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Sample records for accelerator mass spectrometer

  1. 160 keV 26Al-AMS with a single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Richard P.; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.

    2015-10-01

    Proof-of-principle 26Al-AMS analysis is achieved with a single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) utilising very low ion energy. The SSAMS operates by discriminating against atomic isobar interference in a negative ion source and suppressing molecules with thick gas stripper. Resulting 1+ ions counting is with a surface barrier detector. The NEC designed SSAMS for 14C analysis is a popular model accelerator mass spectrometer and the developed further capability might be a significant addition to established 26Al-AMS capacity. Measurements at these energies should also be sufficient for alternative 26Al positive-ion mass spectrometry (PIMS).

  2. Status of the naval research laboratory trace element accelerator mass spectrometer: Characterization of the Pretzel magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Hubler, G. K.; Treacy, D. J.; DeTurck, T. M.; Enge, H. A.

    1997-02-01

    A novel design for a trace element accelerator mass spectrometer has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory and is now under construction. It will allow parallel analysis of a broad range of impurities in electronic, biological, and geological materials. The system includes a modified commercial secondary ion mass spectrometer (Physical Electronics, model 6300) as the source of secondary ions, a recombinator consisting of a Pretzel magnet that serves as a tunable notch mass filter, a 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, a large electrostatic analyzer, and a split-pole magnetic spectrograph with a 1.5-m-long focal plane. All other ion optical and steering elements are electrostatic, to maintain parallel transmission of different mass species. This paper summarizes the design concept, and describes in some detail the characteristics of the Pretzel magnet.

  3. 160 keV {sup 26}Al-AMS with a single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Richard P.; Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.

    2015-10-15

    Proof-of-principle {sup 26}Al-AMS analysis is achieved with a single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) utilising very low ion energy. The SSAMS operates by discriminating against atomic isobar interference in a negative ion source and suppressing molecules with thick gas stripper. Resulting 1+ ions counting is with a surface barrier detector. The NEC designed SSAMS for {sup 14}C analysis is a popular model accelerator mass spectrometer and the developed further capability might be a significant addition to established {sup 26}Al-AMS capacity. Measurements at these energies should also be sufficient for alternative {sup 26}Al positive-ion mass spectrometry (PIMS).

  4. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, M., E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A. [Ion Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV {sup 14,13,12}C{sup 3+} ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  5. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry on SIRIUS: New 6 MV spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Garton, D.; Button, D.; Mann, M.; Kitchen, R.; Hauser, T.; O'Connor, A.

    2017-09-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science at ANSTO operates four tandem accelerator systems for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). The latest addition to the fleet is SIRIUS, a 6 MV combined IBA and AMS system. Following initial ion beam testing, conditioning and debugging software and hardware, SIRIUS is now commissioned. Details of the instrument design and performance data for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl are presented.

  6. Performance of the LNL recoil mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorini, C. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Beghini, S. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Dal Bello, A. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Montagnoli, G. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Scarlassara, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Segato, G.F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Soramel, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Ackermann, D. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Corradi, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Facco, A. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Moreno, H. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Mueller, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Napoli, D.R. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Prete, G.F. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro

    1994-02-01

    The LNL recoil mass spectrometer, in operation for some years on line with the LNL XTU Tandem accelerator has been used primarily for the study of reaction products emitted at 0 to the beam direction. In agreement with the design goal this instrument has a good mass resolution, in the range of 1/300, even with large energy ([+-] 20%) and solid angle (> 7.5 msr) acceptances; the mass dynamic range is around [+-]6% of the central mass. The beam rejection factor at 0 ranges from 10[sup +6] to 10[sup +11] according to various experimental parameters. Advantages and limitations of the spectrometer are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Gas-dust-impact mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Semkin, N D; Myasnikov, S V; Pomelnikov, R A

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes design of a mass spectrometer to study element composition of micro meteorite and man-made particles in space. Paper describes a way to improve resolution of mass spectrometer based on variation of parameters of accelerating electric field in time. The advantage of the given design of mass spectrometer in comparison with similar ones is its large operating area and higher resolution at the comparable weight and dimensions. Application of a combined design both for particles and for gas enables to remove space vehicle degassing products from the spectrum and, thus, to improve reliability of the acquired information, as well as, to acquire information on a gas component of the external atmosphere of a space vehicle

  8. XCAMS: The compact 14C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for 10Be and 26Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondervan, A.; Hauser, T. M.; Kaiser, J.; Kitchen, R. L.; Turnbull, J. C.; West, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact 14C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for 10Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, 14C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and 10Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as 10Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised 14C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of 14C measurement. For 10Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio 10Be/9Be is 6 × 10-15 at at-1 and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  9. THOR Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) onboard THOR will provide the first high-time resolution measurements of mass-resolved ions in near-Earth space, focusing on hot ions in the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath turbulent regions. These measurements are required to study how kinetic-scale turbulent fluctuations heat and accelerate different ion species. IMS will measure the full three-dimensional distribution functions of main ion species (H+, He++, O+) in the energy range 10 eV/q to 30 keV/q with energy resolution DE/E down to 10% and angular resolution down to 11.25˚ . The time resolution will be 150 ms for O+, 300 ms for He++ and ˜ 1s for O+, which correspond to ion scales in the the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath regions. Such high time resolution is achieved by mounting four identical IMS units phased by 90˚ in the spacecraft spin plane. Each IMS unit combines a top-hat electrostatic analyzer with deflectors at the entrance together with a time-of-flight section to perform mass selection. Adequate mass-per-charge resolution (M/q)/(ΔM/q) (≥ 8 for He++ and ≥ 3 for O+) is obtained through a 6 cm long Time-of-Flight (TOF) section. IMS electronics includes a fast sweeping high voltage board that is required to make measurements at high cadence. Ion detection includes Micro Channel Plates (MCPs) combined with Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for charge amplification and discrimination and a discrete Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) to determine the ion time of flight. A processor board will be used to for ion events formatting and will interface with the Particle Processing Unit (PPU), which will perform data processing for THOR particle detectors. The IMS instrument is being designed and will be built and calibrated by an international consortium of scientific institutes from France, USA, Germany and Japan and Switzerland.

  10. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  11. Acquisition of HPLC-Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    31-Jan-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Acquisition of HPLC -Mass Spectrometer The views, opinions and/or findings...published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Acquisition of HPLC -Mass Spectrometer Report Title The acquisition of the mass spectrometer has been a

  12. AixMICADAS, the accelerator mass spectrometer dedicated to {sup 14}C recently installed in Aix-en-Provence, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Edouard, E-mail: bard@cerege.fr [CEREGE, Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, IRD, Collège de France, Technopôle de l’Arbois, BP 80, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Tuna, Thibaut; Fagault, Yoann; Bonvalot, Lise [CEREGE, Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, IRD, Collège de France, Technopôle de l’Arbois, BP 80, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Wacker, Lukas; Fahrni, Simon; Synal, Hans-Arno [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    A compact AMS system dedicated to measuring {sup 14}C in ultra-small samples was installed at the CEREGE in Aix-en-Provence at the end of March 2014, together with an automated graphitization system. AixMICADAS operates at around 200 kV with carbon ion stripping in helium leading to a transmission of about 47%. The hybrid ion source works with graphite targets and CO{sub 2} gas. It is coupled to a versatile gas interface system that ensures stable gas measurements from different sources: a cracker for CO{sub 2} in glass ampoules, an elemental analyzer for combusting organic matter and an automated system to handle carbonate by wet chemistry. The analyses performed during the first half-year of operation show that a precision of about 2‰ is reached on modern samples of about 1 mg of carbon. Measurements of IAEA reference materials of various {sup 14}C ages show a good agreement with consensus values. Direct measurements of geological graphites indicate a machine background equivalent to an age of 68,000 years BP. AixMICADAS is thus limited solely by the {sup 14}C contamination of samples in the field and in the laboratory. The performances of the gas ion source and its gas interface system were tested with two CO{sub 2} production units: the elemental analyzer and the automated carbonate hydrolysis unit. These tests show that samples ranging between 10 and 100 μg C can produce a {sup 12}C{sup −} ion beam of the order of 10–15 μA during time spans ranging from 3 to 30 min depending on the sample mass. Coupling the automated hydrolysis system to the gas ion source of AixMICADAS, enables us to develop a method involving sequential leaching of carbonate samples with direct {sup 14}C measurements of the leached fractions and the residual sample. The main advantage is that all of steps leaching and hydrolysis are performed in the same vial for a particular sample. A sequential leaching was applied to a young carbonate sample (ca. 6600 years BP) whose {sup 14}C age

  13. Newly developed compact magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong; Yongjun, Cheng; Wenjun, Sun; Meiru, Guo; Lian, Chen; Huzhong, Zhang; Gang, Li; Xiaoqiang, Pei

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a novel compact magnetic sector mass spectrometer has been developed and tested at the Lanzhou Institute of Physics. Its design is based on the mass separation of a 90° magnetic sector-field analyzer with a double trajectory, which has a magnetic induction of 0.7 T. The instrument can record mass range from 1 to 50 amu based on two special trajectories when the accelerating voltage of the ion source changes from 200 V to 2500 V. The dimensions of the device together with the electronic unit are approximately 220  ×  165  ×  165 mm3 (length  ×  depth  ×  height). The weight is 10.2 kg and the maximum power consumption was measured to be 20 W. The instrument successfully provided mass spectrum information on the vacuum test chamber, resolving power of about 58 at full width half maximum (FWHM), and demonstrated a sensitivity of 7.2  ×  10‑5 A Pa‑1. The compact magnetic sector mass spectrometer is designed for space application and can be extended to other portable analytical fields on Earth.

  14. Low Power Mass Spectrometer employing TOF Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A low power Mass Spectrometer employing multiple time of flight circuits for parallel processing is possible with a new innovation in design of the Time of flight...

  15. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  16. XCAMS: The compact {sup 14}C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zondervan, A., E-mail: a.zondervan@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hauser, T.M. [National Electrostatics Corporation, Middleton, WI (United States); Kaiser, J. [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Kitchen, R.L. [National Electrostatics Corporation, Middleton, WI (United States); Turnbull, J.C.; West, J.G. [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We review the performance of a 0.5 MV AMS system for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al. • We identify the limiting factors to {sup 10}Be machine blank and detection efficiency. • We discuss an AMS data reduction method that accounts for non-Poisson uncertainty. - Abstract: A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact {sup 14}C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for {sup 10}Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, {sup 14}C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and {sup 10}Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as {sup 10}Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised {sup 14}C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of {sup 14}C measurement. For {sup 10}Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be is 6 × 10{sup −15} at at{sup −1} and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  17. Measuring transfer of 14C-PCB from maternal diet to milk in a goat model using an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janle, E.; Sojka, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Lachcik, P.; Einstien, J. A.; Santerre, C. R.

    2007-06-01

    Environmental pollutants pose a substantial risk to nursing infants. Many of these toxicants (i.e. PCBs, PBDEs, mercury) are passed from the maternal diet to the nursing infant in breast milk. Determining the toxicokinetics has been difficult to measure due to ethical limitations. Since extremely small amounts of 14C can be measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), a goat model was used to establish a minimum oral dose of 14C-labeled PCB (2,2‧,4,4‧,5,5‧-hexachlorobiphenyl-UL-14C) that could be given to a lactating animal and traced into the milk. An oral dose of 66 nCi/kg body weight (1.84 μg PCB/kg bw) was administered. Plasma and milk samples were collected for 2 months after dosing. The concentration of 14C label reached a peak value of 1.71 ng/ml PCB equivalents in the milk on day 2 and then declined to about 135 pg/ml PCB equivalents in the milk at 3 weeks. A second goat was administered a smaller dose (22 nCi/kg bw; 616 ng PCB/kg bw). A peak concentration of 485 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk occurred at 3 days and declined to 77.6 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk by 3 weeks. Our results indicated that an even lower dosage of labeled-PCB could be used due to the extreme sensitivity of AMS measurement. Extrapolating from current data it is estimated that the dose could be reduced by a factor of 20 (31 ng PCB/kg bw; 1.1 nCi/kg bw) and still be detectable after 2 months. Thus, the potential exists for developing protocols for studying toxicokinetics in humans using radiologically- and toxicologically-benign doses of labeled environmental toxicants.

  18. Measuring transfer of {sup 14}C-PCB from maternal diet to milk in a goat model using an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janle, E. [Purdue University, Department of Foods and Nutrition, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059 (United States)]. E-mail: janle@purdue.edu; Sojka, J. [Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Jackson, G.S. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lachcik, P. [Purdue University, Department of Foods and Nutrition, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059 (United States); Einstien, J.A. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Santerre, C.R. [Purdue University, Department of Foods and Nutrition, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Environmental pollutants pose a substantial risk to nursing infants. Many of these toxicants (i.e. PCBs, PBDEs, mercury) are passed from the maternal diet to the nursing infant in breast milk. Determining the toxicokinetics has been difficult to measure due to ethical limitations. Since extremely small amounts of {sup 14}C can be measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), a goat model was used to establish a minimum oral dose of {sup 14}C-labeled PCB (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl-UL-{sup 14}C) that could be given to a lactating animal and traced into the milk. An oral dose of 66 nCi/kg body weight (1.84 {mu}g PCB/kg bw) was administered. Plasma and milk samples were collected for 2 months after dosing. The concentration of {sup 14}C label reached a peak value of 1.71 ng/ml PCB equivalents in the milk on day 2 and then declined to about 135 pg/ml PCB equivalents in the milk at 3 weeks. A second goat was administered a smaller dose (22 nCi/kg bw; 616 ng PCB/kg bw). A peak concentration of 485 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk occurred at 3 days and declined to 77.6 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk by 3 weeks. Our results indicated that an even lower dosage of labeled-PCB could be used due to the extreme sensitivity of AMS measurement. Extrapolating from current data it is estimated that the dose could be reduced by a factor of 20 (31 ng PCB/kg bw; 1.1 nCi/kg bw) and still be detectable after 2 months. Thus, the potential exists for developing protocols for studying toxicokinetics in humans using radiologically- and toxicologically-benign doses of labeled environmental toxicants.

  19. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  20. Effective mass spectrometer. [History and accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, D.

    1979-10-12

    The history and major accomplishments of the Effective Mass Spectrometer (EMS) are described. In the eight years since the EMS turned on, 21 experiments have been completed by groups from nine institutions in 32 months of operation. Over 400 million triggers have been recorded on magnetic tape, resulting in 29 journal publications to date. A list of experimental proposals for the EMS and a sampling of results are presented. 12 figures, 4 tables.

  1. New mass measurements with the ISOLTRAP spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bollen, G; Audi, G; Beck, D; Engels, O; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Moore, R B; Oinonen, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G; Szerypo, J; Weber, C

    2002-01-01

    The Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the on-line mass separator facility ISOLDE/CERN has been employed for mass measurements of more than 200 unstable nuclei. Examples for recent ISOLTRAP measurements on very short-lived isotopes are the precise determination of the mass of /sup 33/Ar, which provides a test of the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME), and of /sup 34/Ar and /sup 74/Rb, which are both important in the context of fundamental weak interaction studies. Isotopes in the vicinity of doubly-magic /sup 132/Sn have been investigated as well as the mass of the rp-process waiting point candidate /sup 76/Sr. (14 refs).

  2. Progress with the PENTATRAP mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, Hendrik; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, Jose; Doerr, Andreas; Eliseev, Sergey; Goncharov, Mikhail; Repp, Julia; Rischka, Alexander; Roux, Christian; Sturm, Sven; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Boehm, Christine [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Helmholtz Gemeinschaft, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Novikov, Yuri [PNPI, Gatchina, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The five-trap mass spectrometer PENTATRAP has been constructed and is currently being characterized at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg. It aims for high-precision mass ratio measurements with a relative mass uncertainty of a few 10{sup -12}. Long-lived and stable, highly charged nuclides with masses up to uranium will be addressed to perform e.g. stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and neutrino oriented mass measurements. The main part of the experiment is a stack of five cylindrical cryogenic Penning traps. An ultra-stable voltage source is required to supply the Penning trap electrodes with appropriate and stable potentials. Therefore, an elaborated source was developed and built at MPIK. Recently, first ions have been successfully trapped. Details about the progress of the installation, especially the status of the voltage source and first ion signals are presented in the talk.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  4. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range.

  5. Recent exploits of the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, S; Naimi, S; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, M; Rossel, R E; Fink, D; Stanja, J; Atanasov, D; Borgmann, Ch; Cocolios, T E; Zuber, K; Wolf, R N; George, S; Neidherr, D; Nicol, T; Rosenbusch, M; Lunney, D; Boehm, Ch; Manea, V; Herlert, A; Koester, U; Beck, D; Wienholtz, F; Kellerbauer, A; Ramirez, E Minaya; Schweikhard, L

    2013-01-01

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, located at the isotope-separator facility ISOLDE (CERN), is presented in its current form taking into account technical developments since 2007. Three areas of developments are presented. The reference ion sources have been modified to guarantee a sufficient supply of reference ions for mass measurements and systematic studies. Different excitation schemes have been investigated for manipulation of the ion motion in the Penning trap, to enhance either the purification or measurement process. A multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator has been implemented and can now be routinely used for purification and as a versatile tool for beam analysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  7. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  8. Mass spectrometer calibration of Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Gupta, Satish C.; Jyoti, G.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2003-02-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft is expected to be placed in orbit about Saturn to sample submicrometer-diameter ring particles and impact ejecta from Saturn's satellites. The CDA measures a mass spectrum of each particle that impacts the chemical analyzer sector of the instrument. Particles impact a Rh target plate at velocities of 1-100 km/s and produce some 10-8 to 10-5 times the particle mass of positive valence, single-charged ions. These are analyzed via a TOF MS. Initial tests employed a pulsed N2 laser acting on samples of kamacite, pyrrhotite, serpentine, olivine, and Murchison meteorite induced bursts of ions which were detected with a microchannel plate and a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). Pulses from the N2 laser (1011 W/cm2) are assumed to simulate particle impact. Using aluminum alloy as a test sample, each pulse produces a charge of ~4.6 pC (mostly Al+1), whereas irradiation of a stainless steel target produces a ~2.8 pC (Fe+1) charge. Thus the present system yields ~10-5% of the laser energy in resulting ions. A CSA signal indicates that at the position of the microchannel plate, the ion detector geometry is such that some 5% of the laser-induced ions are collected in the CDA geometry. Employing a multichannel plate detector in this MS yields for Al-Mg-Cu alloy and kamacite targets well-defined peaks at 24 (Mg+1), 27(Al+1), and 64 (Cu+1) and 56 (Fe+1), 58 (Ni+1), and 60 (Ni+1) dalton, respectively.

  9. Towards a "perfect" Penning trap mass spectrometer for unstable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, G.; Hartmann, H.; Kluge, H.-J.; König, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H.; ISOLDE Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    A Penning trap mass spectrometer has been set up at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN for the mass determination of unstable heavy isotopes. The spectrometer should fulfil the following requirements: capture of external ions in high efficiency, high resolving power and accuracy, general applicability to all elements and isotopes available at the on-line facility.

  10. Combined liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer for involatile biological samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blakley, CR; Carmody, JC; Vestal, ML

    1980-01-01

    .... Oxyhydrogen flames rapidly vaporize the total liquid-chromatographic effluent, and molecular and particle beam techniques are used to efficiently transfer the sample to the ionization source of the mass spectrometer...

  11. MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains the data collected by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) instrument aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN)...

  12. Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Earth Science Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By drastically reducing the physical footprint of a mass spectrometer to the size of a beverage can, Ceramitron could set a new performance/price standard in the...

  13. RISK: A Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashnov, I.; Blagburn, D. J.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2010-03-01

    A resonance ionization mass spectrometer for krypton (RISK) has been developed. Atoms are released by a step-heating and ionized by pulsed tunable lasers. The sensitivity below 1000 atoms is demonstrated by detecting 81Kr in noncumulate eucrite Stannern.

  14. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  15. Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The system generates superior quality mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data from both atmospheric pressure ionization (API) and...

  16. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  17. Combined liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer for involatile biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, C R; Carmody, J C; Vestal, M L

    1980-09-01

    A new liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer has been developed in our laboratory for application to analysis of biological molecules of extremely low volatility. Oxyhydrogen flames rapidly vaporize the total liquid-chromatographic effluent, and molecular and particle beam techniques are used to efficiently transfer the sample to the ionization source of the mass spectrometer. This new instrument is comparable in cost and complexity to a combined gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, but extends the capabilities of combined chromatography/mass spectrometry to a broad range of compounds not previously accessible. We are currently testing biologically significant samples with this instrument, using reversed-phase liquid-chromatographic separation and both positive and negative ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. Results have been obtained from mixtures of nucleic acid components--bases, nucleosides, and nucleotides--and from amino acids, peptides, saccharides, fatty acids, vitamins, and antibiotics. In all cases investigated to date, ions indicative of molecular mass are obtained in at least one of the operating modes available. Detection limits are typically in the 1-10 ng range for full mass scans (about 80-600 amu); sub-nanogram quantities are usually detectable with single-ion monitoring.

  18. The Gated Electrostatic Mass Spectrometer (GEMS): Definition and Preliminary Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrero, Federico A; Jones, Hollis H; Lee, Jeffrey G

    2008-01-01

    ... for the GEMS idea among other approaches to TOF spectrometry. Since GEMS is based on electrostatic energy analyzers (ESAs), a detailed description of the small deflection energy analyzer (SDEA) is given in the next section. The earth's upper atmosphere and the atmospheres of other planets have been investigated with different types of mass spectrometers for mo...

  19. A mass spectrometer based explosives trace detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, Andrey; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Hanold, Karl; Syage, Jack A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we describe the application of mass spectrometry (MS) to the detection of trace explosives. We begin by reviewing the issue of explosives trace detection (ETD) and describe the method of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative to existing technologies. Effective security screening devices must be accurate (high detection and low false positive rate), fast and cost effective (upfront and operating costs). Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the most commonly deployed method for ETD devices. Its advantages are compact size and relatively low price. For applications requiring a handheld detector, IMS is an excellent choice. For applications that are more stationary (e.g., checkpoint and alternatives to IMS are available. MS is recognized for its superior performance with regard to sensitivity and specificity, which translate to lower false negative and false positive rates. In almost all applications outside of security where accurate chemical analysis is needed, MS is usually the method of choice and is often referred to as the gold standard for chemical analysis. There are many review articles and proceedings that describe detection technologies for explosives. 1,2,3,4 Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Mass spectrometry (MS): MS offers high levels of sensitivity and specificity compared to other technologies for chemical detection. Its traditional disadvantages have been high cost and complexity. Over the last few years, however, the economics have greatly improved and MS is now capable of routine and automated operation. Here we compare MS and IMS and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method. - Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS): 5 MS-ETD Screening System IMS is similar in concept to MS except that the ions are dispersed by gas-phase viscosity and not by molecular weight. The main advantage of IMS is that it does not use a vacuum system, which greatly reduces the size, cost, and complexity

  20. The PNL high-transmission three-stage mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.; Bond, L. A.; Freedman, P. A.; Tattersall, B. N.; Lagergren, C. R.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed a three-stage isotope-ratio mass spectrometer of unique ion-optical design that achieves high ion transmission efficiency and high abundance sensitivity. The spectrometer has tandem 90 deg deflection magnets with boundaries 18 deg off normal. The magnet drift lengths are 1.48 times the 27-cm radius of deflection. This extended geometry gives a mass dispersion equivalent to a 40-cm-radius magnet with normal boundaries. The first magnet renders the ion beam parallel in the vertical plane and provides a focus in the horizontal plane of mass dispersion. The second magnet brings the beam to a stigmatic focus. This novel ion-optical design gives 100 percent transmission without the need for intermediate focusing lenses. It also provides a 16 percent increase in mass resolution over the traditional tandem geometry with normal magnet boundaries. Complete transmission of ions is maintained through a third-stage cylindrical electric sector of 38-cm radius, which provides increased isotope-abundance sensitivity. The isotope-abundance sensitivity of the new mass spectrometer is an order of magnitude better than similar instruments with normal magnet boundaries. This is because the vertical focusing of the ion beam prevents ion scattering from the top and bottom of the flight tube. The measured values of the isotope-abundance sensitivity one-half mass unit away from the rhenium ion peaks at masses 185 and 187 are M - 1/2 = (6.5 +/- 0.5)(10)(exp -10) and M + 1/2 = (3.1 +/- 0.8)(10)(exp -10). By extrapolation, the uranium isotope-abundance sensitivity is M - 1 = 1(10)(exp -10). Construction of the instrument was facilitated by using standard commercial mass spectrometer components.

  1. Micro mass spectrometer on a chip.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Dolores Y.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Fleming, James Grant

    2005-11-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, electrical characterization and testing analysis of a microfabricated a cylindrical ion trap ({mu}CIT) array is presented. Several versions of microfabricated cylindrical ion traps were designed and fabricated. The final design of the individual trap array element consisted of two end cap electrodes, one ring electrode, and a detector plate, fabricated in seven tungsten metal layers by molding tungsten around silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) features. Each layer of tungsten is then polished back in damascene fashion. The SiO{sub 2} was removed using a standard release processes to realize a free-hung structure. Five different sized traps were fabricated with inner radii of 1, 1.5, 2, 5 and 10 {micro}m and heights ranging from 3-24 {micro}m. Simulations examined the effects of ion and neutral temperature, the pressure and nature of cooling gas, ion mass, trap voltage and frequency, space-charge, fabrication defects, and other parameters on the ability of micrometer-sized traps to store ions. The electrical characteristics of the ion trap arrays were determined. The capacitance was 2-500 pF for the various sized traps and arrays. The resistance was in the order of 1-2 {Omega}. The inductance of the arrays was calculated to be 10-1500 pH, depending on the trap and array sizes. The ion traps' field emission characteristics were assessed. It was determined that the traps could be operated up to 125 V while maintaining field emission currents below 1 x 10{sup -15} A. The testing focused on using the 5-{micro}m CITs to trap toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}). Ion ejection from the traps was induced by termination of the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode and current measured on the collector electrode suggested trapping of ions in 1-10% of the traps. Improvements to the to the design of the traps were defined to minimize voltage drop to the substrate, thereby increasing trapping voltage applied to the ring electrode, and to

  2. Coupling of the recoil mass spectrometer CAMEL to the {gamma}-ray spectrometer GASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spolaore, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Ackermann, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Bednarczyk, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; De Angelis, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Napoli, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Rossi Alvarez, C. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Bazzacco, D. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Burch, R. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Mueller, L. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Scarlassara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1995-05-15

    A project has been realized to link the CAMEL recoil mass spectrometer to the GASP {gamma}-spectrometer in order to perform high resolution and efficiency {gamma}-recoil coincidence measurements. To preserve high flexibility and autonomy in the operation of the two complex apparatus a rough factor two of reduction in the overall heavy ion transmission was accepted in designing the optics of the particle transport from the GASP center to the CAMEL focal plane. The coupled configuration has been tested with the fusion reaction {sup 58}Ni (E=212 MeV)+{sup 64}Ni, obtaining a mass resolution of 1/300 and efficiency between similar 11% and similar 15% for different evaporation products. (orig.).

  3. A microelectromechanical systems-enabled, miniature triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven; Malcolm, Andrew; Wright, Christopher; O'Prey, Shane; Crichton, Edward; Dash, Neil; Moseley, Richard W; Zaczek, Wojciech; Edwards, Peter; Fussell, Richard J; Syms, Richard R A

    2015-03-17

    Miniaturized mass spectrometers are becoming increasingly capable, enabling the development of many novel field and laboratory applications. However, to date, triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometers, the workhorses of quantitative analysis, have not been significantly reduced in size. Here, the basis of a field-deployable triple quadrupole is described. The key development is a highly miniaturized ion optical assembly in which a sequence of six microengineered components is employed to generate ions at atmospheric pressure, provide a vacuum interface, effect ion guiding, and perform fragmentation and mass analysis. Despite its small dimensions, the collision cell efficiently fragments precursor ions and yields product ion spectra that are very similar to those recorded using conventional instruments. The miniature triple quadrupole has been used to detect thiabendazole, a common pesticide, in apples at a level of 10 ng/g.

  4. Analysis of solid uranium samples using a small mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Michael S.; Abney, Kent D.; Olivares, José A.

    2001-07-01

    A mass spectrometer for isotopic analysis of solid uranium samples has been constructed and evaluated. This system employs the fluorinating agent chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3) to convert solid uranium samples into their volatile uranium hexafluorides (UF 6). The majority of unwanted gaseous byproducts and remaining ClF 3 are removed from the sample vessel by condensing the UF 6 and then pumping away the unwanted gases. The UF 6 gas is then introduced into a quadrupole mass spectrometer and ionized by electron impact ionization. The doubly charged bare metal uranium ion (U 2+) is used to determine the U 235/U 238 isotopic ratio. Precision and accuracy for several isotopic standards were found to be better than 12%, without further calibration of the system. The analysis can be completed in 25 min from sample loading, to UF 6 reaction, to mass spectral analysis. The method is amenable to uranium solid matrices, and other actinides.

  5. Digital Waveform Technology and the Next Generation of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nathan M.; Gotlib, Zachary P.; Opačić, Bojana; Huntley, Adam P.; Moon, Ashley M.; Donahoe, Katherine E. G.; Brabeck, Gregory F.; Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2017-10-01

    Ion traps and guides are integral parts of current commercial mass spectrometers. They are currently operated with sinusoidal waveform technology that has been developed over many years. Recently, digital waveform technology has begun to emerge and promises to supplant its older cousin because it presents new capabilities that result from the ability to instantaneously switch the frequency and duty cycle of the waveforms. This manuscript examines these capabilities and reveals their uses and effects on instrumentation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. The Varian MAT-250 mass spectrometer. Steady isotopes laboratory; Espectrometro de masas Varian MAT-250. Laboratorio de isotopos estables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, V.; Tavera D, M.L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    This work treats over the performance and applications of the Varian Mat-250 mass spectrometer which is in the environmental isotope laboratory. It can be applied over topics such as: ions formation, acceleration and collimation, ions separation, ions detection, data transformation, sampling, {delta} notation. (Author)

  7. The high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer PENTATRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Andreas; Bekker, Hendrik; Blaum, Klaus; Goncharov, Mikhail; Hoekel-Schmoeger, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Boehm, Christine [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, Helmholtz Gemeinschaft, Darmstadt (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, Jose; Eliseev, Sergey; Repp, Julia; Roux, Christian; Sturm, Sven [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Novikov, Yuri [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Ulmer, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, the high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer PENTATRAP is being built up at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany. It aims at mass-ratio measurements of medium- to high-Z elements with uncertainties of a few parts in 10{sup 12}. Mass-ratios will be determined by the measurement of cyclotron frequency-ratios in the strong magnetic field of the trap. The experiment will host five identical cylindrical Penning traps and will allow for simultaneous cyclotron frequency determinations in all measurement traps. It will feature access to highly charged ions provided by EBITs. Measurements at PENTATRAP will contribute to various fields of physics. For example, input parameters for neutrino mass determinations will be provided with measurements of Q-values of relevant β-transitions. The current status of the experiment will be outlined in the talk.

  8. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes using the ISOLTRAP spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lamour, E; Marx, G; Schwarz, S C; Bollen, G; Kellerbauer, A G; Moore, R B; Henry, S

    2000-01-01

    ISOLTRAP is a Penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the on line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. Direct measurements of the masses of short lived radio isotopes are performed using the existing triple trap system. This consists of three electromagnetic traps in tandem: a Paul trap to accumulate and bunch the 60 keV dc beam, a Penning trap for cooling and isobar separation, and a precision Penning trap for the determination of the masses by cyclotron resonance. Measurements of masses of unknown mercury isotopes and in the vicinity of doubly magic /sup 208/Pb are presented, all with an accuracy of delta m/m approximately=1*10/sup -7/. Developments to replace the Paul trap by a radiofrequency quadrupole ion guide system to increase the collection efficiency are presently under way and the status is presented. (10 refs).

  9. Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) measures gas-phase compounds in ambient air and headspace samples before using chemical ionization to produce positively charged molecules, which are detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This ionization method uses a gentle proton transfer reaction method between the molecule of interest and protonated water, or hydronium ion (H3O+), to produce limited fragmentation of the parent molecule. The ions produced are primarily positively charged with the mass of the parent ion, plus an additional proton. Ion concentration is determined by adding the number of ions counted at the molecular ion’s mass-to-charge ratio to the number of air molecules in the reaction chamber, which can be identified according to the pressure levels in the reaction chamber. The PTRMS allows many volatile organic compounds in ambient air to be detected at levels from 10–100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The response time is 1 to 10 seconds.

  10. The geomagnetic mass spectrometer - Mass and energy dispersions of ionospheric ion flows into the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, M.; Moore, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Chappell, C. R.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of ion flows in the polar magnetosphere, made by the retarding ion mass spectrometer on NASA's Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1, are compared with those made simultaneously in the topside ionosphere by the ion drift meter on the lower-altitude DE 2 spacecraft. The results show the dayside auroral ionosphere to be a significant and highly persistent source of plasma for the magnetosphere. The upwelling ionospheric ions are spatially dispersed, according to both their energy and mass, by the combined actions of the geomagnetic field and the dawn-to-dusk convection electric field, in an effect analogous to the operation of an ion mass spectrometer.

  11. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  12. Mass spectrometer output file format mzML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important technique for analyzing proteins and other biomolecular compounds in biological samples. Each of the vendors of these mass spectrometers uses a different proprietary binary output file format, which has hindered data sharing and the development of open source software for downstream analysis. The solution has been to develop, with the full participation of academic researchers as well as software and hardware vendors, an open XML-based format for encoding mass spectrometer output files, and then to write software to use this format for archiving, sharing, and processing. This chapter presents the various components and information available for this format, mzML. In addition to the XML schema that defines the file structure, a controlled vocabulary provides clear terms and definitions for the spectral metadata, and a semantic validation rules mapping file allows the mzML semantic validator to insure that an mzML document complies with one of several levels of requirements. Complete documentation and example files insure that the format may be uniformly implemented. At the time of release, there already existed several implementations of the format and vendors have committed to supporting the format in their products.

  13. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, Herbert O [Los Alamos, NM; Feldman, William C [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  14. Spacecraft mass spectrometer ion source employing field emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    An ion source that utilizes a pair of thin-film field emission cathodes to provide current for electric impact ionization is studied. The field emission cathodes are composed of microscopically small needle tips and an extraction electrode; the cathodes generate a 200-eV, 0.1-mA electron beam. The multistep process for the manufacturing of the field emission cathodes is examined. The operation of the ion source, which ionizes atoms and molecules that enter the mass spectrometer with a ram velocity of about 80 km/sec, is described.

  15. Instruction manual for ORNL tandem high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Chrisite, W.H.; Walker, R.L.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    This manual describes the physical characteristics of the tandem mass spectrometer built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Specific requirements met include ability to run small samples, high abundance sensitivity, good precision and accuracy, and adequate sample throughput. The instrument is capable of running uranium samples as small as 10/sup -12/ g and has an abundance sensitivity in excess of 10/sup 6/. Precision and accuracy are enhanced by a special sweep control circuit. Sample throughput is 6 to 12 samples per day. Operating instructions are also given.

  16. Development of a low power miniature linear ion trap mass spectrometer with extended mass range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun; Pei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Huzhong; Wang, Yongjun; Sun, Jian; Dong, Meng

    2017-12-01

    A miniaturized ion trap mass spectrometer with continuous atmospheric pressure interface was built, which could be used in conjunction with internal ionization (in-vacuum plasma ionization) and external ionization (electrospray ionization). To improve its mass range, a supplemental AC signal frequency scan mode was performed for this miniature mass spectrometer, in which the fundamental RF signal was remained constant with an amplitude as low as several hundreds volts. Experiments showed that the upper limit of the mass range can be extended to 2500 Da for the miniature mass spectrometer developed in this work, and the power consumption can be reduced by 2/5, while maintaining good balance with performance parameters such as stability, sensitivity, and resolution. Due to the improvement in mass range and significant reduction in energy consumption compared with the instrument using the traditional resonant ejection mode, the scan method developed in this work is helpful to promote the miniature design of mass spectrometers for field analysis and space exploration.

  17. Real-Time Food Authentication Using a Miniature Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbig, Stefanie; Neese, Stephan; Penner, Alexander; Spengler, Bernhard; Schulz, Sabine

    2017-10-17

    Food adulteration is a threat to public health and the economy. In order to determine food adulteration efficiently, rapid and easy-to-use on-site analytical methods are needed. In this study, a miniaturized mass spectrometer in combination with three ambient ionization methods was used for food authentication. The chemical fingerprints of three milk types, five fish species, and two coffee types were measured using electrospray ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and low temperature plasma ionization. Minimum sample preparation was needed for the analysis of liquid and solid food samples. Mass spectrometric data was processed using the laboratory-built software MS food classifier, which allows for the definition of specific food profiles from reference data sets using multivariate statistical methods and the subsequent classification of unknown data. Applicability of the obtained mass spectrometric fingerprints for food authentication was evaluated using different data processing methods, leave-10%-out cross-validation, and real-time classification of new data. Classification accuracy of 100% was achieved for the differentiation of milk types and fish species, and a classification accuracy of 96.4% was achieved for coffee types in cross-validation experiments. Measurement of two milk mixtures yielded correct classification of >94%. For real-time classification, the accuracies were comparable. Functionality of the software program and its performance is described. Processing time for a reference data set and a newly acquired spectrum was found to be 12 s and 2 s, respectively. These proof-of-principle experiments show that the combination of a miniaturized mass spectrometer, ambient ionization, and statistical analysis is suitable for on-site real-time food authentication.

  18. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  19. A mini-photofragment translational spectrometer with ion velocity map imaging using low voltage acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenke; Jiang, Pan; Lin, Dan; Chi, Xiaoping; Cheng, Min; Du, Yikui; Zhu, Qihe

    2018-01-01

    A mini time-sliced ion velocity map imaging photofragment translational spectrometer using low voltage acceleration has been constructed. The innovation of this apparatus adopts a relative low voltage (30-150 V) to substitute the traditional high voltage (650-4000 V) to accelerate and focus the fragment ions. The overall length of the flight path is merely 12 cm. There are many advantages for this instrument, such as compact structure, less interference, and easy to operate and control. Low voltage acceleration gives a longer turn-around time to the photofragment ions forming a thicker Newton sphere, which provides sufficient time for slicing. Ion trajectory simulation has been performed for determining the structure dimensions and the operating voltages. The photodissociation and multiphoton ionization of O2 at 224.999 nm is used to calibrate the ion images and examine the overall performance of the new spectrometer. The velocity resolution (Δν/ν) of this spectrometer from O2 photodissociation is about 0.8%, which is better than most previous results using high acceleration voltage. For the case of CF3I dissociation at 277.38 nm, many CF3 vibrational states have been resolved, and the anisotropy parameter has been measured. The application of low voltage acceleration has shown its advantages on the ion velocity map imaging (VMI) apparatus. The miniaturization of the VMI instruments can be realized on the premise of high resolution.

  20. Higher Order Parametric Excitation Modes for Spaceborne Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system.When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  1. Enabling the Next Generation of Spaceborne Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, D. J.; Rubin, M.; BLock, B. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) has over 30 years of spaceflight heritage in making important neutral gas and low energy ion observations. Given their geometrical constraints, these instruments are currently operated at the extreme limit of their capabilities. However, a technique called higher order auxiliary excitation provides a set of novel, robust, electronics-based solutions for improving the performance of these sensors. By driving the quadrupole rods with an additional frequency nearly twice that of the normal RF operating frequency, substantially increased abundance sensitivity, maximum attainable mass resolution, and peak stability can be achieved through operation of voltage scan lines through the center of formed upper stability islands. Such improvements are modeled using numerical simulations of ion trajectories in a quadrupole field with and without applied higher order auxiliary excitation. When compared to a traditional QMS with a mass range up to 500Da, sensors can be designed with the same precision electronics to have expected mass ranges beyond 1500Da with a power increase of less than twice that of its heritage implementations.

  2. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer using proton beams from a pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Michael; Lombardo, Andrew; Graeper, Gavin; Stillman, Collin; Freeman, Charles; Fiksel, Gennady; Stoeckl, Christian; Sinenian, Nareg

    2010-11-01

    The position-to-energy calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS) was measured using proton beams from the 1.7 MV tandem pelletron accelerator at SUNY Geneseo. The TPIS was designed for use on the multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The TPIS implements parallel electric and magnetic fields to separate ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. The position of the ions along the parabola is used to determine the ions' energy. Monoenergetic proton beams with energies between approximately 1 and 3 MeV were directed into the TPIS. Both radiochromic film (RCF) and Fujifilm imaging plates (IP) were placed at the rear of the TPIS and were used to detect the protons. The horizontal deflection due to the electrostatic plates and the vertical deflection due to the permanent magnetic field were studied as a function of the proton energy. This research was funded in part by DOE.

  3. Performance evaluation of a dual linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer for proteomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Chad R; Hoopmann, Michael R; Senko, Michael W; Bruce, James E

    2013-08-02

    A novel dual cell linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) and its performance characteristics are reported. A linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a LTQ-Velos mass spectrometer. This modified instrument features efficient ion accumulation and fast MS/MS acquisition capabilities of dual cell linear RF ion trap instruments coupled to the high mass accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range of a FT-ICR for improved proteomic coverage. The ion accumulation efficiency is demonstrated to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed with LTQ-FT Ultra instrumentation. The proteome coverage with yeast was shown to increase over the previous instrument generation by 50% (100% increase on the peptide level). In addition, many lower abundance level yeast proteins were only detected with this modified instrument. This novel configuration also enables beam type CID fragmentation using a dual cell RF ion trap mass spectrometer. This technique involves accelerating ions between traps while applying an elevated DC offset to one of the traps to accelerate ions and induce fragmentation. This instrument design may serve as a useful option for labs currently considering purchasing new instrumentation or upgrading existing instruments. A novel hybrid mass spectrometer that allows increased MS/MS acquisition rates with high mass measurement accuracy and new ion fragmentation methods greatly improves the number of proteins, posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions that can be identified from cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Gautier, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.

    2004-01-01

    Titan is unique in the solar system, the only moon that has a dense atmosphere. The major constituents of the atmosphere, nitrogen and methane, are continuously broken apart by a combination of solar UV, impinging electrons from Saturn's magnetosphere, and a steady flow of cosmic rays. The resulting molecular fragments recombine and form a variety of new species, many of which were detected for the first time by Voyager 1. The ubiquitous, surface-hiding aerosol blanket manifests the existence of still more complex compounds. In addition to hydrocarbons and nitriles, the atmosphere is known to contain CO, CO2 and externally delivered H2O. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of the atmosphere of Titan from 170 km altitude (approximately lhPa) to the surface (approximately 1500hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to obtain compositional information of several surface materials. The GCMS consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QP) with a secondary electron multiplier ion detector, a three-column gas chromatograph (GC) and an elaborate gas sampling system. The gas sampling system will provide atmospheric samples to the QP for nearly continuous analysis during the Probe descent and batch samples at several altitudes for GC analysis. It also contains a chemical scrubber for noble gas analysis and an enrichment cell for trace constituent enhancement. In addition to the sampling of the atmosphere periodic gas samples, derived from the pyrolysis of aerosols, will be transferred from the ACP to the GCMS for direct QP and full GCMS analysis. The QP can analyze molecular masses from 2 to 14lDalton. The nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10E-8. Data rate is 885 bits/sec. The mass of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for operation during the descent

  5. The gated electrostatic mass spectrometer (GEMS): definition and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Federico A; Jones, Hollis H; Lee, Jeffrey G

    2008-10-01

    GEMS is a new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electrostatic energy analyzer. Mass resolution equals the energy analyzer kinetic energy resolution, which is set by its slit size. In GEMS, monochromatic ions enter the entrance slit at random times, and the gated ion deflection produced by the electrostatic field in the analyzer rejects ions that are inside the analyzer at gate onset, detecting those entering the analyzer after gate onset. This provides mass separation while overcoming the temporal and spatial spread problems typical of TOF applications. Paradoxically, GEMS works because all ion masses follow identical trajectories. GEMS is easily multiplied into two-dimensional arrays to increase sensitivity in space applications, requires relatively low voltages, and uses only a few electrical connections. Thus, it is easy to package GEMS as a small, low-power instrument for applications in harsh environments. A disadvantage of GEMS is that its output is the integral of the TOF spectrum and the derivative of the raw data must be taken, a procedure that is likely to add noise. A version of GEMS detecting un-deflected ions (u-GEMS) has been tested to demonstrate the time-integrated feature of the raw data but without the benefit of energy analysis. This paper describes GEMS implemented with the small deflection energy analyzer (SDEA), a compact version of the parallel plate energy analyzer. SDEA is described both analytically and with ion trajectory simulations using the ion trajectory simulation software SIMION; the results are then used to describe GEMS and compute its performance.

  6. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-10-12

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8,158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with RMS error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apotransferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g. 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1M at m/z =2,700).

  7. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged Substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with root-mean-square (RMS) error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apo-transferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g., 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1 M at m/z = 2700).

  8. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, St.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Otto, Th.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Audi, G.; Moore, R. B.

    1990-12-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for 118-137Cs. A resolving power of over 106 and an accuracy of 1.4×10-7 have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  9. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. (Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, D-6500 Mainz (Federal Republic of Germany)); Audi, G. (Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Laboratoire Rene Bernas, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay (France)); Moore, R.B. (Foster Radiation Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  10. A spectrometer for study of high mass objects created in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Barish, K.N.; Batsouli, S.; Bennett, M.J.; Bennett, S.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Cormier, T.M.; Davies, R.R.; De Cataldo, G.; Dee, P.; Diebold, G.E.; Dover, C.B.; Ewell, L.A.; Emmet, W.; Fachini, P.; Fadem, B.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Giglietto, N.; Greene, S.V.; Haridas, P.; Hill, J.C. E-mail: jhill@iastate.edu; Hirsch, A.S.; Hoversten, R.A.; Huang, H.Z.; Jaradat, H.; Kim, B.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lainis, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Libby, B.; Majka, R.D.; Miller, T.E.; Munhoz, M.G.; Nagle, J.L.; Petridis, A.; Pless, I.A.; Pope, J.K.; Porile, N.T.; Pruneau, C.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Reid, J.D.; Rimai, A.; Riso, J.; Rose, A.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Skank, H.; Slaughter, A.J.; Sleage, G.; Smith, G.A.; Spinelli, P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L.; Toothacker, W.S.; Van Buren, G.; Wilson, W.K.; Wohn, F.K.; Wolin, E.J.; Xu, Z.; Zhao, K

    1999-11-21

    Experiment E864 at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator uses a high sensitivity, large acceptance spectrometer, designed to search for strangelets and other novel forms of matter produced in high-energy heavy ion collisions. The spectrometer has excellent acceptance and rate capabilities for measuring the production properties of known particles and nuclei such as p-bar, d-bar and {sup 6}He. The experiment uses a magnetic spectrometer and employs redundant time of flight and position detectors and a hadronic calorimeter. In this paper we describe the design and performance of the spectrometer.

  11. spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hedelius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bruker™ EM27/SUN instruments are commercial mobile solar-viewing near-IR spectrometers. They show promise for expanding the global density of atmospheric column measurements of greenhouse gases and are being marketed for such applications. They have been shown to measure the same variations of atmospheric gases within a day as the high-resolution spectrometers of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. However, there is little known about the long-term precision and uncertainty budgets of EM27/SUN measurements. In this study, which includes a comparison of 186 measurement days spanning 11 months, we note that atmospheric variations of Xgas within a single day are well captured by these low-resolution instruments, but over several months, the measurements drift noticeably. We present comparisons between EM27/SUN instruments and the TCCON using GGG as the retrieval algorithm. In addition, we perform several tests to evaluate the robustness of the performance and determine the largest sources of errors from these spectrometers. We include comparisons of XCO2, XCH4, XCO, and XN2O. Specifically we note EM27/SUN biases for January 2015 of 0.03, 0.75, –0.12, and 2.43 % for XCO2, XCH4, XCO, and XN2O respectively, with 1σ running precisions of 0.08 and 0.06 % for XCO2 and XCH4 from measurements in Pasadena. We also identify significant error caused by nonlinear sensitivity when using an extended spectral range detector used to measure CO and N2O.

  12. A Micro Cylindrical Ion Trap (5-CIT) Micro Mass Spectrometer Instrument System (5MSIS) for NASA Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project aims to develop a miniature packaging platform for the integration of MEMS mass spectrometer components to form the basis of a Micro Mass Spectrometer...

  13. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  14. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R., E-mail: hogstrom@lsu.edu; Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, Texas 77005-1827 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  15. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  16. Injection optics for fast mass switching for accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisser, D. C.; Fifield, L. K.; De Cesare, M.; Tims, S. G.; Lobanov, N. R.; Crook, G. G.; Tsifakis, D.; Tunningley, T. B.

    2013-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measures the ratio of extremely small amounts of a radioactive isotope in the presence of ˜ 1015 times more stable ones. The isotopes are injected sequentially over a repeated period and observed at the exit of the accelerator. so any fluctuations in ion source output or transmission through the accelerator over a time comparable to the measurement time, will reduce the accuracy of such measurements. This compromise in accuracy can be lessened by reducing the switching time between isotopes from several seconds to a few milli-seconds. New AMS systems accomplish fast switching by modifying the beam energy though the 90 injection magnet by pulsing the voltage by several kV on the flight tube in the magnet. That requires that the flight tube be electrically insulated which competes with having the flight tube as large as possible. At the ANU, insulating the magnet flight tube would not only have reduced the acceptance of the injection system, but conflicted with a beam chopper attached to the flight tube, that would also have had to be insulated from the ground. This was not practical so the novel alternative of pulsing the voltage on the high voltage ion source deck is being implemented. Beam optics calculations have been performed and beam tests conducted that demonstrated that, in addition to pulsing the voltage on the 150 kV ion source deck, a pulsed Einzel lens in front of the following electrostatic quadrupole triplet lens is required to maintain isotope-independent transmission through the 14UD Pelletron accelerator. The high voltage rise time performance of the components of the system has been shown to be satisfactory.

  17. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  18. Characterization of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and its applications in the study of solid surfaces; Charakterisierung eines Flugzeitmassenspektrometers und seine Anwendungen in der Festkoerperoberflaechenuntersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarov, P.

    2006-12-21

    The object and the purpose of the present work was to develop, to assemble and to start running a new TOF (time of flight) mass spectrometer for imaging SNMS analytic which is optimized for the analysis of highly molecular secondary ions. The most important purpose was the characterization of the TOF mass spectrometer. The obtained mass spectra of indium, tantalum and silver clusters reflect the excellent properties of the TOF mass spectrometer for the detection of large clusters with good detection efficiency up to masses of 16000 amu. The possibility of the deflection of selected saturated atom and cluster peaks serves for further improvement of the detection efficiency for large molecules. The accessible mass resolution was determined to be of the order of m/{delta}m=1000 in the high mass region. Numerous measurements were carried out to characterize the useful yield of this spectrometer. For a best possible adaptation of the TOF mass spectrometer for the detection of highly molecular particles, a device for post-acceleration of the detected particles by up to 10 keV were inserted directly before the MCP detector. The detection efficiency of positive secondary ions was determined for different post-acceleration voltages for the example of sputtered indium cluster ions. In addition, a new method was developed for the quantitative determination of the spectral ionization probability {alpha}{sup +}({nu}) of sputtered particles as a function of the emission velocity. The next application of the TOF mass spectrometer is the analysis of complicated organic molecules in solid state surfaces. During measurements of the photo-ionization behaviour of neutral tryptophan molecules, it was found out that a stable molecular ion signal is generated in the SNMS spectrum with h{nu}=7.9 eV can only be observed by the use of a continuous ion beam or very long (ms range) ion pulses. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of Fluoride in Human Urine by Headspace Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsuda, Yoko; Otsuka, Takao; Tsukahara, Teruomi; Nomiyama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to establish a simple sample preparation method for analysis of fluoride in biological materials with headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (HS GC-MS).Methods...

  20. Miniature Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Space and Extraterrestrial Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PI has developed a miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), which can be op-timized for space and extraterrestrial applications, by using a...

  1. Continuation of Mass determinations through a Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer on Line with ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In a previous experiment (1976-77) we have demonstrated the interest and feasibility of atomic mass determinations from the direct measurements of mass ratios on Rb, Cs and Fr isotopes. Masses of long series of isotopes on both side of stability were determined with an accuracy of a few tens to 300 keV (for th exotic). Interesting nuclear structure features could be observed as for example the indication for an onset of deformation, at N~=~60 for Z~=~37, which stimulated further experiments and theoretical calculations. The many mass values, until then unknown, we obtained in our experiments, gave in addition the possibility to make detailed tests of the nuclear mass predictions. Due to improvements on our mass spectrometer (better transmission and higher resolving power) and increased ISOLDE production yields, some new and valuable measurements can be performed. We plan: \\item a) to continue the measurements towards even heavier isotopes and explore the deformation regions which start at |9|7Rb and |1|4|6Cs;...

  2. Quantitative proteomics using the high resolution accurate mass capabilities of the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    High resolution/accurate mass hybrid mass spectrometers have considerably advanced shotgun proteomics and the recent introduction of fast sequencing capabilities has expanded its use for targeted approaches. More specifically, the quadrupole-orbitrap instrument has a unique configuration and its new features enable a wide range of experiments. An overview of the analytical capabilities of this instrument is presented, with a focus on its application to quantitative analyses. The high resolution, the trapping capability and the versatility of the instrument have allowed quantitative proteomic workflows to be redefined and new data acquisition schemes to be developed. The initial proteomic applications have shown an improvement of the analytical performance. However, as quantification relies on ion trapping, instead of ion beam, further refinement of the technique can be expected.

  3. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  4. First direct mass measurements on nobelium and lawrencium with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworschak, Michael Gerhard

    2009-12-08

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt was set up for high-precision mass measurements of heavy radionuclides produced in fusion evaporation reactions and separated from the primary beam by the velocity filter SHIP. It consists of a gas stopping cell for the deceleration of the high energetic reaction products, an RFQ cooler and buncher for cooling and accumulation of the ions, and a double Penning trap system to perform mass measurements. The mass is determined by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the ion of interest in a strong homogeneous magnetic field and comparing it to the frequency of a well-known reference ion. With this method relative uncertainties in the order of 10{sup -8} can be achieved. Recently, mass measurements of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No (Z=102) and the lawrencium isotope {sup 255}Lr (Z=103) were performed successfully. These were the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements ever per- formed. The production rate of the atoms of interest was about one per second or less. The results of the measurements on nobelium confirm the previous mass values which were deduced from Q{sub {alpha}} values. In the case of {sup 255}Lr the mass excess value, which was previously only estimated from systematic trends, was for the first time directly measured. These results mark the first step in the exploration of the region of transuranium elements which is planned at SHIPTRAP. The main objective is to fix the endpoints of {alpha} decay chains which are originating from superheavy elements close to the predicted island of stability. (orig.)

  5. An ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high mass resolution for cold trapped ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Miller, M. I.; Loeffler, K.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Trapping molecular ions that have been sympathetically cooled with laser-cooled atomic ions is a useful platform for exploring cold ion chemistry. We designed and characterized a new experimental apparatus for probing chemical reaction dynamics between molecular cations and neutral radicals at temperatures below 1 K. The ions are trapped in a linear quadrupole radio-frequency trap and sympathetically cooled by co-trapped, laser-cooled, atomic ions. The ion trap is coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to readily identify product ion species and to accurately determine trapped ion numbers. We discuss, and present in detail, the design of this ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the electronics required for driving the trap and mass spectrometer. Furthermore, we measure the performance of this system, which yields mass resolutions of m/Δm ≥ 1100 over a wide mass range, and discuss its relevance for future measurements in chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics.

  6. Mass discrepancy-acceleration relation in Einstein rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Ko, Chung-Ming

    2017-11-01

    We study the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (MDAR) of 57 elliptical galaxies by their Einstein rings from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS). The mass discrepancy between the lensing mass and the baryonic mass derived from population synthesis is larger when the acceleration of the elliptical galaxy lenses is smaller. The MDAR is also related to surface mass density discrepancy. At the Einstein ring, these lenses belong to high-surface-mass density galaxies. Similarly, we find that the discrepancy between the lensing and stellar surface mass density is small. It is consistent with the recent discovery of dynamical surface mass density discrepancy in disc galaxies where the discrepancy is smaller when surface density is larger. We also find relativistic modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can naturally explain the MDAR and surface mass density discrepancy in 57 Einstein rings. Moreover, the lensing mass, the dynamical mass and the stellar mass of these galaxies are consistent with each other in relativistic MOND.

  7. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by carbon-13 urea breath test using a portable mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sreekumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the non-invasive detection of markers of disease, mass spectrometry is able to detect small quantities of volatile markers in exhaled air. However, the problem of size, expense and immobility of conventional mass spectrometry equipment has restricted its use. Now, a smaller, less expensive, portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system has been developed. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the development of chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Objectives: To compare the results obtained from the presence of H. pylori by a carbon-13 urea test using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system with those from a fixed mass spectrometer in a hospital-based clinical trial. Methods: Following ethical approval, 45 patients attending a gastroenterology clinic at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital exhaled a breath sample into a Tedlar gas sampling bag. They then drank an orange juice containing urea radiolabelled with carbon and 30 min later gave a second breath sample. The carbon-13 content of both samples was measured using both quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. If the post-drink level exceeded the pre-drink level by 3% or more, a positive diagnosis for the presence of H. pylori was made. Results: The findings were compared to the results using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry using a laboratory-based magnetic sector instrument off-site. The results showed agreement in 39 of the 45 patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer is a potential alternative to the conventional centralised testing equipment. Future development of the portable quadrupole mass spectrometer to reduce further its size and cost is indicated, together with further work to validate this new equipment and to enhance its use in mass spectrometry diagnosis of other medical conditions.

  8. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  9. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  10. EMMA, a Recoil Mass Spectrometer for TRIUMF's ISAC-II Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Barry; EMMA Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    EMMA is a recoil mass spectrometer for TRIUMF's ISAC-II facility in the final stages of installation and commissioning. In this talk I will briefly review the spectrometer's design capabilities, describe recent progress in its installation and commissioning, and discuss plans for its initial experimental program. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada. TRIUMF receives federal funds through a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  11. A missing-mass spectrometer for momenta below 15 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G; Auriemma, G; Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Caillet, A; Chèze, J B; De Brion, J P; Derré, J; Ducastaing, G; Durand, G; Gennari, E; Lemoine, M; Llosa, R; Marel, Gérard; Marini, G; Martellotti, G; Massa, F; Nigro, A; Pauli, E

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus consisting of two magnetic spectrometers has been constructed at the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) in a missing-mass experiment to identify and select the beam particle and the outgoing one, and to measure their momenta. The authors give details of the two spectrometers, which are comprised of multiwire proportional chambers, high resolution time-of-flight counters, and aerogel and water Cherenkov detectors. (9 refs).

  12. On the transmission function of an ion-energy and mass spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, E. A. G.; van Sark, Wgjhm; Bezemer, J.; W. J. Goedheer,; W.F. van der Weg,

    1998-01-01

    The operation of a mass spectrometer system with an electrostatic energy analyser, designed for measurements of mass-resolved ion-energy distributions, is discussed. We show how the electric fields in the different electrostatic lenses present in the system can be optimized. These lenses direct the

  13. Chemical and microphysical characterization of ambient aerosols with the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canagaratna, M R; Jayne, J T; Jimenez, J L; Allan, J D; Alfarra, M R; Zhang, Q; Onasch, T B; Drewnick, F; Coe, H; Middlebrook, A; Delia, A; Williams, L R; Trimborn, A M; Northway, M J; DeCarlo, P F; Kolb, C E; Davidovits, P; Worsnop, D R

    2007-01-01

    The application of mass spectrometric techniques to the real-time measurement and characterization of aerosols represents a significant advance in the field of atmospheric science. This review focuses on the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), an instrument designed and developed at Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) that is the most widely used thermal vaporization AMS. The AMS uses aerodynamic lens inlet technology together with thermal vaporization and electron-impact mass spectrometry to measure the real-time non-refractory (NR) chemical speciation and mass loading as a function of particle size of fine aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between approximately 50 and 1,000 nm. The original AMS utilizes a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Q) with electron impact (EI) ionization and produces ensemble average data of particle properties. Later versions employ time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometers and can produce full mass spectral data for single particles. This manuscript presents a detailed discussion of the strengths and limitations of the AMS measurement approach and reviews how the measurements are used to characterize particle properties. Results from selected laboratory experiments and field measurement campaigns are also presented to highlight the different applications of this instrument. Recent instrumental developments, such as the incorporation of softer ionization techniques (vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photo-ionization, Li+ ion, and electron attachment) and high-resolution ToF mass spectrometers, that yield more detailed information about the organic aerosol component are also described. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectromet of intact proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domínguez-Vega, Elena; Haselberg, Rob; Somsen, Govert W.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be a powerful analytical tool for the characterization of intact proteins. It combines the high separation efficiency, short analysis time, and versatility of CE with the mass selectivity and sensitivity offered by MS

  15. A small gas inlet system for orbital mass-spectrometer calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Stell, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A gas inlet system is described for generating precise gas pressures that are to be used as calibration references for the mass spectrometers aboard the dual air density Explorer satellites. This gas inlet system was developed as an inflight calibration technique in which a known amount of onboard gas is released in the satellite cavity and is detected by the mass spectrometer. Although several flight mass spectrometer experiments have been proposed, none make use of the inflight calibration technique described in this report. Laboratory measurements and calibration of the metering leak technique for the gas inlet systems are discussed. The systems tested have metering leak rates between 2 and 4 microliters/sec at 298 K for argon-40, and they produce molecular flow up to 100 torr, which is the highest test pressure in this experiment. Test data show that metering leak rates are reproducible within 1 percent of established means for helium-3, helium-4, and argon-40.

  16. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.; Koenig, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. (Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, D-6500 Mainz (Germany)); Moore, R.B.; Rouleau, G. (Foster Radiation Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, Province du Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada)); Audi, G. (ISOLDE Collaboration CERN, PPE-Division, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland))

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on [sup 78]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] and [sup 84]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  17. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; König, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H.; Moore, R. B.; Rouleau, G.; Audi, G.; ISOLDE Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on 78Rbm,g and 84Rbm,g were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  18. A GPU Accelerated Spring Mass System for Surgical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for surgical simulators to dofast and precise calculations of tissue deformation to simulateincreasingly complex morphology in real-time. Unfortunately, evenfast spring-mass based systems have slow convergence rates for largemodels. This paper presents a method to accele...... to accelerate computation of aspring-mass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as theheart. This acceleration is achieved by taking advantage of moderngraphics processing units (GPU)....

  19. Ramsey technique applied in a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H.

    1992-08-01

    The Ramsey method has been applied in an experiment aiming for accurate mass determination of unstable isotopes. The ion motion in a Penning trap has been excited with time-separated oscillatory fields and Ramsey fringes were observed in the case of dipole and quadrupole excitation. The experimental resonances are in good agreement with theory. Further applications of the technique are discussed.

  20. Ramsey technique applied in a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.J.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik)

    1992-08-01

    The Ramsey method has been applied in an experiment aiming for accurate mass determination of unstable isotopes. The ion motion in a Penning trap has been excited with time-separated oscillatory fields and Ramsey fringes were observed in the case of dipole and quadrupole excitation. The experimental resonances are in good agreement with theory. Further applications of the technique are discussed. (orig.).

  1. Cross contamination in dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.A.J.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Visser, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    Since the early days of geochemical isotope ratio mass spectrometry there has always been the problem of cross contamination, i.e. the contamination of the sample gas with traces of reference gas land vice versa) in a dual inlet system and the analyzer itself. This was attributable to valve leakages

  2. High Energy Collisions on Tandem Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    Long before the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), Orbitraps, and any of the other tools that are now used ubiquitously for proteomics and metabolomics, the highest performance mass spectrometers were sector instruments, providing high resolution mass measurements by combining an electrostatic energy analyzer (E) with a high field magnet (B). In its heyday, the four sector mass spectrometer (or EBEB) was the crown jewel, providing the highest performance tandem mass spectrometry using single, high energy collisions to induce fragmentation. During a time in which quadrupole and tandem triple quadrupole instruments were also enjoying increased usage and popularity, there were, nonetheless, some clear advantages for sectors over their low collision energy counterparts. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers are high voltage, high vacuum instruments that have much in common with sectors and have inspired the development of tandem instruments exploiting single high energy collisions. In this retrospective, we recount our own journey to produce high performance TOFs and tandem TOFs, describing the basic theory, problems, and the advantages for such instruments. An experiment testing impulse collision theory (ICT) underscores the similarities with sector mass spectrometers where this concept was first developed. Applications provide examples of more extensive fragmentation, side chain cleavages, and charge-remote fragmentation, also characteristic of high energy sector mass spectrometers. Moreover, the so-called curved-field reflectron has enabled the design of instruments that are simpler, collect and focus all of the ions, and may provide the future technology for the clinic, for tissue imaging, and the characterization of microorganisms.

  3. FY16 Safeguards Technology Cart-Portable Mass Spectrometer Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Cyril V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitten, William B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory project for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Safeguards Technology Development Subprogram has been involved in the development of a cart portable mass spectrometer based on a Thermo ITQ ion trap mass spectrometer (referred to simply as the ITQ) for the field analysis of 235U/238U ratios in UF6. A recent discovery of the project was that combining CO2 with UF6 and introducing the mixture to the mass spectrometer (MS) appeared to increase the ionization efficiency and, thus, reduce the amount of UF6 needed for an analysis while also reducing the corrosive effects of the sample. However, initial experimentation indicated that mixing parameters should be closely controlled to ensure reproducible results. To this end, a sample manifold (SM) that would ensure the precise mixing of UF6 and CO2 was designed and constructed. A number of experiments were outlined and conducted to determine optimum MS and SM conditions which would provide the most stable isotope ratio analysis. The principal objective of the project was to provide a retrofit ITQ mass spectrometer operating with a SM capable of achieving a variation in precision of less than 1% over 1 hour of sampling. This goal was achieved by project end with a variation in precision of 0.5 to 0.8% over 1 hour of sampling.

  4. Shotgun lipidomics on a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer by successive switching between acquisition polarity modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhmann, K.; Almeida, R.; Baumert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Topdown shotgun lipidomics relies on direct infusion of total lipid extracts into a high-resolution tandem mass spectrometer and implies that individual lipids are recognized by their accurately determined m/z. Lipid ionization efficiency and detection specificity strongly depend on the acquisiti...

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-10-20

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10{sup 9}) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10{sup 13--15} on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. {sup 14}C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. {sup 3} H, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 26}Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  6. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  7. Development of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lund Pelletron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, R.; Curtis, L. J.; Erlandsson, B.; Faarinen, M.; Kiisk, M.; Magnusson, C.-E.; Persson, P.; Skog, G.; Stenström, K.

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive method for counting atoms. It is used for detecting very low concentrations of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than one hour). In AMS, rare isotopes from a sample material placed in the ion source of an electrostatic tandem accelerator are measured by counting individual atoms with nuclear detection techniques after acceleration to energies in the MeV range. A dramatic improvement in background rejection for AMS systems has, in the best cases, led to a 108 increase in sensitivity for isotope ratio measurements compared to the older technique of mass spectrometry. In this report some current applications of the AMS technique at the Lund Pelletron accelerator, as well as the recent improvements of the Lund system, are presented.

  8. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  9. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  11. Mobile high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in-situ analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Johannes; Ebert, Jens [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU, Giessen (Germany); Dickel, Timo; Geissel, Hans; Plass, Wolfgang; Scheidenberger, Christoph [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU, Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A compact multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) has been developed. For the first time it allows for mass measurements with a resolving power exceeding 100000 and sub ppm accuracy in a mobile device. Thus it allows to resolve isobars and enables to accurately determine the composition and structure of biomolecules. The MR-TOF-MS consists of an atmospheric pressure interface for DESI and REIMS, ion cooler, ion trap, time-of-flight analyzer, MCP detector and DAQ. Vacuum system components, power supplies as well as electronics are mounted together with the ion optical spectrometer parts on a single frame with a total volume of 0.8 m{sup 3}. Applications of the device within the AmbiProbe research program include in-situ mass spectrometry such as real-time tissue recognition in electrosurgery, identification of mycotoxins and analysis of soil samples for environmental studies.

  12. Solid phase micro-extraction in a miniature ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riter, Leah S; Meurer, Eduardo C; Cotte-Rodriguez, Ismael; Eberlin, Marcos N; Cooks, R Graham

    2003-09-01

    Fiber introduction mass spectrometry (FIMS), a variation of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS), is employed with a miniature mass spectrometer. The inlet system, constructed of commercially available vacuum parts, allows the direct introduction of the SPME needle vacuum chamber into the mass spectrometer. Thermal desorption of the analyte from the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) coated fiber was achieved with a built in nichrome heater, followed by electron ionization of the analytes internal to the cylindrical ion trap (CIT). The system has been tested with several volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air and to analyze the headspace over aqueous solutions, with limits of detection in the low ppb range. The signal rise (10-90%) and fall (90-10%) times for the system ranged from 0.1 to 1 s (rise) and 1.2 to 6 s (fall) using heated desorption. In addition, this method has been applied to quantitation of toluene in benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX) mixtures in water and gasoline. This simple and rapid analysis method, coupled to a portable mass spectrometer, has been shown to provide a robust, simple, rapid, reproducible, accurate and sensitive (low ppb range) fieldable approach to the effective in situ analysis of VOC in various matrices.

  13. The LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System for Biochemical 14C-Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, T J; Bench, G; Brown, T A; Vogel, J S

    2002-10-31

    We report on recent improvements made to our 1 MV accelerator mass spectrometry system that is dedicated to {sup 14}C quantification of biochemical samples. Increased vacuum pumping capacity near the high voltage terminal has resulted in a 2-fold reduction of system backgrounds to 0.04 amol {sup 14}C/mg carbon. Carbon ion transmission through the accelerator has also improved a few percent. We have also developed tritium measurement capability on this spectrometer. The {sup 3}H/{sup 1}H isotopic ratio of a milligram-sized processed tap water sample has been measured at 4 {+-} 1 x 10{sup -16} (430 {+-} 110 {micro}Bq/mg H). Measurement throughput for a typical biochemical {sup 3}H sample is estimated to be {approx}10 minutes/sample.

  14. Design and characterization of a radio-frequency-powered glow discharge source for double-focusing mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.C.; Donohue, D.L.; Smith, D.H.; Lewis, T.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Marcus, R. K. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States))

    1993-09-15

    A radio-frequency- (rf-) powered glow discharge has been interfaced to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. This type of discharge allows direct analysis of nonconducting, as well as conducting, solids. The rf discharge source and electrical system overcome several problems which have inhibited success in prior efforts. Problems of inadequate rf shielding, maintaining the necessary dc bias potential on the sample surface, preventing rf modulation of ion energies, and coupling of the accelerating potential to the discharge are resolved. Representative spectra of glass, soil, and brass matrices are presented. Preliminary relative sensitivity factors for conducting and non-conducting matrices show relatively small differences in ion yields across the periodic table. 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme and related developments at the BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendran, P. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: surendra@tifr.res.in; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kale, R.M. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Nair, J.P. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Hemalatha, M. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Mahata, K.; Yadav, M.L.; Sparrow, H.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The accelerator mass spectrometry programme and the related developments based on the BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator is described. A segmented gas detector and beam chopper control electronics have been developed for conducting {sup 36}Cl measurements. Distinct energy loss characteristics of the gas detector and beam chopper performance are presented. Also presented are the initial results for the measurement of {sup 36}Cl in standard and samples of unknown concentration.

  16. Small mass spectrometer with extended measurement capabilities at high pressures. [for planetary atmosphere analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Zahn, U.; Mauersberger, K.

    1978-01-01

    For the in situ investigation of planetary atmospheres a small Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer has been developed. Its high-pressure performance has been improved by incorporating differential pumping between the ion source and the analyzing fields, shortening the path-length as well as increasing the extraction field in the ion source. In addition doubly ionized and dissociated ions are used for mass analysis. These measures make possible operation up to 0.01 millibars. Results of laboratory tests related to linearity, dynamic range, and mass resolution are presented, in particular for CO2.

  17. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  18. Study and evaluation of impulse mass spectrometers for ion analysis in the D and E regions of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical analyses were made of planar, cylindrical and spherical electrode time-of-flight mass spectrometers in order to optimize their operating conditions. A numerical analysis of potential barrier gating in time-of-flight spectrometers was also made. The results were used in the design of several small mass spectrometers. These were constructed and tested in a laboratory space simulator. Detailed experimental studies of a miniature cylindrical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer and of a miniature hemispherical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer were made. The extremely high sensitivity of these instruments and their ability to operate at D region pressures with an open source make them ideal instruments for D region ion composition measurements.

  19. An aerodynamic assisted miniature mass spectrometer for enhanced volatile sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanbing; Jiang, Ting; Huang, Guangyan; Wei, Yongzheng; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-21

    Previously, we have reported the development of a miniature mass spectrometer with a continuous atmospheric pressure interface (CAPI), and the use of it for non-volatile sample analysis, such as drugs, peptides and proteins. However due to the diffusion effects in the CAPI, especially stronger for light ions, the instrument shows low detection sensitivities for volatile samples when coupling with an atmosphere pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source (>ppmv). In this study, an in-vacuum plasma ionization source was designed and integrated into the system. By performing ionization in the first vacuum stage, ion transfer loss through the CAPI was minimized and tens of ppbv level detection sensitivities were achieved for volatile samples. Due to its improved sensitivity, chemical source tracing was demonstrated in an indoor environment as a simple proof-of-concept example. Furthermore, an aerodynamic sampling method was developed to facilitate directional sample transfer towards the miniature mass spectrometer in an open environment. By coupling this aerodynamic method with the miniature mass spectrometer, remote chemical source sensing could be achieved at a distance of more than two meters. This aerodynamic sampling method could also be applied to other mass spectrometry instruments for enhanced sample sampling in open environments.

  20. Direct trace analysis of metals and alloys in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Song, K S; Yang, M; Cha, H K; Lee, J M; Lee, G H

    1999-01-01

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer adopting a quadrupole ion-trap and laser ablation/ionization method was constructed. The developed system was tested for composition analysis of some metals (Cu, stainless), and alloys (hastalloy C, mumetal) by mass spectrometry. Samples were analyzed by using laser ablation from a sample probe tip followed by a mass analysis with the quadrupole ion-trap. The quadrupole ion-trap was modified to enable laser ablation by a XeCl excimer laser pulse that passed radially through the ring electrode. A mass scan of the produced ions was performed in the mass selective instability mode wherein trapped ions were successively detected by increasing the rf voltage through the ring electrode. Factors affecting the mass resolution, such as pressure of buffer gas and ablation laser power, are discussed.

  1. Detecting the sea level fingerprint of accelerated Greenland mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Nadya; Davis, James

    2017-04-01

    The tide-gauge record from the North American east coast reveals significant accelerations in sea level starting in the late 20th century. We analyze the tide-gauge data using a model in which the accelerations are assumed to be zero prior to 1990. The estimated accelerations range from near zero to 0.3 mm yr-2 and exhibit a systematic spatial variability. We model this variability using several processes: ongoing mass change in Greenland and Antarctica as measured by the GRACE satellites; ocean dynamic and steric variability provided by the GECCO2 ocean synthesis; and the inverted barometer effect. Because we are using accelerations over several decades, the contribution from glacial isostatic adjustment is negligible, a substantial benefit of this approach. This approach also enables us to estimate admittances for any of these processes. By including an admittance for the Greenland mass loss, we test the hypothesis that the self-attraction and loading sea level fingerprint associated with accelerated mass loss is real and observable in the sea level data. An admittance of zero indicates a rejection of this process. Our estimated admittance is 0.75 ± 0.16, a clear positive detection at the level of 4-5 standard deviations.

  2. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  4. Development of a Compact Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Analysis of Potassium

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Minowa, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    A compact resonance ionization mass spectrometer is developed using two laser diodes and a quadrupole mass spectrometer to perform trace element analysis of potassium. With the help of a narrow linewidth of the laser diode, the isotope shifts of $^{40}{\\rm K}$ and $^{41}{\\rm K}$ of the 405~nm line with respect to $^{39}{\\rm K}$, corresponding to the transition of $4\\,^2$S$_{1/2}\\rightarrow$ $5\\,^2$P$^\\circ_{1/2}$, are measured to be $207\\pm13$~MHz and $451\\pm10$~MHz, respectively, by comparing them to the known hyperfine splitting widths of the $4\\,^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ ground state of each potassium isotope. The overall detection efficiency of an order of $\\sim10^{-6}$ in our setup indicates the availability of RIMS to the analysis of the trace metal impurities on or in a certain material such as the contamination assessment of semiconductor wafers.

  5. Exploring the Physics Limitations of Compact High Gradient Accelerating Structures Simulations of the Electron Current Spectrometer Setup in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Van Vliet, Philine Julia

    2017-01-01

    The high field gradient of 100 MV/m that will be applied to the accelerator cavities of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), gives rise to the problem of RF breakdowns. The field collapses and a plasma of electrons and ions is being formed in the cavity, preventing the RF field from penetrating the cavity. Electrons in the plasma are being accelerated and ejected out, resulting in a breakdown current up to a few Amp`eres, measured outside the cavities. These breakdowns lead to luminosity loss, so reducing their amount is of great importance. For this, a better understanding of the physics behind RF breakdowns is needed. To study these breakdowns, the XBox 2 test facility has a spectrometer setup installed after the RF cavity that is being conditioned. For this report, a simulation of this spectrometer setup has been made using Geant4. Once a detailed simulation of the RF field and cavity has been made, it can be connected to this simulation of the spectrometer setup and used to recreate the data that has b...

  6. System Assessment and Calibrations of the Kundsen Effusion QuadrupoleMass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    黄 錦涛; 古川 智弘

    2000-01-01

    A vapor pressure measurement instrument was set up by utilizing the "Microvision Plus(LM70)" quadrupole mass spectrometer combined with the Knudsen vapor effusion cell. The purpose of the vapor pressure measurement is to obtain reliable thermodynamic data of sodium-iron complex compounds. Then, the behaviors of these compounds in various environmental conditions can be investigated in detail for analysis of sodium-leak related accidents in fast breeder reactors(FBR). Therefore, the reliabilit...

  7. Interferometric characterization of ultrashort deep ultraviolet pulses using a multiphoton ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Miyoshi, Yuki; Kira, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Tatoro

    2007-06-15

    The temporal characterization of a femtosecond laser pulse in the deep ultraviolet region using an interferometric autocorrelation scheme is demonstrated. Two-photon ionization of a molecule in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used as a nonlinear detector to obtain an autocorrelation trace. This setup proved useful in not only providing a temporal characterization of a pulse but also investigating the ultrafast dynamics of photochemical processes.

  8. Analysis of U and Pu resin bead samples with a single stage mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.; Bertram, L.K.; Carter, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Resin bead sampling enables the shipment of nanogram U and Pu quantities for analysis. Application of this sampling technique to safeguards was investigated with a single-stage mass spectrometer. Standards gave results in good agreement with NBS certified values. External precisions of +-0.5% were obtained on isotopic ratios of approx. 0.01; precisions on quantitative measurements are +-1.0%. (DLC)

  9. COLETTE: A linear Paul-trap beam cooler for the on-line mass spectrometer MISTRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunney, David [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Bat. 108 Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)], E-mail: david.lunney@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Bachelet, Cyril; Guenaut, Celine; Henry, Sylvain; Sewtz, Michael [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Bat. 108 Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2009-01-11

    A segmented, radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter COLETTE (Cooler for Emittance Elimination) was designed for cooling continuous radioactive beams for injection into the transmission spectrometer MISTRAL at CERN-ISOLDE. A description of the design of COLETTE is given, along with details of performance including measured emittances of less than 8{pi}mmmrad with 20 keV beams from the test bench SIDONIE in Orsay. On-line results with stable and short-lived radionuclide beams from ISOLDE are also presented.

  10. A Method for Estimating Mass-Transfer Coefficients in a Biofilter from Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometer Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Michael; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Feilberg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    A membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) was used in combination with a developed computer model to study and improve management of a biofilter (BF) treating malodorous ventilation air from a meat rendering facility. The MIMS was used to determine percentage removal efficiencies (REs) of selected...... sulfur gases and to provide toluene retention profiles for the model to determine the air velocity and overall mass-transfer coefficient of toluene. The mass-transfer coefficient of toluene was used as a reference for determining the mass transfer of sulfur gases. By presenting the model to scenarios...... of a filter bed with a consortium of effective sulfur oxidizers, the most likely mechanism for incomplete removal of sulfur compounds from the exhaust air was elucidated. This was found to be insufficient mass transfer and not inadequate bacterial activity as anticipated by the manager of the BF. Thus...

  11. Development of a dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Gall', L. N.; Sachenko, V. M.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2013-06-01

    A dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori using the isotope respiratory test is developed. A low-aberration mass analyzer is calculated, an input system that makes it possible to eliminate the memory effects is developed, and a small-size ion detector is constructed. The mass spectrometer is created, and the tests are performed. The measurement accuracy of the 13C/12C and 16O/18O isotope ratios are 1.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. Preliminary medical tests show that the spectrometer can be employed for the desired diagnostics.

  12. Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, j.m.

    1999-01-26

    A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.

  13. Lunar Atmosphere: Expectations and Goals for the LADEE Neutral Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.

    2012-12-01

    Of all of the previous attempts to make in situ measurements of the tenuous neutral atmosphere of the moon, there are only 3 success stories. One is the mass spectrometer that was left at the Apollo 17 site, which had sufficiently low artifact backgrounds at fortuitous spectral locations to permit the unambiguous identification of lunar gases: radiogenic argon-40 and helium of both radiogenic and solar wind origin; the others are the energetic neutral atom detectors on IBEX and Chandrayaan-1 which measured the high energy part of the energy distribution of escaping solar wind hydrogen. The next attempt to improve our knowledge of the moon's atmosphere is the forthcoming Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission that will carry a neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) as well as a complimentary ultraviolet spectrometer. The orbit of the LADEE spacecraft will be nearly equatorial, retrograde, and elliptical, with periapsis between 20 and 50 km and generally in the vicinity of the sunrise terminator. The choice of orbit parameters is based on the evidence that rapid desorption from the warming surface at sunrise forms a pocket of argon-40. By inference, as well as on the basis of simulation results, other predicted gases that may have avoided detection by the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer due to background interference should be expected to be concentrated at sunrise as well. We present simulated orbital data for a variety of potential species and for a range of solar wind speed, magnetic field intensity, and the phenomenological parameters of surface physics, that is, the accommodation and Arrhenius coefficients. In addition, we show how the latter coefficients may be determined from scale heights derived from data collected immediately before and after each orbit maintenance maneuver that changes the altitude of periapsis. Limits on the detectable fluxes of energetic reactive species ejected from the surface by solar wind and meteor impacts are also

  14. ILMA: Ion Laser Mass Analyser. A Mass-Spectrometer for In-Situ Characterization of a Near Earth Object (NEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Hervé; Arezki, B.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Briois, C.; Carrasco, N.; Gilbert, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krüger, H.; Makarov, A.; Pennanech, C.; Puget, P.; Quirico, E.; Szopa, C.; Thirkell, L.; Zapf, P.; Thissen, R.

    Like other small bodies of the Solar System, asteroids are the remnants of planet formation. Their compositions are inherited from the Solar Nebula at the time of planetesimals accretion into planets, 4.5 billion years ago. They are valuable objects to assess the physicochemical conditions prevailing at the time and place of their formation in the Solar Nebula. Among them, some are known to be rich in carbon and volatile species (including water), which suggests that they never underwent major heating and differentiation events. Their organic content is also of prime interest because the chemical evolution leading to life on Earth may have been initiated by the delivery of extraterrestrial organic compounds into primitive oceans. For these reasons, several space missions are currently considered by ESA and JAXA for a sample return mission to a primitive carbonaceous Near-Earth Object (NEO): MARCO POLO, HAYABUZA 2, etc... Their goal is to characterize a NEO at multiple scales via in-situ measurements by a science payload onboard an orbiter and a lander, and to bring samples back to Earth. ILMA is a concept for a new generation high resolution mass spectrometer, proposed to be part of a lander payload for in situ science. This instrument will be a Fourier Transform ion trap mass spectrometer using Laser Desorption and Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDIMS) into a single platform. To this end, an Orbitrap mass analyser (developed by the Thermofisher Company) will be coupled to a laser source. The sample will be exposed to the laser beam producing desorbed ions which will be collected into the ion trap using the orbital trapping method. Ions will be stabilized in the trap by purely electrostatic quadro-logarithmic electrical fields and the detection undertaken by a non destructive measurement of the ion oscillation frequency inside the trap. Indeed, the trapped ions induce a periodic signal converted using Fourier Transform (FT) into an ultra-high mass resolution

  15. CologneAMS, a dedicated center for accelerator mass spectrometry in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Zilges, A. [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Dunai, T.; Rethemeyer, J.; Melles, M.; Staubwasser, M. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany); Kuczewski, B. [Division of Nuclear Chemistry, University of Cologne (Germany); Richter, J. [Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, University of Cologne (Germany); Radtke, U. [Institute of Geography, University of Cologne, Germany, Rectorate, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Klein, M. [HVEE, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    CologneAMS is a new centre for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at University of Cologne. It has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to improve the experimental conditions especially for those German scientists that apply the AMS technique for their geologic, environmental, nuclear chemical, and nuclear astrophysical research. The new AMS-device has been built by High Voltage Engineering Europe (HVEE) and has been installed in the existing accelerator area of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The AMS-facility is designed for the spectrometry of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I in and heavy ions up to {sup 236}U and {sup 244}Pu. The central part of the AMS-facility is a 6 MV Tandetron Trade-Mark-Sign accelerator. Downstream of the high energy mass spectrometer an additional switching magnet is used as a further filter element which supplies also additional ports for future extensions of the detector systems. The current status of CologneAMS and the results of the first test measurements will be presented.

  16. In Situ Geochemical Analysis and Age Dating of Rocks Using Laser Ablation-Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized instrument for performing chemical and isotopic analysis of rocks has been developed. The rock sample is ablated by a laser and the neutral species produced are analyzed using the JPL-invented miniature mass spectrometer. The direct sampling of neutral ablated material and the simultaneous measurement of all the elemental and isotopic species are the novelties of this method. In this laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) method, the ablated neutral atoms are led into the electron impact ionization source of the MMS, where they are ionized by a 70-eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 microsecond wide, compared to the original 5-10-nanosecond laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer and measured in parallel by a modified CCD (charge-coupled device) array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LAMMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect laser-ionized species produced directly in the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the laser beam, and the ionization energies of the elements. The measurement of high-precision isotopic ratios and elemental composition of different rock minerals by LAMMS method has been demonstrated. The LA-MMS can be applied for the absolute age determination of rocks. There is no such instrument available presently in a miniaturized version that can be used for NASA space missions. Work is in progress in the laboratory for geochronology of rocks using LA-MMS that is based on K-Ar radiogenic dating technique.

  17. Analytical capabilities of an inductively coupled plasma Mattauch Herzog mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyom, David A.; Gron, Ole A.; Barnes, James H., IV; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2001-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been coupled to a custom-designed Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer, replacing a glow-discharge source used in earlier research. Adaptation to an ICP source required significant modifications to address concerns regarding shielding from RF radiation and coupling between the ICP and mass spectrometer. The detrimental impact of fringing magnetic fields on the earlier performance of the instrument's detector has also been addressed. Current figures of merit utilizing ultrasonic nebulization include sensitivities in the 10 8-10 9 cps ppm -1 isotope -1 regime and detection limits of 1-500 pg/l (ppq). Isotope-ratio accuracy and precision are 1% relative error and 1-2% relative standard deviation, respectively. Resolving power (5% valley) exceeds 400. Unfortunately, spectral peak shapes are somewhat disappointing and lead to abundance sensitivity values in the 10 3-10 4 range. Although the instrument is designed for use with a multichannel array detector, all results reported here were obtained in scanning mode to separate limitations of the spectrometer from those of the detector.

  18. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  19. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  20. Rapid Detection of Gas Hazards and Leaks with an Atmospheric Sampling, High Resolution, Mass Spectrometer with Low Pumping Requirements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Miniaturization of mass spectrometers is restricted almost exclusively by the ability of small vacuum pumps to remove gas loads during operation of the instrument....

  1. Influence of the coupling between an atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometer and the low pressure ion inlet of a mass spectrometer on the mobility measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzer Frank

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS are versatile gas analyzers. Due to their small size and robustness, combined with a very high sensitivity, they are often used in gas sensing applications such as environmental monitoring. In order to improve the selectivity, they are typically combined with a mass spectrometer (MS. Since IMS works at atmospheric pressure, and MS works at vacuum, a special interface reducing the pressure over normally two stages has to be used. In this paper the influence of this coupling of different pressure areas on the IMS signal will be analyzed with help of finite elements method simulations.

  2. A novel tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer allowing gaseous collisional activation and surface induced dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, S; Chalmers, M J; Gielbert, J; Ferro, M; Gora, L; Smith, D C; Gaskell, S J

    2001-12-01

    A novel tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer is described that enables gaseous collision-induced dissociation (CID) and surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. The instrument consists of a commercially available triple quadrupole mass spectrometer connected to an SID region and an additional, orthogonal quadrupole mass analyser. The performance of the instrument was evaluated using leucine-enkephalin, allowing a comparison between CID and SID, and with previous reports of other SID instruments. The reproducibility of SID data was assessed by replicate determinations of the collision energy required for 50% dissociation of leucine-enkephalin; excellent precision was observed (standard deviation of 0.6 eV) though, unexpectedly, the reproducibility of the equivalent figure for CID was superior. Several peptides were analysed using SID in conjunction with liquid secondary-ion mass spectrometry or electrospray; a comparison of the fragmentation of singly protonated peptide ions and the further dissociation of y-type fragments was consistent with the equivalence of the latter fragments to protonated peptides. Few product ions attributable to high-energy cleavages of amino acid side-chains were observed. The SID properties were investigated of a series of peptides differing only in the derivatization of a cysteine residue; similar decomposition efficiencies were observed for all except the cysteic acid analogue, which demonstrated significantly more facile fragmentation. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Accurate label-free protein quantitation with high- and low-resolution mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Wilmarth, Phillip A; Shin, Jung-Bum; Klimek, John; Sherman, Nicholas E; Jeffery, Erin D; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2014-02-07

    Label-free quantitation of proteins analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry uses either integrated peak intensity from the parent-ion mass analysis (MS1) or features from fragment-ion analysis (MS2), such as spectral counts or summed fragment-ion intensity. We directly compared MS1 and MS2 quantitation by analyzing human protein standards diluted into Escherichia coli extracts on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. We found that summed MS2 intensities were nearly as accurate as integrated MS1 intensities, and both outperformed MS2 spectral counting in accuracy and linearity. We compared these results to those obtained from two low-resolution ion-trap mass spectrometers; summed MS2 intensities from LTQ and LTQ Velos instruments were similar in accuracy to those from the Orbitrap. Data from all three instruments are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000602. Abundance measurements using MS1 or MS2 intensities had limitations, however. While measured protein concentration was on average well-correlated with the known concentration, there was considerable protein-to-protein variation. Moreover, not all human proteins diluted to a mole fraction of 10(-3) or lower were detected, with a strong falloff below 10(-4) mole fraction. These results show that MS1 and MS2 intensities are simple measures of protein abundance that are on average accurate but should be limited to quantitation of proteins of intermediate to higher fractional abundance.

  4. Theory of an Electromagnetic Mass Accelerator for Achieving Hypervelocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    It is shown that for any electromagnetic accelerator which employs an electromagnetic force for driving the projectile and uses the projectile as the heat sink for the energy dissipated in it by ohmic heating, the maximum velocity attainable without melting is a function of the mass of the projectile. Therefore, for hypervelocities a large projectile mass is required and thus a power supply of very large capacity is necessary. It is shown that the only means for reducing the power requirement is maximizing the gradient of the mutual inductance. In the scheme of the sliding-coil accelerator investigated herein, the gradient of the mutual inductance is continuously maintained at a high value. It is also shown that for minimum length of the accelerator, the current must be kept constant despite the rise in induced voltage during acceleration. The use of a capacitor bank as an energy source with the condition that the current be kept constant is investigated. Experiments at low velocities are described.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for 14C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5-10 μg C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry for quantitative in vivo tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J S

    2005-04-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) counts individual rare, usually radio-, isotopes such as radiocarbon at high efficiency and specificity in milligram-sized samples. AMS traces very low chemical doses ({micro}g) and radiative doses (100 Bq) of isotope labeled compounds in animal models and directly in humans for pharmaceutical, nutritional, or toxicological research. Absorption, metabolism, distribution, binding, and elimination are all quantifiable with high precision after appropriate sample definition.

  7. Feasibility of using a miniature NIR spectrometer to measure volumic mass during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Novales, Juan; López, María-Isabel; González-Caballero, Virginia; Ramírez, Pilar; Sánchez, María-Teresa

    2011-06-01

    Volumic mass-a key component of must quality control tests during alcoholic fermentation-is of great interest to the winemaking industry. Transmitance near-infrared (NIR) spectra of 124 must samples over the range of 200-1,100-nm were obtained using a miniature spectrometer. The performance of this instrument to predict volumic mass was evaluated using partial least squares (PLS) regression and multiple linear regression (MLR). The validation statistics coefficient of determination (r(2)) and the standard error of prediction (SEP) were r(2) = 0.98, n = 31 and r(2) = 0.96, n = 31, and SEP = 5.85 and 7.49 g/dm(3) for PLS and MLR equations developed to fit reference data for volumic mass and spectral data. Comparison of results from MLR and PLS demonstrates that a MLR model with six significant wavelengths (P alcoholic fermentation, and that a low-cost NIR instrument can be used for this purpose.

  8. Improvements in the injection system of the Canadian Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J; Boudreau, C; Buchinger, F; Crawford, J E; Gulick, S; Hardy, J C; Heinz, A; Lee, J K P; Moore, R B; Savard, G; Seweryniak, D; Sharma, K S; Sprouse, G; Vaz, J; Wang, J C; Zhou, Z

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer is designed to make precise mass measurements on a variety of stable and short-lived isotopes. Modifications to the injection system of the CPT have been implemented in recent months, the purpose being to more efficiently collect and transfer weakly-produced reaction products from the target to the Penning trap. These include a magnetic triplet situated after the target chamber to increase the acceptance of the Enge spectrograph, a velocity filter to more effectively separate the beam from the reaction products and the replacement of the Paul trap with a linear trap resulting in more efficient capture and accumulation of ions from the ion cooler. This paper will discuss these recent modifications and how they have increased our ability in making mass measurements on isotopes of low abundance, including those from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf fission source.

  9. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    OpenAIRE

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spe...

  10. Detection of methyl-, dimethyl- and diethylamine using a nitrate-based chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, T.; Smith, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    New particle formation is one of the main sources of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) contributing approximately half of the global CCN budget. The initial steps of nucleation have been studied for decades and it is widely accepted that in most places nucleation requires presence of sulphuric acid (SA) and cluster-stabilizing vapours. Recent results from the CLOUD chamber show that only a few pptv levels of dimethylamine (DMA) with SA forms stable clusters at boundary layer conditions. Ambient sulphuric acid is typically measured using nitrate-based chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Unfortunately, because of higher volatilities and stickiness of amines to surfaces, amine measurement techniques suffer from memory effects and high detection limits. Recently it was discovered that DMA can be detected by utilizing nitrate ionization, simultaneously with sulphuric acid measurements. Here we present results of detecting methylamine, dimethylamine and diethylamine using nitrate-based chemical ionization. We conducted a series of measurements with a home-built transverse chemical ionization inlet and a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-HToF). Amine vapour was produced using permeation tubes. Three stages of dilution were applied at roughly one order-of-magnitude dilution per stage. The diluted flow of selected amine was then introduced to a sample flow rate of 7 slpm, thus achieving a final amine concentration of 10 pptv. All selected amines were detected as clusters with HNO3NO3- and showed linear response with increasing concentrations (0.5-minute integration time). Zero measurements were performed using clean nitrogen gas right after injection of a selected amine. Memory effects were only observed when using high amine concentrations (ppbv levels). Our results indicate that a variety of amines can be detected using nitrate-based chemical ionization mass spectrometers. However, more experiments are required to see if this presented method will be

  11. Development of electrospray ionization of biomolecules on a magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2002-01-01

    The initial part of this study involves developments made on an electrospray ionization (ESI) source installed on a large-scale double-focusing reverse-geometry two-sector mass spectrometer. The practical considerations and some basic theory have been given in this thesis for each of the improvements made to the ESI source. The process of partial re-designing the ion optical system showed that the ion beam was affected by both gas dynamics and by the field penetration from the lenses of the ion optical system in the region immediately after second skimmer. More than one order magnitude stronger ion signal intensities at the mass spectrometer final detector and easier ESI source operation conditions and stable ion signals has been achieved. Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectroscopy (MIKES) of different charge-states of relatively small peptides (substance P and bradykinin) for collision-induced dissociation (CID) and the metastable dissociation was carried out successfully. The translational energy losses ...

  12. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  13. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-01-01

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 ng μL-1) and over a dynamic range of ∼5 pg μL-1 to 500 pg μL-1 (ppb). Direct detection of these compounds in complex oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL-1.© 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Feasibility of a Fieldable Mass Spectrometer FY 2015 Year-end Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hager, George J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoegg, Edward D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Garret L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitors the production of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) at declared facilities by collecting a few grams of product in sample tubes that are then sent to central laboratories for processing and isotope ratio analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Analysis of results may not be available for some time after collection. In addition, new shipping regulations will make it more difficult to transport this amount of UF6 to a laboratory. The IAEA is interested in an isotope ratio technique for uranium in UF6 that can be moved to and operated at the enrichment facility itself. This report covers the tasks and activities of the Feasibility of a Fieldable Mass Spectrometer Project for FY 2015, which investigates the feasibility of an in-field isotope ratio technique— the forward deployment of a technique to the non-laboratory situation of a protected room with power and heat at the facility of interest. A variety of nontraditional elemental ionization techniques were considered. It was determined that only two of these should be moved forward for testing with the candidate in-field mass spectrometer and with the adsorbed UF6 sample types.

  15. Collision-induced dissociation of ions within the orifice-skimmer region of an electrospray mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider; Chen

    2000-02-15

    An equation was derived to describe the variation of the gas number density within the region between the orifice and the skimmer of an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. The equation was used to develop a semi-quantitative model to predict the value of orifice voltages that lead to ion fragmentation within this region. This model made it possible to predict the types of solvent adducts observed for analytes at various orifice voltages. In addition, it is shown that a small number of high-energy collisions is equally effective for collision-induced dissociation as compared to a large number of low-energy collisions. Finally, this model is tested with different background electrolyte solutions and a different electrospray mass spectrometer. It is demonstrated that controlled fragmentation studies can be performed on single-quadrupole mass spectrometers, and the proposed model gives a reasonable description of the fragmentation process in both spectrometers.

  16. Multiply charged ion dissociation in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qinyuan; Bakhtair, R.; Sherman, M.G.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Bimolecular ions of up to MDa size with thousands of charges have recently been trapped and studied in this laboratory using electrospray ionization (ESI) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). For structural analysis, multiply charged ions generated by ESI can be dissociated at the interface, by collision induced dissociation (CID) or Surface induced dissociation (SID). However, charge exchange with the surface and charge partition among the fragments significantly complicate the SID and CID spectra of multiply charged large ions. High resolution FTICR is an ideal solution to this problem.

  17. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to p...

  18. Simulation of ion transport in the first vacuum stage of an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven; Spencer, Ross

    2009-10-01

    An Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an instrument used to detect trace elements in a sample and analyze its composition. In an effort to better understand this instrument the United States Department of Energy is funding research to investigate the details of its operation. A computer code called FENIX utilizing the Direct-Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) algorithm has been developed and is being utilized to understand the operation of this machine. The transport of trace ions in the presence of an ambipolar electric field through the first expansion region will be presented.

  19. Measurement of high-mass dilepton production with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shchelina, Ksenia

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of dilepton production in photon-photon fusion with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) are presented. For the first time, exclusive dilepton production at high masses have been observed in the CMS detector while one or two outgoing protons are measured in CT-PPS using around 10~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of data accumulated in 2016 during high-luminosity LHC operation. These first results show a good understanding, calibration and alignment of the new CT-PPS detectors installed in 2016.

  20. High-accuracy mass determination of unstable nuclei with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The mass of a nucleus is its most fundamental property. A systematic study of nuclear masses as a function of neutron and proton number allows the observation of collective and single-particle effects in nuclear structure. Accurate mass data are the most basic test of nuclear models and are essential for their improvement. This is especially important for the astrophysical study of nuclear synthesis. In order to achieve the required high accuracy, the mass of ions captured in a Penning trap is determined via their cyclotron frequency $ \

  1. Onsets of nuclear deformation from measurements with the Isoltrap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Naimi, Sarah

    Mass measurements provide important information concerning nuclear structure. This work presents results from the pioneering Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich manganese ($^{58−66}$Mn) and krypton isotopes ($^{96,97}$Kr) are presented, of which the $^{66}$Mn and $^{96,97}$Kr masses are measured for the first time. In particular, the mass of $^{97}$Kr was measured using the preparation trap and required the definition of a new fit function. In the case of the manganese isotopes, the N = 40 shell closure is addressed. The two-neutron-separation energies calculated from the new masses show no shell closure at N = 40 but give an estimation of the proton-neutron interaction (around 0.5 MeV) responsible for the increase of collectivity and nuclear deformation in this mass region. The new krypton masses show behavior in sharp contrast with heavier neighbors where sudden and intense deformation is present, interpreted as the establishment of a nuclea...

  2. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  3. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A. [High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  4. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  5. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Ditada, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J.P.; Clacher, A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  6. Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: A Method to Quantify Total Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    In applications where leak rates of components or systems are evaluated against a leak rate requirement, the uncertainty of the measured leak rate must be included in the reported result. However, in the helium mass spectrometer leak detection method, the sensitivity, or resolution, of the instrument is often the only component of the total measurement uncertainty noted when reporting results. To address this shortfall, a measurement uncertainty analysis method was developed that includes the leak detector unit's resolution, repeatability, hysteresis, and drift, along with the uncertainty associated with the calibration standard. In a step-wise process, the method identifies the bias and precision components of the calibration standard, the measurement correction factor (K-factor), and the leak detector unit. Together these individual contributions to error are combined and the total measurement uncertainty is determined using the root-sum-square method. It was found that the precision component contributes more to the total uncertainty than the bias component, but the bias component is not insignificant. For helium mass spectrometer leak rate tests where unit sensitivity alone is not enough, a thorough evaluation of the measurement uncertainty such as the one presented herein should be performed and reported along with the leak rate value.

  7. Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer (LAMS) as a Standoff Analyzer in Space Missions for Airless Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Managadze, G. G.; Pugel, D. E.; Corrigan, C. M.; Doty, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A laser ablation mass spectrometer (LAMS) based on a time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer with adjustable drift length is proposed as a standoff elemental composition sensor for space missions to airless bodies. It is found that the use of a retarding potential analyzer in combination with a two-stage reflectron enables LAMS to be operated at variable drift length. For field-free drift lengths between 33 cm to 100 cm, at least unit mass resolution can be maintained solely by adjustment of internal voltages, and without resorting to drastic reductions in sensitivity. Therefore, LAMS should be able to be mounted on a robotic arm and analyze samples at standoff distances of up to several tens of cm, permitting high operational flexibility and wide area coverage of heterogeneous regolith on airless bodies.

  8. Trapping, detection, and mass measurement of individual ions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, J.E.; Cheng, X.; Bakhtiar, R.; Wu, Q.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Anderson, G.A.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-24

    A fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer has been used to trap individual multiply charged ions of several high molecular weight polymers, including poly(ethylene oxide), sodium poly(styrene sulfonate), and the protein bovine serum albumin. Detection of these ions is performed with the nondestructive method distinctive of FTICR, which also allows remeasurement of the same ion or ion population over several hours. For the determination of the charge states (and hence the masses) of individual ions, a new scheme was developed on the basis of the observation of the stepwise m/z shifts that results from charge exchange reactions or adduction of a substance of known mass. A novel technique for mass determination of individual ions has been made possible with the observation of cyclotron frequency shifts during the time-domain acquisition period. This time-resolved ion correlation (TRIC) technique allows reactant and product ions to be correlated with confidence and provides the basis for simultaneously studying a moderate number of ions. In this work, a range of observations related to the detection and measurement of individual ions is presented, as are examples of mass determinations of individual ions performed by utilizing the TRIC technique. 47 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in aluminum metabolism studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirav, O.; Sutton, R. A. L.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.; Klein, J.; Walker, V. R.; Halabe, A.; Vetterli, D.; Johnson, R. R.

    1990-12-01

    The recent recognition that aluminum causes toxicity in uremie patients and may be associated with Alzheimer's disease has stimulated many studies of its biochemical effects. However, such studies were hampered by the lack of a suitable tracer. In a novel experiment, we have applied the new technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to investigate aluminum kinetics in rats, using as a marker the long-lived isotope 26Al. We present the first aluminum kinetic model for a biological system. The results clearly demonstrate the advantage this technique holds for isotope tracer studies in animals as well as in humans.

  10. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  11. 40Ar/36Ar geochronology on a quadrupole mass spectrometer: Where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K. F.; Fenton, C. R.; Williams, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    40Ar/39Ar analysis has passed many milestones since its first application (Wänke & König, 1959). From the early all-glass Reynolds-type vacuum system to today's high quality, bakeable all-metal piping and valve systems, the evolution of ultra high vacuum systems has been considerable. Extraction systems have faced similar changes over time. Early furnaces made partially of glass were later replaced by full metal constructs containing a high temperature resistant molybdenum alloy tube and heating mechanism, sometimes contained within an insulating secondary vacuum chamber. Laser extraction techniques further refined the approach allowing very small samples or sample parts to be analyzed. The principal type of mass spectrometer used for 40Ar/36Ar geochronology is the magnetic sector instrument, which has the resolution and sensitivity necessary for measuring argon isotopes and achieving high precision over a large age range. We present 40Ar/39Ar data from basalt samples collected from a number of different locations, all obtained using the Hiden HAL Series 1000 quadrupole mass spectrometer at Vrije University, Amsterdam. We show that quadrupole technology is not only a viable option in K-Ar geochronology (Rouchon et al., 2008) but also in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. The data was obtained from groundmass hand-picked from 200-500 um size fractions. Sample amounts of 200 to 500 mg were used for incremental heating experiments. The quality of the data is demonstrated by convergence of plateau and isochron ages, replicate analyses and by comparison to results of independent studies. Sample ages range from 40 ka to 400 ka, demonstrating the potential of quadrupole instruments for dating even very young rocks using the 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating technique. Rouchon, V., Lefevre, J.-C., Quidelleur, X., Guerin, G., Gillot, P.-Y. (2008): Nonspiked 40Ar and 36Ar quantification using a quadrupole mass spectrometer: A potential for K-Ar geochronology. International Journal of

  12. Mass measurements on short-lived Cd and Ag nuclides at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenfeldt, Martin

    2009-07-03

    In the present work, mass determinations of the eleven neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 99-109}Cd, of ten neutron-rich silver nuclides {sup 112,114-121,123}Ag, and seven neutron-rich cadmium nuclides {sup 114,120,122-124,126,128}Cd are reported. Due to the clean production of the neutron-deficient nuclides it was possible to reduce the experimental uncertainties down to 2 keV, whereas the measurements of neutron-rich nuclides were hampered by the presence of contaminations from more stable In and Cs nuclides. In the case of {sup 99}Cd and {sup 123}Ag the masses were determined for the first time and for the other nuclides the mass uncertainties could be reduced by up to a factor of 50 as in the case of {sup 100}Cd. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of the neutron-deficient Cd nuclides a conflict between the mass values obtained in the present work and those published by the JYFLTRAP group [EEH{sup +}] could be solved by performing an atomic-mass evaluation. Thus, it was revealed that reason for the conflict was a different value of the JYFLTRAP reference mass {sup 96}Mo. Furthermore, a reduction of the mass uncertainty and a slight increase of the mass of {sup 100}In were obtained. These mass measurements are an important step towards an understanding of the physics of

  13. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  14. Development and characterization of an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Kerri A; Mayer, Joseph E; Holecek, John C; Moffet, Ryan C; Sanchez, Rene O; Rebotier, Thomas P; Furutani, Hiroshi; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Su, Yongxuan; Guazzotti, Sergio; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of atmospheric aerosols are necessary for understanding the impact of air pollution on regional and global climate. To gain further insight into the size-resolved chemistry of individual atmospheric particles, a smaller aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) with increased data acquisition capabilities was developed for aircraft-based studies. Compared to previous ATOFMS systems, the new instrument has a faster data acquisition rate with improved ion transmission and mass resolution, as well as reduced physical size and power consumption, all required advances for use in aircraft studies. In addition, real-time source apportionment software allows the immediate identification and classification of individual particles to guide sampling decisions while in the field. The aircraft (A)-ATOFMS was field-tested on the ground during the Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) and aboard an aircraft during the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L). Initial results from ICE-L represent the first reported aircraft-based single-particle dual-polarity mass spectrometry measurements and provide an increased understanding of particle mixing state as a function of altitude. Improved ion transmission allows for the first single-particle detection of species out to approximately m/z 2000, an important mass range for the detection of biological aerosols and oligomeric species. In addition, high time resolution measurements of single-particle mixing state are demonstrated and shown to be important for airborne studies where particle concentrations and chemistry vary rapidly.

  15. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  16. Development and capabilities of the new 253 Ultra high resolution, gas source mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clog, M. D.; Ellam, R. M.; Hilkert, A.; Schwieters, J. B.; Deerberg, M.

    2016-12-01

    The growing interest in clumped and position-specific isotope geochemistry drives the development of gas source mass spectrometers capable of overcoming the technical challenges that limits our capabilities. The main challenges is reaching a mass resolving power high enough to be able to resolve the species of interest from isobars (contaminants, isotopologues with different isotopes and products of ion source chemistry). Applications to natural samples also requires the ability to make measurements at the sub-permil level for low-intensity ion beams. It is thus also necessary for those instruments to have a high abundance sensitivity, high resolution to avoid the need for peak stripping schemes and a high stability of the signal intensities and peak positions in the image plane of the mass spectrometer. We present here the capabilities of the production series version of the ThermoFisher Scientific 253 Ultra, whose design is an iteration of the Caltech 253 Ultra prototype. It is a double-focusing, multi-collection instrument able to reach a mass resolving power of up to 48,000. Over 30 minutes, the standard deviation of the peak position at mass 44 was 20 micro a.m.u. (0.5 ppm). It is equipped with 9 Faraday cups (8 movable) and 4 ion counters (3 movable, the last one located behind a retardation lens). Without using the retardation lens, around mass 40, the abundance sensitivity at .5 a.m.u. is 1ppm, and at 3 a.m.u. drops to 100 ppb. One of movable Faraday cup and one of the movable ion counters have a narrow entrance slit, to allow for peak separation (for example, to measure separately 13CH3D and 12CD2H2). After integration on ion counters of beams ranging from 100 to 10⁵ cps for several hours, the standard error on the ratio of these peaks to ion beams measured on a Faraday cup was within 10% of the counting statistics error. Overall, the 253 Ultra is showing great potential for the development of clumped and position-specific isotope geochemistry.

  17. High-performance hybrid Orbitrap mass spectrometers for quantitative proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James C; Edwards, Alistair V G; Verano-Braga, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    We present basic workups and quantitative comparisons for two current generation Orbitrap mass spectrometers, the Q Exactive Plus and Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid, which are widely considered two of the highest performing instruments on the market. We assessed the performance of two quantitative methods...... on both instruments, namely label-free quantitation and stable isotope labeling using isobaric tags, for studying the heat shock response in Escherichia coli. We investigated the recently reported MS3 method on the Fusion instrument and the potential of MS3-based reporter ion isolation Synchronous...... Precursor Selection (SPS) and its impact on quantitative accuracy. We confirm that the label-free approach offers a more linear response with a wider dynamic range than MS/MS-based isobaric tag quantitation and that the MS3/SPS approach alleviates but does not eliminate dynamic range compression. We...

  18. Calibration of the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Trainer, M. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Stern, J. C.; Harpold, D.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Lyness, E.

    2011-01-01

    The SAM suite of instruments on the "Curiosity" Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to provide chemical and isotopic analysis of organic and inorganic volatiles for both atmospheric and solid samples. The mission of the MSL investigations is to advance beyond the successful search for aqueous transformation in surface environments at Mars toward a quantitative assessment of habitability and preservation through a series of chemical and geological measurements. The SAM suite was delivered in December 2010 (Figure 1) to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for integration into the Curiosity Rover. We previously outlined the range of SAM solid and gas calibrations implemented or planned and here we discuss a specific set of calibration experiments to establish the response of the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) to the four most abundant gases in the Martian atmosphere CO2, N2, Ar, and O2, A full SAM instrument description and calibration report is presently in preparation.

  19. Simultaneous Online Monitoring of Multiple Reactions Using a Miniature Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Osswald, Heather L; Snyder, Dalton T; Fedick, Patrick W; Ayrton, Stephen T; Flick, Tawnya G; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-07-05

    Advances in chemical sampling using miniature mass spectrometer technology are used to monitor slow reactions at a frequency of ca. 180 h-1 (on the Mini 12) with no sample carryover and with inline derivatization in the case of poorly ionizing compounds. Moreover, we demonstrate high reproducibility with a relative error of less than 10% for major components. Monitoring is enabled using a continuous-flow nanoelectrospray (CF-nESI) probe contained in a custom-built 3D-printed rotary holder. The holder position is automatically set using a stepper motor controlled by a microcontroller. Reaction progress of up to six reactions, including hydrazone formation and Katritzky transamination, can be monitored simultaneously without carryover for several hours.

  20. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Melak, Anthony; Noreiga, Felix; Noriega, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Gundersen, Cynthia; Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Cooper, Curt; Edmonson, Charles; Nolan, J. Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  1. MOMA and other next-generation ion trap mass spectrometers for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R.; Pinnick, V. T.; Li, X.; Grubisic, A.; Southard, A. E.; Hovmand, L.; Cottin, H.; Makarov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970's, quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) systems have served as low-risk, cost-efficient means to explore the inner and outer reaches of the solar system. These legacy instruments have interrogated the compositions of the lunar exosphere (LADEE), surface materials on Mars (MSL), and the atmospheres of Venus (Pioneer Venus), Mars (MAVEN) and outer planets (Galileo and Cassini-Huygens). However, the in situ detection of organic compounds on Mars and Titan, coupled with ground-based measurements of amino acids in meteorites and a variety of organics in comets, has underlined the importance of molecular disambiguation in the characterization of high-priority planetary environments. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) flight instrument, centered on a linear ion trap, enables the in situ detection of volatile and non-volatile organics, but also the characterization of molecular structures through SWIFT ion isolation/excitation and tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Like the SAM instrument on MSL, the MOMA investigation also includes a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling the chemical separation of potential isobaric interferences based on retention times. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS; PI: William Brinckerhoff), developed to TRL 6 via the ROSES MatISSE Program, augments the core MOMA design and adds: expanded mass range (from 20 - 2000 Da); high-temperature evolved gas analysis (up to 1300°C); and, dual polarity detector assemblies (supporting the measurement of negative ions). The LITMS instrument will be tested in the field in 2017 through the Atacama Rover Astrobiology Drilling Studies (ARADS; PI: Brian Glass) ROSES PSTAR award. Following on these advancements, the Advanced Resolution Organic Molecule Analyzer (AROMA; PI: Ricardo Arevalo Jr.), supported through the ROSES PICASSO Program, combines a highly capable MOMA/LITMS-like linear ion trap and the ultrahigh resolution CosmOrbitrap mass analyzer developed by a consortium of five

  2. Unmanned Aerial Mass Spectrometer Systems for In-Situ Volcanic Plume Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C. Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models.

  3. Pulsed Laser TOF Mass Spectrometer for Calibration of Cosmic Dust Analyzer Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, G.; Gupta, Satish C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Kossakovski, Dmitri; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    The time-of-flight mass spectrometer of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft, is expected to be placed in orbit about Saturn to sample the ring material and satellite impact ejecta. Calibration via impact ionization and irradiation with a pulsed N2 laser (4 ns duration, at 337 nm) is in progress. The laser beam is focused to deliver the 300 μJ per laser pulse onto 33 μm^2. Laser power density ( 10^11 W/cm^2) simulates the impact of particles with various combinations of density and velocities, e.g., 8 Mg/m^3 (Fe) projectile at 23 km/s or 1 Mg/m^3 projectile at 65 km/s. The positive ions and electrons resulting from laser ionization are separated by 680 V between target and grid. Laser ionization produces charge of 4.6 pC (mostly Al^+1) for aluminum alloy and 2.8 pC(Fe^+1) for stainless steel targets. Estimating that each A1^+1 and Fe^+1 ion requires an energy of 5.98 and 7.90 eV/ion implies that 10-5 % of the laser pulse energy produces ions and the present system has a 10 % efficiency of collecting the laser-irradiation induced ions. Employing a multi-channel plate detector in what is an essentially time-of-flight mass spectrometer yields for Al-Mg-Cu alloy and FeNi targets well defined peaks at 24(Mg^+1), 27(A1^+1) and 64(Cu^+1), and, 56(Fe^+1), 58(Ni^+1) and 60(Ni^+1) amu, respectively.

  4. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, D. K.; Matsunaga, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species. PMID:20194777

  5. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer – Operational Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the heaviest long-lived radionuclides with a 3-MV tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockenhuber, Christof; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan; Liechtenstein, Vitaly

    2002-12-01

    A 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator is the heart of the Vienna environmental research accelerator (VERA). The original design of the beam transport components allows the transport of ions of all elements, from the lightest to the heaviest. For light ions the suppression of neighboring masses was sufficient to measure isotopic ratios of {(14}) C/{(12}) C and {(26}) Al/{(27}) Al as low as 10{(-15}) and {(10}) Be/{(9}) Be down to 10{(-13}) . To suppress neighboring masses for the heaviest radionuclides in the energy range of 10-20 MeV, the resolution of VERA was increased both by improving the ion optics of existing elements at the injection side and by installing a new high-resolution electrostatic separator at the high-energy side. Interfering ions which pass all beam filters are identified with a Bragg-type ionization detector and a high-resolution time-of-flight system. Two ultra-thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils are used in the start and stop detector, which substantially reduces losses due to beam straggling. This improved set up enables us to measure even the heaviest long-lived radionuclides, where stable isobaric interferences are absent (e.g. {(236}) U and {(244}) Pu), down to environmental levels. Moreover, the advantage of a `small' and well manageable machine like VERA lies in its higher stability and reliability which allows to measure these heavy radionuclides more accurately, and also a large number of samples.

  7. System assessment and calibrations of the Knudsen effusion quadrupole mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jintao; Furukawa, Tomohiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-08-01

    A vapor pressure measurement instrument was set up by utilizing the Microvision Plus (LM70)' quadrupole mass spectrometer combined with the Knudsen vapor effusion cell. The purpose of the vapor pressure measurement is to obtain reliable thermodynamic data of sodium-iron complex compounds. Then, the behaviors of these compounds in various environmental conditions can be investigated in detail for analysis of sodium-leak related accidents in fast breeder reactors (FBR). Therefore, the reliability of the measurement system is of great importance. The following major procedures were made step by step. (1) Vertical alignment arrangements (2) Alignment of the ion mass in Q-mass analyzer (3) 'True' signal identification (4) Noise reducing (5) Determination of electron impact conditions (6) Sensitivity improvement by adjusting parameters (7) Temperature calibration (8) Vapor pressure calibration. First, special attention was paid to the mechanical settlements, exploration of the parameters' effects, calibrations of temperature and pressure. Second, the vapor pressure measurement system was optimized for the specific requirements based on the extensive investigation in this study. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the measured pressures of the standard vapor species (silver and lead) are accurate. Finally, identical result can be reproduced in the same conditions so that the measurement system is believed to be reliable for the future researches. (author)

  8. Characterization of organic aerosols in Beijing using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi; Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Ji, Dongsheng; Sun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fine particle of organic aerosol (OA), mostly arising from pollution, are abundant in Beijing. To achieve a better understanding of the difference in OA in summer and autumn, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) was deployed in urban Beijing in August and October 2012. The mean OA mass concentration in autumn was 30±30 μg m-3, which was higher than in summer (13±6.9 μg m-3). The elemental analysis found that OA was more aged in summer (oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios were 0.41 and 0.32 for summer and autumn, respectively). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis identified three and five components in summer and autumn, respectively. In summer, an oxygenated OA (OOA), a cooking-emission-related OA (COA), and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) were indentified. Meanwhile, the OOA was separated into LV-OOA (low-volatility OOA) and SV-OOA (semi-volatile OOA); and in autumn, a nitrogen-containing OA (NOA) was also found. The SOA (secondary OA) was always the most important OA component, accounting for 55% of the OA in the two seasons. Back trajectory clustering analysis found that the origin of the air masses was more complex in summer. Southerly air masses in both seasons were associated with the highest OA loading, while northerly air masses were associated with the lowest OA loading. A preliminary study of OA components, especially the POA (primary OA), in different periods found that the HOA and COA all decreased during the National Day holiday period, and HOA decreased at weekends compared with weekdays.

  9. A high-resolution mass spectrometer to measure atmospheric ion composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Junninen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present recent achievements on developing and testing a tool to detect the composition of ambient ions in the mass/charge range up to 2000 Th. The instrument is an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (APi-TOF, Tofwerk AG. Its mass accuracy is better than 0.002%, and the mass resolving power is 3000 Th/Th. In the data analysis, a new efficient Matlab based set of programs (tofTools were developed, tested and used. The APi-TOF was tested both in laboratory conditions and applied to outdoor air sampling in Helsinki at the SMEAR III station. Transmission efficiency calibrations showed a throughput of 0.1–0.5% in the range 100–1300 Th for positive ions, and linearity over 3 orders of magnitude in concentration was determined. In the laboratory tests the APi-TOF detected sulphuric acid-ammonia clusters in high concentration from a nebulised sample illustrating the potential of the instrument in revealing the role of sulphuric acid clusters in atmospheric new particle formation. The APi-TOF features a high enough accuracy, resolution and sensitivity for the determination of the composition of atmospheric small ions although the total concentration of those ions is typically only 400–2000 cm−3. The atmospheric ions were identified based on their exact masses, utilizing Kendrick analysis and correlograms as well as narrowing down the potential candidates based on their proton affinities as well isotopic patterns. In Helsinki during day-time the main negative ambient small ions were inorganic acids and their clusters. The positive ions were more complex, the main compounds were (polyalkyl pyridines and – amines. The APi-TOF provides a near universal interface for atmospheric pressure sampling, and this key feature will be utilized in future laboratory and field studies.

  10. On Applicability of a Miniaturised Laser Ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Trace Elements Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tulej

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results from mass spectrometric analysis of NIST standard materials and meteoritic samples conducted by a miniaturised laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research. The mass analyser supports investigation with a mass resolution (/Δ ≈ 500–600 and dynamic range within seven decades. Nevertheless, to maintain an optimal spectral quality laser irradiances lower than ~1 GW/cm2 are applied so far which results in a spread of RSC values. To achieve the quantitative performance of mass analyser, various effects influencing RSC factors have to be investigated. In this paper we investigate influence of laser irradiance, sampling procedure and plasma chemistry on the quantitative elemental and isotopic analysis. The studies indicate necessity for accurate control of laser characteristics and acquisition procedure. A relatively low irradiance applied causes a negligible sample damage and allows for accumulation of large number of waveforms from one sample location. The procedure yields statistically well averaged data and allows a sensitive in-depth analysis. The quantitative analyses of isotopic composition can be performed with accuracy and precision better as 1% and 2%, for isotopic patterns of elements and clusters, respectively. The numerical integration methods would be preferred to achieve more accurate results. The measurements of Allende sample yield detection of Pb isotopic pattern, nevertheless cluster species are readily observed in spectrum and make the elemental analysis of other trace elements difficult due to isobaric interferences. These detections are of a considerable interest because of possible application of the instrument for in situ elemental and isotopic analysis and radiometric dating of solids.

  11. Laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer for elemental and isotopic analysis of rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M P; Neidholdt, E L; Hurowitz, J; Sturhahn, W; Beard, B; Hecht, M H

    2011-09-01

    A laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) for the chemical and isotopic measurement of rocks and minerals is described. In the LA-MMS method, neutral atoms ablated by a pulsed laser are led into an electron impact ionization source, where they are ionized by a 70 eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 μs wide, compared to the original 5-10 ns laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer (MMS) and measured in parallel by a modified CCD array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LA-MMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect ions directly generated by the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the wavelength of the laser beam, and the not well characterized ionization efficiencies of the elements in the process. The above problems attendant to the direct ion analysis has been minimized in the LA-MMS by analyzing the ablated neutral species after their post-ionization by electron impaction. These neutral species are much more abundant than the directly ablated ions in the ablated vapor plume and are, therefore, expected to be characteristic of the chemical composition of the solid. Also, the electron impact ionization of elements is well studied and their ionization cross sections are known and easy to find in databases. Currently, the LA-MMS limit of detection is 0.4 wt.%. Here we describe LA-MMS elemental composition measurements of various minerals including microcline, lepidolite, anorthoclase, and USGS BCR-2G samples. The measurements of high precision isotopic ratios including (41)K

  12. Dating Studies of Elephant Tusks Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideras-Haddad, E; Brown, T A

    2002-10-03

    A new method for determining the year of birth, the year of death, and hence, the age at death, of post-bomb and recently deceased elephants has been developed. The technique is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon analyses of small-sized samples extracted from along the length of a ge-line of an elephant tusk. The measured radiocarbon concentrations in the samples from a tusk can be compared to the {sup 14}C atmospheric bomb-pulse curve to derive the growth years of the initial and final samples from the tusk. Initial data from the application of this method to two tusks will be presented. Potentially, the method may play a significant role in wildlife management practices of African national parks. Additionally, the method may contribute to the underpinnings of efforts to define new international trade regulations, which could, in effect, decrease poaching and the killing of very young animals.

  13. Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of Increasingly Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Oligosaccharides on an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    The structural characterization of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates remains an important target for analytical chemists attributable to challenges introduced by the natural complexity of these mixtures and the defined need for molecular-level details to elucidate biological structure-function relationships. Tandem mass spectrometry has proven to be the most powerful technique for this purpose. Previously, electron detachment dissociation (EDD), in comparison to other methods of ion activation, has been shown to provide the largest number of useful cleavages for de novo sequencing of GAG oligosaccharides, but such experiments are restricted to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FTICR-MS). Negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) provides similar fragmentation results, and can be achieved on any mass spectrometry platform that is designed to accommodate ion-ion reactions. Here, we examine for the first time the effectiveness of NETD-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of GAG oligosaccharides. Compounds ranging in size from tetrasaccharides to decasaccharides were dissociated by NETD, producing both glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages that enabled the location of sulfate modifications. The highly-sulfated, heparin-like synthetic GAG, ArixtraTM, was also successfully sequenced by NETD. In comparison to other efforts to sequence GAG chains without fully ionized sulfate constituents, the occurrence of sulfate loss peaks is minimized by judicious precursor ion selection. The results compare quite favorably to prior results with electron detachment dissociation (EDD). Significantly, the duty cycle of the NETD experiment is sufficiently short to make it an effective tool for on-line separations, presenting a straightforward path for selective, high-throughput analysis of GAG mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. First performance results of a mobile high-resolution MR-ToF mass spectrometer for in-situ analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Johannes; Ebert, Jens [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen (Germany); Dickel, Timo; Plass, Wolfgang; Geissel, Hans; Haettner, Emma; Scheidenberger, Christoph [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Yavor, Mikhail [RAS St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    A mobile multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) has been designed, built and commissioned. While other mobile mass spectrometers are restricted to low or medium mass resolving power, this MR-TOF-MS allows for the first time for a mass resolving power exceeding 100.000 and a sub ppm accuracy in a transportable format. It can thus resolve isobars and enables to accurately determine the composition and structure of biomolecules. An atmospheric pressure interface provides compatibility to various atmospheric ion sources. The mass spectrometer part comprises an RFQ mass filter, ion cooler, ion trap, time-of-flight analyzer and detector. Supply electronics, DAQ and control system are mounted together with the spectrometer into a single frame with a total volume of only 0.8 m{sup 3}. First results with the MR-TOF-MS are presented, and an overview of envisaged life science applications is given, such as realtime tissue recognition in electrosurgery, identification of mycotoxins and analysis of soil samples for environmental studies.

  15. Development of a Portable Single Photon Ionization-Photoelectron Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vacuum ultraviolet lamp based single photon ionization- (SPI- photoelectron ionization (PEI portable reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS was designed for online monitoring gas samples. It has a dual mode ionization source: SPI for analyte with ionization energy (IE below 10.6 eV and PEI for IE higher than 10.6 eV. Two kinds of sampling inlets, a capillary inlet and a membrane inlet, are utilized for high concentration and trace volatile organic compounds, respectively. A mass resolution of 1100 at m/z 64 has been obtained with a total size of 40 × 31 × 29 cm, the weight is 27 kg, and the power consumption is only 70 W. A mixture of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, SO2, and discharging products of SF6 were used to test its performance, and the result showed that the limit of quantitation for BTX is as low as 5 ppbv (S/N = 10 : 1 with linear dynamic ranges greater than four orders of magnitude. The portable TOFMS was also evaluated by analyzing volatile organic compounds from wine and decomposition products of SF6 inside of a gas-insulated switchgear.

  16. Development of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A.; Wojcik, Roza; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin S.; Rusyn, Ivan; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-12-20

    Complex samples benefit from multidimensional measurements where higher resolution enables more complete characterization of biological and environmental systems. To address this challenge, we developed a drift tube-based ion mobility spectrometry-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (IMS-Orbitrap MS) platform. To circumvent the time scale disparity between the fast IMS separation and the much slower Orbitrap MS acquisition, we utilized a dual gate and pseudorandom sequences to multiplexed injection of ions and allowing operation in signal averaging (SA), single multiplexing (SM) and double multiplexing (DM) IMS modes to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements. For the SM measurements, a previously developed algorithm was used to reconstruct the IMS data. A new algorithm was developed for the DM analyses involving a two-step process that first recovers the SM data and then decodes the SM data. The algorithm also performs multiple refining procedures in order to minimize demultiplexing artifacts. The new IMS-Orbitrap MS platform was demonstrated by the analysis of proteomic and petroleum samples, where the integration of IMS and high mass resolution proved essential for accurate assignment of molecular formulae.

  17. First Signal on the Cryogenic Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Mathur, Raman; Aizikov, Kostantin; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and achievement of the first signal on a cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) are reported here, demonstrating proof-of-concept of this new instrument design. Building the FTICR cell into the cold bore of a superconducting magnet provided advantages over conventional warm bore design. At 4.2 K, the vacuum system cryopumps itself, thus removing the requirement for a large bore to achieve the desired pumping speed for maintaining base pressure. Furthermore, because the bore diameter has been reduced, the amount of magnet wire needed to achieve high field and homogeneity was also reduced, greatly decreasing the cost/Tesla of the magnet. The current instrument implements an actively shielded 14-Tesla magnet of vertical design with an external matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The first signal was obtained by detecting the laser desorbed/ionized (LDI) C60+• ions, with the magnet at 7 Tesla, unshimmed, and the preamplifier mounted outside of the vacuum chamber at room temperature. A subsequent experiment done with the magnet at 14 Tesla and properly shimmed produced a C60 spectrum showing ∼350,000 resolving power at m/z ∼720. Increased magnetic field strength improves many FTMS performance parameters simultaneously, particularly mass resolving power and accuracy. PMID:17931882

  18. Cassini ion and neutral mass spectrometer: Enceladus plume composition and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J Hunter; Combi, Michael R; Ip, Wing-Huen; Cravens, Thomas E; McNutt, Ralph L; Kasprzak, Wayne; Yelle, Roger; Luhmann, Janet; Niemann, Hasso; Gell, David; Magee, Brian; Fletcher, Greg; Lunine, Jonathan; Tseng, Wei-Ling

    2006-03-10

    The Cassini spacecraft passed within 168.2 kilometers of the surface above the southern hemisphere at 19:55:22 universal time coordinated on 14 July 2005 during its closest approach to Enceladus. Before and after this time, a substantial atmospheric plume and coma were observed, detectable in the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) data set out to a distance of over 4000 kilometers from Enceladus. INMS data indicate that the atmospheric plume and coma are dominated by water, with significant amounts of carbon dioxide, an unidentified species with a mass-to-charge ratio of 28 daltons (either carbon monoxide or molecular nitrogen), and methane. Trace quantities (<1%) of acetylene and propane also appear to be present. Ammonia is present at a level that does not exceed 0.5%. The radial and angular distributions of the gas density near the closest approach, as well as other independent evidence, suggest a significant contribution to the plume from a source centered near the south polar cap, as distinct from a separately measured more uniform and possibly global source observed on the outbound leg of the flyby.

  19. FATES: a flexible analysis toolkit for the exploration of single-particle mass spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Camille M.; Cornwell, Gavin C.; Rodriguez, Paul; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-04-01

    Single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) analysis of aerosols has become increasingly popular since its invention in the 1990s. Today many iterations of commercial and lab-built SPMSs are in use worldwide. However, supporting analysis toolkits for these powerful instruments are outdated, have limited functionality, or are versions that are not available to the scientific community at large. In an effort to advance this field and allow better communication and collaboration between scientists, we have developed FATES (Flexible Analysis Toolkit for the Exploration of SPMS data), a MATLAB toolkit easily extensible to an array of SPMS designs and data formats. FATES was developed to minimize the computational demands of working with large data sets while still allowing easy maintenance, modification, and utilization by novice programmers. FATES permits scientists to explore, without constraint, complex SPMS data with simple scripts in a language popular for scientific numerical analysis. In addition FATES contains an array of data visualization graphic user interfaces (GUIs) which can aid both novice and expert users in calibration of raw data; exploration of the dependence of mass spectral characteristics on size, time, and peak intensity; and investigations of clustered data sets.

  20. Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) Mass Spectrometer for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, H. O.; Skoug, R. M.; Guthrie, A. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Baldonado, J. R.; Harper, R. W.; Henderson, K. C.; Kihara, K. H.; Lake, J. E.; Larsen, B. A.; Puckett, A. D.; Vigil, V. J.; Friedel, R. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Thomsen, M. F.; Hanley, J. J.; George, D. E.; Jahn, J.-M.; Cortinas, S.; De Los Santos, A.; Dunn, G.; Edlund, E.; Ferris, M.; Freeman, M.; Maple, M.; Nunez, C.; Taylor, T.; Toczynski, W.; Urdiales, C.; Spence, H. E.; Cravens, J. A.; Suther, L. L.; Chen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The HOPE mass spectrometer of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission (renamed the Van Allen Probes) is designed to measure the in situ plasma ion and electron fluxes over 4 π sr at each RBSP spacecraft within the terrestrial radiation belts. The scientific goal is to understand the underlying physical processes that govern the radiation belt structure and dynamics. Spectral measurements for both ions and electrons are acquired over 1 eV to 50 keV in 36 log-spaced steps at an energy resolution Δ E FWHM/ E≈15 %. The dominant ion species (H+, He+, and O+) of the magnetosphere are identified using foil-based time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with channel electron multiplier (CEM) detectors. Angular measurements are derived using five polar pixels coplanar with the spacecraft spin axis, and up to 16 azimuthal bins are acquired for each polar pixel over time as the spacecraft spins. Ion and electron measurements are acquired on alternate spacecraft spins. HOPE incorporates several new methods to minimize and monitor the background induced by penetrating particles in the harsh environment of the radiation belts. The absolute efficiencies of detection are continuously monitored, enabling precise, quantitative measurements of electron and ion fluxes and ion species abundances throughout the mission. We describe the engineering approaches for plasma measurements in the radiation belts and present summaries of HOPE measurement strategy and performance.

  1. Rapid and Deep Proteomes by Faster Sequencing on a Benchtop Quadrupole Ultra-High-Field Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Batth, Tanveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage is evalu......Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage...... in less than 24 hours of analysis time by offline high pH reversed-phase peptide fractionation from which we identify more than 140,000 unique peptide sequences. This is comparable to state-of-the-art multi-day, multi-enzyme efforts. Finally the acquisition methods are evaluated for single-shot...

  2. Rapid and Deep Proteomes by Faster Sequencing on a Benchtop Quadrupole Ultra-High-Field Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Batth, Tanveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage is evalu......Shotgun proteomics is a powerful technology for global analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here, we investigate faster sequencing speed of the latest Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer, which features an ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer. Proteome coverage...... per second or up to 600 new peptides sequenced per gradient minute. We identify 4400 proteins from one microgram of HeLa digest using a one hour gradient, which is an approximately 30% improvement compared to previous instrumentation. In addition, we show very deep proteome coverage can be achieved...

  3. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  4. STRAPS v1.0: evaluating a methodology for predicting electron impact ionisation mass spectra for the aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David O.; Allan, James; Rami Alfarra, M.; Aumont, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. While there are fundamental models now available that can simulate the tens of thousands of reactions thought to take place, validation against experiments is highly challenging. Techniques capable of identifying individual molecules such as chromatography are generally only capable of quantifying a subset of the material present, making it unsuitable for a carbon budget analysis. Integrative analytical methods such as the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) are capable of quantifying all mass, but because of their inability to isolate individual molecules, comparisons have been limited to simple data products such as total organic mass and the O : C ratio. More detailed comparisons could be made if more of the mass spectral information could be used, but because a discrete inversion of AMS data is not possible, this activity requires a system of predicting mass spectra based on molecular composition. In this proof-of-concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI) mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated. Supervised Training Regression for the Arbitrary Prediction of Spectra (STRAPS) is not built from first principles. A methodology is constructed whereby the presence of specific mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) channels is fitted as a function of molecular structure before the relative peak height for each channel is similarly fitted using a range of regression methods. The widely used AMS mass spectral database is used as a basis for this, using unit mass resolution spectra of laboratory standards. Key to the fitting process is choice of structural information, or molecular fingerprint. Our approach relies on using supervised methods to automatically optimise the relationship between spectral characteristics and these molecular fingerprints. Therefore

  5. STRAPS v1.0: evaluating a methodology for predicting electron impact ionisation mass spectra for the aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. While there are fundamental models now available that can simulate the tens of thousands of reactions thought to take place, validation against experiments is highly challenging. Techniques capable of identifying individual molecules such as chromatography are generally only capable of quantifying a subset of the material present, making it unsuitable for a carbon budget analysis. Integrative analytical methods such as the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS are capable of quantifying all mass, but because of their inability to isolate individual molecules, comparisons have been limited to simple data products such as total organic mass and the O : C ratio. More detailed comparisons could be made if more of the mass spectral information could be used, but because a discrete inversion of AMS data is not possible, this activity requires a system of predicting mass spectra based on molecular composition. In this proof-of-concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated. Supervised Training Regression for the Arbitrary Prediction of Spectra (STRAPS is not built from first principles. A methodology is constructed whereby the presence of specific mass-to-charge ratio (m∕z channels is fitted as a function of molecular structure before the relative peak height for each channel is similarly fitted using a range of regression methods. The widely used AMS mass spectral database is used as a basis for this, using unit mass resolution spectra of laboratory standards. Key to the fitting process is choice of structural information, or molecular fingerprint. Our approach relies on using supervised methods to automatically optimise the relationship between spectral characteristics and these molecular

  6. Open Source Software Tool Skyline Reaches Key Agreement with Mass Spectrometer Vendors | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and interrogated in order to extract biological information. Moreover, the raw data output from different MS vendors are generally in different formats inhibiting the ability of labs to productively work together.

  7. Laser-induced surface ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, David C.; Li, Liang

    1995-01-01

    A laser-induced ionization scheme based on laser-metal interaction is described. It is found that when a low power, pulsed UV laser beam is directed to the repeller plate of a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS), which is held at much higher positive potential than the extraction grid, extensive ionization of gas phase species can take place. For monatomic species such as Ar and Xe, multiply charged ions up to Ar6+ and Xe9+ are obtained. For both aromatic and aliphatic organic molecules, classical electron-impact-type mass spectra are observed. Mass resolution is in the range of 300-400, comparable to that obtained using laser-induced resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in the same linear TOFMS. It is shown that this technique can be quite efficient in ionizing organic species. A detection limit of 5 ng and a linear dynamic range of four orders of magnitude for benzene are demonstrated. While not as sensitive as R2PI, it has a much wider applicability and more uniform ionization efficiency than R2PI. It also appears about 1000 times more sensitive than the incorporation of an electron gun in TOFMS. The technique can be interchanged with R2PI very readily by simply adjusting the position and focus of the laser beam. While the ionization mechanism involved in the technique is currently unknown, some preliminary investigation of the ionization process is reported. It is suspected that photoelectron generation from the plate surface may play some important role in producing the ions detected.

  8. A Virtual Research Environment for a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenbeck, M.; Schäfer, L.; Klump, J.; Galkin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Overview: This poster describes the development of a Virtual Research Environment for the Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) at GFZ Potsdam. Background: Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometers (SIMS) are extremely sensitive instruments for analyzing the surfaces of solid and thin film samples. These instruments are rare, expensive and experienced operators are very highly sought after. As such, measurement time is a precious commodity, until now only accessible to small numbers of researchers. The challenge: The Virtual SIMS Project aims to set up a Virtual Research Environment for the operation of the CAMECA IMS 1280-HR instrument at the GFZ Potsdam. The objective of the VRE is to provide SIMS access not only to researchers locally present in Potsdam but also to scientists working with SIMS cooperation partners in e.g., South Africa, Brazil or India. The requirements: The system should address the complete spectrum of laboratory procedures - from online application for measurement time, to remote access for data acquisition to data archiving for the subsequent publication and for future reuse. The approach: The targeted Virtual SIMS Environment will consist of a: 1. Web Server running the Virtual SIMS website providing general information about the project, lab access proposal forms and calendar for the timing of project related tasks. 2. LIMS Server, responsible for scheduling procedures, data management and, if applicable, accounting and billing. 3. Remote SIMS Tool, devoted to the operation of the experiment within a remote control environment. 4. Publishing System, which supports the publication of results in cooperation with the GFZ Library services. 5. Training Simulator, which offers the opportunity to rehearse experiments and to prepare for possible events such as a power outages or interruptions to broadband services. First results: The SIMS Virtual Research Environment will be mainly based on open source software, the only exception being the CAMECA IMS

  9. Impacts of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry on the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. O.; Caffee, M. W.

    2002-12-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) provides a means of detecting rare radionuclides with half-lives in the range 103 - 107 years, at relative isotopic abundances down to 10-15. AMS combines high sensitivity and efficiency with low backgrounds, giving detection limits of 104 - 105 atoms for many nuclides. Due to the cost, complexity and scale of the technology, most AMS analyses are performed at shared, multi-purpose facilities. Recent growth in the availability of AMS analyses has led to major developments in: (i) Radiocarbon dating and related areas of Quaternary climatic and environmental research. Many thousands of geological C-14 measurements are now performed annually, on samples containing ~ 1 mg of carbon. (ii) Chronology of the Earth's surface, and the quantitative study of geomorphic processes, using cosmic-ray-produced nuclides. The ability to measure cosmogenic Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in surficial rocks and minerals has given rise to methods for dating and correlating glacial, fluvial and marine deposits, determining earthquake recurrence patterns and displacement rates on faults, among many other applications. Analogous methods have been developed to study the geomorphic evolution of eroding and aggrading surfaces, at scales ranging from outcrops to drainage basins. Results from these studies complement recent developments in thermochronology, and have helped to advance our understanding of the interplay between tectonic and surficial processes in the evolution of mountain belts. (iii) Radioisotopic tracing of oceanic, hydrologic and atmospheric flows. AMS measurements of natural and man-made nuclides, such as H-3, C-14, Cl-36 and I-129, are contributing to large-scale ocean circulation studies and estimation of the recharge rates and residence times of groundwater. Technological improvements continue to increase efficiency and sample throughput at AMS facilities. Future developments are likely to reduce the size and operating voltage of AMS

  10. Mass measurements of the exotic nuclides {sup 11}Li and {sup 11,12}Be performed with the MISTRAL spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaulard, C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, IN2P3-CNRS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)], E-mail: gaulard@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Bachelet, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Sewtz, M.; Thibault, C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, IN2P3-CNRS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2009-07-15

    The mass of the halo nuclide {sup 11}Li has been measured with unprecedented precision with the MISTRAL mass spectrometer at CERN's ISOLDE facility. Its resulting two-neutron separation energy, S{sub 2n}=378{+-}5 keV, is 25% higher than the previously accepted value and about an order of magnitude more precise than any of the previous measurements. We also report measurement of the masses of {sup 11}Be and {sup 12}Be. The detailed analysis of these results and their evaluation are presented, along with a discussion concerning mass models.

  11. Development of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion desorption studies at HiSOR

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K; Nakashima, Y; Waki, S; Sardar, S A; Yasui, Y; Wada, S I; Sekitani, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which is now under operation at HiSOR storage ring for research of photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID). The employment of the pulsed high voltage method as a trigger allowed us to perform the investigations at a multi bunch operation of the storage ring. The performance of this spectrometer was evaluated by applying to the PSID measurements of PMMA (poly-methylmethacrylate) thin films. The results are compared with those obtained at Photon Factory by using pulsed synchrotron radiation in a single bunch operation. The capabilities of the apparatus for ion desorption studies are discussed.

  12. Design and characterization of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for composition measurements in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, E. Addison

    in-situ composition measurements of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are challenging; this region is only accessible via high-speed sounding rockets, ambient pressures extend into the 10-3 Torr range, and particles of interest range in mass from electrons to meteoric smoke and dust particles. Time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MS) are capable of making fast, accurate measurements over a wide mass range. However, since they rely on pressure-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors and high voltages, they have rarely been applied at these altitudes. A new TOF-MS for making in-situ composition measurements in the MLT has been developed at the Space Dynamics Laboratory. This instrument employs modest acceleration potentials and a pressure-tolerant MCP detector. A Bradbury-Nielsen gate is used to produce short, well-defined ion pulses to reduce the temporal and spatial uncertainty of sampled ions. A prototype TOF-MS was constructed and used to demonstrate TOF-MS technology under conditions relevant to in-situ MLT measurements. Operational boundaries and capabilities of this new instrument were identified through laboratory experiments combined with computer modeling. The prototype instrument achieved a maximum resolution of 100 at m/z 40 (Ar), sufficient to resolve major atmospheric species of interest. During experiments at elevated pressures, the MCP detector maintained low background count rates (<10 /second) at pressures as high as 10 -3 Torr. A novel getter-based vacuum system was evaluated for use with the new TOF-MS, and a computer model was developed to simulate instrument pressure during a rocket flight. Results from these experiments suggest that when combined with an appropriately sized sampling aperture, this pumping system can extend the measurement range of the instrument to lower altitudes by 10 - 20 km, compared to an unpumped instrument. A computer model was developed to study the effects of critical operating parameters on instrument

  13. Performance-enhanced "tunable" capillary microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometer for gas chromatography detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, A M; Robbat, A

    2000-07-15

    Improvements in the stability and performance of a capillary microwave-induced plasma-mass spectrometer (MIP-MS) were achieved by optimizing power transfer to the cavity using a tunable coaxial MIP. The MIP, operating at atmospheric pressure, was sustained with 30 mL/min He and 60 W of power. Measurement precision and sensitivity for the standard waveguide and coaxial systems were determined using 16 organochlorine pesticide solutions separated by gas chromatography (GC). The linear dynamic range obtained with the tunable MIP-MS extended over 3 orders of magnitude, a 10 time improvement with respect to the standard MIP. Detection limits were between 3 and 19 pg of Cl mol(-1) s(-1), 7 times lower than the detection limits obtained with the nontunable MIP-MS. Analysis of pesticides containing sulfur atoms was also possible, further demonstrating multielement MIP-MS detection. Excellent accuracy (10% recovery) and precision (5% RSD) were found for the detection of the pesticides in a petroleum-contaminated reference soil. By placing the GC column at the plasma expansion stage, molecular fragmentation of a mixture of volatile organic compounds was also demonstrated. With the MS operated in the selected ion monitoring mode, measurement sensitivity was approximately 500 pg/s per compound.

  14. Initial SAM Calibration Gas Experiments on Mars: Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H,; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  15. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  16. Standard practice for leaks using the mass spectrometer leak detector in the detector probe mode

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for testing and locating the sources of gas leaking at the rate of 1 × 10−7 Pa m3/s (1 × 10−8 Std cm3/s) or greater. The test may be conducted on any device or component across which a pressure differential of helium or other suitable tracer gas may be created, and on which the effluent side of the leak to be tested is accessible for probing with the mass spectrometer sampling probe. 1.2 Two test methods are described: 1.2.1 Test Method A—Direct probing, and 1.2.2 Test Method B—Accumulation. 1.3 Units—The values stated in either SI or std-cc/sec units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents: therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in non-conformance with the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this sta...

  17. [Rapid determination of volatile organic compounds in workplace air by protable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H B; Su, C J; Tang, H F; Ruan, Z; Liu, D H; Wang, H; Qian, Y L

    2017-10-20

    Objective: To establish a method for rapid determination of 47 volatile organic compounds in the air of workplace using portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer(GC-MS). Methods: The mixed standard gas with different concentration levels was made by using the static gas distribution method with the high purity nitrogen as dilution gas. The samples were injected into the GC-MS by a hand-held probe. Retention time and characteristic ion were used for qualitative analysis,and the internal standard method was usd for quantitation. Results: The 47 poisonous substances were separated and determined well. The linear range of this method was 0.2-16.0 mg/m(3),and the relative standard deviation of 45 volatile ovganic compounds was 3.8%-15.8%. The average recovery was 79.3%-119.0%. Conclusion: The method is simple,accurate,sensitive,has good separation effect,short analysis period, can be used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds in the workplace, and also supports the rapid identification and detection of occupational hazards.

  18. Gas Flow in the Capillary of the Atmosphere-to-Vacuum Interface of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoblin, Michael; Chudinov, Alexey; Soulimenkov, Ilia; Brusov, Vladimir; Kozlovskiy, Viacheslav

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations of a gas flow through a capillary being a part of mass spectrometer atmospheric interface were performed using a detailed laminar flow model. The simulated interface consisted of atmospheric and forevacuum volumes connected via a thin capillary. The pressure in the forevacuum volume where the gas was expanding after passing through the capillary was varied in the wide range from 10 to 900 mbar in order to study the volume flow rate as well as the other flow parameters as functions of the pressure drop between the atmospheric and forevacuum volumes. The capillary wall temperature was varied in the range from 24 to 150 °C. Numerical integration of the complete system of Navier-Stokes equations for a viscous compressible gas taking into account the heat transfer was performed using the standard gas dynamic simulation software package ANSYS CFX. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements of gas flow parameters both performed using our experimental setup and taken from the literature. The simulated volume flow rates through the capillary differed no more than by 10% from the measured ones over the entire pressure and temperatures ranges. A conclusion was drawn that the detailed digital laminar model is able to quantitatively describe the measured gas flow rates through the capillaries under conditions considered. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Gas Flow in the Capillary of the Atmosphere-to-Vacuum Interface of Mass Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoblin, Michael; Chudinov, Alexey; Soulimenkov, Ilia; Brusov, Vladimir; Kozlovskiy, Viacheslav

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations of a gas flow through a capillary being a part of mass spectrometer atmospheric interface were performed using a detailed laminar flow model. The simulated interface consisted of atmospheric and forevacuum volumes connected via a thin capillary. The pressure in the forevacuum volume where the gas was expanding after passing through the capillary was varied in the wide range from 10 to 900 mbar in order to study the volume flow rate as well as the other flow parameters as functions of the pressure drop between the atmospheric and forevacuum volumes. The capillary wall temperature was varied in the range from 24 to 150 °C. Numerical integration of the complete system of Navier-Stokes equations for a viscous compressible gas taking into account the heat transfer was performed using the standard gas dynamic simulation software package ANSYS CFX. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements of gas flow parameters both performed using our experimental setup and taken from the literature. The simulated volume flow rates through the capillary differed no more than by 10% from the measured ones over the entire pressure and temperatures ranges. A conclusion was drawn that the detailed digital laminar model is able to quantitatively describe the measured gas flow rates through the capillaries under conditions considered. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. [Simultaneous determination of three organic fluorides in workplace air by portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Xin, Chaoyi; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-06-01

    To establish a method for rapid determination of organic fluorides in the air of a fluorine chemical plant using portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Standard samples of monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene of different concentrations were prepared by static volumetric method with high-purity nitrogen as the diluent gas. The samples were injected into the GC-MS by a hand-held probe. Retention time and characteristic ion were used for qualitative analysis, and the area of selected ion peak was used for quantitative analysis. The standard curves were then created for quantitative determination of the three organic fluorides. The linear ranges for monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene by the method were 0.39-7.72, 0.45-8.84, and 0.61-12.20 mg/m3, respectively, the average recovery rates for the three concentrations were 102.8%, 96.0%, and 106.5%, respectively, and the average deviations were 2.1%, 5.1%, and 2.4%, respectively. The portable GC-MS can be used for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene in the workplace air, and the method is simple, fast, and accurate.

  1. Study on volatilization mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide from nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate by using mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Tetsuya, E-mail: tkato@criepi.denken.or.jp [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Shibata, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi [Safety Technology Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    In a cooling malfunction accident of a high-level liquid waste (HLLW) tank, behavior of ruthenium (Ru) attracts much attention, since Ru could be oxidized to a volatile chemical form in the boiling and drying of HLLW, and part of radioactive Ru can potentially be released to the environment. In this study, nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), which is commonly contained in a simulated HLLW, was dried and heated up to 723 K, and the evolved gas was introduced into a mass spectrometer. The well-known volatile species, ruthenium tetroxide (RuO{sub 4}) was detected in a temperature range between 390 K and 500 K with the peak top around 440 K. Various gases such as HNO{sub 3}, nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitrogen monoxide (NO) also evolved due to evaporation of the nitric acid and decomposition of the nitrate ions. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} seems to increase with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. More volatilization of RuO{sub 4} was observed from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing not only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} but also cerium nitrate (Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O) which was added for extra supply of nitrate ion, compared with that from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. These experimental results suggest that Ru could be oxidized to form RuO{sub 4} by the nitrate ion as well as HNO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Ion current intensities of the mass numbers corresponding to O, NO, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and RuO{sub 4} obtained in mass spectrometry for dried nitric acid solution containing Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Heating rate: 5 K min{sup −1}, sample solution weight: 6.61 mg, contained Ru weight: 0.56 mg. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} increases with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. - Highlights: • Nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in

  2. Ion source memory in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourles, Didier; Martschini, Martin [ASTER, Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Steier, Peter [VERA, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Since the DREAMS (Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility went operational in 2011, constant effort was put into enabling routine measurements of long-lived radionuclides as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca. For precise AMS-measurements of the volatile element Cl the key issue is the minimization of the long term memory effect. For this purpose one of the two original HVE sources was mechanically modified, allowing the usage of bigger cathodes with individual target apertures. Additionally a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, a small inter-laboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect in the Cs sputter ion sources of the AMS facilities VERA, ASTER and DREAMS had been investigated by running samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples containing highly enriched {sup 35}Cl({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl > 500). Primary goals of the research are the time constants of the recovery from the contaminated sample ratio to the initial ratio of the sample and the level of the long-term memory effect in the sources.

  3. Improving Tritium Exposure Reconstructions Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, A; Hunt, J; Knezovich, J

    2003-06-01

    Exposure reconstructions for radionuclides are inherently difficult. As a result, most reconstructions are based primarily on mathematical models of environmental fate and transport. These models can have large uncertainties, as important site-specific information is unknown, missing, or crudely estimated. Alternatively, surrogate environmental measurements of exposure can be used for site-specific reconstructions. In cases where environmental transport processes are complex, well-chosen environmental surrogates can have smaller exposure uncertainty than mathematical models. Because existing methodologies have significant limitations, the development or improvement of methodologies for reconstructing exposure from environmental measurements would provide important additional tools in assessing the health effects of chronic exposure. As an example, the direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples, which permit greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Tritium AMS was previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases.

  4. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Vogel, J. S.; Knezovich, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. PMID:14735274

  5. Detection of {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Larsson, Ragnar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Chemical Engineering II; Skog, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Geology

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of {sup 59}Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. {sup 59}Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of {sup 59}Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of {sup 59}Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of {sup 59}Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of {sup 59}Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for {sup 59}Ni has been determined to 100{+-}30 Bq per gram nickel (100{+-}30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Assessment of a combined gas chromatography mass spectrometer sensor system for detecting biologically relevant volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Oliver; Wieczorek, Tom; de Lacy Costello, Ben; Persad, Raj; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2017-12-06

    There have been a number of studies in which metal oxide sensors (MOS) have replaced conventional analytical detectors in gas chromatography systems. However, despite the use of these instruments in a range of applications including breath research the sensor responses (i.e. resistance changes w.r.t. concentration of VCs) remain largely unreported. This paper addresses that issue by comparing the response of a metal oxide sensor directly with a mass spectrometer (MS), whereby both detectors are interfaced to the same GC column using an s-swafer. It was demonstrated that the sensitivity of an in-house fabricated ZnO/SnO 2 thick film MOS was superior to a modern MS for the detection of a wide range of volatile compounds (VCs) of different functionalities and masses. Better techniques for detection and quantification of these VCs is valuable, as many of these compounds are commonly reported throughout the scientific literature. This is also the first published report of a combined GC-MS sensor system. These two different detector technologies when combined, should enhance discriminatory abilities to aid disease diagnoses using volatiles from e.g. breath, and bodily fluids. Twenty-nine chemical standards have been tested using solid phase micro-extraction; 25 of these compounds are found on human breath. In all but two instances the sensor exhibited the same or superior limit of detection compared to the MS. Twelve stool samples from healthy participants were analysed; the sensor detected, on average 1.6 peaks more per sample than the MS. Similarly, analysing the headspace of E. coli broth cultures the sensor detected 6.9 more peaks per sample versus the MS. This greater sensitivity is primarily a function of the superior limits of detection of the metal oxide sensor. This shows that systems based on the combination of chromatography systems with solid state sensors shows promise for a range of applications.

  7. Field-deployable, high-resolution, time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Peter F; Kimmel, Joel R; Trimborn, Achim; Northway, Megan J; Jayne, John T; Aiken, Allison C; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Horvath, Thomas; Docherty, Kenneth S; Worsnop, Doug R; Jimenez, Jose L

    2006-12-15

    The development of a new high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is reported. The high-resolution capabilities of this instrument allow the direct separation of most ions from inorganic and organic species at the same nominal m/z, the quantification of several types of organic fragments (CxHy, CxHyOz, CxHyNp, CxHyOzNp), and the direct identification of organic nitrogen and organosulfur content. This real-time instrument is field-deployable, and its high time resolution (0.5 Hz has been demonstrated) makes it well-suited for studies in which time resolution is critical, such as aircraft studies. The instrument has two ion optical modes: a single-reflection configuration offers higher sensitivity and lower resolving power (up to approximately 2100 at m/z 200), and a two-reflectron configuration yields higher resolving power (up to approximately 4300 at m/z 200) with lower sensitivity. The instrument also allows the determination of the size distributions of all ions. One-minute detection limits for submicrometer aerosol are <0.04 microg m(-3) for all species in the high-sensitivity mode and <0.4 microg m(-3) in the high-resolution mode. Examples of ambient aerosol data are presented from the SOAR-1 study in Riverside, CA, in which the spectra of ambient organic species are dominated by CxHy and CxHyOz fragments, and different organic and inorganic fragments at the same nominal m/z show different size distributions. Data are also presented from the MIRAGE C-130 aircraft study near Mexico City, showing high correlation with independent measurements of surrogate aerosol mass concentration.

  8. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Matthew George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adamic, Mary Louise [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, John Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baeck, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, R. V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hahn, P. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jenson, D. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lister, T. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  9. Improved Ion Optics for Introduction of Ions into a 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancements to the ion source and transfer optics of our 9.4 T FT-ICR mass spectrometer have resulted in improved ion transmission efficiency for more sensitive mass measurement of complex mixtures at the MS and MS/MS levels. The tube lens/skimmer has been replaced by a dual ion funnel and the following octopole by a quadrupole for reduced ion cloud radial expansion before transmission into a mass-selective quadrupole. The number of ions that reach the ICR cell is increased by an order of magnitude for the funnel/quadrupole relative to the tube lens/skimmer/octopole. PMID:25601704

  10. Density profiles of different negative ion mass groups at Titan as observed by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of heavy negative ions by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer (ELS) in Titan's ionosphere (Coates et al., 2007, Waite et al., 2007) suggests that complex hydrocarbon and nitrile processes occur in Titan's upper atmosphere which are also linked to haze formation. Negative ions are observed during Titan encounters at altitudes different mass groups as reported by Coates et al. (2007). These have been updated by Wellbrock et al. (2013) who performed a study investigating trends of mass groups with altitude using data from 34 negative ion encounters. We continue this work here by studying individual flybys in more detail. We investigate density profiles for different mass groups and total densities.

  11. Pushing the accelerator - speeding up drug research with accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, R.C. E-mail: colin.garner@cbams.co.uk; Leong, D

    2000-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive analytical method yet developed for elemental isotope analysis and has a broad range of applications. The measurement of {sup 14}C is of most interest to biomedical researchers but few studies have been reported using AMS in drug discovery and development. For biomedical use, {sup 14}C is incorporated into organic molecules by either radiosynthesis or biosynthetically and the isotope is used as a surrogate for the distribution of the radiolabelled molecule either in animal or human studies. The majority of users of {sup 14}C quantitate the radioactivity using decay counting usually with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Our Centre over the past 12 months has been evaluating and validating the use of AMS as an alternative detection method. In vitro spiking studies of human plasma with {sup 14}C-Fluconazole, a prescription antifungal drug has demonstrated an excellent correlation between AMS and LSC (correlation coefficient 0.999). Human Phase I clinical studies have been conducted with radioactive doses ranging from 120 Bq (7000 dpm) to 11 kBq (300 nCi) to provide mass balance, plasma concentration and radioactive metabolite profiling data. Limits of detection of 0.00022 Bq {sup 14}C-labelled drug/ml plasma have been accurately quantitated in a plasma background of 0.0078 Bq/ml (0.013 dpm/ml in a plasma background of 0.47 dpm/ml or 2.72 pMC in a background of 90.19 pMC)

  12. Mass measurements on stable nuclides in the rare-earth region with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaer, J.; Audi, G.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Droese, C.; Dworschak, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.; Wang, M.

    2011-07-01

    The masses of 15 stable nuclides in the rare-earth region have been measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. This is the first series of absolute mass measurements linking these nuclides to the atomic-mass standard C12. Previously, nuclear reaction studies almost exclusively determined the literature values of these masses in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. The TRIGA-TRAP results show deviations on the order of 3-4 standard deviations from the latest published values of the Atomic-Mass Evaluation 2003 for some cases. However, the binding-energy differences that are important for nuclear structure studies have been confirmed and improved. The new masses are discussed in the context of valence proton-neutron interactions using double differences of binding energies, δVpn(Z,N).

  13. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-08

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  14. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  15. Sample preparation for quantitation of tritium by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Dingley, Karen H; Roberts, Mark L; Velsko, Carol A; Love, Adam H

    2002-12-15

    The capability to prepare samples accurately and reproducibly for analysis of tritium (3H) content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) greatly facilitates isotopic tracer studies in which attomole levels of 3H can be measured in milligram-sized samples. A method has been developed to convert the hydrogen of organic samples to a solid, titanium hydride, which can be analyzed by AMS. Using a two-step process, the sample is first oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. In the second step, the water is transferred within a heated manifold into a quartz tube, reduced to hydrogen gas using zinc, and reacted with titanium powder. The 3H/1H ratio of the titanium hydride is measured by AMS and normalized to standards whose ratios were determined by decay counting to calculate the amount of 3H in the original sample. Water, organic compounds, and biological samples with 3H activities measured by liquid scintillation counting were utilized to develop and validate the method. The 3H/1H ratios were quantified in samples that spanned 5 orders of magnitude, from 10(-10) to 10(-15), with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10(-15), which is equivalent to 0.02 dpm tritium/mg of material. Samples smaller than 2 mg were analyzed following addition of 2 mg of a tritium-free-hydrogen carrier. Preparation of organic standards containing both 14C and 3H in 2-mg organic samples demonstrated that this sample preparation methodology can also be applied to quantify both of these isotopes from a single sample.

  16. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    Funding was received from NA-22 to investigate transitioning iodine isotopic analyses to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The present method uses gas-phase chemistry followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). It was anticipated that the AMS approach could provide comparable data, with improved background levels and superior sample throughput. An aqueous extraction method was developed for removal of iodine species from high-volume air filters. Ethanol and sodium hydroxide, plus heating and ultrasonic treatment, were used to successfully extract iodine from loaded high-volume air filters. Portions of the same filters were also processed in the traditional method and analyzed by TIMS for comparison. Aliquot parts of the aqueous extracts were analyzed by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel visited several AMS laboratories in the US, Spain, and Switzerland. Experience with AMS systems from several manufacturers was gained, and relationships were developed with key personnel at the laboratories. Three batches of samples were analyzed in Switzerland, and one in Spain. Results show that the INL extraction method successfully extracted enough iodine from high-volume air filters to allow AMS analysis. Comparison of the AMS and TIMS data is very encouraging; while the TIMS showed about forty percent more atoms of 129I, the 129/127 ratios tracked each other very well between the two methods. The time required for analysis is greatly reduced for the aqueous extraction/AMS approach. For a hypothetical batch of thirty samples, the AMS methodology is about five times faster than the traditional gas-phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than for TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and cleanup of molecular interferences. We showed that an aqueous extraction of high

  17. Aseptic Handling of the MOMA Mass Spectrometer After Dry Heat Microbial Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalime, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS) is an instrument in the larger MOMA instrument suite for the European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars 2020 Rover. As a life-detection instrument on a Mars landing mission, MOMA-MS has very stringent Planetary Protection (PP) bioburden requirements. Within the MOMA instrument suite, the hardware surfaces of the sample path must be cleaned to a level of 0.03 spore/sq m. To meet this requirement, a process called Dry Heat Microbial Reduction (DHMR) is used to decrease the number of viable spores by 4 orders of magnitude. Before DHMR, the hardware is handled using standard cleanroom practices, while after DHMR, all sample path surfaces must be handled aseptically when exposed. Aseptic handling of the sample path involves a number of strategies and protocols including working only in an aseptic ISO class 5 work space, limiting the amount of time of exposure, using sterile garmenting with sterile gloves, and using sterile tools. Before work begins, the aseptic workspace will be tested for bioburden and particle fallout, and all tools that will contact sample path surfaces must be sterilized. During the exposure activity, sterile garments will be worn, sterile tools will be handled in a 2 person set up so that the operator touches only the sterile tool and not the exterior surfaces of the sterile pouch, and the environment will be monitored with active and passive fallout for bioburden and particle levels. Any breach in the planetary protection cleanliness can necessitate repeating DHMR, which not only has significant cost and schedule implications, it also become a risk to hardware that is not rated for repeated long exposures to high temperatures.

  18. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  19. Optimizing the Parameters Governing the Fragmentation of Cross-Linked Peptides in a Tribrid Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbowski, Lars; Mendes, Marta L; Rappsilber, Juri

    2017-05-16

    We compared the five different ways of fragmentation available on a tribrid mass spectrometer and optimized their collision energies with regard to optimal sequence coverage of cross-linked peptides. We created a library of bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3/DSS) cross-linked precursors, derived from the tryptic digests of three model proteins (Human Serum Albumin, creatine kinase, and myoglobin). This enabled in-depth targeted analysis of the fragmentation behavior of 1065 cross-linked precursors using the five fragmentation techniques: collision-induced dissociation (CID), beam-type CID (HCD), electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), and the combinations ETciD and EThcD. EThcD gave the best sequence coverage for cross-linked m/z species with high charge density, while HCD was optimal for all others. We tested the resulting data-dependent decision tree against collision energy-optimized single methods on two samples of differing complexity (a mix of eight proteins and a highly complex ribosomal cellular fraction). For the high complexity sample the decision tree gave the highest number of identified cross-linked peptide pairs passing a 5% false discovery rate (on average ∼21% more than the second best, HCD). For the medium complexity sample, the higher speed of HCD proved decisive. Currently, acquisition speed plays an important role in allowing the detection of cross-linked peptides against the background of linear peptides. Enrichment of cross-linked peptides will reduce this role and favor methods that provide spectra of higher quality. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006131.

  20. Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

    2014-11-19

    We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  1. Airborne observations of formic acid using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of formic acid mixing ratios over the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft on 16 March 2010 with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I reagent ions. The I ionization scheme was able to measure formic acid mixing ratios at 1 Hz in the boundary layer.

    In-flight standard addition calibrations from a formic acid source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 35 ± 6 ion counts pptv−1 s−1 and a limit of detection of 25 pptv. Routine measurements were made through a scrubbed inlet to determine the instrumental background. Three plumes of formic acid were observed over the UK, originating from London, Humberside and Tyneside. The London plume had the highest formic acid mixing ratio throughout the flight, peaking at 358 pptv. No significant correlations of formic acid with NOx and ozone were found, but a positive correlation was observed between CO and HCOOH within the two plumes where coincident data were recorded.

    A trajectory model was employed to determine the sources of the plumes and compare modelled mixing ratios with measured values. The model underestimated formic acid concentrations by up to a factor of 2. This is explained by missing sources in the model, which were considered to be both primary emissions of formic acid of mainly anthropogenic origin and a lack of precursor emissions, such as isoprene, from biogenic sources, whose oxidation in situ would lead to formic acid formation.

  2. Integrated mass spectrometer-microreactor system for the in situ investigation of oxide semiconductor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, R.; Hárs, G.; Perczel, I. V.; Réti, F.

    1998-09-01

    This work describes the construction of an experimental setup — a mass spectrometer coupled microreactor — which makes possible the simultaneous monitoring of the electric resistance of a solid sensor sample and the composition of the near surface gas atmosphere. The information obtained from the constant voltage resistance measurement is complemented by the information about of the near-sensor gas composition. The evaluation of both sets of results offers insight into the mechanism of the sensing process. As an example, the results obtained on an undoped, oven-heated CeO2 sensor sample is presented, in a CO and oxygen containing atmosphere between 25 and 900 °C. It was found that between 200 and 300 °C the decrease in the sensor resistance is mainly due to the CO chemisorption. In this temperature range the oxidation of CO is negligible. The CO sensitivity decreases with the temperature in the whole interval examined. However, its value is the highest in this temperature range due to the relatively high surface coverage. In the 300-400 °C range the most important process is the gas phase oxidation of the CO; about 85% of it is transformed. The transformation of CO leads to a smaller surface coverage, and so to a decreasing — but still high enough — sensitivity. A further temperature rise hinders the CO chemisorption and the lack of chemisorption results in no CO sensitivity. It is noted that even the catalytic effect of the CeO2 sample is important in the studied system; its effect on the near-sensor gas composition is easily detectable. The maximum catalytic activity of CeO2 in the CO oxidation was found to be around 400 °C.

  3. Direct Chemical Analysis of Solids by Laser Ablation in an Ion-Storage Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D; Russo, R E

    2003-09-29

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct analysis of solids, particles, and fibers. The system uses a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode, coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The sample is inserted radially into the ring electrode and an imaging system allows direct viewing and selected analysis of the sample. Measurements identified trace contaminants of Ag, Sn, and Sb in a Pb target with single laser-shot experiments. Resolution (m/{micro}m) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  4. Proof of Concept Coded Aperture Miniature Mass Spectrometer Using a Cycloidal Sector Mass Analyzer, a Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Field Emission Electron Ionization Source, and an Array Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J.; Herr, Philip J.; Landry, David M. W.; Kim, William; Vyas, Raul; Parker, Charles B.; Kirley, Matthew P.; Keil, Adam D.; Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Hall, Stephen D.; Carlson, James B.; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Stokes, David; Di Dona, Shane T.; Russell, Zachary E.; Grego, Sonia; Edwards, Steven J.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Stoner, Brian R.; Gehm, Michael E.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2017-10-01

    Despite many potential applications, miniature mass spectrometers have had limited adoption in the field due to the tradeoff between throughput and resolution that limits their performance relative to laboratory instruments. Recently, a solution to this tradeoff has been demonstrated by using spatially coded apertures in magnetic sector mass spectrometers, enabling throughput and signal-to-background improvements of greater than an order of magnitude with no loss of resolution. This paper describes a proof of concept demonstration of a cycloidal coded aperture miniature mass spectrometer (C-CAMMS) demonstrating use of spatially coded apertures in a cycloidal sector mass analyzer for the first time. C-CAMMS also incorporates a miniature carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron ionization source and a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) ion array detector. Results confirm the cycloidal mass analyzer's compatibility with aperture coding. A >10× increase in throughput was achieved without loss of resolution compared with a single slit instrument. Several areas where additional improvement can be realized are identified. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  6. Gaseous composition measured by a chemical ionization mass spectrometer in fresh and aged ship plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxon, Cameron; Psichoudaki, Magda; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Hallquist, Åsa; Thomson, Erik; Pettersson, Jan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    The port of Gothenburg is the largest port of the Nordic countries with numerous ships calling the port daily. The ship exhausts contain numerous pollutants including gases such as SO2 and NOx as well as particulate matter and soot. The exhaust also contains numerous organic compounds, a large fraction of which are unidentified. These organics are oxidized in the atmosphere producing more oxygenated and potentially less volatile compounds that may contribute to the secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This work focuses on the characterization of fresh gaseous species present in the exhaust plumes of the passing ships and also on their photochemical aging. Between 26 September and 12 November 2014 measurements were conducted at a sampling site located on a small peninsula at the entrance of Gothenburg's port. The campaign was divided in two periods. During the first period, the fresh plumes of the passing ships were measured through a main inlet. During the second period, the sample passed through the same inlet and was then introduced into a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) reactor. The PAM reactor uses UV lamps and high concentrations of oxidants (OH radicals and O3) to oxidize the organic species present in the plumes. The oxidation that takes place within the reactor can be equivalent to up to one week of atmospheric oxidation. Preliminary tests showed that the oxidation employed in the current camping corresponded to 3.4 days in the atmosphere. A Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) was employed to monitor the concentration of different organic species present in the fresh and aged plumes. Water (positive) and iodide (negative) ionization methods were employed were water was primarily used for fresh plumes (large fraction of non-polar compounds) while iodide was used for the aged plumes (primarily oxidised products). The H2O, O3 and SO2 concentrations inside the PAM chamber were monitored, and an organic tracer for OH exposure determination

  7. On the potential of lower limb muscles to accelerate the body's centre of mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Pandy, Marcus G

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of lower limb muscle function during gait or other common activities may be achieved using an induced acceleration analysis, which determines the contributions of individual muscles to the accelerations of the body's centre of mass. However, this analysis is reliant on a mathematical optimisation for the distribution of net joint moments among muscles. One approach that overcomes this limitation is the calculation of a muscle's potential to accelerate the centre of mass based on either a unit-force or maximum-activation assumption. Unit-force muscle potential accelerations are determined by calculating the accelerations induced by a 1 N muscle force, whereas maximum-activation muscle potential accelerations are determined by calculating the accelerations induced by a maximally activated muscle. The aim of this study was to describe the acceleration potentials of major lower limb muscles during normal walking obtained from these two techniques, and to evaluate the results relative to absolute (optimisation-based) muscle-induced accelerations. Dynamic simulations of walking were generated for 10 able-bodied children using musculoskeletal models, and potential- and absolute induced accelerations were calculated using a perturbation method. While the potential accelerations often correctly identified the major contributors to centre-of-mass acceleration, they were noticeably different in magnitude and timing from the absolute induced accelerations. Potential induced accelerations predicted by the maximum-activation technique, which accounts for the force-generating properties of muscle, were no more consistent with absolute induced accelerations than unit-force potential accelerations. The techniques described may assist treatment decisions through quantitative analyses of common gait abnormalities and/or clinical interventions.

  8. In situ quantification and tracking of volatile organic compounds with a portable mass spectrometer in tropical waste and urban sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocoste, Thomas; Jacoby-Koaly, Sandra; Petit, Rose-Helen; Molinié, Jack; Roussas, André

    2017-09-01

    This study outlines an experimental method for landfill volatile organic compounds (VOCs) characterization by means of a portable time-of-flight mass spectrometer in an insular tropical environment. The concentrations of six VOCs, three aromatic and three chlorinated compounds, frequently identified in landfill gas plume were determined in the main municipal solid waste of Guadeloupe archipelago and its surrounding areas (in the Leeward Islands). Measurements were carried out for various stages of waste degradation. Without mechanical forcing on the waste piles, the results for aromatic and chlorinated compounds showed much higher concentrations at covered waste. Benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene were easily detected by the portable mass spectrometer in the air matrix with concentrations significantly greater than the equipment limit of detection (LOD) estimates. Trichloroethylene is not often measured by the mass spectrometer and very few calculated concentrations reach the instrument LOD. For sites near the landfill, using the sum trichloroethylene + tetrachlororethylene as tracer, it was observed that the most affected locations are under the wind of the landfill plume. Moreover, under certain atmospheric conditions, most of the surrounding area, downwind and upwind, can undergo an increase of the tracer concentration levels, as shown in the paper during a dust outbreak.

  9. Observations of the Coronal Mass Ejection with a Complex Acceleration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Kirichenko, A. S.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    We study the coronal mass ejection (CME) with a complex acceleration profile. The event occurred on 2009 April 23. It had an impulsive acceleration phase, an impulsive deceleration phase, and a second impulsive acceleration phase. During its evolution, the CME showed signatures of different acceleration mechanisms: kink instability, prominence drainage, flare reconnection, and a CME–CME collision. The special feature of the observations is the usage of the TESIS EUV telescope. The instrument could image the solar corona in the Fe 171 Å line up to a distance of 2 {R}ȯ from the center of the Sun. This allows us to trace the CME up to the LASCO/C2 field of view without losing the CME from sight. The onset of the CME was caused by kink instability. The mass drainage occurred after the kink instability. The mass drainage played only an auxiliary role: it decreased the CME mass, which helped to accelerate the CME. The first impulsive acceleration phase was caused by the flare reconnection. We observed the two-ribbon flare and an increase of the soft X-ray flux during the first impulsive acceleration phase. The impulsive deceleration and the second impulsive acceleration phases were caused by the CME–CME collision. The studied event shows that CMEs are complex phenomena that cannot be explained with only one acceleration mechanism. We should seek a combination of different mechanisms that accelerate CMEs at different stages of their evolution.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the heaviest long-lived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1 Vitaly Liechtenstein2. Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Institute for Isotopic Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Russian Research Center, “Kurchatov Institute”, Institute of Nuclear Fusion, ...

  11. CBNM isotopic reference material set for testing linearity of isotope mass spectrometers (CBNM IRM 072/1-15)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lycke, W.; Bievre, P. de; Verbruggen, A.; Hendrickx, F.; Rosman, K.

    1988-06-01

    Any mass spectrometric measurement system has inherent inaccuracies caused by isotope fractionation in the ion source and non-linearity of the detector and or measurement system. A set of well known triple isotope mixtures is an excellent means to verify and correct non-linearity of the mass spectrometer detector and measurement system after the isotope fractionation has been corrected for. CBNM IRM 072/1-15 is a set of such mixtures. Its preparation and characterization is described. It is available for interested users.

  12. Proteomics: from hypothesis to quantitative assay on a single platform. Guidelines for developing MRM assays using ion trap mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bomie; Higgs, Richard E

    2008-09-01

    High-throughput HPLC-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) is routinely used to profile biological samples for potential protein markers of disease, drug efficacy and toxicity. The discovery technology has advanced to the point where translating hypotheses from proteomic profiling studies into clinical use is the bottleneck to realizing the full potential of these approaches. The first step in this translation is the development and analytical validation of a higher throughput assay with improved sensitivity and selectivity relative to typical profiling assays. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays are an attractive approach for this stage of biomarker development given their improved sensitivity and specificity, the speed at which the assays can be developed and the quantitative nature of the assay. While the profiling assays are performed with ion trap mass spectrometers, MRM assays are traditionally developed in quadrupole-based mass spectrometers. Development of MRM assays from the same instrument used in the profiling analysis enables a seamless and rapid transition from hypothesis generation to validation. This report provides guidelines for rapidly developing an MRM assay using the same mass spectrometry platform used for profiling experiments (typically ion traps) and reviews methodological and analytical validation considerations. The analytical validation guidelines presented are drawn from existing practices on immunological assays and are applicable to any mass spectrometry platform technology.

  13. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  14. Organic chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and its astrobiological consequences: I. Views towards Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) and ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Sittler, E. C.; Chornay, D.; Rowe, B. R.; Puzzarini, C.

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of carbocations and carbanions by Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft in Titan's upper atmosphere is truly amazing for astrochemists and astrobiologists. In this paper we identify the reaction mechanisms for the growth of the complex macromolecules observed by the CAPS Ion Beam Spectrometer (IBS) and Electron Spectrometer (ELS). This identification is based on a recently published paper (Ali et al., 2013. Planet. Space Sci. 87, 96) which emphasizes the role of Olah's nonclassical carbonium ion chemistry in the synthesis of the organic molecules observed in Titan's thermosphere and ionosphere by INMS. The main conclusion of that work was the demonstration of the presence of the cyclopropenyl cation - the simplest Huckel's aromatic molecule - and its cyclic methyl derivatives in Titan's atmosphere at high altitudes. In this study, we present the transition from simple aromatic molecules to the complex ortho-bridged bi- and tri-cyclic hydrocarbons, e.g., CH2+ mono-substituted naphthalene and phenanthrene, as well as the ortho- and peri-bridged tri-cyclic aromatic ring, e.g., perinaphthenyl cation. These rings could further grow into tetra-cyclic and the higher order ring polymers in Titan's upper atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Cassini observations, the nitrogen chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere is found to be extremely rich. A variety of N-containing hydrocarbons including the N-heterocycles where a CH group in the polycyclic rings mentioned above is replaced by an N atom, e.g., CH2+ substituted derivative of quinoline (benzopyridine), are found to be dominant in Titan's upper atmosphere. The mechanisms for the formation of complex molecular anions are discussed as well. It is proposed that many closed-shell complex carbocations after their formation first, in Titan's upper atmosphere, undergo the kinetics of electron recombination to form open-shell neutral

  15. A Micro-Cylindrical Ion Trap (5-CIT) Micro-Mass Spectrometer Instrument System (5-MSIS) for NASA Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This activity will significantly increase the fidelity of the miniaturized component packaging of the µ-CIT mass spectrometer assembly. Our design approach...

  16. A Micro-Cylindrical Ion Trap (B5-CIT) Micro-Mass Spectrometer Instrument System (B5-MSIS) for NASA Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This activity will significantly increase the fidelity of the miniaturized component packaging of the μ-CIT mass spectrometer assembly. Our design approach...

  17. Low CO/CO2 ratios of comet 67P measured at the Abydos landing site by the Ptolemy mass spectrometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, A; Mousis, O; Sheridan, S; Morgan, G; Andrews, D; Barber, S; Wright, I

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we report the direct in situ measurement of H2O, CO, and CO2 by the Ptolemy mass spectrometer onboard the Philae lander, part of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, at the Abydos site...

  18. Real-time monitoring of trace-level VOCs by an ultrasensitive lamp-based VUV photoionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. Q.; Shu, J. N.; Zhang, P.; Li, Z.; Li, N. N.; Liang, M.; Yang, B.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a lamp-based vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer (VUV-PIMS) in our laboratory; it is composed of a radio-frequency-powered VUV lamp, a VUV photoionizer, an ion-migration lens assembly, and a reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By utilizing the novel photoionizer consisting of a photoionization cavity and a VUV light baffle, the baselines of the mass spectra decreased from 263.6 ± 15.7 counts to 4.1 ± 1.8 counts. A detection limit (2σ) of 3 pptv was achieved for benzene after an acquisition time of 10 s. To examine its potential for real-time monitoring applications of samples, the developed VUV-PIMS was employed for the continuous measurement of urban air for 6 days in Beijing, China. Strong signals of trace-level volatile organic compounds, such as benzene and its alkylated derivatives, were observed in the mass spectra. These initial experimental results reveal that the instrument can be used for the online monitoring of trace-level species in the atmosphere.

  19. Acceleration of Mass Losses and Mass Gains of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from 1992 to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. J.; Li, J.; Robbins, J. W.; Yi, D.

    2016-12-01

    A review of Antarctic mass balance that separated pre-2012 studies and 2012 studies (Hanna et al., 2013) showed the evolution toward results that are more-narrowly distributed between +100 Gt/yr and -100 Gt/yr, with the deletion of earlier more negative values except for a more negative IOM estimate. Subsequent analysis (Zwally et al., 2015) of ICESat data (2003-08) showed mass gains from snow accumulation exceeded discharge losses by 82 ± 25 Gt/yr, reducing global sea-level rise by 0.23 mm/yr, which was consistent with the gain of 112 ± 61 Gt/yr from ERS1/ERS2 (1992-2001). Gains of 136 Gt/yr in East Antarctica and 72 Gt/yr in four drainage systems in West Antarctic exceeded losses of 97 Gt/yr from three coastal DS and 29 Gt/yr from the Antarctic Peninsula. East Antarctic dynamic thickening of 147 Gt/yr was interpreted as a continuing long-term response to increased accumulation (>50%) beginning in the early Holocene. In this paper, we describe newly-constructed time-series (for 2003-2009) of the total mass changes, MT(t), the accumulation-driven component, Ma(t), and the dynamic-driven component, Md(t), by DS, regions, coastal, inland, and overall, as well as similar time-series for 1992-2001. These series are analyzed to characterize the linear and second orders changes, which characterize the time varying effects of accumulation/snowfall variations and the dynamic changes. Published time-series of GRACE mass changes are used to extend the analysis to 2016. Results show an acceleration of dynamic losses in West Antarctic and the Antarctic Peninsula that are partially offset by increases in snowfall. In East Antarctica, overall dynamic-driven changes are undetectable and accumulation-driven changes are small prior to 2009, followed by a significant accumulation-driven increase in the Queen Maud Land region. References:Hanna, E. and 11 others. (2013) Ice sheet mass balance and climate change, Nature 498, doi:10.1038/nature12238.Zwally, H. J., J. Li, J. W. Robbins

  20. Orbitrap for ILMA: Ion Laser Mass Analyser. A Mass-Spectrometer for In-Situ Characterization of a Near Earth Object (NEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, Roland; Thissen, R.; Arezki, B.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Briois, C.; Carrasco, N.; Gilbert, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krüger, H.; Makarov, A.; Pennanech, C.; Puget, P.; Quirico, E.; Szopa, C.; Thirkell, L.; Zapf, P.; Cottin, H.

    Like other small bodies of the Solar System, asteroids are the remnants of planet formation. Their compositions are inherited from the Solar Nebula at the time of planetesimal accretion into planets, 4.5 billion years ago. They are valuable objects to assess the physicochemical conditions prevailing at the time and place of their formation in the Solar Nebula. Among them, some are known to be rich in carbon and volatile species (including water), which suggests that they never underwent major heating and differentiation events. Their organic content is also of prime interest because the chemical evolution leading to life on Earth may have been initiated by the delivery of extraterrestrial organic compounds into primitive oceans. For these reasons, several space missions are currently considered by ESA and JAXA for a sample return mission to a primitive carbonaceous Near-Earth Object (NEO): MARCO POLO, HAYABUZA 2, etc... Their goal is to characterize a NEO at multiple scales via in-situ measurements by a science payload onboard an orbiter and a lander, and to bring samples back to Earth. ILMA is a concept for a new generation high resolution mass spectrometer, proposed to be part of a lander payload for in situ science. This instrument will be a Fourier Transform ion trap mass spectrometer using Laser Desorption and Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDIMS) into a single platform. To this end, an Orbitrap mass analyser (developed by the Thermofisher Company) will be coupled to a laser source. The sample will be exposed to the laser beam producing desorbed ions which will be collected into the ion trap using the orbital trapping method. Ions will be stabilized in the trap by purely electrostatic quadro-logarithmic electrical fields and the detection undertaken by a non destructive measurement of the ion oscillation frequency inside the trap. Indeed, the trapped ions induce a periodic signal converted using Fourier Transform (FT) into an ultra-high mass resolution spectrum

  1. Development of a mass spectrometer for planetary exosphere exploration: from simulations to a flight like design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The exploration of habitable environments around the gas giants in the Solar System is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of ESA, which will characterise Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats [1], [2]. We developed a prototype of the Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for the JUICE mission intended for composition measurements of neutral gas and thermal plasma [3]. NIM/PEP will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. Besides direct ion measurement, the NIM instrument is able to measure the inflowing neutral gas in two different modes: in neutral mode the gas enters directly the ion source (open source) and in thermal mode, the gas gets thermally accommodated to wall temperature by several collisions inside an equilibrium sphere before entering the ion source (closed source). We started the development of NIM with detailed ion-optical simulations and optimisations using SIMION software. Based on the ion-optical design we developed a prototype of NIM with several iterations. We tested the prototype NIM under realistic mission conditions and thereby successfully verified its required functionality. We will present the development process from ion-optical simulation up to NIM prototype test results and the concluded flight like design. Furthermore, we will provide an insight into the working principle of NIM and its performance, based on measurement data. References: 1) ESA, "JUICE assessment study report (Yellow Book)", ESA/SRE(2011)18, 2012. 2) O. Grasset, M.K. Dougherty, A. Coustenis, E.J. Bunce, C. Erd, D. Titov, M. Blanc, A. Coates, P. Drossart, L.N. Fletcher, H. Hussmann, R. Jaumann, N. Krupp, J.-P. Lebreton, O. Prieto-Ballesteros, P. Tortora, F. Tosi, T. Van Hoolst, "JUpiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE): An ESA mission to orbit Ganymede

  2. Continuous Measurements of Dissolved Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe Ratios with a Field-Deployable Gas Equilibration Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Cara C; Stanley, Rachel H R; Lott, Dempsey E

    2016-03-15

    Noble gases dissolved in natural waters are useful tracers for quantifying physical processes. Here, we describe a field-deployable gas equilibration mass spectrometer (GEMS) that provides continuous, real-time measurements of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe mole ratios in natural waters. Gas is equilibrated with a membrane contactor cartridge and measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, after in-line purification with reactive metal alloy getters. We use an electron energy of 35 V for Ne to eliminate isobaric interferences, and a higher electron energy for the other gases to improve sensitivity. The precision is 0.7% or better and 1.0% or better for all mole ratios when the instrument is installed in a temperature-controlled environment and a variable-temperature environment, respectively. In the lab, the accuracy is 0.9% or better for all gas ratios using air as the only calibration standard. In the field (and/or at greater levels of disequilbrium), the accuracy is 0.7% or better for Ne/Kr, Ne/Ar, and Ar/Kr, and 2.5% or better for Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe using air as the only calibration standard. The field accuracy improves to 0.6% or better for Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe when the data is calibrated using discrete water samples run on a laboratory-based mass spectrometer. The e-folding response time is 90-410 s. This instrument enables the collection of a large number of continuous, high-precision and accuracy noble gas measurements at substantially reduced cost and labor compared to traditional methods.

  3. Comparing Theory and Experiment for Analyte Transport in the First Vacuum Stage of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachreson, Matthew R.

    The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used in laboratories for many years. The majority of the improvements to the instrument have been done empirically through trial and error. A few fluid models have been made, which have given a general description of the flow through the mass spectrometer interface. However, due to long mean free path effects and other factors, it is very difficult to simulate the flow details well enough to predict how changing the interface design will change the formation of the ion beam. Towards this end, Spencer et al. developed FENIX, a direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm capable of modeling this transitional flow through the mass spectrometer interface, the transitional flow from disorganized plasma to focused ion beam. Their previous work describes how FENIX simulates the neutral ion flow. While understanding the argon flow is essential to understanding the ICP-MS, the true goal is to improve its analyte detection capabilities. In this work, we develop a model for adding analyte to FENIX and compare it to previously collected experimental data. We also calculate how much ambipolar fields, plasma sheaths, and electron-ion recombination affect the ion beam formation. We find that behind the sampling interface there is no evidence of turbulent mixing. The behavior of the analyte seems to be described simply by convection and diffusion. Also, ambipolar field effects are small and do not significantly affect ion beam formation between the sampler and skimmer cones. We also find that the plasma sheath that forms around the sampling cone does not significantly affect the analyte flow downstream from the skimmer. However, it does thermally insulate the electrons from the sampling cone, which reduces ion-electron recombination. We also develop a model for electron-ion recombination. By comparing it to experimental data, we find that significant amounts of electron-ion recombination occurs just downstream from the

  4. Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Composition Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer: New York 2001 Supersite Summer Intensive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnick, F.; Schwab, J. J.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    A summer field measurement campaign in Queens, New York during July 2001 was operated as part of the PM2.5 Technology Assessment and Characterization Study in New York (PMTACS-NY) Supersite program. During this study several state-of-the art aerosol instruments were deployed including an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne Research, Inc.). This AMS is designed to deliver quantitative information on mass loadings and size-resolved mass distributions of volatile and semi-volatile aerosol chemical species. AMS aerosol mass concentration measurements made during the campaign indicated significant contributions of sulfate and organic species to the total aerosol mass concentration. Sulfate, ranging from 0.05 μg/m3 for clean days to 53 μg/m3 for the most polluted period, had a median concentration of 2.6 μg/m3. The total organics mass concentration, with a median mass concentration of 2.7 μg/m3, ranged from 0.5 μg/m3 up to 29 μg/m3. In addition species-resolved size distribution measurements for sulfate, nitrate and organic aerosol particles indicate that sulfate and nitrate occur mainly internally mixed while the organic particles show a completely different size distribution, reflecting their different sources. AMS mass concentration measurements combined with total aerosol mass concentration data from a co-located TEOM are used to provide a continuous mass balance with 10-min time resolution. Diurnal patterns of absolute sulfate, nitrate and organics mass concentration as well as diurnal patterns of relative contributions of different types of organic particles are calculated using the AMS mass concentration data. Typical size distributions as well as the evolution processes of particulate sulfate size distributions are presented, measured during high background concentrations of organic particles. In addition, capabilities and limitations of the AMS instrument, as indicated by laboratory testing and evaluation studies in the laboratory and in the field

  5. Reduction and scientific analysis of data from the charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Charge-Energy-Mass (CHEM) spectrometer instrument on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft is designed to measure the mass and charge-state abundance of magnetospheric and magnetosheath ions between 0.3 and 315 keV/e, an energy range that includes the bulk of the ring current and the dynamically important portion of the plasma sheet population. Continuing research is being conducted using the AMPTE mission data set, and in particular, that of the CHEM spectrometer which has operated flawlessly since launch and still provides excellent quality data. The requirted routine data processing and reduction, and software develpment continues to be performed. Scientific analysis of composition data in a number of magnetospheric regions including the ring current region, near-earth plasma sheet and subsolar magnetosheath continues to be undertaken. Correlative studies using data from the sister instrument SULEICA, which determines the mass and charge states of ions in the energy range of approximately 10 to 250 keV/e on the IRM, as well as other data from the CCE and IRM spacecraft, particularly in the upstream region and plasma sheet have also been undertaken.

  6. A quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for in-situ UHV analyses on Earth and other planetary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. E.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Simcic, J.; Farley, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The JPL quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer presents an exceptional opportunity for combining cutting edge terrestrial geochemical research with the next generation of extraterrestrial science. The QIT is a small mass spectrometer that filters particles of different mass by electron ionization and subsequent separation with a quadrupole RF field. The latest version is capable of achieving very high resolution (R > 1000) without an increase in power consumption through the addition of a dipole RF to augment the primary quadrupole field. Crucially, we demonstrate the ability to achieve this resolution with high sensitivity (> 1014 cps/Torr), and at UHV without the addition of a cooling gas. In this mode, the high sensitivity and extremely low background allow the measurement of a large number of species in very small samples. Most laboratory instruments are too heavy, large, and energy-intensive to fly on spacecraft in their optimal forms. As a result, instruments for spaceflight have traditionally been heavily-modified versions of terrestrial instruments, designed to be lighter, smaller, and more efficient than their terrestrial counterparts, at the expense of analytical capabilities. The JPL QIT, in contrast, weighs less than 1 kg, is only a few cm in size, and consumes less than 30W. Only the accompanying UHV system and supporting electronics must be extensively redesigned for spaceflight, and NASA already possesses pumps capable of fulfilling this need. The opportunity for parallel development for terrestrial and extraterrestrial labs and the capability of direct comparison between planetary science and terrestrial geochemistry will benefit both fields.

  7. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  8. Real-time monitoring of trace-level VOCs by an ultrasensitive compact lamp-based VUV photoionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. Q.; Shu, J. N.; Zhang, P.; Li, Z.; Li, N. N.; Liang, M.; Yang, B.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a compact lamp-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometer (PIMS; hereafter referred to as VUV-PIMS) in our laboratory; it is composed of a radio frequency-powered VUV lamp, a VUV photoionizer, an ion-immigration region, and a reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By utilizing the novel photoionizer consisting of a photoionization cavity and a VUV light baffle, extremely low background noise was obtained. An ultrasensitive detection limit (2σ) of 3 pptv was achieved for benzene after an acquisition time of 10 s. To examine its potential for application in real-time sample monitoring, the developed VUV-PIMS was employed for the continuous measurement of urban air for six days in Beijing, China. Strong signals of trace-level volatile organic compounds such as benzene and its alkylated derivatives were observed in the mass spectra. These initial experimental results reveal that the instrument can be used for the online monitoring of trace-level species in the atmosphere.

  9. A Microchannel Inlet to Reduce High-Velocity Impact Fragmentation of Molecules in Orbital and Fly-by Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon; Anupriya, Anupriya; Sevy, Eric; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-10-01

    Closed source neutral mass spectrometers are often used on flyby missions to characterize the molecular components of planetary exospheres. In a typical closed source, neutrals are thermalized as they deflect off the walls within a spherical antechamber prior to ionization and mass analysis. However, the high kinetic energy of each molecule as it impacts the chamber can lead to fragmentation before the ionization region is reached. Due to this fragmentation, the original composition of the molecule can be altered, leading to ambiguous identification.Even knowing the fragmentation pathways that occur may not allow deconvolution of data to give the correct composition. Only stable, volatile fragments will be observed in the subsequent mass spectrometer and different organic compounds likely give similar fragmentation products. Simply detecting these products will not lead to unambiguous identication of the precursor molecules. Here, we present a hardware solution to this problem—an inlet that reduces the fragmentation of molecules that impact at high velocities.We present a microchannel inlet that reduces the impact fragmentation by allowing the molecules to dissipate kinetic energy faster than their respective dissociation lifetimes. Preliminary calculations indicate that impact-induced fragmentation will be reduced up to three orders of magnitude compared with conventional closed sources by using this inlet. The benefits of such an inlet apply to any orbital or flyby velocity. The microchannel inlet enables detection of semi-volatile molecules that were previously undetectable due to impact fragmentation.

  10. Performance assessment of a portable mass spectrometer using a linear ion trap operated in non-scanning mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulyte, Aurika; Zerega, Yves; Andre, Jacques; Brkic, Boris; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-11-30

    The desire for mass spectrometer portability provides the motivation for simpler, lighter electronics to deliver switched potentials applied to the electrodes of the linear ion trap operated in non-scanning mode. Using a novel method of modelling and theoretical analysis, we simulate the mass analyser performance under these unfavourable operating conditions. The electrical fields are simulated using the Charge Particle Optics software which employs the boundary element method. The ion trajectories are computed from the ion cage of the EI source to the interior of the trap where the ions are confined. The spatial/temporal ion distributions during injection are calculated from the individual ion trajectories computed with constant time-steps. Due to geometric non-linearities, βy  = 0 lines close to the apex of the stability diagram have been computed for different initial positions with zero initial velocities in order to define the acceptable maximum axial extension. The DC potential well depth has been estimated at about 15 eV from the axial velocity distribution, and the minimum time of ion injection at 120 μs from the temporal ion distribution. To ensure a mass separation of one unit and the confinement of the whole of the injected ions, buffer gas cooling is necessary to reduce the trajectory excursion amplitudes to 0.1 and 15 mm in the radial and axial directions, respectively. The portable mass spectrometer is predicted to achieve a mass resolution of better than one mass unit providing that helium buffer gas is used. An additional cooling sequence has to be added prior to moving the operating point toward the apex. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Composition and structure of Mars' upper atmosphere - Results from the neutral mass spectrometers on Viking 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    The upper atmospheric mass spectrometers flown on Viking 1 and 2 are described, and results obtained for the composition and structure of Mars' upper atmosphere are summarized. Carbon dioxide is the major constituent of the atmosphere at all heights below 180 km. The thermal structure of the upper atmosphere is complex and variable with average temperatures below 200 K for both Viking 1 and 2. The atmosphere is mixed to heights in excess of 120 km. The isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in the Martian atmosphere is similar to that in the terrestrial atmosphere: N-15 is enriched in Mars' atmosphere by a factor of 1.62 + or - 0.16.

  12. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, Pavel P., E-mail: povinec@fmph.uniba.sk; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-15

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  13. Negative ion electrospray of bromo- and chloroacetic acids and an evaluation of exact mass measurements with a bench-top time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debre; Budde; Song

    2000-09-01

    The negative ion electrospray mass spectra of six bromo- and chloroacetic acids were measured using two different electrospray interfaces and single quadrupole and bench-top time-of-flight mass spectrometers. With each acid at 50 microg/mL in aqueous methanol at pH 10, the anions observed included deprotonated molecules, adducts, and fragment ions. With each acid at 100 ng/mL in aqueous acetonitrile at pH 10, mainly deprotonated molecules are observed. The exact m/z measuring capability of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer was evaluated to assess the potential for the determination of the individual acids in mixtures without an on-line separation. Mean measurement errors were nearly always less than +/- 9 ppm and the majority were less than +/- 5 ppm. Potential interferences by substances having similar exact masses and the ability to form anions in aqueous solutions were evaluated. The estimated detection limits of the five regulated haloacetic acids in drinking water, without a sample preconcentration step, are in the range of 24-86 ng/mL, which is within about a factor of 10 of the levels required for routine monitoring of the acids. Actual drinking water samples were not analyzed pending the development of slightly more sensitive techniques and quantitative analytical procedures.

  14. Measurement of 59Ni and 63Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry at CIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; He, Ming; Ruan, Xiangdong; Xu, Yongning; Shen, Hongtao; Du, Liang; Xiao, Caijin; Dong, Kejun; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Xuran; Lan, Xiaoxi; Wu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Qingzhang; Cai, Li; Pang, Fangfang

    2015-10-01

    The long lived isotopes 59Ni and 63Ni can be used in many areas such as radioactive waste management, neutron dosimetry, cosmic radiation study, and so on. Based on the large accelerator and a big Q3D magnetic spectrometer, the measurement method for 59Ni and 63Ni is under development at the AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). By using the ΔE-Q3D technique with the Q3D magnetic spectrometer, the isobaric interferences were greatly reduced in the measurements of 59Ni and 63Ni. A four anode gas ionization chamber was then used to further identify isobars. With these techniques, the abundance sensitivities of 59Ni and 63Ni measurements are determined as 59Ni/Ni = 1 × 10-13 and 63Ni/Ni = 2 × 10-12, respectively.

  15. A novel approach to electron data background treatment in an online wide-angle spectrometer for laser-accelerated ion and electron bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F. H.; Bin, J. H.; Englbrecht, F.; Haffa, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Gao, Y.; Hartmann, J.; Hilz, P.; Kreuzer, C.; Ostermayr, T. M.; Rösch, T. F.; Speicher, M.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P. G.; Schreiber, J.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is driven by electrical fields emerging when target electrons absorb laser energy and consecutively leave the target material. A direct correlation between these electrons and the accelerated ions is thus to be expected and predicted by theoretical models. We report on a modified wide-angle spectrometer, allowing the simultaneous characterization of angularly resolved energy distributions of both ions and electrons. Equipped with online pixel detectors, the RadEye1 detectors, the investigation of this correlation gets attainable on a single shot basis. In addition to first insights, we present a novel approach for reliably extracting the primary electron energy distribution from the interfering secondary radiation background. This proves vitally important for quantitative extraction of average electron energies (temperatures) and emitted total charge.

  16. An aircraft-borne chemical ionization – ion trap mass spectrometer (CI-ITMS for fast PAN and PPN measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An airborne chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer instrument (CI-ITMS has been developed for tropospheric and stratospheric fast in-situ measurements of PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate and PPN (peroxypropionyl nitrate. The first scientific deployment of the FASTPEX instrument (FASTPEX = Fast Measurement of Peroxyacyl nitrates took place in the Arctic during 18 missions aboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon, within the framework of the POLARCAT-GRACE campaign in the summer of 2008. The FASTPEX instrument is described and characteristic properties of the employed ion trap mass spectrometer are discussed. Atmospheric data obtained at altitudes of up to ~12 km are presented, from the boundary layer to the lowermost stratosphere. Data were sampled with a time resolution of 2 s and a 2σ detection limit of 25 pmol mol−1. An isotopically labelled standard was used for a permanent on-line calibration. For this reason the accuracy of the PAN measurements is better than ±10% for mixing ratios greater than 200 pmol mol−1. PAN mixing ratios in the summer Arctic troposphere were in the order of a few hundred pmol mol−1 and generally correlated well with CO. In the Arctic boundary layer and lowermost stratosphere smaller PAN mixing ratios were observed due to a combination of missing local sources of PAN precursor gases and efficient removal processes (thermolysis/photolysis. PPN, the second most abundant PAN homologue, was measured simultaneously. Observed PPN/PAN ratios range between ~0.03 and 0.3.

  17. LAVA Subsystem Integration and Testing for the RESOLVE Payload of the Resource Prospector Mission: Mass Spectrometers and Gas Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Mary R.; Stewart, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload is part of Resource Prospector (RP) along with a rover and a lander that are expected to launch in 2020. RP will identify volatile elements that may be combined and collected to be used for fuel, air, and water in order to enable deeper space exploration. The Resource Prospector mission is a key part of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). The demand for this method of utilizing resources at the site of exploration is increasing due to the cost of resupply missions and deep space exploration goals. The RESOLVE payload includes the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. The main instrument used to identify the volatiles evolved from the lunar regolith is the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS). LAVA analyzes the volatiles emitted from the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) Subsystem. The objective of OVEN is to obtain, weigh, heat and transfer evolved gases to LAVA through the connection between the two subsystems called the LOVEN line. This paper highlights the work completed during a ten week internship that involved the integration, testing, data analysis, and procedure documentation of two candidate mass spectrometers for the LAVA subsystem in order to aid in determining which model to use for flight. Additionally, the examination of data from the integrated Resource Prospector '15 (RP' 15) field test will be presented in order to characterize the amount of water detected from water doped regolith samples.

  18. A satellite-borne ion mass spectrometer for the energy range 0 to 16 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsiger, H.; Eberhardt, P.; Geiss, J.; Ghielmetti, A.; Walker, H. P.; Young, D. T.; Loidl, H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1976-01-01

    The Ion Composition Experiment (ICE) on GEOS represents the first comprehensive attempt to measure the positive ion composition at high altitudes in the magnetosphere. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the magnetospheric plasma a novel mass spectrometer has been developed to cover the mass per charge range from H-1(+) to beyond Ba-138(+) and the energy per charge range from 0 to 16 keV/e. The ICE consists primarily of a cylindrical electrostatic analyzer followed by a curved analyzer incorporating crossed magnetic and electric fields. This combination has limited angular and energy focusing properties, but it maintains a mass resolution of about 4 over a wide range in energy and mass, sufficient for the objectives of measuring plasmas of both solar and terrestrial origin. High sensitivity and low background should allow measurements of rarer ion constituents down to flux levels of 0.01 ions/sq cm sec ster eV. A sophisticated electronics combined with powerful ground computer and telecommand systems allow for very efficient scanning of the mass-energy space.

  19. Biopolymer sequencing using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in the ESI nozzle-skimmer/precursor ion MS/MS mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Tabei, K; Siegel, M M

    2001-07-01

    A variety of model biopolymers, including oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides and a synthetic pharmaceutical agent, were sequenced using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray source and operated in a scan mode referred to as pseudo-MS3. This scan mode consists of three steps: (1) in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the nozzle-skimmer (NS) region, (2) scanning of the fragment ions into the collision cell for further CID, and (3) passing of the secondary fragment ions through the final mass filter at a preselected mass, generally corresponding to the mass of a terminal sequence ion for the biopolymer. The mass spectra are recorded in the precursor ion MS/MS mode where ion selection and detection occur at the third stage of the triple quadrupole but the scan function is determined by the first stage. The advantages and limitations in using this pseudo-MS3 NS/precursor ion MS/MS scan mode for biopolymer sequencing are discussed.

  20. Implementation of a MR-ToF isobar separator at the on-line mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Robert; Breitenfeldt, Martin; Marx, Gerrit; Rosenbusch, Marco; Schweikhard, Lutz [University Greifswald (Germany); Blaum, Klaus; Borgmann, Christopher; Fink, Daniel; Kreim, Susanne [Max-Planck-Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Herlert, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lunney, Dave; Naimi, Sarah [CSNSM, Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    A multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator (MR-ToF-MS) was installed at the ISOLTRAP/CERN mass spectrometer for isobaric purification of rare isotope ensembles as a preparation for precision mass determinations. The MR-ToF-MS consists of two ion optical mirrors between which ions are oscillating and are separated by their mass-over-charge ratio m/q. Flight paths of several hundreds of meters are folded to an apparatus length of less than one meter. Previous tests resulted in a mass resolving power of up to m/{delta}m{approx}10{sup 5} and the separation was demonstrated for the isobaric ions CO{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}. In combination with a Bradbury-Nielsen beamgate, the MR-ToF-MS will support the existing purification methods of the setup to gain access to nuclides produced with high isobaric contamination yields at the ISOLDE facility. The modified ISOLTRAP setup and its performance are presented.

  1. Comparing the Performance of Hyperbolic and Circular Rod Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers with Applied Higher Order Auxiliary Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, D.J.; Block, B.P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    This work applies higher order auxiliary excitation techniques to two types of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs): commercial systems and spaceborne instruments. The operational settings of a circular rod geometry commercial system and an engineering test-bed for a hyperbolic rod geometry spaceborne instrument were matched, with the relative performance of each sensor characterized with and without applied excitation using isotopic measurements of Kr+. Each instrument was operated at the limit of the test electronics to determine the effect of auxiliary excitation on extending instrument capabilities. For the circular rod sensor, with applied excitation, a doubling of the mass resolution at 1% of peak transmission resulted from the elimination of the low-mass side peak tail typical of such rod geometries. The mass peak stability and ion rejection efficiency were also increased by factors of 2 and 10, respectively, with voltage scan lines passing through the center of stability islands formed from auxiliary excitation. Auxiliary excitation also resulted in factors of 6 and 2 in peak stability and ion rejection efficiency, respectively, for the hyperbolic rod sensor. These results not only have significant implications for the use of circular rod quadrupoles with applied excitation as a suitable replacement for traditional hyperbolic rod sensors, but also for extending the capabilities of existing hyperbolic rod QMSs for the next generation of spaceborne instruments and low-mass commercial systems.

  2. Spurious barometric pressure acceleration in Antarctica and propagation into GRACE Antarctic mass change estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung; Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.

    2016-08-01

    Apparent acceleration in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Antarctic ice mass time-series may reflect both ice discharge and surface mass balance contributions. However, a recent study suggests there is also contamination from errors in atmospheric pressure de-aliasing fields [European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) operational products] used during GRACE data processing. To further examine this question, we compare GRACE atmospheric pressure de-aliasing (GAA) fields with in situ surface pressure data from coastal and inland stations. Differences between the two are likely due to GAA errors, and provide a measure of error in GRACE solutions. Time-series of differences at individual weather stations are fit to four presumed error components: annual sinusoids, a linear trend, an acceleration term and jumps at times of known ECMWF model changes. Using data from inland stations, we estimate that atmospheric pressure error causes an acceleration error of about +7.0 Gt yr-2, which is large relative to prior GRACE estimates of Antarctic ice mass acceleration in the range of -12 to -14 Gt yr-2. We also estimate apparent acceleration rates from other barometric pressure (reanalysis) fields, including ERA-Interim, MERRA and NCEP/DOE. When integrated over East Antarctica, the four mass acceleration estimates (from GAA and the three reanalysis fields) vary considerably (by ˜2-16 Gt yr-2). This shows the need for further effort to improve atmospheric mass estimates in this region of sparse in situ observations, in order to use GRACE observations to measure ice mass acceleration and related sea level change.

  3. Constant-momentum acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry with energy focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Enke, Christie G; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental aspects of constant-momentum acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CMA-TOFMS) are explored as a means to improve mass resolution. By accelerating all ions to the same momentum rather than to the same energy, the effects of the initial ion spatial and energy distributions upon the total ion flight time are decoupled. This decoupling permits the initial spatial distribution of ions in the acceleration region to be optimized independently, and energy focus, including ion turn-around-time error, to be accomplished with a linear-field reflectron. Constant-momentum acceleration also linearly disperses ions across time according to mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio, instead of the quadratic relationship between flight time and m/z found in conventional TOFMS. Here, CMA-TOFMS is shown to achieve simultaneous spatial and energy focusing over a selected portion of the mass spectrum. An orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight system outfitted with a reduced-pressure DC glow discharge (GD) ionization source is used to demonstrate CMA-TOFMS with atomic ions. The influence of experimental parameters such as the amplitude and width of the time-dependent CMA pulse on mass resolution is investigated, and a useful CMA-TOFMS focusing window of 2 to 18 Da is found for GD-CMA-TOFMS.

  4. HUMAN MASS BALANCE STUDY OF TAS-102 USING 14C ANALYZED BY ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J.; Seraj, Jabed; Yoshida, Kenichiro; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Strychor, Sandra; Fiejdasz, Jillian; Faulkner, Tyeler; Parise, Robert A.; Fawcett, Patrick; Pollice, Laura; Mason, Scott; Hague, Jeremy; Croft, Marie; Nugteren, James; Tedder, Charles; Sun, Weijing; Chu, Edward; Beumer, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Background TAS-102 is an oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug composed of trifluridine (FTD) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) in a 1:0.5 ratio. FTD is a thymidine analog, and it is degraded by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to the inactive trifluoromethyluracil (FTY) metabolite. TPI inhibits degradation of FTD by TP, increasing systemic exposure to FTD. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumors (6 M/2 F; median age 58 years; PS 0–1) were enrolled on this study. Patients in group A (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 200 nCi [14C]-FTD, while patients in group B (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 1000 nCi [14C]-TPI orally. Plasma, blood, urine, feces, and expired air (group A only) were collected up to 168 h, and were analyzed for 14C by accelerator mass spectrometry and analytes by LC-MS/MS. Results FTD: 59.8% of the 14C dose was recovered; 54.8% in urine mostly as FTY and FTD glucuronide isomers. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 52.7% FTD and 33.2% FTY. TPI: 76.8% of the 14C dose was recovered; 27.0% in urine mostly as TPI, and 49.7% in feces. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 53.1% TPI and 30.9% 6-HMU, the major metabolite of TPI. Conclusion Absorbed 14C-FTD was metabolized and mostly excreted in urine. The majority of 14C-TPI was recovered in feces, and the majority of absorbed TPI was excreted in urine. The current data with the ongoing hepatic and renal dysfunction studies will provide an enhanced understanding of the TAS-102 elimination profile. PMID:26787503

  5. [Development of a membrane inlet-single photon ionization/chemical ionization-mass spectrometer for online analysis of VOCs in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qing-Hao; Hou, Ke-Yong; Cui, Hua-Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2011-12-01

    A home-made membrane inlet- single photon ionization/chemical ionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been described. A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with photon energy of 10.6 eV was used as the light source for single photon ionization (SPI). Chemical ionization (CI) was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O2- reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization. The two ionization modes could be rapidly switched by adjusting electric field in the ionization region within 2 s. Membrane inlet system used for rapid enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water was constructed by using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane with a thickness of 50 microm. A purge gas was added to accelerate desorption of analytes from the membrane surface. The purge gas could also help to prevent the pump oil back-streaming into the ionization region from the analyzer chamber and improve the signal to noise ratio (S/N). Achieved detection limits were 2 microg x L(-1) for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in SPI mode and 1 microg x L(-1) for chloroform in SPI-CI mode within 10 s analysis time, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to the rapid analysis of MTBE in simulated underground water nearby petrol station and VOCs in disinfected drinking water. The results indicate that the instrument has a great application prospect for online analysis of VOCs in water.

  6. Accelerating Twisted Mass LQCD with QPhiX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröck, Mario [INFN, Rome3; Simula, Silvano [INFN, Rome3; Strelchenko, Alexei [Fermilab

    2016-07-08

    We present the implementation of twisted mass fermion operators for the QPhiX library. We analyze the performance on the Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Corner) coprocessor as well as on Intel Xeon Haswell CPUs. In particular, we demonstrate that on the Xeon Phi 7120P the Dslash kernel is able to reach 80\\% of the theoretical peak bandwidth, while on a Xeon Haswell E5-2630 CPU our generated code for the Dslash operator with AVX2 instructions outperforms the corresponding implementation in the tmLQCD library by a factor of $\\sim 5\\times$ in single precision. We strong scale the code up to 6.8 (14.1) Tflops in single (half) precision on 64 Xeon Haswell CPUs.

  7. Facility monitoring of chemical warfare agent simulants in air using an automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonell N; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-05-30

    Vapors of four chemical warfare agent (CWA) stimulants, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), diethyl malonate (DEM), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and methyl salicylate (MeS), were detected, identified, and quantitated using a fully automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer. Samples were ionized using a glow discharge electron ionization (GDEI) source, and ions were mass analyzed with a cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. A dual-tube thermal desorption system was used to trap compounds on 50:50 Tenax TA/Carboxen 569 sorbent before their thermal release. The sample concentrations ranged from low parts per billion [ppb] to two parts per million [ppm]. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.26 to 5.0 ppb. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented for each analyte. A sample of CEES at low ppb concentration was combined separately with two interferents, bleach (saturated vapor) and diesel fuel exhaust (1%), as a way to explore the capability of detecting the simulant in an environmental matrix. Also investigated was a mixture of the four CWA simulants (at concentrations in air ranging from 270 to 380 ppb). Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectral data were used to identify and quantify the individual components. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Accuracy studies with carbon clusters at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaer, J.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Smorra, C.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive cross-reference measurements of well-known frequency ratios using various sizes of carbon cluster ions 12Cn + (10≤n≤23) were performed to determine the effects limiting the accuracy of mass measurements at the Penning-trap facility TRIGA-TRAP. Two major contributions to the uncertainty of a mass measurement have been identified. Fluctuations of the magnetic field cause an uncertainty in the frequency ratio due to the required calibration by a reference ion of uf(νref)/νref = 6(2) × 10-11/min × Δt. A mass-dependent systematic shift of the frequency ratio of epsilonm(r)/r = -2.2(2) × 10-9 × (m-mref)/u has been found as well. Finally, the nuclide 197Au was used as a cross-check since its mass is already known with an uncertainty of 0.6 keV.

  9. The charge-energy-mass spectrometer for 0.3-300 keV/e ions on the AMPTE CCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Lundgren, R. A.; Studemann, W.; Wilken, B.; Kremser, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Gliem, F.; Rieck, W.

    1985-01-01

    The charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) has the function to measure the energy spectra, pitch-angle distributions, and ionization states of ions in the earth's magnetosphere and magnetosheath in the energy range from 0.3 to 300 keV/charge with a time resolution of less than 1 min. The obtained data will provide essential information on outstanding problems related to ion sources and dynamical processes of space plasmas and of suprathermal ions. A description of the CHEM experiment is given, taking into account the principle of operation, the sensor, the electronics, instrument characteristics, specifications, and requirements. Questions of postlaunch performance are also discussed.

  10. In-situ chemical composition measurements with a laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research: Quantitative investigations of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuland, M. B.; Frey, S.; Riedo, A.; Mezger, K.; Wiesendanger, R.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present a laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer (LMS). With this instrument we measured the quantitative chemical composition of Allende and Sayh al Uhaymir meteorites in-situ and with very high spatial resolution. From the main rock-forming elements, the mineralogy of the samples was inferred. Measurements of trace elements in SaU allowed dating analyses of the material and the calculation of the crystallisation temperature of the Zircon grains that were identified in the KREEP sample. The measurements on Allende made it possible to analyse the meteorite matrix in particular, beside the various chondrules embedded in the matrix. The LMS is suitable for being operated on a planetary lander or rover, where it would allow for high performance in-situ studies of rocks on the planetary surface.

  11. Building biomarker libraries with novel chemical sensors: correlating differential mobility spectrometer signal outputs with mass spectrometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivo, Michael; Aksenov, Alexander A.; Bardaweel, Hamzeh; Zhao, Weixiang; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Davis, Cristina E.

    2011-10-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is a widely used analytic tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. However, GC/MS use is limited by its large size, lack of portability, high cost and inherent complexity. Smaller instruments capable of high-throughput analysis of volatile compounds have the potential of combining MS-like sensitivity with portability. The micromachined differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) is a miniature sensor capable of registering volatile compounds in sub-parts-per-million (ppm) concentrations. It is small, portable, and can be coupled with multiple other compound separation methods. Here we describe paired volatile sample analyses using both GC/MS and GC/DMS which show that the DMS is capable of registering known compounds as verified by MS. Furthermore, we show that MS can be used to help build a library for our unique DMS sensor outputs and detect compounds in chemically complex backgrounds.

  12. In-line monitoring of effluents from HTGR fuel particle preparation processes using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.A.; Costanzo, D.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Carpenter, J.A.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.; Canada, D.C.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    The carbonization, conversion, and coating processes in the manufacture of HTGR fuel particles have been studied with the use of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Non-condensable effluents from these fluidized-bed processes have been monitored continuously from the beginning to the end of the process. The processes which have been monitored are these: uranium-loaded ion exchange resin carbonization, the carbothermic reduction of UO/sub 2/ to UC/sub 2/, buffer and low temperature isotropic pyrocarbon coatings of fuel kernels, SiC coating of the kernels, and high-temperature particle annealing. Changes in concentrations of significant molecules with time and temperature have been useful in the interpretation of reaction mechanisms and optimization of process procedures.

  13. Probing the electron beam induced reduction of graphite oxide by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Yeping; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    The graphite oxide (GO) was reduced successfully by electron-beam irradiation without solution chemistry and high temperature, where the chemical structural changes and gaseous species released during the exposure was monitored directly by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer. The degree of reduction of GO can be tuned effectively by way of electron beam intensity and irradiation time, resulting a high C/O ratio of 5.27. The evolution of C 1s spectra with irradiation time was also investigated. The CO, CO2, H2 molecules and several organic species were detected during the irradiation, confirmed that the electron beam induced the photoreduction of GO. The combined chemical structure evolution and gas species analysis make the XPS-MS highly desirable as a powerful in situ analytical instrument for tracking the reaction process. The electron-beam-induced reduction described in detail here provides potential way to fabricate graphene device from GO in one step.

  14. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 2: analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit-mass-resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, volatility and level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the OA mass after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging also decreased the volatility of the OA and made it progressively more oxygenated. The results also illustrate strengths of, and challenges with, using AMS data for source apportionment analysis. For example, the mass spectra of fresh and aged BBOA are distinct from fresh motor-vehicle emissions. The mass spectra of the secondary OA produced from aging wood smoke are very similar to those of the oxygenated OA (OOA that dominates ambient AMS datasets, further reinforcing the connection between OOA and OA formed from photo-chemistry. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidizing dilute diesel exhaust. This demonstrates that the OOA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from different types of combustion systems operating on fuels with modern or fossil carbon. Since OOA is frequently the dominant component of ambient OA, the similarity of spectra of aged emissions from different sources represents an important challenge for AMS-based source apportionment studies.

  15. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient nuclides at SHIPTRAP and commissioning of a cryogenic narrow-band FT-ICR mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer Garcia, R.

    2007-07-01

    The dissertation presented here deals with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived radionuclides. Owed to the ability of revealing all nucleonic interactions, mass measurements far off the line of {beta}-stability are expected to bring new insight to the current knowledge of nuclear properties and serve to test the predictive power of mass models and formulas. In nuclear astrophysics, atomic masses are fundamental parameters for the understanding of the synthesis of nuclei in the stellar environments. This thesis presents ten mass values of radionuclides around A=90 interspersed in the predicted rp-process pathway. Six of them have been experimentally determined for the first time. The measurements have been carried out at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP using the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance (TOF-ICR) detection technique. Given the limited performance of the TOF-ICR detection when trying to investigate heavy/superheavy species with small production cross sections ({sigma} <1 {mu}b), a new detection system is found to be necessary. Thus, the second part of this thesis deals with the commissioning of a cryogenic double-Penning trap system for the application of a highly-sensitive, narrow-band Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique. With the non-destructive FT-ICR detection method a single singly-charged trapped ion will provide the required information to determine its mass. First off-line tests of a new detector system based on a channeltron with an attached conversion dynode, of a cryogenic pumping barrier, to guarantee ultra-high vacuum conditions during mass determination, and of the detection electronics for the required single-ion sensitivity are reported. (orig.)

  17. Determination of high-energy fragmentation of protonated peptides using a beqq hybrid mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, O; Orkiszewski, R S; Gaskell, S J

    1993-06-01

    A hybrid tandem instrument of BEqQ geometry was used to determine high-energy decomposition of protonated peptides, such as side-chain fragmentation yielding d n and w n ions. The transmission through both E and Q of such product ions, formed in the second field-free region, permits improved mass resolution and confident mass assignment. The experimental technique may involve synchronous scanning of E and Q, or, for the purpose of identification of specific products, limited-range scanning of either E or Q with the other analyzer fixed. These techniques are not equivalent, with respect to product ion transmission, to the double focusing of product ions achieved with four-sector instruments but nevertheless represent a critical improvement over conventional mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectrometry analyses. Fragmentation of protonated peptides occurring in the second field-free region inside and outside the collision cell were distinguished by floating the collision cell above ground potential. Mass filtering using Q confirmed the mass assignments. The data indicate that product ions resulting from spontaneous decomposition are in some instances quantitatively more significant than those resulting from high-energy collisional activation. Furthermore, the differentiation of the products of low- and high-energy processes should facilitate spectral interpretation.

  18. Optimized Fast and Sensitive Acquisition Methods for Shotgun Proteomics on a Quadrupole Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Young, Clifford; Lavallee, Richard

    2012-01-01

    (HCD) tandem mass spectra due to the parallel mode of operation, where the generation, filling, and storage of fragment ions can be performed while simultaneously measuring another ion packet in the Orbitrap mass analyzer. In this study, data-dependent acquisition methods for "fast" or "sensitive...... h of analysis time. At sample loads below 125 ng, a 156 ms HCD acquisition method improved the sensitivity, mass accuracy, and quality of data and enabled us to identify 30% more proteins and peptides than the faster scanning method. A similar effect was observed when the LC gradient was extended...... to 2 or 3 h for the analysis of complex mammalian whole cell lysates. Using a 3 h LC gradient, the sensitive method enabled identification of more than 4000 proteins from 1 µg of tryptic HeLa digest, which was almost 200 more identifications compared to the faster scanning method. Our results...

  19. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of uranium hexafluoride by double standard single-collector gas mass spectrometer method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This is a quantitative test method applicable to determining the mass percent of uranium isotopes in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) samples with 235U concentrations between 0.1 and 5.0 mass %. 1.2 This test method may be applicable for the entire range of 235U concentrations for which adequate standards are available. 1.3 This test method is for analysis by a gas magnetic sector mass spectrometer with a single collector using interpolation to determine the isotopic concentration of an unknown sample between two characterized UF6 standards. 1.4 This test method is to replace the existing test method currently published in Test Methods C761 and is used in the nuclear fuel cycle for UF6 isotopic analyses. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appro...

  20. Investigation of Ion Transmission Effects on Intact Protein Quantification in a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Appulage, Dananjaya Kalu; McAllister, Erin A.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, direct intact protein quantitation using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was demonstrated (J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 27, 886-896 (2016)). Even though QqQ-MS is known to provide extraordinary detection sensitivity for quantitative analysis, we found that intact proteins exhibited a less than 5% ion transmission from the first quadrupole to the third quadrupole mass analyzer in the presence of zero collision energy (ZCE). With the goal to enhance intact protein quantitation sensitivity, ion scattering effects, proton transfer effects, and mass filter resolution widths were examined for their contributions to the lost signal. Protein standards myoglobin and ubiquitin along with small molecules reserpine and vancomycin were analyzed together with various collision induced dissociation (CID) gases (N2, He, and Ar) at different gas pressures. Mass resolution settings played a significant role in reducing ion transmission signal. By narrowing the mass resolution window by 0.35 m/z on each side, roughly 75%-90% of the ion signal was lost. The multiply charged proteins experienced additional proton transfer effects, corresponding to 10-fold signal reduction. A study of increased sensitivity of the method was also conducted with various MRM summation techniques. Although the degree of enhancement was analyte-dependent, an up to 17-fold increase in sensitivity was observed for ubiquitin using a summation of multiple MRM transitions. Biological matrix, human urine, and equine plasma were spiked with proteins to demonstrate the specificity of the method. This study provides additional insight into optimizing the use and sensitivity of QqQ-MS for intact protein quantification. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Jensen, Robert; Christensen, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal...

  2. Gas-phase CO2 subtraction for improved measurements of the organic aerosol mass concentration and oxidation degree by an aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, S; Zhang, Q

    2013-12-17

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) has been widely used for real-time characterization of the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micrometer aerosol particles. The first step in AMS sampling is the pre-concentration of aerosols while stripping away the gas-phase components, which contributes to the high sensitivity of this instrument. The strength of the instrument lies in particle phase measurement; however, ion signals generated from gas-phase species can influence the interpretation of the particle-phase chemistry data. Here, we present methods for subtracting the varying contributions of gas-phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in the AMS spectra of aerosol particles, which is critical for determining the mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of organic aerosol. This report gives details on the gaseous CO2 subtraction analysis performed on a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data set acquired from sampling of fresh and diluted vehicle emissions. Three different methods were used: (1) collocated continuous gas-phase CO2 measurement coupled with periodic filter tests consisting of sampling the same particle-free air by the AMS and the CO2 analyzer, (2) positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis to separate the gas- and particle-phase signals of CO2(+) at m/z 44, and (3) use of the particle time-of-flight (PTOF) size-resolved chemical information for separation of gas- and particle-phase signals at m/z 44. Our results indicate that these three different approaches yield internally consistent values for the gas/particle apportionment of m/z 44, but methods 2 and 3 require certain conditions to be met to yield reliable results. The methods presented are applicable to any situation where gas-phase components may influence the PM signal of interest.

  3. Virtual Models of Mass Spectrometers as Teaching Tools for Graduate Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gomes da Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ – Campus Macaé- RJMass spectrometry is an analytical powerful technique for identifying unknowns, quantitating knows and discovering chemicals properties and molecular structures. The mass spectrometry concept is very simple: The sample becomes an ion through an ionization method. Ions are selected by mass to charge ratio (m/z based upon the motion in a magnetic field and each one is register under a spectrum. To access the basic of these techniques by using appropriate literature, videos, virtual models and simulations for this machinesbehavior is today´s exclusiveness for researchers through manufacturer handbooks. This reality becomes the science popularization and knowledge diffusion about proteomic analysis something plenty arduous for the portion or part of graduate students. The work objectives were making a multimediaschool-book showing biochemical techniques for proteomic analysis using mass spectrometry. The material was make with specific software for building 3D models and animation of different ionizations methods: Electron Ionization (EI, Electro spray Ionization (ESI, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization(APCI, Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALD and mass analyzers: Time of Flight(TOF, Quadrupole and Ion Trap.

  4. Cluster Analysis of the Organic Peaks in Bulk Mass Spectra Obtained During the 2002 New England Air Quality Study with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marcolli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied hierarchical cluster analysis to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS bulk mass spectral dataset collected aboard the NOAA research vessel R. H. Brown during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study off the east coast of the United States. Emphasizing the organic peaks, the cluster analysis yielded a series of categories that are distinguishable with respect to their mass spectra and their occurrence as a function of time. The differences between the categories mainly arise from relative intensity changes rather than from the presence or absence of specific peaks. The most frequent category exhibits a strong signal at m/z 44 and represents oxidized organic matter probably originating from both anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources. On the basis of spectral and trace gas correlations, the second most common category with strong signals at m/z 29, 43, and 44 contains contributions from isoprene oxidation products. The third through the fifth most common categories have peak patterns characteristic of monoterpene oxidation products and were most frequently observed when air masses from monoterpene rich regions were sampled. Taken together, the second through the fifth most common categories represent on average 17% of the total organic mass that stems likely from biogenic sources during the ship's cruise. These numbers have to be viewed as lower limits since the most common category was attributed to anthropogenic sources for this calculation. The cluster analysis was also very effective in identifying a few contaminated mass spectra that were not removed during pre-processing. This study demonstrates that hierarchical clustering is a useful tool to analyze the complex patterns of the organic peaks in bulk aerosol mass spectra from a field study.

  5. Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2013-01-01

    We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed gravimetric data from the GRACE mission for the period 2002-2011. Three different data products - the CNES/GRGS, DMT-1b and GGFC GRACE solutions - have been...

  6. Chemical analyses of micrometre-sized solids by a miniature laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer (LMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, Marek; Wiesendanger, Reto; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Valentine; Moreno-Garcia, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Knopp, Gregor

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of elemental and isotope compositions of planetary solids with high spatial resolution are of considerable interest to current space research. Planetary materials are typically highly heterogenous and such studies can deliver detailed chemical information of individual sample components with the sizes down to a few micrometres. The results of such investigations can yield mineralogical surface context including mineralogy of individual grains or the elemental composition of of other objects embedded in the sample surface such as micro-sized fossils. The identification of bio-relevant material can follow by the detection of bio-relevant elements and their isotope fractionation effects [1, 2]. For chemical analysis of heterogenous solid surfaces we have combined a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) (mass resolution (m/Dm) 400-600; dynamic range 105-108) with in situ microscope-camera system (spatial resolution ˜2um, depth 10 um). The microscope helps to find the micrometre-sized solids across the surface sample for the direct mass spectrometric analysis by the LMS instrument. The LMS instrument combines an fs-laser ion source and a miniature reflectron-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometric analysis of the selected on the sample surface objects followed after ablation, atomisation and ionisation of the sample by a focussed laser radiation (775 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz; the spot size of ˜20 um) [4, 5, 6]. Mass spectra of almost all elements (isotopes) present in the investigated location are measured instantaneously. A number of heterogenous rock samples containing micrometre-sized fossils and mineralogical grains were investigated with high selectivity and sensitivity. Chemical analyses of filamentous structures observed in carbonate veins (in harzburgite) and amygdales in pillow basalt lava can be well characterised chemically yielding elemental and isotope composition of these objects [7, 8]. The investigation can be

  7. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  8. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  9. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  10. Advancing Top-down Analysis of the Human Proteome Using a Benchtop Quadrupole-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornelli, Luca; Durbin, Kenneth R; Fellers, Ryan T; Early, Bryan P; Greer, Joseph B; LeDuc, Richard D; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-02-03

    Over the past decade, developments in high resolution mass spectrometry have enabled the high throughput analysis of intact proteins from complex proteomes, leading to the identification of thousands of proteoforms. Several previous reports on top-down proteomics (TDP) relied on hybrid ion trap-Fourier transform mass spectrometers combined with data-dependent acquisition strategies. To further reduce TDP to practice, we use a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument coupled with software for proteoform-dependent data acquisition to identify and characterize nearly 2000 proteoforms at a 1% false discovery rate from human fibroblasts. By combining a 3 m/z isolation window with short transients to improve specificity and signal-to-noise for proteoforms >30 kDa, we demonstrate improving proteome coverage by capturing 439 proteoforms in the 30-60 kDa range. Three different data acquisition strategies were compared and resulted in the identification of many proteoforms not observed in replicate data-dependent experiments. Notably, the data set is reported with updated metrics and tools including a new viewer and assignment of permanent proteoform record identifiers for inclusion of highly characterized proteoforms (i.e., those with C-scores >40) in a repository curated by the Consortium for Top-Down Proteomics.

  11. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dickel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC. They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS. The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  12. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickel, T. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Plaß, W.R., E-mail: Wolfgang.R.Plass@exp2.physik.uni-giessen.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ayet San Andres, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ebert, J. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Geissel, H.; Haettner, E. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hornung, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Miskun, I. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-11

    {sup 211}Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via {sup 238}U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The {sup 211}Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  13. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  14. Ar isotope analysis for K-Ar dating using two modified-VG5400 mass spectrometers. 1. Isotope dilution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Ogata, Atsumi; Miura, Y.N.; Yamaguchi, Kenji [Okayama Univ., Misasa, Tottori (Japan). Inst. for Study of the Earth`s Interior

    1996-02-01

    Two noble gas mass spectrometry systems (MS-I and MS-II) have been installed in 1989, one of which was designed in our laboratory for Ar isotope analysis to measure K-Ar age by isotope dilution method using {sup 38}Ar-spike. The whole system was modified and improved to obtain high quality Ar data. The improved system composed of an Ar extraction and purification line and a Modified-VG5400 mass spectrometer enables us to determine precise Ar isotope composition easily and speedily irrespective to operator`s skillfulness. Formulas calculating radiogenic {sup 40}Ar abundance, which takes account of correction for Ar isotopes of both spike and blank, are presented. For samples with young K-Ar age, formulas to estimate the radiogenic {sup 40}Ar abundance based on {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar ratio are also proposed. Replicate analyses on many K-Ar standard samples show that the system can be applicable to samples with ages ranging 0.01 to 1500 Ma without any systematic analytical errors. (author).

  15. Measurement of low mass muon pairs in sulphur-nucleus collisions with an optimized HELIOS muon spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Dileptons provide a unique and specific tool to detect collective behaviour and to probe for signs of quark gluon plasma formation in nucleus-nucleus interactions. In particular, in the low transverse mass region, below the rho meson, dimuons probe the thermal nature of the interaction while their multiplicity dependence can indicate nuclear volume effects. \\\\\\\\This experiment uses the (almost) unchanged HELIOS muon spectrometer and a combination of a new carefully designed light absorber, at an optimized distance from the target, and multiplicity measurements provided by new Silicon ring detectors, covering more than the muon rapidity acceptance. It intends to improve in quality and quantity on the low mass, low $p_{T}$ dimuon signal already observed in the NA34/2 experiment. The wide range of rapidity from 3.5 to 6.0 will enable us to explore the rapidity dependence of the signal from high energy density at nearly central rapidity up to very forward rapidities. \\\\\\\\The commissioning of the new apparatus (...

  16. Laser post-ionisation combined with a high resolving power orbitrap mass spectrometer for enhanced MALDI-MS imaging of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S R; Soltwisch, J; Paine, M R L; Dreisewerd, K; Heeren, R M A

    2017-06-29

    Coupling laser post-ionisation with a high resolving power MALDI Orbitrap mass spectrometer has realised an up to ∼100-fold increase in the sensitivity and enhanced the chemical coverage for MALDI-MS imaging of lipids relative to conventional MALDI. This could constitute a major breakthrough for biomedical research.

  17. Characterisation of chemical components for identifying historical Chinese textile dyes by ultra high performance liquid chromatography – photodiode array – electrospray ionisation mass spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, J.; Wanrooij, J.; van Bommel, M.; Quye, A.

    2017-01-01

    This research makes the first attempt to apply Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to both Photodiode Array detection (PDA) and Electrospray Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (ESI–MS) to the chemical characterisation of common textile dyes in ancient China. Three different

  18. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shun-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional centerof- mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5 and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5. The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML acceleration (r = −0.83 to −0.93, p < 0.05, and between anterior-posterior (AP acceleration and running distance (r = −0.8953 to −0.9653, p < 0.05, but not for vertical control of the center of mass. This study suggests that runners reduce stride length to minimize mediolateral sway and the effects of braking on the trunk; moreover, cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated.

  19. Determination of Collision Cross Sections Using a Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T; Johnson, Joshua T; Lee, Kenneth W; McLuckey, Scott A

    2017-07-11

    Collision cross sections (CCSs) were determined from the frequency-domain linewidths in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap. With use of an ultrahigh-vacuum precision leak valve and nitrogen gas, transients were recorded as the background pressure in the mass analyzer chamber was varied between 4× 10-8 and 7 × 10-7 Torr. The energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model, described by Xu and coworkers, was used to relate the recorded image charge to the CCS of the molecule. In lieu of our monoisotopically isolating the mass of interest, the known relative isotopic abundances were programmed into the Lorentzian fitting algorithm such that the linewidth was extracted from a sum of Lorentzians. Although this works only if the isotopic distribution is known a priori, it prevents ion loss, preserves the high signal-to-noise ratio, and minimizes the experimental error on our homebuilt instrument. Six tetraalkylammonium cations were used to correlate the CCS measured in the electrostatic linear ion trap with that measured by drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry, for which there was an excellent correlation (R 2 ≈ 0.9999). Although the absolute CCSs derived with our method differ from those reported, the extracted linear correlation can be used to correct the raw CCS. With use of [angiotensin II]2+ and reserpine, the corrected CCSs (334.9 ± 2.1 and 250.1 ± 0.5, respectively) were in good agreement with the reported ion mobility spectrometry CCSs (335 and 254.3, respectively). With sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the CCSs determined are reproducible to within a fraction of a percent, comparable to the uncertainties reported on dedicated ion mobility instruments. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Determination of Collision Cross Sections Using a Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T.; Johnson, Joshua T.; Lee, Kenneth W.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-07-01

    Collision cross sections (CCSs) were determined from the frequency-domain linewidths in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap. With use of an ultrahigh-vacuum precision leak valve and nitrogen gas, transients were recorded as the background pressure in the mass analyzer chamber was varied between 4× 10-8 and 7 × 10-7 Torr. The energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model, described by Xu and coworkers, was used to relate the recorded image charge to the CCS of the molecule. In lieu of our monoisotopically isolating the mass of interest, the known relative isotopic abundances were programmed into the Lorentzian fitting algorithm such that the linewidth was extracted from a sum of Lorentzians. Although this works only if the isotopic distribution is known a priori, it prevents ion loss, preserves the high signal-to-noise ratio, and minimizes the experimental error on our homebuilt instrument. Six tetraalkylammonium cations were used to correlate the CCS measured in the electrostatic linear ion trap with that measured by drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry, for which there was an excellent correlation (R 2 ≈ 0.9999). Although the absolute CCSs derived with our method differ from those reported, the extracted linear correlation can be used to correct the raw CCS. With use of [angiotensin II]2+ and reserpine, the corrected CCSs (334.9 ± 2.1 and 250.1 ± 0.5, respectively) were in good agreement with the reported ion mobility spectrometry CCSs (335 and 254.3, respectively). With sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the CCSs determined are reproducible to within a fraction of a percent, comparable to the uncertainties reported on dedicated ion mobility instruments.

  1. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Cross

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first single particle results obtained with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS. The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The LS-ToF-AMS acquires both ensemble average and single particle data. Over a 75-h sampling period from 27–30 March 2006, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically-triggered and saved. The single particles were classified based on observed vaporization histories and measured chemical compositions. The single particle data is shown to provide insights on internal AMS collection efficiencies and ambient mixing state information that augments the ensemble data.

    Detection of correlated light scattering and chemical ion signals allowed for a detailed examination of the vaporization/ionization process for single particles measured with the AMS instrument. Three particle vaporization event types were identified as a fraction of the total number of particles detected: (1 23% with prompt vaporization, (2 26% with delayed vaporization, and (3 51% characterized as null. Internal consistency checks show that average single particle nonrefractory mass and chemical composition measurements were in reasonable agreement with ensemble measurements and suggest that delayed and null vaporization events are the dominant source of the nonunit collection efficiency of the AMS. Taken together, the simultaneous prompt single particle and aerosol ensemble measurements offer insight into the mixing state and atmospheric transformations of ambient aerosol particles.

  2. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Evelyn H; Combe, Peter C; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with axial field in a quadrupole reaction cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Dmitry R; Baranov, Vladimir I; Tanner, Scott D

    2002-10-01

    A novel reaction cell for ICP-MS with an electric field provided inside the quadrupole along its axis is described. The field is implemented via a DC bias applied to additional auxiliary electrodes inserted between the rods of the quadrupole. The field reduces the settling time of the pressurized quadrupole when its mass bandpass is dynamically tuned. It also improves the transmission of analyte ions. It is shown that for the pressurized cell with the field activated, the recovery time for a change in quadrupole operating parameters is reduced to 610 times, respectively. The use of a retarding axial field for in-situ energy discrimination against cluster and polyatomic ions is shown. When the cell is pressurized with O2 for suppression of 129Xe+, the formation of 127IH2+ by reactions with gas impurities limits the detection of 129I to isotopic abundance of approximately 10(-6). In-cell energy discrimination against 127IH2+ utilizing a retarding axial field is shown to reduce the abundance of the background at m/z = 129 to ca. 3 x 10(-8) of the 127I+ signal. In-cell energy discrimination against 127IH2+ is shown to cause less I+ loss than a post-cell potential energy barrier for the same degree of 127IH2+ suppression.

  4. Calibration of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer for the measurement of gaseous sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Andreas; Rondo, Linda; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Curtius, Joachim

    2012-06-21

    The accurate measurement of the gaseous sulfuric acid concentration is crucial within many fields of atmospheric science. Instruments utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measuring H(2)SO(4), therefore, require a careful calibration. We have set up a calibration source that can provide a stable and adjustable concentration of H(2)SO(4). The calibration system initiates the production of sulfuric acid through the oxidation of SO(2) by OH. The hydroxyl radical is produced by UV photolysis of water vapor. A numerical model calculates the H(2)SO(4) concentration provided at the outlet of the calibration source. From comparison of this concentration and the signals measured by CIMS, a calibration factor is derived. This factor is evaluated to be 1.1 × 10(10) cm(-3), which is in good agreement with values found in the literature for other CIMS instruments measuring H(2)SO(4). The calibration system is described in detail and the results are discussed. Because the setup is external to the CIMS instrument, it offers the possibility for future CIMS intercomparison measurements by providing defined and stable concentrations of sulfuric acid.

  5. Triacetone triperoxide detection using low reduced-field proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengyin; Li, Jianquan; Han, Haiyan; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2009-08-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was applied to on-line detection of the explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) using a discharge gas of water vapor or alternative ammonia in the ion source. The dependence of ionic intensity on reduced-field in the drift tube was investigated, and the results indicate that an irregular operation using low reduced-field can enhance TATP detection due to reduced collision-induced dissociation in the drift tube. When water vapor is used as the discharge gas, the characteristic ions for TATP identification are [TATP + H]+ which are detectable at a reduced-field about 50 Td. If ammonia is the discharge gas, PTR-MS exhibits a better sensitivity, the explosive TATP can be discriminated according to the adduct ions [TATP + NH4]+, and a limit of detection at ppb level can be achieved at a reduced-field around 100 Td in this PTR-MS apparatus. PTR-MS is suggested as a potential tool for on-site detection of the explosive TATP with the advantages of rapid response and high sensitivity without sample pretreatment.

  6. Measured performance of a semi-active tuned mass damper with acceleration feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Semi-active tuned mass dampers (STMDs) with magnetorheological (MR) dampers are becoming promising alternative to passive tuned mass dampers (TMDs) and active tuned mass dampers (ATMDs). In this paper, a new control algorithm for STMDs with acceleration feedback is experimentally evaluated in a laboratory wind tower - nacelle model equipped with a prototype STMD. The control algorithm adopts an existing acceleration feedback control approach which was originally proposed for ATMDs. The STMD consists of a mass, passive springs and an MR damper. The fail-safe operation of the STMD is reported due to both an internal friction of the STMD and a residual force of the MR damper at its off-state. The paper compares the simulated performance of the STMD with the measured performance of the fail-safe STMD under harmonic force excitation and discusses the major deteriorating factors that limit the measured performance. Despite the limitations, the paper reports that at low excitation the fail-safe STMD acts similarly to the TMD with same mass, while already at moderate excitation its performance is almost equally good as that of the TMD with two times larger mass.

  7. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML, equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE – a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1 species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc., black carbon (BC, and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate and oxygenated OA (OOA showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60% with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum

  8. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-06

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Raman-lidar-based regularized microphysical retrievals and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements for the characterization of biomass burning aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Nicolae, Doina; Böckmann, Christine; Vasilescu, Jeni; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2015-10-01

    In this work we extract the microphysical properties of aerosols for a collection of measurement cases with low volume depolarization ratio originating from fire sources captured by the Raman lidar located at the National Institute of Optoelectronics (INOE) in Bucharest. Our algorithm was tested not only for pure smoke but also for mixed smoke and urban aerosols of variable age and growth. Applying a sensitivity analysis on initial parameter settings of our retrieval code was proved vital for producing semi-automatized retrievals with a hybrid regularization method developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University. A direct quantitative comparison of the retrieved microphysical properties with measurements from a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (CToF-AMS) is used to validate our algorithm. Microphysical retrievals performed with sun photometer data are also used to explore our results. Focusing on the fine mode we observed remarkable similarities between the retrieved size distribution and the one measured by the AMS. More complicated atmospheric structures and the factor of absorption appear to depend more on particle radius being subject to variation. A good correlation was found between the aerosol effective radius and particle age, using the ratio of lidar ratios (LR: aerosol extinction to backscatter ratios) as an indicator for the latter. Finally, the dependence on relative humidity of aerosol effective radii measured on the ground and within the layers aloft show similar patterns.

  10. A Practical Guide on Coupling a Scanning Mobility Sizer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (SMPS-ICPMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarik, Mohamed; Foppiano, Debora; Hess, Adrian; Ludwig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A large variety of analytical methods are available to characterize particles in aerosols and suspensions. The choice of the appropriate technique depends on the properties to be determined. In many fields information about particle size and chemical composition are of great importance. While in aerosol techniques particle size distributions of gas-borne particles are determined online, their elemental composition is commonly analyzed offline after an appropriate sampling and preparation procedure. To obtain both types of information online and simultaneously, a hyphenated setup was recently developed, including a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). This allows first to classify the particles with respect to their mobility diameter, and then to determine their number concentration and elemental composition in parallel. A Rotating Disk Diluter (RDD) is used as the introduction system, giving more flexibility regarding the use of different aerosol sources. In this work, a practical guide is provided describing the different steps for establishing this instrumentation, and how to use this analysis tool. The versatility of this hyphenated technique is demonstrated in example measurements on three different aerosols generated out of a) a salt solution, b) a suspension, and c) emitted by a thermal process. PMID:28745635

  11. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Yellowknife Bay Sediments: Measurements by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Archer, P. D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater in Au-gust 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instru-ment suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) “Curiosity” rover has analyzed solid samples from the martian regolith in three locations, beginning with a scoop of aeolian deposits from the Rocknest (RN) sand shadow. Curiosity subsequently traveled to Yellowknife Bay, where SAM analyzed samples from two separate holes drilled into the Sheepbed Mudstone, designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phas-es, in most cases at abundances below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of tem-peratures at which gases are evolved from solid sam-ples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gas-es may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from the JK and CB mudstone samples as measured with SAM’s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw com-parisons to RN.

  12. Mass measurements of {sup 238}U-projectile fragments for the first time with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Mass measurements of short-lived uranium projectile fragments were performed for the first time with a Multiple-Reflexion-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). A major part of this doctoral work was a novel development of a data analysis method for the MR-TOF-MS mass measurements of exotic nuclei at the fragment separator FRS at GSI. The developed method was successfully applied to the data obtained from two pilot experiments with the MR-TOF-MS at the FRS in 2012 and 2014. A substantial upgrade of the experimental setup of the MR-TOF-MS was also performed in the frame work of this doctoral thesis after the first run. In the experiments projectile fragments were created with 1000 MeV/u {sup 238}U ions in a Be/Nb target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS. The exotic nuclei were spatially separated, energy bunched and slowed down with the ion-optical system of the FRS combined with monoenergetic and homogeneous degraders. At the final focal plane of the FRS the fragments were completely slowed down and thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell (CSC) filled with 3-5 mg/cm{sup 2} pure helium gas. The exotic nuclei were fast extracted from the CSC to enable mass measurements of very short-lived fragments with the MR-TOF-MS. The achievement of this goal was successfully demonstrated with the mass measurement of {sup 220}Ra ions with a half-life of 17.9 ms and 11 detected events. The mass measurements of the isobars {sup 211}Fr, {sup 211}Po and {sup 211}Rn have clearly demonstrated the scientific potential of the MR-TOF-MS for the investigation of exotic nuclei and the power of the data analysis system. Difficult measurements with overlapping mass distributions with only a few counts in the measured spectra were the challenge for the new data analysis method based on the maximum likelihood method. The drifts during the measurements were corrected with the developed time-resolved calibration method. After the improvements of the setup as a consequence of

  13. Synopsis of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, R. D.; Mateos, M. A.; Lincoln, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly described are the essential features of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast, digital data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The instrumentation was developed to provide a time-resolved analysis of individual vapor pulses produced by the incidence of a pulsed laser beam on an ablative material. The high repetition rate spectrometer coupled to a fast transient recorder captures complete mass spectra every 20 to 35 microsecs, thereby providing the time resolution needed for the study of this sort of transient event. The program enables the computer to record the large amount of data generated by the system in short time intervals, and it provides the operator the immediate option of presenting the spectral data in several different formats. Furthermore, the system does this with a high degree of automation, including the tasks of mass labeling the spectra and logging pertinent instrumental parameters.

  14. Assessment of a combined gas chromatography mass spectrometer sensor (GC-MSS) system for detecting biologically relevant volatile compounds (VCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Oliver; Wieczorek, Tomas; de Lacy Costello, Ben P J; Persad, Raj; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2017-09-26

    There have been a number of studies in which metal oxide sensors (MOS) have replaced conventional analytical detectors in gas chromatography systems. However, despite the use of these instruments in a range of applications including breath research the sensor responses (i.e. resistance changes w.r.t. concentration of VCs) remain largely unreported. This paper addresses that issue by comparing the response of a metal oxide sensor directly with a mass spectrometer (MS), whereby both detectors are interfaced to the same GC column using an s-swafer. It was demonstrated that the sensitivity of an in-house fabricated ZnO/ SnO2 thick film MOS was superior to a modern MS for the detection of a wide range of volatile compounds (VCs) of different functionalities and masses. Better techniques for detection and quantification of these VCs is valuable, as many of these compounds are commonly reported throughout the scientific literature. This is also the first published report of a combined GC-MS sensor system. These 2 different detector technologies when combined, should enhance discriminatory abilities to aid disease diagnoses using volatiles from e.g. breath, and bodily fluids. 29 chemical standards have been tested using solid phase micro-extraction; 25 of these compounds are found on human breath. In all but 2 instances the sensor exhibited the same or superior limit of detection compared to the MS. 12 stool samples from healthy participants were analysed, the sensor detected, on average 1.6 peaks more per sample than the MS. Similarly analysing the headspace of E. coli broth cultures the sensor detected 6.9 more peaks per sample versus the MS. This greater sensitivity is primarily a function of the superior limits of detection of the metal oxide sensor. This shows that systems based on the combination of chromatography systems with solid state sensors shows promise for a range of applications. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Protein Identification Via Surface-Induced Dissociation in an FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer and a Patchwork Sequencing Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Facundo; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2006-05-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) are ion activation techniques based on energetic collisions with a surface or gas molecules, respectively. One noticeable difference between CID and SID is that SID does not require a collision gas for ion activation and is therefore directly compatible with the high vacuum requirement of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS). Eliminating the introduction of collision gas into the ICR cell for collisional activation dramatically shortens the acquisition time for MS/MS experiments, suggesting that SID could be utilized for high-throughput MS/MS studies in FT-ICR MS. We demonstrate for the first time the utility of SID combined with FT-ICR MS for protein identification. Tryptic digests of standard proteins were analyzed using a hybrid 6-Tesla FT-ICR MS with SID and CID capabilities. SID spectra of mass-selected singly and doubly charged peptides were obtained using a diamond-coated target mounted at the rear trapping plate of the ICR cell. The broad internal energy distribution deposited into the precursor ion following collision with the diamond surface allowed a variety of fragmentation channels to be accessed by SID. Composition and sequence qualifiers produced by SID of tryptic peptides were used to improve the statistical significance of database searches. Protein identification MASCOT scores obtained using SID were comparable or better than scores obtained using sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) –the conventional ion activation technique in FT-ICR MS.

  16. High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD™) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-μm object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

  17. Determination of uranium isotope ratios using a liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge/Orbitrap mass spectrometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Edward D; Marcus, R Kenneth; Koppenaal, David W; Irvahn, Jan; Hager, George J; Hart, Garret L

    2017-09-30

    The field of highly accurate and precise isotope ratio analysis, for use in nonproliferation, has been dominated by thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. While these techniques are considered the gold standard for isotope ratio analysis, a downsized instrument capable of accurately and precisely measuring uranium (U) isotope ratios is desirable for field studies or in laboratories with limited infrastructure. The developed system interfaces the liquid sampling, an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ion source, with a high-resolution Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer. With this experimental setup certified U isotope standards and unknown samples were analyzed. The accuracy and precision of the system were then determined. The LS-APGD/Exactive instrument measured a certified reference material of natural U (235 U/238 U = 0.007261) with a 235 U/238 U ratio of 0.007065 and a % relative standard uncertainty of 0.082, meeting the International Target Values for the destructive analysis of U. In addition, when three unknowns were measured and these measurements were compared with the results from an ICP multi-collector instrument, there were no statistical differences between the two instruments. The LS-APGD/Orbitrap system, while still in the preliminary stages of development, offers highly accurate and precise isotope ratio results that suggest a potential paradigm shift in the world of isotope ratio analysis. Furthermore, the portability of the LS-APGD as an elemental ion source, combined with the small size and smaller operating demands of the Orbitrap, suggests that the instrumentation is capable of being field-deployable. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  19. On the acceleration and deceleration of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei - II. Mass loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, E. E.; Beskin, V. S.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of mass loading of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow in relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) due to γγ → e+e- conversion is considered analytically. We argue that the effects of charge average separation due to specific initial pairs' motion lead to partial magnetic and electric field screening or enhancement. The effect of the field screening has not been considered earlier. The pairs with the centre of mass moving faster or slower than the bulk plasma flow create a surface charge and a current that either screen or enhance both electric and magnetic fields in a pair creation domain. This impacts the bulk flow motion, which either accelerates or decelerates. The pairs with the centre of mass moving with exactly the drift velocity do not induce the field disturbance. In this case, the flow decelerates due to pure mass loading. For these different cases, the Lorentz factor of the loaded outflow is calculated as a function of loading pair number density. The effect may be important on sub-parsec to parsec scales due to the conversion of TeV jet radiation on the soft infrared to the ultraviolet external isotropic photon field. This leads to a jet outer shell acceleration. The conversion of MeV jet radiation on larger scales may account for the flow deceleration due to pure mass loading. The proposed mechanism may be a source of internal shocks and instabilities in the pair creation region.

  20. A Large-Radius High-Mass-Resolution Multiple-Collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer for Analysis of Rare Isotopologues of CH4 and Other Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. D.; Rumble, D.; Freedman, P.; Mills, M.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a unique and novel isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS), the Panorama, developed explicitly for high-mass-resolution analysis of isotopologue ratios of gas samples. The double-focussing instrument routinely operates at a mass resolving power of 40,000 with a maximum useful MRP of 80,000. The instrument achieves this exceptional MRP for a multi-collector using a Matsuda ion optical design with an ESA radius of 1018 mm and a magnetic sector radius of 800 mm. Collectors comprise 9 Faraday cups and a single channel of ion counting each with continuously variable collector slits. The continously variable collector slits are key for making meausrements of rare doubly-substituted species free of corrections that would otherwise be necessitated by intefereing ion beams. First results demonstrate both accuracy and precision for singly and doubly-substituted molecular species. Our first applications have focussed on resolving the mass-18 rare isotopologues of methane, 12CH2D2 and 13CH3D. By measuring a wide variety of natural methane sources, we find that the ability to separate these two species allows one to substantiate temperatures of methane bond formation where temperatures from the two species are concordant, representing thermodynamic equilibrium. Conversely, where the species are in disequilibrium, the data provide evidence for the reaction pathways for methane formation or subsequent processing, including mixing with other reservoirs. Concordant temperatures are sometimes inconsistent with previous estimates from indirect methods. These sometimes surprising results are fortified by the concordancy of two doubly-substituted isotopologues. Similarly, there are instances in which the temperatures derived from the relative concentrations of 13CH3D seem plausible, yet substantial kinetically-induced deficits in 12CH2D2show that these temperatures are in fact suspect. The ability to measure more than one doubly-substituted istopologue in the same gas, now

  1. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Xiao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS at the rural site Back Garden (BG, located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m−3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m−3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300–700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions. The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA. The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly

  2. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva) ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  3. LCMS using a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer for impurity identification during process chemical development of a novel integrase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, T J; Grinberg, N; Hartman, B; Marcinko, S; DiMichele, L; Mao, B

    2010-01-05

    LCMS incorporating a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer was used to identify impurities found in a chemical process development sample of a novel integrase inhibitor, raltegravir. The combination of accurate mass measurement in full scan mode followed by construction of targeted masses for further MSMS interrogation allowed for the determination of atomic composition and connectivity. The fragmentation pattern of raltegravir was used as a model compound, and the product ion spectra of an impurity was compared to both the model fragmentation pattern and the atomic composition generated in the full scan experiment to deduce a structure.

  4. A thermosphere composition measurement using a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a side energy focussing quasi-open ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H. B.; Spencer, N. W.; Schmitt, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    The atomic oxygen concentration in the altitude range 130 to 240 km was determined through the use of a quadrupole spectrometer with a strongly focussing ion source. The instrument is used in the Thermosphere Probe in a manner that greatly increases the proportion of measured oxygen ions that have not experienced a surface collision and permits quantitative evaluation of surface recombination and thermalization effects which inevitably enter all spectrometer determinations. The data obtained strengthen the concept that consideration of surface effects is significant in quantifying spectrometer measurements of reactive gases, and tend to be in agreement with von Zahn's recent results.

  5. The SAGE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  6. The SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Herzberg, R.D.; Butler, P.A.; Cox, D.M.; Cresswell, J.R.; Mistry, A.; Page, R.D.; Parr, E.; Sampson, J.; Seddon, D.A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P.J.; Lazarus, I.H.; Letts, S.C.; Pucknell, V.F.E.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and γ-rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of urban and rural organic particulate in the Lower Fraser Valley using two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarra, M. Rami; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James D.; Bower, Keith N.; Boudries, Hacene; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Jayne, John T.; Garforth, Arthur A.; Li, Shao-Meng; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2004-11-01

    Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) were deployed at three sites representing urban, semi-rural and rural areas during the Pacific 2001 experiment in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), British Columbia, Canada in August 2001. The AMS provides on-line quantitative measurements of the size and chemical composition of the non-refractory fraction of submicron aerosol particles. A significant accumulation mode with a peak around 400-500 nm was observed at all sites that was principally composed of sulphate, organics, ammonium and some nitrate. Another significant mode with a peak below 200 nm was also observed at the urban site and when urban plumes affected the other sites. This paper focuses on the variability of the organic particulate composition and size distribution as a function of location and photochemical activity with a particular emphasis on the urban and rural areas. The small organic mode at the urban site was well correlated with gas phase CO, 1,3-butadiene, benzene and toluene with Pearson's r values of 0.76, 0.71, 0.79 and 0.69, respectively, suggesting that combustion-related emissions are likely to be the main source of the small organic mode at this site. The mass spectra of the urban organic particulate are similar to those of internal combustion engine lubricating oil, and of diesel exhaust aerosol particles, implying that they were composed of a mixture of n-alkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics. In contrast, organic particulate at the rural site was dominated by shorter chain oxidized organic compounds. Correlations between the two organic modes and gas phase compounds at the rural site indicated that a significant part of the small mode originated from combustion sources, while the large accumulation organic mode appeared to be the result of photochemical processing. Processing of organic particulate during a relatively high O3 episode at the rural site appeared to increase the modal diameter of the accumulation mode from

  8. Evaluation of the new capture vapourizer for aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) through laboratory studies of inorganic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Croteau, Philip; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2017-08-01

    Aerosol mass spectrometers (AMSs) and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (ACSMs) commercialized by Aerodyne are widely used to measure the non-refractory species in submicron particles. With the standard vapourizer (SV) that is installed in all commercial instruments to date, the quantification of ambient aerosol mass concentration requires the use of the collection efficiency (CE) to correct for the loss of particles due to bounce. A new capture vapourizer (CV) has been designed to reduce the need for a bounce-related CE correction. Two high-resolution AMS instruments, one with a SV and one with a CV, were operated side by side in the laboratory. Four standard species, NH4NO3, NaNO3, (NH4)2SO4 and NH4Cl, which typically constitute the majority of the mass of ambient submicron inorganic species, are studied. The effect of vapourizer temperature (Tv ˜ 200-800 °C) on the detected fragments, CE and size distributions are investigated. A Tv of 500-550 °C for the CV is recommended. In the CV, CE was identical (around unity) for more volatile species (e.g. NH4NO3) and comparable to or higher than the SV for less-volatile species (e.g. (NH4)2SO4), demonstrating an improvement in CE for laboratory inorganic species in the CV. The detected relative intensities of fragments of NO3 and SO4 species observed with the CV are different from those observed with the SV, and are consistent with additional thermal decomposition arising from the increased residence time and multiple collisions. Increased residence times with the CV also lead to broader particle size distribution measurements than with the SV. A method for estimating whether pure species will be detected in AMS sizing mode is proposed. Production of CO2(g) from sampled nitrate on the vapourizer surface, which has been reported for the SV, is negligible for the CV for NH4NO3 and comparable to the SV for NaNO3. . We observe an extremely consistent fragmentation for ammonium compared to very large changes for the

  9. Evaluation of the new capture vapourizer for aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS through laboratory studies of inorganic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol mass spectrometers (AMSs and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (ACSMs commercialized by Aerodyne are widely used to measure the non-refractory species in submicron particles. With the standard vapourizer (SV that is installed in all commercial instruments to date, the quantification of ambient aerosol mass concentration requires the use of the collection efficiency (CE to correct for the loss of particles due to bounce. A new capture vapourizer (CV has been designed to reduce the need for a bounce-related CE correction. Two high-resolution AMS instruments, one with a SV and one with a CV, were operated side by side in the laboratory. Four standard species, NH4NO3, NaNO3, (NH42SO4 and NH4Cl, which typically constitute the majority of the mass of ambient submicron inorganic species, are studied. The effect of vapourizer temperature (Tv ∼ 200–800 °C on the detected fragments, CE and size distributions are investigated. A Tv of 500–550 °C for the CV is recommended. In the CV, CE was identical (around unity for more volatile species (e.g. NH4NO3 and comparable to or higher than the SV for less-volatile species (e.g. (NH42SO4, demonstrating an improvement in CE for laboratory inorganic species in the CV. The detected relative intensities of fragments of NO3 and SO4 species observed with the CV are different from those observed with the SV, and are consistent with additional thermal decomposition arising from the increased residence time and multiple collisions. Increased residence times with the CV also lead to broader particle size distribution measurements than with the SV. A method for estimating whether pure species will be detected in AMS sizing mode is proposed. Production of CO2(g from sampled nitrate on the vapourizer surface, which has been reported for the SV, is negligible for the CV for NH4NO3 and comparable to the SV for NaNO3. . We observe an extremely consistent fragmentation for ammonium compared to very

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry of Strontium-90 for homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumey, S J; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F; Hillegonds, D J

    2008-03-03

    Strontium-90 is one of the most hazardous materials managed by agencies charged with protecting the public from radiation. Traditional radiometric methods have been limited by low sample throughput and slow turnaround times. Mass spectrometry offers the advantage of shorter analysis times and the ability to measure samples immediately after processing, however conventional mass spectrometric techniques are susceptible to molecular isobaric interferences that limit their overall sensitivity. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry is insensitive to molecular interferences and we have therefore begun developing a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr by accelerator mass spectrometry. Despite a pervasive interference from {sup 90}Zr, our initial development has yielded an instrumental background of {approx} 10{sup 8} atoms (75 mBq) per sample. Further refinement of our system (e.g., redesign of our detector, use of alternative target materials) is expected to push the background below 10{sup 6} atoms, close to the theoretical limit for AMS. Once we have refined our system and developed suitable sample preparation protocols, we will utilize our capability in applications to homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health.

  11. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  12. ChiMS: Open-source instrument control software platform on LabVIEW for imaging/depth profiling mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Hanley, Luke

    2015-06-01

    ChiMS is an open-source data acquisition and control software program written within LabVIEW for high speed imaging and depth profiling mass spectrometers. ChiMS can also transfer large datasets from a digitizer to computer memory at high repetition rate, save data to hard disk at high throughput, and perform high speed data processing. The data acquisition mode generally simulates a digital oscilloscope, but with peripheral devices integrated for control as well as advanced data sorting and processing capabilities. Customized user-designed experiments can be easily written based on several included templates. ChiMS is additionally well suited to non-laser based mass spectrometers imaging and various other experiments in laser physics, physical chemistry, and surface science.

  13. ChiMS: Open-source instrument control software platform on LabVIEW for imaging/depth profiling mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Hanley, Luke

    2015-01-01

    ChiMS is an open-source data acquisition and control software program written within LabVIEW for high speed imaging and depth profiling mass spectrometers. ChiMS can also transfer large datasets from a digitizer to computer memory at high repetition rate, save data to hard disk at high throughput, and perform high speed data processing. The data acquisition mode generally simulates a digital oscilloscope, but with peripheral devices integrated for control as well as advanced data sorting and processing capabilities. Customized user-designed experiments can be easily written based on several included templates. ChiMS is additionally well suited to non-laser based mass spectrometers imaging and various other experiments in laser physics, physical chemistry, and surface science. PMID:26133872

  14. An energy-filtering device coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer for soft-landing molecular ions on surfaces with controlled energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, A.; Laloo, R.; Abeilhou, P.; Guiraud, L.; Gauthier, S.; Martrou, D. [Nanosciences Group, CEMES, CNRS UPR 8011 and University Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, BP94347, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-09-15

    We have developed an energy-filtering device coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer to deposit ionized molecules on surfaces with controlled energy in ultra high vacuum environment. Extensive numerical simulations as well as direct measurements show that the ion beam flying out of a quadrupole exhibits a high-energy tail decreasing slowly up to several hundred eV. This energy distribution renders impossible any direct soft-landing deposition of molecular ions. To remove this high-energy tail by energy filtering, a 127° electrostatic sector and a specific triplet lenses were designed and added after the last quadrupole of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The results obtained with this energy-filtering device show clearly the elimination of the high-energy tail. The ion beam that impinges on the sample surface satisfies now the soft-landing criterion for molecular ions, opening new research opportunities in the numerous scientific domains involving charges adsorbed on insulating surfaces.

  15. Mass measurement of halo nuclides and beam cooling with the mass spectrometer Mistral; Mesure de masse de noyaux a halo et refroidissement de faisceaux avec l'experience MISTRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, C

    2004-12-01

    Halo nuclides are a spectacular drip-line phenomenon and their description pushes nuclear theories to their limits. The most critical input parameter is the nuclear binding energy; a quantity that requires excellent measurement precision, since the two-neutron separation energy is small at the drip-line by definition. Moreover halo nuclides are typically very short-lived. Thus, a high accuracy instrument using a quick method of measurement is necessary. MISTRAL is such an instrument; it is a radiofrequency transmission mass spectrometer located at ISOLDE/CERN. In July 2003 we measured the mass of the Li{sup 11}, a two-neutron halo nuclide. Our measurement improves the precision by a factor 6, with an error of 5 keV. Moreover the measurement gives a two-neutron separation energy 20% higher than the previous value. This measurement has an impact on the radius of the nucleus, and on the state of the two valence neutrons. At the same time, a measurement of the Be{sup 11} was performed with an uncertainty of 4 keV, in excellent agreement with previous measurements. In order to measure the mass of the two-neutron halo nuclide Be{sup 14}, an ion beam cooling system is presently under development which will increase the sensitivity of the spectrometer. The second part of this work presents the development of this beam cooler using a gas-filled Paul trap. (author)

  16. MASS TRANSFER EFFECTS ON ACCELERATED VERTICAL PLATE IN A ROTATING FLUID WITH FIRST ORDER CHEMICAL REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthucumaraswamy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The precise analysis of the rotation effects on the unsteady flow of an incompressible fluid past a uniformly accelerated infinite vertical plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion has been undertaken, in the presence of a homogeneous first order chemical reaction. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace-transform technique. The plate temperature as well as the concentration near the plate increase linearly with time. The velocity profiles, temperature and concentration are studied for different physical parameters, like the chemical reaction parameter, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, Schmidt number, Prandtl number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with increasing values of thermal Grashof number or mass Grashof number. It is also observed that the velocity increases with decreasing rotation parameter Ω.

  17. Targeted analysis with benchtop quadrupole–orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer: Application to determination of synthetic hormones in animal urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc [Laboratori Agència Salut Pública de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Granados, Mercè [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep [Mass Spectrometry Laboratory-Organic Pollutants, IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Companyó, Ramon, E-mail: compano@ub.edu [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The quadrupole in Q Exactive acts as a powerful filter to reduce ion suppression. •Reducing mass range using quadrupole in targeted modes increases the S/N ratio. •Targeted SIM data dependent scan modes are the most suitable for residue analysis. •A HRMS confirmatory method for synthetic hormones in urine has been developed. •The Q Exactive provides similar sensitivity and enhanced selectivity compared to QqQ. -- Abstract: Sensitive and unequivocal determination of analytes/contaminants in complex matrices is a challenge in the field of food safety control. In this study, various acquisition modes (Full MS/AIF, Full MS + tMS/MS, Full MS/dd MS/MS and tSIM/ddMS/MS) and parameters of a quadrupole–orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (Q Exactive) were studied in detail. One of the main conclusions has been that, reducing the scan range for Full MS (using the quadrupole) and targeted modes give higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and thereby better detection limits for analytes in matrix. The use of Q Exactive in a complex case, for the confirmatory analysis of hormones in animal urine is presented. A targeted SIM data dependent MS/MS (tSIM/ddMS/MS) acquisition method for determination of eight synthetic hormones (trenbolone, 17α ethinylestradiol, zeranol, stanozolol, dienestrol, diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, taleranol) and a naturally occurring hormone (zearalenone) in animal urine were optimized to have sensitive precursors from targeted SIM mode and trigger MS/MS scans over the entire chromatograph peak. The method was validated according to EC/657/2002. CCα (decision limit) for the analytes ranged between 0.11 μg L{sup −1} and 0.69 μg L{sup −1} and CCβ (detection capability) ranged between 0.29 μg L{sup −1} and 0.90 μg L{sup −1}.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Laser Transmitter for the Two-Step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Li, Steven X.; Fahey, Molly E.; Grubisic, Andrej; Farcy, Benjamin J.; Uckert, Kyle; Li, Xiang; Getty, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Missions to diverse Outer Solar System bodies will require investigations that can detect a wide range of organics in complex mixtures, determine the structure of selected molecules, and provide powerful insights into their origin and evolution. Previous studies from remote spectroscopy of the Outer Solar System showed a diverse population of macromolecular species that are likely to include aromatic and conjugated hydrocarbons with varying degrees of methylation and nitrile incorporation. In situ exploration of Titan's upper atmosphere via mass and plasma spectrometry has revealed a complex mixture of organics. Similar material is expected on the Ice Giants, their moons, and other Outer Solar System bodies, where it may subsequently be deposited onto surface ices. It is evident that the detection of organics on other planetary surfaces provides insight into the chemical and geological evolution of a Solar System body of interest and can inform our understanding of its potential habitability. We have developed a prototype two-step laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument by exploiting the resonance-enhanced desorption of analyte. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the L2MS to detect hydrocarbons in organically-doped analog minerals, including cryogenic Ocean World-relevant ices and mixtures. The L2MS instrument operates by generating a neutral plume of desorbed analyte with an IR desorption laser pulse, followed at a delay by a ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse, ionizing the plume. Desorption of the analyte, including trace organic species, may be enhanced by selecting the wavelength of the IR desorption laser to coincide with IR absorption features associated with vibration transitions of minerals or organic functional groups. In this effort, a preliminary laser developed for the instrument uses a breadboard mid-infrared (MIR) desorption laser operating at a discrete 3.475 µm wavelength, and a breadboard UV

  19. Analysis of cloud condensation nuclei composition and growth kinetics using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor and aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Slowik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method of determining the size and composition of CCN-active aerosol particles. Method utility is illustrated through a series of ambient measurements. A continuous-flow thermal-gradient diffusion chamber (TGDC, pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI, and Aerodyne time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AMS are operated in series. Ambient particles are sampled into the TGDC, where a constant supersaturation is maintained, and CCN-active particles grow to ~2.5 ± 0.5 μm. The output flow from the TGDC is directed into the PCVI, where a counterflow of dry N2 gas opposes the particle-laden flow, creating a region of zero axial velocity. This stagnation plane can only be traversed by particles with sufficient momentum, which depends on their size. Particles that have activated in the TGDC cross the stagnation plane and are entrained in the PCVI output flow, while the unactivated particles are diverted to a pump. Because the input gas is replaced by the counterflow gas with better than 99 % efficiency at the stagnation plane, the output flow consists almost entirely of dry N2 and water evaporates from the activated particles. In this way, the system yields an ensemble of CCN-active particles whose chemical composition and size are analyzed using the AMS. Measurements of urban aerosol in downtown Toronto identified an external mixture of CCN-active particles consisting almost entirely of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, with CCN-inactive particles of the same size consisting of a mixture of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and organics. We also discuss results from the first field deployment of the TGDC-PCVI-AMS system, conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2007 in Egbert, Ontario, a semirural site ~80 km north of Toronto influenced both by clean air masses from the north and emissions from the city. Organic-dominated particles sampled during a major biogenic event exhibited higher CCN activity and/or faster

  20. Status and research programs of the multinuclide accelerator mass spectrometry system at the University of Tsukuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Kimikazu, E-mail: ksasa@tac.tsukuba.ac.j [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tosaki, Yuki [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem Accelerator, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke; Tamari, Michiko; Amano, Takahiro; Oki, Toshiyuki; Mihara, Shozo; Yamato, Yoshihiro; Nagashima, Yasuo [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Kotaro; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Radiation Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We present the current status and research programs of a multinuclide accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system), Japan. A maximum terminal voltage of 12 MV is available for the AMS system. The Tsukuba AMS system can measure environmental levels of long-lived radioisotopes of {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I by employing a molecular pilot beam. Recently, enhancements in AMS techniques and equipment, including sample preparation, the ion source and the data acquisition system, have improved the performance of {sup 36}Cl-AMS. The standard deviation of fluctuations is typically +-2%, and the machine background level for the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio is lower than 1 x 10{sup -15} with a halite sample. We have measured over 500 samples in 1 year, including samples for earth and environmental sciences and nuclear safety research.

  1. Improved detection limit for {sup 59}Ni using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    2002-11-01

    59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. To be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage it is important to measure the 59 Ni level. Accelerator mass spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive method for counting atoms, suitable for 59 Ni measurements. Improvements in the reduction of the background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt, the interfering isobar, have been made. This chemical purification is essential when using small tandem accelerators, <3 MV, combined with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. These improvements have lowered the detection limit for 59 Ni by a factor of twenty compared with the first value reported for the Lund AMS facility. Material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analysed and examples of the results are presented.

  2. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  3. The ANTARES recoil time-of-flight spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES), is a 8MV FN tandem particle accelerator at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. Research on the accelerator is divided between two groups, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and lon Beam Analysis (IBA). The IBA group carries out a range of research projects from nuclear physics to materials characterisation. The major IBA project on the accelerator is a recoil time-of-flight spectrometer which consists of two electrostatic time pulse generators and an ion-implanted surface barrier detector. The spectrometer is ideally suited to the profiling of layered multi-element materials, and has been used to characterise materials such as metal-germanides, optoelectronics, superconductors and catalytic converters. This paper will describe the time-of-flight system as well as some recent materials characterisation results. 1 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement...

  5. Semivolatile organic compounds monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer at 200m above ground in rural Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Jessica; Klinger, Andreas; Herbig, Jens; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are anthropogenically and naturally occurring chemical compounds that have vapor pressures such that they exist in both the gas and condensed phase at room temperature. Due to the fact SVOCs condense easily, they are interesting in the context of organic aerosol formation and these compounds impact atmospheric properties and human health. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS, resolution 1200 FWHM) is a method that facilitates deeper analysis of SVOCs. Our setup, consisting of a PTR-MS with a time of flight mass spectrometer coupled to a denuder sampler (DS) was stationed as part of the European ACTRIS-2 program at 200m atop the Cabauw tower in the Netherlands as of September, 2016. The DS consists of three denuders in series. The first two denuders are coated with dimethylpolysiloxane (DB1, OD 4mm, 3cm long) and consists of an assemblage of micro-channels (ID 80 micrometer). The third denuder is an activated charcoal monolith of the same dimensions but with larger (thus fewer) channels (ID 800 micrometer). The air sampled at 800mL/min is pulled through these denuders as laminar flow and the SVOCs will collide and condense on the wall. Undesirable wall losses are minimized by using a short and high flow inlet lines. The collected SVOCs are thermally desorbed under a Nitrogen (N2) gas flow and transferred to the PTR-MS through heated lines to avoid re-condensation. Evaluation of the full mass spectra revealed over 200 different compounds in the range 15-500 Da. The majority of the mass of SVOCs was contained in m/z > 100 and typical mixing ratios of the detected SVOCs were a few pmol/mol in ambient air. Discernible contamination from the DB1 coating was detected and therefore, different blank methods have been tested and evaluated using a student T-test. Proper blank correction is an important issue of this method and will be discussed in detail. Data from October 19th, 2016, are used as case studies for analyzing

  6. Identification and quantification of organic aerosol from cooking and other sources in Barcelona using aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mohr

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <1 μm non-refractory components and black carbon were measured continuously together with additional air quality and atmospheric parameters at an urban background site in Barcelona, Spain, during March 2009 (campaign DAURE, Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was conducted on the organic aerosol (OA data matrix measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer, on both unit mass (UMR and high resolution (HR data. Five factors or sources could be identified: LV-OOA (low-volatility oxygenated OA, related to regional, aged secondary OA; SV-OOA (semi-volatile oxygenated OA, a fresher oxygenated OA; HOA (hydrocarbon-like OA, related to traffic emissions; BBOA (biomass burning OA from domestic heating or agricultural biomass burning activities; and COA (cooking OA. LV-OOA contributed 28% to OA, SV-OOA 27%, COA 17%, HOA 16%, and BBOA 11%. The COA HR spectrum contained substantial signal from oxygenated ions (O:C: 0.21 whereas the HR HOA spectrum had almost exclusively contributions from chemically reduced ions (O:C: 0.03. If we assume that the carbon in HOA is fossil while that in COA and BBOA is modern, primary OA in Barcelona contains a surprisingly high fraction (59% of non-fossil carbon.

    This paper presents a method for estimating cooking organic aerosol in ambient datasets based on the fractions of organic mass fragments at m/z 55 and 57: their data points fall into a V-shape in a scatter plot, with strongly influenced HOA data aligned to the right arm and strongly influenced COA data points aligned to the left arm. HR data show that this differentiation is mainly driven by the oxygen-containing ions C3H3O+ and C3H5O+, even though their contributions to m/z 55 and 57 are low compared to the

  7. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Mass Spectrometer System for Clinical Use for the Identification of Microorganisms. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the mass spectrometer system for clinical use for the identification of microorganisms into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the mass pectrometer system for clinical use for the identification of microorganisms' classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.

  8. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  9. Progress with a gas-accepting ion source for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. L.; von Reden, K. F.; McIntyre, C. P.; Burton, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ocean Sciences AMS (NOSAMS) facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has developed a novel, gas-accepting microwave-plasma ion-source. The source is a key component of a compact Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) system built for the analysis of 14C in a continuously flowing gas stream. The gas source produces carbon currents from a stream of CO 2 with currents typical of a traditional graphite source. Details of the gas source, including ion current achieved, optimal flow rate, efficiency, and memory are presented. Additionally, data obtained from coupling a gas chromatograph to the source shown. Details about ion optics are presented separately [1].

  10. Isotope-selective laser photodetachment for {sup 129}I accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Tone, E-mail: takahashi.ton@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Tomita, Hideki; Nakayama, Motoi; Adachi, Yoshitaka [Nagoya University (Japan); Sonnenschein, Volker [Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany); Iguchi, Tetsuo [Nagoya University (Japan); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    A pulsed injection-locked Ti:Sapphire laser and a negative ion laser ablation source are developed for compact accelerator mass spectrometry assisted by isotope-selective laser photodetachment. An output of about 60 mW at a repetition rate of 1 kHz is available using intracavity second-harmonic generation with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. A negative iodine ion pulse with a width of 100 ns is obtained by laser ablation of a NH{sub 4}I sample. The negative ion source and the injection-locked Ti:Sapphire laser are suitable for trace analysis of {sup 129}I.

  11. Discretization of space and time: mass-energy relation, accelerating expansion of the Universe, Hubble constant

    OpenAIRE

    Roatta, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Assuming that space and time can only have discrete values, we obtain the expression of the gravitational potential energy that at large distance coincides with the Newtonian. In very precise circumstances it coincides with the relativistic mass-energy relation: this shows that the Universe is a black hole in which all bodies are subjected to an acceleration toward the border of the Universe itself. Since the Universe is a black hole with a fixed radius, we can obtain the density of the Unive...

  12. Accelerated ice-sheet mass loss in Antarctica from 18-year satellite laser ranging measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the ice-sheet mass balance in Antarctic is very difficult due to complex ice sheet condition and sparse in situ measurements. In this paper, the low-degree gravity field coefficients of up to degree and order 5 derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR measurements are used to determine the ice mass variations in Antarctica for the period 1993–2011. Results show that the ice mass is losing with -36±13 Gt/y in Antarctica, -42±11 Gt/y in the West Antarctica and 6±10 Gt/y in the East Antarctica from 1993 to 2011. The ice mass variations from the SLR 5×5 have a good agreement with the GRACE 5×5, GRACE 5×5 (1&2 and GRACE (60×60 for the entire continent since 2003, but degree 5 from SLR is not sufficient to quantify ice losses in West and East Antarctica, respectively. The rate of ice loss in Antarctica is -28±17 Gt/y for 1993-2002 and -55±17 Gt/y for 2003-2011, indicating significant accelerated ice mass losses since 2003. Furthermore, the results from SLR are comparable with GRACE measurements.

  13. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  14. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS at an elementary school 18 m from the US 95 freeway soundwall in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen oxides (NOx, and meteorological data were collected. The US~Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA positive matrix factorization (PMF data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA, biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA. When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26% of the OM, while LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26% of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12% of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining third of the OM. Use of the pulling techniques

  15. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of monolayer protected clusters Au144 and Au130 in an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David M; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Whetten, Robert L; Bach, Stephan B H

    2014-11-13

    Gas-phase reactions of larger gold clusters are poorly known because generation of the intact parent species for mass spectrometric analysis remains quite challenging. Herein we report in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) results for the monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) Au144(SR)60 and Au130(SR)50, where R- = PhCH2CH2-, in a Bruker micrOTOF time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A sample mixture of the two clusters was introduced into the mass spectrometer by positive mode electrospray ionization. Standard source conditions were used to acquire a reference mass spectrum, exhibiting negligible fragmentation, and then the capillary-skimmer potential difference was increased to induce in-source CID within this low-pressure region (∼4 mbar). Remarkably, distinctive fragmentation patterns are observed for each MPC[3+] parent ion. An assignment of all the major dissociation products (ions and neutrals) is deduced and interpreted by using the distinguishing characteristics in the standard structure-models for the respective MPCs. Also, we propose a ring-forming elimination mechanism to explain R-H neutral loss, as separate from the channels leading to RS-SR or (AuSR)4 neutrals.

  17. The masses of nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, the mass difference between {sup 180}W and {sup 180}Hf, and a characterization of the future cryogenic stopping cell of the online mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droese, Christian

    2015-01-29

    This work describes the recent scientific and technical achievements obtained at the high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The scientific focus of the SHIPTRAP experiment are mass measurements of short-lived nuclides with proton number larger than 100. The masses of these isotopes are usually determined via extrapolations, systematic trends, predictions based on theoretical models or alpha-decay spectroscopy. In several experiments the masses of the isotopes {sup 252-255}No and {sup 255,256}Lr have been measured directly. With the obtained results the region of enhanced nuclear stability at the deformed shell closure at the neutron number 152 was investigated. Furthermore, the masses have been used to benchmark theoretical mass models. The measured masses were compared selected mass models which revealed differences between few keV/c² up to several MeV/c² depending on the investigated nuclide and model. In order to perform mass measurements on superheavy nuclei with lower production rates, the efficiency of the SHIPTRAP setup needs to be increased. Currently, the efficiency is 2% and mainly limited by the stopping- and extraction efficiency of the buffer gas cell. The stopping and extraction efficiency of the current buffer gas cell is 12%. To this end, a modified version of the buffer gas cell was developed and characterized with {sup 223}Ra ion source. Besides a larger stopping volume and a coaxial injection the new buffer gas cell is operated at a temperature of 40 K. The operation at cryogenic temperatures increases the cleanliness of the buffer gas. From extraction measurements and simulations an overall efficiency of 62(3)% was determined which results in an increase by a factor of 5 in comparison to the current buffer gas cell. Aside from high-precision mass measurements of heavy radionuclides the mass differences of metastable isobars was measured to identify candidates for the neutrinoless double-electron capture. Neutrinoless double

  18. MASCOT: a new mass-spectrometer facility dedicated to the analysis of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) from terrestrial samples (Institute of Geological Sciences - University of Bern, Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunel, Romain; Enderli, Patrick; Jenni, Hans-Erich; Leya, Ingo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In the past years, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been successfully used for dating exposure history of landforms and measuring erosional processes on Earth's surface. In this context, quantifications of landscape change have mainly been accomplished through the use of radioactive cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al, but their application has generally been restricted to Quaternary time scales because of their relatively short half-lives. The results are 10Be and 26Al concentrations that are below the detection limit of available accelerator mass spectrometers if the samples have a Late Miocene or even a Pliocene age. Contrariwise, cosmogenic noble gases such as 3He and 21Ne do not experience any radioactive decay through time, which places these isotopes in an unbeatable position for measuring paleo-denudation rates preserved in detrital material even if the ages of these deposits are up to 10 Ma and even older. These isotopes are thus keys for assessing the interplays between tectonic, climate and surface processes involved in the long-term evolution of mountain belts. Here we report the technical specifications of a noble gas analytical system that we have developed and set up at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, Switzerland, with the motivations to get dates and rates of erosion processes from the measurement of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) concentrations from terrestrial samples. This new facility, hosted at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, combines a MAP215-50 mass spectrometer fitted with a new high-sensitivity channel electron multiplier with an all-metal extraction and purification line. This later system thus comprises: (i) a double vacuum resistance furnace loaded by a 22-samples carrousel, (ii) three in-vacuo crushers (iii) an ultra high vacuum pumping system (mass spectrometer. This communication will be the opportunity to present our new noble gas system's full

  19. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  20. Performance evaluation of a miniature laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations in planetary space research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedo, A; Bieler, A; Neuland, M; Tulej, M; Wurz, P

    2013-01-01

    Key performance features of a miniature laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations of the chemical composition of planetary surfaces are presented. This mass spectrometer is well suited for elemental and isotopic analysis of raw solid materials with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. In this study, ultraviolet laser radiation with irradiances suitable for ablation (laser ablation studies at infrared wavelengths, several improvements to the experimental setup have been made, which allow accurate control over the experimental conditions and good reproducibility of measurements. Current performance evaluations indicate significant improvements to several instrumental figures of merit. Calibration of the mass scale is performed within a mass accuracy (Δm/m) in the range of 100 ppm, and a typical mass resolution (m/Δm) ~600 is achieved at the lead mass peaks. At lower laser irradiances, the mass resolution is better, about (m/Δm) ~900 for lead, and limited by the laser pulse duration of 3 ns. The effective dynamic range of the instrument was enhanced from about 6 decades determined in previous study up to more than 8 decades at present. Current studies show high sensitivity in detection of both metallic and non-metallic elements. Their abundance down to tens of ppb can be measured together with their isotopic patterns. Due to strict control of the experimental parameters, e.g. laser characteristics, ion-optical parameters and sample position, by computer control, measurements can be performed with high reproducibility. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Real-time analysis of soot emissions from bituminous coal pyrolysis and combustion with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shaokai; Zhang, Yang; Meng, Junwang; Shu, Jinian

    2009-01-15

    This paper reports on-line analyses of the soot emissions from the Inner Mongolia bituminous coal combustion and pyrolysis processes with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). The soot particles are generated by heating a small amount of screened coal powder in synthetic air and nitrogen atmosphere in a tubular oven. The vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight (VUV-TOF) mass spectra of the soot particles emitted from combustion and pyrolysis at different oven temperatures and different stages are obtained. The VUV-TOF mass spectra are assigned with the references of the results of the off-line GC/MS analysis.

  2. Accurate mass measurements of {sup 26}Ne, {sup 26-3}Na, {sup 29-33}Mg performed with the MISTRAL spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaulard, C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)]. E-mail: gaulard@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Audi, G. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Bachelet, C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Lunney, D. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Saint Simon, M. de [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Thibault, C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Vieira, N. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS and UPS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2006-02-20

    The minuteness of the nuclear binding energy requires that mass measurements be highly precise and accurate. Here we report on new measurements of {sup 29-33}Mg and {sup 26}Na performed with the MISTRAL mass spectrometer at CERN's ISOLDE facility. Since mass measurements are prone to systematic errors, considerable effort has been devoted to their evaluation and elimination in order to achieve accuracy and not only precision. We have therefore conducted a campaign of measurements for calibration and error evaluation. As a result, we now have a satisfactory description of the MISTRAL calibration laws and error budget. We have applied our new understanding to previous measurements of {sup 26}Ne, {sup 26-3}Na and {sup 29,32}Mg for which re-evaluated values are reported.

  3. Precision and long-term stability of clumped-isotope analysis of CO2 using a small-sector isotope ratio mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Vasilev, Mikhail; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Abe, Osamu; Yamada, Keita; Morimoto, Maki

    2013-01-15

    The ratio of the measured abundance of (13)C-(18)O bonding CO(2) to its stochastic abundance, prescribed by the δ(13)C and δ(18)O values from a carbonate mineral, is sensitive to its growth temperature. Recently, clumped-isotope thermometry, which uses this ratio, has been adopted as a new tool to elucidate paleotemperatures quantitatively. Clumped isotopes in CO(2) were measured with a small-sector isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CO(2) samples digested from several kinds of calcium carbonates by phosphoric acid at 25 °C were purified using both cryogenic and gas-chromatographic separations, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C, δ(18)O, Δ(47), Δ(48) and Δ(49) values) were then determined using a dual-inlet Delta XP mass spectrometer. The internal precisions of the single gas Δ(47) measurements were 0.005 and 0.02‰ (1 SE) for the optimum and the routine analytical conditions, respectively, which are comparable with those obtained using a MAT 253 mass spectrometer. The long-term variations in the Δ(47) values for the in-house working standard and the heated CO(2) gases since 2007 were close to the routine, single gas uncertainty while showing seasonal-like periodicities with a decreasing trend. Unlike the MAT 253, the Delta XP did not show any significant relationship between the Δ(47) and δ(47) values. The Delta XP gave results that were approximately as precise as those of the MAT 253 for clumped-isotope analysis. The temporal stability of the Delta XP seemed to be lower, although an advantage of the Delta XP was that no dependency of δ(47) on Δ(47) was found. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  5. An electrospray/inductively coupled plasma dual-source time-of-flight mass spectrometer for rapid metallomic and speciation analysis. Part 1. Molecular channel characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duane A; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2010-04-01

    A new time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed that uses an electrospray source and an inductively coupled plasma to extract molecular, atomic, and isotopic information simultaneously from a single sample. This paper will focus on characterization of the ESI channel. Sensitivities are reported for hexadecyltrimethylammonium, tetrahexylammonium, tetraoctylammonium, myoglobin, insulin, cyanocobalamin, leucine enkephalin, and alcohol dehydrogenase. Skimmer-nozzle collisionally induced dissociation is explored for adduct removal and analyte fragmentation on the ESI channel for tetraoctylammonium ion and leucine enkephalin. Long-term and short-term spray stability is also examined.

  6. Development of Tandem, Double-Focusing, Electron Impact, Gas Source Mass Spectrometer for Measurement of Rare Double-Substituted Isotoplogues in Geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Edward D. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    This project culminated in construction and delivery of the world’s first large-radius gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometer that permits unparalleled analyses of the stable isotopic composition of methane gas. The instrument, referred to as the “Panorama” and installed at UCLA in March 2015, can now be used to determine the relative abundances of rare isotopic species of methane that serve as tracers of temperature of formation and/or subsequent processing of gas. With this technology we can begin to delineate different sources and sinks of methane isotopically in ways not possible until now.

  7. Approaching {sup 100}Sn with GASP + Si-ball + recoil mass spectrometer: collective states of {sup 105}Sn and {sup 103,105}In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Poli, M.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Sferrazza, M.; Gadea, A.; Li, Y.; Spolaore, P.; Ackermann, D.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bizzeti, P.G.; Bizzeti Sona, A.M.; Brandolini, F.; Burch, R.; Buscemi, A.; De Acuna, D.; Fahlander, C.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Lunardi, S.; Makishima, A.; Menegazzo, R.; Mueller, L.; Napoli, D.; Ogawa, M.; Pavan, P.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Seweryniak, D.; Soramel, F.; Zanon, R. [INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)]|[Sezione INFN and Dipt. di Fisica dell`Univ., Padova (Italy)]|[Sezione INFN and Dipt. di Fisica dell`Univ., Firenze (Italy)]|[Svedberg Lab., Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Center for Radioisotope Science, National Defense Medical Coll., Tokorozawa (Japan)]|[Dept. of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Yokohama (Japan)]|[Sezione INFN and Dipt. di Fisica dell`Univ., Udine (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Very proton rich nuclei in the A {approx} 100 region have been investigated using the GASP array coupled with the Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) and the GASP Si-ball. High-spin states of {sup 105}Sn and {sup 103,105}In nuclei formed with the reaction {sup 58}Ni + {sup 50}Cr at 210 MeV have been investigated up to {approx} 10 and 7 MeV of excitation energy respectively. We have confirmed the known excited states for both nuclei and extended to higher spin the level scheme. The experimental level schemes are compared with shell model calculations. (orig.).

  8. Correlation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B [Albuquerque, NM; Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb H [Albuquerque, NM; Jones, Gary D [Tijeras, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  9. Locomotion analysis of a vibration-driven system with three acceleration-controlled internal masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Zhan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The controlled motion of a rigid body in the horizontal plane is investigated in this article. Three internal and acceleration-controlled masses are used to actuate the system. Dry friction acting between the system and the plane is isotropic. The dynamics of two basic motions of the system, that is, rectilinear and rotary motions, are first studied. Then by combining these two basic types of motions, planar locomotion of the system is constructed. Two typical planar trajectories of the system, that is, oblique lines and curve lines, are proposed and both approached with folding lines. The slope of the oblique lines and the curvature of the curves can be adjusted by varying the drive parameters, and the planar locomotion is thus controlled. To achieve a maximum average velocity, the drive parameters are optimized.

  10. A dedicated AMS setup for medium mass isotopes at the Cologne FN tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, M.; Altenkirch, R.; Feuerstein, C.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Hackenberg, G.; Herb, S.; Bhandari, P.; Heinze, S.; Stolz, A.; Dewald, A.

    2017-09-01

    AMS measurements of medium mass isotopes, e.g. of 53Mn and 60Fe, are gaining interest in various fields of operation, especially geoscience. Therefore a dedicated AMS setup has been built at the Cologne 10 MV FN tandem accelerator. This setup is designed to obtain a sufficient suppression of the stable isobars at energies around 100 MeV. In this contribution we report on the actual status of the new setup and the first in-beam tests of its individual components. The isobar suppression is done with (dE/dx) techniques using combinations of energy degrader foils with an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) and a time of flight (ToF) system, as well as a (dE/dx),E gas ionization detector. Furthermore, the upgraded ion source and its negative ion yield measurement for MnO- are presented.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry for human biochemistry: The practice and the potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John S.

    2000-10-01

    Isotopic labels are a primary tool for tracing chemicals in natural systems. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) quantifies long-lived isotopes that can be used in safe, sensitive and precise biochemical research with human participants. AMS could reduce the use of animals in biochemical research and remove the uncertain extrapolations from animal models to humans. Animal data seldom represent the sort of variability expected in a human population. People, knowingly or not, routinely expose themselves to radiation risks much greater than AMS-based biochemical research that traces μg/kg doses of chemicals containing tens of nCi of 14C for as long as 7 months. AMS is applied to research in toxicology, pharmacology and nutrition.

  12. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona: Geochronology of the Climatic Record and Connections with the Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Jull

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many diverse uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. 14C studies at our laboratory include much research related to paleoclimate, with 14C as a tracer of past changes in environmental conditions as observed in corals, marine sediments, and many terrestrial records. Terrestrial records can also show the influence of oceanic oscillations, whether they are short term, such as ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation, or on the millennial time scale. In tracer applications, we have developed the use of 129I as well as 14C as tracers for nuclear pollution studies around radioactive waste dump sites, in collaboration with IAEA. We discuss some applications carried out in Tucson, AZ, for several of these fields and hope to give some idea of the breadth of these studies.

  13. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  14. The chemical composition and mineralogy of meteorites measured with very high spatial resolution by a laser mass spectrometer for in situ planetary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Tulej, Marek; Frey, Samira; Riedo, Andreas; Wurz, Peter; Wiesendanger, Reto

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of moons, comets, asteroids or other planetary bodies is of particular importance for the investigation of the origin and evolution of the Solar System. High resolution in situ studies on planetary surfaces can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1]. We investigated samples of Allende and Sayh al Uhaymir with a highly miniaturised laser mass spectrometer (LMS), which has been designed and built for in situ space research [2,3]. Both meteorite samples were investigated with a spatial resolution of about 10μm in lateral direction. The high sensitivity and high dynamic range of the LMS allow for quantitative measurements of the abundances of the rock-forming and minor and trace elements with high accuracy [4]. From the data, the modal mineralogy of micrometre-sized chondrules can be inferred [5], conclusions about the condensation sequence of the material are possible and the sensitivity for radiogenic elements allows for dating analyses of the investigated material. We measured the composition of various chondrules in Allende, offering valuable clues about the condensation sequence of the different components of the meteorite. We explicitly investigated the chemical composition and heterogeneity of the Allende matrix with an accuracy that cannot be reached by the mechanical analysis methods that were and are widely used in meteoritic research. We demonstrate the capabilities for dating analyses with the LMS. By applying the U-Th-dating method, the age of the SaU169 sample could be determined. Our analyses show that the LMS would be a suitable instrument for high-quality quantitative chemical composition measurements on the surface of a celestial body like a planet, moon or

  15. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan, E-mail: s.pavetich@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Akhmadaliev, Shavkat [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Golser, Robin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keddadouche, Karim [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Martschini, Martin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Steier, Peter [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in {sup 35}Cl ({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion

  16. A Modified FEM for Transverse and Lateral Vibration Analysis of Thin Beams Under a Mass Moving with a Variable Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Esen

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a new modified finite element method that can be used in the analysis of transverse and lateral vibrations of the thin beams under a point mass moving with a variable acceleration and constant jerk is presented. Jerk is the change in acceleration over time. In this method, the classical finite element of the beam is modified by the inclusion of the inertial effects of the moving mass. This modification is made using the relations between nodal forces and nodal deflections and shape functions of six DOF beam element. The mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the modified finite element are determined by forces caused by the corresponding transverse and lateral accelerations and jerks, and transverse Coriolis and centripetal accelerations and jerks, respectively. This method was first applied on a simply supported beam plate to provide a comparison with the previous studies in literature, and it was proved that the results were within acceptable limits. Secondly, it was applied on a CNC type box-framed beam to analyse the dynamic response of the beam in terms of variable acceleration and jerk as well as constant velocity and mass ratios.

  17. Characterization of chemical constituents in Rhodiola Crenulate by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (HPLC-FT-ICR MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Li, Yanting; Mao, Xinjuan; Xu, Rui; Yin, Ran

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an approach using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (HPLC-FT-ICR MS) for the identification and profiling of chemical constituents in Rhodiola crenulata was developed for the first time. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an Inertsil ODS-3 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm,3 µm) using a gradient elution program, and the detection was performed on a Bruker Solarix 7.0 T mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source in both positive and negative modes. Under the optimized conditions, a total of 48 chemical compounds, including 26 alcohols and their glycosides, 12 flavonoids and their glycosides, 5 flavanols and gallic acid derivatives, 4 organic acids and 1 cyanogenic glycoside were identified or tentatively characterized. The results indicated that the developed HPLC-FT-ICR MS method with ultra-high sensitivity and resolution is suitable for identifying and characterizing the chemical constituents in R. crenulata. And it provides a helpful chemical basis for further research on R. crenulata. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Performance of the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Investigation on the 2018 Exomars Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Pinnick, Veronica T.; van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Li, Xiang; Getty, Stephanie; Hovmand, Lars; Atanassova, Martina; Mahaffy, Paul R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from degradation derived from cosmic radiation and/or oxidative chemical reactions. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. The MOMA investigation is led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) with the mass spectrometer subsystem provided by NASA GSFC. MOMA's linear ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is designed to analyze molecular composition of: (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated in a gas chromatograph; and, (ii) ions directly desorbed from crushed solid samples at Mars ambient pressure, as enabled by a pulsed UV laser system, fast-actuating aperture valve and capillary ion inlet. Breadboard ITMS and associated electronics have been advanced to high end-to-end fidelity in preparation for flight hardware delivery to Germany in 2015.

  19. A STUDY ON CARBON ISOTOPE OF CO2 AND CH4 IN WESTERN DIENG PLATEU BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY- ISOTOPE RATIO MASS SPECTROMETER (GC-IRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon isotope can be used to evaluate volcanism phenomenon of volcano. The study of carbon isotope of CO2 and CH4 was carried out in western Dieng Plateau by mass-spectrometer. Before analysis, sampel was separated by gas chromatography using a Porapak-Q column and a FID (Flame Ionization Detector detector. The gas was oxidized by copper oxide at 850oC before being ionized in mass-spectrometer for isotope analysis. The CO2 content in Candradimuka crater (-4.10 O/OO, indicated that the gas may be as volcanic gas. The other CO2 from Sumber and western Gua Jimat, had isotope value  of -10.05 and -12.07 O/OO, respectively, indicating contamination from crustal and subduction material. The carbon isotope of CH4 gas from Pancasan village was -63.42 O/OO, that may be categorized as biogenic gas.   Keywords: isotope, CO2, CH4, Dieng.

  20. Ozone-induced dissociation on a traveling wave high-resolution mass spectrometer for determination of double-bond position in lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ngoc; Brown, Jeffery; Giles, Kevin; Zhang, Qibin

    2017-09-15

    The position of C=C within fatty acyl chains affects the biological function of lipids. Ozone-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (OzID-MS) has great potential in determination of lipid double-bond position, but has generally been implemented on low-resolution ion trap mass spectrometers. In addition, most of the OzID-MS experiments carried out so far were focused on the sodiated adducts of lipids; fragmentation of the most commonly observed protonated ions generated in LC/MS-based lipidomics workflow has been less explored. Ozone generated in line from an ozone generator was connected to the trap and transfer gas supply line of a Synapt G2 high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protonated ions of different phosphatidylcholines (PC) were generated by electrospray ionization through direct infusion. Different parameters, including traveling wave height and velocity, trap entrance and DC potential, were adjusted to maximize the OzID efficiency. sn-positional isomers and cis/trans isomers of lipids were compared for their reactivity with ozone. Traveling wave height and velocity were tuned to prolong the encounter time between lipid ions and ozone, and resulted in improved OzID efficiency, as did increasing trapping region DC and entrance potential. Under optimized settings, at least 1000 times enhancement in OzID efficiency was achieved compared to that under default settings for monounsaturated PC standards. Monounsaturated C=C in the sn-2 PC isomer reacted faster with ozone than the sn-1 isomer. Similarly, the C=C in trans PC reacted faster than in cis PC. This is the first implementation of OzID in the trap and transfer region of a traveling wave enabled high-resolution mass spectrometer. The OzID reaction efficiency is significantly improved by slowing down ions in the trap region for their prolonged interaction with ozone. This will facilitate application of high-resolution OzID-MS in lipidomics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Linking accretion flow and particle acceleration in jets - II. Self-similar jet models with full relativistic MHD gravitational mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polko, P.; Meier, D.L.; Markoff, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, semi-analytic formalism to model the acceleration and collimation of relativistic jets in a gravitational potential. The gravitational energy density includes the kinetic, thermal and electromagnetic mass contributions. The solutions are close to self-similar throughout the

  2. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest(®) laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest(®) LIS. WE LICENSED SOFTWARE FOR THE DATA MANAGEMENT INTERFACE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, BUT EXTENDED THIS WORK AS FOLLOWS: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap(®) mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest(®) via file transfer protocol. The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst(®) software to the required Sunquest(®) import format. This required writing of a "pre-processor" by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available.

  3. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX TM mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah French

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX TM mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX TM × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a "pre-processor" by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available.

  4. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a “pre-processor” by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available. PMID:23599901

  5. The ion trap aerosol mass spectrometer: field intercomparison with the ToF-AMS and the capability of differentiating organic compound classes via MS-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachinger, Johannes R. W.; Gallavardin, Stéphane J.; Helleis, Frank; Fachinger, Friederike; Drewnick, Frank; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Further development and optimisation of a previously described ion trap aerosol mass spectrometer (IT-AMS) are presented, which resulted in more reproducible and robust operation and allowed for the instrument's first field deployment. Results from this 11-day-long measurement indicate that the instrument is capable of providing quantitative information on organics, nitrate, and sulfate mass concentrations with reasonable detection limits (0.5-1.4 µg m-3 for 1 h averages) and that results obtained with the IT-AMS can directly be related to those from Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers. The capability of the IT-AMS to elucidate the structure of fragment ions is demonstrated via an MS4 study on tryptophan. Detection limits are demonstrated to be sufficiently low to allow for MS2 studies not only in laboratory but also in field measurements under favourable conditions or with the use of an aerosol concentrator. In laboratory studies the capability of the IT-AMS to differentiate [C4Hy]+ and [C3HyO]+ fragments at the nominal m/z 55 and 57 via their characteristic fragmentation patterns in MS2 experiments is demonstrated. Furthermore, with the IT-AMS it is possible to distinguish between fragments of the same elemental composition ([C2H4O2]+ at m/z 60 and [C3H5O2]+ at m/z 73) originating from different compound classes (carboxylic acids and sugars) due to their different molecular structure. These findings constitute a proof of concept and could provide a new means of distinguishing between these two compound classes in ambient organic aerosol.

  6. Design and realization of a space-borne reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer: electronics and measuring head; Conception et realisation d'un spectrometre de masse a temps de vol spatialisable de type 'reflectron' electronique et tete de mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, P

    2006-03-15

    The purpose of this thesis is the design of the electronics of a time of flight mass spectrometer, the making and the vacuum tests of a prototype which can be put onboard a satellite. A particular effort was necessary to decrease to the maximum the mass and electric consumption of the spectrometer, which led to the development of new circuits. The work completed during this thesis initially concerns the electronics of the measuring equipment which was conceived in a concern for modularity. A complete 'reflectron' type mass spectrometer was then designed, simulated and developed. The built prototype, which uses the developed electronics, was exposed to ion flows of different masses and energies in the CESR vacuum chambers. Its measured performances validate the implemented principles and show that an identical mass spectrometer can be put onboard a satellite with profit, for planetary or solar missions. (author)

  7. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan; Grover, Monica; Sibai, Tarek; Black, Jennifer; Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacokinetic analysis of 14C-ursodiol in newborn infants using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordi, Toufigh; Baillie, Rebecca; Vuong, Le T; Abidi, Saira; Dueker, Stephen; Vasquez, Herbert; Pegis, Priscilla; Hopper, Andrew O; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies in the neonatal population are often limited by the small volume of blood that can be collected. The high sensitivity of (14) C-accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables pharmacokinetic studies to be conducted with greatly reduced sample volumes. We demonstrated the utility of AMS in infants by studying the plasma pharmacokinetic behavior of nanogram doses of (14) C-ursodiol administered as a non-perturbing microdose or as a microtracer with therapeutic doses of non-labeled ursodiol in infants. Five non-cholestatic infants were administered 3 consecutive oral microdoses of (14) C-ursodiol: 8 ng (1.0 nCi), 26 ng (3.3 nCi), and 80 ng (10 nCi) 48 hours apart. Three additional infants with cholestasis were administered a single 80 ng (10.0 nCi) oral dose of (14) C-ursodiol together with a therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg of non-labeled ursodiol. A pharmacokinetic model describing ursodiol concentrations was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The pharmacokinetics of ursodiol in this pilot study were best described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. This study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of microdose and microtrace methodology in pediatric research. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Preparation of Plant 41Ca Tracer Samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Qing-zhang1;JANG Ping-ping3;LIN De-yu4;YANG Xian-lin1;DOU Liang1;PANG Yi-jun1;WANG Xiao-ming1;ZHANG Hui1,5;YANG Xu-ran1;WU Shao-yong1;GAO Dong-sheng2;LI Ling2;WANG Lei2;SUN Ke-peng2;ZHOU Jun2;DONG Ke-jun1;HE Ming1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the metabolism of plants and animals. In this paper, the preparation method of plant 41Ca for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS measurement was developed for the first time in China. AMS, with its advantages of high sensitivity, small dose of radioactivity, high accuracy, large measuring range, and long tracer cycle, can be used to measure cosmogenic nuclide 41Ca , which has long half-life. The intensity of the beam in ion source is an important parameter for the sensitivity of AMS measurement. The high beam current can improve the sensitivity of AMS. The preparation methods of plant samples of 41Ca tracer were systematically studied to obtain high beam current using wet, dry and a combining method with wet and dry re-fluoride. A reliable preparation procedure of plant samples for 41Ca tracer and its optimization parameters were determined by testing beam currents of various samples and lay a foundation for the 41Ca-AMS technology at plant tracer applications.

  10. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-31

    {beta}-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of {beta}-[{sup 14}C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 {micro}mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed {beta}-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of {beta}-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between {beta}-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism.

  11. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Hydroxyl Radical (OH) Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Saewung [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The University of California, Irvine, science team (Dr. Saewung Kim, Dr. Roger Seco, Dr. Alex Guenther, and Dr. Jim Smith) deployed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer system for hydroxyl radical (OH) and sulfuric acid quantifications. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/15 field campaign. Hydroxyl radical determines tropospheric oxidation capacity and had been expected to be very low in the pristine rain forest region such as the Brazilian Amazon because of the presence of significant levels of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds and very low levels of NO, which is an OH recycling agent. However, several recent in situ OH observations provided by a laser-induced fluorescence system reported unaccountably high OH concentrations. To address this discrepancy, a series of laboratory and theoretical studies has postulated chemical reaction mechanisms of isoprene that may regenerate OH in photo-oxidation processes. Along with these efforts, potential artifacts on the laser induced fluorescence system from isoprene and its oxidation products also have been explored. Therefore, the first chemical ionization mass spectrometer observations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, are expected to provide a critical experimental constraint to address uncertainty in constraining oxidation capacity over pristine rain forest environments. In addition, we deployed a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to characterize atmospheric volatile organic compound levels, especially isoprene and its oxidation products, which are critical input parameters for box modeling to simulate OH with different isoprene photo-oxidation schemes. As there has been no report on noticeable new particle formation events, our first in situ sulfuric acid observations in the Amazon rain forest were expected to constrain the

  12. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of bioactive lipids in mouse brain with a Synapt G2-S mass spectrometer operated at elevated pressure: improving the analytical sensitivity and the lateral resolution to ten micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettling, Hans; Vens-Cappell, Simeon; Soltwisch, Jens; Pirkl, Alexander; Haier, Jörg; Müthing, Johannes; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-08-05

    Mass spectrometers from the Synapt-G1/G2 family (Waters) are widely employed for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). A lateral resolution of about 50 μm is typically achieved with these instruments, that is, however, below the often desired cellular resolution. Here, we show the first MALDI-MSI examples demonstrating a lateral resolution of about ten micrometers obtained with a Synapt G2-S HDMS mass spectrometer without oversampling. This improvement became possible by laser beam shaping using a 4:1 beam expander and a circular aperture for spatial mode filtering and by replacement of the default focusing lens. We used dithranol as an effective matrix for imaging of acidic lipids such as sulfatides, gangliosides, and phosphatidylinositols in the negative ion mode. At the same time, the matrix enables MS imaging of more basic lipids in the positive ion mode. Uniform matrix coatings with crystals having average dimensions between 0.5 and 3 μm were obtained upon spraying a chloroform/methanol matrix solution. Increasing the cooling gas pressure in the MALDI ion source after adding an additional gas line was furthermore found to increase the ion abundances of labile lipids such as gangliosides. The combined characteristics are demonstrated with the MALDI-MSI analysis of fine structures in coronal mouse brain slices.

  13. Single photon ionization and chemical ionization combined ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet lamp for orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qinghao; Hou, Keyong; Cui, Huapeng; Chen, Ping; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2011-07-01

    A novel combined ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with both single photon ionization (SPI) and chemical ionization (CI) capabilities has been developed for an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oaTOFMS). The SPI was accomplished using a commercial 10.6 eV krypton discharge lamp with a photon flux of about 10(11) photons s(-1), while the CI was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O(2)(+) reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization at medium vacuum pressure (MVP). To achieve high ionization efficiency, the ion source pressure was elevated to 0.3 mbar and the photoionization length was extended to 36 mm. As a result, limits of detection (LODs) down to 3, 4, and 6 ppbv were obtained for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in MVP-SPI mode, and values of 8 and 10 ppbv were obtained for toluene and chloroform, respectively, in SPI-CI mode. As it is feasible to switch between MVP-SPI mode and SPI-CI mode rapidly, this system is capable of monitoring complex organic mixtures with a wide range of ionization energies (IEs). The analytical capacity of this system was demonstrated by measuring dehydrogenation products of long-chain paraffins to olefins through direct capillary sampling and drinking water disinfection byproducts from chlorine through a membrane interface.

  14. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Protein Complexes in a Hybrid Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Mowei; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Wolff, Jeremy J.; Somogyi, Árpád; Pedder, Randall E.; Quintyn, Royston S.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Easterling, Michael L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2017-01-03

    Mass spectrometry continues to develop as a valuable tool in the analysis of proteins and protein complexes. In protein complex mass spectrometry studies, surface-induced dissociation (SID) has been successfully applied in quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. SID provides structural information on non-covalent protein complexes that is complementary to other techniques. However, the mass resolution of Q-TOF instruments can limit the information that can be obtained for protein complexes by SID. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) provides ultrahigh resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy measurements. In this study, an SID device was designed and successfully installed in a hybrid FT-ICR instrument in place of the standard gas collision cell. The SID-FT-ICR platform has been tested with several protein complex systems (homooligomers, a heterooligomer, and a protein-ligand complex, ranging from 53 kDa to 85 kDa), and the results are consistent with data previously acquired on Q-TOF platforms, matching predictions from known protein interface information. SID fragments with the same m/z but different charge states are well-resolved based on distinct spacing between adjacent isotope peaks, and the addition of metal cations and ligands can also be isotopically resolved with the ultrahigh mass resolution available in FT-ICR.

  15. Investigation of metal matrix systems for cosmogenic 26Al analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. L.; Petrucci, G. A.; Bierman, P. R.; Finkel, R. C.

    2007-07-01

    We report experiments designed to help optimize accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 26Al (in the form of Al 2O 3) for geochronologic and geomorphologic applications. Analysis times are long and the precision of AMS are restricted by counting statistics for 26Al, which are in turn limited by the intensity of Al - beam currents. We show that ion beam currents are affected by the metal matrix in which Al 2O 3 is dispersed, by the matrix-to-Al 2O 3 mixing ratio, and for at least some matrices, such as Ag, by the depth to which the sample is packed in the AMS cathode. Typical instantaneous Al +7 currents (μA) produced by the LLNL CAMS Cs sputter ion source and measured in a Faraday cup after the accelerator are 2.26 for samples in Ag, 2.17 in Re, 2.00 in Nb, 1.92 in V and 1.73 in Mo. The AMS counting efficiency (Al - ions detected per Al atom loaded in the target) for a constant analysis time (900 s) and for equimolar mixtures of Al 2O 3 and matrix is in the range of 6 × 10 -5-9 × 10 -5 in the order Ag > Re > Nb > V > Mo. Additionally, we observed a correlation between the ion detection efficiency (Al ions detected per Al atoms loaded) and the matrix work function and inverse vaporization enthalpy of the matrix and beam current. Typical currents (μA) obtained with elemental Al are 13.3 for samples in no matrix, 3.23 in V, 3.14 in Nb, 3.07 in Re, 2.85 in Mo, 1.46 in Ag. The ion detection efficiency for elemental Al correlates strongly with matrix electron affinity. Thus, our data indicate that the current practice of mixing Al 2O 3 with Ag is reasonable until a means is found to produce cathodes of elemental Al.

  16. Energy accommodation of 5-50 eV ions within an enclosure. [for subsequent detection by satellite-borne mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, R. R.; Boring, J. W.; Nelson, C. V.

    1981-01-01

    Beams of 5-50 eV He(+), Ar(+), Ne(+), O(+), and N2(+) ions were directed into an aluminum sphere, and the equilibrium number density of the atom or molecules was measured inside the sphere using a quadrupole mass spectrometer and signal averaging techniques. The equilibrium number density is inversely proportional to the average speed of the atoms; thus, the results are expressed in terms of the speed ratio, R = V(i)/V(s), where V(i) is the average speed within the enclosure, and V(s) is the average speed of atoms fully accommodated to the temperature of the wall. The speed ratios vary between 1.0 and 1.8. For N2, several values of R were less than 1; this was largely due to desorbed N2. There was no detectable number density for O, which is explained by the reaction of O with the surface.

  17. Experimental characterization of the effect of skimmer cone design on shock formation and ion transmission efficiency in the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    Laser-induced fluorescence has been used to evaluate five commercially available skimmer cone designs from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers in terms of shock formation at the skimmer tip and transmission efficiency. Efficiency was measured as the ratio of analyte density downstream from the skimmer tip to analyte density upstream from the skimmer tip. The strongest shock was recorded for a skimmer with a cylindrical throat, and the weakest shock was produced by the skimmer with the largest diameter and a conical throat. Transmission efficiency increased with increasing orifice diameter. Coulombic effects, revealed in a comparison between the behaviors of neutral barium atoms and barium ions, were small. Transmission efficiencies recorded for calcium ions were lower than those recorded for barium ions by more than a factor of two.

  18. Development and Deployment of a Particle-into-Liquid sampling - Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PiLs-ESI/MS) for Characterization of Water-Soluble Biomass Burning Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C.; Witkowski, B.; Talukdar, R. K.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Roberts, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major influence on Earth's atmosphere as it is an important source of primary and secondary aerosols. Measuring the aerosol composition for such complex mixtures remains an analytical challenge and the characterization of the water-soluble portion of BB aerosol has been traditionally limited to off-line analysis and/or qualitative techniques. In this work, we present a new method of directly interfacing a particle-into-liquid sampler with an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (PiLs-ESI/MS). This technique allows real-time, sensitive, and chemically-specific speciation of water-soluble organics and inorganics for the quantification of fresh BB aerosol sampled during the recent Firelab component of the NOAA FIREX experiments. The aerosol composition is fuel and combustion-phase dependent, and several polar organic species thought to be main contributors to aerosol brown carbon and secondary organic aerosol were measured.

  19. THE VARIABILITY OF HCN IN TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE AS IMPLIED BY THE CASSINI ION-NEUTRAL MASS SPECTROMETER MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J.; Cao, Y.-T. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Lavvas, P. P. [Groupe de Spectroscopie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, Universite de Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, CNRS UMR F-7331 (France); Koskinen, T. T. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    HCN is an important constituent in Titan’s upper atmosphere, serving as the main coolant in the local energy budget. In this study, we derive the HCN abundance at the altitude range of 960–1400 km, combining the Ion-Neutral Mass Spectrometer data acquired during a large number of Cassini flybys with Titan. Typically, the HCN abundance declines modestly with increasing altitude and flattens to a near constant level above 1200 km. The data reveal a tendency for dayside depletion of HCN, which is clearly visible below 1000 km but weakens with increasing altitude. Despite the absence of convincing anti-correlation between HCN volume mixing ratio and neutral temperature, we argue that the variability in HCN abundance makes an important contribution to the large temperature variability observed in Titan’s upper atmosphere.

  20. Rapid liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometer (LCMS) method for clozapine and its metabolite N-desmethyl clozapine (norclozapine) in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, L V; Snyder, M L; Vallaro, G M

    2009-01-01

    Clozapine is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. Several methods have been developed for monitoring Clozapine levels; however, they possess limited specificity and are often laborious. This study describes a simple liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometer (LCMS) method in human serum. The ion transitions monitored were m/z 327, 270, 296 for Clozapine, m/z 313, 192, 227 for Norclozapine and m/z 328, 271 for Loxapine. The assay is linear (25-1000 ng/ml) and showed a good correlation (r=0.98) within the analytical range of 79-1210 ng/ml in human serum. This assay is highly specific and sensitive for the simultaneous measurements of Clozapine and Norclozapine. The simplification of this assay makes it ideal for high throughput analyses of the patient samples in a routine clinical laboratory staffed with general medical technologists.

  1. Effect of secondary organic aerosol coating thickness on the real-time detection and characterization of biomass-burning soot by two particle mass spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Ahern

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is a large source of light-absorbing refractory black carbon (rBC particles with a wide range of morphologies and sizes. The net radiative forcing from these particles is strongly dependent on the amount and composition of non-light-absorbing material internally mixed with the rBC and on the morphology of the mixed particles. Understanding how the mixing state and morphology of biomass-burning aerosol evolves in the atmosphere is critical for constraining the influence of these particles on radiative forcing and climate. We investigated the response of two commercial laser-based particle mass spectrometers, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV ablation LAAPTOF and the IR vaporization SP-AMS, to monodisperse biomass-burning particles as we sequentially coated the particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA from α-pinene ozonolysis. We studied three mobility-selected soot core sizes, each with a number of successively thicker coatings of SOA applied. Using IR laser vaporization, the SP-AMS had different changes in sensitivity to rBC compared to potassium as a function of applied SOA coatings. We show that this is due to different effective beam widths for the IR laser vaporization region of potassium versus black carbon. The SP-AMS's sensitivity to black carbon (BC mass was not observed to plateau following successive SOA coatings, despite achieving high OA : BC mass ratios greater than 9. We also measured the ion fragmentation pattern of biomass-burning rBC and found it changed only slightly with increasing SOA mass. The average organic matter ion signal measured by the LAAPTOF demonstrated a positive correlation with the condensed SOA mass on individual particles, despite the inhomogeneity of the particle core compositions. This demonstrates that the LAAPTOF can obtain quantitative mass measurements of aged soot-particle composition from realistic biomass-burning particles with complex morphologies and composition.

  2. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography.

  3. Standard test method for determination of uranium or plutonium isotopic composition or concentration by the total evaporation method using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This method describes the determination of the isotopic composition and/or the concentration of uranium and plutonium as nitrate solutions by the thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) total evaporation method. Purified uranium or plutonium nitrate solutions are loaded onto a degassed metal filament and placed in the mass spectrometer. Under computer control, ion currents are generated by heating of the filament(s). The ion beams are continually measured until the sample is exhausted. The measured ion currents are integrated over the course of the run, and normalized to a reference isotope ion current to yield isotopic ratios. 1.2 In principle, the total evaporation method should yield isotopic ratios that do not require mass bias correction. In practice, some samples may require this bias correction. When compared to the conventional TIMS method, the total evaporation method is approximately two times faster, improves precision from two to four fold, and utilizes smaller sample sizes. 1.3 The tot...

  4. Size and composition measurements of background aerosol and new particle growth in a Finnish forest during QUEST 2 using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Allan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the growth of nucleation-mode particles is important, as this prevents their loss through diffusion and allows them to reach sizes where they may become effective cloud condensation nuclei. Hyytiälä, a forested site in southern Finland, frequently experiences particle nucleation events during the spring and autumn, where particles first appear during the morning and continue to grow for several hours afterwards. As part of the QUEST 2 intensive field campaign during March and April 2003, an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS was deployed alongside other aerosol instrumentation to study the particulate composition and dynamics of growth events and characterise the background aerosol. Despite the small mass concentrations, the AMS was able to distinguish the grown particles in the <100 nm regime several hours after an event and confirm that the particles were principally organic in composition. The AMS was also able to derive a mass spectral fingerprint for the organic species present, and found that it was consistent between events and independent of the mean particle diameter during non-polluted cases, implying the same species were also condensing onto the accumulation mode. The results were compared with those from offline analyses such as GC-MS and were consistent with the hypothesis that the main components were alkanes from plant waxes and the oxidation products of terpenes.

  5. Comparison of the applicability of mass spectrometer ion sources using a polarity- molecular weight scattergram with a 600 sample in-house chemical library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Furuya, Asami; Yatsu, Takahiro; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2015-01-01

    To provide a practical guideline for the selection of a mass spectrometer ion source, we compared the applicability of three types of ion source: direct analysis in real time (DART), electrospray ionization (ESI) and fast atom bombardment (FAB), using an in-house high-resolution mass spectrometry sample library consisting of approximately 600 compounds. The great majority of the compounds (92%), whose molecular weights (MWs) were broadly distributed between 150 and 1000, were detected using all the ion sources. Nevertheless, some compounds were not detected using specific ion sources. The use of FAB resulted in the highest sample detection rate (>98%), whereas the detection rates obtained using DART and ESI were slightly lower (>96%). A scattergram constructed using MW and topological polar surface area (tPSA) as a substitute for molecular polarity showed that the performance of ESI was weak in the low-MW (800) area. These results might provide guidelines for the selection of ion sources for inexperienced mass spectrometry users.

  6. On-line analysis of organic compounds in diesel exhaust using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Maupin, G. D.; Muntean, G. G.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function of engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to agree well with calculated sensitivities for non-polar species. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The diesel exhaust mass spectra were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n + 1 (n = 3.8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ion signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On-line analysis of diesel exhaust using this technology may be valuable tool for diesel engine emission research.

  7. Modeling the impact and costs of semiannual mass drug administration for accelerated elimination of lymphatic filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma A Stolk

    Full Text Available The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020.

  8. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Allows for Cellular Quantification of Doxorubicin at Femtomolar Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGregorio, M W; Dingley, K H; Wurz, G T; Ubick, E; Turteltaub, K W

    2005-04-12

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive analytical methodology used to quantify the content of radioisotopes, such as {sup 14}C, in a sample. The primary goals of this work were to demonstrate the utility of AMS in determining cellular [{sup 14}C]doxorubicin (DOX) concentrations and to develop a sensitive assay that is superior to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the quantification of DOX at the tumor level. In order to validate the superior sensitivity of AMS versus HPLC with fluorescence detection, we performed three studies comparing the cellular accumulation of DOX: one in vitro cell line study, and two in vivo xenograft mouse studies. Using AMS, we quantified cellular DOX content up to 4 hours following in vitro exposure at concentrations ranging from 0.2 pg/ml (345 fM) to 2 {micro}g/ml (3.45 {micro}M) [{sup 14}C]DOX. The results of this study show that, compared to standard fluorescence-based HPLC, the AMS method was over five orders of magnitude more sensitive. Two in vivo studies compared the sensitivity of AMS to HPLC using a nude mouse xenograft model in which breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously. After sufficiently large tumors formed, DOX was administered intravenously at two dose levels. Additionally, we tested the AMS method in a nude mouse xenograft model of multidrug resistance (MDR) in which each mouse was implanted with both wild type and MDR+ cells on opposite flanks. The results of the second and third studies showed that DOX concentrations were significantly higher in the wild type tumors compared to the MDR+ tumors, consistent with the MDR model. The extreme sensitivity of AMS should facilitate similar studies in humans to establish target site drug delivery and to potentially determine the optimal treatment dose and regimen.

  9. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  10. Acceleration of the GrIS mass loss as observed by GRACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2012-01-01

    this acceleration and its statistical significance, using different sets of processed gravimetric data from the GRACE mission. Using an OLS model that takes annual and subannual variation into account, we compare three different GRACE solutions, determining the spatial variability of the acceleration and confidence...

  11. Commissioning the EMMA spectrometer at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esker, Nicholas; Davids, Barry; Alcorta, Martin; Hudson, Kevan; Williams, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    The ElectroMagnetic Mass Analyser (EMMA) is a new experimental facility at TRIUMF. Located after the ISAC-II accelerator, EMMA is a symmetric QQEDEQQ-type mass spectrometer capable of separating the recoiling nuclear reaction products from the beam. With the low emittance radioactive beams delivered from ISAC-II at energies up to at least 6.5 A MeV, EMMA is designed for fusion evaporation and transfer reactions of interest in nuclear structure and astrophysics studies. A vacuum mode separator, EMMA disperses ions according to mass/charge in the focal plane. During a successful commissioning run in Dec. 2016, the dispersion and resolving power were measured and found to agree with ion optical calculations. In the future, cross section measurements and decay spectroscopy studies will be performed using a parallel grid avalanche counter, Si implantation detectors, and external high purity Ge detectors at the focal plane. When coupled with the TIGRESS γ-ray detector array, in-beam spectroscopy at the target will also be available. Today, we present the current status of the EMMA mass spectrometer as it continues to undergo commissioning and begin its experimental life.

  12. LogViewer: a software tool to visualize quality control parameters to optimize proteomics experiments using Orbitrap and LTQ-FT mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweredoski, Michael J; Smith, Geoffrey T; Kalli, Anastasia; Graham, Robert L J; Hess, Sonja

    2011-12-01

    Visualization tools that allow both optimization of instrument's parameters for data acquisition and specific quality control (QC) for a given sample prior to time-consuming database searches have been scarce until recently and are currently still not freely available. To address this need, we have developed the visualization tool LogViewer, which uses diagnostic data from the RAW files of the Thermo Orbitrap and linear trap quadrupole-Fourier transform (LTQ-FT) mass spectrometers to monitor relevant metrics. To summarize and visualize the performance on our test samples, log files from RawXtract are imported and displayed. LogViewer is a visualization tool that allows a specific and fast QC for a given sample without time-consuming database searches. QC metrics displayed include: mass spectrometry (MS) ion-injection time histograms, MS ion-injection time versus retention time, MS(2) ion-injection time histograms, MS(2) ion-injection time versus retention time, dependent scan histograms, charge-state histograms, mass-to-charge ratio (M/Z) distributions, M/Z histograms, mass histograms, mass distribution, summary, repeat analyses, Raw MS, and Raw MS(2). Systematically optimizing all metrics allowed us to increase our protein identification rates from 600 proteins to routinely determine up to 1400 proteins in any 160-min analysis of a complex mixture (e.g., yeast lysate) at a false discovery rate of <1%. Visualization tools, such as LogViewer, make QC of complex liquid chromotography (LC)-MS and LC-MS/MS data and optimization of the instrument's parameters accessible to users.

  13. Front-End Electron Transfer Dissociation Coupled to a 21 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer for Intact Protein Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Syka, John E. P.; Early, Lee; Mullen, Christopher; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; English, A. Michelle; Anderson, Lissa C.; Blakney, Greg T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Hunt, Donald F.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution mass spectrometry is a key technology for in-depth protein characterization. High-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables high-level interrogation of intact proteins in the most detail to date. However, an appropriate complement of fragmentation technologies must be paired with FTMS to provide comprehensive sequence coverage, as well as characterization of sequence variants, and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the integration of front-end electron transfer dissociation (FETD) with a custom-built 21 tesla FT-ICR mass spectrometer, which yields unprecedented sequence coverage for proteins ranging from 2.8 to 29 kDa, without the need for extensive spectral averaging (e.g., 60% sequence coverage for apo-myoglobin with four averaged acquisitions). The system is equipped with a multipole storage device separate from the ETD reaction device, which allows accumulation of multiple ETD fragment ion fills. Consequently, an optimally large product ion population is accumulated prior to transfer to the ICR cell for mass analysis, which improves mass spectral signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, and scan rate. We find a linear relationship between protein molecular weight and minimum number of ETD reaction fills to achieve optimum sequence coverage, thereby enabling more efficient use of instrument data acquisition time. Finally, real-time scaling of the number of ETD reactions fills during method-based acquisition is shown, and the implications for LC-MS/MS top-down analysis are discussed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Accurate calibration of a molecular beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line analysis of high molecular weight species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, B; Wang, X; Passaro, M; Ciajolo, A; Russo, C

    2016-10-15

    Time-of-Flight (TOF) Mass Spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique, provided that an accurate calibration by standard molecules in the same m/z range of the analytes is performed. Calibration in a very large m/z range is a difficult task, particularly in studies focusing on the detection of high molecular weight clusters of different molecules or high molecular weight species. External calibration is the most common procedure used for TOF mass spectrometric analysis in the gas phase and, generally, the only available standards are made up of mixtures of noble gases, covering a small mass range for calibration, up to m/z 136 (higher mass isotope of xenon). In this work, an accurate calibration of a Molecular Beam Time-of Flight Mass Spectrometer (MB-TOFMS) is presented, based on the use of water clusters up to m/z 3000. The advantages of calibrating a MB-TOFMS with water clusters for the detection of analytes with masses above those of the traditional calibrants such as noble gases were quantitatively shown by statistical calculations. A comparison of the water cluster and noble gases calibration procedures in attributing the masses to a test mixture extending up to m/z 800 is also reported. In the case of the analysis of combustion products, another important feature of water cluster calibration was shown, that is the possibility of using them as "internal standard" directly formed from the combustion water, under suitable experimental conditions. The water clusters calibration of a MB-TOFMS gives rise to a ten-fold reduction in error compared to the traditional calibration with noble gases. The consequent improvement in mass accuracy in the calibration of a MB-TOFMS has important implications in various fields where detection of high molecular mass species is required. In combustion products analysis, it is also possible to obtain a new calibration spectrum before the acquisition of each spectrum, only modifying some operative conditions. Copyright © 2016

  15. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in human plasma are used as biomarkers of disease. PC biomarkers are often limited by the inability to separate isobaric PC. In this work, we developed a targeted shotgun approach for analysis of isobaric and isomeric PC. This approach is comprised of two mass spectr...

  16. Preliminary observations of organic gas-particle partitioning from biomass combustion smoke using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Lee; S. M. Kreidenweis; J. L. Collett; A. P. Sullivan; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Jimenez; M. Cubison; S. Saarikoski; D. R. Worsnop; T. B. Onasch; E. Fortner; W. C. Malm; E. Lincoln; Cyle Wold; WeiMin Hao

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols play important roles in adverse health effects, indirect and direct forcing of Earth’s climate, and visibility degradation. Biomass burning emissions from wild and prescribed fires can make a significant contribution to ambient aerosol mass in many locations and seasons. In order to better understand the chemical properties of particles produced by combustion...

  17. Construction of a Newly Designed Small-Size Mass Spectrometer for Helium Isotope Analysis: Toward the Continuous Monitoring of 3He/4He Ratios in Natural Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Toyoda, Michisato; Okazaki, Ryuji; Osawa, Takahito; Ishihara, Morio; Katakuse, Itsuo; Notsu, Kenji; Igarashi, George; Nagao, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    The construction of a small-size, magnetic sector, single focusing mass spectrometer (He-MS) for the continuous, on-site monitoring of He isotope ratios (3He/4He) is described. The instrument is capable of measuring 4He/20Ne ratios dissolved in several different types of natural fluids of geochemical interest, such as groundwater and gas from hot springs, volcanoes and gas well fields. The ion optics of He-MS was designed using an ion trajectory simulation program “TRIO,” which permits the simultaneous measurement of 3He and 4He with a double collector system under a mass resolution power (M/ΔM) of >700. The presently attained specifications of He-MS are; (1) a mass resolving power of ca. 430, sufficient to separate 3He+ from interfering ions, HD+ and H3+, (2) ultra-high vacuum conditions down to 3×10−8 Pa, and (3) a sufficiently high sensitivity to permit amounts of 3He to be detected at levels as small as 10−13 cm3 STP (3×106 atoms). Long term stability for 3He/4He analysis was examined by measuring the 3He/4He standard gas (HESJ) and atmospheric He, resulting in ∼3% reproducibility and ≤5% experimental error for various amounts of atmospheric He from 0.3 to 2.3×10−6 cm3 STP introduced into the instrument. A dynamic range of measurable 3He/4He ratios with He-MS is greater than 103 which was determined by measuring various types of natural fluid samples from continental gas (with a low 3He/4He ratio down to 2×10−8) to volcanic gas (with a high 3He/4He ratio up to 3×10−5). The accuracy and precision of 3He/4He and 4He/20Ne ratios were evaluated by comparing the values with those measured using well established noble gas mass spectrometers (modified VG5400/MS-III and -IV) in our laboratory, and were found to be in good agreement within analytical errors. Usefulness of the selective extraction of He from water/gas using a high permeability of He through a silica glass wall at high temperature (700°C) is demonstrated. PMID:24349910

  18. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration by a Shock Wave Accompanying a Coronal Mass Ejection in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particle acceleration by a shock wave accompanying a coronal mass ejection (CME) is studied. The description of the accelerated particle spectrum evolution is based on the numerical calculation of the diffusive transport equation with a set of realistic parameters. The relation between the CME and shock speeds, which depend on the initial CME radius, is determined. Depending on the initial CME radius, its speed, and the magnetic energy of the scattering Alfvén waves, the accelerated particle spectrum is established 10-60 minutes from the beginning of CME motion. The maximum energies of particles reach 0.1-10 GeV. The CME radii of 3-5 {R}⊙ and the shock radii of 5-10 {R}⊙ agree with observations. The calculated particle spectra agree with the observed ones in events registered by ground-based detectors if the turbulence spectrum in the solar corona significantly differs from the Kolmogorov one.

  19. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Peters, C; Power, M; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  20. On-line Analysis of Organic Compounds in Diesel Exhaust Using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Maupin, Gary D.; Muntean, George G.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function on engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to be between 30% and 100% greater than calculated sensitivities. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The mass spectra of diesel exhaust were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n+1 (n=3..8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ions signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. It is shown that the relative abundances of VOCs changed as a function of engine load. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On line analysis of diesel exhaust using this

  1. Miniature laser mass spectrometer and optical microscopy: current capabilities for the quantitative analysis of micro-sized solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, M.; Wiesendanger, R.; Neuland, M., B.; Meyer, S.; Wurz, P.; Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.; Riedo, V.; Moreno-Garcia, P.; Riedo, A.

    2017-09-01

    The current progress in the development of the instrumentation for the context analysis of planetary surfaces is described. By combining a miniature laser time-of-flight mass analyser with a microscope-camera system, one can conduct detailed optical and mass spectrometric analyses of the solid material down to micrometre-sized samples. Improvements of the instrument performance made by installation of a pulser, high-resolution microscope and modification of laser ion source are discussed. It is shown that with the current instrument capabilities quantitative elemental and isotope analyses even of small micrometer-sized grains or fossilized materials are possible. The performance capabilities are demonstrated by measurements conducted on standard and natural samples of rocks and meteorites.

  2. Pb and Sr isotope measurements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer: efficient time management for precision improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monna, F.; Loizeau, J.-L.; Thomas, B. A.; Guéguen, C.; Favarger, P.-Y.

    1998-08-01

    One of the factors limiting the precision of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is the counting statistics, which depend upon acquisition time and ion fluxes. In the present study, the precision of the isotopic measurements of Pb and Sr is examined. The time of measurement is optimally shared for each isotope, using a mathematical simulation, to provide the lowest theoretical analytical error. Different algorithms of mass bias correction are also taken into account and evaluated in term of improvement of overall precision. Several experiments allow a comparison of real conditions with theory. The present method significantly improves the precision, regardless of the instrument used. However, this benefit is more important for equipment which originally yields a precision close to that predicted by counting statistics. Additionally, the procedure is flexible enough to be easily adapted to other problems, such as isotopic dilution.

  3. Silver/oxygen depth profile in coins by using laser ablation, mass quadrupole spectrometer and X-rays fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Sayed, R.; Gentile, C.; Mondio, G.; Serafino, T.; Castrizio, E. D.

    2013-05-01

    Silver coins belonging to different historical periods were investigated to determine the Ag/O atomic ratio depth profiles. Laser ablation has been employed to remove, in high vacuum, the first superficial layers of the coins. Mass quadrupole spectrometry has been used to detect the Ag and the O atomic elements vaporized from the coin surface. The depth profile allowed to determine the thickness of the oxidation layer indicating that, in general, it is high in old coins. A complementary technique, using scanning electron microscope and the associated XRF microprobe, have been devoted to confirm the measurements of Ag/O atomic ratio measured with the laser-coupled mass spectrometry. The oxidation layer thicknesses range between about 25 and 250 microns.

  4. Verification of the sputter-generated 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, R. G.; Surendran, P.; Kumar, Sanjay; Nair, J. P.; Yadav, M. L.; Hemalatha, M.; Thomas, R. G.; Mahata, K.; Kailas, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have performed systematic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements at our ion source test set up and have demonstrated that gas phase 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions for all size 'n' can be readily generated from a variety of surfaces undergoing Cs+ ion sputtering in the presence of high purity SF6 gas by employing the gas spray-cesium sputter technique. In our SIMS measurements, the isotopic yield ratio 34SFn-/32SFn- (n = 1-6) was found to be close to its natural abundance but not for all size 'n'. In order to gain further insight into the constituents of these molecular anions, ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were conducted with the most abundant 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions, at BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron accelerator. The results from these measurements are discussed in this paper.

  5. Determination of ultra-trace organic acids in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) by accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuiliang; Fan, China Q; Wang, Ping

    2015-02-15

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE)-solid-phase extraction (SPE)-liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ASE-SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) methodology was developed for the extraction, cleanup and quantification of ultra-trace organic acids in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) tissues. The separation was carried out on a Bio-Rad Aminex HPX-87H sulfonic column with an eluent containing 5 mmol L(-1) H₂SO₄ at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1). A linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization (ESI) source was operated in negative ion mode, and the six organic acids were eluted within 20 min. ASE extraction, SPE cleanup and LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis conditions were optimized to obtain reliable information about plant organic acid composition. Selective reaction monitoring (SRM) was employed for quantitative measurement. Intra-day precisions averaged 6.7%, and inter-day precisions were 2.1-10.7% for organic acid measurements in the pine samples. External standard calibration curves were linear over the range of 16.5-5000 ng L(-1), and detection limits based on a signal-to-noise ratio of three were at 0.5-5.0 ng L(-1). The results obtained showed the sensibility of the method was better than that of previously described HPLC methodology, and had no significant matrix effect. The proposed ASE-SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS method is sensitive and reliable for the determination of ultra-trace organic acids in plant samples, despite the presence of the particularly complex matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataraj Raviraj

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI. Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS, and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its

  7. New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages for the Mazama tephra layer from Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallett, D.J. [Simon Fraser Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: dhallett@sfu.ca; Hills, L.V. [Univ. of Calgary, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Clague, J.J. [Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Simon Fraser Univ., Dept. of Earth Sciences, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-09-15

    Charcoal fragments recovered from the Mazama air-fall tephra layer in cores from Dog and Cobb lakes, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, yielded accelerator mass spectrometry ages of 6720 {+-} 70 and 6760 {+-} 70 {sup 14}C years BP, respectively. These two new ages, together with other previously published radiocarbon ages on charcoal and twig fragments from Mazama air-fall deposits, indicate that the climatic eruption of Mount Mazama occurred 6730 {+-} 40 {sup 14}C years BP. (author)

  8. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrstein, Steffen H; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-01

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  9. Structure of coal: new approaches to characterizing organonitrogen and organosulfur functionalities in coal and coal liquids. Final report. [Finnigan triple quadrupole mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the application of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to the analysis of coal-related materials. A Finnigan Triple State Quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for most of the results obtained in this study. Both collision energy (0 to 30 eV) and collision gas pressure (0 to 2.5 mtorr, typically argon) have significant effects on the spectra. Increasing the collision energy or collision pressure results in an increased fragmentation of the selected ion. The analytical utility of different chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases is shown. The MS/MS spectra of a selected ion obtained by isobutane and ammonia CI are identical, which paves the way for development of MS/MS libraries. A library is being developed especially for the analysis of coal-related materials. Three principal MS/MS scan modes (daughter, parent and neutral loss) are utilized in the analysis of coal-related materials. Parent and neutral loss scans characterize the complex mixture for particular chemical moieties (functional groups, structure type), while daughter scans are used for identification of specific components. SRC II was the principal sample studied by CI. Laser desorption methodology for coal analysis was developed. Other fuel-related materials were examined to generalize the analytical methodology being developed for the coal-related materials, including shale oil and diesel exhaust particulates. 35 references, 50 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Subsequent radical fragmentation reactions of N, N-diethylamino-substituted azobenzene derivatives in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer using collision-induced dissociation and photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, Martin; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    The fragmentation behavior of N, N-diethylamino-substituted azobenzene derivatives is investigated by high-resolving mass spectrometry using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Former investigations by photodissociation as well as collision-induced dissociation experiments used to induce a loss of C 3 H 8 from the diethylamino group. The position of the additional proton in [M + H] + ions is important due to the sequences of radical fragmentation reactions. Two possibilities arise. First, a charge is located at the azo group leading to a methyl radical loss. The second possibility is that the charge has been located on the aniline nitrogen of the molecule resulting in an ethyl radical loss. Only o-ethyl red has shown the overall loss of C 3 H 8 in a two-step radical reaction mechanism. Nevertheless, p-ethyl red and ethyl yellow have shown systematic fragmentation reactions as well. Loss of C 3 H 8 has not been likely regarding both these molecules. All experimental findings together with quantum chemical calculations as well as kinetic calculations support the proposed fragmentation mechanisms of the three azo dyes.

  11. [Real-time analysis of polyvinyl chloride thermal decomposition/combustion products with single photon ionization/photoelectron ionization online mass spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Dong; Hou, Ke-Yong; Chen, Ping; Li, Fang-Long; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Cui, Hua-Peng; Hua, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2013-01-01

    With the features of a broad range of ionizable compounds, reduced fragments and simple mass spectrum, a homemade magnetic field enhanced photoelectron ionization (MEPEI) source combined with single photon ionization (SPI) for time-of-flight mass spectrometer was built and applied to analyze thermal decomposition/combustion products of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The combined ion source can be switched very fast between SPI mode and SPI-MEPEI mode for detecting different targeted compounds, and only adjusting the voltage of the electrode in the ionization region to trigger the switch. Among the PVC thermal decomposition/combustion products, HCl and CO2, which ionization energies (12.74 eV, 13.77 eV respectively) were higher than the energy of photon (10.60 eV), were ionized by MEPEI, while alkenes, dichloroethylene, benzene and its homologs, monochlorobenzene, styrene, indane, naphthalene and its homologs were ionized by SPI and MEPEI simultaneously. Spectra of interested products as a function of temperatures indicated that products are formed via two main mechanisms: (1) dechlorination and intramolecular cyclization can lead to the formation of HCl, benzene and naphthalene at 250-370 degrees C; (2) intermolecular crosslinking leads to the formation of alkyl aromatics such as toluene and xylene/ethylbenzene at 380-510 degrees C. The experimental results show that the combined ion source of SPI/ SPI-MEPEI for TOF-MS has broad application prospects in the online analysis field.

  12. Isotopic abundance measurements of K and Ca using a wide-dispersion multi-collector mass spectrometer and low-fractionation ionisation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, I. R.; Maggi, A. L.; Rosman, K. J. R.; McNaughton, N. J.

    1997-04-01

    Procedures have been established for routine high-precision isotopic analyses of all aspects of the K-Ca isotopic system, for virtually any natural sample, using a set of 40K + 43Ca + 46Ca spikes and a VG354 (Multi-II) mass spectrometer. Loading samples as KI and CaI2 on triple (or double) filament arrays results in reduced mass fractionation, approximately as expected from Rayleigh distillation theory. For K, this improves the fractionation (or 41K anomaly) detection limit to ~0.8[per mille sign]/amu for single analyses. For Ca, the reduced fractionation renders data insensitive to the choice of fractionation law used for internal corrections. The 2[sigma] reproducibility of normalised 40Ca/44Ca data (expressed as [epsilon]Ca) is ~4, approximately twice the theoretical limits, but for measurements of natural fractionation ([delta]44/42Ca) it is ~0.4[per mille sign], about five times theoretical. These measurement procedures yield an atomic weight for the Ca standard which is consistent with the IUPAC value, and provide strong support for a reduced uncertainty (by a factor of two). A value of 40.078 ± 0.002 would include all known isotopic fractionations in natural and commercial materials. Analyses of four Nerita marine mollusc samples from a wide geographic (and water temperature) range failed to detect any thermally controlled Ca isotope fractionation ([delta]44/42Ca) corresponding to the observed [delta]18O variations.

  13. Characterization and identification of eight designer benzodiazepine metabolites by incubation with human liver microsomes and analysis by a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Balkhi, Souleiman; Chaslot, Maxime; Picard, Nicolas; Dulaurent, Sylvain; Delage, Martine; Mathieu, Olivier; Saint-Marcoux, Franck

    2017-07-01

    Designer benzodiazepines (DBZDs) have become of particular importance in the past few years. The metabolite monitoring of DBZD in biological fluids could be of great interest in clinical and forensic toxicology. However, DBZD metabolites are not known or not commercially available. The identification of some DBZD metabolites has been mostly explored by self-administration studies or by in vitro studies followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The question arose whether a unit resolution instrument could be efficient enough to allow the identification of DBZD metabolites. In this study, we used an in vitro experiment where eight DBZDs (diclazepam, flubromazepam, etizolam, deschloroetizolam, flubromazolam, nifoxipam, meclonazepam and clonazolam) were incubated with human liver microsomes (HLMs) and metabolite identification was carried out by using a UHPLC coupled to a QTRAP triple quadrupole linear iontrap tandem mass spectrometer system. Post-mortem samples obtained from a real poisoning case, involving deschloroetizolam and diclazepam, were also analysed and discussed. Our study using HLM allowed the identification of 26 metabolites of the 8 DBZDs. These were denitro-, mono- or di-hydroxylated and desmethyl metabolites. In the forensic case, diclazepam was not detected whereas its metabolites (lormetazepam and lorazepam) were present at high concentrations in urine. We also identified hydroxy-deschloroetizolam in urine, while the parent compound was not detected in this matrix. This supports the approach that LC coupled to a simple QTRAP could be used by laboratories to identify other not-known/not-commercialized new psychoactive substance (NPS) metabolites.

  14. Integrated Vibration and Acceleration Testing to Reduce Payload Mass, Cost and Mission Risk Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a capability to provide integrated acceleration, vibration, and shock testing using a state-of-the-art centrifuge, allowing for the test of...

  15. Mass Producing Innovation: A Case Investigation on Why Accelerators Might Not Be a Paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Barnes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a growing number of accelerator programmes designed to start and support innovative startup businesses. Many accelerators are increasing the size of their intakes, with some programmes now launching over 200 new companies per year. On first inspection the large numbers and consistent approach taken to accelerating the participating companies appears to be in conflict with producing innovative and disruptive companies. This paper uses Y Combinator as a single case study to investigate whether increasing the number of companies within a batch has resulted in longer or shorter timeframes for companies to achieve an exit (through acquisition or initial public offering. The paper finds that the timeframe for achieving an exit for Y Combinator companies is reducing, even while batch size has sharply increased. There is no statistically significant correlation between the cohort size and the initial money raised during the programme.    Keyword : Accelerators, Startups, Innovation

  16. Ion/molecule reactions in the orifice-skimmer region of an atmospheric pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Hiroko; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Suzuki, Shigeo; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Okazaki, Shigemitsu; Wada, Akira; Beech, Iwona B; Sunner, Jan; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure Penning ionization mass spectra of methanol were measured as functions of Ar or He gas pressure in the first vacuum chamber, the position of the skimmer, and the voltage applied between the orifice and the skimmer. When the orifice and the skimmer were coaxial with a distance of 4 mm, the distribution of CH3OH2+(CH3OH)n clusters was only weakly dependent on both Ar pressure (in the range of 19-220 Pa) and orifice-skimmer voltage (in the range of 1-45 V). The ion/molecule reaction CH3OH2+ + CH3OH --> CH3+(CH3OH) + H2O was observed in the free jet expansion, especially at high orifice-skimmer voltage values. When the orifice and the skimmer were off-centered and the distance between them was increased to 18 mm, the formation of large CH3OH2+(CH3OH)n clusters, as well as their dissociation, were seen. The endothermic proton transfer reaction, CH3+(CH3OH) + CH3OH --> CH3OH2+ + CH3OCH3, occurred at high orifice-skimmer voltage. The collision-induced dissociation of cluster ions by He gas in the first vacuum chamber was much more efficient than by Ar. These results demonstrated that the mass spectra are highly dependent on skimmer position and on orifice-skimmer voltage and that ions observed by mass spectrometry do not necessarily reflect the abundance of ions produced in the atmospheric pressure ion source. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  18. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, retrieved from AirCore sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Been, Henk A.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In this decade, understanding the impact of human activities on climate is one of the key issues of discussion globally. The continuous rise in the concentration of greenhouse gases, e.g., CO2, CH4, etc. in the atmosphere, predominantly due to human activities, is alarming and requires continuous monitoring to understand the dynamics. Radiocarbon is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4. Measurement of 14C (or radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 generally requires collection of large air samples (few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined. Currently, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most precise, reliable and widely used technique for atmospheric radiocarbon detection. However, the regular collection of air samples from troposphere and stratosphere, for example using aircraft, is prohibitively expensive. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, developed by NOAA. It comprises of a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ~ 30 km) measurements of CH4and CO2(Karion et al. 2010). In Europe, AirCore measurements are being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of two such AirCore samples collected in July 2014, Finland, for determining the 14C concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore samples were collected on consecutive days. Each stratospheric AirCore sample was divided into six fractions, each containing ~ 35 μg CO2 (~9.5 μg C). Each fraction was separately trapped in 1 /4 inch coiled stainless steel tubing for radiocarbon measurements. The procedure for CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples; the sample preparation, with samples containing < 10

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry in the biomedical sciences: applications in low-exposure biomedical and environmental dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, J. S.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Vogel, J. S.; Balhorn, R.; Gledhill, B. L.; Southon, J. R.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.; Nelson, D. E.; Proctor, I. D.; Davis, J. C.

    1990-12-01

    We are utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry as a sensitive detector for tracking the disposition of radioisotopically labeled molecules in the biomedical sciences. These applications have shown the effectiveness of AMS as a tool to quantify biologically important molecules at extremely low levels. For example, AMS is being used to determine the amount of carcinogen covalently bound to animal DNA (DNA adduct) at levels relevent to human exposure. Detection sensitivities are 1 carcinogen molecule bound in 1011 to 1012 DNA bases, depending on the specific activity of the radiolabeled carcinogen. Studies have been undertaken in our laboratory utilizing heterocyclic amine food-borne carcinogens and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent environmental carcinogen, to study the metabolism of carcinogens at low doses. In addition, AMS is being used to detect the presence of rare proteins (mutant forms of protamine) in human sperm. Approximately l per 106 sperm analyzed contain the rare form of the protamine. Protamine isolated from this small number of cells is being analyzed by AMS, following 14C labeling. Thus, AMS can be used to verify the identity of an extremely small amount of biological material. Furthermore, an additional improvement of 2 orders of magnitude in the sensitivity of biomédical tracer studies is suggested by preliminary work with bacterial hosts depleted in radiocarbon. Other problems in the life sciences where detection sensitivity or sample sizes are limitations should also benefit from AMS. Studies are underway to measure the molecular targeting of cancer chemotherapeutics in human tissue and to pursue applications for receptor biology. We are also applying other candidate isotopes, such as 3H (double labeling with 14C) and 41Ca (bone absorption) to problems in biology. The detection of 36Cl and 26Al have applications for determination of human neutron exposure and understanding neurological toxicity, respectively. The results

  20. Headspace analysis of new psychoactive substances using a Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, W. Joe; Lanza, Matteo; Agarwal, Bishu; Jürschik, Simone; Sulzer, Philipp; Breiev, Kostiantyn; Jordan, Alfons; Hartungen, Eugen; Hanel, Gernot; Märk, Lukas; Mayhew, Chris A.; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion in the number and use of new psychoactive substances presents a significant analytical challenge because highly sensitive instrumentation capable of detecting a broad range of chemical compounds in real-time with a low rate of false positives is required. A Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SRI-ToF-MS) instrument is capable of meeting all of these requirements. With its high mass resolution (up to m/Δm of 8000), the application of variations in reduced electric field strength (E/N) and use of different reagent ions, the ambiguity of a nominal (monoisotopic) m/z is reduced and hence the identification of chemicals in a complex chemical environment with a high level of confidence is enabled. In this study we report the use of a SRI-ToF-MS instrument to investigate the reactions of H3O+, O2+, NO+ and Kr+ with 10 readily available (at the time of purchase) new psychoactive substances, namely 4-fluoroamphetamine, methiopropamine, ethcathinone, 4-methylethcathinone, N-ethylbuphedrone, ethylphenidate, 5-MeO-DALT, dimethocaine, 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran and nitracaine. In particular, the dependence of product ion branching ratios on the reduced electric field strength for all reagent ions was investigated and is reported here. The results reported represent a significant amount of new data which will be of use for the development of drug detection techniques suitable for real world scenarios. PMID:25844048

  1. Online mass measurements with a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) at the FRS Ion Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Jens; Greiner, Florian; Jesch, Christian; Lang, Johannes; Petrick, Martin; Reiter, Moritz P.; Rink, Ann-Kathrin; Diwisch, Marcel [JLU Giessen (Germany); Dickel, Timo; Plass, Wolfgang R.; Geissel, Hans; Haettner, Emma; Knoebel, Ronja; Scheidenberger, Christoph [JLU Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Ayet, Samuel; Estrade, Alfredo; Farinon, Fabio; Kurcewicz, Jan; Mukha, Ivan; Nociforo, Chiara; Pfutzner, Marek; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej; Purushothaman, Sivaji; Takechi, Maya; Weick, Helmut; Winfield, John [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Dendooven, Peter; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Moore, Iain [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Yavor, Mikhail I. [Russian Academy of Sci., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    At the Low-Energy-Branch (LEB) of the Super-FRS at FAIR experiments with-slowed down exotic nuclei will be performed. The FRS Ion Catcher experiment at the FRS serves a test facility for the LEB. The relativistic ions are thermalized in a novel cryogenic stopping cell, extracted and transported to a MR-TOF-MS for high precision mass measurements or decay-spectroscopy. In summer 2012 direct mass measurements of U projectile fragments have been performed for the first time with a MR-TOF-MS, among then {sup 213}Rn with a half-life of only 19.5 ns.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF BENZENE-ETHANOL EXTRACTIVES SOLUBLE IN ACETONE FROM SUGARCANE BAGASSE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY –MASS SPECTROMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Hernández Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extractives separated from sugarcane bagasse with a mixture of ethanol:benzene (1:2 were analyzed in a GC-17A/MS-QP5050 (Shimadzu. Hernández and others (2012 carried out a qualitative and quantitative determination of such extractives, with a cautious percentage of confidence. This confidence in the results was solved calculating the index of retention kovats that allows us to corroborate the accuracy of the identification of a certain molecule. The studied samples correspond to the integral bagasse, desmedullated and pre-hydrolysated. Among 98-99% of the separate compounds they were identified by their retention time, the molecular fragments of their spectrum of mass, and for the index of retention kovats, all were compared with their data reported in the different available libraries.

  3. In-Flight Chemical Composition Observations of Aircraft Emissions using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial aircraft are an important source of aerosols to the upper troposphere. The microphysical and chemical properties of these emitted aerosols govern their ability to act as ice nuclei, both in near-field contrails and for cirrus formation downstream. During the ACCESS-II (Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions) campaign, NASA DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engine emissions were sampled systematically at a range of cruise-relevant thrust levels and at several altitudes. Sampling was done aboard the NASA HU-25 Falcon aircraft, which was equipped with a suite of aerosol and gas-phase instruments focused on assessing the effects of burning different fuel mixtures on aerosol properties and their associated contrails. Here we present in-flight measurements of particle chemical composition made by a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The AMS was able to sufficiently resolve near-field (within 100m) aircraft emissions plumes. Low-sulfur HEFA (hydro-processed esters and fatty-acids) and JetA fuels yielded particles that contained 11 and 8% sulfate, respectively, compared to 30% sulfate contribution for traditional JetA fuel. Each of the fuels produced organic aerosol with similarly low oxygen content. Lubrication oils, which are not a combustion product but result from leaks in the engine, were likely a dominant fraction of the measured organic mass based on mass-spectral marker analysis. These results are compared to similar engine conditions from ground-based testing.

  4. A Field-Portable Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometer for Real-time Quantitation and Spatial Mapping of Atmospheric and Aqueous Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ryan J.; Davey, Nicholas G.; Martinsen, Morten; Collin-Hansen, Christian; Krogh, Erik T.; Gill, Christopher G.

    2015-02-01

    Environmental concentrations of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC/SVOCs) can vary dramatically in time and space under the influence of environmental conditions. In an industrial setting, multiple point and diffuse sources can contribute to fugitive emissions. Assessments and monitoring programs using periodic grab sampling provide limited information, often with delay times of days or weeks. We report the development and use of a novel, portable membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) system capable of resolving and quantifying VOC and SVOCs with high spatial and temporal resolution, in the field, in real-time. An electron impact ionization cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer modified with a capillary hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane interface was used for continuous air and water sampling. Tandem mass spectrometry and selected ion monitoring scans performed in series allowed for the quantitation of target analytes, and full scan mode was used to survey for unexpected analytes. Predeployment and in-field external calibrations were combined with a continuously infused internal standard to enable real-time quantitation and monitor instrument performance. The system was operated in a moving vehicle with internet-linked data processing and storage. Software development to integrate MIMS and relevant meta-data for visualization and geospatial presentation in Google Earth is presented. Continuous quantitation enables the capture of transient events that may be missed or under-represented by traditional grab sampling strategies. Real-time geospatial maps of chemical concentration enable adaptive sampling and in-field decision support. Sample datasets presented in this work were collected in Northern Alberta in 2010-2012.

  5. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hongying; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shi

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ=355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO(2) nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Calibration of Nu-Instruments Noblesse multicollector mass spectrometers for argon isotopic measurements using a newly developed reference gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, M.A.; Grove, M.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge limiting 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements is the availability of appropriate standard gasses to intercalibrate detectors. In particular, use of zoom lens ion-optics to steer and focus ion beams into a fixed detector array (i.e., Nu Instruments Noblesse) makes intercalibration of multiple detectors challenging because different ion-optic tuning conditions are required for optimal peak shape and sensitivity at different mass stations. We have found that detector efficiency and mass discrimination are affected by changes in ion-optic tuning parameters. Reliance upon an atmospheric Ar standard to calibrate the Noblesse is problematic because there is no straightforward way to relate atmospheric 40Ar and 36Ar to measurements of 40Ar and 39Ar if they are measured on separate detectors. After exploring alternative calibration approaches, we have concluded that calibration of the Noblesse is best performed using exactly the same source, detector, and ion-optic tuning settings as those used in routine 40Ar/39Ar analysis. To accomplish this, we have developed synthetic reference gasses containing 40Ar, 39Ar and 38Ar produced by mixing gasses derived from neutron-irradiated sanidine with an enriched 38Ar spike. We present a new method for calibrating the Noblesse based on use of both atmospheric Ar and the synthetic reference gasses. By combining atmospheric Ar and synthetic reference gas in different ways, we can directly measure 40Ar/39Ar, 38Ar/39Ar, and 36Ar/39Ar correction factors over ratios that vary from 0.5 to 460. These correction factors are reproducible to better than ??0.5??? (2?? standard error) over intervals spanning ~24h but can vary systematically by ~4% over 2weeks of continuous use when electron multiplier settings are held constant. Monitoring this variation requires daily calibration of the instrument. Application of the calibration method to 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements of widely used sanidine reference materials

  7. The Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  8. Quantitative analysis of a brass alloy using CF-LIBS and a laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar; Abdullah, M.; Ahmed, Rizwan; Piracha, N. K.; Aslam Baig, M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of a brass alloy using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LA-TOF-MS). The emission lines of copper (Cu I) and zinc (Zn I), and the constituent elements of the brass alloy were used to calculate the plasma parameters. The plasma temperature was calculated from the Boltzmann plot as (10 000  ±  1000) K and the electron number density was determined as (2.0  ±  0.5)  ×  1017 cm‑3 from the Stark-broadened Cu I line as well as using the Saha–Boltzmann equation. The elemental composition was deduced using these techniques: the Boltzmann plot method (70% Cu and 30% Zn), internal reference self-absorption correction (63.36% Cu and 36.64% Zn), EDX (61.75% Cu and 38.25% Zn), and LA-TOF (62% Cu and 38% Zn), whereas, the certified composition is (62% Cu and 38% Zn). It was observed that the internal reference self-absorption correction method yields analytical results comparable to that of EDX and LA-TOF-MS.

  9. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E; Hall, Seth E; Wieland, Jamie R; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C; Mulligan, Christopher C

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Development of a new method for the enantiomer specific determination of HBCD using an ion trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomara, Belen [Department of Instrumental Analysis and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of General Organic Chemistry (CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: bgomara@iqog.csic.es; Lebron-Aguilar, Rosa [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Rocasolano' (CSIC), Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Quintanilla-Lopez, Jesus Eduardo [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Rocasolano' (CSIC), Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica Industrial y del Medio Ambiente, ETSI Industriales (UPM), Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Maria Jose [Department of Instrumental Analysis and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of General Organic Chemistry (CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-12-12

    An alternative method for the enantiomer specific determination of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) by LC-ESI-MS/MS using an ion trap analyser is proposed. The method is based on the formation of a chlorine adduct (m/z 676.6) of the ({+-}){alpha}-, ({+-}){beta}-, and ({+-}){gamma}-HBCD enantiomers and their further fragmentation into their stable quasi-molecular ion (m/z 640.6). In this way, problems related to the ion trap low mass cutoff and variable amounts of other adduct peaks in the samples are solved. Parameters affecting separation, ionisation and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated: calibration curves were found linear from 20 to 400 pg {mu}L{sup -1} for each enantiomer; detection limits ranged between 1.5 and 4.3 pg {mu}L{sup -1}; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were lower than 6% and 13%, respectively. The application to different types of spiked samples (pork meat, lean fish, and butter) pointed out the occurrence of matrix effects that could be solved by using labelled standards.

  11. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Monitoring protein glycation by electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıllıoğlu, H Gül; Çelikbıçak, Ömür; Salih, Bekir; Gökmen, Vural

    2017-02-15

    In this study electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometry was used to investigate protein glycation. The glycated species of cytochrome C, lysozyme, and β-casein formed during glycation with d-glucose were identified and monitored in binary systems heated at 70°C under dry and aqueous conditions. Cytochrome C had multiple charges in non-glycated state, primarily changing from +13 to +17 positive charges, whereas β-casein had charge states up to +30. Upon heating with glucose at 70°C in aqueous state, attachment of one glucose molecule onto proteins was observed in each charge state. However, heating in dry state caused much more glucose attachment, leading to the formation of multiple glycoforms of proteins. By using ESI-QTOF-MS technique, formation of glycated cytochrome C containing up to 12 glucose moieties were observed, while glycated species containing 6 and 8 glucose moieties were observed for lysozyme and β-casein, respectively in various heating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.