessing the risk posed to these satellites by meteoroid impacts. We present an analytic model of cometary comae that describes the spatial and size distributions of cometary dust and meteoroids. This model correctly reproduces, to within an order of magnitude, the number of impacts recorded by Giotto near 1P/Halley [1] and by Stardust near comet 81P/Wild 2 [2]. Applied to Siding Spring, our model predicts a total particle fluence near Mars of 0.02 particles per square meter. In order to determine the degree to which Siding Spring's coma deviates from a sphere, we perform numerical simulations which take into account both gravitational effects and radiative forces. We take the entire dust component of the coma and tail continuum into account by simulating the ejection and evolution of dust particles from comet Siding Spring. The total number of particles simulated is essentially a free parameter and does not provide a check on the total fluence. Instead, these simulations illustrate the degree to which the coma of Siding Spring deviates from the perfect sphere described by our analytic model (see Figure). We conclude that our analytic model sacrifices less than an order of magnitude in accuracy by neglecting particle dynamics and radiation pressure and is thus adequate for order-of-magnitude fluence estimates. Comet properties may change unpredictably and therefore an analytic coma model that enables quick recalculation of the meteoroid fluence is highly desirable. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office is monitoring comet Siding Spring and taking measurements of cometary brightness and dust production. We

  11. Fluxes and fluences of SEP events derived from SOLPENCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aran, A. [Dept. d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sanahuja, B. [Dept. d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); CER d' Astrofisica, Fisica de Particules i Cosmologia, Unitat Associada al CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Lario, D. [Applied Physics Lab., The Johns Hopkins Univ., MD (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We have developed (Aran et al., 2004) a tool for rapid predictions of proton flux and fluence profiles observed during gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events and upstream of the associated traveling interplanetary shocks. This code, named SOLPENCO (for SOLar Particle ENgineering COde), contains a data base with a large set of interplanetary scenarios under which SEP events develop. These scenarios are basically defined by the solar longitude of the parent solar activity, ranging from E76 to W90, and by the position of the observer, located at 0.4 AU or at 1.0 AU, from the Sun. We are now analyzing the performance and reliability of SOLPENCO. We address here two features of SEP events especially relevant to space weather purposes: the peak flux and the fluence. We analyze how the peak flux and the fluence of the synthetic profiles generated by SOLPENCO vary as a function of the strength of the CME-driven shock, the heliolongitude of the solar parent activity and the particle energy considered. In particular, we comment on the dependence of the fluence on the radial distance of the observer (which does not follow an inverse square law) and we draw conclusions about the influence of the sock as a particle accelerator in terms of its evolving strength and the heliolongitude of the solar site where the SEP event originated. (orig.)

  12. SU-E-I-10: Automatic Monitoring of Accumulated Dose Indices From DICOM RDSR to Improve Radiation Safety in X-Ray Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, A; Bujila, R; Nowik, P; Karambatsakidou, A [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits of automatic monitoring of accumulated patient and staff dose indicators, i.e., CAK and KAP, from DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR) in x-ray angiography (XA). Methods: Recently RDSR has enabled the convenient aggregation of dose indices and technique parameters for XA procedures. The information contained in RDSR objects for three XA systems, dedicated to different types of clinical procedures, has been collected and aggregated in a database for over one year using a system developed with open-source software at the Karolinska University Hospital. Patient weight was complemented to the RDSR data via an interface with the Hospital Information System (HIS). Results: The linearly approximated trend in KAP over a time period of a year for cerebrovascular, pelvic/peripheral vascular, and cardiovascular procedures showed a decrease of 12%, 20%, and 14%, respectively. The decrease was mainly due to hardware/software upgrades and new low-dose imaging protocols, and partially due to ongoing systematic radiation safety education of the clinical staff. The CAK was in excess of 3 Gy for 15 procedures, and exceeded 5 Gy for 3 procedures. The dose indices have also shown a significant dependence on patient weight for cardiovascular and pelvic/peripheral vascular procedures; a 10 kg shift in mean patient weight can result in a dose index increase of 25%. Conclusion: Automatic monitoring of accumulated dose indices can be utilized to notify the clinical staff and medical physicists when the dose index has exceeded a predetermined action level. This allows for convenient and systematic follow-up of patients in risk of developing deterministic skin injuries. Furthermore, trend analyses of dose indices over time is a valuable resource for the identification of potential positive or negative effects (dose increase/decrease) from changes in hardware, software, and clinical work habits.

  13. Transperineal in vivo fluence-rate dosimetry in the canine prostate during SnET2-mediated PDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilge, Lothar [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Douplik, Alexander [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Selman, Steven H [Urology Research Center, Department of Urology, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Keck, Rick W [Urology Research Center, Department of Urology, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Szkudlarek, Maria [Urology Research Center, Department of Urology, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Pestka, Maciej [Urology Research Center, Department of Urology, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Jankun, Jerzy [Urology Research Center, Department of Urology, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2004-07-21

    Advances in photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment for prostate cancer can be achieved either by improving selectivity of the photosensitizer towards prostate gland tissue or improving the dosimetry by means of individualized treatment planning using currently available photosensitizers. The latter approach requires the ability to measure, among other parameters, the fluence rate at different positions within the prostate and the ability to derive the tissue optical properties. Here fibre optic probes are presented capable of measuring the fluence rate throughout large tissue volumes and a method to derive the tissue optical properties for different volumes of the prostate. The responsivity of the sensors is sufficient to detect a fluence rate of 0.1 mW cm{sup -2}. The effective attenuation coefficient in the canine prostate at 660 nm is higher at the capsule (2.15 {+-} 0.19 cm{sup -1}) than in proximity of the urethra (1.84 {+-} 0.36 cm{sup -1}). Significant spatial and temporal intra- and inter-canine variability in the tissue optical properties was noted, highlighting the need for individualized monitoring of the fluence rate for improved dosimetry.

  14. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  15. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konheiser Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactor pressure vessel (RPV represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p54Mn and 58Ni(n,p58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  16. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konheiser, Joerg; Grahn, Alexander; Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady

    2016-02-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS) programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p)54Mn and 58Ni(n,p)58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  17. Rethinking the Concepts of Fluence (UV Dose) and Fluence Rate: The Importance of Photon-based Units - A Systemic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, James R; Mayor-Smith, Ian; Linden, Karl G

    2015-11-01

    After a critical review of the fundamental equations describing photobiological and photochemical processes occurring in a medium exposed to a quasi-collimated monochromatic UV light beam, the analysis in this review is extended to analogous processes driven by polychromatic UV light, such as that emitted by medium pressure mercury-vapor arc lamps. The analysis is based on the Second Law of Photochemistry, namely that all photochemical events must be independent, and the rate of such events must be proportional to the rate of photon absorption. A consistent application of the Second Law of Photochemistry leads to a concept change; hence it is proposed herein to use photon fluence and photon fluence rate, rather than fluence (UV dose) and fluence rate, respectively, in the analysis and interpretation of photobiological and photochemical processes. As a consequence, many equations that have been used in the past must be revised, and some experimental information (e.g. action spectra) needs to be re-analyzed. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Compensator models for fluence field modulated computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolac, Steven [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated computed tomography (FFMCT) presents a novel approach for acquiring CT images, whereby a patient model guides dynamically changing fluence patterns in an attempt to achieve task-based, user-prescribed, regional variations in image quality, while also controlling dose to the patient. This work aims to compare the relative effectiveness of FFMCT applied to different thoracic imaging tasks (routine diagnostic CT, lung cancer screening, and cardiac CT) when the modulator is subject to limiting constraints, such as might be present in realistic implementations.Methods: An image quality plan was defined for a simulated anthropomorphic chest slice, including regions of high and low image quality, for each of the thoracic imaging tasks. Modulated fluence patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization script, which attempts to achieve the image quality plan under a global dosimetric constraint. Optimization was repeated under different types of modulation constraints (e.g., fixed or gantry angle dependent patterns, continuous or comprised of discrete apertures) with the most limiting case being a fixed conventional bowtie filter. For each thoracic imaging task, an image quality map (IQM{sub sd}) representing the regionally varying standard deviation is predicted for each modulation method and compared to the prescribed image quality plan as well as against results from uniform fluence fields. Relative integral dose measures were also compared.Results: Each IQM{sub sd} resulting from FFMCT showed improved agreement with planned objectives compared to those from uniform fluence fields for all cases. Dynamically changing modulation patterns yielded better uniformity, improved image quality, and lower dose compared to fixed filter patterns with optimized tube current. For the latter fixed filter cases, the optimal choice of tube current modulation was found to depend heavily on the task. Average integral dose reduction compared

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation method for calculating fluence-dependent range profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, J; Keinonen, J

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has proven to be successful in calculating range profiles for low energy (keV) ions implanted into crystalline materials. However, for high fluences the structure of the material changes during the implantation process. The crystalline material becomes amorphized, which changes the range profiles. This damage build-up process has usually been taken into account with probabilities for changing the crystal structure during the simulation, and typically only BCA methods have been used. We present a fast MD method that simulates the damage build-up process in silicon, without bringing any free parameters to the simulation. Damage accumulation during the implantation is simulated by changing the material structure in front of path of the incoming ion. The amorphization level at each depth is proportional to the nuclear deposited energy in that depth region. The amorphization states are obtained from MD simulations of cascade damage. Silicon was used as a target material because of the large amou...

  20. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  1. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the VMAT case

    CERN Document Server

    Balvert, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. This model was presented for the single map case in a companion paper (Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case). The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. The single-map approach cannot directly be applied to the full arc case due to the large increase in model size, the issue of allocating delivery times to each of the arc segments, and the fact that the ending leaf positions for one map will be the starting leaf positions for the next map. In this article the method proposed in \\cite{dm1} is extended to solve the full map treatment planning problem. We test ...

  2. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  3. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  4. Fluence and fluence rate effects on electrical conductivity and shrinkage in polyimide bombarded by an ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigaud, T. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Moliton, J.P. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Jussiaux, C. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Maziere, B. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France)

    1996-02-01

    When the ion fluence is increasing, a diminishing of the thickness and a rise in electrical conductivity can be simultaneously observed with polyimide films. However, in the 100 keV energy range, a saturation limit appears in both processes. Two experimental processes are presented to increase the conductivity limit ({approx_equal}10{sup -1} S cm{sup -1} with N{sup +} ions), while the shrinkage effect is maintained or even reduced. (1) Multiple irradiations of N{sup +} ions implemented from high to low energies induce tenfold increase in conductivity, and stop the thickness decrease beyond a fluence threshold. (2) Liquid-metal ion sources (LMIS) with Ga{sup +} ions (keV) perform high conductivities (above 300 S cm{sup -1}) without notable shrinkage. (orig.).

  5. Fluence measurements applied to 5-20 MeV/amu ion beam dosimetry by simultaneous use of a total-absorption calorimeter and a Faraday cup

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, T; Takizawa, H; Tachibana, H; Tanaka, R

    1998-01-01

    A Faraday cup was fabricated for measuring the beam current of a few tens MeV/amu ion beams of the TIARA AVF cyclotron. It has been applied as a beam monitor for studying the characteristics of film dosimeters that are well-established for high doses of sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-rays and 1 to 10 MeV electrons. A total absorption calorimeter designed to measure energy fluence has also been tested for estimating the uncertainty in fluence measurement of 5-20 MeV/amu ion beams, by simultaneous use of the calorimeter and the Faraday cup in a broad uniform fluence field. The estimated fluence was evaluated on the basis of nominal particle energy values derived from the cyclotron acceleration parameters. The average ratio of the measured fluence values to the estimated values is 1.024, and the average precision is within +-2% at a 68% confidence level, for most of the ion beams with a range of kinetic energy per nucleon, 5-20 MeV/amu, at an integrated charge above 5 nC/cm sup 2.

  6. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  7. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...

  8. Radioactive cesium accumulation in seaweeds by the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident-two years' monitoring at Iwaki and its vicinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akira; Mimura, Mari; Mimura, Tetsuro; Tahara, Tomoya; Aida, Daiki; Sato, Kenji; Sasaki, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Accumulations of radionuclides in marine macroalgae (seaweeds) resulting from the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) accident in March 2011 have been monitored for two years using high-purity germanium detectors. Algal specimens were collected seasonally by snorkeling at Nagasaki, Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture (Pref.), Japan, ca. 50 km perimeter from the F1NPP. Additional collections were done at Soma, Hironocho, Hisanohama and Shioyazaki in Fukushima Pref. as well as at Chiba Pref. and Hyogo Pref. as controls. In May 2011, specimens of most macroalgal species showed ¹³⁷Cs levels greater than 3,000 Bq kg⁻¹ at Shioyazaki and Nagasaki. The highest ¹³⁷Cs level recorded 7371.20 ± 173.95 Bq kg⁻¹ in Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar on 2 May 2011, whereas seawater collected at the same time at Shioyazaki and Nagasaki measured 8.41 ± 3.21 and 9.74 ± 3.43 Bq L⁻¹, respectively. The concentration factor of marine macroalgae was estimated to be ca. 8-50, depending on taxa and considering a weight ratio of wet/dry samples of ca. 10. ¹³⁷Cs level declined remarkably during the following 5-6 months. In contrast, the ¹³⁷Cs level remained rather stable during the following 12-16 months, and maintained the range of 10-110 Bq kg⁻¹. Contamination was still detectable in many samples in March 2013, 24 months after the most significant pollution.

  9. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  10. Towards a reference numerical scheme using MCNPX for PWR control rod tip fluence estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferroukhi, H.; Vasiliev, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Dufresne, A. [Dept. of Physics, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Dept. of Physics, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Recent occurrences of cracks and fissures on the cladding tubes of PWR control rod (CR) fingers employed in the Swiss reactors prompted the need to develop more reliable analytical methods for CR tip fluence estimations. To partly address this need, a deterministic methodology based on SIMULATE-3/CASMO-4 was in recent years developed at PSI. Although this methodology has already been applied for independent support to licensing issues related to CR lifetime, two main questions are currently being the center of attention for further enhancements. First, the methodology relies on several assumptions that have so far not been verified. Secondly, an assessment of the achieved accuracy has not been addressed. In an attempt to answer both these open questions, it was considered appropriate to develop an alternative computational scheme based on the stochastic MCNPX code with the objective to provide reference numerical solutions. This paper presents the first steps undertaken in that direction. To start, a methodology for a volumetric neutron source transfer to full core MCNPX models with detailed CR as well as axial reflector representations is established. On this basis, the assumptions of the deterministic methodology are studied for selected CR configurations for two Beginning-of-Life cores by comparing the spatial neutron flux distributions obtained with the two approaches for the entire spectrum. Finally, for the high-energy range (E> 1 MeV) and for a few CRs, the new MCNPX scheme is applied to estimate the accumulated fluence over one real operated cycle and the results are compared with the deterministic approach. (authors)

  11. On determining the spot size for laser fluence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bfarkas@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu; Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2006-04-30

    Energy fluence, defined as pulse energy over irradiated area, is a key parameter of pulsed laser processing. Nevertheless, most of the authors using this term routinely do not realize the problems related to the accurate measurement of the spot size. In the present paper we are aiming to approach this problem by ablating crystalline Si wafers with pulses of a commercial KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 15 ns) both in vacuum and at ambient atmosphere. For any pulse energy, the size of the ablated area monotonously increases with increasing number of pulses. The difference in the ablated area could be as high as a factor of three when 2000 consecutive pulses impinge on the surface. The existence and extent of the gradual lowering of multi-pulse ablation threshold queries the applicability of routinely used procedure of dividing the pulse energy with the size of the ablated area exposed into either carbon-paper or a piece of Si with one or a few pulses when determining the fluence. A more quantitative way is proposed allowing comparison of results originating from different laboratories.

  12. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  13. Comparison of Reg. Guide 1.99 fluence attenuation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.N. [TransWare Enterprises Inc., 1565 Mediterranean Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    U.S. Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1988, 'Radiation Embrittlement of Reactor Vessel Materials,' Regulatory Guide 1.99, Revision 2, Washington, D.C.) provides for the use of two substantially different methods for determining through-wall fluence in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. One method is a generic attenuation curve based on a simplistic exponential decay equation. Partly due to the simplicity of its application, the generic attenuation method is predominantly used for licensing calculations. However, it has a limitation in that at increasing distances away from the core belt-line, it becomes increasingly less accurate because it cannot account for neutron streaming effects in the cavity region surrounding the pressure vessel. The other attenuation method is based on a displacement per atom (dpa) calculation specific to the reactor vessel structure. The dpa method provides a more accurate representation of fluence attenuation through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall at all elevations of the pressure vessel because it does account for neutron streaming in the cavity region. A requirement for using the dpa method, however, is an accurate flux solution through the RPV wall. This requirement has limited the use of traditional transport methods, such as discrete ordinates, that are limited by their treatment of cavity regions (i.e., air) outside the pressure vessel wall. TransWare Enterprises, under the sponsorship of EPRI and BWRVIR has developed an advanced three-dimensional transport methodology capable of producing fully converged flux solutions throughout the entire reactor system, including in the cavity region and primary shield structures. This methodology provides an accurate and reliable determination of through-wall fluence in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessels, thus allowing the dpa method to be implemented with high reliability. Using this advanced 3

  14. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  15. Fluorescence Enhancement Ratio Dropdown at Low Fluences during Femtosecond Double Pulse Laser Ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sima SINGHA; Robert J. GORDON; HU Zhan

    2008-01-01

    In the study of double pulse ablation of materials (silicon and copper), a dropdown of double pulse to single pulse fluorescence signal enhancement at low fluences is observed. The dropdown is analysed with a simple theoretical one-dimensional heat diffusion model and verified by fluorescence time constants change as a function of fluence. The dropdown is explained as a result of liquid-solid mixture layer at the liquid and solid boundary. The effect of the layer becomes important at low fluences.

  16. Erosion of carbon fiber composites under high-fluence heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, Natalya N.; Borisov, Anatoly M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mashkova, Eugenia S., E-mail: es_mashkova@mail.r [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Virgiliev, Yury S. [NIIgraphite, 111141 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-01

    The ion-induced erosion, determining by sputtering yield Y and surface evolution including structure and morphology changes of the modified surface layers, of two commercial carbon fiber composites (CFC) with different reinforcement - KUP-VM (1D) and Desna 4 (4D) have been studied under 30 keV Ar{sup +} high fluence ({phi}t {approx} 10{sup 18}-10{sup 20} ion/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in the temperature range from room temperature to 400 {sup o}C. Ion-induced erosion results in the changes of carbon fiber structure which depend on temperature and ion fluence. Monitoring of ion-induced structural changes using the temperature dependence of ion-induced electron emission yield has shown that for Desna 4 and KUP-VM at dynamic annealing temperature T{sub a} {approx} 170 {sup o}S the transition takes place from disordering at T < T{sub a} to recrystallization at T > T{sub a}. The annealing temperature T{sub a} is close to the one for polycrystalline graphites. Microscopy analysis has shown that at temperatures T < T{sub a} the etching of the fibers results in a formation of trough-like longitudinal cavities and hillocks. Irradiation at temperatures T > T{sub a} leads to a crimped structure with the ribs perpendicular to fiber axis. After further sputtering of the crimps the fiber morphology is transformed to an isotropic globular structure. As a result the sputtering yield decreases for Desna 4 more than twice. This value is almost equal to that for KUP-VM, Desna 4, polycrystalline graphites and glassy carbons at room temperature.

  17. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the logN–logF function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 the universe.

  18. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  19. Fractal characterization of the silicon surfaces produced by ion beam irradiation of varying fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, R.P. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kumar, T. [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh, Haryana 123029 (India); Mittal, A.K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Dwivedi, S., E-mail: suneetdwivedi@gmail.com [K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Fractal analysis of Si(1 0 0) surface morphology at varying ion fluences. • Autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function as fractal measures. • Surface roughness and lateral correlation length increases with ion fluence. • Ripple pattern of the surfaces is found at higher ion fluences. • Wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each fluence. - Abstract: Si (1 0 0) is bombarded with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at oblique incidence with fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology of the irradiated surfaces is captured by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each ion fluence. The fractal analysis is performed on the AFM images. The autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function are used as fractal measures. It is found that the average roughness, interface width, lateral correlation length as well as roughness exponent increase with ions fluence. The analysis reveals the ripple pattern of the surfaces at higher fluences. The wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each ion fluence.

  20. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  1. Safety and efficacy of low fluence, high repetition rate versus high fluence, low repetition rate 810-nm diode laser for axillary hair removal in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhai; Liu, Chengyi; Chen, Zhou; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Qianxi; Li, Houmin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-11-01

    High-fluence diode lasers with contact cooling have emerged as the gold standard to remove unwanted hair. Lowering the energy should result in less pain and could theoretically affect the efficacy of the therapy. To compare the safety and efficacy of a low fluence high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser to those of a high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser for permanent axillary hair removal in Chinese women. Ninety-two Chinese women received four axillae laser hair removal treatments at 4-week intervals using the low fluence, high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser in super hair removal (SHR) mode on one side and the high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser in hair removal (HR) mode on the other side. Hair counts were done at each follow-up visit and 6-month follow-up after the final laser treatment using a "Hi Quality Hair Analysis Program System"; the immediate pain score after each treatment session was recorded by a visual analog scale. The overall median reduction of hair was 90.2% with the 810-nm diode laser in SHR mode and 87% with the same laser in HR mode at 6-month follow-up. The median pain scores in SHR mode and in HR mode were 2.75 and 6.75, respectively. Low fluence, high repetition rate diode laser can efficiently remove unwanted hair but also significantly improve tolerability and reduce adverse events during the course of treatment.

  2. Comparison of fluence-response relationships of phototropism in light- and dark-grown buckwheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R J

    1987-11-01

    Fluence-response relationships of phototropism in light- and dark-grown buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) were compared using systematically varied fluence rates and irradiation times of unilateral monochromatic blue light. Etiolated seedlings respond to most fluence rates in a tri-phasic manner. Phase one differs from classic first positive in that reciprocity is not observed and the peak occurs at a wide variety of fluences, often orders of magnitude less than those characteristic of first positive. Light-grown plants display this pattern only when stimulated by low fluence rates. Phase three is an ascending arm directly related to irradiance time and is comparable to classic second positive. Phase two is a nearly indifferent zone separating phases one and three. At the lowest fluence rates, the maximal observed curvature is greater for dark-grown than for light-grown plants and the former curve more in response to short (2-second) exposures than do the latter. At the highest fluence rates, the maximal observed curvature is much greater for light-grown than for dark-grown seedlings, particularly at irradiation times of 2 to 3 minutes or more. Tropic curvatures correlate positively with increasing fluence rate up to some inflection range, above which the relationship becomes negative. This inflection range is approximately two orders of magnitude higher for light-grown plants.

  3. Neutron fluence depth profiles in water phantom on epithermal beam of LVR-15 research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L; Klupak, V; Lahodova, Z; Marek, M; Burian, J

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal channel with epithermal neutron beam at the LVR-15 research reactor is used mainly for boron neutron capture therapy. Neutron fluence depth profiles in a water phantom characterise beam properties. The neutron fluence (approximated by reaction rates) depth profiles were measured with six different types of activation detectors. The profiles were determined for thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons.

  4. Surface modulation of silicon surface by excimer laser at laser fluence below ablation threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit (CPMU), Bangalore, Jakkur PO (India)

    2010-04-15

    Controlled single step fabrication of silicon conical surface modulations on [311] silicon surface is reported utilizing KrF excimer laser [{lambda}=248 nm] at laser fluence below ablation threshold laser fluence. When laser fluence was increased gradually from 0 to 0.2 J/cm{sup 2} for fixed 200 numbers of shots; first nanopores are observed to form at 0.1 J/cm{sup 2}, then very shallow nanocones evolve as a function of laser fluence. At 0.2 J/cm{sup 2}, nanoparticles are observed to form. Up to 0.15 J/cm{sup 2} the very shallow nanocone volume is smaller but increases at a fast rate with laser fluence thereafter. It is observed that the net material volume before and after the laser irradiation remains the same, a sign of the melting and resolidification without any ablation. (orig.)

  5. La138/139 Isotopic Data and Neutron Fluences for Oklo RZ10 Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, C R; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.027601

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past. We consider whether it possible to use the present isotopic La138/139 data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors. We calculate the dependence of the Oklo La138 abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration. The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  6. La-138/139 isotopic data and neutron fluences for Oklo RZ10 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant α. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past.Purpose: We consider whether it is possible to use the present isotopic 138La-139La data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors.Results: We calculate the dependence of the Oklo 138La abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration.Conclusion: The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  7. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  8. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, A.; Sobierajski, R.; Ozkan, C.; Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Klepka, M. T.; DłuŻewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  9. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, Hamburg D-22671 (Germany); Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K. [Institute of Physics, PAS Al. Lotnikw 32/46, Warsaw PL-02-668 (Poland); Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Störmer, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, Geesthacht D-21502 (Germany); Bajt, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, Hamburg D-22607 (Germany); Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K. [RIKEN/SPring-8 Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN/SPring-8 Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  10. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N(3)) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  11. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vedantham, H K; Hallinan, G; Shannon, R

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections, and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters, can be used to infer the index $\\alpha$ of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the log$N$-log$F$ function: $\\alpha=1.5$ for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint $0.52<\\alpha<1.0$ with $90$% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to $0.66<\\alpha<0.96$. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for $\\alpha<1$, the gain in field-of-view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduc...

  12. Effect of UVA Fluence Rate on Indicators of Oxidative Stress in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Hoerter, Christopher S. Ward, Kyle D. Bale, Admasu N. Gizachew, Rachelle Graham, Jaclyn Reynolds, Melanie E. Ward, Chesca Choi, Jean-Leonard Kagabo, Michael Sauer, Tara Kuipers, Timothy Hotchkiss, Nate Banner, Renee A. Chellson, Theresa Ohaeri, L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the course of a day human skin is exposed to solar UV radiation that fluctuates in fluence rate within the UVA (290-315 nm and UVB (315-400 nm spectrum. Variables affecting the fluence rate reaching skin cells include differences in UVA and UVB penetrating ability, presence or absence of sunscreens, atmospheric conditions, and season and geographical location where the exposure occurs. Our study determined the effect of UVA fluence rate in solar-simulated (SSR and tanning-bed radiation (TBR on four indicators of oxidative stress---protein oxidation, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and reactive oxygen species--in human dermal fibroblasts after receiving equivalent UVA and UVB doses. Our results show that the higher UVA fluence rate in TBR increases the level of all four indicators of oxidative stress. In sequential exposures when cells are exposed first to SSR, the lower UVA fluence rate in SSR induces a protective response that protects against oxidative stress following a second exposure to a higher UVA fluence rate. Our studies underscore the important role of UVA fluence rate in determining how human skin cells respond to a given dose of radiation containing both UVA and UVB radiation.

  13. Defects creation in sapphire by swift heavy ions: A fluence depending process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, A. [LRPCSI, Universite 20 Aout 55, BP 26, Route d' El-Hadaiek, Skikda (Algeria)], E-mail: a.nour_kabir@yahoo.fr; Meftah, A. [LRPCSI, Universite 20 Aout 55, BP 26, Route d' El-Hadaiek, Skikda (Algeria); Stoquert, J.P. [InESS, 23, rue du Loess - BP 20 CR - F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Toulemonde, M.; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-03-15

    Single crystals of sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were irradiated at GANIL with 0.7 MeV/amu xenon ions corresponding to an electronic stopping power of 21 keV/nm. Several fluences were applied between 5 x 10{sup 11} and 2 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Irradiated samples were characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy. This technique exhibited the characteristic bands associated with F and F{sup +} centers defects. The F centers density was found to increase with the fluence following two different kinetics: a rapid increase for fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} and then, a slow increase for higher fluences. For fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}, results are in good agreement with those obtained by Canut et al. [B. Canut, A. Benyagoub, G. Marest, A. Meftah, N. Moncoffre, S.M.M. Ramos, F. Studer, P. Thevenard, M. Toulemonde, Phys. Rev. B 51 (1995) 12194]. In the fluences range: 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}, the F centers defects creation process is found to be different from the one evidenced for fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Defects creation in sapphire by swift heavy ions: A fluence depending process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, A.; Meftah, A.; Stoquert, J. P.; Toulemonde, M.; Monnet, I.

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals of sapphire (α-Al 2O 3) were irradiated at GANIL with 0.7 MeV/amu xenon ions corresponding to an electronic stopping power of 21 keV/nm. Several fluences were applied between 5 × 10 11 and 2 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. Irradiated samples were characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy. This technique exhibited the characteristic bands associated with F and F + centers defects. The F centers density was found to increase with the fluence following two different kinetics: a rapid increase for fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2 and then, a slow increase for higher fluences. For fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2, results are in good agreement with those obtained by Canut et al. [B. Canut, A. Benyagoub, G. Marest, A. Meftah, N. Moncoffre, S.M.M. Ramos, F. Studer, P. Thévenard, M. Toulemonde, Phys. Rev. B 51 (1995) 12194]. In the fluences range: 10 13-10 14 ions/cm 2, the F centers defects creation process is found to be different from the one evidenced for fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2.

  15. Characterization of the New n_TOF Neutron Beam: Fluence, Profile and Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, C; Perkowski, J; Andriamonje, S; Carrapico, C; Moinul, M; Vannini, G; Quesada, J M; Harrisopulos, S; Milazzo, P M; Berthier, B; Lozano, M; Krticka, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Nolte, R; Chiaveri, E; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Massimi, C; Giubrone, G; Avrigeanu, V; Martinez, T; Andrzejewski, J; Karadimos, D; Mengoni, A; Mendoza, E; Ganesan, S; Vlachoudis, V; Praena, J; Becares, V; Cortes, G; Variale, V; Quinones, J; Calvino, F; Kappeler, F; Gunsing, F; Gramegna, F; Colonna, N; Marrone, S; Pavlik, A; Berthoumieux, E; Paradela, C; Mastinu, P F; Vaz, P; Tassan-Got, L; Kadi, Y; Tarrio, D; Cano-Ott, D; Brugger, M; Wallner, A; Audouin, L; Fernandez-Ordonez, M; Sarmento, R; Becvar, F; Goncalves, I F; Martin-Fuertes, F; Cerutti, F; Pina, G; Mosconi, M; Tagliente, G; Duran, I; Ioannides, K; Weiss, C; Mirea, M; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Vlastou, R; Calviani, M; Lederer, C; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Marganiec, J; Lebbos, E; Leeb, H; Heil, M; Dillmann, I; Tain, J L; Belloni, F

    2011-01-01

    After a halt of four years, the n\\_TOF spallation neutron facility at CERN has resumed operation in November 2008 with a new spallation target characterized by an improved safety and engineering design, resulting in a more robust overall performance and efficient cooling. The first measurement during the 2009 run has aimed at the full characterization of the neutron beam. Several detectors, such as calibrated fission chambers, the n\\_TOF Silicon Monitor, a MicroMegas detector with (10)B and (235)U samples, as well as liquid and solid scintillators have been used in order to characterize the properties of the neutron fluence. The spatial profile of the beam has been studied with a specially designed ``X-Y{''} MicroMegas which provided a 2D image of the beam as a function of neutron energy. Both properties have been compared with simulations performed. with the FLUKA code. The characterization of the resolution function is based on results from simulations which have been verified by the study of narrow capture...

  16. Accumulation of color centers in lithium fluoride crystals under irradiation with swift lead projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhacine, H. [LRPCSI, University of 20 Août 1955 Skikda, Route El-Hadaeik, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Département de physique Université Constantine 1, Route Ain El-Bey 25000 (Algeria); Sorokin, M.V., E-mail: m40@lab2.ru [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Meftah, A. [LRPCSI, University of 20 Août 1955 Skikda, Route El-Hadaeik, 21000 Skikda (Algeria)

    2015-09-15

    Lithium fluoride crystals were irradiated with lead ions of different energies, having the electronic energy loss of 10–20 keV/nm. Accumulation of F centers with fluence was studied by absorption UV–VIS spectroscopy. It was found that the average F-center concentration is mainly determined by the average absorbed energy density with a weak decrease above 10{sup 23} eV/cm{sup 3}. A defect accumulation model, taking into account the recombination processes, is proposed for a seamless description of the F-center concentration fluence dependences for various projectiles and energy losses.

  17. Moss monitoring as a mirror of land use? Nitrogen and metal accumulation in mosses of two regions in middle Europe; Moosmonitoring als Spiegel der Landnutzung? Stickstoff- und Metallakkumulation in Moosen zweier Regionen Mitteleuropas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W.; Hornsmann, I.; Pesch, R.; Schmidt, G. [Hochschule Vechta (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Landschaftsoekologie; Fraenzle, S.; Wuenschmann, S.; Heidenreich, H.; Markert, B. [Internationales Hochschulinstitut, Zittau (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    Goal, Scope and Background. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the regional variability of nitrogen (N) and metal accumulations in terrestrial ecosystems are due to historical and recent ways of land use. To this end, in two regions of Central Europe the metal and N accumulations in both regions should be examined by comparative moss analysis. The regions should be of quantitatively specified representativity for selected ecological characteristics of Europe. Within both regions these characteristics should be covered by the sites where the moss samples were collected. The number of samples should allow for geostatistical estimation of the measured nitrogen and metal loads. Results. By use of the ecological regionalisation of Europe the Weser-Ems Region (WER) and the Euro Region Nissa (ERN) were selected for investigation. The sampling sites represent quite well the natural landscapes and the land use categories of both regions. The measurement values corroborate the decline of metal accumulation observed since the beginning of the European Mosses Monitoring Survey in 1990. The metal loads of the mosses in the ERN exceed those in the WER significantly. The opposite holds true for the N concentrations: those in the WER are significantly higher than those in the ERN. (orig.)

  18. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  19. Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of silicon nitride layers: Investigation near threshold fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Gerrit, E-mail: gheinrich@cismst.de [CIS Forschungsinstititut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, Erfurt 99099 (Germany); Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Wollgarten, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Bereich Solarenergieforschung, Institut für Technologie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bähr, Mario; Lawerenz, Alexander [CIS Forschungsinstititut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, Erfurt 99099 (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    In this work, silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers, deposited on a planar silicon wafer are locally irradiated by ultra short laser pulses with fluences near the threshold fluence. The irradiated areas are investigated by SEM and TEM in order to analyze the laser influence to silicon and to the SiN{sub x} layer. Thereby, a lift-off process is observed for this SiN{sub x} layer. The silicon absorbs the laser pulse energy. For low fluences, crystalline silicon is disordered below the SiN{sub x} layer. For high fluences, silicon evaporates below the SiN{sub x} layer and bulge the SiN{sub x} layer. If the pressure within the bulge is high enough, the SiN{sub x} layer will break down due to high mechanical stress.

  20. Embrittlement of low copper VVER 440 surveillance samples neutron-irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.; Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    2000-11-01

    An atom probe tomography microstructural characterization of low copper (0.06 at.% Cu) surveillance samples from a VVER 440 reactor has revealed manganese and silicon segregation to dislocations and other ultrafine features in neutron-irradiated base and weld materials (fluences 1×10 25 m-2 and 5×10 24 m-2, E>0.5 MeV, respectively). The results indicate that there is an additional mechanism of embrittlement during neutron irradiation that manifests itself at high fluences.

  1. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Nathala, Chandra Sekher; Ajami, Ali Asghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm-2 was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  2. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Nathala, Chandra Sekher [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Ajami, Ali Asghar [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm{sup −2} was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  3. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence may be attributed to less "free" H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  4. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn

    2016-02-01

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrogen dose on blistering was investigated. • Changes in the blistering phenomena of all the samples were studied. • The evolutions of strain and implantation induced-defects were analyzed. • The platelet forming tendency is responsible for the difference in blistering. - Abstract: The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence may be attributed to less “free” H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  5. Determination of the Neutron Fluence, the Beam Characteristics and the Backgrounds at the CERN-PS TOF Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of our programme we propose to start in July 2000 with measurements on elements of well known cross sections, in order to check the reliability of the whole experimental installation at the CERN-TOF facility. These initial exploratory measurements will provide the key-parameters required for the further experimentation at the CERN-TOF neutron beam. The neutron fluence and energy resolution will be determined as a function of the neutron kinetic energy by reproducing standard capture and fission cross sections. The measurements of capture cross sections on elements with specific cross section features will allow to us to disentangle the different components of backgrounds and estimate their level in the experimental area. The time-energy calibration will be determined and monitored with a set of monoenergetic filters as well as by the measurements of elements with resonance-dominated cross sections. Finally, in this initial phase the behaviour of several detectors scheduled in successive measureme...

  6. 累积式放射性气溶胶连续监测仪的实验运行数据处理%Processing Methods for Operation Test Data of Radioactive Aerosols Monitor Based on Accumulation Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅翠明; 席萍萍; 马英豪; 谭玲龙; 沈福

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a radioactive aerosol continuous monitor based on accumulation sampling and measuring and three methods for processing the operation data. The monitoring results are processed by the 3 methods which are applied both under the conditions of natural background and at workplaces of a nuclear facility. How the monitoring results are assessed and how to calculate the detection limit when using the 3 different methods are explained. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 methods are discussed.%介绍了一种按累积式采样和计数测量方式运行的α/β放射性气溶胶连续监测仪及其实验运行数据的3种处理方法。用这3种方法分别给出了在只有氡(和Th)子体的天然本底和在核设施工作场所的条件下的实验数据计算结果,并对相关的数据处理结果做出了评价,给出了3种不同数据处理方法的监测仪探测下限的计算公式,并且讨论了3种数据处理方法的优缺点以及与此有关的问题。

  7. Evaluation of damage accumulation behavior and strength anisotropy of NITE SiC/SiC composites by acoustic emission, digital image correlation and electrical resistivity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Asakura, Yuuki; Kohyama, Akira [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Understanding the cracking process of the composites is essential to establish the design basis for practical applications. This study aims to investigate the damage accumulation process and its anisotropy for nano-infiltration transient eutectic sintered (NITE) SiC/SiC composites by various characterization techniques such as the acoustic emission (AE), digital image correlation (DIC) and electrical resistivity (ER) measurements. Cracking behavior below the proportional limit stress (PLS) was specifically addressed. Similar to the other generic SiC/SiC composites, the 1st AE event was identified below the PLS for NITE SiC/SiC composites with a dependency of fabric orientation. The DIC results support that the primary failure mode depending on fiber orientation affected more than the other minor modes did. Detailed AE waveform analysis by wavelet shows a potential to classify the failure behavior depending on architecture. Cracking below the PLS is a potential concern in component deign but the preliminary ER measurements imply that the impact of cracking below the PLS on composite function was limited.

  8. Monitoring of contaminated toxic and heavy metals, from mine tailings through age accumulation, in soil and some wild plants at Southeast Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, M N

    2010-06-15

    This study includes tailing from gold mine, at Allaqi Wadi Aswan, Egypt, used by incident Egyptian and after by some English companies. Tailings, soils and wild plants (Acia Raddiena and Aerva Javanica) were sampled and analysed for toxic metals (Hg, Cd, Pb and As) and associated heavy metals (Cr, Ag, Ni, Au, Mo, Zn, Mn and Cu) using ICP-MS, ICP-AES, CVAAS and FAAS techniques. The present work concerns the distribution and mobility of these metals from tailing to the surrounding soils and wild flora. The results reveal that Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ag, Au, Mn, Hg, As, Ag, Au and Pb in soil decreased as faraway from the tailing, after then irregular trends as a result of input from surrounding rocks. Acia Raddiena plant accumulated As, Cd and Pb in higher levels than Aerva Javanica. Quantification of soil and plant pollution was studied using enrichment factors, contamination factor, pollution index and bioaccumulation factors and show good interpretations of the results. The overall results of this study show that the soil and plants near the gold mine tailing were highly toxic, and the plants and soil must not be uses for grazing or agriculture. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  10. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation: selective epidermal damage to human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, B R; Tang, S V; Arndt, K A; Stern, R S; Noe, J M; Rosen, S

    1985-09-01

    The interaction of normal human skin with low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation was studied using a three-phase approach. In phase one, freshly excised skin was observed immediately after impact. In phase two, skin irradiated 2 h prior to excision was studied. In phase three, human volunteers were irradiated and biopsied at time zero, 24 h and 48 h. Seventy-five sites were exposed and 60 biopsies were performed. The earliest histologic changes were observed in the 6-10 J/cm2 fluence (radiant exposure) range and these changes included spindle and vacuolar changes in the basal layer of the epidermis. Papillary dermal coagulation was present to a maximum of 0.03 mm. At fluences of 10-25 J/cm2, superficial dermal necrosis (0.06-0.08 mm) was observed. At fluences above 25 J/cm2, transepidermal necrosis was present with increasing papillary dermal necrosis that was in proportion to the energy density delivered. At 2h, basal vacuolar changes were accompanied by diffuse keratinocytic cell death where contact was maintained between the epidermis and dermis, while where separation occurred limited keratinocytic death was observed. The earliest changes occurred at lower threshold fluences (4-6 J/cm2). After 24 h, these doses resulted in extensive epidermal necrosis with focal acute inflammatory infiltrates. At 48 h, the degree of epidermal "slough" was proportional to the energy density delivered and was maximal with a fluence of 5.7 J/cm2 delivered whereas with a fluence of 3.8 J/cm2 thin slough (0.02 mm) was observed. These findings suggest that low-dose CO2 laser irradiation may provide a new approach to selectively damage the epidermis with minimal dermal damage.

  11. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in monoenergetic neutron fields: CCRI(III)-K11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, V.; Bonaldi, A. C.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Harano, H.; Masuda, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Moiseev, N.; Nico, J. S.; Nolte, R.; Oberstedt, S.; Roberts, N. J.; Röttger, S.; Thomas, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the validity of their national standards, National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) participate regularly in international comparisons. In the area of neutron metrology, Section III of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation is in charge of the organization of these comparisons. From September 2011 to October 2012, the eleventh key comparison, named CCRI(III)-K11, took place at the AMANDE facility of the LNE-IRSN, in France. Participants from nine NMIs came with their own primary reference instruments, or instruments traceable to primary standards, with the aim of determining the neutron fluence, at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum, per monitor count at four monoenergetic neutron fields: 27 keV, 565 keV, 2.5 MeV and 17 MeV. The key comparison reference values (KCRV) were evaluated as the weighted mean values of the results provided by seven participants. The uncertainties of each KCRV are between 0.9% and 1.7%. The degree of equivalence (DoE), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding KCRV, and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported and discussed. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  13. The effect of local fluence on the micropatterning of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils through proton beam writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Papaléo, R. M.; Dias, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of ion fluence on the development of microstructures produced by 2.2 MeV H+ impinging on 12-μm-thick poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET, Mylar®) foils. Several lines of 1 × 100 pixels corresponding to approximately 2.5 × 101.5 µm2 were patterned on PET foils using different ion fluences (from 1012 to 1017 H+/cm2) and etching times (from 1 to 60 min). We observe the presence of three different behaviors according to the ion fluence. Long etching times are necessary to open the structure in the low fluence regime, while moderate fluences require shorter etching times. In the high fluence regime, a more complex scenario emerges where short etching times lead to structures either fully or partially developed.

  14. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  15. Fluence Rate in UV Photoreactor for Disinfection of Water: Isotropically Radiating Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ilinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of fluence rate in the photochemical reactor using ultraviolet (UV radiation for disinfection of water for the case, when a cylinder of infinite length is used as a light source, has been considered. Such a cylinder is filled with an isotropically radiating medium. The dependence of the fluent rate on the diameter of the radiating cylinder has been analytically analyzed. The limiting case when the diameter of the radiating cylinder tends to zero has been considered and the notion of “effective interval” has been introduced. Based on this notion, the comparison of fluence rates for the cylinders of finite and infinite lengths has been performed. In the calculations of fluence rate, it is advisable to use the Chebyshev method for the operations of numerical integration.

  16. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, C; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Rivera, T; Azorín, J

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same.

  17. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollar, Esther, E-mail: e.rebollar@csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Tong, Daniel E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • IR pulsed laser ablation of aluminium gives rise to smooth layers of several tens of nanometers. • Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} and above 7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films and metallic aluminium films respectively. • Highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. • It is possible to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films. - Abstract: We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I–V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2}, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  18. Measurement of angular distribution of cosmic-ray muon fluence rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jeng-Wei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Department of Engineering and System Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Rong-Jiun [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei, E-mail: Shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.t [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    In this work a Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector was used to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic-ray muon fluence rate. Angular response functions of the detector at each measurement orientation were calculated by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, where no energy attenuation was taken into account. Coincidence counting rates were measured at ten orientations with equiangular intervals. The muon angular fluence rate spectrum was unfolded from the measured counting rates associated with the angular response functions using both the MAXED code and the parameter adjusting method.

  19. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  20. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  1. Simulation of the dependence of spatial fluence profiles on tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Medical laser applications are promoted as safe, effective treatments for a multiplicity of concerns, ranging from hyperthermal skin rejuvenation to subcutaneous tumor ablation. Chromophore and structural protein concentration and distribution within a patient's tissue vary from patient to patient and dictate the interaction of incident radiative energy of a specific wavelength with the target tissue. Laser parameters must be matched to tissue optical and thermal properties in order to achieve the desired therapeutic results without inducing unnecessary tissue damage, although accurate tissue optical properties are not always measured prior to and during laser therapies. A weighted variable step size Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation of skin tissue was used to determine the effects of variations in absorption (μa) and scattering coefficients (μs) and the degree of anisotropy (g) on the radiant energy transport per mm2 in response to steady-state photon propagation. The three parameters were varied in a factorial experimental design for the ranges of 0.25/mm isolate their impacts on the overall fluence distribution. Box plots of the resulting fluence profiles were created and compared to identify ranges in which optical property variance could be considered to significantly impact the spatial variance of fluence within the simulation volume. Results indicated that accurate prediction of the fluence profiles that will be achieved by any given medical laser treatment is unlikely without pre-treatment assessment of the tissue optical properties of individual patients.

  2. Two thermal methods to measure the energy fluence of a brief exposure of diagnostic x rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A A; Mascarenhas, S; dePaula, M H; Cameron, J R

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes two simple thermal methods for measuring the energy fluence in J/cm2 from a diagnostic x-ray exposure. Both detectors absorb essentially 100% of the radiation and give a signal that is directly proportional to the energy fluence of the x-ray beam. One detector measures the thermal effect when a pulse of x rays is totally absorbed in the pyroelectric detector of lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT). The other detector measures the expansion of a gas surrounding a lead disk detector in a photoacoustic chamber. The increased pressure of the gas is transmitted through a 1-mm duct to a sensitive microphone. Both detectors have previously been used to measure the energy fluence rate of continuous x-ray beams in the same energy region using a chopped beam and a lock-in amplifier. Measurement of the energy fluence of a pulse of radiation eliminates the need for the beam chopper and lock-in amplifier and results in a simple, rugged, and inexpensive dosimeter. Either method can be combined with the area of the beam to give an estimate of the imparted energy to the patient from a diagnostic x-ray exposure.

  3. Evaluation of the Fluence Conversion Factor for 32P in Sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    When 32S is exposed to neutrons it undergoes a 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a neutron cross section as shown in Figure 1. This reaction may be used to characterize the neutron fluence for neutrons greater than 3 MeV.

  4. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  5. Ultra low fluence rate photodynamic therapy: simulation of light emitted by the Cerenkov effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Jonathan; Wang, Fred; Zamora, Genesis; Trinidad, Anthony; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    PDT has been shown to be most effective at low fluence rates. Many radionuclides used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes produce measurable amounts of visible radiation when they decay via the Cerenkov effect which occurs when a charged particle travels faster in a dielectric medium than the speed of light in that medium. Cerenkov radiation from radiopharmaceuticals could serve as a source of extended duration, low level "internal" light, to mediate PDT, with the ultimate goals of overcoming some its current limitations. Using laser light, we are exploring the effects of fluence rates that could be generated by Cerenkov radiation on PDT efficacy. ALA or TPPS2a mediated PDT of rat gliomas monolayers or multicell spheroids ( F98, C6) was performed with 410 nm laser light exposure over an extended period of 24-96hrs. Photosensitizers were delivered either as a bolus or continuously with light exposure. At fluence rate of 20μW/cm2 effective PDT was obtained as measured by decrease in cell viability or inhibition of spheroid growth. PDT is effective at ultra low fluence rates if given over long time periods. No lower threshold has been ascertained. Since the half-life of 90Y, a radionuclide with a high Cherenkov yield is 64 hrs it is a good candidate to supply sufficient light activation for PDT. The combination of radionuclide and photodynamic therapies could improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment by exploiting synergies between these two modalities.

  6. New method for estimation of fluence complexity in IMRT fields and correlation with gamma analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanušová, T.; Vondráček, V.; Badraoui-Čuprová, K.; Horáková, I.; Koniarová, I.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimation of fluence complexity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields is proposed. Unlike other previously published works, it is based on portal images calculated by the Portal Dose Calculation algorithm in Eclipse (version 8.6, Varian Medical Systems) in the plane of the EPID aS500 detector (Varian Medical Systems). Fluence complexity is given by the number and the amplitudes of dose gradients in these matrices. Our method is validated using a set of clinical plans where fluence has been smoothed manually so that each plan has a different level of complexity. Fluence complexity calculated with our tool is in accordance with the different levels of smoothing as well as results of gamma analysis, when calculated and measured dose matrices are compared. Thus, it is possible to estimate plan complexity before carrying out the measurement. If appropriate thresholds are determined which would distinguish between acceptably and overly modulated plans, this might save time in the re-planning and re-measuring process.

  7. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Esther; Martínez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Castillejo, Marta

    2016-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I-V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm2 resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm2, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  8. Towards a laser fluence dependent nanostructuring of thin Au films on Si by nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pugliara, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Carria, E.; Romano, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bongiorno, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Fisicaro, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); La Magna, A.; Spinella, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Grimaldi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au nanoclusters are produced by nanosecond laser irradiations of thin Au film on Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shape, size, and surface density of the Au nanoclusters are tunable by laser fluence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation dynamic of the Au nanoclusters under nanosecond laser irradiation is analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, we study the nanostructuring effects of nanosecond laser irradiations on 5 nm thick Au film sputter-deposited on Si. After deposition of Au on Si substrate, nanosecond laser irradiations were performed increasing the laser fluence from 750 to 1500 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Several analyses techniques, such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were crossed to study the morphological evolution of the Au film as a function of laser fluence. In particular, the formation of Au nanoparticles was observed. The analyses allowed a quantitative evaluation of the evolution of the nanoparticles size, surface density, and shape as a function of the laser fluence. Therefore, a control the structural properties of the Au nanoparticles is reached, for example, for applications in Si nanowires growth or plasmonics.

  9. Substrate temperature and electron fluence effects on metallic films created by electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, S.G.; Landheer, K.; Hagen, C.W.; Fairbrother, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Using three different precursors [MeCpPtMe3, Pt(PF3)4, and W(CO)6], an ultra-high vacuum surface science approach has been used to identify and rationalize the effects of substrate temperature and electron fluence on the chemical composition and bonding in films created by electron beam induced

  10. Evaluation of fast neutron fluence for Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Young Kyou; Lim, Mi Joung; Kim, Byoung Chul; Kim, Kyung Sik [Korea Reactor Integrity Surveillance Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Unit 2 at Kori reactor has been put into operation in 1983. During 24 cycle operation, five surveillance capsules at inner vessel and three ex-vessel dosimeter at cavity both are taken out for evaluation to neutron fluence. The evaluations following the surveillance program of Kori 2 unit which are required detect and prevent degradation of safety-related structures and components of the vessel. The fast (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluencies are necessary to estimate the fracture toughness of the pressure vessel materials. The determination of the pressure vessel neutron fluence is based on both calculations and measurements. The fluence prediction is made with a calculation, and the measurements are used to qualify the calculational methodology. Measurement-to-calculation comparisons are used to identify biases in the calculations and to provide reliable estimates of the fluence uncertainties As shown in Fig. 1, the Kori unit 2 reactor vessel surveillance programs includes the analysis of flux dosimeters contained in capsules located on the inner vessel wall at the Beltline region (0., 15., 30. and 40. Azimuth) and Ex vessel dosimeter capsules located on the cavity at connected bid chain. In this paper, the methodologies used to perform neutron transport calculations and dosimetry evaluations are described, the results of the plant specific transport calculations are given for the beltline region of Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel and the comparisons of calculations and measurements are discussed

  11. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  12. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  13. Assessment of the Efficiency of HWCon IASCC Crack Growth Rate for High Fluence BWRMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the experimental study performed to assess the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry on the propagation rate of cracks generated by irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in high fluence material. The selection of the material and the test procedures followed for this study are presented. The test results obtained with 8.6 dpa specimen are discussed.

  14. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.L. [Primary Systems Inspection and Repair, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Rouden, J. [Material and Analytical Services, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Efsing, P. [Materials Mechanics, Research and Nuclear Development, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  15. Beam rate influence on dose distribution and fluence map in IMRT dynamic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosarek, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Lukasz; Bekman, Barbara; Petrovic, Borislava

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of beam rate on dose distribution in IMRT plans and then to evaluate agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions for various beam rate values. Accelerators used in radiotherapy utilize some beam rate modes which can shorten irradiation time and thus reduce ability of patient movement during a treatment session. This aspect should be considered in high conformal dynamic techniques. Dose calculation was done for two different beam rates (100 MU/min and 600 MU/min) in an IMRT plan. For both, a comparison of Radiation Planning Index (RPI) and MU was conducted. Secondly, the comparison of optimal fluence maps and corresponding actual fluence maps was done. Next, actual fluence maps were measured and compared with the calculated ones. Gamma index was used for that assessment. Additionally, positions of each leaf of the MLC were controlled by home made software. Dose distribution obtained for lower beam rates was slightly better than for higher beam rates in terms of target coverage and risk structure protection. Lower numbers of MUs were achieved in 100 MU/min plans than in 600 MU/min plans. Actual fluence maps converted from optimal ones demonstrated more similarity in 100 MU/min plans. Better conformity of the measured maps to the calculated ones was obtained when a lower beam rate was applied. However, these differences were small. No correlation was found between quality of fluence map conversion and leaf motion accuracy. Execution of dynamic techniques is dependent on beam rate. However, these differences are minor. Analysis shows a slight superiority of a lower beam rate. It does not significantly affect treatment accuracy.

  16. SU-E-T-436: Fluence-Based Trajectory Optimization for Non-Coplanar VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, G; Bamber, JC; Bedford, JL [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Evans, PM [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Saran, FH; Mandeville, HC [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a fluence-based trajectory optimization technique for non-coplanar VMAT for brain cancer. Methods: Single-arc non-coplanar VMAT trajectories were determined using a heuristic technique for five patients. Organ at risk (OAR) volume intersected during raytracing was minimized for two cases: absolute volume and the sum of relative volumes weighted by OAR importance. These trajectories and coplanar VMAT formed starting points for the fluence-based optimization method. Iterative least squares optimization was performed on control points 24° apart in gantry rotation. Optimization minimized the root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of PTV dose from the prescription (relative importance 100), maximum dose to the brainstem (10), optic chiasm (5), globes (5) and optic nerves (5), plus mean dose to the lenses (5), hippocampi (3), temporal lobes (2), cochleae (1) and brain excluding other regions of interest (1). Control point couch rotations were varied in steps of up to 10° and accepted if the cost function improved. Final treatment plans were optimized with the same objectives in an in-house planning system and evaluated using a composite metric - the sum of optimization metrics weighted by importance. Results: The composite metric decreased with fluence-based optimization in 14 of the 15 plans. In the remaining case its overall value, and the PTV and OAR components, were unchanged but the balance of OAR sparing differed. PTV RMS deviation was improved in 13 cases and unchanged in two. The OAR component was reduced in 13 plans. In one case the OAR component increased but the composite metric decreased - a 4 Gy increase in OAR metrics was balanced by a reduction in PTV RMS deviation from 2.8% to 2.6%. Conclusion: Fluence-based trajectory optimization improved plan quality as defined by the composite metric. While dose differences were case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  18. IMRT of prostate cancer. A comparison of fluence optimization with sequential segmentation and direct step-and-shoot optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treutwein, Marius; Hipp, Matthias; Koelbl, Oliver; Bogner, Ludwig [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has shown its superiority to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Different optimization algorithms are available: algorithms which first optimize the fluence followed by a sequencing (IM), and algorithms which involve the machine parameters directly in the optimization process (DSS). The aim of this treatment-planning study is to compare both of them regarding dose distribution and treatment time. Patients and methods: ten consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled for the planning study. The planning target volume and the rectum volume, urinary bladder and femoral heads as organs at risk were delineated. Average doses, the target dose homogeneity H, D{sub 5}, D{sub 95}, monitor units per fraction, and the number of segments were evaluated. Results: while there is only a small difference in the mean doses at rectum and bladder, there is a significant advantage for the target dose homogeneity in the DSS-optimized plans compared to the IM-optimized ones. Differences in the monitor units (nearly 10% less for DSS) and the number of segments are also statistically significant and reduce the treatment time. Conclusion: particularly with regard to the tumor control probability, the better homogeneity of the DSS-optimized plans is more profitable. The shorter treatment time is an improvement regarding intrafractional organ motion. The DSS optimizer results in a higher target dose homogeneity and, simultaneously, in a lower number of monitor units. Therefore, it should be preferred for IMRT of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  19. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...... that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier...

  20. An altitude and distance correction to the source fluence distribution of TGFs

    CERN Document Server

    Nisi, R S; Gjesteland, T; Collier, A B

    2016-01-01

    The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the...

  1. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.;

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  2. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...... 70 eV up to 145 eV in a direction normal to the target surface with increasing fluence. With increasing observation angle the time-of-flight spectra exhibit a peak at longer flight times, i.e. at a lower kinetic energy. At the highest fluence the ionized fraction of the ablated particles exceeds 0.5....

  3. High-power laser interference lithography process on photoresist: Effect of laser fluence and polarisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellman, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: mellman@ceit.es; Rodriguez, A.; Perez, N.; Echeverria, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Verevkin, Y.K. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ul' yanova Street, 603600 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Peng, C.S. [ORC (Tampere University of Technology), Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Berthou, T. [SILIOS Technologies SA, Rue Gaston Imbert prolongee 13790 Peynier (France); Wang, Z. [MEC (Cardiff University), Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Olaizola, S.M.; Ayerdi, I. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    High throughput and low cost fabrication techniques in the sub-micrometer scale are attractive for the industry. Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a promising technique that can produce one, two and three-dimensional periodical patterns over large areas. In this work, two- and four-beam laser interference lithography systems are implemented to produce respectively one- and two-dimensional periodical patterns. A high-power single pulse of {approx}8 ns is used as exposure process. The optimum exposure dose for a good feature patterning in a 600 nm layer of AZ-1505 photoresist deposited on silicon wafers is studied. The best aspect ratio is found for a laser fluence of 20 mJ/cm{sup 2}. A method to control the width of the sub-micrometer structures based on controlling the resist thickness and the laser fluence is proposed.

  4. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirkx, M.L.P.; Heijmen, B.J.M.; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam/Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application. (author)

  5. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, M. L. P.; Heijmen, B. J. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application.

  6. The importance of the direction distribution of neutron fluence, and methods of determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D.T. E-mail: david.bartlett@nrpb.org.uk; Drake, P.; D' Errico, F.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Matzke, M.; Tanner, R.J

    2002-01-01

    For the estimation of non-isotropic quantities such as personal dose equivalent and effective dose, and for the interpretation of the readings of personal dosemeters, it is necessary to determine both the energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence. In fact, for workplace fields, the fluence and dose-equivalent responses of dosemeters and the relationships of operational and protection quantities, are frequently more dependent on the direction than on the energy distribution. In general, the direction distribution will not be independent of the energy distribution, and simultaneous determination of both may be required, which becomes a complex problem. The extent to which detailed information can be obtained depends on the spectrometric properties and on the angle dependence of the response of the detectors used. Methods for the determination of direction distributions of workplace fields are described.

  7. Biphasic fluence-response curves for phytochrome-mediated kalanchoë seed germination : sensitization by gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, R; Dedonder, A; De Petter, E; Van Wiemeersch, L; Fredericq, H; De Greef, J; Steyaert, H; Stevens, H

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA(3)) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA(3) induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA(3) concentration. GA(3) having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA(3) appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal.

  8. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Rossomme, S.; Renaud, J.; Kanai, T.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, {{k}\\text{fl}} , needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm2, without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The {{k}\\text{fl}} term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the {{k}\\text{fl}} due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  9. An efficient method to determine double Gaussian fluence parameters in the eclipse™ proton pencil beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiajian; Liu, Wei; Stoker, Joshua; Ding, Xiaoning; Anand, Aman; Hu, Yanle; Herman, Michael G; Bues, Martin

    2016-12-01

    To find an efficient method to configure the proton fluence for a commercial proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment planning system (TPS). An in-water dose kernel was developed to mimic the dose kernel of the pencil beam convolution superposition algorithm, which is part of the commercial proton beam therapy planning software, eclipse™ (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The field size factor (FSF) was calculated based on the spot profile reconstructed by the in-house dose kernel. The workflow of using FSFs to find the desirable proton fluence is presented. The in-house derived spot profile and FSF were validated by a direct comparison with those calculated by the eclipse TPS. The validation included 420 comparisons of the FSFs from 14 proton energies, various field sizes from 2 to 20 cm and various depths from 20% to 80% of proton range. The relative in-water lateral profiles between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS agree very well even at the level of 10(-4). The FSFs between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS also agree well. The maximum deviation is within 0.5%, and the standard deviation is less than 0.1%. The authors' method significantly reduced the time to find the desirable proton fluences of the clinical energies. The method is extensively validated and can be applied to any proton centers using PBS and the eclipse TPS.

  10. Change of regional choroid thickness after reduced-fluence photodynamic therapy for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Saki; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Izumibata, Saeko; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate macular choroidal thickness after reduced-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT) for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Prospective, consecutive, interventional case series. Twenty-two eyes with chronic CSC were treated with reduced-fluence PDT. Macular choroidal thickness was examined using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with a 3-dimensinonal radial scan protocol in the choroidal mode before and 1, 3, and 6 months after the treatment. The mean choroidal thickness in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid (center, inner circle, and outer circle) was compared between before and after therapy, as well as between treated eyes and 54 volunteer normal eyes. Chronic CSC eyes showed significantly thicker choroids in the macular area compared with normal controls (P Choroidal thickness within the center area and inner circle showed a significant reduction at all time points after treatment (P choroidal thickness in the outer circle showed a statistically significant reduction at 1 and 3 months but not at 6 months. After treatment, the choroidal thickness reduced to the normal values at the center and inner circle, but was still significantly thicker in the outer circle (P choroids in the macular area. After reduced-fluence PDT, macular choroidal thickness became thinner within 6 months of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-04-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT.

  12. Effects of laser fluence on the structural properties of pulsed laser deposited ruthenium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Centre for Advanced Devices and Systems (CADS), Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) has received great interest in recent years for applications in microelectronics. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) enables the growth of Ru thin films at low temperatures. In this paper, we report for the first time the characterization of pulsed laser deposited Ru thin films. The deposition processes were carried out at room temperature in vacuum environment for different durations with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 355-nm laser wavelength, employing various laser fluences ranging from 2 J/cm{sup 2} to 8 J/cm{sup 2}. The effect of the laser fluence on the structural properties of the deposited Ru films was investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ru droplets, some spherical in shape and some flattened into round discs were found on the deposited Ru. The droplets were correlated to ripple formations on the target during the laser-induced ejection from the target. In addition, crystalline Ru with orientations of (100), (101), and (002) was observed in the XRD spectra and their intensities were found to increase with increasing laser fluence and film thickness. Grain sizes ranging from 20 nm to 35 nm were deduced using the Scherrer formula. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) show that the composition of the plume and the deposited Ru film was of high purity. (orig.)

  13. Analysis for the Effect of Spatial Discretization Method on AP1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiao Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a critical concern related to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. To estimate the structural integrity over the designed lifetime and to support analyses for a potential plant life extension, an accurate calculation of the fast neutron fluence (E>1.0 MeV or E>0.1 MeV at the RPV is significant. The discrete ordinates method is one of the main methods to solve such problems. During the calculation process, many factors will affect the results. In this paper, the deviations introduced by different differencing schemes and mesh sizes on the AP1000 RPV fast neutron fluence have been studied, which are based on new discrete ordinates code ARES. The analysis shows that the differencing scheme (diamond difference with or without linear zero fix-up, theta weighted, directional theta weighted, and exponential directional weighted introduces a deviation within 4%. The coarse mesh (4 × 4 cm meshes in XY plane leads to approximately 23.7% calculation deviation compared to those of refined mesh (1 × 1 cm meshes in XY plane. Comprehensive study on the deviation introduced by differencing scheme and mesh size has great significance for reasoned evaluation of RPV fast neutron fluence calculation results.

  14. Kinetic study of the effects of energetic fluence, the fluence flow, and the induced fading by heavy ions and. gamma. photons in cellulose triacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moliton, J.P. (Laboratoire des Radiations Ionisantes, Limoges, France); Boutinaud, C.; Vareille, J.C.; Decossas, J.L.; Teyssier, J.L.; Delaunay, B.

    1982-07-01

    The kinetic interpretation of the damage produced by heavy ions (/sup 84/Kr and /sup 35/Cl from 1 MeV/amu) and ..gamma.. radiation in cellulose triacetate leads to an exponential dependence on the ion fluence. A comparison of the fading effect produced by heavy ions and ..gamma.. rays shows that the heavy ions, unlike ..gamma.. rays, cause irreversible damage. Finally, a nonlinear dependence on the flux of ions and ..gamma.. rays is found in the kinetics of radiation damage. This result is contrary to the usual assumption that heavy-ion flux, like ..gamma..-ray flux, is additive, at least for the fluxes of 10/sup 9/ to 2 x 10/sup 10/ ions/cm/sup 2/ s and dose rates of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ Gy/h used in this work.

  15. Analysis of the longitudinal dependence of the downstream fluence of large solar energetic proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Daniel; Sanahuja, Blai; Aran, Angels; Agueda, Neus; Jiggens, Piers

    2016-07-01

    Simulations of the solar energetic particle (SEP) intensity-time profiles are needed to estimate the radiation environment for interplanetary missions. At present, the physics-based models applied for such a purpose, and including a moving source of particles, are not able to model the portion of the SEP intensity enhancement occurring after the coronal/interplanetary shock crossing by the observer (a.k.a. the downstream region). This is the case, for example, of the shock-and-particle model used to build the SOLPENCO2 code. SOLPENCO2 provides the statistical modelling tool developed in the ESA/SEPEM project for interplanetary missions with synthetic SEP event simulations for virtual spacecraft located at heliocentric distances between 0.2 AU and 1.6 AU (http://dev.sepem.oma.be/). In this work we present an analysis of 168 individual SEP events observed at 1 AU from 1988 to 2013. We identify the solar eruptive phenomena associated with these SEP events, as well as the in-situ passage of interplanetary shocks. For each event, we quantify the amount of fluence accounted in the downstream region, i.e. after the passage of the shock, at the 11 SEPEM reference energy channels (i.e., from 5 to 300 MeV protons). First, from the subset of SEP events simultaneously detected by near Earth spacecraft (using SEPEM reference data) and by one of the STEREO spacecraft, we select those events for which the downstream region can be clearly determined. From the 8 selected multi-spacecraft events, we find that the western observations of each event have a minor downstream contribution than their eastern counterpart, and that the downstream-to-total fluence ratio of these events decreases as a function of the energy. Hence, there is a variation of the downstream fluence with the heliolongitude in SEP events. Based on this result, we study the variation of the downstream-to-total fluence ratios of the total set of individual events. We confirm the eastern-to-western decrease of the

  16. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Mahmood, Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10-3 Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm-2 to 6 J cm-2. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas Csbnd H stretching vibration band is formed for two moderate fluences (5 J cm-2 and 5.5 J cm-2) in case of ablation in hydrogen. Raman spectroscopy shows that no new bands are formed in case of ablation in both environments; however a slight Raman shift is observed which is attributed to laser-induced stresses. The electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge increases with increasing fluence and is also dependent upon the environment as well as grown structures.

  17. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, T. P.; Mistretta, C. A.

    2014-03-01

    Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of the view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of ten iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron, the x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or ‘flat field’ scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to ‘flat field’ CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. The results presented in

  18. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So-Yeon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); Carlson, Joel [Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MI{sub SPORT}) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The r

  19. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  20. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... from a silver target irradiated by a laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum was measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes. The time-of-flight spectra in all directions, as well as the total angular yield were determined. The angular distribution peaks strongly in forward direction...... flight times, i.e., at a lower kinetic energy. At the highest fluence, the ionized fraction of the ablated particles in the plume increases up to 0.5....

  1. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, W. Tyler, E-mail: watkinswt@virginia.edu; Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Moore, Joseph A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Gordon, James [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  2. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  3. Study of the fluence dependent interplay between laser induced material removal mechanisms in metals: Vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishburn, J.M. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia); Withford, M.J. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia)]. E-mail: withford@ics.mq.edu.au; Coutts, D.W. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Piper, J.A. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia)

    2006-05-15

    Three quantitative methods, namely profilometry, high speed imaging and recoil momentum measurements using a ballistic pendulum, are used to determine the interplay of vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection on nanosecond laser induced material removal. At low to moderate fluences (<7 J cm{sup -2}) material removal occurs via vaporization and melt displacement in aluminium. At high fluences (>7 J cm{sup -2}), material removal occurs predominantly via the explosive ejection of liquid droplets from the melt pool.

  4. Fluence dependence of the ultrafast transition from the A7 to the simple cubic structure in arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntemann, Nils; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Garcia, Martin E. [Universitaet Kassel, Theoretische Physik, Kassel (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    We extend a previous theoretical study, in which we have predicted that a solid-solid phase transition can be induced by a laser in arsenic under pressure, to higher fluences. In particular, we compute the fluence that is needed to induce an ultrafast structural transition from the A7 to the simple cubic phase as a function of the applied pressure. We further discuss the possibility of ultrafast, laser-induced melting. (orig.)

  5. A Directional Dose Equivalent Monitor for Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Alberts, W.G.; Curzio, G.; Matzke, M.; Nath, R.; Siebert, B.R.L

    2001-07-01

    A directional dose equivalent monitor is introduced which consists of a 30 cm diameter spherical phantom hosting a superheated drop detector embedded at a depth of 10 mm. The device relies on the similarity between the fluence response of neutron superheated drop detectors based on halocarbon-12 and the quality-factor-weighted kerma factor. This implies that these detectors can be used for in-phantom dosimetry and provide a direct reading of dose equivalent at depth. The directional dose equivalent monitor was characterised experimentally with fast neutron calibrations and numerically with Monte Carlo simulations. The fluence response was determined at angles of 0, 45, 90, 135 and 180 degrees for thermal to 20 MeV neutrons. The response of the device is closely proportional to the fluence-to-directional dose equivalent conversion coefficient, H'{sub F}(10;a,E). Therefore, our monitor is suitable for a direct measurement of neutron directional dose equivalent, H'(10), regardless of angle and energy distribution of the neutron fluence. (author)

  6. Neutron fluence rate measurements at an underground laboratory: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Kasper, Angelika; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Zimbal, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    We describe the analysis of neutron fluence rate measurements that were carried out at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller, near Dresden, Germany, which is at a depth of 47 m. At this depth, neutrons are mainly produced by natural radioactivity via spontaneous fission and (α, n) reactions, and by reactions induced by cosmic-ray muons. The measurements were made with the NEMUS Bonner sphere spectrometer. This system consists of a set of moderating spheres of different diameters and a 3He-filled proportional counter placed at the center of each sphere. Due to time constraints, it was only possible to use three of the spheres and the "bare detector" (i.e., a 3He-filled proportional counter without a moderating sphere). In addition to the measurements carried out at Felsenkeller, we also made low-level measurements with a set of 3He-filled proportional counters in the UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine, near Braunschweig, Germany, which is at a depth of 490 m. The neutron background at UDO is substantially lower than that at Felsenkeller and these data are useful for setting limits on the background of the 3He-filled proportional counters. To estimate the neutron fluence rate at Felsenkeller, we did an analysis which took into account the measurements at UDO, Felsenkeller, and calibration measurements made at our facility in PTB. The analysis was done using Bayesian parameter estimation. Since the data consisted of low-level measurements, careful attention was given to the modeling of the intrinsic background of the detector and to identifying relevant sources of uncertainty. With the approach developed here, it is possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate with a relatively small uncertainty of the order of 10%. The method should be useful for other underground laboratories.

  7. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  8. Efficient localized heating of silver nanoparticles by low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Sivayoganathan, M. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Duley, W.W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zhou, Y., E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Obtained efficient localized heating (melting) of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure, which is induced by the excitation of surface plasmon under femtosecond laser irradiation. • Resonance condition is not required here for surface plasmon induced efficient heating; this is different from previous studies where surface plasmon resonance is usually used to obtain enough heating generation. Compared to the previous studies of off-resonance laser heating, the laser fluence used in this study to obtain melting of silver nanoparticles is much lower, only 7.2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • Beside surface plasmon itself induced heating, surface plasmon induced polymer shell deformation which resulted in electron and ion emission was identified to have certain contribution to the heating of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure. - Abstract: Highly localized heating can be obtained in plasmonic nanomaterials using laser excitation but the high fluences required often produce unacceptable damage in and near irradiated components and structures. In this work we show that plasmonic nanostructures involving aggregated Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be heated effectively without attendant damage to the surrounding material when these structures are irradiated with many overlapping femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at very low fluence. Under these conditions, the effectiveness of heating is such that the temperature of 50 nm Ag NPs can be raised to their melting point from room temperature. Aggregates of these NPs are then observed to grow into larger spherical particles as laser heating continues. Imaging of these materials shows that the initiation of melting in individual Ag NPs depends on the local geometry surrounding each NP and on the polarization of the incident laser radiation. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations indicate that melting is triggered by localized surface plasmon (LSP)-induced electric field enhancement at “hotspots”.

  9. Estimation of saturation activities for activation experiments in CHARM and CSBF using Fluence Conversion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, Helene Chloe; Iliopoulou, Elpida; CERN. Geneva. HSE Department

    2017-01-01

    As summer student at CERN, I have been working in the Radiation Protection group for 10 weeks. I worked with the \\textsc{Fluka} Monte Carlo simulation code, using Fluence Conversion Coefficients method to perform simulations to estimate the saturation activities for activation experiments in the \\textsc{CSBF} and the \\textsc{Charm} facility in the East Experimental Area. The provided results will be used to plan a Monte Carlo benchmark in the \\textsc{CSBF} during a beam period at the end of August 2017.

  10. Investigating the Causes of Solar-Cycle Variations in Solar Energetic Particle Fluences and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, Richard; Cohen, Christina; Mason, Glenn M.; von Rosenvinge, Tycho; Li, Gang; Smith, Charles; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-04-01

    Measurements with ACE, STEREO, and GOES show that the number of large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in solar cycle 24 is reduced by a factor of ~2 compared to this point of cycle 23, while the fluences of >10 MeV/nuc ions from H to Fe are reduced by factors ranging from ~4 to ~10. We investigate the origin of these cycle-to-cycle differences by evaluating possible factors that include properties of the associated CMEs, seed particle densities, and the interplanetary magnetic field strength and turbulence levels. These properties will be evaluated in the context of existing SEP acceleration models.

  11. Diamond single crystal-surface modification under high- fluence ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikin, V. A.; Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Palyanov, Yu N.; Popov, V. P.; Shmytkova, E. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    The modification of (111) face of synthetic diamond has been studied experimentally for high-fluence 30 keV argon bombardment. It has been found that ion irradiation leads to the electrically conductive layer formation the sheet resistance of which decreases more than 100 times while changing the temperature of the irradiated diamond from 70 to 400 oC. This effect, as well as significant changes of optical transmittance after ion irradiation are associated with ion-induced structural changes of irradiated diamond obtained by the methods of Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Residual radioactivity measurement in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the evaluation of DS86 neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, K.; Endo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi, Hiroshima (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Residual {sup 152}Eu activity produced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured in seven mineral samples located up to 1142 m from the epicenter. Europium was chemically separated from the sample and gamma-ray measurement was carried out with a well-type Ge detector. Deduced specific activities were compared with previous measurements and with activation calculation based on the DS86 neutron fluence. Present results are slightly higher than the calculation at far distances. However, systematic discrepancy as has been observed in Hiroshima is not clear. Further measurements for samples beyond 1000 m from the hypocenter are necessary to ensure the discrepancy problem. (author)

  13. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  14. The GRB afterglow onset observed by REM: fireball Lorentz factor and afterglow fluence

    CERN Document Server

    Malesani, Daniele; Vergani, Susanna; Covino, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of the early light curves of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A, carried out with the pink robotic telescope REM. A clear peak is detected for both events, which is interpreted as the onset of the afterglow, that is the time at which the fireball starts decelerating. This detection allows to directly measure the initial fireball Lorentz factor, which was found to be Gamma_0 ~ 400 for both events, fully confirming the ultrarelativistic nature of gamma-ray burst fireballs. Sampling the light curve before the peak also allows to compute the bolometric fluence of the afterglow, which is 16% of the prompt one in the case of GRB 060418.

  15. Recombination monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-03

    This is a brief report on LEReC recombination monitor design considerations. The recombination produced Au78+ ion rate is reviewed. Based on this two designs are discussed. One is to use the large dispersion lattice. It is shown that even with the large separation of the Au78+ beam from the Au79+ beam, the continued monitoring of the recombination is not possible. Accumulation of Au78+ ions is needed, plus collimation of the Au79+ beam. In another design, it is shown that the recombination monitor can be built based on the proposed scheme with the nominal lattice. From machine operation point of view, this design is preferable. Finally, possible studies and the alternative strategies with the basic goal of the monitor are discussed.

  16. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.gomezselles@imdea.org; Martin-Bragado, Ignacio [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Claverie, Alain [CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Sklenard, Benoit [CEA, LETI, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Benistant, Francis [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  17. SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, A [University College London, London (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Thomas, R [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Bouchard, H [University of Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Kacperek, A [National Eye Proton therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral (United Kingdom); Vondracek, V [Proton Therapy Center, Prague (Czech Republic); Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Palmans, H [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For photon and electron beams, the standard device used to measure absorbed dose is a calorimeter. Standards laboratories are currently working on the establishment of graphite calorimeters as a primary standard for proton beams. To provide a practical method for graphite calorimetry, it is necessary to convert dose to graphite to dose to water, requiring knowledge of the water-to-graphite stopping-power ratio and the fluence correction factor. This study aims to present a novel method to determine fluence corrections experimentally, and to apply this methodology to low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Measurements were performed in 60 MeV and 180 MeV proton beams. Experimental information was obtained from depth-dose ionization chamber measurements performed in a water phantom. This was repeated with different thicknesses of graphite plates in front of the water phantom. One distinct advantage of this method is that only ionization chamber perturbation factors for water are required. Fluence corrections were also obtained through Monte Carlo simulations for comparison with the experiments. Results: The experimental observations made in this study confirm the Monte Carlo results. Overall, fluence corrections between water and graphite increased with depth, with a maximum correction of 1% for the low-energy beam and 4% for the high-energy beam. The results also showed that a fraction of the secondary particles generated in proton therapy beams do not have enough energy to cross the ionization chamber wall; thus, their contribution is not accounted for in the measured fluence corrections. This effect shows up as a discrepancy in fluence corrections of 1% and has been confirmed by simulations of the experimental setup. Conclusion: Fluence corrections derived by experiment do not account for low-energy secondary particles that are stopped in the ion chamber wall. This work will contribute to a practical graphite calorimetry technique for determining

  18. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  19. Characterization of 235U Targets for the Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, J.; Anastasiou, M.; Eykens, R.; Moens, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2014-05-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program (EMRP), aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. As part of this project a secondary neutron fluence standard is being developed and tested at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). This secondary standard will help to reach the neutron cross section measurement uncertainties required for the design of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. Such a neutron fluence device contains targets for which the neutron induced cross section is considered to be a standard. A careful preparation and characterization of these samples is an essential part of its development. In this framework a set of 235U targets has been produced by vacuum deposition of UF4 on aluminum backings by the target preparation laboratory at IRMM. These targets have been characterized for both their total mass and mass distribution over the sample area.

  20. Squeezed Thermal Phonons Precurse Nonthermal Melting of Silicon as a Function of Fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeuwe S. Zijlstra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A femtosecond-laser pulse can induce ultrafast nonthermal melting of various materials along pathways that are inaccessible under thermodynamic conditions, but it is not known whether there is any structural modification at fluences just below the melting threshold. Here, we show for silicon that in this regime the room-temperature phonons become thermally squeezed, which is a process that has not been reported before in this material. We find that the origin of this effect is the sudden femtosecond-laser-induced softening of interatomic bonds, which can also be described in terms of a modification of the potential energy surface. We further find in ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations on laser-excited potential energy surfaces that the atoms move in the same directions during the first stages of nonthermal melting and thermal phonon squeezing. Our results demonstrate how femtosecond-laser-induced coherent fluctuations precurse complete atomic disordering as a function of fluence. The common underlying bond-softening mechanism indicates that this relation between thermal squeezing and nonthermal melting is not material specific.

  1. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  2. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  3. Comparison of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for deuterons, tritons and helions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Friedberg, Wallace; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Secondary radiation in aircraft and spacecraft includes deuterons, tritons and helions. Two sets of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for isotropic exposure to these particles were compared: one used the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) radiation transport code coupled with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms (PHITS-ICRP) and the other the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport code coupled with modified BodyBuilder™ phantoms (MCNPX-BB). Also, two sets of fluence-to-effective dose equivalent conversion coefficients calculated using the PHITS-ICRP combination were compared: one used quality factors based on linear energy transfer; the other used quality factors based on lineal energy (y). Finally, PHITS-ICRP effective dose coefficients were compared with PHITS-ICRP effective dose equivalent coefficients. The PHITS-ICRP and MCNPX-BB effective dose coefficients were similar, except at high energies, where MCNPX-BB coefficients were higher. For helions, at most energies effective dose coefficients were much greater than effective dose equivalent coefficients. For deuterons and tritons, coefficients were similar when their radiation weighting factor was set to 2.

  4. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  5. Fast modelling of spectra and stopping-power ratios using differentiated fluence pencil kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2008-08-21

    Modern radiotherapy steadily utilizes more of the available degrees of freedom provided by radiotherapy equipment, raising the need for the dosimetric methods to deliver reliable measurements for situations where the spectral properties of the radiation field may also vary. A kernel-based superposition method is presented for which the spectra from any field modulation can be instantly calculated, thus facilitating the determination of dosimetric quantities at arbitrary locations. A database of fluence pencil kernels describing the fluence resulting from point monodirectional monoenergetic beams incident onto a water phantom has been calculated with the PENELOPE-2005 Monte Carlo package. Spectra calculated by means of the kernels are presented for various 6 MV fields. The spectra have been used to investigate depth and lateral variations of water-to-air stopping-power ratios. Results show that the stopping-power ratio decreases with depth, and that this effect is more pronounced for small fields. These variations are clearly connected to spectral variations. For a 10 x 10 cm(2) field, the difference between the stopping-power ratio at 2.5 cm depth and 30 cm depth is less than 0.3% while for a 0.3 x 0.3 cm(2) field this difference is 0.7%. Ratios outside the field were found to be sensitive to the collimator leakage spectral variations.

  6. Statistical analysis on the fluence factor of surveillance test data of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang; Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The transition temperature shift (TTS) of the reactor pressure vessel materials is an important factor that determines the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. The prediction of the TTS at the end of a plant’s lifespan is calculated based on the equation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 revision 2 (RG1.99/2) from the US. The fluence factor in the equation was expressed as a power function, and the exponent value was determined by the early surveillance data in the US. Recently, an advanced approach to estimate the TTS was proposed in various countries for nuclear power plants, and Korea is considering the development of a new TTS model. In this study, the TTS trend of the Korean surveillance test results was analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and a mixed-effect model based on the power function. The nonlinear regression model yielded a similar exponent as the power function in the fluence compared with RG1.99/2. The mixed-effect model had a higher value of the exponent and showed superior goodness of fit compared with the nonlinear regression model. Compared with RG1.99/2 and RG1.99/3, the mixed-effect model provided a more accurate prediction of the TTS.

  7. Inferences of Shell Asymmetry in ICF Implosions using Fluence Compensated Neutron Images at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D.; Fittinghoff, D.; Bionta, R.; Smalyuk, V.; Grim, G.; Munro, D.; Spears, B.; Raman, K.; Clark, D.; Kritcher, A.; Hinkel, D.; Hurricane, O.; Callahan, D.; Döppner, T.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Ross, S.; Meezan, N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Volegov, P.; Merill, F.

    2016-10-01

    In ICF experiments, a dense shell is imploded and used to compress and heat a hotspot of DT fuel. Controlling the symmetry of this process is both important and challenging. It is therefore important to observe the symmetry of the stagnated shell assembly. The Neutron Imaging System at the NIF is used to observe the primary 14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and the down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV), from the assembled shell but with a strong imprint from the primary-neutron fluence. Using a characteristic scattering angle approximation, we have compensated the image for this fluence effect, revealing information about shell asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without models. Preliminary observations with NIF data show asymmetries in imploded shell, which will be compared with other nuclear diagnostics and postshot simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Signal and noise of Diamond Pixel Detectors at High Radiation Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Hügging, Fabian; Kagan, Harris; Krüger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    CVD diamond is an attractive material option for LHC vertex detectors because of its strong radiation-hardness causal to its large band gap and strong lattice. In particular, pixel detectors operating close to the interaction point profit from tiny leakage currents and small pixel capacitances of diamond resulting in low noise figures when compared to silicon. On the other hand, the charge signal from traversing high energy particles is smaller in diamond than in silicon by a factor of about 2.2. Therefore, a quantitative determination of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of diamond in comparison with silicon at fluences in excess of 10$^{15}$ n$_{eq}$ cm$^{-2}$, which are expected for the LHC upgrade, is important. Based on measurements of irradiated diamond sensors and the FE-I4 pixel readout chip design, we determine the signal and the noise of diamond pixel detectors irradiated with high particle fluences. To characterize the effect of the radiation damage on the materials and the signal decrease, the chang...

  9. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. J.; Smith, G. W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M. C.

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCD's) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4-12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate approx. = .05 V/rad responsivity with greater than or = 1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or 'peaks' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 105 to 107 n/cc range indicate smearing over approx. 1 to 10 percent of the CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  10. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana, E-mail: dianabachillerperea@gmail.com [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Debelle, Aurélien, E-mail: aurelien.debelle@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P. 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique. - Highlights: • High-temperature MeV-ion irradiated MgO exhibits a two-step damage process. • The occurrence of the second step is delayed with increasing temperature. • The damage level decreases with increasing temperature. • A shift of the damage peak is observed with increasing fluence. • A high defect mobility at high temperatures in MgO is clearly evidenced.

  11. A Hierarchical Relationship between CME Properties and the Fluence Spectral Index of Large Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, Seiji; Thakur, Neeharika; Makela, Pertti; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    We report on a hierarchical relationship found between properties of white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the fluence spectral indices of the associated Large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) Events. We consider 74 large SEP events from the western hemisphere in solar cycles 23 and 24 by multiple spacecraft (SAMPEX, GOES, and STEREO). The associated CMEs are observed by SOHO. We find that CMEs with high initial acceleration are associated with SEP events with the hardest fluence spectra, while those with lowest initial acceleration have SEP events with the softest fluence spectra; CMEs with intermediate initial acceleration result in SEP events with moderately hard fluence spectra. Impulsive acceleration leading to high CME speeds close to the Sun results in shock formation close to the Sun, where the ambient magnetic field and density are high and the particles are energized more efficiently. Slowly accelerating CMEs drive shocks at large distances from the Sun, where the magnetic field and density have fallen off significantly, reducing the efficiency of shock acceleration. These opposite extremes are represented by ground level enhancement (GLE) events that have high speeds early on (high initial acceleration) and the SEP events associated with CMEs from quiescent filament region that have low early speeds (low initial acceleration). This finding strongly supports the idea that CME-driven shocks accelerate SEPs and the heliocentric distance where the acceleration takes place decides the hardness of the SEP fluence spectrum.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  13. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G.; De Angelis, L.; Rit, S.; Hansen, D.; Belka, C.; Bashkirov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Coutrakon, G.; Schubert, K. E.; Schulte, R. W.; Parodi, K.; Landry, G.

    2017-08-01

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  14. Comparison of direct machine parameter optimization versus fluence optimization with sequential sequencing in IMRT of hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogner Ludwig

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effects of direct machine parameter optimization in the treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for hypopharyngeal cancer as compared to subsequent leaf sequencing in Oncentra Masterplan v1.5. Methods For 10 hypopharyngeal cancer patients IMRT plans were generated in Oncentra Masterplan v1.5 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, the Netherlands for a Siemens Primus linear accelerator. For optimization the dose volume objectives (DVO for the planning target volume (PTV were set to 53 Gy minimum dose and 59 Gy maximum dose, in order to reach a dose of 56 Gy to the average of the PTV. For the parotids a median dose of 22 Gy was allowed and for the spinal cord a maximum dose of 35 Gy. The maximum DVO to the external contour of the patient was set to 59 Gy. The treatment plans were optimized with the direct machine parameter optimization ("Direct Step & Shoot", DSS, Raysearch Laboratories, Sweden newly implemented in Masterplan v1.5 and the fluence modulation technique ("Intensity Modulation", IM which was available in previous versions of Masterplan already. The two techniques were compared with regard to compliance to the DVO, plan quality, and number of monitor units (MU required per fraction dose. Results The plans optimized with the DSS technique met the DVO for the PTV significantly better than the plans optimized with IM (p = 0.007 for the min DVO and p 0.05. Plan quality, target coverage and dose homogeneity inside the PTV were superior for the plans optimized with DSS for similar dose to the spinal cord and lower dose to the normal tissue. The mean dose to the parotids was lower for the plans optimized with IM. Treatment plan efficiency was higher for the DSS plans with (901 ± 160 MU compared to (1151 ± 157 MU for IM (p-value Renormalization of the IM plans to the mean of the dose to 95% of the PTV (D95 of the DSS plans, resulted in similar target coverage and dose to the parotids for both

  15. Fluence measurement at the neutron time of flight experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Jericha, Erwin

    At the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new spallation target was installed in 2008. In 2008 and 2009 the commissioning of the new target took place. During the summer 2009 a fission chamber of the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig was used for the neutron fluence measurement. The evaluation of the data recorded with this detector is the primary topic of this thesis. Additionally a neutron transmission experiment with air has been performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (ATI). The experiment was implemented to clarify a question about the scattering cross section of molecular gas which could not be answered clearly via the literature. This problem came up during the evaluations for n_TOF.

  16. Energy spectra and fluence of the neutrons produced in deformed space-time conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Rosada, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, spectra of energy and fluence of neutrons produced in the conditions of deformed space-time (DST), due to the violation of the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) in the nuclear interactions are shown for the first time. DST-neutrons are produced by a mechanical process in which AISI 304 steel bars undergo a sonication using ultrasounds with 20 kHz and 330 W. The energy spectrum of the DST-neutrons has been investigated both at low (less than 0.4 MeV) and at high (up to 4 MeV) energy. We could conclude that the DST-neutrons have different spectra for different energy intervals. It is therefore possible to hypothesize that the DST-neutrons production presents peculiar features not only with respect to the time (asynchrony) and space (asymmetry) but also in the neutron energy spectra.

  17. Fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for polyethylene-moderated {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, J.E.; Soldat, K.L.; Stewart, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Casson, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Neutron measurements and calculations were conducted to characterize the polyethylene-moderated {sup 252}Cf source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL). The 12-inch-diameter polyethylene sphere produces a highly scattered neutron spectrum which is more representative of most radiation fields found in the workplace than the D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron spectrum typically used for dosimeter calibration. However, the energy-dependent fluence and dose equivalent must be well known before using such a source for radiation protection purposes. The measurements and calculations were performed as independent checks of the desired quantities which were the flux, the absorbed dose rate, the dose equivalent rate, and the average energy. These quantities were determined for the polyethylene sphere with and without an outer cadmium shell and compared with a D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf source.

  18. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  19. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose rates and its validation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Kumawat; V Kumar; P Srinivasan

    2009-03-01

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, neutron dose rates are experimentally measured at different locations of a 5Ci Am–Be source, shielded in Howitzer-type system and these results are compared with those estimated using (i) modified CASCADE.04.d and (ii) MCNP4A codes and it is found that the agreement is good. The paper presents details of modification and results of the comparative study.

  20. In-air fluence profiles and water depth dose for uncollimated electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toutaoui Abdelkader

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced electron beam dose calculation models for radiation treatment planning systems require the input of a phase space beam model to configure a clinical electron beam in a computer. This beam model is a distribution in position, energy, and direction of electrons and photons in a plane in front of the patient. The phase space beam model can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head or from a limited set of measurements. In the latter case, parameters of the electron phase space beam model are obtained by fitting measured to calculated dosimetric data. In the present work, data for air fluence profiles and water depth doses have been presented for electron beams without an applicator for a medical linear accelerator. These data are used to parameterize the electron phase space beam model to a Monte Carlo dose calculation module available in the first commercial (MDS Nordion, now Nucletron Monte Carlo treatment planning for electron beams.

  1. Retention of nanocrystalline WNx layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Angella, G.; Dellasega, D.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pedroni, M.; Ricci, D.; Rigato, V.; Passoni, M.

    2015-11-01

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N2 gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WNx compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WNx compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼1024 m-2). It is shown that WNx compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER.

  2. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  3. FLUKA Simulation of Particle Fluences to ALICE due to LHC Injection Kicker Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Shetty, N V; Di Mauro, A; Lechner, A; Leogrande, E; Uythoven, J

    2014-01-01

    The counter-rotating beams of the LHC are injected in insertion regions which also accommodate the ALICE and LHCb experiments. An assembly of beam absorbers ensures the protection of machine elements in case of injection kicker failures, which can affect either the injected or the stored beam. In the first years of LHC operation, secondary particle showers due to beam impact on the injection beam stopper caused damage to the MOS injectors of the ALICE silicon drift detector as well as high-voltage trips in other ALICE subdetectors. In this study, we present FLUKA [1,2] simulations of particle fluences to the ALICE cavern for injection failures encountered during operation. Two different cases are reported, one where the miskicked beam is fully intercepted and one where the beam grazes the beam stopper.

  4. In-air fluence profiles and water depth dose for uncollimated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutaoui, Abedelkadar; Aichouche, Amar Nassim; Adjidir, Kenza Adjidir; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2008-01-01

    Advanced electron beam dose calculation models for radiation treatment planning systems require the input of a phase space beam model to configure a clinical electron beam in a computer. This beam model is a distribution in position, energy, and direction of electrons and photons in a plane in front of the patient. The phase space beam model can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head or from a limited set of measurements. In the latter case, parameters of the electron phase space beam model are obtained by fitting measured to calculated dosimetric data. In the present work, data for air fluence profiles and water depth doses have been presented for electron beams without an applicator for a medical linear accelerator. These data are used to parameterize the electron phase space beam model to a Monte Carlo dose calculation module available in the first commercial (MDS Nordion, now Nucletron) Monte Carlo treatment planning for electron beams. PMID:19893707

  5. Status of the design concepts for a high fluence fast pulse reactor (HFFPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, J.S.; Nelson, W.E.; Rosenstroch, B.

    1978-10-01

    The report describes progress that has been made on the design of a High Fluence Fast Pulse Reactor (HFFPR) through the end of calendar year 1977. The purpose of this study is to present design concepts for a test reactor capable of accommodating large scale reactor safety tests. These concepts for reactor safety tests are adaptations of reactor concepts developed earlier for DOE/OMA for the conduct of weapon effects tests. The preferred driver core uses fuel similar to that developed for Sandia's ACPR upgrade. It is a BeO/UO/sub 2/ fuel that is gas cooled and has a high volumetric heat capacity. The present version of the design can drive large (217) pin bundles of prototypically enriched mixed oxide fuel well beyond the fuel's boiling point. Applicability to specific reactor safety accident scenarios and subsequent design improvements will be presented in future reports on this subject.

  6. Identification of major proton fluence events from nitrates in polar ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M A; Smart, D F; Dreschhoff, G A

    1999-06-01

    Large transient concentrations of nitrates in polar ice cores have been identified as the signature of some major solar proton fluence events between 1940 and 1991. We review this solar proton proxy identification technique using nitrate concentration measurements in ice cores from the Arctic and Antarctic. Using this identification technique we go back in time in an attempt to identify major solar proton events during the past several centuries. There is a very large nitrate increase corresponding to the Carrington flare of 1859 evident in the Arctic ice core. Other significant nitrate increases may indicate that major solar proton events occurred toward the end of the last century. The problems associated with this new technique of using nitrates as proxies to identify solar proton events are discussed.

  7. Ultrahigh precision nonlinear reflectivity measurement system for saturable absorber mirrors with self-referenced fluence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsila, Lasse; Härkönen, Antti; Hyyti, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of nonlinear optical reflectivity of saturable absorber devices is discussed. A setup is described that enables absolute accuracy of reflectivity measurements better than 0.3%. A repeatability within 0.02% is shown for saturable absorbers with few-percent modulation depth. The setup incorporates an in situ knife-edge characterization of beam diameters, making absolute reflectivity estimations and determination of saturation fluences significantly more reliable. Additionally, several measures are discussed to substantially improve the reliability of the reflectivity measurements. At its core, the scheme exploits the limits of state-of-the-art digital lock-in technology but also greatly benefits from a fiber-based master-oscillator power-amplifier source, the use of an integrating sphere, and simultaneous comparison with a linear reflectivity standard.

  8. Identification of cholesterol gallstones using in vitro low-fluence laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, R.; Niay, P.; Bernage, P.; Blondeau, J. M.; Ledee, J. J.; Brunetaud, J. M.

    1990-12-01

    Identifying the chemical composition of gallstones may be important in certain cases of calculus biliary disease when planning a dissolution therapy or a fragmentation of the calculi using pulsed lasers. The present study was conducted in vitro to evaluate the feasibility of distinguishing cholesterol gallstones from pigment stones. We propose an identification method in which the stone fluorescence spectrum, induced by a low fluence laser, is recorded using an optical multichannel analyser. Fluorescence spectra of twenty-two stones were recorded together with the fluorescence spectra of various pure compounds likely to compose the gallstones, using successively four different pump lasers (λp=308 nm, 337 nm, 423 nm, 469 nm). The fluorescence spectra of cholesterol gallstones are quite different from the pigment ones. Ratios of fluorescence intensities taken at three different wavelengths enable one to distinguish easily between cholesterol and pigment stones.

  9. Inferences from the Distributions of Fast Radio Burst Pulse Widths, Dispersion Measures and Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The widths, dispersion measures, dispersion indices and fluences of Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) impose coupled constraints that all models must satisfy. Observation of dispersion indices close to their low density limit of $-2$ sets a model-independent upper bound on the electron density and a lower bound on the size of any dispersive plasma cloud. The non-monotonic dependence of burst widths (after deconvolution of instrumental effects) on dispersion measure excludes the intergalactic medium as the location of scattering that broadens the FRB in time. Temporal broadening far greater than that of pulsars at similar high Galactic latitudes implies that scattering occurs close to the sources, where high densities and strong turbulence are plausible. FRB energetics are consistent with supergiant pulses from young, fast, high-field pulsars at cosmological distances. The distribution of FRB dispersion measures is inconsistent with expanding clouds (such as SNR). It excludes space-limited distributions (such as the loc...

  10. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after...... a low-fluence IPL treatment with a home-use device. Sixteen subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) II-V were enrolled. Three constitutive buttock blocks (4.4 × 6.4 cm) were each subdivided into four sites, randomized to one IPL exposure of 0, 7, 8, or 10 J/cm2 (spectral output 530-1100 nm). Blocks...... were randomized to no UVR or three standard erythema doses (SEDs) UVR either 30 min or 24 h after IPL. Follow-up visits were 48 h, 1 week, and 4 weeks after IPL. Outcome measures were (i) clinical skin reactions, (ii) reflectance measurements of erythema and pigmentation, and (iii) pain. Subjects...

  11. Influence of monte carlo variance with fluence smoothing in VMAT treatment planning with Monaco TPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study aimed to investigate the interplay between Monte Carlo Variance (MCV and fluence smoothing factor (FSF in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning by using a sample set of complex treatment planning cases and a X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system equipped with tools to tune fluence smoothness as well as MCV. Materials and Methods: The dosimetric (dose to tumor volume, and organ at risk and physical characteristic (treatment time, number of segments, and so on of a set 45 treatment plans for all combinations of 1%, 3%, 5% MCV and 1, 3, 5 FSF were evaluated for five carcinoma esophagus cases under the study. Result: Increase in FSF reduce the treatment time. Variation of MCV and FSF gives a highest planning target volume (PTV, heart and lung dose variation of 3.6%, 12.8% and 4.3%, respectively. The heart dose variation was highest among all organs at risk. Highest variation of spinal cord dose was 0.6 Gy. Conclusion: Variation of MCV and FSF influences the organ at risk (OAR doses significantly but not PTV coverage and dose homogeneity. Variation in FSF causes difference in dosimetric and physical parameters for the treatment plans but variation of MCV does not. MCV 3% or less do not improve the plan quality significantly (physical and clinical compared with MCV greater than 3%. The use of MCV between 3% and 5% gives similar results as 1% with lesser calculation time. Minimally detected differences in plan quality suggest that the optimum FSF can be set between 3 and 5.

  12. Influence of Two Different Fluences on Laser Photobiomodulation of Wound Healing in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplow, Philip V.; Chung, Tzu-Yun; Baxter, G. David

    2011-08-01

    Background: Laser irradiation of wounds in mice and rats was shown in previous studies to stimulate healing but in almost all the studies the wounds were not covered. Purpose: To compare the healing of covered wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice and the effect of laser irradiation 660 nm at two different fluences (energy densities). Method: A single wound 5-mm diameter was made on the left flank of forty-seven diabetic and twenty nondiabetic mice and covered with Tegaderm HP dressing (day 1). Wounds were irradiated 660 nm 20 s using a low power (18 mW) or high power (80 mW) laser starting immediately post-wounding for 7 consecutive days, with non-irradiated wounds as controls. Mice were euthanized on day 8, 10 or 14. Wound specimens were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and examined by light microscopy. Results: Wound healing was impaired in diabetic mice. Tegaderm HP dressing had retarded contraction in a large proportion of diabetic mice (splinted the wounds) and to a lesser extent in nondiabetic mice. Healing of splinted wounds was delayed compared to unsplinted wounds, but laser irradiation at high power stimulated healing by re-epithelization and granulation tissue formation. The fluence of low power laser was estimated to be about 1 J/cm2, while that of the high power laser was 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2. Conclusion: Laser irradiation of wounds 660 nm with 1 J/cm2 had little effect on healing of wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice, whereas irradiation with 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2 stimulated healing of wounds in diabetic mice most of which were splinted by the dressing.

  13. Low-fluence red light increases the transport and biosynthesis of auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Cohen, Jerry D; Gardner, Gary

    2011-10-01

    In plants, light is an important environmental signal that induces photomorphogenesis and interacts with endogenous signals, including hormones. We found that light increased polar auxin transport in dark-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) hypocotyls. In tomato, this increase was induced by low-fluence red or blue light followed by 1 d of darkness. It was reduced in phyA, phyB1, and phyB2 tomato mutants and was reversed by far-red light applied immediately after the red or blue light exposure, suggesting that phytochrome is involved in this response. We further found that the free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) level in hypocotyl regions below the hook was increased by red light, while the level of conjugated IAA was unchanged. Analysis of IAA synthesized from [¹³C]indole or [¹³C]tryptophan (Trp) revealed that both Trp-dependent and Trp-independent IAA biosynthesis were increased by low-fluence red light in the top section (meristem, cotyledons, and hook), and the Trp-independent pathway appears to become the primary route for IAA biosynthesis after red light exposure. IAA biosynthesis in tissues below the top section was not affected by red light, suggesting that the increase of free IAA in this region was due to increased transport of IAA from above. Our study provides a comprehensive view of light effects on the transport and biosynthesis of IAA, showing that red light increases both IAA biosynthesis in the top section and polar auxin transport in hypocotyls, leading to unchanged free IAA levels in the top section and increased free IAA levels in the lower hypocotyl regions.

  14. The dose-dependence biological effect of laser fluence on rabbit fibroblasts derived from urethral scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongchong; Wu, Yuanyi; Xiao, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Two-micrometer laser vaporization resection has been used in clinic for years, but some patients received the treatment are still faced with excessive and abnormal wound repair which leads to the recurrent of urethral stricture eventually. Fibroblasts play a key role in the processes of "narrow-expansion/operation-restenosis" recurring problems. Here, we investigated the effect of laser fluence biomodulation on urethral scar fibroblasts as well as the underlying mechanism. Urethral scar fibroblasts were isolated and cultured, and laser irradiation (2 μm) was applied at different laser fluence or doses (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, 8, 32 J/cm(2)) with a single exposure in 1 day. The effect of 2-μm laser irradiation on cell proliferation, viability, and expression of scar formation related genes were investigated. Two-micrometer laser irradiation with intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) promoted scar fibroblasts proliferation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, while higher doses of 32 J/cm(2) are suppressive as it decreased the survival rate, viability, and proliferation of fibroblasts. In addition, qRT-PCR and Western blotting results both proven that collagen type I, collagen IV, MMP9, and CTGF display significant increase, yet the TGF-β1 expression was severely reduced at intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) group when compared with the others groups. Our findings suggest the scar formation-related genes are sensitive to intermediate laser irradiation dose, the most in scar fibroblasts. We revealed the bioeffect and molecular mechanism of 2-μm laser irradiation on rabbit urethral scar fibroblasts. Our study provides new insights into the mechanisms which involved in the excessive and abnormal wound repair of 2-μm laser vaporization resection. These results could potentially contribute to further study on biological effects and application of 2-μm laser irradiation in urethral stricture therapy.

  15. 基于高光谱的冬油菜植株氮素积累量监测模型%Monitoring models of plant N accumulation of winter oilseed rape based on hyperspectral technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岚涛; 马驿; 魏全全; 汪善勤; 任涛; 李小坤; 丛日环; 王振; 王少华

    2015-01-01

    Quick, non-destructive and accurate monitoring and diagnosis of plant nitrogen accumulation (PNA) is important for site-specific N management in winter oilseed rape production. To develop a method for determining PNA of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napusL.) with the hyperspectral techniques, field experiments were carried out for two growing seasons (2013-2014 and 2014-2015) at Meichuan town (30°06′47′′ N, 115°35′35′′ E), Hubei province, China. Rapeseed cultivar of Huayouza No. 9 (with low glucosinolate and erucic acid concentrations) was chosen as the test cultivar. Five N (as urea) fertilization rates were applied in the 2013-2014 growing season, i.e., 0 (N0), 90 (N90), 180 (N180), 270(N270) and 360 kg/hm2(N360). Additionally, for further examining the effects of N status on crop growth and spectral reflectance characteristics, three additional N rates, 45 (N45), 135 (N135) and 225 kg/hm2 (N225) were applied in the 2014-2015 growing season. Canopy hyperspectral reflectance and PNA under different N application rates at seedling, budding and flowering stage during the two growing seasons were measured separately using a Field Spec Pro spectrometer (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. (ASD), Boulder, CO, USA) and chemical assays in the laboratory. Using linear and nonlinear regression methods, the estimate model for PNA of winter oilseed rape was built on the basis of the experiment data in 2013-2014 acted as training data set, and its precision had been evaluated and tested based on the experiment data in 2014-2015 acted as testing data set. The coefficient of determination (R2), relative root mean square error (RRMSE) and mean relative error (MRE) were used to evaluate the fitness between observed and predicted PNA values. The following sensitivity analysis method, Noise Equivalent (NE) model was calculated to assess the sensitivity of the optimal spectral parameters for detecting changes in PNA across different growth stages. The results indicated

  16. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence; Metodologia RAMA para el Calculo de la Fluencia Neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-07-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  17. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mamalis

    Full Text Available Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease.The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed.High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR. For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2.High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched

  18. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Koo, Eugene; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Murphy, William; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL) is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease. The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS) free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed. High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR). For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2. High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched controls

  19. Intense Pulsed Light and Low-Fluence Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser Treatment in Melasma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Se Young; Cho, Soyun

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, low fluence collimated Q-switched (QS) Nd:YAG laser has drawn attention for the treatment of melasma. However, it needs a lot of treatment sessions for the substantial results and repetitive laser exposures may end up with unwanted depigmentation. Objective We evaluated the clinical effects and safety of the combinational treatment, using intense pulsed light (IPL) and low fluence QS Nd:YAG laser. Methods Retrospective case series of 20 female patients, with mixed type melasma, were analyzed using medical records. They were treated with IPL one time, and 4 times of weekly successive low fluence Nd:YAG laser treatments. At each visit, digital photographs were taken under the same condition. Melanin index (MI) and erythema index (EI) were measured on the highest point on the cheekbones. Modified melasma area and severity index (MASI) scores were calculated by two investigators using digital photographs. Results The mean values of MI and EI decreased significantly after treatments. The modified MASI score has decreased by 59.35%, on average. Sixty percents of the participants did not require any more treatments, and no clinical aggravations were observed during the follow-up period (mean 5.9 months). Conclusion IPL and low fluence laser may elicit a clinical resolution in the mixed type melasma with long term benefits. PMID:22879709

  20. Pulse-fluence-specified optimal control simulation with applications to molecular orientation and spin-isomer-selective molecular alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Masataka; Nakashima, Kaoru; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University 6-3 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We propose an optimal control simulation with specified pulse fluence and amplitude. The simulation is applied to the orientation control of CO molecules to examine the optimal combination of THz and laser pulses, and to discriminate nuclear-spin isomers of {sup 14}N{sub 2} as spatially anisotropic distributions.

  1. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmans, Hugo; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P

    2013-01-01

    -eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence correction factor is almost solely influenced by non-elastic nuclear interactions the results are also relevant for plastic phantoms that consist of carbon...

  2. Study of the fluence dependent interplay between laser induced material removal mechanisms in metals: Vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, J. M.; Withford, M. J.; Coutts, D. W.; Piper, J. A.

    2006-05-01

    Three quantitative methods, namely profilometry, high speed imaging and recoil momentum measurements using a ballistic pendulum, are used to determine the interplay of vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection on nanosecond laser induced material removal. At low to moderate fluences (7 J cm -2), material removal occurs predominantly via the explosive ejection of liquid droplets from the melt pool.

  3. Modification in surface properties of poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 implanted by Au+ ions at different fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagheer Riffat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion implantation has a potential to modify the surface properties and to produce thin conductive layers in insulating polymers. For this purpose, poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 was implanted by 400 keV Au+ ions with ion fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The chemical, morphological and optical properties of implanted CR-39 were analyzed using Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity of implanted samples was determined through four-point probe technique. Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbonaceous structures in the implanted layer of CR-39. From FT-IR spectroscopy analysis, changes in functional groups of CR-39 after ion implantation were observed. AFM studies revealed that morphology and surface roughness of implanted samples depend on the fluence of Au ions. The optical band gap of implanted samples decreased from 3.15 eV (for pristine to 1.05 eV (for sample implanted at 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The electrical conductivity was observed to increase with the ion fluence. It is suggested that due to an increase in ion fluence, the carbonaceous structures formed in the implanted region are responsible for the increase in electrical conductivity.

  4. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  5. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  6. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  7. Reduced photoinactivation of 10-dodecyl acridine orange-sensitized yeast cells at high fluence rates measurements and computer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keij, J.F.; Jansen, J.Th.M.; Schultz, F.W.; Visser, J.W.M.

    1994-01-01

    During the development of a photodamage cell sorter several photosensitizers were tested for their ability to photoinactivate more than 90% of the sensitized cells after a brief irradiation with a fluence of 10 kJ/m2. In pilot experiments, yeast cells sensitized with 10-dodecyl acridine orange (DAO)

  8. Dye sublimation as a measure of accumulated heat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoju; Ying, Xiaofang; Deng, Zongwu

    2013-10-21

    Heat history monitor: Combination of the sublimation and adsorption processes of specific dyes can be used as a measure of accumulated heat exposure. Mass transfer from the sublimation layer to the adsorption layer strongly depends on temperature and results in a gradual color change in the adsorption layer. The total color change reflects the accumulated heat exposure.

  9. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  10. Efficacy of Intense Pulsed Light Therapy in the Treatment of Facial Acne Vulgaris: Comparison of Two Different Fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Monika V; Deshmukh, Ashish Ramchandra; Khedkar, Maruti Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin affecting adolescents and young adults causing psychological distress. The combination of antibiotic resistance, adverse effects of topical and systemic anti acne medications and desire for high tech approaches have all led to new enthusiasm for light based acne treatment. Intense pulse light (IPL) therapy has three modes of action in acne vulgaris i.e., photochemical, photo thermal and photo immunological. Aims: (1) to study efficacy of IPL therapy in facial acne vulgaris. (2) To compare two fluences - one normal and other subnormal on right and left side of face respectively. Methods: (Including settings and design and statistical analysis used). Total 45 patients in age group 16 to 28 years with inflammatory facial acne vulgaris were included in prospective study. Baseline data for each patient was recorded. All patients were given 4 sittings of IPL at 2 weeks interval and were followed for 2 months every 2 weeks. Fluence used was 35J/cm2 on right and 20J/cm2 on left side. Percentage reduction in lesion count was calculated at each sitting and follow up and graded as mild (0-25%), moderate (26-50%), good (51-75%) and excellent (76-100%). Side effects were noted. The results were analysed using Mann-Whitney Test. Results: On right side, excellent results were achieved in 10(22%), good in 22(49%) and moderate in 13(29%) patients. On left side excellent were results achieved in 7(15%), good in 19(42%) and moderate in 16(43%) patients. There was no statically significant difference noted in efficacy of two fluences used in treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Conclusions: IPL is a effective and safe option for inflammatory acne vulgaris with minimal reversible side effects. Subnormal fluence is as effective as normal fluence in Indian skin. PMID:27688446

  11. Efficacy of intense pulsed light therapy in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris: Comparison of two different fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika V Patidar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin affecting adolescents and young adults causing psychological distress. The combination of antibiotic resistance, adverse effects of topical and systemic anti acne medications and desire for high tech approaches have all led to new enthusiasm for light based acne treatment. Intense pulse light (IPL therapy has three modes of action in acne vulgaris i.e., photochemical, photo thermal and photo immunological. Aims: (1 to study efficacy of IPL therapy in facial acne vulgaris. (2 To compare two fluences - one normal and other subnormal on right and left side of face respectively. Methods: (Including settings and design and statistical analysis used. Total 45 patients in age group 16 to 28 years with inflammatory facial acne vulgaris were included in prospective study. Baseline data for each patient was recorded. All patients were given 4 sittings of IPL at 2 weeks interval and were followed for 2 months every 2 weeks. Fluence used was 35J/cm2 on right and 20J/cm2 on left side. Percentage reduction in lesion count was calculated at each sitting and follow up and graded as mild (0-25%, moderate (26-50%, good (51-75% and excellent (76-100%. Side effects were noted. The results were analysed using Mann-Whitney Test. Results: On right side, excellent results were achieved in 10(22%, good in 22(49% and moderate in 13(29% patients. On left side excellent were results achieved in 7(15%, good in 19(42% and moderate in 16(43% patients. There was no statically significant difference noted in efficacy of two fluences used in treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Conclusions: IPL is a effective and safe option for inflammatory acne vulgaris with minimal reversible side effects. Subnormal fluence is as effective as normal fluence in Indian skin.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about -1.63 in the lateral region and -1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2009-11-21

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about -1.63 in the lateral region and -1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example.

  14. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  15. Evaluation of fluence-based dose delivery incorporating the spatial variation of dosimetric leaf gap (DLG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraswamy, Lalith K; Xu, Zhengzheng; Bailey, Daniel W; Schmitt, Jonathan D; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-01-08

    The Eclipse treatment planning system uses a single dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value to retract all multileaf collimator leaf positions during dose calculation to model the rounded leaf ends. This study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the 2D variation of DLG on clinical treatment plans based on their degree of fluence modulation. In-house software was developed to retrospectively apply the 2D variation of DLG to 61 clinically treated VMAT plans, as well as to several test plans. The level of modulation of the VMAT cases were determined by calculating their modulation complexity score (MCS). Dose measurements were done using the MapCHECK device at a depth of 5.0 cm for plans with and without the 2D DLG correction. Measurements were compared against predicted dose planes from the TPS using absolute 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm gamma criteria for test plans and for VMAT cases, respectively. The gamma pass rate for the 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm sweep test plans increased by 23.2%, 28.7%, and 26.0%, respectively, when the measurements were corrected with 2D variation of DLG. The clinical anal VMAT cases, which had very high MLC modulation, showed the most improvement. The majority of the improvement occurred for doses created by the 1.0 cm width leaves for both the test plans and the VMAT cases. The gamma pass rates for the highly modulated head and neck (H&N) cases, moderately modulated prostate and esophageal cases, and minimally modulated brain cases improved only slightly when corrected with 2D variation of DLG. This is because these cases did not employ the 1.0 cm width leaves for dose calculation and delivery. These data suggest that, at the very least, the TPS plans with highly modulated fluences created by the 1.0 cm fields require 2D DLG correction. Incorporating the 2D variation of DLG for the highly modulated clinical treatment plans improves their planar dose gamma pass rates, especially for fields employing the outer 1.0 cm width MLC leaves. This is because there are

  16. Isotopic Composition of Boron Secondary Ions as a Function of Ion-Beam Fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumel, Laurie Michelle

    The experiment performed in this work isolates and examines the effects of mass on the composition of the sputtered flux from a multi-component target. Chemical complexities are minimized by measuring sputtered ions from a target consisting only of two isotopes of one element. In this case, chemical effects as well as inter-atomic potentials are assumed to be identical for all constituents moving within the target, thus simplifying the target kinematics. Since any non-stoichiometry in the sputtered material should be caused only by the effects of mass on the kinetics in the target, measuring the sputtered material and comparing various analytical predictions with the experimental results leads to a better understanding of mass effects in these targets. 100-keV argon and neon were used to sputter an elemental target comprising the two naturally occurring isotopes of boron. The resulting secondary ions were examined with an electrostatic quadrupole mass analyzer. At low beam fluences (~1 times 20^{15} ions/cm ^2) a light-isotope secondary ion enhancement is observed relative to the steady-state secondary ion yields collected at higher beam fluences ( ~5 times 10 ^{17} ions/cm^2 ). The steady-state ion yields are representative of the bulk composition of the target. The enhancement (46.1perthous for Ne^+ irradiation and 51.8perthous for Ar^+ irradiation) is large compared to the predictions of analytical theories and is determined to be independent of variations in surface potential, chemical effects, and surface impurities. This effect is consistent with an explanation based on an energy and momentum asymmetry in the collision cascade. The asymmetry was caused by an extra collision mechanism which allowed light particles to backscatter 180^circ (towards the target surface) from underlying heavier target particles whereas the reverse process can not occur. When irradiated with projectiles heavier than the target constituents, the heavier target particles had a higher

  17. Accumulation by Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büscher, Bram; Fletcher, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Following the financial crisis and its aftermath, it is clear that the inherent contradictions of capitalist accumulation have become even more intense and plunged the global economy into unprecedented turmoil and urgency. Governments, business leaders and other elite agents are frantically searchin

  18. Effect of hydrogen on mechanical fluence during storage in dry; Efecto del hidrogeno en la fluencia mecanica durante el almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-07-01

    One of the challenges in the field of the mechanical fluence modeling is to include the effect of hydrogen as an additional hardening factor associated with reactor irradiation. For this it is necessary to identify the weight of each variable in the factor hardening of the classical laws of mechanics fluence.

  19. Soft x-ray free-electron laser imaging by LiF crystal and film detectors over a wide range of fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, Tatiana A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Bolton, Paul; Mitrofanov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Alexander V; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Senba, Yasunori; Togashi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-01-20

    LiF crystal and film detectors were used to measure the far-field fluence profile of a self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser beam and diffraction imaging with high spatial resolution. In these measurements the photoluminescence (PL) response of LiF crystal and film was compared over a wide range of soft x-ray fluences. It was found that the soft x-ray fluence dependences of LiF crystal and film differ. At low fluence, the LiF crystal shows higher PL response compared to LiF film, while this comparison is the opposite at higher fluence. Accurate measurement of LiF crystal and film PL response is important for precise characterization of the spatial, spectral, and coherence features of x-ray beams across the full profile and in localized areas. For such measurements, crucial LiF detector attributes are high spatial resolution and high dynamic range.

  20. Absorbed Dose in Ion Beams: Comparison of Ionization and Fluence-based Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Osinga, Julia-Maria; Bartz, James A; Akselrod, Mark S; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    We present a direct comparison measurement of fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) and a thimble ionization chamber. Irradiations were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) using monoenergetic protons (142.66 MeV, 3x10^6 1/cm2) and carbon ions (270.55 MeV/u, 3x10^6 1/cm2) in the entrance channel of the ion beam. We found that absorbed dose to water values as determined by fluence measurements using FNTDs are in case of protons in good agreement (2.2 %) with ionization chamber measurements when including slower protons and Helium secondaries by an effective stopping power. For carbon, however, we found a discrepancy of 4.6 %. This deviation is significant considering both the uncertainties for ionization chambers as given in the TRS 398 and from experimental design (e.g. inhomogeneous irradiation, machine stability, beam direction). Additionally, the abundance of secondary protons expected from Monte-Carlo transport simulation was not seen.

  1. Chamber wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.; Provencio, P. P.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Stolp, J. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Knowles, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Candidate dry-wall materials for the reactor chambers of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants have been exposed to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. These pulses simulate the MeV-level ion pulses with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 that can be expected to impinge on the first wall of such future plants. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were subjected to up to 1600 pulses, usually while being heated to 600 °C. Other metals were exposed as well. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Powder-metallurgy (PM) tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. This roughening is worse than for other metals, and worse than for either tungsten alloyed with rhenium (W25Re), or for CVD and single-crystal forms of tungsten. Carbon, particularly the form used in composite material, appears to suffer material loss well below its sublimation point. Some engineered materials were also investigated. It appears that some modification to PM tungsten is required for its successful use in a reactor environment.

  2. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    CERN Document Server

    Kadler, M; Mannheim, K; Ojha, R; Müller, C; Schulz, R; Anton, G; Baumgartner, W; Beuchert, T; Buson, S; Carpenter, B; Eberl, T; Edwards, P G; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsässer, D; Gehrels, N; Gräfe, C; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; James, C W; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kreikenbohm, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Langejahn, M; Leiter, K; Litzinger, E; Longo, F; Lovell, J E J; McEnery, J; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Quick, J; Ros, E; Stecker, F W; Steinbring, T; Stevens, J; Thompson, D J; Trüstedt, J; Tzioumis, A K; Wilms, J; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of extraterrestrial very-high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration has launched a quest for the identification of their astrophysical sources. Gamma-ray blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the gamma-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. Since the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of an extraterrestrial origin are those at PeV energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and pos...

  3. Experimental Assessment of Photon Fluence Rate Distributions in a Medium-Pressure UV Photoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Qiang, Zhimin; Wang, Chen; Bolton, James R; Blatchley Iii, Ernest R

    2017-02-28

    The performance of a medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamp photoreactor is strongly influenced by the spatial photon fluence rate (PFR) distributions which are wavelength-dependent. To address this issue, PFR distributions in an MP lamp photoreactor were measured using a 360-degree response microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD). To accurately express the optical behavior in an MP photoreactor, PFR, MFSD response PFR (PFRMFSD), and effective germicidal PFR (PFRGER) were defined and compared. The measured axial and radial PFRMFSD values agreed well with the corresponding results from a simulation model (UVCalc). The PFR and PFRGER were obtained from the measured PFRMFSD by using correction factors calculated by the UVCalc. Under identical UV transmittance (254 nm) conditions (75% and 85%), the weighted average PFRGER values were 13.3-18.7% lower than the corresponding PFR values, indicating that PFRGER, rather than PFR should be used in MP photoreactor design to meet disinfection standards. Based on measured lamp output, medium absorption spectrum, MFSD response, and microbial DNA response spectrum, the detailed relationships between the PFR, PFRMFSD, and PFRGER were elucidated. This work proposes a new method for the accurate description of wavelength-dependent PFR distributions in MP photoreactors, thus providing an important tool for the optimal design of these systems.

  4. High-fluence hyperthermal ion irradiation of gallium nitride surfaces at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, A.; Gerlach, J.W., E-mail: juergen.gerlach@iom-leipzig.de; Lorbeer, J.; Frost, F.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Irradiation of gallium nitride films with hyperthermal nitrogen ions. • Surface roughening at elevated sample temperatures was observed. • No thermal decomposition of gallium nitride films during irradiation. • Asymmetric surface diffusion processes cause local roughening. - Abstract: Wurtzitic GaN films deposited on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by ion-beam assisted molecular-beam epitaxy were irradiated with hyperthermal nitrogen ions with different fluences at different substrate temperatures. In situ observations with reflection high energy electron diffraction showed that during the irradiation process the surface structure of the GaN films changed from two dimensional to three dimensional at elevated temperatures, but not at room temperature. Atomic force microscopy revealed an enhancement of nanometric holes and canyons upon the ion irradiation at higher temperatures. The roughness of the irradiated and heated GaN films was clearly increased by the ion irradiation in accordance with x-ray reflectivity measurements. A sole thermal decomposition of the films at the chosen temperatures could be excluded. The results are discussed taking into account temperature dependent sputtering and surface uphill adatom diffusion as a function of temperature.

  5. Neutron fluence effects on SLOWPOKE-2 beryllium reflector composition and reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Francesc, E-mail: fpuig@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dennis, Haile, E-mail: haile.dennis02@uwimona.edu.jm [International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, 2 Anguilla Close, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7 (Jamaica)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • SLOWPOKE-2 reflector composition evolution estimated using two different methods. • Reactivity effects of reflector composition changes calculated using MCNP5. • Impurities depletion dominates over poisons buildup, increasing reactivity. • Results contradict previously published behavior estimates for MNSR reactors. • Identified main factors explaining the observed prediction discrepancies. - Abstract: Within the scope of the conversion process from HEU to LEU of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (JM-1), the effects of the neutron fluence on the beryllium reflector composition, and the corresponding effect on reactivity throughout the life of the reactor core, have been studied. Two different methods have been used and compared involving MCNP5, ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN-S and COUPLE codes, reaching excellent agreement between them. The neutron flux profile and energy spectrum specific to the beryllium reflectors of this reactor design have been taken into account to analyze several scenarios, comprising both real and hypothetical conditions and involving different initial reflector compositions and reactor burnups. The analysis has been extended to provide estimates for the similar MNSR reactor design and compared with previously published predictions for the Syrian MNSR. The results show small overall reactivity effects in most cases, being dominated by impurity depletion as opposed to poison buildup, contrarily to what generally occurs in beryllium reflected reactors of far higher power and to MNSR predictions. The resulting reactivity increases are typically of less than 0.4 mk for usual impurity levels and maximum HEU core burnup achievable.

  6. Retention of nanocrystalline WN{sub x} layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassallo, E., E-mail: vassallo@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Caniello, R., E-mail: caniello@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Angella, G., E-mail: angella@ieni.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, D., E-mail: david.dellasega@polimi.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, 20156 Milano (Italy); Granucci, G., E-mail: granucci@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Mellera, V., E-mail: mellera@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Minelli, D., E-mail: minelli@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Pedroni, M., E-mail: pedroni@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ricci, D., E-mail: ricci@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Rigato, V., E-mail: valentino.rigato@lnl.infn.it [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, 35020 Padova (Italy); and others

    2015-11-15

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N{sub 2} gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WN{sub x} compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WN{sub x} compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼10{sup 24} m{sup −2}). It is shown that WN{sub x} compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER. - Highlights: • Nitrogen in the process of tungsten redeposition in tokamak plays a very important role for fuel retention. • Incorporation of nitrogen in tungsten decreases the D retention. • WN{sub x} compounds showed a level of D retention lower than the acceptable limit for tritium (T) operation in ITER.

  7. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  8. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zheng.lu@lboro.ac.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Morgan, T.S. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 400 deg. C and 28 dpa (1.7 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 465 deg. C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided ({approx}15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  9. The conductivity of high-fluence noble gas ion irradiated CVD polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. A.; Shemukhin, A. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The conductivity of surface layer of polycrystalline CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond has been studied experimentally after high-fluence 30 keV Ne+, 20 and 30 keV Ar+ ion irradiation at target temperature range from 30 to 400 °C. The hot ion irradiation of CVD diamond may be described as ion-stimulated heat graphitization in which an exponential resistance decrease with increasing of the irradiation temperature is much faster than at the heat treatment. Under ion irradiation of CVD diamond the graphite-like materials resistivity is achieved at temperatures not exceeding 200 °C. The graphite phase in a heterogeneous structure of diamond irradiated layer is in dynamic equilibrium. In the temperature range from RT to 400 °C, the proportion of graphite phase increases so that at temperatures 200 < Tir < 400 °C it is dominant. The Raman spectra of ion-induced conductive layer created on CVD diamond reflect the processes of nanostructural ordering - disordering of sp2-bonded carbon.

  10. Review of low x-ray fluence detection developments on flash radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailler, Claude

    1995-05-01

    Dealing with dynamic behavior of solids, flows, detonator initiation, high explosives properties, shock waves and other fast processes, implies a large amount of metrology problems. When studies on shock waves began, forty five years ago, only flash X-ray radiography achieving chronometric measurements was developed, in order to investigate shaped charges jets. This technique has also been widely used in detonics because it does not affect hydrodymanic phenomena. Since that time, a large amount of data has been gathered and has allowed physicists to confirm many theories. Later pulsed high energy radiographic machines emitting X-rays have allowed large images record of voluminous objects containing dense materials (with high atomic numbers) and therefore very absorbing. Our laboratory has been working in this field for more than 30 years. A great deal of effort has been spent to enhance the radiographic capabilities of our X-ray machines. High dose levels and better spot size diameter of X-ray sources have allowed quite good records for a better understanding on material densities and boundaries. During the same period of time many works were led on the detection of low X-ray fluences. We present in this communication the main studies developed in that field on cells of light screens coupled with visible film and on microchannel plates image intensifiers.

  11. SPAD-502 readings in response to photon fluence in leaves with different chlorophyll content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Cristina Santos Nascimento

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502 is widely used to estimate chlorophyll content, but non-uniform chloroplast distribution can affect its accuracy. This study aimed to assess the effect of photon fluence (F, irradiance x time of illumination in leaves with different chlorophyll content and determine the effect of chlorophyll a/b on SPAD values of four tropical tree species (Croton draconoides Müll. Arg., Hevea guianensis Aubl., Hymenaea courbaril L. and Matisia cordata H.B.K.. There were also determined calibration equations for the chlorophyll meter and assessed the effect of F on SPAD values between 07:00 h and 17:00 h. Calibration equations were obtained after determining leaf chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Increases in F with time caused a reduction in SPAD values in species with a high chlorophyll content, with reductions of 20% in M. cordata and 10% in H. guianensis. Leaves of C. draconoides and H. courbaril had lower chlorophyll content and showed no changes in SPAD values with increase in F. The chlorophyll a/b ratio increased with SPAD values and the SPAD/chlorophyll relationship was best described by an exponential equation. It seems that F may affect SPAD values in leaves with high chlorophyll content, probably due to non-uniform chloroplast distribution at high irradiance. This indicates that SPAD values tend to be more accurate if recorded early in morning when irradiance is low.

  12. Helium effects on mechanical properties and microstructure of high fluence ion-irradiated RAFM steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, H.; Kohyama, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Sakasegawa, H.

    2007-08-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, RAFS, are leading candidates for the blanket and first wall of fusion reactors, and effects of displacement damage and helium production on mechanical properties and microstructures are important to these applications. Because it is the most effective way to obtain systematic and accurate information about microstructural response under fusion environment, single-(Fe 3+) and dual-(Fe 3+ + He +) irradiations were performed followed by TEM observation and nano-indentation hardness measurement. Dual-ion irradiation at 420 °C induced finer defect clusters compared to single-ion irradiation. These fine defect clusters caused large differences in the hardness increase between these irradiations. TEM analysis clarified that radiation induced precipitates were MX precipitates (M: Ta, W). Small defects invisible to TEM possibly caused the large increase in hardness, in addition to the hardness increment produced by radiation induced MX. In this work, radiation hardening and microstructural evolution accompanied by the synergistic effects to high fluences are discussed.

  13. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  14. Atmospheric ionization by high-fluence, hard spectrum solar proton events and their probable appearance in the ice core archive

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Laird, Claude M; Neuenswander, Ben; Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Solar energetic particles ionize the atmosphere, leading to production of nitrogen oxides. It has been suggested that some such events are visible as layers of nitrate in ice cores, yielding archives of energetic, high fluence solar proton events (SPEs). There has been controversy, due to slowness of transport for these species down from the upper stratosphere; past numerical simulations based on an analytic calculation have shown very little ionization below the mid stratosphere. These simulations suffer from deficiencies: they consider only soft SPEs and narrow energy ranges; spectral fits are poorly chosen; with few exceptions secondary particles in air showers are ignored. Using improved simulations that follow development of the proton-induced air shower, we find consistency with recent experiments showing substantial excess ionization down to 5 km. We compute nitrate available from the 23 February 1956 SPE, which had a high fluence, hard spectrum, and well-resolved associated nitrate peak in a Greenland...

  15. Modeling of Radiation Damage Effects in Silicon Detectors at High Fluences HL-LHC with Sentaurus TCAD

    CERN Document Server

    Passeri, Daniele; Morozzi, Arianna; Bilei, GianMario

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of an enhanced radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps / recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of silicon detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 2.0 1016 1MeV equivalent neutrons/cm2). We present the comparison between simulation results and experimental data for p-type substrate structures in dierent operating conditions (temperature and biasing voltages) for fluences up to 2.2 1016 neutrons/cm2. The good agreement between simulation findings and experimental measurements fosters the application of this modeling scheme to the optimization of the next silicon detectors to be used at HL-LHC.

  16. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation.

  17. The role of natural and UV-induced skin pigmentation on low-fluence IPL-induced side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Lin, Jennifer Y; Nash, Jf

    2014-01-01

    were randomized to receive 0 or 8 solar simulated ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposures of consecutively increasing Standard Erythema Doses (2-4 SED). Each block was subdivided into four sites, randomized to receive IPL of 0, 7, 8, or 10 J/cm(2) , once a week for 3 weeks. Biopsies were taken 16...... of cellular pigment-markers was not influenced by IPL exposure, neither in constitutive nor in facultative pigmented skin. Clinical appearance of biopsy wounds was unaffected by IPL exposure. CONCLUSION: The prevalence and intensity of low-fluence IPL-induced adverse skin effects depended on IPL dose and skin...... disproportionately. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of constitutive and facultative skin pigmentation on low-fluence intense pulsed light (IPL)-induced adverse skin effects. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-one subjects with Fitzpatrick skin type II-IV were enrolled. Two buttock blocks...

  18. Phytochrome controls achene germination in Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae by very low fluence response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amaral-Baroli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Achene without ornament of the tegument were light insensitive with germination under all tested light conditions. Achene with verrucose ornament of the tegument presented low germination under darkness and high germination under light conditions. By pre-incubation at 36° C for remotion of pre-existing Pfr and by comparison of results of counting of dark germinating achenes at the end of experiment and daily under dim green safe light (0.001mumol m-2 s-1 nm-1 we concluded that germination was controlled by phytochrome through very low fluence response.Aquênios sem ornamento do tegumento são insensíveis à luz com ocorrência de germinação sob todas as condições de luz testadas. Aquênios com ornamento verrucoso do tegumento apresentou baixa germinação sob escuro e alta germinação sob luz. A pré-incubação a 36° C para a remoção de Fve pré-existente e pela comparação dos resultados de contagem no final do experimento de aquênios que germinam no escuro e diárias sob luz verde de segurança (0.001mimol m-2s-1nm-1 concluimos que a germinação de Bidens pilosa é controlada pelo fitocromo através da resposta de fluência baixa.

  19. The Charge-to-Mass Dependence of SEP Fluences Over Wide Longitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mason, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate characterization of the transport of energetic particles throughout the inner heliosphere is important for the planning of space missions and the development and testing of space weather forecasting tools. How particles are distributed in both radius and longitude during a solar energetic particle (SEP) event has been the subject of a number of studies. Initially these studies were performed through statistical analysis of single-spacecraft measurements of many different SEP events. Later multi-spacecraft observations of individual events were examined, most notably using data from Helios and, very recently, MESSENGER. Currently by combining measurements from near-Earth spacecraft and the twin STEREO spacecraft, particle distributions can be examined as a function of longitude separately from radial dependences. Additionally, while previous studies concentrated on protons and electrons, the SEP sensors on STEREO and ACE allow heavy ions to be examined as well. We have analyzed 5 large SEP events in 2011 and 2012 that were clearly observed by both STEREOs and ACE and determined the longitudinal distribution of the event-integrated fluences for H, He, O at 3.6-5 MeV/nuc and for H, He, O, and Fe at 0.32-0.45 MeV/nuc. We find no consistent charge-to-mass dependence in the longitudinal distributions at either energy suggesting rigidity is not a controlling factor in the particle spread in longitude. We find that typically lower energy ions have a wider longitudinal spread than higher energy ions suggesting a velocity dependence. Both of these results are consistent with the possibility that magnetic field line meandering and/or co-rotation is a primary means of longitudinally transporting particles.

  20. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, Janet E; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut's ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  1. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Baulch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut’s ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space.

  2. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  3. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig E. Grossman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm. To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67 identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm.

  4. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Sánchez, M M G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Klein, S; Leonor, I; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  5. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy; Divergencia da fluencia de fontes de Cs-137 usadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- LCR-DBB (UERJ). R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC, sala 136 terreo- CEP 20.550- 013. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  6. Hypopigmentation Induced by Frequent Low-Fluence, Large-Spot-Size QS Nd:YAG Laser Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Yisheng; Lee, Siong See Joyce; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    The Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG) laser is increasingly used for nonablative skin rejuvenation or "laser toning" for melasma. Multiple and frequent low-fluence, large-spot-size treatments are used to achieve laser toning, and these treatments are associated with the development of macular hypopigmentation as a complication. We present a case series of three patients who developed guttate hypomelanotic macules on the face after receiving laser t...

  7. Deuterium trapping and surface modification of polycrystalline tungsten exposed to a high-flux plasma at high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibrov, M.; Balden, M.; Morgan, T. W.; Mayer, M.

    2017-04-01

    Deuterium (D) retention and surface modifications of hot-rolled polycrystalline tungsten (W) exposed to a low-energy (~40 eV D‑1), high-flux (2–5  ×  1023 D m‑2 s‑1) D plasma at temperatures of ~380 K and ~1140 K to fluences up to 1.2  ×  1028 D m‑2 have been examined by using nuclear reaction analysis, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The samples exposed at ~380 K exhibited various types of surface modifications: dome-shaped blister-like structures, stepped flat-topped protrusions, and various types of nanostructures. It was observed that a large fraction of the surface was covered with blisters and protrusions, but their average size and the number density showed almost no fluence dependence. The D depth distributions and total D inventories also barely changed with increasing fluence at ~380 K. A substantial amount of D was retained in the subsurface region, and thickness correlated with the depth where the cavities of blisters and protrusions were located. It is therefore suggested that defects appearing during creation of blisters and protrusions govern the D trapping in the investigated fluence range. In addition, a large number of small cracks was observed on the exposed surfaces, which can serve as fast D release channels towards the surface, resulting in a reduction of the effective D influx into the W bulk. On the samples exposed at ~1140 K no blisters and protrusions were found. However, wave-like and faceted terrace-like structures were formed instead. The concentrations of trapped D were very low (<10‑5 at. fr.) after the exposure at ~1140 K.

  8. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana; Debelle, Aurélien; Thomé, Lionel; Behar, Moni

    2016-09-01

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 1014 cm-2 has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique.

  9. Fluence-dependent effects of low-level laser therapy in myofascial trigger spots on modulation of biochemicals associated with pain in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei; Yang, Shun-An; Yang, Chen-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Evidence strongly supports that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an effective physical modality for the treatment of pain associated with myofascial trigger points (MTrP). However, the effect of laser fluence (energy intensity in J/cm(2)) on biochemical regulation related to pain is unclear. To better understand the biochemical mechanisms modulated by high- and low-fluence LLLT at myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs; similar to human MTrPs) in skeletal muscles of rabbits, the levels of β-endorphin (β-ep), substance P (SP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were investigated in this study. New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg in weight) were used in this study. High-fluence LLLT (27 J/cm(2)), low-fluence LLLT (4.5 J/cm(2)), or sham operations were applied on MTrSs of biceps femoris of rabbits for five sessions (one session per day). Effects of LLLT at two different fluences on biceps femoris, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and serum were determined by β-ep, SP, TNF-α, and COX-2 immunoassays. LLLT irradiation with fluences of 4.5 and 27 J/cm(2) at MTrSs can significantly reduce SP level in DRG. LLLT with lower fluence of 4.5 J/cm(2) exerted lower levels of TNF-α and COX-2 expression in laser-treated muscle, but LLLT with higher fluence of 27 J/cm(2) elevated the levels of β-ep in serum, DRG, and muscle. This study demonstrated fluence-dependent biochemical effects of LLLT in an animal model on management of myofascial pain. The findings can contribute to the development of dosage guideline for LLLT for treating MTrP-induced pain.

  10. Annihilation behavior of irradiation defects in Li4SiO4 irradiated with high thermal neutron fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Guangming; Xiao, Chengjian; Chen, Xiaojun; Gong, Yu; Zhao, Linjie; Wang, Heyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-08-01

    The annihilation behavior of irradiation defects in Li4SiO4 which were irradiated with thermal neutrons to a high fluence was studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). It was observed that the ratio of O-related centers to E'-centers increased with increasing annealing temperature. The total irradiation defects were annihilated through two processes, namely the fast (120-250 °C, 70%) and the slow ones (250-500 °C, 30%), and their activation energies were determined to be 0.63 ± 0.09 and 0.89 ± 0.14 eV, respectively. The observed annihilation behavior of irradiation defects in Li4SiO4 was found to be very different from that in a previous study, which could be attributed to the difference in concentration and types of irradiation defects generated by different neutron fluences. It was implied that the annihilation behavior of irradiation defects in ternary lithium oxides would become more complicated with increasing neutron fluence.

  11. Accuracy of Spencer-Attix cavity theory and calculations of fluence correction factors for the air kerma formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, D J; Rogers, D W O

    2009-09-01

    EGSnrc calculations of ion chamber response and Spencer-Attix (SA) restricted stopping-power ratios are used to test the assumptions of the SA cavity theory and to assess the accuracy of this theory as it applies to the air kerma formalism for 60Co beams. Consistent with previous reports, the EGSnrc calculations show that the SA cavity theory, as it is normally applied, requires a correction for the perturbation of the charged particle fluence (K(fl)) by the presence of the cavity. The need for K(fl) corrections arises from the fact that the standard prescription for choosing the low-energy threshold delta in the SA restricted stopping-power ratio consistently underestimates the values of delta needed if no perturbation to the fluence is assumed. The use of fluence corrections can be avoided by appropriately choosing delta, but it is not clear how delta can be calculated from first principles. Values of delta required to avoid K(fl) corrections were found to be consistently higher than delta values obtained using the conventional approach and are also observed to be dependent on the composition of the wall in addition to the cavity size. Values of K(fl) have been calculated for many of the graphite-walled ion chambers used by the national metrology institutes around the world and found to be within 0.04% of unity in all cases, with an uncertainty of about 0.02%.

  12. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  13. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  14. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  15. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  16. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  17. Verification of the algorithm of sum of fluences for quality control in IMRT; Verificacion del algoritmo de suma de fluencias para control de calidad en IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela Rodriguez, F.; Camara Turbi, A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.; Martinez Rodriguez, D.

    2013-07-01

    In prior to each IMRT treatment quality control measures face are made to verify the match between the Royal treatment and details of the Planner. verified values of absolute dose at different points of a mannequin, the distribution of doses of all the fields (individual fluences), and the distribution of dose in the treatment full (global creep). This paper compares the distribution of doses for the full treatment measurement with that obtained by combining data from the fluences of the individual fields. (Author)

  18. A method to improve fluence resolution derived from two-dimensional detector array measurements for patient-specific IMRT verification using the information collected in dynalog files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Juan Agustin Calama; Utrilla, Miguel Angel Infante; Rodriguez, Maria Elisa Lavado

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for improving the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurement using the information collected in dynalog files. From dynalog information, a file is generated with the actual multileaf collimator (MLC) positions and used as input to the treatment planning system (TPS) to obtain the dynalog-derived fluence and the theoretical response over the detector array. In contrast with the measured response, this theoretical response allows for correction of the dynalog-derived fluence and translation into the reconstructed fluence. This fluence is again introduced into the planning system to verify the treatment using clinical tools. Initially, more than 98% of the points passed the two-dimensional (2D) phantom gamma test (3% local dose - 3 mm) for all of the treatment verifications, but in some dose–volume histogram (DVH) comparisons, we note sensitive differences for the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and for the maximum doses in at-risk organs (up to 3.5%). In dose–distribution evaluations, we found differences of up to 5% in the PTV edges in certain cases due to detector array measurement errors. This work improves the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurements based on the treatment information, in contrast with the current commercial proposals based on planned data. PMID:26150681

  19. A method to improve fluence resolution derived from two-dimensional detector array measurements for patient-specific IMRT verification using the information collected in dynalog files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Agustin Calama Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method for improving the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurement using the information collected in dynalog files. From dynalog information, a file is generated with the actual multileaf collimator (MLC positions and used as input to the treatment planning system (TPS to obtain the dynalog-derived fluence and the theoretical response over the detector array. In contrast with the measured response, this theoretical response allows for correction of the dynalog-derived fluence and translation into the reconstructed fluence. This fluence is again introduced into the planning system to verify the treatment using clinical tools. Initially, more than 98% of the points passed the two-dimensional (2D phantom gamma test (3% local dose - 3 mm for all of the treatment verifications, but in some dose-volume histogram (DVH comparisons, we note sensitive differences for the planning target volume (PTV coverage and for the maximum doses in at-risk organs (up to 3.5%. In dose-distribution evaluations, we found differences of up to 5% in the PTV edges in certain cases due to detector array measurement errors. This work improves the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurements based on the treatment information, in contrast with the current commercial proposals based on planned data.

  20. Tailoring out-of-plane magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited FePt thin films by changing laser energy fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ying; Tan, T.L.; Tan, K.S.; Lee, P. [NSSE, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Liu, Hai; Yadian, Boluo; Hu, Ge; Huang, Yizhong; Ramanujan, R.V. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Rawat, R.S., E-mail: rajdeep.rawat@nie.edu.sg [NSSE, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Laser energy fluence (LEF) effect on composition, microstructure and magnetism. • Enhancing out-of-plane magnetic properties by tailoring LEF on target surface. • Higher LEF results in more energetic plasma species causing vacancy defects. • Formation of vacancy defect in FePt thin films leads to improved magnetic properties. • Best out-of-plane magnetic properties are achieved with medium LEF. - Abstract: Magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) FePt thin films are investigated at three different laser energy fluences of 51, 136 and 182 J/cm{sup 2}. Deposition at lower laser energy fluence (51 J/cm{sup 2}) yields softer out-of-plane coercivity (≤0.4 kG), whereas deposition at higher laser energy fluence (136 and 182 J/cm{sup 2}) results in harder out-of-plane coercivity (≥5.0 kG). The improved coercivity is found to be attributed to the formation of vacancy defects in thin films, which is indicated by stress change from tensile to compressive form with increasing laser energy fluence. Maximum out-of-plane saturated magnetization of 615 emu/cm{sup 3} and remanent squareness ratio of 0.88 are achieved for 16 nm thick FePt thin films deposited at moderate laser energy fluence of 136 J/cm{sup 2}, making them suitable for high density perpendicular data storage applications.

  1. Monitoring Biomass and N Accumulation at Jointing Stage in Winter Wheat Based on SPOT-5 Images%基于SPOT-5影像的冬小麦拔节期生物量及氮积累量监测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王备战; 冯晓; 温暖; 郑涛; 杨武德

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The monitoring equations to determine the above-ground biomass weight and N accumulation of winter wheat at jointing stage were established based on SPOT-5 images to provide reference for prediction of productivity and nitrogen regulation in mass production of wheat. [Method] Using SPOT-5 images and test data, the relationships were analyzed between spectral parameter and above-ground biomass weight, N accumulation of winter wheat at jointing stage, then the monitoring equations were established. [Result] The correlation between reflectance of green, red, near-infrared band and above-ground biomass weight, N accumulation reached 0.01 significant level. Reflectance of near-infrared band showed the most sensitive response for above-ground biomass weight, and reflectance of red band showed the most sensitive response to above-ground N accumulation. The exponential function model based on NDVI inversed plant above-ground biomass weight was the best, and R2 was 0.696** and that of RMSE was 258.92 kg·hm-2. The exponential function model based on the reflectance ratio of near-infrared band to red band inversed plant above-ground N accumulation was the best, and R2 was 0.717** and that of RMSE was 19.24 kg·hm-2. Based on the monitoring models, the thematic maps were produced to monitor above-ground biomass and N accumulation at jointing stage. [Conclusion] Using SPOT-5 images can achieve high precision in growth monitoring of winter wheat at jointing stage and it has a wide application prospect.%[目的]建立基于SPOT-5遥感信息的冬小麦拔节期地上部生物量和氮积累量的遥感监测模型,为利用SPOT-5影像进行大面积小麦生产力预测和氮素调控提供依据.[方法]分析冬小麦拔节期地上部生物量和氮积累量与同期SPOT-5光谱参数之间的定量关系,筛选出适宜的光谱参数,建立并评价冬小麦拔节期地上部生物量和氮积累量的遥感监测模型.[结果]绿光、红光和近红外波

  2. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  3. ITER helium ash accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  4. Study of High Fluence Radiation-induced Swelling and Hardening under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents a comprehensive model that has been developed to enable simulations of microstructural evolution under the irradiation conditions typical of light water reactor (LWR) internal components. The model, which accounts cascade production of point defects and vacancy, interstitial faulted dislocation loops, interstitial clusters migrating one-dimensionally and the evolution of the network dislocation structure, has been parameterized to account damage accumulation in austenitic stainless steels. Nucleation and growth of an ensemble of cavities is based on accounting the residual and produced by irradiation He atoms and existence of the dislocation and production biases. Additional applications and potential future developments for the model are also discussed.

  5. Beam test measurements with planar and 3D silicon strip detectors irradiated to sLHC fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Michael; Wiik, Liv; /Freiburg U.; Bates, Richard; /Glasgow U.; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; /INFN, Trento /Trento U.; Fleta, Celeste; /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron.; Harkonen, Jaakko; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, Karl; /Freiburg U.; Lozano, Manuel; /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron.; Maenpaa, Teppo; Moilanen, Henri; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Parkes, Chris; /Glasgow U. /Freiburg U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade of the CERN LHC to the super LHC (sLHC) requires investigation of new radiation hard tracking detectors. Compared to the LHC, tracking detectors must withstand a 5-10 times higher radiation fluence. Promising radiation hard options are planar silicon detectors with n-side readout and silicon detectors in 3D technology, where columnar electrodes are etched into the silicon substrate. This article presents beam test measurements per formed with planar and 3D n-in-p silicon strip detectors. The detectors were irradiated to different fluences, where the maximum fluence was 3 x 10{sup 15} 1 MeV neutron equivalent particles per square centimeter (n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) for the planar detectors and 2 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} for the 3D detectors. In addition to signal measurements, charge sharing and resolution of both detector technologies are compared. An increased signal from the irradiated 3D detectors at high bias voltages compared to the signal from the unirradiated detector indicates that charge multiplication effects occur in the 3D detectors. At a bias voltage of 260 V, the 3D detector irradiated to 2 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} yields a signal almost twice as high as the signal of the unirradiated detector. Only 30% of the signal of an unirradiated detector could be measured with the planar detector irradiated to 3 x 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of 600 V, which was the highest bias voltage applied to this sensor.

  6. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omotoso, E., E-mail: ezekiel.omotoso@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Departments of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 220005 (Nigeria); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P.N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×10{sup 10} to 9.2×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Current–voltage (I–V), capacitance–voltage (C–V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBH{sub I–V}) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, N{sub d} decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×10{sup 16} to 1.1×10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in N{sub d} shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm{sup −1}. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E{sub 0.39} and E{sub 0.62}), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E{sub 0.39} as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E{sub 0.62} has the attribute of Z{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F; Beerwerth, Frank; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans C; Haedersdal, Merete

    2015-11-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after a low-fluence IPL treatment with a home-use device. Sixteen subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) II-V were enrolled. Three constitutive buttock blocks (4.4 × 6.4 cm) were each subdivided into four sites, randomized to one IPL exposure of 0, 7, 8, or 10 J/cm2 (spectral output 530-1100 nm). Blocks were randomized to no UVR or three standard erythema doses (SEDs) UVR either 30 min or 24 h after IPL. Follow-up visits were 48 h, 1 week, and 4 weeks after IPL. Outcome measures were (i) clinical skin reactions, (ii) reflectance measurements of erythema and pigmentation, and (iii) pain. Subjects with FST II-IV experienced no skin reactions up to 4 weeks after IPL, neither erythema, edema, blisters, crusting, textual, nor pigment changes. Reflectance confirmed no change in erythema and pigmentation (p ≥ 0.090). UVR exposure induced erythema and increased pigmentation. The combination of IPL and UVR induced skin reactions not different to responses from UVR (IPL-UVR vs. UVR, p ≥ 0.164). Pain was generally low (median 1, range 0-4) and correlated positively with fluence and pigmentation (Spearman's rho ≥ 0.394, p exposure of three SEDs either shortly or 1 day after low-fluence IPL causes no amplification of skin responses in constitutive skin of individuals with FST II-IV.

  8. Fluence- and time-dependant lysosomal and mitochondrial damage induced by LS11 PDT characterized with light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    Light scattering from cells originates from sub-cellular organelles. Our measurements of angularly resolved light scattering have demonstrated that at 633 nm, the dominant scattering centers within EMT6 cells are mitochondria and lysosomes. To assess their specific contributions, we have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to induce organelle-specific perturbations within intact cells. We have developed a coated sphere scattering model for mitochondrial swelling in response to ALA- and Pc 4-PDT, and in the case of Pc 4-PDT we have used this model to map the scattering responses into clonogenic cell survival. More recently, we demonstrated the ability to measure the size, scattering contribution, and refractive index of lysosomes within cells by exploiting the localization and high extinction of the photosensitizer LS11 and an absorbing sphere scattering model. Here we report on time- and fluence-dependant scattering measurements from cells treated with LS11-PDT. LS11-PDT causes rapid lysosomal disruption, as quantified by uptake of acridine orange, and can induce downstream effects including release of mitochondrial cytochrome c preceding the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Reiners et al., Cell Death Differ. 9:934, 2002). Using scattering and these various methods of analysis, we observed that the induction of lysosomal morphology changes requires a fluence significantly higher than that reported for cell killing. At lower fluences, we observe that at 1 h after irradiation there is significant mitochondrial swelling, consistent with the onset of cytochrome c-induced cell death, while the morphology of lysosomes remains unchanged. We also expand on the ideas of lysosomal staining to demonstrate the sensitivity of scattering measurements at different wavelengths to different organelle populations.

  9. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  10. Review of current indications for combined very high fluence collagen cross-linking and laser in situ keratomileusis surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios John Kanellopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review we will discuss the reasoning and evolution of our current use of combined very high-fluence collagen crosslinking and laser in situ keratomileusis. Several presentations and pertinent publications are reviewed, along with the key steps of the enhanced LASIK procedure. Long term outcome data support the safety and efficacy of LASIK Xtra in stabilizing myopic but also hyperopic LASIK results.In conclusion, we have compelling evidence that LASIK Xtra is a safe and effective adjunct.

  11. Combination therapy of low-fluence photodynamic therapy and intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascular membrane in choroidal osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney J Morris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal osteoma is an unusual form of intraocular calcification seen in otherwise healthy eyes. It is a benign idiopathic osseous tumor of the choroid, typically seen in young females. Choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM is a complication seen in one-third of these patients and carries a poor visual outcome. We report a case of a 25-year-old hyperthyroid female with choroidal osteoma and subfoveal CNVM in her left eye which was successfully treated using low-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT with verteporfin followed by a single injection of intravitreal ranibizumab.

  12. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  13. Comparison of anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based treatment planning approaches for VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Min; Cao Daliang; Chen Fan; Ye Jinsong; Mehta, Vivek; Wong, Tony; Shepard, David, E-mail: min.mrao@gmail.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, 1221 Madison St Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2010-11-07

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to reduce treatment times while producing comparable or improved dose distributions relative to fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In order to take full advantage of the VMAT delivery technique, one must select a robust inverse planning tool. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of VMAT planning techniques of three categories: anatomy-based, fluence-based and aperture-based inverse planning. We have compared these techniques in terms of the plan quality, planning efficiency and delivery efficiency. Fourteen patients were selected for this study including six head-and-neck (HN) cases, and two cases each of prostate, pancreas, lung and partial brain. For each case, three VMAT plans were created. The first VMAT plan was generated based on the anatomical geometry. In the Elekta ERGO++ treatment planning system (TPS), segments were generated based on the beam's eye view (BEV) of the target and the organs at risk. The segment shapes were then exported to Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS followed by segment weight optimization and final dose calculation. The second VMAT plan was generated by converting optimized fluence maps (calculated by the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS) into deliverable arcs using an in-house arc sequencer. The third VMAT plan was generated using the Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc IMRT module which is an aperture-based optimization method. All VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the plan comparisons were made in terms of plan quality and delivery efficiency. The results show that for cases of little or modest complexity such as prostate, pancreas, lung and brain, the anatomy-based approach provides similar target coverage and critical structure sparing, but less conformal dose distributions as compared to the other two approaches. For more complex HN cases, the anatomy-based approach is not able to provide clinically acceptable

  14. Anthocyanin Accumulation Mediated by Blue Light and Cytokinin in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported that pigmentation in plants is stimulated by light and cytokinin (CTK); however, the signaling pathways and the relationship between light and CTK involved in the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation remain to be elucidated. We investigated (i) the role of blue light (BL) and CTK in anthocyanin accumulation; and (ii) the relationship between BL and CTK in wild type (WT) and hy4 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Two-d-old seedlings grown on medium with or without kinetin (KT) or zeatin (ZT) in darkness were irradiated using BL at different fluence rates for 3 d before the anthocyanin content was determined using a spectrophotometric method. Anthocyanin accumulation was strongly induced by BL in WT seedlings but not in hy4 seedlings, which demonstrated that CRY1 is the main photoreceptor for BL. Both KT and ZT enhanced the response of the WT seedlings to BL in a dose-dependent manner, whereas they were not sufficient to promote anthocyanin accumulation in darkness. In addition, data from experiments using the hy4 mutant showed that the CTK effect of BL was also CRY1-dependent. The results from experiments with three different treatment programs showed that the relationship between BL and KT in anthocyanin accumulation of Arabidopsis seedlings seems neither multiplicative nor additive coaction, but rather interaction. BL is necessary for anthocyanin accumulation, and KT might be involved in the BL signaling pathway.

  15. Integrated optical fiber lattice accumulators

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, Adam F

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sigma-delta modulators track a signal by accumulating the error between an input signal and a feedback signal. The accumulated energy is amplitude analyzed by a comparator. The comparator output signal is fed back and subtracted from the input signal. This thesis is primarily concerned with designing accumulators for inclusion in an optical sigma-delta modulator. Fiber lattice structures with optical amplifiers are used to perform the...

  16. A comparative study on efficacy of high and low fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and glycolic acid peel in melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Kumar Kar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melasma is acquired symmetric hypermelanosis characterized by light-to-deep brown pigmentation over cheeks, forehead, upper lip, and nose. Treatment of this condition is difficult and associated with high recurrence rates. With the advent of newer therapies, there is interest in the use of glycolic acid peels and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (QSNYL in high and low fluence for this disorder. Aims: To compare the therapeutic efficacy of low fluence QSNYL, high fluence QSNYL, and glycolic acid peel in melasma in three study groups of 25 patients each. Methods: Seventy-five Indian patients diagnosed as melasma were included. These patients were randomly divided in three groups (Group A = 25 patients of melasma treated with low-fluence QSNYL at weekly intervals, Group B = 25 patients of melasma treated with glycolic acid peel at 2 weeks intervals, Group C = 25 patients of melasma treated with high-fluence QSNYL at 2 weeks intervals. Study period and follow-up period was of 12 weeks each. Out of the 75 patients included, 21 patients in Group A, 19 patients in Group B, and 20 patients in Group C completed the study. Response to treatment was assessed using melasma area and severity index score. Results: Significant improvement was recorded in all the three groups. The improvement was statistically highly significant in Group A as compared to Group C (P<0.005, significant in Group A as compared to Group B (P<0.05, and also in Group B when compared to Group C (P<0.05. Low-fluence QSNYL was associated with least side effects. Conclusions: This study shows the efficacy of low-fluence QSNYL and glycolic acid peel in melasma. These could be an effective treatment options compared to conventional methods for the treatment of melasma.

  17. Heat accumulation during high repetition rate ultrafast laser interaction: Waveguide writing in borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibin; Eaton, Shane M; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON, M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2007-04-15

    During high repetition rate (>200 kHz) ultrafast laser waveguide writing, visible heat modified zones surrounding the formed waveguide occur as a result of heat accumulation. The radii of the heat-modified zones increase with the laser net fluence, and were found to correlate with the formation of low-loss and cylindrically symmetric optical waveguides. A numerical thermal model based on the finite difference method is applied here to account for cumulative heating and diffusion effects. The model successfully shows that heat propagation and accumulation accurately predict the radius of the 'heat modified' zones observed in borosilicate glass waveguides formed across a wide range of laser exposure conditions. Such modelling promises better control of thermal effects for optimizing the fabrication and performance of three-dimensional optical devices in transparent materials.

  18. COP1/SPA ubiquitin ligase complexes repress anthocyanin accumulation under low light and high light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Hoecker, Ute

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis and many other plant species, anthocyanin pigments accumulate only after light exposure and not in darkness. Excess light of very high fluence rates leads to a further, very strong increase in anthocyanin levels. How excess light is sensed is not well understood. Here, we show that mutations in the key repressor of light signaling, the COP1/SPA complex, cause a strong hyperaccumulation of anthocyanins not only under normal light but also under excess, high light conditions. Hence, normal light signaling via COP1/SPA is required to prevent hyperaccumulation of anthocyanins under these high light conditions. However, since cop1 and spa mutants show a similar high-light responsiveness of anthocyanin accumulation as the wild type it remains to be resolved whether COP1/SPA is directly involved in the high-light response itself.

  19. A combined surface and bulk TCAD damage model for the analysis of radiation detectors operating at HL-LHC fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Moscatelli, F.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Bilei, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present the development and the application of a new TCAD modelling scheme to simulate the effects of radiation damage on silicon radiation detectors at the very high fluence levels expected at High Luminosity LHC (up to 2 × 1016 1MeV n/cm2). In particular, we propose a combined approach for the analysis of the surface effects (oxide charge build-up and interface trap states introduction) as well as bulk effects (deep level traps and/or recombination centers introduction). Experimental measurements have been carried out aiming at: i) extraction from simple test structures of relevant parameters to be included within the TCAD model and ii) validation of the new modelling scheme through comparison with measurements of different test structures (e.g. different technologies) before and after irradiation. The good agreements between experimental measurements and simulation findings foster the suitability of the TCAD modelling approach as a predictive tool for investigating the radiation detector behavior at different fluences and operating conditions. This would allow the design and optimization of innovative 3D and planar silicon detectors for future HL-LHC High Energy Physics experiments.

  20. On the Statistical Relationship between CME Speed and Soft X-ray Flux and Fluence of the Associated Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Salas-Matamoros, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Both observation and theory reveal a close relationship between the kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the thermal energy release traced by the related soft X-ray (SXR) emission. The major problem of empirical studies of this relationship is the distortion of the CME speed by the projection effect in the coronagraphic measurements. We present a re-assessment of the statistical relationship between CME velocities and SXR parameters, using the SOHO/LASCO catalog and GOES whole Sun observations during the period 1996 to 2008. 49 events were identified where CMEs originated near the limb, at central meridian distances between 70$^\\circ$ and 85$^\\circ$, and had a reliably identified SXR burst, the parameters of which - peak flux and fluence - could be determined with some confidence. We find similar correlations between the logarithms of CME speed and of SXR peak flux and fluence as several earlier studies, with correlation coefficients of 0.48 and 0.58, respectively. Correlations are slightly improve...

  1. Microstructural behavior of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels under irradiation to neutron fluences beyond the design operation period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Nikolaev, Yu. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-microscopy and fractographic studies of the surveillance specimens from base and weld metals of VVER-440/213 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in the original state and after irradiations to different fast neutron fluences from ˜5 × 10 23 n m -2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) up to over design values have been carried out. The maximum specimens irradiation time was 84 480 h. It is shown that there is an evolution in radiation-induced structural behavior with radiation dose increase, which causes a change in relative contribution of the mechanisms responsible for radiation embrittlement of RPV materials. Particularly, radiation coalescence of copper-enriched precipitates and extensive density increase of dislocation loops was observed. Increase in dislocation loop density was shown to provide the dominant contribution to radiation hardening at the late irradiation stages (after reaching double the design end-of-life neutron fluence of ˜4 × 10 24 n m -2). The fracture mechanism of the base metal at those stages was observed to change from transcrystalline to intercrystalline.

  2. Effect of fluence and ambient environment on the surface and structural modification of femtosecond laser irradiated Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umm-i-Kalsoom; Shazia, Bashir; Nisar, Ali; M Shahid, Rafique; Wolfgang, Husinsky; Chandra, S. R. Nathala; Sergey, V. Makarov; Narjis, Begum

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions, ultrafast pulsed laser interaction with matter leads to the formation of self-organized conical as well as periodic surface structures (commonly reffered to as, laser induced periodic surface structures, LIPSS). The purpose of the present investigations is to explore the effect of fsec laser fluence and ambient environments (Vacuum & O2) on the formation of LIPSS and conical structures on the Ti surface. The surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ablation threshold with single and multiple (N = 100) shots and the existence of an incubation effect was demonstrated by SEM investigations for both the vacuum and the O2 environment. The phase analysis and chemical composition of the exposed targets were performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. SEM investigations reveal the formation of LIPSS (nano & micro). FFT d-spacing calculations illustrate the dependence of periodicity on the fluence and ambient environment. The periodicity of nano-scale LIPSS is higher in the case of irradiation under vacuum conditions as compared to O2. Furthermore, the O2 environment reduces the ablation threshold. XRD data reveal that for the O2 environment, new phases (oxides of Ti) are formed. EDS analysis exhibits that after irradiation under vacuum conditions, the percentage of impurity element (Al) is reduced. The irradiation in the O2 environment results in 15% atomic diffusion of oxygen. Project supported by Österreichische Forschungsfödergesellschaft (FFG) (Grant No. 834325).

  3. An alternative calibration method for counting P-32 reactor monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, T.J. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1143, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1143 (United States); Vehar, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1143 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Radioactivation of sulfur is a common technique used to measure fast neutron fluences in test and research reactors. Elemental sulfur can be pressed into pellets and used as monitors. The {sup 32}S(n, p) {sup 32}P reaction has a practical threshold of about 3 MeV and its cross section and associated uncertainties are well characterized [1]. The product {sup 32P} emits a beta particle with a maximum energy of 1710 keV [2]. This energetic beta particle allows pellets to be counted intact. ASTM Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates and Fast-Neutron Fluences by Radioactivation of Sulfur-32 (E265) [3] details a method of calibration for counting systems and subsequent analysis of results. This method requires irradiation of sulfur monitors in a fast-neutron field whose spectrum and intensity are well known. The resultant decay-corrected count rate is then correlated to the known fast neutron fluence. The Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia has traditionally performed calibration irradiations of sulfur pellets using the {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutron source at the National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST) [4] as a transfer standard. However, decay has reduced the intensity of NIST's source; thus lowering the practical upper limits of available fluence. As of May 2010, neutron emission rates have decayed to approximately 3 e8 n/s. In practice, this degradation of capabilities precludes calibrations at the highest fluence levels produced at test reactors and limits the useful range of count rates that can be measured. Furthermore, the reduced availability of replacement {sup 252}Cf threatens the long-term viability of the NIST {sup 252}Cf facility for sulfur pellet calibrations. In lieu of correlating count rate to neutron fluence in a reference field the total quantity of {sup 32}P produced in a pellet can be determined by absolute counting methods. This offers an attractive alternative to extended {sup 252}Cf exposures because

  4. Tailoring out-of-plane magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited FePt thin films by changing laser energy fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Tan, T. L.; Tan, K. S.; Lee, P.; Liu, Hai; Yadian, Boluo; Hu, Ge; Huang, Yizhong; Ramanujan, R. V.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) FePt thin films are investigated at three different laser energy fluences of 51, 136 and 182 J/cm2. Deposition at lower laser energy fluence (51 J/cm2) yields softer out-of-plane coercivity (≤0.4 kG), whereas deposition at higher laser energy fluence (136 and 182 J/cm2) results in harder out-of-plane coercivity (≥5.0 kG). The improved coercivity is found to be attributed to the formation of vacancy defects in thin films, which is indicated by stress change from tensile to compressive form with increasing laser energy fluence. Maximum out-of-plane saturated magnetization of 615 emu/cm3 and remanent squareness ratio of 0.88 are achieved for 16 nm thick FePt thin films deposited at moderate laser energy fluence of 136 J/cm2, making them suitable for high density perpendicular data storage applications.

  5. A real-time virtual delivery system for photon radiotherapy delivery monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Treatment delivery monitoring is important for radiotherapy, which enables catching dosimetric error at the earliest possible opportunity. This project develops a virtual delivery system to monitor the dose delivery process of photon radiotherapy in real-time using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC method.Methods: The simulation process consists of 3 parallel CPU threads. A thread T1 is responsible for communication with a linac, which acquires a set of linac status parameters, e.g. gantry angles, MLC configurations, and beam MUs every 20 ms. Since linac vendors currently do not offer interface to acquire data in real time, we mimic this process by fetching information from a linac dynalog file at the set frequency. Instantaneous beam fluence map (FM is calculated based. A FM buffer is also created in T1 and the instantaneous FM is accumulated to it. This process continues, until a ready signal is received from thread T2 on which an in-house developed MC dose engine executes on GPU. At that moment, the accumulated FM is transferred to T2 for dose calculations, and the FM buffer in T1 is cleared. Once the dose calculation finishes, the resulting 3D dose distribution is directed to thread T3, which displays it in three orthogonal planes in color wash overlaid on the CT image. This process continues to monitor the 3D dose distribution in real-time.Results: An IMRT and a VMAT cases used in our patient-specific QA are studied. Maximum dose differences between our system and treatment planning system are 0.98% and 1.58% for the IMRT and VMAT cases, respectively. The update frequency is >10Hz and the relative uncertainty level is 2%.Conclusion: By embedding a GPU-based MC code in a novel data/work flow, it is possible to achieve real-time MC dose calculations to monitor delivery process.------------------------------Cite this article as: Shi F, Gu X, Graves YJ, Jiang S, Jia X. A real-time virtual delivery system for photon radiotherapy delivery

  6. Monitoring nitrogen accumulation in mosses in central European forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Roland; Schröder, Winfried; Schmidt, Gunther; Genssler, Lutz

    2008-10-01

    In order to assess whether nitrogen (N) loads in mosses reflect different land uses, 143 sites in North Rhine-Westphalia, the Weser-Ems Region and the Euro Region Nissa were sampled between 2000 and 2005. The data were analysed statistically with available surface information on land use and forest conditions. N bioaccumulation in mosses in the Weser-Ems Region with high densities of agricultural land use and livestock exceeded the concentrations in the more industrialised Euro Region Nissa. In all three study areas agricultural and livestock spatial densities were found to be positively correlated with N bioaccumulation in mosses. In North Rhine-Westphalia, the N concentrations in mosses was also moderately correlated with N concentrations in leaves and needles of forest trees. The moss method proved useful to assess the spatial patterns of N bioaccumulation due to land use.

  7. Low-fluence rate, long duration photodynamic therapy in glioma mouse model using organic light emitting diode (OLED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Lin, Liang-Ting; Chen, Po-Hsiung; Ho, Meng-Huan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lee, Yi-Jang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hsieh, Yei-San; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of gliomas poses significant clinical challenges due to resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, and treatment side effects. Metronomic photodynamic therapy (mPDT), which involves long treatment time with low fluence rate and multiple or continuous photosensitizer administrations, has potential in treating gliomas without threatening the quality of life and has been demonstrated in rats and rabbits. mPDT in small animals such as mouse is not yet shown due to lack of lightweight illumination device for long periods of time. We presented low fluence rate (3mW/cm(2)) and long duration (3.7h) PDT treatment in a nude mouse model of human glioblastoma by using organic light emitting diode (OLED) with single dose of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration as photosensitizer. Tumor volume was measured using bioluminescent imaging and the animal survival time was recorded. Additionally, we have performed limited PDT dosimetric measurements of PpIX fluorescence, tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in 3 PDT mice. For animals with similar pre- and immediate post-light tumor volume, the averaged total survival time of PDT mice is 40.5±9.2 days that are significantly longer than the control mice (26.0±2.0 days). The post-light survival time of PDT mice is 14.3±5.9 days that are marginally longer than the control group (8.0±0.0 days). In the dosimetric measurement, good maintenance of PpIX fluorescence in one PDT mouse has relatively improved survival time, compared with the other two PDT mice (i.e., 24 days versus 16 and 17 days). This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of low-fluence rate and long treatment time of ALA-PDT using OLED without anesthetization of animals. The response of PDT treated animals with similar pre- and post-light tumor volume is encouraging to show a longer survival time than the controls. The dosimetric indices such as photosensitizer fluorescence and tissue oxygenation would help understand the possible treatment

  8. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-01

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  9. Accumulation chamber as monitoring system for biogas emission from solid waste land filling: preliminary experimental results and elaborations on italian provincial scale; Camera di accumulo portatile per il monitoraggio di emissioni di biogas da discarica: risultati sperimentali ed elaborazioni preliminari a scala provinciale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capaccioni, B.; Pirillo, L. [Urbino Univ. Carlo Bo, Urbino (Italy). Istituto di Vulcanologia e Geochimica; Didero, M. [Urbino Univ. Carlo Bo, Urbino (Italy). Istituto di Geologia Applicata; Lucci, P.; Scartoni, P. [Area Territorio e Ambiente Provincia di Arezzo, Arezzo (Italy). Servizio Ecologia; Tatano, F. [Urbino Univ. Carlo Bo, Urbino (Italy). Facolta' di Scienze Ambientali

    2005-04-01

    On site CO{sub 2} flux measurements with the static, not stationary accumulation chamber system were experimentally carried out in no. 5 MSW (active and closed) landfills located in the territory of the Province of Arezzo (Tuscany Region). Corresponding CO{sub 2} emission flux maps were contoured and analysed, revealing a possible, preliminary geometrical classification of biogas dispersion: diffuse dispersion (internal), lateral/angular dispersion (internal), and external dispersion. Also specific (volume and surface) biogas emission parameters were calculated and graphically compared for the monitored inactive facilities. [Italian] La metodologia strumentale portatile della camera di accumulo, statica non stazionaria, e' stata adoperata sperimentalmente per la misura on site di flussi puntuali di emissione di CO{sub 2} in cinque discariche (attive e non) per RSU ed assimilabili localizzate nel territorio della Provincia di Arezzo. Si sono elaborate, ed analizzate criticamente, le corrispondenti mappe areali di flusso, che hanno consentito di delineare una possibile classificazione geometrica - ancorche' preliminare - di dispersioni di biogas generabili da discarica: diffuse interne, laterali/angolari interne, esterne. Con riferimento alle discariche inattive d'indagine, si sono altresi' determinati, e rappresentati graficamente, i valori di possibili parametri specifici (volumetrico, superficiale) di dispersione di biogas.

  10. On-line beam monitoring for neutron capture therapy at the MIT Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Otto K.; Moulin, Damien J.; Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Solares, Guido R.

    1995-08-01

    Neutron capture therapy sets new requirements on the measurement and monitoring of the radiation fields used in this new form of therapy. Beams used for neutron capture therapy are comprised of mixed radiation fields which include slow, epithermal, and fast neutrons, as well as gamma rays. A computer-based beam monitoring system for epithermal or thermal neutron capture therapy is described. This system provides accurate, sensitive, and rapid on-line readout and recording of the various beam components. Readout of fluxes, fluences, and corresponding doses in the target are provided in color coded graphic analog as well as numerical form on the computer monitors. Variations in neutron spectrum or spatial distribution of the beam can be rapidly diagnosed with the aid of the monitor readout. Redundancy of fluence measurement is provided by an independent system using scalers and timers and by utilizing reactor power measuring instruments.

  11. Does the fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator improve dose homogeneity in bilateral field plan of head and neck patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator (ETC on the dose homogeneity for head and neck cancer patients. Treatment planning using 6-MV X-rays and bilateral field arrangement employing ETC was carried out on the computed tomography (CT datasets of 20 patients with head and neck cancer. All the patients were planned in Varian Eclipse three-dimensional treatment planning system (3DTPS with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC. The treatment plans, with and without fluence editing, was compared and the effect of pre-editing and post-editing the fluence maps in the treatment field was evaluated. The skin dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs and was compared with the skin dose estimated by TPS. The mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 5.4 (range 1.5-10; SD 2.4. Post-editing fluence map showed that the mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 0.47 (range 0.1-0.9; SD 0.3. The mean skin dose measured with TLD was found to be 74% (range 71-80% of the prescribed dose while the TPS showed the mean skin dose as 85% (range 80-90%. The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 11%. Fluence map editing thus proved to be a potential tool for improving dose homogeneity in head and neck cancer patients planned with ETC, thus reducing the hot spots in the treatment region as well. The treatment with ETC is feasible with DMLC and does not take any additional time for setup or delivery. The method used to edit the fluence maps is simple and time efficient. Manual control over a plan is essential to create the best treatment plan possible.

  12. Mechanism study on mitochondrial fragmentation under oxidative stress caused by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo continual fusion and fission to maintain their morphology and functions, but the mechanism involved is still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) on mitochondrial dynamics in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Upon HF-LPLI-triggered oxidative stress, mitochondria displayed a fragmented structure, which was abolished by exposure to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a reactive oxygen species scavenger, indicating that oxidative stress can induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial translocation of the profission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was observed following HF-LPLI, demonstrating apoptosis-related activation of Drp1. Notably, DHA pre-treatment prevented HF-LPLI-induced Drp1 activation. We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress through activation of Drp1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation.

  13. High resolution characterization of modifications in fused silica after exposure to low fluence 355 nm laser at different repetition frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C H; Ju, X; Jiang, X D; Huang, J; Zhou, X D; Zheng, Z; Wu, W D; Zheng, W G; Li, Z X; Wang, B Y; Yu, X H

    2011-03-28

    We report on the characterization of modifications in fused silica after exposure to low fluence (2 J/cm2) 355 nm laser at repetition frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz. Synchrotron based XRF spectroscopy is employed to study concentration variation of metal inclusions in the surface layer. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is used to probe atomic size defects variation in bulk silica. FT-IR is used to characterize changes of bond length and angle of Si-O-Si covalent bond of irradiated silica. Compared to the basic frequency, the big loss of cerium and iron concentration, the size enlargement of vacancy cluster and the decrease of Si-O-Si covalent bond length after 10 Hz laser irradiation are illustrated by our data. These tiny modifications provide important data to investigate laser damage mechanism.

  14. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  15. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, Roberto; Betta, G -F Dalla; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2 10^16 1 MeV equivalent n/cm^2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  16. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  17. High energy (MeV) ion fluence dependent nano scale free volume defects studies of PMMA films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Paramjit [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshkumaripu@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Cyriac, Jincemon; Rahul, M.T. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala 686560 (India); Nambissan, P.M.G. [Applied Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Prasad, Rajendra [Vivekananda College of Technology and Management, Aligarh 202002 (India)

    2014-02-01

    A systematic study on the dependence of the free volume at nanoscale in carbon ions irradiated polymethylmethacrylate polymer samples was carried out by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS). An investigation about the evolution of cross-linking in the polymeric chains after ion irradiation was carried out from the calculated values of hole radius, free volume and fractional free volume using Tao-Eldrup Model. The role of rise in temperature on the growth of free volume was observed at higher fluences. The results were supported by variations in the S parameter of DBS study. The structural analyses were carried out using XRD to investigate for the modification in the structural nature, degree of crystallinity and average crystallite size of the polymer after ion irradiation. Additional information on the modifications of optical and chemical properties was extracted by means of UV–visible and FTIR spectroscopy respectively.

  18. Accuracy validation of incident photon fluence on DQE for various measurement conditions and X-ray units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Kondo, Shimpei; Hayashi, Daiki; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used as a comprehensive metric for X-ray image evaluation in digital X-ray units. The incident photon fluence per air kerma (SNR²(in)) is necessary for calculating the DQE. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) reports the SNR²(in) under conditions of standard radiation quality, but this SNR²(in) might not be accurate as calculated from the X-ray spectra emitted by an actual X-ray tube. In this study, we evaluated the error range of the SNR²(in) presented by the IEC62220-1 report. We measured the X-ray spectra emitted by an X-ray tube under conditions of standard radiation quality of RQA5. The spectral photon fluence at each energy bin was multiplied by the photon energy and the mass energy absorption coefficient of air; then the air kerma spectrum was derived. The air kerma spectrum was integrated over the whole photon energy range to yield the total air kerma. The total photon number was then divided by the total air kerma. This value is the SNR²(in). These calculations were performed for various measurement parameters and X-ray units. The percent difference between the calculated value and the standard value of RQA5 was up to 2.9%. The error range was not negligibly small. Therefore, it is better to use the new SNR²(in) of 30694 (1/(mm(2) μGy)) than the current [Formula: see text] of 30174 (1/(mm(2) μGy)).

  19. Modeling solar cell degradation in space: a comparison of the NRL displacement damage dose and the JPL equivalent fluence approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messenger, S.R. [SFA Inc., Largo, MD (United States); Summers, G.P. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Walters, R.J.; Xapsos, M.A. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Burke, E.A.

    2001-07-01

    The method for predicting solar cell degradation in space radiation environments developed recently at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is compared in detail with the earlier method developed at the US Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Although both methods are similar, the key difference is that in the NRL approach, the energy dependence of the damage coefficients is determined from a calculation of the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) and requires relatively few experimental measurements, whereas in the JPL method the damage coefficients have to be determined using an extensive set of experimental measurements. The end result of the NRL approach is a determination of a single characteristic degradation curve for a cell technology, which is measured against displacement damage dose rather than fluence. The end-of-life (EOL) cell performance for a particular mission can be read from the characteristic curve once the displacement damage dose for the mission has been determined. In the JPL method, the end result is a determination of the equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence, which would cause the same level of degradation as the actual space environment. The two approaches give similar results for GaAs/Ge solar cells, for which a large database exists. Because the NRL method requires far less experimental data than the JPL method, it is more readily applied to emerging cell technologies for which extensive radiation measurements are not available. The NRL approach is being incorporated into a code named SAVANT by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center. The predictions of SAVANT are shown to agree closely with actual space data for GaAs/Ge and CuInSe{sub 2} cells flown on the Equator-S mission. (author)

  20. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  1. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  2. Optical transmission damage of undoped and Ce doped Y3Al5O12 scintillation crystals under 24 GeV protons high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffray, E.; Fedorov, A.; Dormenev, V.; Houžvička, J.; Korjik, M.; Lucchini, M. T.; Mechinsky, V.; Ochesanu, S.

    2017-06-01

    This report presents results on the optical transmission damage of undoped and Ce doped Y3Al5O12 scintillation crystals under high fluence of 24 GeV protons. We observed that, similarly to other middle heavy scintillators, it possesses the unique radiation hardness at fluence values as high as 5×1014 p/cm2 and it is thus promising for the application in the detectors at High Luminosity LHC. The crystalline structure of the garnet scintillator allows to control and further optimize its scintillation parameters, such as scintillation decay time and emission wavelength, and shows a limited set of the radioisotopes after the irradiation with protons.

  3. Modeling IRA Accumulation and Withdrawals

    OpenAIRE

    Sabelhaus, John

    2000-01-01

    Empirical analysis of IRA accumulation and withdrawal patterns is limited because information about IRA balances and flows is not available for a sample of taxpayers. This paper combines survey data on IRA balances with individual tax return data on IRA flows to study IRA accumulation and withdrawal patterns across cohorts. The analysis shows that IRA rules such as penalties for early withdrawals and minimum distribution requirements have predictable effects on IRA flows. The estimated propen...

  4. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As.

  5. MO-E-BRB-04: Real-Time Exit-Fluence Delivery Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, J. [University of Virginia Health System (United States)

    2015-06-15

    could be used. review error detection via log file analysis Learn how exit detector signal recorded in log file could be used to improve patient safety understand real-time EPID-based transmission dosimetry methods understand the goals of real-time delivery monitoring CMS Innovation grant. Rapid response supportive and palliative care program for patients with advanced cancer, starts July, 2012; Accuray Inc. Exit detector based QA software evaluation, Sept, 2012-Sept, 2013; ROI GRant from ASTRO “Safety and Quality: IMRT treatment delivery accuracy”.

  6. Accumulation of contaminants from urban rainfall runoff in blue crabs: A pilot study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of using caged blue crabs Callinectes sapidus to monitor accumulation of contaminants in urban...

  7. Laser-induced plasma from pure and doped water-ice at high fluence by ultraviolet and infrared radiation - art. no. 70050X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, A.; Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Ice made of ultrapure water or water doped with 1 % polymer (polyethylene glycol, "PEG") was irradiated by laser light with fluences between 2 and 80 J/cm(2) in the ultraviolet (UV) regime at 355 nm and in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm in vacuum. In the UV regime there is a threshold for pl...

  8. Measurements of thermal neutron fluence proton therapy for head and neck; Medidas de la fluencia de neutrones termicos en protonterapia de cabeza y cuello

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F.; Terron, J. A.; Muniz, J. L.; Exposito, M. r.; Nieto-Camero, J.J.; Korf, A.; Arce, P.; Nunez, L.; Loubser, M.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    We present an estimate of the distribution of thermal neutron fluence proton therapy for head and neck using an anthropomorphic phantom called NORMA. It also represents a small part within a larger project which aims to develop a risk prediction model due to neutron radiation generated indirectly in radiotherapy.

  9. Effects of temperature-dependent optical properties on the fluence rate and temperature of biological tissue during low-level laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    The effects of temperature-dependent optical properties on the change of fluence rate and temperature distribution within biological tissues during low-level laser therapy (LLLT) were investigated by experimental and numerical methods. The fluence rate and temperature within a porcine skin were measured in vitro using an optical fiber sensor and a thermocouple, respectively, while irradiating the sample with a continuous wave laser (IPG Laser GmbH, Burbach, Germany, 1,064 nm, 3.14 W/cm(2)). The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of porcine skin were estimated using an inverse adding-doubling algorithm from the total reflectance and transmittance measured with a double-integrating sphere. It was shown that the reduced scattering coefficient of porcine skin decreased significantly as the skin temperature increased within the range of 26-40 °C. To incorporate the temperature dependency of tissue optical properties in the simulation, a mathematical model that adopted coupled equations for fluence rate and bioheat transfer was developed. It was shown that the predicted fluence rate and temperature by the proposed mathematical model agreed closely with the measured values of porcine skin. The calculation of human skin temperature using the developed model revealed that the skin temperature could be significantly underestimated if the temperature dependency of optical properties of human skin were ignored during LLLT simulation.

  10. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mahdm@iust.ac.ir; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Colloidal aluminum- and titanium-based nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation. • Various liquid environments and laser fluences were applied as variable parameters. • Physical characteristics of liquid medium influence ablation process and nanoparticle formation. • Size properties of prepared nanoparticles depend on liquid medium and laser fluence. • Ablation of both metals in ethanol results in nanoparticles with smaller size. - Abstract: In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles’ mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  11. Structure and morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Effects of temperature and energy fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillén, G. García; Palma, M.I. Mendivil [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León – Centro de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); and others

    2015-07-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a zinc metal target at different water temperatures (room temperature, 50, 70 and 90 °C). Ablation was carried out using 532 nm output from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at three different laser fluence. Analysis of the morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical and luminescent properties were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. TEM analysis showed that a change in temperature resulted in ZnO and Zn(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles with different sizes and morphologies. XPS results confirmed the compositions and chemical states of these nanoparticles. These zinc nanomaterials showed emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and blue regions. The results of this work demonstrated that by varying the liquid medium temperature, the structure, composition, morphology and optical properties of the nanomaterials could be modified during pulsed laser ablation in liquid. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zinc nanomaterial colloids were synthesized by PLAL. • Effects of laser fluence and the distilled water temperature were analyzed. • The final structure varied with the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • The morphology was dependent on the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • Zinc nanocolloids showed emission in the UV and blue region.

  12. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  13. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla [Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (DCCI) - University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm{sup 2}). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm{sup 2}) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}–1 mJ/cm{sup 2} on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after

  14. A Comparison of Low-Fluence 1064-nm Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser with Topical 20% Azelaic Acid Cream and their Combination in Melasma in Indian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Charu; Naik, Hira; Kar, Hemanta K; Chauhan, Amrita

    2012-01-01

    Background: Melasma is an acquired symmetric hypermelanosis characterised by irregular light to gray-brown macules on sun-exposed skin with a predilection for the cheeks, forehead, upper lip, nose and chin. The management of melasma is challenging and requires meticulous use of available therapeutic options. Aims: To compare the therapeutic efficacy of low-fluence Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (QSNYL) with topical 20% azelaic acid cream and their combination in melasma in three study groups of 20 patients each. Materials and Methods: Sixty Indian patients diagnosed as melasma were included. These patients were randomly divided in three groups (group A = 20 patients of melasma treated with low-fluence QSNYL at weekly intervals, group B = 20 patients of melasma treated with twice daily application of 20% azelaic acid cream and group C = 20 patients of melasma treated with combination of both). Study period was of 12 weeks each. Response to treatment was assessed using melasma area and severity index score. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, paired and unpaired student t-test. Results: Significant improvement was recorded in all the three groups. The improvement was statistically highly significant in Group C as compared to group A (P < 0.001) and group B (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study shows the efficacy of low-fluence QSNYL, topical 20% azelaic acid cream and their combination in melasma. The combination of low-fluence QSNYL and topical 20% azelaic acid cream yields better results as compared to low-fluence QSNYL and azelaic acid alone. PMID:23378709

  15. A comparison of low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched Nd: YAG laser with topical 20% azelaic acid cream and their combination in melasma in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melasma is an acquired symmetric hypermelanosis characterised by irregular light to gray-brown macules on sun-exposed skin with a predilection for the cheeks, forehead, upper lip, nose and chin. The management of melasma is challenging and requires meticulous use of available therapeutic options. Aims: To compare the therapeutic efficacy of low-fluence Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (QSNYL with topical 20% azelaic acid cream and their combination in melasma in three study groups of 20 patients each. Materials and Methods: Sixty Indian patients diagnosed as melasma were included. These patients were randomly divided in three groups (group A = 20 patients of melasma treated with low-fluence QSNYL at weekly intervals, group B = 20 patients of melasma treated with twice daily application of 20% azelaic acid cream and group C = 20 patients of melasma treated with combination of both. Study period was of 12 weeks each. Response to treatment was assessed using melasma area and severity index score. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, paired and unpaired student t-test. Results: Significant improvement was recorded in all the three groups. The improvement was statistically highly significant in Group C as compared to group A ( P < 0.001 and group B ( P < 0.001. Conclusions: This study shows the efficacy of low-fluence QSNYL, topical 20% azelaic acid cream and their combination in melasma. The combination of low-fluence QSNYL and topical 20% azelaic acid cream yields better results as compared to low-fluence QSNYL and azelaic acid alone.

  16. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  17. Completeness of the Accumulation Calculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞慧群; 孙永强; 等

    1998-01-01

    The accumulation calculs(AC for short)is an interval based temporal logic to specify and reason about hybrid real-time systems.This paper presents a formal proof system for AC,and proves that the system is complete relative to that of Interval Temporal Logic(ITL for short)on real domain.

  18. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  19. Laser inertial fusion dry-wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, T. J.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Knowles, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulses of MeV-level ions with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 can be expected to impinge on the first-wall of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. To simulate the effect of these ions, we have exposed candidate dry-wall materials to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were exposed to up to 1000 pulses, with some samples heated to 600 °C. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. Heating and Re-alloying mitigate, but do not eliminate, these apparently thermomechanically-caused effects. Use of a 3-D geometry, and/or use of the tungsten in thin-film form may offer improved survivability compared to bulk tungsten.

  20. Influence of polydisperse distributions of both primary particle and aggregate size on soot temperature in low-fluence LII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Yang, M.; Hill, F. A.; Snelling, D. R.; Smallwood, G. J.

    2006-06-01

    An improved aggregate-based low-fluence laser-induced incandescence (LII) model has been developed. The shielding effect in heat conduction between aggregated soot particles and the surrounding gas was modeled using the concept of the equivalent heat transfer sphere. The diameter of such an equivalent sphere was determined from direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations in the free molecular regime as functions of the aggregate size and the thermal accommodation coefficient of soot. Both the primary soot particle diameter and the aggregate size distributions are assumed to be lognormal. The effective temperature of a soot particle ensemble containing different primary particle diameters and aggregate sizes in the laser probe volume was calculated based on the ratio of the total thermal radiation intensities of soot particles at 400 and 780 nm to simulate the experimentally measured soot particle temperature using two-color optical pyrometry. The effect of primary particle diameter polydispersity is in general important and should be considered. The effect of aggregate size polydispersity is relatively unimportant when the heat conduction between the primary particles and the surrounding gas takes place in the free-molecular regime; however, it starts to become important when the heat conduction process occurs in the near transition regime. The model developed in this study was also applied to the re-determination of the thermal accommodation coefficient of soot in an atmospheric pressure laminar ethylene diffusion flame.

  1. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  2. Trapping in irradiated p-on-n silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, Th.; Leonard, A.; Maerschalk, Th.; Mohammadi, A.; Pernie, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Zeid, S.Abu; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.; Van Parijs, I.; Strom, D.A.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Callatay, B.; Delaere, C.; Pree, T.Du; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Michotte, D.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pagano, D.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M.Vidal; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G.H.; Harkonen, J.; Lampen, T.; Luukka, P.R.; Maenpaa, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Tuuva, T.; Beaulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sabes, D.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Zoccarato, Y.; Agram, J.L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.Ch.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.M.; Chabert, E.; Charles, L.; Goetzmann, Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Mathieu, C.; Richer, M.; Skovpen, K.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Geisler, M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Autermann, C.; Edelhoff, M.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schwering, G.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Burgmeier, A.; Calligaris, L.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Fluke, G.; Garcia, J.Garay; Gizhko, A.; Hansen, K.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Schroeder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Blobel, V.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Draeger, A.R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Lapsien, T.; Mattig, S.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Sola, V.; Steinbruck, G.; Wellhausen, J.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Eber, R.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, Th.; Heindl, S.; Hoffmann, K.H.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Mallows, S.; Muller, Th.; Nuernberg, A.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H.J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Bhardwaj, A.; Kumar, A.; Ranjan, K.; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Di Mattia, A.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M.A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Civinini, C.; Gallo, E.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Ciulli, V.; D'Alessandro, R.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Scarlini, E.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Dinardo, M.; Fiorendi, S.; Manzoni, R.A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Giubilato, P.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; Zucchetta, A.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Bilei, G.M.; Bissi, L.; Checcucci, B.; Magalotti, D.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Biasini, M.; Conti, E.; Ciangottini, D.; Fano, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Salvatore, M.; Santocchia, A.; Solestizi, L.A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M.A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M.T.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Minuti, M.; Moggi, A.; Moon, C.S.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A.T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Rizzi, A.; Tonelli, G.; Calzolari, F.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Ligabue, F.; Vernieri, C.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Bellan, R.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Solano, A.; Trapani, P.; Jaramillo Echeverria, R.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Moya, D.; F. Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Munoz Sanchez, F.J.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bianchi, G.; Blanchot, G.; Breuker, H.; Ceresa, D.; Christiansen, J.; Cichy, K.; Daguin, J.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; De Visscher, S.; Deyrail, D.; Faccio, F.; Felici, D.; Frank, N.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Harris, P.; Honma, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kornmayer, A.; Kottelat, L.; Kovacs, M.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Marconi, S.; Martina, S.; Mersi, S.; Michelis, S.; Moll, M.; Onnela, A.; Pakulski, T.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.F.; Petagna, P.; Petrucciani, G.; Postema, H.; Rose, P.; Rzonca, M.; Stoye, M.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Vichoudis, P.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; Bani, L.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Dunser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Horisberger, U.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Wallny, R.; Amsler, C.; Bosiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.S.; Lu, R.S.; Moya, M.; Wilken, R.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Jacob, J.; El Nasr-Storey, S.Seif; Cole, J.; Hobson, P.; Leggat, D.; Reid, I.D.; Teodorescu, L.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Magnan, A.M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D.M.; Uchida, K.; Coughlan, J.A.; Harder, K.; Ilic, J.; Tomalin, I.R.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Sagir, S.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Yohay; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo, M.; Cerati, G.; Sharma, V.; Vartak, A.; Yagil, A.; Della Porta, G.Zevi; Dutta, V.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S.; White, D.; Cumalat, J.P.; Ford, W.T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S.R.; Baldin, B.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W.E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Jung, A.; Joshi, U.; Kahlid, F.; Lei, C.M.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Shenai, A.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Yin, H.; Adams, M.R.; Berry, D.R.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C.E.; Hofman, D.J.; Kapustka, B.K.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, D.I.; Trauger, H.; Turner, P.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; I.I.I.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D.H.; Shi, X.; Tan, P.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Gray, J.; Majumder, D.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Ivanov, A.; Makouski, M.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J.G.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D.R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Hahn, K.; Sevova, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Bartz, E.; Duggan, D.; Halkiadakis, E.; Lath, A.; Park, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J.E.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Kaufman, G.; Mirman, N.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Winstrom, L.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K.M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Demina, R.; Hindrichs, O.; Petrillo, G.; Eusebi, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Perloff, A.; Ulmer, K.A.; Delannoy, A.G.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200 $\\mu$m thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to $3 \\cdot 10^{15}$ neq/cm$^2$. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming two effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. The effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes...

  3. Deep learning for evaluating difficult-to-detect incomplete repairs of high fluence laser optics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Kegelmeyer, Laura M.; Trummer, Scott K.

    2017-03-01

    Two machine-learning methods were evaluated to help automate the quality control process for mitigating damage sites on laser optics. The mitigation is a cone-like structure etched into locations on large optics that have been chipped by the high fluence (energy per unit area) laser light. Sometimes the repair leaves a difficult to detect remnant of the damage that needs to be addressed before the optic can be placed back on the beam line. We would like to be able to automatically detect these remnants. We try Deep Learning (convolutional neural networks using features autogenerated from large stores of labeled data, like ImageNet) and find it outperforms ensembles of decision trees (using custom-built features) in finding these subtle, rare, incomplete repairs of damage. We also implemented an unsupervised method for helping operators visualize where the network has spotted problems. This is done by projecting the credit for the result backwards onto the input image. This shows regions in an image most responsible for the networks decision. This can also be used to help understand the black box decisions the network is making and potentially improve the training process.

  4. Diamond Particle Detector Properties during High Fluence Material Damage Tests and their Future Applications for Machine Protection in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, F; Borburgh, J; Dehning, B; Di Castro, M; Griesmayer, E; Lechner, A; Lendaro, J; Loprete, F; Losito, R; Montesano, S; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2013-01-01

    Experience with LHC machine protection (MP) during the last three years of operation shows that the MP systems sufficiently protect the LHC against damage in case of failures leading to beam losses with a time constant exceeding 1ms. An unexpected fast beam loss mechanism, called UFOs [1], was observed, which could potentially quench superconducting magnets. For such fast losses, but also for better understanding of slower losses, an improved understanding of the loss distribution within a bunch train is required [2]. Diamond particle detectors with bunch-by-bunch resolution and high dynamic range have been developed and successfully tested in the LHC and in experiments to quantify the damage limits of LHC components. This paper will focus on experience gained in use of diamond detectors. The properties of these detectors were measured during high-fluence material damage tests in CERN’s Hi-RadMat facility. The results will be discussed and compared to the cross-calibration with FLUKA simulations. Future app...

  5. Estimation of Covariances on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Impact of the PFNS Model on the Vessel Fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Léonie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the need for precise handling of nuclear data covariances grows ever stronger, no information about covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS are available in the evaluated library JEFF-3.2, although present in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries for the main fissile isotopes. The aim of this work is to provide an estimation of covariance matrices related to PFNS, in the frame of some commonly used models for the evaluated files, such as the Maxwellian spectrum, the Watt spectrum, or the Madland-Nix spectrum. The evaluation of PFNS through these models involves an adjustment of model parameters to available experimental data, and the calculation of the spectrum variance-covariance matrix arising from experimental uncertainties. We present the results for thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. The systematic experimental uncertainties are propagated via the marginalization technique available in the CONRAD code. They are of great influence on the final covariance matrix, and therefore, on the spectrum uncertainty band width. In addition to this covariance estimation work, we have also investigated the importance on a reactor calculation of the fission spectrum model choice. A study of the vessel fluence depending on the PFNS model is presented. This is done through the propagation of neutrons emitted from a fission source in a simplified PWR using the TRIPOLI-4® code. This last study includes thermal fission spectra from the FIFRELIN Monte-Carlo code dedicated to the simulation of prompt particles emission during fission.

  6. Estimation of Covariances on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Impact of the PFNS Model on the Vessel Fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Léonie; Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Archier, Pascal; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Pénéliau, Yannick; Regnier, David

    2016-02-01

    As the need for precise handling of nuclear data covariances grows ever stronger, no information about covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are available in the evaluated library JEFF-3.2, although present in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries for the main fissile isotopes. The aim of this work is to provide an estimation of covariance matrices related to PFNS, in the frame of some commonly used models for the evaluated files, such as the Maxwellian spectrum, the Watt spectrum, or the Madland-Nix spectrum. The evaluation of PFNS through these models involves an adjustment of model parameters to available experimental data, and the calculation of the spectrum variance-covariance matrix arising from experimental uncertainties. We present the results for thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. The systematic experimental uncertainties are propagated via the marginalization technique available in the CONRAD code. They are of great influence on the final covariance matrix, and therefore, on the spectrum uncertainty band width. In addition to this covariance estimation work, we have also investigated the importance on a reactor calculation of the fission spectrum model choice. A study of the vessel fluence depending on the PFNS model is presented. This is done through the propagation of neutrons emitted from a fission source in a simplified PWR using the TRIPOLI-4® code. This last study includes thermal fission spectra from the FIFRELIN Monte-Carlo code dedicated to the simulation of prompt particles emission during fission.

  7. Effect of fluence on the lattice site of implanted Er and implantation induced strain in GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Decoster, S; Vantomme, A; Correi, J G

    2009-01-01

    A GaN thin film was implanted with 5 × 1014 cm−2 of 60 keV stable 166Er, followed by the implantation of 2 × 1013 cm−2 radioactive 167Tm (t1/2 = 9.3 d) and an annealing sequence up to 900 °C. The emission channeling (EC) technique was applied to assess the lattice location of Er following the Tm decay from the conversion electrons emitted by 167mEr, which showed that more than 50% of 167mEr occupies substitutional Ga sites. The results are briefly compared to a 167mEr lattice location experiment in a GaN sample not pre-implanted with 166Er. In addition, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to characterize the perpendicular strain in the high-fluence implanted film. The HRXRD experiments showed that the Er implantation resulted in an increase of the c-axis lattice constant of the GaN film around 0.5–0.7%. The presence of significant disorder within the implanted region was corroborated by the fact that the EC patterns for off-normal directions exhibit a pronounced angular broadening of t...

  8. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) - monitor for environmental pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleff, I.; Djingova, R.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used to determine the amounts of As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb, Se, and Zn in the leaves of Taraxacum officinale and show that it accumulates these elements. The accumulation corresponds to the extent of environmental pollution. Since Taraxacum officinale is widely distributed it may be successfully used for monitoring metal pollution.

  9. Effects of lower fluence pulsed dye laser irradiation on production of collagen and the mRNA expression of collagen relative gene in cultured fibroblasts in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-yan; CHEN Da-fang; WANG Qi; CHENG Hao

    2006-01-01

    Background Lower fluence of 585-nm flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser has been successfully used as a nonablative technique in the treatment of wrinkles. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the pulsed dye laser (585 nm) on the production of collagen and the mRNA expression of collagen related gene in fibroblasts in vitro.Methods Cultured fibroblasts were treated with a 585-nm flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser ( fluence 3 J/cm2,4 J/cm2, spot size 7 mm, pulse duration 450 μs). The production of collagen and the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, SMAD7 and type I procollagen α1, α2 in fibroblasts were investigated by colorimetry or real time polymerase chain reaction.Results The production of collagen was significantly up-regulated after treatment with a 585-nm flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser with a fluence of 3 J/cm2 (P <0.001). The mRNA expression of TGF- β1,SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, SMAD7 and procollagen I was significantly up-regulated after treatment with a 585-nm flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser with a fluence of 3 J/cm2 (P <0.001). No significant difference of mRNA expression of SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, SMAD7 and type I procollagen was found between controls and fibroblasts treated with pulsed dye laser with a fluence of 4 J/cm2 (P >0.05).Conclusions Lower fluence (3 J/cm2) pulsed dye laser increased the collagen production in fibroblasts by up-regulating TGF-β1, SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, SMAD7 and type I procollagen mRNA expression. These may be the reason it can be effectively used in the treatment of wrinkles.

  10. A Systematic Analysis of Coal Accumulation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Aiguo

    2008-01-01

    Formation of coal seam and coal-rich zone is an integrated result of a series of factors in coal accumulation process. The coal accumulation system is an architectural aggregation of coal accumulation factors. It can be classified into 4 levels: the global coal accumulation super-system, the coal accumulation domain mega.system, the coal accumulation basin system, and the coal seam or coal seam set sub-system. The coal accumulation process is an open, dynamic, and grey system, and is meanwhile a system with such natures as aggregation, relevance, entirety, purpose-orientated, hierarchy, and environment adaptability. In this paper, we take coal accumulation process as a system to study origin of coal seam and coal-rich zone; and we will discuss a methodology of the systematic analysis of coal accumulation process. As an example, the Ordos coal basin was investigated to elucidate the application of the method of the coal accumulation system analysis.

  11. Metal accumulating plants: Medium's role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabier, J.; Prudent, P.; Szymanska, B.; Mevy, J.-P.

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate phytoremediation potentialities by metal accumulation in tolerant plants, trials are carried out using in vitro cultures. Organie compounds influence on metal accumulation is studied with metals supplemented media. The tested compounds on zinc and lead absorption by Brassica juncea, are chelating agents (EDTA, citric acid) and soluble organic fractions of compost. EDTA seems to enhance the transfer of lead in plant but it is the opposite in the case of zinc. Citric acid stimulates root absorption for both zinc and lead. For the aqueous extracts of compost, variable effects are obtained according to the origin of compost (green wastes and food wastes). In'all tested conditions of cultures, zinc is mainly exported towards shoot while lead is stored in root.

  12. Bacterial accumulation in viscosity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Guasto, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Cell motility is greatly modified by fluid rheology. In particular, the physical environments in which cells function, are often characterized by gradients of viscous biopolymers, such as mucus and extracellular matrix, which impact processes ranging from reproduction to digestion to biofilm formation. To understand how spatial heterogeneity of fluid rheology affects the motility and transport of swimming cells, we use hydrogel microfluidic devices to generate viscosity gradients in a simple, polymeric, Newtonian fluid. Using video microscopy, we characterize the random walk motility patterns of model bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), showing that both wild-type ('run-and-tumble') cells and smooth-swimming mutants accumulate in the viscous region of the fluid. Through statistical analysis of individual cell trajectories and body kinematics in both homogeneous and heterogeneous viscous environments, we discriminate passive, physical effects from active sensing processes to explain the observed cell accumulation at the ensemble level.

  13. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic trigl...

  14. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-28

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD.

  15. Monitoring and assessment of tumor hemodynamics during pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Rodriguez, Carmen E.; Dimofte, Andrea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Busch, Theresa M.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Cengel, Keith A.; Singhal, Sunil; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Intrapleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used in combination with lung sparing surgery to treat patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. The light, photosensitizers and tissue oxygen are the three most important factors required by type II PDT to produce singlet oxygen, 1O2, which is the main photocytotoxic agent that damages the tumor vasculature and stimulates the body's anti-tumor immune response. Although light fluence rate and photosensitizer concentrations are routinely monitored during clinical PDT, there is so far a lack of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved non-invasive technique that can be employed clinically to monitor tissue oxygen in vivo. In this paper, we demonstrated that blood flow correlates well with tissue oxygen concentration during PDT and can be used in place of [3O2] to calculate reacted singlet oxygen concentration [1O2]rx using the macroscopic singlet oxygen model. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) was used to monitor the change in tissue blood flow non-invasively during pleural PDT. A contact probe with three source and detectors separations, 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0-cm, was sutured to the pleural cavity wall of the patients after surgical resection of the pleural mesothelioma tumor to monitor the tissue blood flow during intraoperative PDT treatment. The changes of blood flow during PDT of 2 patients are found to be in good correlation with the treatment light fluence rate recorded by the isotropic detector placed adjacent to the DCS probe. [1O2]rx calculated based on light fluence, mean photosensitizer concentration, and relative blood flow was found to be 32% higher in patient #4 (0.50mM) than that for patient #3 (0.38mM).

  16. Paradoxical darkening of unperceived tattoo ink after relatively low fluence from a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064-nm) laser in the course of treatment for melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W K; Yang, J H; Lee, D W; Chang, S E; Lee, M W; Choi, J H; Moon, K C

    2009-12-01

    Although Q-switched (QS) lasers are the mainstay of modern tattoo removal, paradoxical darkening of tattoo ink may occur. This darkening of tattoo ink is dependent on laser wavelength, pulse duration and fluence, with high-energy, nanosecond-pulsed lasers more prone to induce tattoo-ink darkening. Laser toning, consisting of multiple-passed QS neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG), 1064-nm laser treatment with low fluence, short pulse duration (hair, eyebrows or eyelashes, but this phenomenon is reversible. A more problematic error is caused by treatment of eyeliner or eyebrow tattoos. We report a patient who experienced changes in unperceived, skin-coloured tattoos, turning them blue after QS Nd:YAG laser treatment of melasma.

  17. Quantitative assessment of growing hair counts, thickness and colour during and after treatments with a low-fluence, home-device laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, D; Barbet-Pfeilsticker, M; Beerwerth, F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At-home laser and intense pulsed-light hair removal continues to grow in popularity and availability. A relatively limited body of evidence is available on the course of hair growth during and after low-fluence laser usage. OBJECTIVES: To assess growing hair counts, thickness and colour...... quantitatively during and after cessation of low-fluence laser treatment. METHODS: Thirty-six women with skin phototypes I-IV and light to dark-brown axillary hairs were included. Entire axillary regions were randomized to zero or eight self-administered weekly treatments with an 810-nm home-use laser at 5......·0-6·4 J cm(-2). Standardized clinical photographs were taken before each treatment and up to 3 months after the final treatment for computer-aided quantification of growing hair counts, thickness and colour. RESULTS: Thirty-two women completed the study protocol. During sustained treatment...

  18. Post-focus expansion of ion beams for low fluence and large area MeV ion irradiation: Application to human brain tissue and electronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Guibert, Edouard; Jeanneret, Patrick; Homsy, Alexandra; Roth, Joy; Krause, Sven; Roux, Adrien; Eggermann, Emmanuel; Stoppini, Luc

    2017-08-01

    Irradiation with ∼3 MeV proton fluences of 106-109 protons cm-2 have been applied to study the effects on human brain tissue corresponding to single-cell irradiation doses and doses received by electronic components in low-Earth orbit. The low fluence irradiations were carried out using a proton microbeam with the post-focus expansion of the beam; a method developed by the group of Breese [1]. It was found from electrophysiological measurements that the mean neuronal frequency of human brain tissue decreased to zero as the dose increased to 0-1050 Gy. Enhancement-mode MOSFET transistors exhibited a 10% reduction in threshold voltage for 2.7 MeV proton doses of 10 Gy while a NPN bipolar transistor required ∼800 Gy to reduce the hfe by 10%, which is consistent the expected values.

  19. Tuning the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition in FeRh thin films by means of low-energy/low fluence ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidarian, A.; Bali, R.; Grenzer, J.; Wilhelm, R.A.; Heller, R.; Yildirim, O.; Lindner, J.; Potzger, K.

    2015-09-01

    Ion irradiation induced modifications of the thermomagnetic properties of equiatomic FeRh thin films have been investigated. The application of 20 keV Ne{sup +} ions at different fluencies leads to broadening of the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition as well as a shift of the transition temperature towards lower temperatures with increasing ion fluence. Moreover, the ferromagnetic background at low temperatures generated by the ion irradiation leads to pronounced saturation magnetisation at 5 K. Complete erasure of the transition, i.e. ferromagnetic ordering through the whole temperature regime was achieved at a Ne{sup +} fluence of 3 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. It does not coincide with the complete randomization of the chemical ordering of the crystal lattice.

  20. Microscopic evaluation of the absolute fluence distribution of a large-area uniform ion beam using the track-etching technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akane, E-mail: ogawa.akane@jaea.go.jp [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaki, Tetsuya [High Performance Polymer Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yuri, Yosuke [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sawada, Shin-ichi [High Performance Polymer Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yuyama, Takahiro [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The absolute fluence distribution of a large-area uniform beam was investigated microscopically via track etching of an Ar-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. The irradiated sample was divided equally into 64 pieces, for each of which the track-pore densities were counted over a 12 × 17 μm{sup 2} microscopic area near the center. For comparison, the relative intensity distribution was obtained by measuring the optical density of a similarly irradiated Gafchromic film at a resolution of 500 × 500 μm{sup 2} and then taking the measured value at the center of each of the 64 areas. The relative standard deviations of the distributions were in good agreement despite the difference in the observed resolution area and the small sample number. It was, therefore, confirmed that track etching is a reliable technique for evaluating absolute fluence and that a uniform intensity distribution of the beam was microscopically realized.

  1. Effect of wavelength and fluence on morphology, cellular and genetic integrity of diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, H.; Hawkins, D.; Houreld, N.

    2006-02-01

    An alternative treatment modality for diabetic wound healing includes low level laser therapy (LLLT). Biostimulation of such wounds may be of benefit to patients by reducing healing time. Structural, cellular and genetic events in diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts (WS1) were evaluated after exposing cells in culture to a Helium-Neon (632.8nm), a Diode laser (830nm) and a Nd:YAG (Neodynium:Yttrium-Allumina-Gallium) laser (1064nm) at either 5J/cm2 or 16J/cm2. Cells were exposed twice a week and left 24 hours post-irradiation prior to measuring effects. Structural changes were evaluated by assessing colony formation, haptotaxis and chemotaxis. Cellular changes were evaluated using cell viability, (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP production), and proliferation, (alkaline phosphatase, ALP and basic fibroblast growth factor, bFGF expression), while the Comet assay evaluated DNA damage and cytotoxicity was determined assessing membrane permeability for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Caspase 3/7 activity was used as an estimate of apoptosis as a result of irradiation. The irradiated diabetic wounded cells showed structural, cellular as well as molecular resilience comparable to that of unwounded normal skin fibroblast cells. With regards to fluence, 5J/cm2 elicit positive cellular and structural responses while 16J/cm2 increases cellular and genetic damage and cellular morphology is altered. Different wavelengths of LLLT influences the beneficial outcomes of diabetic wounded cells and although all three wavelengths elicit cellular effects, the penetration depth of 830nm plays a significant role in the healing of diabetic wounded human fibroblast cells. Results from this study validate the contribution of LLLT to wound healing and elucidate the biochemical effects at a cellular level while highlighting the role of different dosages and wavelengths in LLLT.

  2. Comparison of four NDT methods for indication of reactor steel degradation by high fluences of neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomáš, I., E-mail: tomas@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Vértesy, G. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Pirfo Barroso, S. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); The Open University, Walton Hall, MK92BS Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); Kobayashi, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Results of 4 NDT methods on highly irradiated steel are normalized and compared. • Two of the methods (MAT and HV) correlate well with DBTT. • Magnetic Adaptive Testing gives the most sensitive and the best correlated results. • Measurements and sample shapes for an NDT surveillance program are suggested. - Abstract: Results of three magnetic nondestructive methods, Magnetic Barkhausen Emission (MBE), magnetic minor loops Power Scaling Laws (PSL) and Magnetic Adaptive Testing (MAT), and of one reference mechanical measurement, Vickers Hardness (HV), applied on the same series of neutron heavily irradiated nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel materials, were normalized and presented here for the purpose of their straightforward quantitative mutual comparison. It is uncommon to carry out different round-robin testing on irradiated materials, and if not answering all open questions, the comparison alone justifies this paper. The assessment methods were all based on ferromagnetism, although each of them used a different aspect of it. The presented comparison yielded a justified recommendation of the most reliable nondestructive method for indication of the reactor steel irradiation hardening and embrittlement effects. The A533 type B Class 1 steel (JRQ), and the base (15Kh2MFA) and welding (10KhMFT) steels for the WWER 440-type Russian reactors were used for the investigations. The samples were irradiated by high-energy neutrons (>1 MeV) with up to 11.9 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} fluences. From all the applied measurements, the results of MAT produced the most satisfactory correlation with independently measured ductile-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT) values of the steel. The other two magnetic methods showed a weaker correlation with DBTT, but some other aspects and information could be assessed by them. As MAT and MBE were sensitive to uncontrolled fluctuation of surface quality of the steel, contact-less ways of testing and more

  3. Dependence of the thermal neutron fluence at the size installations radiotherapy bunker; Dependencia de la fluencia termica de neutrones en el tamano del bunquer en instalaciones de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Soto, X.; Amgarou, K.; Langares, J. L.; Exposito, M. R.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    The project aims to infer the dose deposited by neutrons in the patient treated by radiation therapy, from a measurement of the thermal neutron fluence at a selected point within the treatment room. These thermal neutrons are created when fast neutrons produced in the linac head are moderate, mainly in the walls of the bunker, and its yield depends on both the volume of the room and its geometry.

  4. Combination treatment of low fluence photodynamic therapy and intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascular membrane secondary to angioid streaks in Paget′s disease - 12 month results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha V Prabhu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioid streaks also called Knapp striae are small breaks in the Bruch′s membrane and have been reported with a host of systemic diseases. Rupture of streaks or development of secondary choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM carries a dismal visual prognosis. We report the successful treatment of CNVM secondary to Paget′s disease using low fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT and intravitreal ranibizumab.

  5. Novel myopic refractive correction with transepithelial very high-fluence collagen cross-linking applied in a customized pattern: early clinical results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos LaserVision.gr Institute, Athens, Greece, and New York Medical School, New York, NY, USA Background: The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of a new application of collagen cross-linking using a novel device to achieve predictable refractive myopic changes in virgin corneas. Methods: Four cases were treated with a novel device employing very high-fluence collagen cross-linking applied in a myopic pattern. Prior to treatment, riboflavin solution was applied to the intact epithelium. The collagen cross-linking device was then engaged for a total of 12 J/cm2, to be applied transepithelially in a predetermined pattern. Cornea clarity, corneal keratometry, and corneal topography were evaluated by both Placido disc and Scheimpflug imaging, along with cornea anterior segment optical coherence tomography and endothelial cell counts. Results: An average of 2.3 diopters was achieved in the first week in all four cases treated with the very high-fluence myopic collagen cross-linking intervention. There was a slight regression to 1.44 diopters at 1 month, which remained stable at 6-month follow-up. The mean keratometry change was from 44.90 diopters to 43.46 diopters. There was no significant change in endothelial cell counts or corneal clarity. There was some mild change in epithelial thickness distribution, with the treated area showing a slight but homogeneous reduction in mean thickness from 52 µm to 44 µm. Conclusion: This report describes the novel application of very high-fluence collagen cross-linking with a predictable well defined myopic refractive (flattening corneal effect. This technique has the advantages of essentially no postoperative morbidity, immediate visual rehabilitation, and the potential for tapering until the desired result is achieved. Keywords: myopia, refractive correction, high-fluence collagen cross-linking, clinical results

  6. Collision-kerma conversion between dose-to-tissue and dose-to-water by photon energy-fluence corrections in low-energy brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Antunes, Paula C. G.; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, introduced in 1995, has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations, except in the vicinity of the source capsule. Subsequent dosimetry developments, based on Monte Carlo calculations or analytical solutions of transport equations, do not rely on the CPE assumption and determine directly the dose to different tissues. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seeds is proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences. State-of-the art Monte Carlo calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone), which in all cases include a realistic modelling of low-energy brachytherapy sources in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases (e.g. bone tissue).

  7. Fluence to Effective Dose and Effective Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients foe Photons from 50 KeV to 10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Pelliccioni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati; Pillon, M. [Associazione EUROATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati. Rome (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    Effective dose equivalent and effective dose per unit photon fluence have been calculated by the FLUKA code for various geometrical conditions of irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom placed in a vacuum. Calculations have been performed for monoenergetic photons of energy ranging from 50 keV to 10 GeV. The agreement with the results of other authors, when existing, is generally very satisfactory.

  8. Characterization of high fluence neutron induced defect levels in high resistivity silicon detectors using a laser deep level transient spectroscopy (L-DLTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chengji (Inst. of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China)); Li Zheng (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1994-03-15

    Neutron irradiated high resistivity (4-6 k[Omega]-cm) silicon detectors in the neutron fluence ([Phi][sub n]) range of 5x10[sup 11] n/cm[sup 2] to 1x10[sup 14] n/cm[sup 2] have been studied using a laser deep level transient spectroscopy (L-DLTS). It has been found that the A-center (oxygen-vacancy, E[sub c]=0.17 eV) concentration increases with neutron fluence, reaching a maximum at [Phi][sub n] [approx]5x10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2] before decreasing with [Phi][sub n]. A broad peak has been found between 200 K and 300 K, which is the result of the overlap of three single levels: the V-V[sup -] (E[sub c]=0.38 eV), the E-center (P-V, E[sub c]=0.44 eV), and a level at E[sub c] = 0.56 eV that is probably V-V[sup 0]. At low neutron fluences ([Phi][sub n]<5x10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]), this broad peak is dominated by V-V[sup -] and the E-centers. However, as the fluence increases ([Phi][sub n][>=]5x10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]), the peak becomes dominated by the level of E[sub c]=0.56 eV. (orig.)

  9. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; 10.1118/1.4761870

    2012-01-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a PMMA phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Differential Compto...

  10. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  11. Study on Double Range Neutron Fluence Rate Detector%双探头中子注量率探测器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春雨; 李文杰

    2012-01-01

    At the initial stage of reactor start-up, the neutron fluence is very low, so there exists certain blind area for a general nuclear measurement system. A double probe neutron fluence rate detector was designed which has a wide range and high sensitivity for the measurement of the blind area. The calculation and experiment results show that the double detector works stably and provides a method of measuring very low neutron fluence rate in the process of reactor physical start-up.%反应堆启动初始阶段,中子注量非常低,是一般核测量系统的测量盲区.针对测量盲区的问题,设计了一种高灵敏度宽量程的中子注量率探测器.通过计算及实验表明,该探测器具有稳定的性能,能提供一种反应堆物理启动过程中盲区中子注量率测量的方法.

  12. Microstructure variation in fused silica irradiated by different fluence of UV laser pulses with positron annihilation lifetime and Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhu, Qihua; Chen, Jun; Wang, B. Y.; Ju, Xin

    2016-10-01

    We present an original study on the non-destructive evaluation of the microstructure evolution of fused silica induced by pulsed UV laser irradiation at low fluence (less than 50% Fth). Positron annihilation spectroscopy discloses that the spatial size of the vacancy cluster is increased exponentially with the linearly elevated laser fluence. Particularly, the vacancy cluster size in bulk silica is significantly increased by 14.5% after irradiated by pulsed 355 nm laser at F = 14 J/cm2 (50% Fth), while the void size varies only ∼2%. UV laser-excited Raman results suggest that the bond length and average bond angle of Sisbnd Osbnd Si bridging bond are both slightly reduced. Results reveals that the rearrangement process of (Sisbnd O)n fold rings and breakage of the Sisbnd O bridging bond in bulk silica occurred during pulsed UV laser irradiation. The micro-structural changes were taken together to clarify the effect of sub-threshold laser fluence on material stability of silica glass. The obtained data provide important information for studying material stability and controlling the lifetime of fused silica optics for high power laser system.

  13. Quantum dot imaging in the second near-infrared optical window: studies on reflectance fluorescence imaging depths by effective fluence rate and multiple image acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yebin; Jeong, Sanghwa; Nayoun, Won; Ahn, Boeun; Kwag, Jungheon; Geol Kim, Sang; Kim, Sungjee

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dot (QD) imaging capability was investigated by the imaging depth at a near-infrared second optical window (SOW; 1000 to 1400 nm) using time-modulated pulsed laser excitations to control the effective fluence rate. Various media, such as liquid phantoms, tissues, and in vivo small animals, were used and the imaging depths were compared with our predicted values. The QD imaging depth under excitation of continuous 20 mW/cm(2) laser was determined to be 10.3 mm for 2 wt%hemoglobin phantom medium and 5.85 mm for 1 wt% intralipid phantom, which were extended by more than two times on increasing the effective fluence rate to 2000 mW/cm(2). Bovine liver and porcine skin tissues also showed similar enhancement in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values. A QD sample was inserted into the abdomen of a mouse.With a higher effective fluence rate, the CNR increased more than twofold and the QD sample became clearly visualized, which was completely undetectable under continuous excitation.Multiple acquisitions of QD images and averaging process pixel by pixel were performed to overcome the thermal noise issue of the detector in SOW, which yielded significant enhancement in the imaging capability, showing up to a 1.5 times increase in the CNR.

  14. Design, Fabrication and Test Report on a Verification Capsule (05M-06K) for the Control of a Neutron Irradiation Fluence of Specimens in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S.; Son, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Choi, M. H.; Lee, D. S.

    2007-02-15

    As a part of a project for a capsule development and utilization for an irradiation test, a verification capsule (05M-06K) was designed, fabricated and tested for the development of new instrumented capsule technology for a more precise control of the irradiation fluence of a specimen, irrespective of the reactor operation condition. The basic structure of the 05M-06K capsule was based on the 04M-22K mock-up capsule which was successfully designed and out-pile tested to confirm the various key technologies necessary for the fluence control of a specimen. 21 square and round shaped specimens made of STS 304 were inserted into the capsule. The capsule was constructed in 5 stages with specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. Each of the five specimens which were accommodated in the 1st stage (top) of the capsule can be taken out of the HANARO core during a normal reactor operation. The specimen is extracted by a specimen extraction mechanism using a steel wire. During the out-pile test, the temperatures of the specimens were measured by 12 thermocouples installed in the capsule. The capsule was successfully out-pile tested in a single channel test loop. The obtained results will be used for a safety evaluation of the new irradiation capsule for controlling the irradiation fluence of specimens in HANARO.

  15. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhalandinov A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  16. Surface nanopatterning of Al/Ti multilayer thin films and Al single layer by a low-fluence UV femtosecond laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Aleksander G.; Petrović, Suzana; Bokić, Bojana; Gaković, Biljana; Bokorov, Miloš T.; Vasić, Borislav; Gajić, Radoš; Trtica, Milan; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of UV femtosecond laser beam with 76 MHz repetition rate on two types of thin films on Si substrate - the Al single layer thin film, and the multilayered thin film consisted of five Al/Ti bilayers (total thickness 130 nm) - were studied. The surface modification of the target was done by low fluences and different irradiation times, not exceeding ∼300 s. Nanopatterns in the form of femtosecond-laser induced periodic surface structures (fs-LIPSS) with periodicity of LIPSS evolve from ruffles similar to high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) into a low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) if a certain threshold of the fluence is met, (ii) the number of LSFL increases with the exposition time and (iii) the LSFL remain stable even after long exposure times. We achieved high-quality highly-controllable fabrication of periodic structures on the surface of nanosized multilayer films with high-repetition-rate low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses. Compared to the Al single layer, the presence of the Ti underlayer in the Al/Ti multilayer thin film enabled more efficient heat transmittance through the Al/Ti interface away from the interaction zone which caused the reduction of the ablation effects leading to the formation of more regular LIPSS. The different outcomes of interactions with multi and single layer thin films lead to the conclusion that the behavior of the LIPSS is due to thin film structure.

  17. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  18. Neutron Fluence and Energy Reconstruction with the LNE-IRSN/MIMAC Recoil Detector MicroTPC at 27 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Querre, Ph. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, site of Cadarache, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Guillaudin, O.; Muraz, J.F.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie - LPSCCNRSIN2P3/ UJF/INP, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), designated by the French Metrology Institute (LNE) for neutron metrology, is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: microTPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 5 MeV with a primary procedure. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulation of the detector response. The μTPC is a new reliable detector able to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without unfolding procedure or prior neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The microTPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27 keV and 144 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector response simulation. This work

  19. Neutron fluence and energy reconstruction with the IRSN recoil detector μ-TPC at 27 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Richer, J.P. [IRSN, PRP-HOM, SDE, LMDN, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [CNRS/IN2P3-UJF-INPG, LPSC, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), associated to the French Metrology Institute (LNE), is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: μ-TPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize with a primary procedure the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 1 MeV. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors, which are able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulated detector response. The μ-TPC is a new reliable detector which enables to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without deconvolution or neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The μ-TPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27.2 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector simulation. This work shows the first direct

  20. Research of Mosses Accumulation Properties Used for Assessment of Regional and Local Atmospheric Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda K. Ryzhakova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of atmospheric heavy metal and other toxic element depositions by using widespread bryophytes as biomonitors has been widely used. Choosing most appropriate moss species in relation to their accumulation properties is the main goal of this research. The accumulation of heavy metals and other toxic elements by widespread mosses of midland have been studied. The research is focused on assessing accumulation properties of 4 species of terrestrial moss, 4 species of paludal moss and 2 species of epiphytic moss. The concentrations of 32 elements have been determined in moss samples by neutron activation analysis (NAA and atom emission spectrometry (AES. Interspecies and intraspecies comparison revealed significant differences in accumulation properties. The accumulation capacity of Dicranum polysetum was higher than other terrestrial mosses and Aulacomnium palustre had higher accumulation capacity than other paludal mosses. These moss species have been used for monitoring atmospheric pollutants in an immense territory, particularly for research of transboundary transfer of heavy metal pollution. The accumulation property of epiphytic moss was higher than others. The epiphytic moss could be found on the bark of old trees (aspens, poplars, birch that are of frequent occurrence in urban areas. Therefore, epiphytic moss can be used for monitoring atmospheric pollutants in an immense territory and for research of atmospheric pollution in industrial centers, inhabited locations as well as assessment of atmospheric contamination in local pollution source. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.69.3.5566

  1. Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor contains approximately 20,000 biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) from 20 locations (mostly Superfund sites) for...

  2. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility.

  3. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  4. Sugar and organic acid accumulation in guard cells of Vicia faba in response to red and blue light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbott, L.D.; Zeiger, E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Changes in neutral sugar and organic acid content of guard cells were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography during stomatal opening in different light qualities. Sonicated Vicia faba epidermal peels were irradiated with 10 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1] of blue light, a fluence rate insufficient for the activation of guard cell photosynthesis, or 125 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1] of red light, in the presence of 1mM KCl, 0.1 mM CaCl[sub 2]. The low-fluence-rate blue light stimulated an average net stomatal opening of 4.7 [mu]m in 2 h, whereas the saturating fluence rate of red light stimulated an average net opening of 3.8 [mu]m in 2 h. Under blue light, the malate content of guard cells increased to 173% of the initial level during the first 30 min of opening and declined as opening continued. Sucrose levels continuously rose throughout the blue light-stimulated opening, reaching 215% of the initial level after 2 h. The starch hydrolysis products maltose and maltotriose remained elevated at all times. Under red light, guard cells showed very little increase in organic acid or maltose levels, whereas sucrose levels increased to 208% of the initial level after 2 h. Total measured organic metabolite concentrations were correlated with stomatal apertures in all cases except where substantial malate increases occurred. These results support the hypothesis that light quality modulates alternative mechanisms of osmotic accumulation guard cells, including potassium uptake, photosynthetic sugar production, and starch breakdown. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tab.

  5. Technical Benefits of Tram Vehicle Energy Accumulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Drazek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy saving effects connected with use of energy accumulator on board of tram vehicle instead of substation are presented. Differences in results regarding weak and strong power supply system when taking into account energy losses and energy recuperation are pointed out. Running mode and energy changed from substation by a tram vehicle with accumulator is compared to a tram vehicle without on-board accumulator but supplied from substation equipped with energy accumulator.

  6. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accumulated depreciation. 32.3100 Section 32... Accumulated depreciation. (a) This account shall include the accumulated depreciation associated with the... with depreciation amounts concurrently charged to Account 6561, Depreciation...

  7. Fluence to absorbed dose, effective dose and gray equivalent conversion coefficients for iron nuclei from 10 MeV to 1 TeV, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to (56)Fe(26+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Calculations using ICRP 2007 recommendations result in fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients that are almost identical at most energies to those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  8. Markov models for accumulating mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Ectoine accumulation in Brevibacterium epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onraedt, Annelies; De Muynck, Cassandra; Walcarius, Bart; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2004-10-01

    As a halotolerant bacterial species, Brevibacterium epidermis DSM 20659 can grow at relatively high salinity, tolerating up to 2 M NaCl. It synthesizes ectoine and the intracellular content increases with the medium salinity, with a maximum of 0.14 g ectoine/g CDW at 1 M NaCl. Sugar-stressed cells do not synthesize ectoine. Ectoine synthesis is also affected by the presence of external osmolytes. Added betaine is taken up and completely replaced ectoine, while L-proline is only temporarily accumulated after which ectoine is synthesized. The strain can metabolize ectoine; L-glutamate is a better carbon source for ectoine synthesis than L-aspartate.

  10. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Document Server

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  11. Energy Accumulation by Hydrogen Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Čermáková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic power plants as a renewable energy source have been receiving rapidly growing attention in the Czech Republic and in the other EU countries. This rapid development of photovoltaic sources is having a negative effect on the electricity power system control, because they depend on the weather conditions and provide a variable and unreliable supply of electric power. One way to reduce this effect is by accumulating electricity in hydrogen. The aim of this paper is to introduce hydrogen as a tool for regulating photovoltaic energy in island mode. A configuration has been designed for connecting households with the photovoltaic hybrid system, and a simulation model has been made in order to check the validity of this system. The simulation results provide energy flows and have been used for optimal sizing of real devices. An appropriate system can deliver energy in a stand-alone installation.

  12. Multiple roles for UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 in regulating gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis under solar ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia; Jenkins, Gareth I; Wargent, Jason J; Sipari, Nina; Strid, Åke; Lindfors, Anders V; Tegelberg, Riitta; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2013-02-01

    Photomorphogenic responses triggered by low fluence rates of ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B; 280-315 nm) are mediated by the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8). Beyond our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of UV-B perception by UVR8, there is still limited information on how the UVR8 pathway functions under natural sunlight. Here, wild-type Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the uvr8-2 mutant were used in an experiment outdoors where UV-A (315-400 nm) and UV-B irradiances were attenuated using plastic films. Gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation, and leaf metabolite signatures were analyzed. The results show that UVR8 is required for transcript accumulation of genes involved in UV protection, oxidative stress, hormone signal transduction, and defense against herbivores under solar UV. Under natural UV-A irradiance, UVR8 is likely to interact with UV-A/blue light signaling pathways to moderate UV-B-driven transcript and PDX1 accumulation. UVR8 both positively and negatively affects UV-A-regulated gene expression and metabolite accumulation but is required for the UV-B induction of phenolics. Moreover, UVR8-dependent UV-B acclimation during the early stages of plant development may enhance normal growth under long-term exposure to solar UV.

  13. A Distributed Fiber Optic Sensor Network for Online 3-D Temperature and Neutron Fluence Mapping in a VHTR Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel; Dickerson, Bryan; French, Joseph; McEachern, Donald; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-04-30

    Robust sensing technologies allowing for 3D in-core performance monitoring in real time are of paramount importance for already established LWRs to enhance their reliability and availability per year, and therefore, to further facilitate their economic competitiveness via predictive assessment of the in-core conditions.

  14. Accumulation of heavy metals in oil-contaminated peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Savichev, A. T.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Shishkonakova, E. A.

    2012-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence and X-ray radiometry represent easy and simple methods to determine concentrations of heavy metals in the ash of peat soils contaminated with oil and can be applied for soil monitoring purposes. Oil spills on peat bogs produce two contamination zones differing in the composition of heavy metals. In the zone of primary contamination, the peat surface is covered by a bitumen crust with V, Ni, Sr, Ba, Ce, and La accumulating there. This zone adjoins the zone of secondary peat contamination, where heavy alkaline-earth metals (Sr, Ba) and lanthanides (Ce and La) are accumulated to a lesser extent. Biological preparations recommended for remediation of oil-contaminated peat soils should be tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals, particularly, V, Ni, and Ba that are present in the oil contaminated soils in relatively high amounts.

  15. Surface nanopatterning of Al/Ti multilayer thin films and Al single layer by a low-fluence UV femtosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovačević, Aleksander G., E-mail: Aleksander.Kovacevic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Beograd (Serbia); Petrović, Suzana [Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Bokić, Bojana [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Beograd (Serbia); Gaković, Biljana [Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Bokorov, Miloš T. [Center for Electron Microscopy, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 2, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Vasić, Borislav; Gajić, Radoš [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Beograd (Serbia); Trtica, Milan [Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Jelenković, Branislav M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Beograd (Serbia)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser beam was applied to multilayer Al/Ti and single layer Al thin film. • The evolution of laser induced periodic surface structures and its causes is explained. • The structures remained stable after great number of pulses. • The different outcomes of the two cases (single and multilayer) have been explained in the light of the presence of the Ti underlayer. - Abstract: The effects of UV femtosecond laser beam with 76 MHz repetition rate on two types of thin films on Si substrate – the Al single layer thin film, and the multilayered thin film consisted of five Al/Ti bilayers (total thickness 130 nm) – were studied. The surface modification of the target was done by low fluences and different irradiation times, not exceeding ∼300 s. Nanopatterns in the form of femtosecond-laser induced periodic surface structures (fs-LIPSS) with periodicity of <315 nm and height of ∼45 nm were registered upon irradiation of the thin films. It was shown that: (i) the fs-LIPSS evolve from ruffles similar to high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) into a low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) if a certain threshold of the fluence is met, (ii) the number of LSFL increases with the exposition time and (iii) the LSFL remain stable even after long exposure times. We achieved high-quality highly-controllable fabrication of periodic structures on the surface of nanosized multilayer films with high-repetition-rate low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses. Compared to the Al single layer, the presence of the Ti underlayer in the Al/Ti multilayer thin film enabled more efficient heat transmittance through the Al/Ti interface away from the interaction zone which caused the reduction of the ablation effects leading to the formation of more regular LIPSS. The different outcomes of interactions with multi and single layer thin films lead to the conclusion that the behavior of the LIPSS is due to thin film structure.

  16. Rapid, high-fluence multi-pass q-switched laser treatment of tattoos with a transparent perfluorodecalin-infused patch: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesman, Brian S; O'Neil, Michael P; Costner, Cara

    2015-10-01

    Perfluorodecalin (PFD) has previously been shown to rapidly dissipate the opaque, white micro-bubble layer formed after exposure of tattoos to Q-switched lasers [1]. The current pilot study was conducted to qualitatively determine if the use of a transparent PFD-infused silicone patch would result in more rapid clearance of tattoos than conventional through-air techniques. Black or dark blue tattoos were divided into two halves in a single-site IRB-approved study with 17 subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III. One half of each tattoo served as its own control and was treated with one pass of a standard Q-switched Alexandrite laser (755 nm). The other half of the tattoo was treated directly through a transparent perfluorodecalin (PFD) infused patch (ON Light Sciences, Dublin, CA). The rapid whitening reduction effect of the Patch routinely allowed three to four laser passes in a total of approximately 5 minutes. Both sides were treated at highest tolerated fluence, but the optical clearing, index-matching, and epidermal protection properties of the PFD Patch allowed significantly higher fluence compared to the control side. Standard photographs were taken at baseline, immediately prior to treatment with the PFD Patch in place, and finally before and after each treatment session. Treatments were administered at 4- to 6-week intervals. In a majority of subjects (11 of 17), tattoos treated through a transparent PFD-infused patch showed more rapid tattoo clearance with higher patient and clinician satisfaction than conventional treatment. In no case did the control side fade faster than the PFD Patch side. No unanticipated adverse events were observed. Rapid multi-pass treatment of tattoos with highest tolerated fluence facilitated by a transparent PFD-infused patch clears tattoos more rapidly than conventional methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately.

  18. Monitoring madness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankinship, S.

    2006-01-15

    High quality continuous emission monitoring capability can be as essential as high quality emission control equipment. Future mercury monitoring and control requirements add to the justification for better CEMS. The article discusses two prominent mercury measurement methods - the cold vapour atomic absorptive spectrometer (CVAAs) and the atomic absorptive spectrometer (AFS). It stresses the importance of maintaining a CEMS. 1 photo.

  19. Mobility Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schæbel, Anne-Lise; Dybbro, Karina Løvendahl; Andersen, Lisbeth Støvring;

    2015-01-01

    Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby......Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby...

  20. Update on the Code Intercomparison and Benchmark for Muon Fluence and Absorbed Dose Induced by an 18 GeV Electron Beam After Massive Iron Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A. [SLAC; Ferrari, A. [CERN; Ferrari, A. [HZDR, Dresden; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Mueller, S. E. [HZDR, Dresden; Nelson, W. R. [SLAC; Roesler, S. [CERN; Sanami, t.; Striganov, S. I. [Fermilab; Versaci, R. [Unlisted, CZ

    2016-12-01

    In 1974, Nelson, Kase and Svensson published an experimental investigation on muon shielding around SLAC high-energy electron accelerators [1]. They measured muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by 14 and 18 GeV electron beams hitting a copper/water beamdump and attenuated in a thick steel shielding. In their paper, they compared the results with the theoretical models available at that time. In order to compare their experimental results with present model calculations, we use the modern transport Monte Carlo codes MARS15, FLUKA2011 and GEANT4 to model the experimental setup and run simulations. The results are then compared between the codes, and with the SLAC data.

  1. Code intercomparison and benchmark for muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by an 18-GeV electron beam after massive iron shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Fasso, Alberto; Ferrari, Anna; Mokhov, Nikolai V; Mueller, Stefan E; Nelson, Walter Ralph; Roesler, Stefan; Sanami, Toshiya; Striganov, Sergei I; Versaci, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In 1974, Nelson, Kase, and Svenson published an experimental investigation on muon shielding using the SLAC high energy LINAC. They measured muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by a 18 GeV electron beam hitting a copper/water beam dump and attenuated in a thick steel shielding. In their paper, they compared the results with the theoretical mode ls available at the time. In order to compare their experimental results with present model calculations, we use the modern transport Monte Carlo codes MARS15, FLUKA2011 and GEANT4 to model the experimental setup and run simulations. The results will then be compared between the codes, and with the SLAC data.

  2. LHC RadMon SRAM Detectors Used at Different Voltages to Determine the Thermal Neutron to High Energy Hadron Fluence Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, D; Pignard, C; Brugger, M; Spiezia, G; Roeed, K; Klupak, V; Wijnands, T

    2011-01-01

    The thermal neutron SEU cross-section of the Toshiba SRAM memory used in the LHC RadMon system was measured at different voltages. A method using the difference in its response compared to mixed particle energy field is proposed to be used as a discriminator between thermal neutron and high-energy hadron fluences. For test purposes, the proposed method was used at the CNGS and CERF facilities to estimate the field composition by counting SEUs at two different voltages and the results were compared to simulations.

  3. Environmental parasitology: Parasites as accumulation bioindicators in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachev, Milen; Sures, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Parasites can be used as effective monitoring tools in environmental impact studies as they are able to accumulate certain pollutants (e.g. metals) at levels much higher than those of their ambient environment and of free-living sentinels. Thus, they provide valuable information not only about the chemical conditions of their and their hosts' environment but also deliver insights into the biological availability of allochthonous substances. While a large number of different freshwater parasites (mainly acanthocephalans and cestodes) were investigated in terms of pollutant bioaccumulation, studies based on marine host-parasites systems remain scarce. However, available data show that different marine parasite taxa such as nematodes, cestodes and acanthocephalans exhibit also an excellent metal accumulation capacity. The biological availability of metals and their uptake routes in marine biota and parasites differ from those of freshwater organisms. We assume that a large part of metals and other pollutants are also taken up via the digestive system of the host. Therefore, in addition to environmental conditions the physiology of the host also plays an important role for the accumulation process. Additionally, we highlight some advantages in using parasites as accumulation indicators in marine ecosystems. As parasites occur ubiquitously in marine food webs, the monitoring of metals in their tissues can deliver information about the spatial and trophic distribution of pollutants. Accordingly, parasites as indicators offer an ecological assessment on a broader scale, in contrast to established free-living marine indicators, which are mostly benthic invertebrates and therefore limited in habitat distribution. Globally distributed parasite taxa, which are highly abundant in a large number of host species, are suggested as worldwide applicable sentinels.

  4. PABLM. Accumulated Environment Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E.Jr.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-04-01

    PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years.

  5. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  6. Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, Scott

    2011-01-01

    We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surfa...

  7. Accumulation boundaries: codimension-two accumulation of accumulations in phase diagrams of semiconductor lasers, electric circuits, atmospheric and chemical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, Cristian; Gallas, Jason Alfredo Carlson

    2008-02-28

    We report high-resolution phase diagrams for several familiar dynamical systems described by sets of ordinary differential equations: semiconductor lasers; electric circuits; Lorenz-84 low-order atmospheric circulation model; and Rössler and chemical oscillators. All these systems contain chaotic phases with highly complicated and interesting accumulation boundaries, curves where networks of stable islands of regular oscillations with ever-increasing periodicities accumulate systematically. The experimental exploration of such codimension-two boundaries characterized by the presence of infinite accumulation of accumulations is feasible with existing technology for some of these systems.

  8. Variance and covariance of accumulated displacement estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Matthew; Hall, Timothy J

    2013-04-01

    Tracking large deformations in tissue using ultrasound can enable the reconstruction of nonlinear elastic parameters, but poses a challenge to displacement estimation algorithms. Such large deformations have to be broken up into steps, each of which contributes an estimation error to the final accumulated displacement map. The work reported here measured the error variance for single-step and accumulated displacement estimates using one-dimensional numerical simulations of ultrasound echo signals, subjected to tissue strain and electronic noise. The covariance between accumulation steps was also computed. These simulations show that errors due to electronic noise are negatively correlated between steps, and therefore accumulate slowly, whereas errors due to tissue deformation are positively correlated and accumulate quickly. For reasonably low electronic noise levels, the error variance in the accumulated displacement estimates is remarkably constant as a function of step size, but increases with the length of the tracking kernel.

  9. Revealing accumulation zones of plastic pellets in sandy beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fabiana T; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Barbosa, Lucas; Turra, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Microplastics such as pellets are reported worldwide on sandy beaches, and have possible direct and indirect impacts on the biota and physical characteristics of the habitats where they accumulate. Evaluations of their standing stock at different spatial scales generate data on levels of contamination. This information is needed to identify accumulation zones and the specific beach habitats and communities that are likely to be most affected. Standing stocks of plastic pellets were evaluated in 13 sandy beaches in São Paulo state, Brazil. The sampling strategy incorporated across-shore transects from coastal dunes and backshores, and vertical profiles of the accumulated pellets down to 1 m depth below the sediment surface. Accumulation zones were identified at regional (among beaches) and local (between compartments) scales. At the regional scale pellet density tended to increase at beaches on the central and southwestern coast, near ports and factories that produce and transport the largest amounts of pellets in the country. At the local scale coastal dunes showed larger accumulations of pellets than backshores. For both compartments pellets tended to occur deeper in areas where standing stocks were larger. Most of the pellets were concentrated from the surface down to 0.4 m depth, suggesting that organisms inhabiting this part of the sediment column are more exposed to the risks associated with the presence of pellets. Our findings shed light on the local and regional scales of spatial variability of microplastics and their consequences for assessment and monitoring schemes in coastal compartments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. ACCUMULATION AND CONSUMPTION IN MICROECONOMIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghey A. Amelkin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Two main processes are common for an economic system. They are consumption and accumulation. The first one is described by utility function, either cardinal or ordinal one. The mathematical model for accumulation process can be constructed using wealth function introduced within the frame of irreversible microeconomics. Characteristics of utility and wealth functions are compared and a problem of extreme performance of resources exchange process is solved for a case when both the consumption and accumulation exist.

  11. [Probe into monitoring mechanism of Chinese materia medica resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Da-Ning; Guo, Lan-Ping; Lu, Jian-Wei; Sun, Li-Ying; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2013-10-01

    Focusing on the problems of Chinese materia medica resources,and combining with the national Chinese materia medica resources survey, the paper probes into monitoring mechanism of Chinese materia medica resources. The establishment of the monitoring mechanism needs one organization and management agencies to supervise and guide monitoring work, one network system to gather data information, a group of people to perform monitoring work, a system of technical methods to assure monitoring work scientific and practical, a series of achievements and products to figure out the methods for solving problems, a group of monitoring index system to accumulate basic data, and a plenty of funds to keep normal operation of monitoring work.

  12. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbal, Andreas; Degering, Detlev; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-01

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a 228Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed 228Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10-6. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of 3He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  13. Six-month follow-up multicenter prospective study of 368 patients, phototypes III to V, on epilation efficacy using an 810-nm diode laser at low fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Josefina; Urdiales, Fernándo; Moreno, Javier; Al-Zarouni, Marwan; Cornejo, Paloma; Trelles, Mario A

    2011-03-01

    Laser hair removal is currently a popular cosmetic procedure. Traditional high-fluence laser treatment for hair elimination is associated with discomfort and adverse events and it is restricted to low phototype skins. A multicenter study of hair epilation with low fluences and high repetition pulse rate using an 810-nm diode laser was carried out on 368 patients (phototypes III to V) to test its efficacy in a 6-month follow-up after five treatments on the face and various body areas. Objective and subjective assessment as well as histologies show a high index of patient satisfaction due to high efficacy of hair elimination, also proved histologically by the damage observed at hair structure level. Results obtained a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low index of adverse events. Laser epilation was well accepted regarding discomfort and was also complication-free for dark and tanned skins. Treatment is easy to conduct and requires adapting the movement of the hand-piece to a constant speed in order to achieve high-energy deposit on tissue avoiding risks of burning.

  14. BURST FLUENCE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS 1806-20 AND 1900+14 IN THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER PCA ERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Kaaret, Philip, E-mail: prieskorn@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    We study the fluence distributions of over 3040 bursts from SGR 1806-20 and over 1963 bursts from SGR 1900+14 using the complete set of observations available from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array through 2011 March. Cumulative event distributions are presented for both sources and are fitted with single and broken power laws as well as an exponential cutoff. The distributions are best fitted by a broken power law with exponential cutoff; however the statistical significance of the cutoff is not high and the upper portion of the broken power law can be explained as the expected number of false bursts due to random noise fluctuations. Event distributions are also examined in high and low burst rate regimes and power-law indices are found to be consistent, independent of the burst rate. The contribution function of the event fluence is calculated. This distribution shows that the energy released in the soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts is dominated by the most powerful events for both sources. The power-law nature of these distributions combined with the dominant energy dissipation of the system occurring in the large, less frequent bursts is indicative of a self-organized critical system, as suggested by Gogus et al. in 1999.

  15. Multiple population-period transient spectroscopy (MUPPETS) of CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles. II. Effects of high fluence and solvent heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haorui; Sahu, Kalyanasis; Berg, Mark A

    2013-12-12

    Multiple population-period transient spectroscopy (MUPPETS) is a six-pulse experiment with two time dimensions that is capable of adding information about systems with complicated kinetics. The core theory for MUPPETS focuses on the χ(5) response of the chromophores. This theory was used to analyze the dynamics of excitons and biexcitons in CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles in part I of this paper [J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, DOI:10.1021/jp405785a]. In real experiments, the potential role of additional processes must also be considered, in particular, the χ(7), "saturation" of the MUPPETS signal and nonresonant signals from heating of the solvent. A pathway method for calculating fluence effects in MUPPETS is developed. The fluence dependence of the biexciton signal and its sign reversal, as found in part I, are explained without invoking higher excitons or unexpected species. A method is presented for quantitatively predicting the magnitude of signals from solvent heating using an external standard. Thermal effects in this system are found to be too small to affect the conclusions in part I. Their small size, combined with small, systematic errors in the data, also makes it difficult to measure the yield of solvent heat in these experiments.

  16. The evolution of melasma therapy: targeting melanosomes using low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B

    2012-06-01

    Melasma is an acquired disorder of pigmentation that commonly affects women with phototypes III-V, and it has a negative impact on the quality of life in affected individuals. It presents clinically as symmetric tan or brown patches on the face, most often involving the forehead, cheeks, perioral region, and periorbital region. On histologic examination, there is increased melanin in the epidermis and/or an increased number of melanosomes in the dermis, with a normal number of highly melanized and dendritic melanocytes. The mainstay of treatment is the use of sunscreen along with topical medications that suppress melanogenesis. Clearance is usually incomplete and recurrences or exacerbations are frequent, probably because of the poor efficacy in clearing dermal melanosomes. Treatment with high-energy pigment-specific lasers, ablative resurfacing lasers, and fractional lasers results in an unacceptably high rate of postinflammatory hyper- and hypopigmentation and rebound melasma. Recently, promising results have been achieved with low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser treatment, which can selectively target dermal melanosomes without producing inflammation or epidermal damage, in all skin phototypes. This article reviews the current treatment modalities for melasma, the rationale for using and the clinical results of combination therapy with low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers.

  17. Determination of radionuclides produced by neutrons in heavily exposed workers of the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura for estimating an individual's neutron fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Y; Noda, Y; Yonehara, H; Ishigure, N; Yoshida, S; Yukawa, M; Tagami, K; Ban-Nai, T; Uchida, S; Hirama, T; Akashi, M; Nakamura, Y

    2001-09-01

    In the Tokai-mura criticality accident, three workers were heavily exposed. Biological materials, such as blood, urine, vomit and hair, were collected from the workers and analyzed for radioactivities, produced by the neutron irradiation. Activation products. such as 24Na, -K and 82Br, were found in these materials by gamma-ray spectrometry. The radionuclide of the highest activity observed in biological materials was 24Na, e.g. the concentrations of this nuclide in the blood samples from the three patients at the accident time were 169, 92 and 23 Bq/ml, respectively. The concentrations of stable sodium in the same samples were determined by ICP-AES to obtain specific activities of 24Na (concentration ratio between the produced 24Na and stable 23Na), which are essential for estimating the neutron fluences and radiation doses. The specific activities of 24Na obtained for the three patients through the blood analysis were 8.2 x 10(4),4.3 x 10(4) and 1.2 x 10(4) Bq24Na/g23Na. Based on these values, individual's neutron fluences were estimated to be 5.7 x 10(11), 3.0 x 10(-1) and 0.85 x 10(11) cm(-2), respectively.

  18. Desorption/Ionization Fluence Thresholds and Improved Mass Spectral Consistency Measured Using a Flattop Laser Profile in the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Bacillus Endospores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P T; Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Tobias, H J; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-11-30

    Bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) is being developed to analyze and identify biological aerosols in real-time. Mass spectra of individual Bacillus endospores were measured here with a bipolar aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer in which molecular desorption and ionization were produced using a single laser pulse from a Q-switched, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser that was modified to have an approximately flattop profile. The flattened laser profile allowed the minimum fluence required to desorb and ionize significant numbers of ions from single aerosol particles to be determined. For Bacillus spores this threshold had a mean value of approximately 1 nJ/{micro}m{sup 2} (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}). Thresholds for individual spores, however, could apparently deviate by 20% or more from the mean. Threshold distributions for clumps of MS2 bacteriophage and bovine serum albumin were subsequently determined. Finally, the flattened profile was observed to increase the reproducibility of single spore mass spectra. This is consistent with the general conclusions of our earlier paper on the fluence dependence of single spore mass spectra and is particularly significant because it is expected to enable more robust differentiation and identification of single bioaerosol particles.

  19. Long Term Effects of Multiple DBD Pulses on Thin Liquid Layers Over Tissue: Reactive Fluences and Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are used in treatment of tissue, often covered by thin liquid layers. The reactivity reaching the tissue depends on the plasma dose, composition and acidification of the liquid, and the cumulative delivery of electric fields through the liquid. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the interaction of DBDs with a thin liquid layer covering tissue over many minutes. We used nonPDPSIM, a 2-d model in which Poisson's equation, the electron temperature equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species and radiation transport are solved in both the gas and liquid. The liquid layer, 100's μm thick, is water with dissolved gases [O2aq (aq is aqueous), CO2aq], metal ions (Feaq2+ , Feaq3+) , and organics (RHaq) . Hundreds of pulses at 100 Hz are computed, followed by minutes of afterglow. In the liquid, transient radicals (OHaq, Haq) are produced during the discharge pulse and are consumed during the interpulse period. Terminal species (H2O2aq, O3aq) accumulate and diffuse to the tissue. Ions are dominated by NO3-aq, O2-aq and H3Oaq+.Production of HNO3aq and HOONOaq is assisted by O2aq for the first pulses and then O3aq. Accumulating nitric acid lowers the pH. RHaq consumes most reactive oxygen species in the early plasma treatment leaving Raq. With longer exposure, RHaq can be consumed, enabling more ROS to reach the tissue. The cumulative exposure of electric fields to the tissue depends on the increasing conductivity of the liquid. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and NSF.

  20. Monarch Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The US Fish and Wildlife Service has engaged in a multi-partnered, integrated strategy for monitoring conservation of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus...

  1. Monitoring Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    This book is useful for Hadoop administrators who need to learn how to monitor and diagnose their clusters. Also, the book will prove useful for new users of the technology, as the language used is simple and easy to grasp.

  2. Calculating the accumulative neutron fluence rate of Al alloy on upper link chest of Swimming Pool Research Reactor-300%300#研究堆寿期内上联箱铝材中子注量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯琦杰; 刘耀光; 杨万奎; 张松宝; 石炳元; 杨锐

    2015-01-01

    材料在辐照过程中所受的中子注量是辐照性能研究中的一个重要参数.上联箱铝材作为300#研究堆关键结构材料,经历了从反应堆首次临界到退役的全过程,极具材料辐照效应研究价值.为获取整个反应堆运行寿期内的上联箱中子注量水平,须克服堆芯装载变化频繁与堆芯不断扩大装载两大关键难点,故提出了堆芯归并等效计算方法.通过该方法的成功应用,得到了300#研究堆寿期内上联箱铝材的中子注量,并进行了误差分析.

  3. Bayesian Monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirstein, Roland

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the inspection game: The ?Bayesian Monitoring? model rests on the assumption that judges are interested in enforcing compliant behavior and making correct decisions. They may base their judgements on an informative but imperfect signal which can be generated costlessly. In the original inspection game, monitoring is costly and generates a perfectly informative signal. While the inspection game has only one mixed strategy equilibrium, three Perfect Bayesia...

  4. Testglass changer for direct optical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, A.; Hagedorn, H.; Weinrich, W.; Wirth, E.

    2011-09-01

    For the production of high performance multilayer systems with tight specifications and large numbers of layers optical monitoring is essential. Substantial progress was achieved by the introduction of direct monitoring on the rotating substrate holder. Pre production analysis by computer simulation of coating processes helps to optimise monitoring strategies and reduces the effort for expensive and time consuming test runs significantly. However not in any case we can find error compensating monitoring strategies. Also we have to deal with error accumulation effects especially with multi layer systems with large number of layers. Changing the monitor glass after the layer stack is deposited partly is a useful method to discontinue accumulation or to simplify the monitoring strategy. A testglass changer which helps to suppress error accumulation was developed and automized. The testglasses are located on the rotating substrate holder which may be a calotte or a plane substrate holder. It combines the advantages of direct monitoring with the flexibility to change testglasses in a fully automatic process. The basic principle will be described. Results of multilayer systems demonstrate the benefits of the newly developed testglass changer.

  5. 40 CFR 262.34 - Accumulation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accumulation time. 262.34 Section 262...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.34 Accumulation time... removed from the drip pad and the sump or collection system and the date and time of removal; and/or...

  6. Charge accumulation in lossy dielectrics: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen Knøster; McAllister, Iain Wilson; Crichton, George C

    1999-01-01

    such that the material parameters which influence charge accumulation are clearly identified; viz. the conductivity, permittivity and dimensions of the insulating media. The two former parameters, together with the applied voltage, govern both the magnitude and polarity of the accumulated charge....

  7. Annual Greenland accumulation rates (2009-2012) from airborne snow radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Alexander, Patrick M.; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Panzer, Ben; Paden, John D.; Forster, Richard R.; Das, Indrani; McConnell, Joesph R.; Tedesco, Marco; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2016-08-01

    Contemporary climate warming over the Arctic is accelerating mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through increasing surface melt, emphasizing the need to closely monitor its surface mass balance in order to improve sea-level rise predictions. Snow accumulation is the largest component of the ice sheet's surface mass balance, but in situ observations thereof are inherently sparse and models are difficult to evaluate at large scales. Here, we quantify recent Greenland accumulation rates using ultra-wideband (2-6.5 GHz) airborne snow radar data collected as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge between 2009 and 2012. We use a semiautomated method to trace the observed radiostratigraphy and then derive annual net accumulation rates for 2009-2012. The uncertainty in these radar-derived accumulation rates is on average 14 %. A comparison of the radar-derived accumulation rates and contemporaneous ice cores shows that snow radar captures both the annual and long-term mean accumulation rate accurately. A comparison with outputs from a regional climate model (MAR) shows that this model matches radar-derived accumulation rates in the ice sheet interior but produces higher values over southeastern Greenland. Our results demonstrate that snow radar can efficiently and accurately map patterns of snow accumulation across an ice sheet and that it is valuable for evaluating the accuracy of surface mass balance models.

  8. Primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae accumulates storage glucan and triacylglycerol under nitrogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusagawa, Mari; Nakajima, Yohei; Saito, Takafumi; Misumi, Osami

    2016-07-14

    Most microalgae accumulate neutral lipids, including triacylglycerol (TAG), into spherical structures called lipid bodies (LBs) under environmental stress conditions such as nutrient depletion. In green algae, starch accumulation precedes TAG accumulation, and the starch is thought to be a substrate for TAG synthesis. However, the relationship between TAG synthesis and the starch content in red algae, as well as how TAG accumulation is regulated, is unclear. In this study, we cultured the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae under nitrogen-depleted conditions, and monitored the formation of starch granules (SGs) and LBs using microscopy. SGs stained with potassium iodide were observed at 24 h; however, LBs stained specifically with BODIPY 493/503 were observed after 48 h. Quantitative analysis of neutral sugar and cytomorphological semi-quantitative analysis of TAG accumulation also supported these results. Thus, the accumulation of starch occurred and preceded the accumulation of TAG in cells of C. merolae. However, TAG accumulation was not accompanied by a decrease in the starch content, suggesting that the starch is a major carbon storage sink, at least under nitrogen-depleted conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of genes involved in starch and TAG synthesis rarely changed during the culture period, suggesting that starch and TAG synthesis in C. merolae are not controlled through gene transcription but at other stages, such as translation and/or enzymatic activity.

  9. Are NORMs Accumulated in Filters of Drinking Water Facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Shin, W.; Park, M.; Han, J. H.; Ryu, J. S.; Han, W. S.; Chang, B. U.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is used as raw water to produce mineral drinking water through filtering processes in bottled water facilities. Although natural occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) exist in groundwater, accumulation of NORMs were rarely studied due to their low concentrations in groundwater. The goal of this study is to evaluate potential accumulation of NORMs in filters used at the drinking water facilities. Raw water and treated water after each filtering step, bottled water, and used filters were collected from a total of 13 bottled water facilities to analyze major dissolved ions and NORMs. Additionally, surface radioactive dose rate were measured at individual filter housings. The measured concentrations of NORMs in raw and treated water were quite low. However, the surface radioactivity dose rates dramatically increased around filter housing located at very first step regardless of filter type (i.e., activated carbon or membrane filter) in 4 out of 6 facilities. Some used filters showed approximately 20 times greater contents of Pb-210 than the Korean regulation level of 1 Bq g-1. Also, the concentrations of uranium and thorium were detected up to 75 µg g-1filter and 2 µg g-1filter, respectively, in 4 water facilities. These results implies potential accumulation of NORMs in filters used at bottled water facilities. Therefore, the filters need to be monitored during manufacturing processes of bottled water, and may be properly managed after use.

  10. Accumulation of Transcripts Abundance after Barley Inoculation with Cochliobolus sativus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Imad Eddin Arabi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spot blotch caused by the hemibiotrophic pathogen Cochliobolus sativus has been the major yield-reducing factor for barley production during the last decade. Monitoring transcriptional reorganization triggered in response to this fungus is an essential first step for the functional analysis of genes involved in the process. To characterize the defense responses initiated by barley resistant and susceptible cultivars, a survey of transcript abundance at early time points of C. sativus inoculation was conducted. A notable number of transcripts exhibiting significant differential accumulations in the resistant and susceptible cultivars were detected compared to the non-inoculated controls. At the p-value of 0.0001, transcripts were divided into three general categories; defense, regulatory and unknown function, and the resistant cultivar had the greatest number of common transcripts at different time points. Quantities of differentially accumulated gene transcripts in both cultivars were identified at 24 h post infection, the approximate time when the pathogen changes trophic lifestyles. The unique and common accumulated transcripts might be of considerable interest for enhancing effective resistance to C. sativus.

  11. Neutron area monitor with passive detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero L, C.; Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Using Monte Carlo method the responses of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated. To detect thermal neutrons the monitor has a gold foil that is located at the center of a polyethylene cylinder. Impinging neutrons are moderated by polyethylene nuclei reaching the gold foil with the energy to induce activation through the reaction {sup 197}Au(n, {gamma}) {sup 198}Au. The {sup 198}Au decays emitting 0.411 MeV gamma rays with a half life of 2.7 days. The induced activity is intended to be measured with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3'' {phi} x 3'' NaI(Tl) scintillator and the saturation activity is correlated to the ambient dose equivalent. The response was calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources ranging from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV. Calculated fluence response was compared with the response of neutron monitor area LB 6411. (Author)

  12. Accumulation of cadmium and uranium in arable soils in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Moritz; Ulrich, Andrea; Rehmus, Agnes; Keller, Armin

    2017-02-01

    Mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizers contain contaminants that are potentially hazardous to humans and the environment. Frequent mineral P fertilizer applications can cause heavy metals to accumulate and reach undesirable concentrations in agricultural soils. There is particular concern about Cadmium (Cd) and Uranium (U) accumulation because these metals are toxic and can endanger soil fertility, leach into groundwater, and be taken up by crops. We determined total Cd and U concentrations in more than 400 topsoil and subsoil samples obtained from 216 agricultural sites across Switzerland. We also investigated temporal changes in Cd and U concentrations since 1985 in soil at six selected Swiss national soil monitoring network sites. The mean U concentrations were 16% higher in arable topsoil than in grassland topsoil. The Cd concentrations in arable and grassland soils did not differ, which we attribute to soil management practices and Cd sources other than mineral P fertilizers masking Cd inputs from mineral P fertilizers. The mean Cd and U concentrations were 58% and 9% higher, respectively, in arable topsoil than in arable subsoil, indicating that significant Cd and U inputs to arable soils occurred in the past. Geochemical mass balances confirmed this, indicating an accumulation of 52% for Cd and 6% for U. Only minor temporal changes were found in the Cd concentrations in topsoil from the six soil-monitoring sites, but U concentrations in topsoil from three sites had significantly increased since 1985. Sewage sludge and atmospheric deposition were previously important sources of Cd to agricultural soils, but today mineral P fertilizers are the dominant sources of Cd and U. Future Cd and U inputs to agricultural soils may be reduced by using optimized management practices, establishing U threshold values for mineral P fertilizers and soils, effectively enforcing threshold values, and developing and using clean recycled P fertilizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  13. Study on Monitoring Model for Nitrogen Accumulation in Peanut (Arachis Hypogasa L.) Leaves Based on Hyper- Spectral Remote Sensing%基于高光谱遥感的花生叶片氮积累量监测模型的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓艳; 王丽丽; 刘锋; 封文杰; 刘淑云; 朱建华

    2012-01-01

    作物氮素状况是评价长势、提高产量和改善品质的重要指标,因此叶片氮积累量的实时无损估测对作物生产的氮素管理具有重要意义.本研究选用大花生品种丰花1号为试验材料,在大田生产条件下,分析了花生叶片氮积累量与冠层高光谱参数的定量关系.结果表明,叶片氮素含量随生育进程逐渐下降,不同处理之间差异较小;叶片氮素积累量随生育时期推进呈现先升后降的单峰曲线变化趋势,在结荚期达到高峰.花生冠层光谱反射率在740 ~1100nm波段内随叶片氮积累量的增加而增加,叶片氮积累量的敏感波段主要存在于近红外平台和可见光区,其中,“红边”区域表现最为显著.通过微分等技术构造多种植被指数,对高光谱参数和叶片氮积累量进行相关回归分析,红边振幅(Dr)、氮素反射指数(NRI)、归一化植被指数(NDVI)各波段组合平均值及比值植被指数( RVI)与叶片氮积累量关系最密切,方程拟合决定系数分别为0.9194、0.8984、0.8918、0.8899、0.8794、0.8797.经另外一组独立数据的检验表明,对叶片氮积累量的预测以红边位置(REP)和Dr两个参数表现最优,预测的根均方差(RMSE)分别为1.78和1.10,相对误差为5.29%和3.59%.NDVI[ Average(1230,1240,1250,1260),640]和土壤调整植被指数(SAVI)两个光谱参数预测的RMSE分别为1.15和1.19,预测相对误差为5.42%和7.41%.比较而言,Dr为自变量建立的模型,可以更好地评估不同条件下叶片氮素积累状况.%Nitrogen condition of crops was an important indicator for evaluating growth vigor, increasing yield and improving quality, so it was significant of real - time and lossless estimation of nitrogen accumulation in leaves for nitrogen management during crop production. In this study, the peanut variety Fenghua 1 with large seed was used as experimental material to study the relationship between nitrogen accumulation in

  14. 47 CFR 36.505 - Accumulated amortization-Tangible-Account 3400 (Class B Telephone Companies); Accumulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Class B Telephone Companies); Accumulated amortization-Capital Leases-Account 3410 (Class A Telephone... and Deferrals § 36.505 Accumulated amortization—Tangible—Account 3400 (Class B Telephone Companies); Accumulated amortization—Capital Leases—Account 3410 (Class A Telephone Companies). (a) Amounts in...

  15. Rapid, high‐fluence multi‐pass q‐switched laser treatment of tattoos with a transparent perfluorodecalin‐infused patch: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Michael P.; Costner, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Perfluorodecalin (PFD) has previously been shown to rapidly dissipate the opaque, white micro‐bubble layer formed after exposure of tattoos to Q‐switched lasers [1]. The current pilot study was conducted to qualitatively determine if the use of a transparent PFD‐infused silicone patch would result in more rapid clearance of tattoos than conventional through‐air techniques. Materials and Methods Black or dark blue tattoos were divided into two halves in a single‐site IRB‐approved study with 17 subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types I–III. One half of each tattoo served as its own control and was treated with one pass of a standard Q‐switched Alexandrite laser (755 nm). The other half of the tattoo was treated directly through a transparent perfluorodecalin (PFD) infused patch (ON Light Sciences, Dublin, CA). The rapid whitening reduction effect of the Patch routinely allowed three to four laser passes in a total of approximately 5 minutes. Both sides were treated at highest tolerated fluence, but the optical clearing, index‐matching, and epidermal protection properties of the PFD Patch allowed significantly higher fluence compared to the control side. Standard photographs were taken at baseline, immediately prior to treatment with the PFD Patch in place, and finally before and after each treatment session. Treatments were administered at 4‐ to 6‐week intervals. Results In a majority of subjects (11 of 17), tattoos treated through a transparent PFD‐infused patch showed more rapid tattoo clearance with higher patient and clinician satisfaction than conventional treatment. In no case did the control side fade faster than the PFD Patch side. No unanticipated adverse events were observed. Conclusions Rapid multi‐pass treatment of tattoos with highest tolerated fluence facilitated by a transparent PFD‐infused patch clears tattoos more rapidly than conventional methods. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:613–618, 2015. © 2015 The

  16. Dose monitoring for boron neutron capture therapy using a reactor-based epithermal neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Nottelman, E. L.; Konijnenberg, M. W.; Mijnheer, B. J.

    1996-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine the variation with time of the relevant beam parameters of a clinical reactor-based epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and (ii) to test a monitoring system for its applicability to monitor the dose delivered to the dose specification point in a patient treated with BNCT. For this purpose two fission chambers covered with Cd and two GM counters were positioned in the beam-shaping collimator assembly of the epithermal neutron beam. The monitor count rates were compared with in-phantom reference measurements of the thermal neutron fluence rate, the gamma-ray dose rate and the fast neutron dose rate, at a constant reactor power, over a period of 2 years. Differences in beam output, defined as the thermal neutron fluence rate at 2 cm depth in a phantom, of up to 15% were observed between various reactor cycles. A decrease in beam output of about 5% was observed in each reactor cycle. An unacceptable decrease of 50% in beam output due to malfunctioning of the beam filter assembly was detected. For safe and accurate treatment of patients, on-line monitoring of the beam is essential. Using the calibrated monitor system, the standard uncertainty in the total dose at depth due to variations with time of the beam output parameters has been reduced to a clinically acceptable value of 1% (one standard deviation).

  17. [Status of lead exposure and its impact on health of workers in an accumulator factory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiabin; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Xiaojing; Mai, Jianping; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yimin

    2014-02-01

    To identify the occupational hazard factors in an accumulator factory, to analyze the status of internal and external lead exposure and evaluate the impact of lead exposure on the health of workers in the accumulator industry, and to provide a theoretical basis for improved lead exposure criteria and technical support for the control of lead contamination in the accumulator industry. An on-site investigation was carried out to monitor and evaluate the lead fume and dust in the workplaces of an accumulator factory, and occupational health examination was performed in all workers. The occupational hazard safeguards in the accumulator factory were unadvanced. The contamination of lead fume and dust was serious. The abnormal rate of blood lead was up to 79.80%, and many workers developed anemia and mild peripheral nerve disease. Lead contamination is serious in the accumulator factory, leading to poor health of workers. It is essential to take effective control measures, improve the working environment, provide occupational health education, increase workers' self-protection awareness, and periodically conduct occupational hazard monitoring and health surveillance. The government must reinforce occupational health supervision of such enterprises.

  18. Seasonal Arsenic Accumulation in Stream Sediments at a Groundwater Discharge Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKay, Allison A.; Gan, Ping; Yu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal changes in arsenic and iron accumulation rates were examined in the sediments of a brook that receives groundwater discharges of arsenic and reduced iron. Clean glass bead columns were deployed in sediments for known periods over the annual hydrologic cycle to monitor changes in arsenic ...

  19. Alpha particles at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence to absorbed dose, fluence to effective dose and fluence to gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure to alpha particles in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for effective dose are within 30 % of those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  20. Incorporation of radiometric tracers in peat and implications for estimating accumulation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Sophia V., E-mail: sophia.hansson@emg.umu.se [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Kaste, James M. [Geology Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Olid, Carolina; Bindler, Richard [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Accurate dating of peat accumulation is essential for quantitatively reconstructing past changes in atmospheric metal deposition and carbon burial. By analyzing fallout radionuclides {sup 210}Pb, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 7}Be, and total Pb and Hg in 5 cores from two Swedish peatlands we addressed the consequence of estimating accumulation rates due to downwashing of atmospherically supplied elements within peat. The detection of {sup 7}Be down to 18–20 cm for some cores, and the broad vertical distribution of {sup 241}Am without a well-defined peak, suggest some downward transport by percolating rainwater and smearing of atmospherically deposited elements in the uppermost peat layers. Application of the CRS age–depth model leads to unrealistic peat mass accumulation rates (400–600 g m{sup −2} yr{sup −1}), and inaccurate estimates of past Pb and Hg deposition rates and trends, based on comparisons to deposition monitoring data (forest moss biomonitoring and wet deposition). After applying a newly proposed IP-CRS model that assumes a potential downward transport of {sup 210}Pb through the uppermost peat layers, recent peat accumulation rates (200–300 g m{sup −2} yr{sup −1}) comparable to published values were obtained. Furthermore, the rates and temporal trends in Pb and Hg accumulation correspond more closely to monitoring data, although some off-set is still evident. We suggest that downwashing can be successfully traced using {sup 7}Be, and if this information is incorporated into age–depth models, better calibration of peat records with monitoring data and better quantitative estimates of peat accumulation and past deposition are possible, although more work is needed to characterize how downwashing may vary between seasons or years. - Highlights: • {sup 210}Pb, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and {sup 7}Be, and tot-Pb and tot Hg were measured in 5 peat cores. • Two age–depth models were applied resulting in different accumulation rates

  1. Aflatoxin Accumulation in a Maize Diallel Cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Paul Williams

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins, produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus, occur naturally in maize. Contamination of maize grain with aflatoxin is a major food and feed safety problem and greatly reduces the value of the grain. Plant resistance is generally considered a highly desirable approach to reduction or elimination of aflatoxin in maize grain. In this investigation, a diallel cross was produced by crossing 10 inbred lines with varying degrees of resistance to aflatoxin accumulation in all possible combinations. Three lines that previously developed and released as sources of resistance to aflatoxin accumulation were included as parents. The 10 parental inbred lines and the 45 single crosses making up the diallel cross were evaluated for aflatoxin accumulation in field tests conducted in 2013 and 2014. Plants were inoculated with an A. flavus spore suspension seven days after silk emergence. Ears were harvested approximately 60 days later and concentration of aflatoxin in the grain determined. Parental inbred lines Mp717, Mp313E, and Mp719 exhibited low levels (3–12 ng/g of aflatoxin accumulation. In the diallel analysis, both general and specific combining ability were significant sources of variation in the inheritance of resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. General combining ability effects for reduced aflatoxin accumulation were greatest for Mp494, Mp719, and Mp717. These lines should be especially useful in breeding for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. Breeding strategies, such as reciprocal recurrent selection, would be appropriate.

  2. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  3. Recent accumulation rate at Dome A, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU ShuGui; LI YuanSheng; XIAO CunDe; REN JiaWen

    2007-01-01

    Based on the horizon of β activity and the density profiles, recent accumulation rate at Dome A, Antarctica is calculated to be 0.023 m water equivalent per year. This value is comparative to the accumulation rates deduced from the other inland sites of Antarctica. Clear-sky precipitation (or diamond dust) dominates the total precipitation at Dome A region. We speculate Dome A as a potential site to discover the oldest ice in Antarctica due to its tremendous ice thickness (>3000 m), extremely low accumulation rate, and low ice velocity.

  4. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  5. Accumulation of Norfloxacin by Bacteroides fragilis

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Vito; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2000-01-01

    The accumulation of norfloxacin by Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343 was determined by the modified fluorescence method. The time required to achieve a steady-state concentration (SSC) after allowing B. fragilis to accumulate norfloxacin in an aerobic or an anaerobic environment was ∼2 min; the SSC achieved in air was 90.28 ± 9.32 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells, and that achieved anaerobically was 98.45 ± 3.7 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells. Initial rates of accumulation w...

  6. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  7. Neutron spectral fluence measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer in the development of the iBNCT accelerator-based neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Takada, Kenta; Onishi, Takahiro; Kotaki, Kohei; Sugimoto, Hidenori; Kumada, Hiroaki; Harano, Hideki; Sakae, Takeji

    2017-09-01

    The neutron spectral fluence of an accelerator-based neutron source facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) based on a proton linac and a beryllium target was evaluated by the unfolding method using a Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS). A (3)He-proportional-counter-based BSS was used with weak beam during the development of the facility. The measured epithermal neutron spectra were consistent with calculations. The epithermal neutron intensity at the beam port was estimated and the results gave a numerical target for the enhancement of the proton beam intensity and will be used as reference data for measurements performed after the completion of the facility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal neutron fluence from ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of spoons activated during the JCO criticality accident at Tokai-mura in 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Martínez Canet, María Jose; Johnston, Peter N; Komura, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    During the JCO-accident in Tokai-mura in 1999, the surrounding village was irradiated by an uncontrolled neutron flux. At some locations in that village, the thermal neutron flux was determined retrospectively by measurement of the very low activity of 51Cr and 60Co in stainless-steel spoons using gamma-ray spectrometry in underground laboratories. Activities determined in the HADES underground facility are presented here, together with calibrations performed using a well-defined thermal neutron flux to directly estimate the fluence of thermal neutrons independent of most assumptions. The results show measurable 51Cr in three samples and 60Co in four samples taken from locations at distances of up to 430m from the accident location despite the elapse of 4 half-lives of 51Cr before measurement. Effects of air transport of the samples were considered and shown to be negligible.

  9. Bindi tattoo on forehead: Success with modified R-20 technique using low fluence Q-switched Nd YAG laser: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Zawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bindi tattoo on the forehead, is one of the cultural practice in Indian women from rural areas. Many patients are not pleased with the appearance of their tattoo and thus seek removal. The development of quality-switched lasers has revolutionized the removal of unwanted tattoos. However, despite multiple treatment sessions, the efficacy is often found to be limited. We herein report a case of green-blue bindi tattoo which failed to clear after 8 sessions of Q-switched Nd YAG laser. The tattoo significantly cleared with R-20 method using low fluence Q-switched Nd YAG Laser. R-20 technique seems to be an effective method of tattoo removal and might be a boon for patients who are reluctant to pursue laser treatment because of fear of expenditure, side effects and uncertainty of result. We report efficacy of R-20 technique for a bindi tattoo on forehead.

  10. Geomagnetic transmission disturbances and heavy-ion fluences observed in low Earth orbit during the solar energetic particle events of October 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, P R; Tylka, A J; Adams, J H; Beahm, L P; Fluckiger, E O; Kleis, T; Kobel, E

    1996-01-01

    The large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and simultaneous large geomagnetic disturbances observed during October 1989 posed a significant, rapidly evolving space radiation hazard. Using data from the GOES-7, NOAA-10, IMP-8 and LDEF satellites, we determined the geomagnetic transmission, heavy ion fluences, mean Fe ionic charge state, and effective radiation hazard observed in low Earth orbit (LEO) for these SEPs. We modeled the geomagnetic transmission by tracing particles through the combination of the internal International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and the Tsyganenko (1989) magnetospheric field models, extending the modeling to large geomagnetic disturbances. We used our results to assess the radiation hazard such very large SEP events would pose in the anticipated 52 degrees inclination space station orbit.

  11. Long-term safety and efficacy follow-up of prophylactic higher fluence collagen cross-linking in high myopic laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John KanellopoulosLaservision.gr Institute, Athens, Greece, and New York University Medical School, New York, NY, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet A irradiation cross-linking on completion for cases of high myopic laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK.Methods: Forty-three consecutive LASIK cases treated with femtosecond laser flap and the WaveLight excimer platform were evaluated perioperatively for uncorrected visual acuity, best corrected spectacle visual acuity, refraction, keratometry, topography, total and flap pachymetry, corneal optical coherence tomography, and endothelial cell count. All eyes at the completion of LASIK had cross-linking through the repositioned flap, with higher fluence (10 mW/cm2 ultraviolet light of an average 370 µm wavelength and 10 mW/cm2 fluence applied for 3 minutes following an earlier single instillation of 0.1% riboflavin within the flap interface. Mean follow-up duration was 3.5 (range 1.0–4.5 years.Results: Mean uncorrected visual acuity changed from 0.2 to 1.2, best corrected spectacle visual acuity from 1.1 to 1.2, spherical equivalent from -7.5 diopters (D to -0.2 D, keratometry from 44.5 D to 38 D, flap pachymetry from 105 µm to, total pachymetry from 525 to 405, and endothelial cell count from 2750 to 2800. None of the cases developed signs of ectasia or significant regression during follow-up.Conclusion: Prophylactic collagen cross-linking for high-risk LASIK cases appears to be a safe and effective adjunctive treatment for refractive regression and potential ectasia. This application may be viewed as prophylactic customization of the biomechanical behavior of corneal collagen.Keywords: prophylactic collagen cross-linking, laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, high-risk, post-LASIK ectasia

  12. Effects of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Kenji [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan)], E-mail: kenji.sugimoto@kanhokyo.or.jp; Hiraoka, Kiyonori [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan); Ohta, Seiji [Hiroshima Defense Facilities Administration Bureau, 6-30, Kamihattyobori, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0012 (Japan); Niimura, Yoko [National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea, 2-17-5 Maruishi Ohno, Saeki, Hiroshima 739-0452 (Japan); Terawaki, Toshinobu [Fisheries Research Agency, Queen' s Tower-B 15F, Minato-Mirai, West, Yokohama 220-6115 (Japan); Okada, Mitsumasa [Hiroshima University, 1-4-1, Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effect of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of an eelgrass bed by the coast of Iwakuni, Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We monitored eelgrass shoot density and volume of ulvoid accumulation in the study site and evaluated effects of the accumulated ulvoid canopy on the percent survival, seedling density, growth rates, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and carbon contents of eelgrass. Eelgrass shoot density decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid. Also, seedling density decreased by the increase in the ulvoid volumes. Shoot density, seedling density and leaf elongation were negatively correlated with ulvoid volume. Carbon contents in eelgrass decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid (canopy height: 25 cm). These results suggest that accumulation of ulvoid bloom has significant negative impacts on the structure and function of eelgrass bed, i.e. decreases in vegetative shoot density, seedling density, shoot height and growth rate.

  13. Effects of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenji; Hiraoka, Kiyonori; Ohta, Seiji; Niimura, Yoko; Terawaki, Toshinobu; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effect of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of an eelgrass bed by the coast of Iwakuni, Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We monitored eelgrass shoot density and volume of ulvoid accumulation in the study site and evaluated effects of the accumulated ulvoid canopy on the percent survival, seedling density, growth rates, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and carbon contents of eelgrass. Eelgrass shoot density decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid. Also, seedling density decreased by the increase in the ulvoid volumes. Shoot density, seedling density and leaf elongation were negatively correlated with ulvoid volume. Carbon contents in eelgrass decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid (canopy height: 25cm). These results suggest that accumulation of ulvoid bloom has significant negative impacts on the structure and function of eelgrass bed, i.e. decreases in vegetative shoot density, seedling density, shoot height and growth rate.

  14. Smarter radiation monitors for safeguards and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlau, P. E.; Pratt, J. C.; Markin, J. T.; Scurry, T., Jr.

    Versatile microprocessor systems permit more efficient, and more useful methods for monitoring nuclear materials. One such method is simple stepwise monitoring, which has variable alarm levels to expedite monitoring where extended monitoring periods are required. Another method, sequential probability ratio logic, tests data as it accumulates against two hypothesis - background, or background plus a transient diversion signal - and terminates monitoring as soon as a decision can be made that meets false alarm and detection confidence requirements. A third method, quntitative monitoring for personnel, calculates count ratios of high to low energy gamma ray regions to predict whether the material detected is a small quantity of bare material or a larger quantity of shielded material. Microprocessor system subprograms can assist in detector calibration and trouble shooting. Examples of subprograms are a variance analysis technique to set hias levels in plastic scintillators and a state of health routine for detecting malfunctions in digital circuit components.

  15. Towards innovative roadside monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, G.; Appel, E.; Magiera, T.

    2012-04-01

    Soil contamination along roadsides is an important factor of anthropogenic point source pollution. Climatic and traffic-specific factors influence the amount and characteristics of pollution emitted and deposited in the roadside soil. In our present study we focus on monitoring typical traffic pollutants (heavy metals HM, platinum group elements, polycyclic hydrocarbons PAH), and investigate the use of magnetic parameters, especially magnetic susceptibility (MS) as proxy. Monitoring plots were installed along roadside in areas with different climatic conditions and different traffic-specific activities (traffic density and speed, vehicle types, abrasion of tires, brake linings, petrol/diesel compounds and road maintenance). For monitoring we removed 10-15 cm of top soil at 1 m distance from the roadside edge and placed 30 plastic boxes there filled with clean quartz sand, to be sampled after regular intervals within two years. Preliminary data from the first year of monitoring are presented. Magnetic results revealed that a coarse grained magnetite-like phase is responsible for the enhancement of magnetic concentration. The mass-specific MS and concentration of pollutants (HM, PAH) all show a significant increase with time, however, there are obviously also seasonal and site-dependent effects which lead to more stable values over several months or even some decrease in the upper few cm due to migration into depth. Source identification indicates that the accumulated PAHs are primarily emissions from traffic. In order to be able to discriminate in between different kinds of transport and deposition (surface run off from the road and neighbouring soil material, splash water, air transport), we additionally established pillars at the roadside with clean quartz sampling boxes at different heights (surface, 0.5 m, 2 m). As a first surprising result we observed that the increase in the boxes at surface is not necessarily higher than at 0.5 m height. The results from our

  16. Factors influencing the cardiac MIBG accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsu, Hisato; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-02-01

    Following factors possibly influencing the cardiac MIBG accumulation were examined mainly in mice. 1. The specific activity of the MIBG (meta-iodo-benzyl guanidine) on the neuronal and non-neuronal fractions. 2. Motor restriction stress on MIBG accumulation and washout. 3. Loading and restriction of sodium chloride on the accumulation and effect of suppression of renin-angiotensin system. 4. Examinations in Dahl rats. 125I- or 131I-MIBG was intravenously administered to mice at 74 kBq. At 30 min or 4 hr after administration, mice were sacrificed and their left ventricles were dissected out for measurement of radioactivity in a liquid scintillation counter. Salt-sensitive and -resistant Dahl rats were given with 37 MBq of 123I-MIBG and cardiac radioactivity was measured externally for calculation of washout. Factors examined were found highly correlated with the accumulation of MIBG and measurement of its washout was considered useful for evaluating sympathetic activity. (K.H.)

  17. Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, M.

    1977-12-01

    The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

  18. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TFmetal treatment. Among the 4 transgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  19. Comet 81p/Wild 2: The Updated Stardust Coma Dust Fluence Measurement for Smaller (Sub 10-Micrometre) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, Friedrich; Cole, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometre and smaller scale dust within cometary comae can be observed by telescopic remote sensing spectroscopy [1] and the particle size and abundance can be measured by in situ spacecraft impact detectors [2]. Initial interpretation of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft [3] appears to show that very fine dust contributes not only a small fraction of the solid mass, but is also relatively sparse [4], with a low negative power function describing grain size distribution, contrasting with an apparent abundance indicated by the on-board Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) [5] operational during the encounter. For particles above 10 m diameter there is good correspondence between results from the DFMI and the particle size inferred from experimental calibration [6] of measured aerogel track and aluminium foil crater dimensions (as seen in Figure 4 of [4]). However, divergence between data-sets becomes apparent at smaller sizes, especially submicrometre, where the returned sample data are based upon location and measurement of tiny craters found by electron microscopy of Al foils. Here effects of detection efficiency tail-off at each search magnification can be seen in the down-scale flattening of each scale component, but are reliably compensated by sensible extrapolation between segments. There is also no evidence of malfunction in the operation of DFMI during passage through the coma (S. Green, personal comm.), so can the two data sets be reconciled?

  20. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  1. NEURODEGENERATION WITH IRON ACCUMULATION TYPE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikhande D Y

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1 is a rare degenerative disorder presenting with dementia and progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction. A 10 yrs old girl reported with complaints of difficulty in speech and involuntary movements. MRI Brain showed ‘eye of tiger appearance’ which is suggestive of neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1. Treatment is symptomatic and chelating agents have no effect. The disease is progressivelyfatal

  2. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  3. Real-time monitoring for human clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    On August 3-4, 1994, an INEL team made measurements related to a real-time monitoring system for use on the epithermal beam facility at the BMRR. BNL has installed two fission chambers in front of the beam collimator, which are to monitor the beam coming from the reactor. These two monitors are located with one just above the 16-cm dia. front aperture and the other is just below. The fission chambers contain depleted uranium, but because of the small amount of U-235 present, they respond to thermal and near thermal neutrons rather than fast neutrons. This feature combined with their relatively small size (0.6 cm dia x 4 cm long) makes them very good monitors in the BMRR epithermal neutron beam. The INEL team worked with H.B. Lui (BNL) in performing initial tests of these monitors and established the settings to achieve stable operation. The main purpose of the measurement studies was to establish a basis for a monitoring method that tracks the dose the patient is receiving rather than the neutron fluence being delivered down the beam line.

  4. Sucrose induces vesicle accumulation and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Hiroko

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the treatment of mammalian cells with sucrose leads to vacuole accumulation associated with lysosomes and upregulation of lysosomal enzyme expression and activity. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostatic process by which cells deliver cytoplasmic material for degradation into lysosomes, thus it is probable that sucrose affects the autophagic activity. The role of sucrose in autophagy is unknown; however, another disaccharide, trehalose has been shown to induce autophagy. In the current study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate whether sucrose induces autophagy and whether vesicle formation is associated with autophagy. The results showed that sucrose induces autophagy while being accumulated within the endosomes/lysosomes. These vesicles were swollen and packed within the cytoplasm. Furthermore, trehalose and the trisaccharide raffinose, which are not hydrolyzed in mammalian cells, increased the rate of vesicles accumulation and LC3-II level (a protein marker of autophagy). However, fructose and maltose did not show the same effects. The correlation between the two processes, vesicle accumulation and autophagy induction, was confirmed by treatment of cells with sucrose plus invertase, or maltose plus acarbose-the α-glucosidase inhibitor-and by sucrose deprivation. Results also showed that vesicle accumulation was not affected by autophagy inhibition. Therefore, the data suggest that sucrose-induced autophagy through accumulation of sucrose-containing vesicles is caused by the absence of hydrolysis enzymes.

  5. Accumulation of radionuclides by lichen symbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifontova, M.G.; Kulikov, N.V. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehkologii Rastenij i Zhivotnykh)

    1983-01-01

    The aim of investigation is the quantitative estimation of ability and role of separate symbionts in the accumulation of radionuclides. As investigation volumes, durably cultivated green lichen alga Trebouxia erici and lichen fungi extracted from Cladonia rangiferina, Parmelia caperata and Acarospora fuscata are used. The accumulation of radioactive isotopes with fungi and seaweeds is estimated according to accumulation coefficients (AC) which are the ratio of radiation concentration in plants and agarized medium. Radionuclide content (/sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs) is determined radiometrically. A special series of experiments is done to investigate radionuclide accumulation dependences with lichen seaweed and fungi on light conditions. It is shown that both symbionts of lichen-seaweed and fungus take part in the accumulation of radionuclide from outer medium (atmospheric fall-out and soil). However fungus component constituting the base of structural organization of thallus provides the greater part of radionuclides accumulated by the plant. Along with this the violation of viability of seaweed symbionts particularly in the case of light deficiency brings about the reduction of /sup 137/Cs sorption by seaweeds and tells on the total content of radiocesium in plant thallus.

  6. Realization of a scanning ion beam monitor; Realisation d'un dispositif de controle et d'imagerie de faisceaux balayes d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautard, C

    2008-07-15

    During this thesis, a scanning ion beam monitor has been developed in order to measure on-line fluence spatial distributions. This monitor is composed of an ionization chamber, Hall Effect sensors and a scintillator. The ionization chamber set between the beam exit and the experiment measures the ion rate. The beam spot is localized thanks to the Hall Effect sensors set near the beam sweeping magnets. The scintillator is used with a photomultiplier tube to calibrate the ionization chamber and with an imaging device to calibrate the Hall Effect sensors. This monitor was developed to control the beam lines of a radiobiology dedicated experimentation room at GANIL. These experiments are held in the context of the research in hadron-therapy. As a matter of fact, this new cancer treatment technique is based on ion irradiations and therefore demands accurate knowledge about the relation between the dose deposit in biological samples and the induced effects. To be effective, these studies require an on-line control of the fluence. The monitor has been tested with different beams at GANIL. Fluence can be measured with a relative precision of {+-}4% for a dose rate ranging between 1 mGy/s and 2 Gy/s. Once permanently set on the beam lines dedicated to radiobiology at GANIL, this monitor will enable users to control the fluence spatial distribution for each irradiation. The scintillator and the imaging device are also used to control the position, the spot shape and the energy of different beams such as those used for hadron-therapy. (author)

  7. Energy Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus T.; Madsen, Dines; Christiensen, Thomas

    Energy measurement has become an important aspect of our daily lives since we have learned that energy consumption, is one of the main source of global warming. Measuring instruments varies from a simple watt-meter to more sophisticated microprocessor control devices. The negative effects...... that fossil fuels induce on our environment has forced us to research renewable energy such as sunlight, wind etc. This new environmental awareness has also helped us to realize the importance of monitoring and controlling our energy use. The main purpose in this research is to introduce a more sophisticated...... but affordable way to monitor energy consumption of individuals or groups of home appliances. By knowing their consumption the utilization can be regulated for more efficient use. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate our idea....

  8. Energy Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus T.; Madsen, Dines; Christiensen, Thomas

    Energy measurement has become an important aspect of our daily lives since we have learned that energy consumption, is one of the main source of global warming. Measuring instruments varies from a simple watt-meter to more sophisticated microprocessor control devices. The negative effects...... that fossil fuels induce on our environment has forced us to research renewable energy such as sunlight, wind etc. This new environmental awareness has also helped us to realize the importance of monitoring and controlling our energy use. The main purpose in this research is to introduce a more sophisticated...... but affordable way to monitor energy consumption of individuals or groups of home appliances. By knowing their consumption the utilization can be regulated for more efficient use. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate our idea....

  9. Material monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, W.; Zirker, L.; Hancock, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) facilities are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The overall goal for the Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Unit is to identify and establish the correct amount of waste generated so that it can be reduced. Quarterly, the INEL Pollution Prevention (P2) Unit compares the projected amount of waste generated per process with the actual amount generated. Examples of waste streams that would be addresses for our facility would include be are not limited to: Maintenance, Upgrades, Office and Scrap Metal. There are three potential sources of this variance: inaccurate identification of those who generate the waste; inaccurate identification of the process that generates the waste; and inaccurate measurement of the actual amount generated. The Materials Monitoring Program was proposed to identify the sources of variance and reduce the variance to an acceptable level. Prior to the implementation of the Material Monitoring Program, all information that was gathered and recorded was done so through an informal estimation of waste generated by various personnel concerned with each processes. Due to the inaccuracy of the prior information gathering system, the Material Monitoring Program was established. The heart of this program consists of two main parts. In the first part potential waste generators provide information on projected waste generation process. In the second part, Maintenance, Office, Scrap Metal and Facility Upgrade wastes from given processes is disposed within the appropriate bin dedicated to that process. The Material Monitoring Program allows for the more accurate gathering of information on the various waste types that are being generated quarterly.

  10. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Luparia, A.; Marchette, F.; Peroni, C.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other