WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerating structure assemblies

  1. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  2. Pulsed neutron source based on accelerator-subcritical-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Makoto; Noda, Akira; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Hiromi; Shirai, Toshiyuki [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research

    1997-03-01

    A new pulsed neutron source which consists of a 300MeV proton linac and a nuclear fuel subcritical assembly is proposed. The proton linac produces pulsed spallation neutrons, which are multipied by the subcritical assembly. A prototype proton linac that accelerates protons up to 7MeV has been developed and a high energy section of a DAW structure is studied with a power model. Halo formations in high intensity beam are also being studied. (author)

  3. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  4. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  5. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gluckstern, R. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Ko, K.; Kroll, N. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  6. CLIC Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Travelling structures for accelerating the high-current (4.2 A) CLIC Drive Beam to an energy of 2.37 GeV are presented. The structures are optimised for efficiency (full beam loading operation) and a desired filling time. Higher order modes are studied and are reduced by detuning along the structure and by damping with silicon carbide loads.

  7. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds accelerate wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Schneider

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound repair regenerates skin integrity, but a chronic failure to heal results in compromised tissue function and increased morbidity. To address this, we have used an integrated approach, using nanobiotechnology to augment the rate of wound reepithelialization by combining self-assembling peptide (SAP nanofiber scaffold and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF. This SAP bioscaffold was tested in a bioengineered Human Skin Equivalent (HSE tissue model that enabled wound reepithelialization to be monitored in a tissue that recapitulates molecular and cellular mechanisms of repair known to occur in human skin. We found that SAP underwent molecular self-assembly to form unique 3D structures that stably covered the surface of the wound, suggesting that this scaffold may serve as a viable wound dressing. We measured the rates of release of EGF from the SAP scaffold and determined that EGF was only released when the scaffold was in direct contact with the HSE. By measuring the length of the epithelial tongue during wound reepithelialization, we found that SAP scaffolds containing EGF accelerated the rate of wound coverage by 5 fold when compared to controls without scaffolds and by 3.5 fold when compared to the scaffold without EGF. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrated that biomaterials composed of a biofunctionalized peptidic scaffold have many properties that are well-suited for the treatment of cutaneous wounds including wound coverage, functionalization with bioactive molecules, localized growth factor release and activation of wound repair.

  8. Accelerating structure with linear excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1988-03-01

    The switched power linac (SPL) structures require a ring-shaped laser beam pulse of uniform intensity to avoid transverse field components of the accelerating field at the center. In order to also utilize the reflection of the outgoing EM wave, the switching element has to be very close to the outer edge of the structure to ensure nearly synchronous superposition at the beam hole with the original inward going wave. It is sometimes easier to produce linear (flat) laser beams, e.g., from powerful excimer lasers which have beams of rectangular cross section. Such flat beams could be used to excite linear photocathode switches or be used to produce flat electron beam pulses in electron sources. In this paper, an accelerator structure is proposed which may be considered a variant of the SPL disk structure, but could be used with linear beams. The structure utilizes a double parabolic horn. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  10. Ion acceleration in a scalable MEMS RF-structure for a compact linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Persaud, A; Feinberg, E; Seidl, P A; Waldron, W L; Lal, A; Vinayakumar, K B; Ardanuc, S; Schenkel, T

    2016-01-01

    A new approach for a compact radio-frequency(rf) accelerator structure is presented. The idea is based on the Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) structure that was first developed in the 1980s. The MEQALAC allowed scaling of rf-structure down to dimensions of centimeters while at the same time allowing for higher beam currents through parallel beamlets. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for highly scalable fabrication, we reduce the critical dimension to the sub-millimeter regime, while massively scaling up the potential number of parallel beamlets. The technology is based on rf-acceleration components and electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQs) implemented in a silicon wafer based design where each beamlet passes through beam apertures in the wafer. The complete accelerator is then assembled by stacking these wafers. This approach allows fast and cheap batch fabrication of the components and flexibility in system design for different applications. For prototyping these ...

  11. Damped and detuned accelerator structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D; Hoag, H.A.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Thompson, K.A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports continuing work on accelerator structures for future TeV linear colliders. These structures, in addition to having to operate at high gradients, must minimize the effects of wakefield modes which are induced by e{sup {plus minus}} bunch trains. Two types of modified disk-loaded waveguides are under investigation: damped structures in which the wakefield power is coupled out to lossy regions through radial slots in the disks and/or azimuthal rectangular waveguides, whereby the external Q of the undesirable HEM{sub 11} mode is lowered to values below 20, and detuned structures in which the frequencies of these modes are modified from one end to the other of each section by {approximately}10%, thereby scrambling their effects on the beam. Beam dynamics calculations indicate that these two approaches are roughly equivalent. MAFIA, ARGUS and URMEL codes have been used extensively in conjunction with low-power tests on S- and X-band models to identify mode patterns, dispersion curves and Q values, and to demonstrate damping or detuning of the HEM modes. Results of calculations and measurements on the various structures are presented and evaluated.

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  13. Light-structured colloidal assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Antoine; Mena, Youssef; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Sacanna, Stefano; Palacci, Jeremie; Palacci lab Team; Sacanna lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled particles (SPP) are a key tool since they are of relative simplicity as compared to biological micro-entities and provide a higher level of control. They can convert an energy source into motion and work, and exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behavior. In our work, we focus on the manipulation of colloids using light. We exploit osmotic and phoretic effects to act on single and ensemble of colloids. The key mechanism relies on the photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using hematite, which triggers the motion of colloids around it when illuminated. We use hematite particles and particles with photocatalytic inclusions (i.e. SPP). We first show that the interactions between hematite and colloidal tracers can be tuned by adjusting the chemical environment. Furthermore, we report a phototaxic behavior (migration in light gradient) of the particles. From this, we explore the effect of spatio-temporal modulation of the light to control the motion of colloids at the single particle level, and to generate self-assembled colloidal structures through time and space. The so-formed structures are maintained by phoretic and hydrodynamic forces resulting from the motion of each particles. Ultimately, a dynamic light modulation may be a route for the creation of active colloidal motion on a collective scale through the synchronization of the individual motions of SPP. This work is supported by NSF CAREER DMR 1554724.

  14. The accelerating structure of the IFUSP microtron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, J.; Martins, M.N.; Lima, J.A. de; Malafronte, A.A.; Portante, L.; Cruz, M.T.F. da; Pascholati, P.R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-10-01

    The accelerating structure for ultra-relativistic electrons ({beta}=1) of the IFUSP microtron accelerator is described. We present the main characteristics of the structure and discuss some of the expected properties of the project, such as effective shunt impedance, coupling factor and accelerating field distribution, based on calculations. We describe the construction procedures, from the machining and pre-tuning of the cavities, to the brazing process and the final tuning of the whole structure. The final results obtained for the structure are presented and the dynamic tuning system based on moving plungers described. (author). 1 ref., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) experiment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.

    1982-03-01

    The Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment concept is to erect a hybrid deployed/assembled structure as an early space experiment in large space structures technology. The basic objectives can be broken down into three generic areas: (1) by performing assembly tasks both in space and in neutral buoyancy simulation, a mathematical basis will be found for the validity conditions of neutral buoyancy, thus enhancing the utility of water as a medium for simulation of weightlessness; (2) a data base will be established describing the capabilities and limitations of EVA crewmembers, including effects of such things as hardware size and crew restraints; and (3) experience of the M.I.T. Space Systems Lab in neutral buoyancy simulation of large space structures assembly indicates that the assembly procedure may create the largest loads that a structure will experience during its lifetime. Data obtained from the experiment will help establish an accurate loading model to aid designers of future space structures.

  16. On the structure of acceleration in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Alex; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Ott, Søren; Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob

    2012-02-01

    Acceleration and spatial velocity gradients are obtained simultaneously in an isotropic turbulent flow via three dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. We observe two distinct populations of intense acceleration events: one in flow regions of strong strain and another in regions of strong vorticity. Geometrical alignments with respect to vorticity vector and to the strain eigenvectors, curvature of Lagrangian trajectories and of streamlines for total acceleration, a=Du/Dt and for its convective part, a=(uṡ∇)u, are studied in detail. We discriminate the alignment features of total and convective acceleration statistics, which are genuine features of turbulent nature from those of kinematic nature. We find pronounced alignment of acceleration with vorticity. Similarly, a and especially a are predominantly aligned at 45°with the most stretching and compressing eigenvectors of the rate of the strain tensor, λ, and λ, respectively. Via autocorrelation functions of acceleration, conditioned on preferential directions, the vorticity vector field is found to play an important role as an ordering reference axis for acceleration orientation. Associating a velocity-acceleration structure function with an energy flux gives a clear indication that a strong energy flux occurs via compression in strain dominated events and via stretching in vorticity dominated events.

  17. CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2002-01-01

    The 3 GHz drive beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, currently under construction at CERN, will be equipped with 16 novel SICA (Slotted Iris – Constant Aperture) accelerating structures. The slotted irises couple out the potentially disruptive induced transverse HOM energy to integrated silicon carbide loads (dipole mode Q's below 20). The use of nose cones for detuning allows a constant inner aperture (34 mm). The structures will be 1.2 m long and consist of 34 cells. A first 6 cell prototype structure has been tested successfully up to power levels of 100 MW (nominal: 30 MW), corresponding to surface electric field levels of 180 MV/m.

  18. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called digital materials. We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  19. Foam rigidized inflatable structural assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Michael L. (Inventor); Schnell, Andrew R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An inflatable and rigidizable structure for use as a habitat or a load bearing structure is disclosed. The structure consists of an outer wall and an inner wall defining a containment member and a bladder. The bladder is pressurized to erect the structure from an initially collapsed state. The containment member is subsequently injected with rigidizable fluid through an arrangement of injection ports. Exhaust gases from the curing rigidizable fluid are vented through an arrangement of exhaust ports. The rate of erection can be controlled by frictional engagement with a container or by using a tether. A method for fabricating a tubular structure is disclosed.

  20. Production of S-band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, C; Vogel, H; Vom Stein, P

    2004-01-01

    ACCEL currently produces accelerating structures for several scientific laboratories. Multi-cell cavities at S-band frequencies are required for the projects CLIC-driver-linac, DLS and ASP pre-injector linac and the MAMI-C microtron. Based on those projects differences and similarities in design, production technologies and requirements will be addressed.

  1. High-Gradient, Millimeter Wave Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzikov, S V; Peskov, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    The millimeter wave all-metallic accelerating structure, aimed to provide more than 100 MeV/m gradient and fed by feeding RF pulses of 20-30 ns duration, is proposed. The structure is based on a waveguide with small helical corrugation. Each section of 10-20 wavelengths long has big circular cross-section aperture comparable with wavelength. Because short wavelength structures are expected to be critical to wakefields excitation and emittance growth, we suggest to combine in one structure properties of a linear accelerator and a cooling damping ring simultaneously. It provides acceleration of straight on-axis beam as well as cooling of this beam due to the synchrotron radiation of particles in strong non-synchronous transverse fields. These properties are provided by specific slow eigen mode which consists of two partial waves, TM01 and TM11. Simulations show that shunt impedance can be as high as 100 MOhm/m. Results of the first low-power tests with 30 GHz accelerating section are analyzed.

  2. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  3. Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-11

    Whole community shotgun sequencing of total DNA (i.e. metagenomics) and total RNA (i.e. metatranscriptomics) has provided a wealth of information in the microbial community structure, predicted functions, metabolic networks, and is even able to reconstruct complete genomes directly. Here we present ATLAS (Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures) a comprehensive pipeline for assembly, annotation, genomic binning of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data with an integrated framework for Multi-Omics. This will provide an open source tool for the Multi-Omic community at large.

  4. Treatment planning capability assessment of a beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M.S., E-mail: herrera@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, S.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Burlon, A.A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Minsky, D.M.; Kreiner, A.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) a theoretical study was performed to assess the treatment planning capability of different configurations of an optimized beam shaping assembly for such a facility. In particular this study aims at evaluating treatment plans for a clinical case of Glioblastoma.

  5. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Design of PWT Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, David; Chen Ping; Lundquist, Martin; Luo, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microwave power losses on the surfaces of accelerating structures will transform to heat which will deform the structures if it is not removed in time. Thermal hydraulic design of the disk and cooling rods of a Plane Wave Transformer (PWT) structure is presented. Experiments to measure the hydraulic (pressure vs flow rate) and cooling (heat removed vs flow rate) properties of the PWT disk are performed, and results compared with simulations using Mathcad models and the COSMOSM code. Both experimental and simulation results showed that the heat deposited on the structure could be removed effectively using specially designed water-cooling circuits and the temperature of the structure could be controlled within the range required.

  7. Hepatic aberrant glycosylation by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V accelerates HDL assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Yoshihiro; Kida, Sachiho; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Akira; Hashimoto, Chikako; Kimura, Akihiro; Sato, Motoya; Fujii, Hironobu; Sobajima, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ebisutani, Yusuke; Takamatsu, Shinji; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamada, Makoto; Nagasaka, Hironori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2016-11-01

    Glycosylation is involved in various pathophysiological conditions. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), catalyzing β1-6 branching in asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, is one of the most important glycosyltransferases involved in cancer and the immune system. Recent findings indicate that aberrant N-glycan structure can modify lipid metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of aberrant glycosylation by GnT-V on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) assembly. We used GnT-V transgenic (Tg) mice and GnT-V Hep3B cell (human hepatoma cell line) transfectants. The study also included 96 patients who underwent medical health check-ups. Total serum cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, were significantly increased in Tg vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Hepatic expression of apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI) and ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), two important factors in HDL assembly, were higher in Tg mice compared with WT mice. ApoAI and ABCA1 were also significantly elevated in GnT-V transfectants compared with mock-transfected cells. Moreover, ApoAI protein in the cultured media of GnT-V transfectants was significantly increased. Finally, we found a strong correlation between serum GnT-V activity and HDL-C concentration in human subjects. Multivariate logistic analyses demonstrated that GnT-V activity was an independent and significant determinant for serum HDL-C levels even adjusted with age and gender differences. Further analyses represented that serum GnT-V activity had strong correlation especially with the large-size HDL particle concentration. These findings indicate that enhanced hepatic GnT-V activity accelerated HDL assembly and could be a novel mechanism for HDL synthesis.

  8. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Jung-Ho; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Paik, Seung R

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  9. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghibom Bhak

    Full Text Available alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  10. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  11. Helical Pulseline Structures for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, R J; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of the "Pulseline Ion Accelerator" involves launching a ramped high voltage pulse on a broad band traveling wave (slow-wave) structure. An applied voltage pulse at the input end with a segment rising linearly in time becomes a linear voltage ramp in space that propagates down the line, corresponding to a (moving) region of constant axial accelerating electric field. The ions can "surf" on this traveling wave, experiencing a total energy gain that can greatly exceed the peak of the applied voltage. The applied voltage waveform can also be shaped to longitudinally confine the beam against its own space charge forces, and (in the final stage) to impart an inward compression to the beam for neutralized drift compression in heavy ion HEDP applications. In the first stages of a heavy ion accelerator, the pulseline velocity needs to be the order of 1% of the speed of light and the line must be sufficiently non-dispersive for the broad band voltage pulse propagating down the line to have minimal dis...

  12. Latest insights on adenovirus structure and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å) and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25), but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber) had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  13. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  14. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU,J.P.; CASEY,W.R.; HARDER,D.A.; PJEROV,S.; RAKOWSKY,G.; SKARITKA,J.R.

    2002-09-05

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90{sup o} downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety.

  15. Structure investigations on assembled astaxanthin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpsel, Christian; Möltgen, Holger; Schuch, Horst; Auweter, Helmut; Kleinermanns, Karl; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Bettermann, Hans

    2005-08-01

    The carotenoid r,r-astaxanthin (3R,3‧R-dihydroxy-4,4‧-diketo-β-carotene) forms different types of aggregates in acetone-water mixtures. H-type aggregates were found in mixtures with a high part of water (e.g. 1:9 acetone-water mixture) whereas two different types of J-aggregates were identified in mixtures with a lower part of water (3:7 acetone-water mixture). These aggregates were characterized by recording UV/vis-absorption spectra, CD-spectra and fluorescence emissions. The sizes of the molecular assemblies were determined by dynamic light scattering experiments. The hydrodynamic diameter of the assemblies amounts 40 nm in 1:9 acetone-water mixtures and exceeds up to 1 μm in 3:7 acetone-water mixtures. Scanning tunneling microscopy monitored astaxanthin aggregates on graphite surfaces. The structure of the H-aggregate was obtained by molecular modeling calculations. The structure was confirmed by calculating the electronic absorption spectrum and the CD-spectrum where the molecular modeling structure was used as input.

  16. Structure and photochromism of spiropyran assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜祖亮; 赵伟利; 马晓东; 朱自强; 明阳福; 樊美公; 吕安德

    1995-01-01

    Nanocluster assemblies of spiropyran compounds have been prepared by means of LB technique, and the relations between the subphase, pH value, condition of preparation and the structure of the fabricated LB film are systematically investigated. The stability, photochromic fatigue properties of the spiropyran LB film, which are of primary importance in optic signal storage applications, are also studied in detail. A kind of supermolecular film with homogeneously distributed J aggregates of similar granular size has been obtained with the optical resolution in the order of micrometer. Finally, a nondestructive readout method for such an LB film to be used as the optic signal storage film is proposed.

  17. Alignment Pins for Assembling and Disassembling Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Oliver C.

    2008-01-01

    Simple, easy-to-use, highly effective tooling has been devised for maintaining alignment of bolt holes in mating structures during assembly and disassembly of the structures. The tooling was originally used during removal of a body flap from the space shuttle Atlantis, in which misalignments during removal of the last few bolts could cause the bolts to bind in their holes. By suitably modifying the dimensions of the tooling components, the basic design of the tooling can readily be adapted to other structures that must be maintained in alignment. The tooling includes tapered, internally threaded alignment pins designed to fit in the bolt holes in one of the mating structures, plus a draw bolt and a cup that are used to install or remove each alignment pin. In preparation for disassembly of two mating structures, external supports are provided to prevent unintended movement of the structures. During disassembly of the structures, as each bolt that joins the structures is removed, an alignment pin is installed in its place. Once all the bolts have been removed and replaced with pins, the pins maintain alignment as the structures are gently pushed or pulled apart on the supports. In assembling the two structures, one reverses the procedure described above: pins are installed in the bolt holes, the structures are pulled or pushed together on the supports, then the pins are removed and replaced with bolts. The figure depicts the tooling and its use. To install an alignment pin in a bolt hole in a structural panel, the tapered end of the pin is inserted from one side of the panel, the cup is placed over the pin on the opposite side of the panel, the draw bolt is inserted through the cup and threaded into the pin, the draw bolt is tightened to pull the pin until the pin is seated firmly in the hole, then the draw bolt and cup are removed, leaving the pin in place. To remove an alignment pin, the cup is placed over the pin on the first-mentioned side of the panel, the draw

  18. Lymphocytes accelerate epithelial tight junction assembly: role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiao Tang

    Full Text Available The tight junctions (TJs, characteristically located at the apicolateral borders of adjacent epithelial cells, are required for the proper formation of epithelial cell polarity as well as for sustaining the mucosal barrier to the external environment. The observation that lymphocytes are recruited by epithelial cells to the sites of infection [1] suggests that they may play a role in the modulation of epithelial barrier function and thus contribute to host defense. To test the ability of lymphocytes to modulate tight junction assembly in epithelial cells, we set up a lymphocyte-epithelial cell co-culture system, in which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells, a well-established model cell line for studying epithelial TJ assembly [2], were co-cultured with mouse lymphocytes to mimic an infection state. In a typical calcium switch experiment, the TJ assembly in co-culture was found to be accelerated compared to that in MDCK cells alone. This accelaration was found to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK activation was independent of changes in cellular ATP levels but it was found to be activated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Forced suppression of AMPK, either with a chemical inhibitor or by knockdown, abrogated the accelerating effect of lymphocytes on TJ formation. Similar results were also observed in a co-culture with lymphocytes and Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells, suggesting that the activation of AMPK may be a general mechanism underlying lymphocyte-accelerated TJ assembly in different epithelia. These results suggest that signals from lymphocytes, such as cytokines, facilitate TJ assembly in epithelial cells via the activation of AMPK.

  19. Research Programme for the 660 Mev Proton Accelerator Driven MOX-Plutonium Subcritical Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Buttseva, G L; Dudarev, S Yu; Polanski, A; Puzynin, I V; Sissakian, A N

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a research programme of the Experimental Acclerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton acceletator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the JINR, Dubna. MOX fuel (25% PuO_2 + 75% UO_2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core of a nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient k_eff = 0.945, energetic gain G = 30 and the accelerator beam power 0.5 kW.

  20. Physics analyses of an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naberezhnev, Dmitry G. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Av., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: dimitri@anl.gov; Gohar, Yousry [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Av., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bailey, James [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Av., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Belch, Henry [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Av., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-06-23

    Physics analyses have been performed for an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly as a part of the Argonne National Laboratory activity in preparation for a joint conceptual design with the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine. KIPT has a plan to construct an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly targeted towards the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. The external neutron source is produced either through photonuclear reactions in tungsten or uranium targets, or deuteron reactions in a beryllium target. KIPT intends using the high-enriched uranium (HEU) for the fuel of the sub-critical assembly. The main objective of this paper is to study the possibility of utilizing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel instead of HEU fuel without penalizing the sub-critical assembly performance, in particular the neutron flux level. In the course of this activity, several studies have been carried out to investigate the main choices for the system's parameters. The external neutron source has been characterized and a pre-conceptual target design has been developed. Several sub-critical configurations with different fuel enrichments and densities have been considered. Based on our analysis, it was shown that the performance of the LEU fuel is comparable with that of the HEU fuel. The LEU fuel sub-critical assembly with 200-MeV electron energy and 100-kW electron beam power has an average total flux of {approx}2.50x10{sup 13} n/s cm{sup 2} in the irradiation channels. The corresponding total facility power is {approx}204 kW divided into 91 and 113 kW deposited in the target and sub-critical assemblies, respectively.

  1. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  2. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D, two-dimensional (2D, and three-dimensional (3D arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  3. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  4. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  5. On the structure of acceleration in turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberzon, A.; Lüthi, B.; Holzner, M.

    2012-01-01

    vorticity. Geometrical alignments with respect to vorticity vector and to the strain eigenvectors, curvature of Lagrangian trajectories and of streamlines for total acceleration, and for its convective part, , are studied in detail. We discriminate the alignment features of total and convective acceleration...... statistics, which are genuine features of turbulent nature from those of kinematic nature. We find pronounced alignment of acceleration with vorticity. Similarly, and especially are predominantly aligned at 45°with the most stretching and compressing eigenvectors of the rate of the strain tensor...

  6. Structural analyses and integrated design of the MITICA Injector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucco, G., E-mail: gianluca.mazzucco@dicea.unipd.it [Department ICEA, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Muraro, D.; Salomoni, V.; Majorana, C. [Department ICEA, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Marcuzzi, D.; Rigato, W.; Sonato, P.; Zaccaria, P.; Toigo, V. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Inoue, T.; Takemoto, J.; Tobari, H.; Tsuchida, K.; Yamanaka, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Seismic design has been carried out on PRIMA building. ► Three-dimensional FE models have been developed the vessel and TL device. ► Three bellows stiffness have been considered to evaluate maximum TL displacements. -- Abstract: In the framework of the activities foreseen for PRIMA (Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated) the MITICA neutral beam injector plays the role of main experiment, aiming to build, operate, test and optimize a full power and full scale prototype of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam Injector [1–3]. The entire MITICA system will be housed in special buildings, suitably designed to provide all the necessary supports, interfaces and shielding walls for nuclear radiation safety. Therefore an integrated design of the MITICA system and relevant buildings shall be developed and verified carefully, considering all the different configurations, operational modes and load combinations. This paper presents the numerical models and the results of MITICA assembly integrated analyses. The model takes into account properly constraints to ground and surrounding buildings, to study and verify the static and seismic response of the whole assembly. The load cases are defined and the numerical analyses described. Load definition and analyses have been performed considering the requirements of both the ASME [4] and the National Standard NTC2008 [5] for the seismic verification of structures subject to design response spectra. The obtained results are finally shown in detail and discussed, also comparing some different design options for design optimization.

  7. Operational experience with room temperature continuous wave accelerator structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.

    1993-05-01

    The paper reports the results of the computer simulation of parameters of the on-axis coupled accelerator structure for the continuous wave racetrack microtron. The operational experience with the accelerating sections on the basis of the on-axis coupled structure is described.

  8. Particle accelerations and current structures of Weibel and Filamentation instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, C. M.; Huynh, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Particle accelerations of the Wibel instability (WI) and the Filamentation instability(FI) are studied by using PIC simuations, comparing them side-by-side. Although two instabilities are almost identical in the linear growth phase, significant differences are found in the nonlinear phase in their particle accelerations and current structures. The FI shows enhanced electron acceleration, whereas particle acceleration is almost absent in the WI. The different particle accelerations between the FI and the WI seem to be associated with their different current structures; a hollow electron current structure for the FI and a center filled current structure for that of the WI. Different electron distributions seem to bring in different current filament structures, eventually leading to different magnetic characteristics.

  9. Simulation studies of crystal-photodetector assemblies for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory electromagnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, F., E-mail: fkocak@uludag.edu.tr

    2015-07-01

    The Turkish Accelerator Center Particle Factory detector will be constructed for the detection of the produced particles from the collision of a 1 GeV electron beam against a 3.6 GeV positron beam. PbWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals are considered for the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter part of the detector. The generated optical photons in these crystals are detected by avalanche or PIN photodiodes. Geant4 simulation code has been used to estimate the energy resolution of the calorimeter for these crystal–photodiode assemblies.

  10. Ground Test of the Urine Processing Assembly for Accelerations and Transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice; Almond, Deborah F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the ground test of the urine processing assembly for accelerations and transfer functions. Details are given on the test setup, test data, data analysis, analytical results, and microgravity assessment. The conclusions of the tests include the following: (1) the single input/multiple output method is useful if the data is acquired by tri-axial accelerometers and inputs can be considered uncorrelated; (2) tying coherence with the matrix yields higher confidence in results; (3) the WRS#2 rack ORUs need to be isolated; (4) and future work includes a plan for characterizing performance of isolation materials.

  11. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  12. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  13. Multipactor Physics, Acceleration, and Breakdown in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Richard P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this 3-year program is to study the physics issues associated with rf acceleration in dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with a focus on the key issue of multipactor loading, which has been found to cause very significant rf power loss in DLA structures whenever the rf pulsewidth exceeds the multipactor risetime (~10 ns). The experiments are carried out in the X-band magnicon laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC, who develop the test structures with support from the DoE SBIR program. There are two main elements in the research program: (1) high-power tests of DLA structures using the magnicon output (20 MW @11.4 GHz), and (2) tests of electron acceleration in DLA structures using relativistic electrons from a compact X-band accelerator. The work during this period has focused on a study of the use of an axial magnetic field to suppress multipactor in DLA structures, with several new high power tests carried out at NRL, and on preparation of the accelerator for the electron acceleration experiments.

  14. The determinism and boundedness of self-assembling structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoro, S

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly processes are widespread in nature, and lie at the heart of many biological and physical phenomena. The characteristics of self-assembly building blocks determine the structures that they form. Among the most important of these properties are whether the self-assembly is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. The former tells us whether the same set of building blocks always generates the same structure, and the latter whether it grows indefinitely. These properties are highly relevant in the context of protein structures, as the difference between deterministic protein self-assembly and nondeterministic protein aggregation is central to a number of diseases. Here we introduce a graph-based approach that can determine, with a few restrictions, whether a set of self-assembly building blocks is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. We apply this methodology to a previously studied lattice self-assembly model and discuss generalisatio...

  15. Some aspects in accelerator structure studies at SLAC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ju-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in the accelerator structure studies at SLAC is reported.This paper covers the projects including RF deflectors and the LCLS RF gun;the high gradient accelerator R&D in a global CLIC collaboration for the future multi-TeV linear colliders.

  16. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  17. Multipacting simulation in accelerating RF structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusarova, M.A.; Kaminsky, V.I. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation); Kravchuk, L.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kutsaev, S.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: s_kutsaev@mail.ru; Lalayan, M.V.; Sobenin, N.P. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S.G. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2009-02-01

    A new computer code for 3D simulation of multipacting phenomenon in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric radio frequency (RF) structures is presented. The goal of the simulation is to determine resonant electron trajectories and electron multiplication in RF structure. Both SW and TW structures of normal and superconductivity have been studied. Simulation results are compared with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements.

  18. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  19. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlon, A.A. E-mail: burlon@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Kreiner, A.J.; Valda, A.A.; Minsky, D.M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon[reg ], and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  20. Design and construction of the clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. S.; Song, I. T

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this report is to design, construction and evaluation of clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly. The design conditions o Class : 1,000(1,000 ea ft{sup 3}), o Flow Rate : 200 m{sup 3}/h m{sup 2}, o Temperature : 22 deg C{+-}2, o Humidity : 55%{+-}5. The main design results are summarized as follows: o Air-handling unit : Cooling Capacity : 13,500 kcal/h, Heating Capacity : 10,300 kcal/h, Humidity Capacity : 4 kg/h, Flow Rate : 150 CMM o Air Shower : Flow Rate : 35 CMM, Size : 1500 x 1000 x 2200, Material : In-steel, Out-SUS304, Filter : PRE + HEPA, AIR Velocity : 25 m/s o Relief Damper : Size : {phi}250, Casing : SS41, Blade : AL, Shaft : SUS304, Weight Ring : SS41, Grill : AL o HEPA Filter Box : Filter Box Size : 670 x 670 x 630, Filter Size : 610 x 610 x 150, Frame: Poly Wood, Media : Glass Fiber, Filter Efficiency : 0.3{mu}m, 99.97%, Separator : AL, Flow Rate : 17 CMM, Damper Size : {phi}300 Following this report will be used important data for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of the clean room, for high precision apparatus assembly laboratory.

  1. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed.

  2. Rectangular Dielectric-loaded Structures for Achieving High Acceleration Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changbiao; Yakovlev, V. P.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2006-11-01

    Rectangular dielectric-loaded structures are described that may sustain higher acceleration gradients than conventional all-metal structures with similar apertures. One structure is a test cavity designed to ascertain the breakdown limits of dielectrics, while a second structure could be the basis for a two-beam accelerator. CVD diamond is an attractive dielectric for a high-gradient structure, since the published DC breakdown limit for CVD diamond is ˜ 2 GV/m, although the limit has never been determined for RF fields. Here we present a design of a diamond-lined test cavity to measure the breakdown limit. The designed cavity operates at 34 GHz, where with 10-MW input power it is expected to produce an ˜800 MV/m field on the diamond surface—provided breakdown is avoided. The two channel rectangular dielectric-loaded waveguide could be a two-beam accelerator structure, in which a drive beam is in one channel and an accelerated beam is in the other. The RF power produced by drive bunches in the drive channel is continuously coupled to the acceleration channel. The ratio of fields in the channels (transformer ratio) for the operating mode can be designed by adjusting the dimensions of the structure. An example of the two-channel structure is described, in which a train of five 3-nC drive bunches excites wake fields in the accelerator channel of up to 1.3 GV/m with a transformer ratio of 10 for the design mode.

  3. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  4. A telerobotic system for automated assembly of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Wise, Marion A.

    1990-01-01

    Future space missions such as polar platforms and antennas are anticipated to require large truss structures as their primary support system. During the past several years considerable research has been conducted to develop hardware and construction techniques suitable for astronaut assembly of truss structures in space. A research program has recently been initiated to develop the technology and to demonstrate the potential for automated in-space assembly of large erectable structures. The initial effort will be focused on automated assembly of a tetrahedral truss composed of 2-meter members. The facility is designed as a ground based system to permit evaluation of assembly concepts and was not designed for space qualification. The system is intended to be used as a tool from which more sophisticated procedures and operations can be developed. The facility description includes a truss structure, motionbases and a robot arm equipped with an end effector. Other considerations and requirements of the structural assembly describe computer control systems to monitor and control the operations of the assembly facility.

  5. SADE: A space experiment to demonstrate structural assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. K.; Cramblit, D. C.

    1983-05-01

    The Structural Assembly and Demonstration Experiment (SADE) demonstrates that the Shuttle is a suitable base for space construction; this includes a test of the Shuttle's control system to determine its performance when a long attached truss or beam is extended from the bay. Examples of Shuttle-related systems that will receive special attention are the RMS, the lighting system, and the crew assembly capabilities. A second purpose is to determine the extent to which the assembly results from the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator can be used to forecast the results of space assembly is determined. Finally, the SADE truss design will be validated by measuring the performance of the deployment, the special connectors, and the assembly methods.

  6. High Power Test on an x-Band Slotted-Iris Accelerator Structure at NLCTA

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, C; Fandos, R; Grudiev, A; Heikkinen, S; Laurent, L; Rodríguez, José Alberto; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The CLIC study group at CERN has built two X-band HDS (Hybrid Damped Structure) accelerating structures for high-power testing in NLCTA at SLAC. These accelerating structures are novel with respect to their rf-design and their fabrication technique. The eleven-cell constant impedance structures, one made out of copper and one out of molybdenum, are assembled from clamped high-speed milled quadrants. They feature the same heavy higher-order-mode damping as nominal CLIC structures achieved by slotted irises and radial damping waveguides for each cell. The X-band accelerators are exactly scaled versions of structures tested at 30 GHz in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. The results of the X-band tests are presented and compared to those at 30 GHz to determine frequency scaling, and are compared to the extensive copper data from the NLC structure development program to determine material dependence and make a basic validation of the HDS design. INTRODUCTION

  7. Theoretical temperature model with experimental validation for CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Aasly, Sara Hegdahl; Vamvakas, Alex; Alme, Johan; Haustveit, Svein

    Micron level stability of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) components is one of the main requirements to meet the luminosity goal for the future $48 \\,km$ long underground linear accelerator. The radio frequency (RF) power used for beam acceleration causes heat generation within the aligned structures, resulting in mechanical movements and structural deformations. A dedicated control of the air- and water- cooling system in the tunnel is therefore crucial to improve alignment accuracy. This thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC Accelerating Structure (AS). In CLIC, the AS must be aligned to a precision of $10\\,\\mu m$. The thesis shows that a relatively simple theoretical model can be used within reasonable accuracy to predict the temperature response of an AS as a function of the applied RF power. During failure scenarios or maintenance interventions, the RF power is turned off resulting in no heat dissipation and decrease in the overall temperature of the components. The theoretica...

  8. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Inanç; Chu, Justin; Mohamadi, Hamid; Jackman, Shaun D; Raghavan, Karthika; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Raymond, Anthony; Warren, René L

    2015-01-01

    De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG) paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  9. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  10. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  11. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  12. A Newly Designed and Optimized CLIC Main Linac Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Grudiev, A

    2004-01-01

    A new CLIC main-linac accelerating-structure design, HDS (Hybrid Damped Structure), with improved high-gradient performance, efficiency and simplicity of fabrication is presented. The gains are achieved in part through a new cell design which includes fully-profiled rf surfaces optimized to minimize surface fields and hybrid damping using both iris slots and radial waveguides. The slotted irises allow a simple structure fabrication in quadrants with no rf currents across joints. Further gains are achieved through a new structure optimization procedure, which simultaneously balances surface fields, power flow, short and long-range transverse wakefields, rf-to-beam efficiency and the ratio of luminosity to input power. The optimization of a 30 GHz structure with a loaded accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m results in a bunch spacing of seven rf cycles and 32 % rf-to-beam efficiency.

  13. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  14. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Self Assembled Peptide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Pantagos, Spyros P.;

    2011-01-01

    In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures. In partic......In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures....... In particular we use EFM to investigate the structures of diphenylalanine peptide tubes, particles, and CSGAITIG peptide particles placed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. We show that the cavity in the peptide tubes could be to the presence of water residues. Additionally we show that self......-assembled amyloid peptides form spherical solid structures containing the same self-assembled peptide in its interior. In both cases transmission electron microscopy is used to verify these structures. Further, the limitations of the EFM technique are discussed, especially when the observed structures become small...

  15. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS

  16. Acceleration of stable interface structure searching using a kriging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Shin; Oda, Hiromi; Tsuda, Koji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2016-04-01

    Crystalline interfaces have a tremendous impact on the properties of materials. Determination of the atomic structure of the interface is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the interface properties. Despite this importance, extensive calculation is necessary to determine even one interface structure. In this study, we apply a technique called kriging, borrowed from geostatistics, to accelerate the determination of the interface structure. The atomic structure of simplified coincidence-site lattice interfaces were determined using the kriging approach. Our approach successfully determined the most stable interface structure with an efficiency almost 2 orders of magnitude better than the traditional “brute force” approach.

  17. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-01

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  18. Structure of Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) Efforts, 2000-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenen, Nancy; Yaman, Kimberly

    This report focuses on the structure of instructional assistance available through the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) to students who show low achievement in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), North Carolina. Context information is also provided on other programs available to these students. Reports on ALP student participation,…

  19. Fabrication of the CERN/PSI/ST X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, Micha; Gudkov, Dmitry; Lebet, Serge; Riddone, Germana; Shi, Jiaru; Citterio, Alessandro; Zennaro, Riccardo; D'Auria, Gerardo; Serpico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, PSI and Sincrotrone Trieste (ST), a multi- purpose X-band accelerating structure has been designed and fabricated, used for high gradients tests in the CLIC structure testing program and in the FEL projects of PSI and ST. The structure has 72 cells with a phase advance of 5 pi/6 and includes upstream and down-stream wakefield monitors to measure the beam alignment. The SLAC mode launcher design is used to feed it with RF power. Following the CERN fabrication procedures for high-gradient structure, diffusion bonding and brazing in hydrogen atmosphere is used to assemble the cells. After tuning, a vacuum bakeout is required before the feedthroughs for the wake field monitors are welded in as a last step. We describe the experiences gained in finishing the first two structures out of a series of four and present the results from the RF tuning and low level RF tests.

  20. A Precise Packing Sequence for Self-Assembled Convex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Zhenli; Glotzer, Sharon

    2007-03-01

    We present molecular simulations of the self-assembly of cone-shaped particles with patchy, attractive interactions[1,2]. Upon cooling from random initial conditions, we find that the cones self assemble into clusters and that clusters comprised of particular numbers of cones have a unique and precisely packed structure that is robust over a range of cone angles. These precise clusters form precise packing sequence that for small sizes is identical to that observed in evaporation-driven assembly of colloidal spheres. This sequence is reproduced and extended in simulations of two simple models of spheres self-assembling from random initial conditions subject to convexity constraints, and contains six of the most common virus capsid structures obtained in vivo including large chiral clusters, and a cluster that may correspond to several non- icosahedral, spherical virus capsid structures obtained in vivo. For prolate spheroidal convexity conditions, we demonstrate the formation of several prolate virus structures from self-assembling hard spheres[3]. [1] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, PNAS, in press (http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/ 0608592) [2] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/0608613 [3] Chen T, Glotzer SC http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/q-bio.BM/0608040

  1. Design and Construction of the Linac4 Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Dallocchio, A; Favre, G; Vretenar, M; Wegner, R; Tirado, P Ugena; Rossi, C; Riffaud, B; Ramberger, S; Polini, M; Gentini, L; Geisser, JM; Giguet, JM; Mathot, S; Naumenko, M; Kendjebulatov, E; Tribendis, A; Kryuchkov, Ya

    2013-01-01

    The Linac4 project at CERN is at an advanced state of construction. Prototypes and/or operational modules of the different types of accelerating structures (RFQ, buncher, DTL, CCDTL, and PIMS) have been built and are presently tested. This paper gives the status of the cavity production and reviews the RF and mechanical design of the various structure types. Furthermore the production experience and the first test results shall be presented.

  2. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  3. In-Space Structural Assembly: Applications and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Doggett, Bill R.; Watson, Judith J.; Dorsey, John T.; Warren, Jay; Jones, Thomas C.; Komendera, Erik E.; Mann, Troy O.; Bowman, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    As NASA exploration moves beyond earth's orbit, the need exists for long duration space systems that are resilient to events that compromise safety and performance. Fortunately, technology advances in autonomy, robotic manipulators, and modular plug-and-play architectures over the past two decades have made in-space vehicle assembly and servicing possible at acceptable cost and risk. This study evaluates future space systems needed to support scientific observatories and human/robotic Mars exploration to assess key structural design considerations. The impact of in-space assembly is discussed to identify gaps in structural technology and opportunities for new vehicle designs to support NASA's future long duration missions.

  4. H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O'Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Wangler, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic computations, multi-particle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or ...

  5. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF CLUSTER ASSEMBLED Al12C (Si) SOLID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN HONG-JUN; GONG XIN-GAO

    2000-01-01

    The electronic structures of the cluster-assembled solid Al12C (Si) are studied by the ab initio method. We find that Al12C (Si) can solidify into a van der Waals solid. The electronic band structures show very weak dispersion. The main features in the electronic structure of cluster are retained in the solid, and an energy gap up to about 1.5 eV is observed for Al12C and Al12Si solids.

  6. Tuning and Matching of Constant Impedance Travelling Wave Accelerating Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jing-he; ZHU; Zhi-bin; WU; Qing-feng; ZENG; Zi-qiang; WANG; Xiu-long; ZHOU; Wen-zhen

    2015-01-01

    As the penetration depth of electron accelerated by 10MeV electron irradiating accelerator is deep,and the accelerator has broad application prospects.The performance of the accelerator is influenced,to a great extent,by the traveling wave accelerating tube,which is the core component of the accelerator.To develop the accelerator

  7. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal; Theruvakkattil S. Sreeprasad; Samal, Akshaya K.; Thalappil Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates...

  8. Gravitational energy as dark energy: Cosmic structure and apparent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Wiltshire, David L

    2011-01-01

    Below scales of about 100/h Mpc our universe displays a complex inhomogeneous structure dominated by voids, with clusters of galaxies in sheets and filaments. The coincidence that cosmic expansion appears to start accelerating at the epoch when such structures form has prompted a number of researchers to question whether dark energy is a signature of a failure of the standard cosmology to properly account, on average, for the distribution of matter we observe. Here I discuss the timescape scenario, in which cosmic acceleration is understood as an apparent effect, due to gravitational energy gradients that grow when spatial curvature gradients become significant with the nonlinear growth of cosmic structure. I discuss conceptual issues related to the averaging problem, and their impact on the calibration of local geometry to the solutions of the volume-average evolution equations corrected by backreaction, and the question of nonbaryonic dark matter in the timescape framework. I further discuss recent work on ...

  9. Comparison of the conditioning of High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV/m, at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous CLIC prototype accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of RF pulses and not the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  10. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  11. Emergence of hierarchical structural complexities in nanoparticles and their assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Chen, Yuxiang; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Lambright, Kelly J.; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that nanoparticle self-assembly can reach the same level of hierarchy, complexity, and accuracy as biomolecules. The precise assembly structures of gold nanoparticles (246 gold core atoms with 80 p-methylbenzenethiolate surface ligands) at the atomic, molecular, and nanoscale levels were determined from x-ray diffraction studies. We identified the driving forces and rules that guide the multiscale assembly behavior. The protecting ligands self-organize into rotational and parallel patterns on the nanoparticle surface via C-Hṡṡṡπ interaction, and the symmetry and density of surface patterns dictate directional packing of nanoparticles into crystals with orientational, rotational, and translational orders. Through hierarchical interactions and symmetry matching, the simple building blocks evolve into complex structures, representing an emergent phenomenon in the nanoparticle system.

  12. Structural and transport properties of directly assembled nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Birol

    Scope and method of study. In this work, we present a systematic study on the assembly and characterization of nanostructures. We employed self and directed assembly methods in order to organize nanostructures. Quantitative film balance studies of self-assembled semiconductor nanoparticles enabled the determination of their effective interparticle potential. As a directed-assembly method, dielectrophoresis was used in the fabrication of interconnects from dispersions of nanostructures between targeted points in external circuitry. Directed electrochemical nanowire assembly (DENA) was developed and used in the fabrication of metallic nanowires from simple salt solutions. The structural and charge transport properties of the assembled nanostructures and the DENA-grown nanowires were characterized. Findings and conclusions. The CdSe nanoparticles of a given diameter were found to behave like hard-disks with significantly smaller diameters. This behavior was attributed to an attractive contribution to the interparticle potential, such as the dipolar potential. We found that nanoparticulate CdS converts to bulk CdS during dielectrophoretic interconnect fabrication. We demonstrated that the dielectrophoretic interconnects fabricated from gold nanorods are nanostructured, limiting their conductivity. DENA technique enabled the single-step growth and low-resistance interconnecting of crystalline diameter-tunable metallic nanowires. The preliminary results of the diameter-dependent resistivity studies with the DENA-grown gold nanowires were consistent with the predicted behavior.

  13. On radiative acceleration in spine-sheath structured blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chhotray, Atul; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Salafia, Om Sharan; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Lazzati, Davide

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that blazar jets are structured, with a fast spine surrounded by a slower sheath or layer. This structured jet model explains some properties of their emission and morphology. Because of their relative motion, the radiation produced by one component is seen amplified by the other, thus enhancing the inverse Compton emission of both. Radiation is emitted anisotropically in the comoving frames, and causes the emitting plasma to recoil. As seen in the observer frame, this corresponds to a deceleration of the fastest component (the spine) and an acceleration of the slower one (the layer). While the deceleration of the spine has already been investigated, here we study for the first time the acceleration of the sheath and find self-consistent velocity profile solutions for both the spine and the sheath while accounting for radiative cooling. We find that the sheath can be accelerated to the velocities required by the observations if its leptons remain energetic in the acceleration region, assu...

  14. Electromagnetic Simulations of Helical-Based Ion Acceleration Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Scott D; Caporaso, George; Friedman, Alex; Poole, Brian R; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    Helix structures have been proposed* for accelerating low energy ion beams using MV/m fields in order to increase the coupling effeciency of the pulsed power system and to tailor the electromagnetic wave propagation speed with the particle beam speed as the beam gains energy. Calculations presented here show the electromagnetic field as it propagates along the helix structure, field stresses around the helix structure (for voltage breakdown determination), optimizations to the helix and driving pulsed power waveform, and simulations showing test particles interacting with the simulated time varying fields.

  15. Development of X-band accelerating structures for high gradients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Bini; M. G. Grimaldi; L. Romano; F. Ruffino; R. Parodi; V. Chimenti; A. Marcelli; L. Palumbo; B. Spataro; V. A. Dolgashev; S. Tantawi; A.D. Yeremian; Y. Higashi

    2012-01-01

    Short copper standing wave (SW) structures operating at an X-band frequency have been recently designed and manufactured at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) using the vacuum brazing technique.High power tests of the structures have been performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.In this manuscript we report the results of these tests and the activity in progress to enhance the high gradient performance of the next generation of structures,particularly the technological characterization of high performance coatings obtained via molybdenum sputtering.

  16. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  17. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  18. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  19. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  20. Summary report of working group 3: Laser and high-gradient structure-based acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonian, Gerard; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-03-01

    High-gradient particle acceleration with reduced power demands is essential for miniaturization and cost reduction of future accelerators. Applications for compact accelerators span collider research for High Energy Physics, light source development for Basic Energy Sciences and National Security, and industrial accelerators for Energy and Environmental Applications. Working Group 3 discussed and surveyed the recent advances in achieving higher gradients and better acceleration efficiency in externally powered, structure-based accelerators. The topics covered in Working Group 3 included dielectric laser acceleration, millimeter-wave accelerators, breakdown phenomena, exotic topologies such as photonic band-gap structures, artificial materials, and nanostructures, and novel rf technology.

  1. Accelerating VASP electronic structure calculations using graphic processing units

    KAUST Repository

    Hacene, Mohamed

    2012-08-20

    We present a way to improve the performance of the electronic structure Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) program. We show that high-performance computers equipped with graphics processing units (GPUs) as accelerators may reduce drastically the computation time when offloading these sections to the graphic chips. The procedure consists of (i) profiling the performance of the code to isolate the time-consuming parts, (ii) rewriting these so that the algorithms become better-suited for the chosen graphic accelerator, and (iii) optimizing memory traffic between the host computer and the GPU accelerator. We chose to accelerate VASP with NVIDIA GPU using CUDA. We compare the GPU and original versions of VASP by evaluating the Davidson and RMM-DIIS algorithms on chemical systems of up to 1100 atoms. In these tests, the total time is reduced by a factor between 3 and 8 when running on n (CPU core + GPU) compared to n CPU cores only, without any accuracy loss. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Electromagnetic simulation study of dielectric wall accelerator structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Quan-Tang; ZHANG Zi-Min; YUAN Ping; CAO Shu-Chun; SHEN Xiao-Kang; JING Yi; LIU Ming; ZHAO Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two types of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) structures,a bi-polar Blumlein line and zero integral pulse line (ZIP) structures were investigated.The high gradient insulator simulated by the particle in cell code confirms that it has little influence on the axial electric field.The results of simulations using CST microwave studio indicate how the axial electric field is formed,and the electric field waveforms agree with the theoretical one very well.The influence of layer-to-layer coupling in a ZIP structure is much smaller and the electric field waveform is much better.The axial of the Blumlein structure's electric field has better axial stability.From both of the above,it found that for a shorter pulse width,the axial electric field is much higher and the pulse stability and fidelity are much better.The CST simulation is very helpful for designing DWA structures.

  3. High-performance insulator structures for accelerator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Sanders, D.M.; Stoddard, R.D.; Trimble, D.O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Elizondo, J.; Krogh, M.L.; Wieskamp, T.F. [Allied Signal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States). Federal Mfg. and Technologies

    1997-05-01

    A new, high gradient insulator technology has been developed for accelerator systems. The concept involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods of order 1 mm or less. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We describe our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from alternate fabrication techniques, the effect of gas pressure, the effect of the insulator-to-electrode interface gap spacing, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress.

  4. Design of a beam shaping assembly and preliminary modelling of a treatment room for accelerator-based BNCT at CNEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlon, A.A.; Girola, S. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina); Valda, A.A., E-mail: valda@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina); Minsky, D.M.; Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sanchez, G. [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    This work reports on the characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly (BSA) prototype and on the preliminary modelling of a treatment room for BNCT within the framework of a research programme for the development and construction of an accelerator-based BNCT irradiation facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The BSA prototype constructed has been characterised by means of MCNP simulations as well as a set of experimental measurements performed at the Tandar accelerator at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements: total and epi-cadmium neutron fluxes and beam homogeneity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations: Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP code. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measured and calculated figure-of-merit parameters in agreement with those of IAEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial MCNP dose calculations for a treatment room to define future design actions.

  5. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juwen; /SLAC; Lewandowski, James; /SLAC; Van Pelt, John; /SLAC; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC; Gudkov, Boris; /CERN; Riddone, Germana; /CERN; Higo, Toshiyasu; /KEK, Tsukuba; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  6. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Zadrozny, Kaneil K.; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D.; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-07-14

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate.

  7. Failure Engineering Study and Accelerated Stress Test Results for the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft's Power Shunt Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbel, Mark; Larson, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    An Engineering-of-Failure approach to designing and executing an accelerated product qualification test was performed to support a risk assessment of a "work-around" necessitated by an on-orbit failure of another piece of hardware on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The proposed work-around involved exceeding the previous qualification experience both in terms of extreme cold exposure level and in terms of demonstrated low cycle fatigue life for the power shunt assemblies. An analysis was performed to identify potential failure sites, modes and associated failure mechanisms consistent with the new use conditions. A test was then designed and executed which accelerated the failure mechanisms identified by analysis. Verification of the resulting failure mechanism concluded the effort.

  8. Surface Appendages of Archaea: Structure, Function, Genetics and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Siu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms representing diverse subgroupings of the Domain Archaea are known to possess unusual surface structures. These can include ones unique to Archaea such as cannulae and hami as well as archaella (archaeal flagella and various types of pili that superficially resemble their namesakes in Bacteria, although with significant differences. Major advances have occurred particularly in the study of archaella and pili using model organisms with recently developed advanced genetic tools. There is common use of a type IV pili-model of assembly for several archaeal surface structures including archaella, certain pili and sugar binding structures termed bindosomes. In addition, there are widespread posttranslational modifications of archaellins and pilins with N-linked glycans, with some containing novel sugars. Archaeal surface structures are involved in such diverse functions as swimming, attachment to surfaces, cell to cell contact resulting in genetic transfer, biofilm formation, and possible intercellular communication. Sometimes functions are co-dependent on other surface structures. These structures and the regulation of their assembly are important features that allow various Archaea, including thermoacidophilic, hyperthermophilic, halophilic, and anaerobic ones, to survive and thrive in the extreme environments that are commonly inhabited by members of this domain.

  9. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  10. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals.

  12. Investigation of Beam-RF Interactions in Twisted Waveguide Accelerating Structures Using Beam Tracking Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Zhang, Yan [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Galambos, John D [ORNL; Hassan, Mohamed H [ORNL; Wilson, Joshua L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of the RF properties of certain twisted waveguide structures show that they support favorable accelerating fields. This makes them potential candidates for accelerating cavities. Using the particle tracking code, ORBIT, We examine the beam - RF interaction in the twisted cavity structures to understand their beam transport and acceleration properties. The results will show the distinctive properties of these new structures for particle transport and acceleration, which have not been previously analyzed.

  13. Structural assembly of molecular complexes based on residual dipolar couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Konstantin; O'Leary, Dianne P; Fushman, David

    2010-07-07

    We present and evaluate a rigid-body molecular docking method, called PATIDOCK, that relies solely on the three-dimensional structure of the individual components and the experimentally derived residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for the complex. We show that, given an accurate ab initio predictor of the alignment tensor from a protein structure, it is possible to accurately assemble a protein-protein complex by utilizing the RDCs' sensitivity to molecular shape to guide the docking. The proposed docking method is robust against experimental errors in the RDCs and computationally efficient. We analyze the accuracy and efficiency of this method using experimental or synthetic RDC data for several proteins, as well as synthetic data for a large variety of protein-protein complexes. We also test our method on two protein systems for which the structure of the complex and steric-alignment data are available (Lys48-linked diubiquitin and a complex of ubiquitin and a ubiquitin-associated domain) and analyze the effect of flexible unstructured tails on the outcome of docking. The results demonstrate that it is fundamentally possible to assemble a protein-protein complex solely on the basis of experimental RDC data and the prediction of the alignment tensor from 3D structures. Thus, despite the purely angular nature of RDCs, they can be converted into intermolecular distance/translational constraints. Additionally, we show a method for combining RDCs with other experimental data, such as ambiguous constraints from interface mapping, to further improve structure characterization of protein complexes.

  14. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  15. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  16. Computer simulations predict that chromosome movements and rotations accelerate mitotic spindle assembly without compromising accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Raja; Wollman, Roy; Silkworth, William T; Nardi, Isaac K; Cimini, Daniela; Mogilner, Alex

    2009-09-15

    The mitotic spindle self-assembles in prometaphase by a combination of centrosomal pathway, in which dynamically unstable microtubules search in space until chromosomes are captured, and a chromosomal pathway, in which microtubules grow from chromosomes and focus to the spindle poles. Quantitative mechanistic understanding of how spindle assembly can be both fast and accurate is lacking. Specifically, it is unclear how, if at all, chromosome movements and combining the centrosomal and chromosomal pathways affect the assembly speed and accuracy. We used computer simulations and high-resolution microscopy to test plausible pathways of spindle assembly in realistic geometry. Our results suggest that an optimal combination of centrosomal and chromosomal pathways, spatially biased microtubule growth, and chromosome movements and rotations is needed to complete prometaphase in 10-20 min while keeping erroneous merotelic attachments down to a few percent. The simulations also provide kinetic constraints for alternative error correction mechanisms, shed light on the dual role of chromosome arm volume, and compare well with experimental data for bipolar and multipolar HT-29 colorectal cancer cells.

  17. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Schaub

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  18. Problems in understanding the structure and assembly of viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Though viruses infect the cells of all groups of animals, plants, and microorganisms, their structures follow a limited number of general themes; spherical or cylindrical shells built of hundreds of repeated protein subunits enclosing a nucleic acid - DNA or RNA - genome. Since the 1960s it has been known that the protein shells of spherical viruses in fact conform to icosahedral symmetry or to subtle deviations from icosahedral symmetry. The construction of the shell lattices and the transformations they go through in the different stages of the viral life cycle are not fully understood. The shells contain the nucleic in a highly condensed state, of unknown coiling/organization. Features of the well studied bacterial viruses will be reviewed, with examples from adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poliovirus, and HIV. The emergence of new viral disease has led to increased interest in the development of agents which interfere with virus reproduction at the level of the assembly or function of the organized particle. Recently computational approaches to the problem of virus assembly have made important contributions to clarifying shell assembly processes. 1 ref.

  19. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael T; Billeh, Yazan N; Anastassiou, Costas A; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  20. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Mesoscopic structure prediction of nanoparticle assembly and coassembly: Theoretical foundation

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical framework that unifies polymer field theory and density functional theory in order to efficiently predict ordered nanostructure formation of systems having considerable complexity in terms of molecular structures and interactions. We validate our approach by comparing its predictions with previous simulation results for model systems. We illustrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to hybrid systems composed of block copolymers and ligand coated nanoparticles. We expect that our approach will enable the treatment of multicomponent self-assembly with a level of molecular complexity that approaches experimental systems. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Heating of Micro-protrusions in Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Keser, A C; Nusinovich, G S; Kashyn, D G; Jensen, K L

    2013-01-01

    The thermal and field emission of electrons from protrusions on metal surfaces is a possible limiting factor on the performance and operation of high-gradient room temperature accelerator structures. We present here the results of extensive numerical simulations of electrical and thermal behavior of protrusions. We unify the thermal and field emission in the same numerical framework, describe bounds for the emission current and geometric enhancement, then we calculate the Nottingham and Joule heating terms and solve the heat equation to characterize the thermal evolution of emitters under RF electric field. Our findings suggest that, heating is entirely due to the Nottingham effect, that thermal runaway scenarios are not likely, and that high RF frequency causes smaller swings in temperature and cooler tips. We build a phenomenological model to account for the effect of space charge and show that space charge eliminates the possibility of tip melting, although near melting temperatures reached.

  3. Growth of Structure in Theories of Cosmic Acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataneo, Matteo

    Various astrophysical data sets support the current standard model of cosmology, in which our universe is well-described on large scales by a cosmological constant Lambda and cold dark matter (CDM). The Lambda-CDM paradigm rests on two assumptions: (i) the cosmological principle; and that (ii......, gravitation being the dominant force at large distances. Under these premises, to explain the observed late-time accelerated expansion of the universe we need an exotic form of energy with large negative pressure, named dark energy. Lambda is the simplest candidate for this obscure ingredient......, and is currently associated with the energy density of the vacuum. Cold dark matter is the second most abundant constituent of the universe, even though it has not been detected yet. This slowly moving collection of particles forms the scaffolding of the stunning, luminous structures we see with our telescopes...

  4. RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a travelling wave disk-loaded accelerating structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Shi-Lun; CHI Yun-Long; ZHANG Jing-Ru; HOU Mi; LI Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The travelling wave (TW) disk-loaded accelerating structure is one of the key components in normal conducting (NC) linear accelerators,and has been studied for many years.In the design process,usually after the dimensions of each cell and the two couplers are finalized,the structure is fabricated and tuned,and then the whole structure RF characteristics are measured by using a vector network analyzer.Before fabrication,the whole structure characteristics (including RF,thermal and structural ones) are less simulated due to the limited capability of currently available computers.In this paper,we described a method for performing RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a TW disk-loaded structure using only one PC.In order to validate our method,we first analyzed and compared our RF simulation results on the 3 m long BEPC Ⅱ structure with the corresponding experimental results,which shows very good consistency.Finally,the RF-thermal-structure-RF coupled analysis results on the 1.35 m long NSC KIPT linac accelerating structure are presented.

  5. Sequence Planning for On-Orbit Assembly of Large Space Truss Structures in a Multirobot Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jifeng; WANG Ping; CUI Naigang

    2006-01-01

    An approach to sequence planning for on-orbit assembly of large space truss structures in a multirobot environment is presented. A hierarchical representation of large space truss structures at the structural volume element level and strut level is adopted. The representation of connectivity matrix and directed graph is respectively presented at the strut level and SVE level. The multirobot environment that consists of autonomous space robots and struts is supposed. Then the multirobot serial assembly strategy, assembly states, assembly tasks and assembly sequences are described. The assembly sequence planning algorithms at the strut level and SVE level are respectively discussed. The results of the simulations show that this approach is feasible and efficient. Two extensions of this approach include more accurate assessment of the efficiency representation and improvements in planning algorithm. In the future, the assembly sequence planning of more large space truss structures and complex multirobot environments and assembly tasks will be considered.

  6. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  7. Further finite element structural analysis of FAST Load Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frosi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.frosi@enea.it [Associazione Euratom ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Crescenzi, F.; Cucchiaro, A.; Roccella, S. [Associazione Euratom ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The FAST (Fusion Advanced Study Torus) machine is a compact high magnetic field tokamak, that will allow to study in an integrated way the main operational issues relating to plasma-wall interaction, plasma operation and burning plasma physics in conditions relevant for ITER and DEMO. The present work deals with the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for a proposed new plasma scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T), aimed to increase the operational limits of the machine. A previous paper has dealt with an integrated set of finite element models (regarding a former reference scenario: 6.5 MA – 7.5 T) of the load assembly, including the Toroidal and Poloidal Field Coils and the supporting structure. This set of models has regarded the evaluation of magnetic field values, the evaluation of the electromagnetic forces and the temperatures in all the current-carrying conductors: these analysis have been a preparatory step for the evaluation of the stresses of the main structural components. The previous models have been analyzed further on and improved in some details, including the computation of the out-of-plane electromagnetic forces coming from the interaction between the poloidal magnetic field and the current flowing in the toroidal magnets. After this updating, the structural analysis has been executed, where all forces and temperatures, coming from the formerly mentioned most demanding scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T) and acting on the tokamak's main components, have been considered. The two sets of analysis regarding the reference scenario and the extreme one have been executed and a useful comparison has been carried on. The analyses were carried out by using the FEM code Ansys rel. 13.

  8. Environmental Exposure and Accelerated Testing of Rubber-to-Metal Vulcanized Bonded Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    subjected to the hydrolytic stability test or when exposed to the severe climatic conditions at Panama. EPDM and nitrile vulcanized bonded-specimens...butadiene acrylonitrile rubber bonded Sassembliesshowed a severe loes of 100 percent in bond strength; the EPDM bond.ed assemblies shcwed a 40 percent lose...02 ~ 4 -0 04 0: 00 V 4 o ~no 󈧄 0 80 EPDM Spgcimens aged up to 450°F are .shown .in Table 7. At 3000F, all - bonding agents provided good retention

  9. An accelerated photo-magnetic imaging reconstruction algorithm based on an analytical forward solution and a fast Jacobian assembly method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouizi, F.; Erkol, H.; Luk, A.; Marks, M.; Unlu, M. B.; Gulsen, G.

    2016-10-01

    We previously introduced photo-magnetic imaging (PMI), an imaging technique that illuminates the medium under investigation with near-infrared light and measures the induced temperature increase using magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT). Using a multiphysics solver combining photon migration and heat diffusion, PMI models the spatiotemporal distribution of temperature variation and recovers high resolution optical absorption images using these temperature maps. In this paper, we present a new fast non-iterative reconstruction algorithm for PMI. This new algorithm uses analytic methods during the resolution of the forward problem and the assembly of the sensitivity matrix. We validate our new analytic-based algorithm with the first generation finite element method (FEM) based reconstruction algorithm previously developed by our team. The validation is performed using, first synthetic data and afterwards, real MRT measured temperature maps. Our new method accelerates the reconstruction process 30-fold when compared to a single iteration of the FEM-based algorithm.

  10. Origami tubes assembled into stiff, yet reconfigurable structures and metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, Evgueni T; Tachi, Tomohiro; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2015-10-06

    Thin sheets have long been known to experience an increase in stiffness when they are bent, buckled, or assembled into smaller interlocking structures. We introduce a unique orientation for coupling rigidly foldable origami tubes in a "zipper" fashion that substantially increases the system stiffness and permits only one flexible deformation mode through which the structure can deploy. The flexible deployment of the tubular structures is permitted by localized bending of the origami along prescribed fold lines. All other deformation modes, such as global bending and twisting of the structural system, are substantially stiffer because the tubular assemblages are overconstrained and the thin sheets become engaged in tension and compression. The zipper-coupled tubes yield an unusually large eigenvalue bandgap that represents the unique difference in stiffness between deformation modes. Furthermore, we couple compatible origami tubes into a variety of cellular assemblages that can enhance mechanical characteristics and geometric versatility, leading to a potential design paradigm for structures and metamaterials that can be deployed, stiffened, and tuned. The enhanced mechanical properties, versatility, and adaptivity of these thin sheet systems can provide practical solutions of varying geometric scales in science and engineering.

  11. Cell wall assembly and intracellular trafficking in plant cells are directly affected by changes in the magnitude of gravitational acceleration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Chebli

    Full Text Available Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in gravitational acceleration. To understand the effect of gravity on the metabolism and cellular functioning of non-specialized plant cells, we investigated a rapidly growing plant cell devoid of known statoliths and without gravitropic behavior, the pollen tube. The effects of hyper-gravity and omnidirectional exposure to gravity on intracellular trafficking and on cell wall assembly were assessed in Camellia pollen tubes, a model system with highly reproducible growth behavior in vitro. Using an epi-fluorescence microscope mounted on the Large Diameter Centrifuge at the European Space Agency, we were able to demonstrate that vesicular trafficking is reduced under hyper-gravity conditions. Immuno-cytochemistry confirmed that both in hyper and omnidirectional gravity conditions, the characteristic spatial profiles of cellulose and callose distribution in the pollen tube wall were altered, in accordance with a dose-dependent effect on pollen tube diameter. Our findings suggest that in response to gravity induced stress, the pollen tube responds by modifying cell wall assembly to compensate for the altered mechanical load. The effect was reversible within few minutes demonstrating that the pollen tube is able to quickly adapt to changing stress conditions.

  12. A structural and functional perspective of alphavirus replication and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Snyder, Jonathan E; Kuhn, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Alphaviruses are small, spherical, enveloped, positive-sense ssRNA viruses responsible for a considerable number of human and animal diseases. Alphavirus members include Chikungunya virus, Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, the western, eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, and the Ross River virus. Alphaviruses can cause arthritic diseases and encephalitis in humans and animals and continue to be a worldwide threat. The viruses are transmitted by blood-sucking arthropods, and replicate in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Alphaviruses form spherical particles (65-70 nm in diameter) with icosahedral symmetry and a triangulation number of four. The icosahedral structures of alphaviruses have been defined to very high resolutions by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallographic studies. In this review, we summarize the major events in alphavirus infection: entry, replication, assembly and budding. We focus on data acquired from structural and functional studies of the alphaviruses. These structural and functional data provide a broader perspective of the virus lifecycle and structure, and allow additional insight into these important viruses.

  13. Latin American collaboration to the CERN-LHC accelerator assembly and its projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Summary of Latin American (LA) scientists main contributions to the construction of a heavy ion detector assembly currently operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva,Switzerland is given with description of the provided support for posterior data analysis. This joint effort highlights the much needed recognition of LA as a technologically emerging region. It has also shown a net benefit in development of science for our region. Details are given on the LHC-Alice experiment where several LA countries have contributed with innovative technological solutions. These include the ability to build part of the numerous detectors, including the central barrel as well as acquired knowledge on aspects concerning high energy dosimetry and radiation damage. (Author)

  14. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  15. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serine/threonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, medi-ated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interac-tion with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  16. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YiGong

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serinetthreonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, mediated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interaction with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  17. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang; , Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2013-03-12

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  18. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  19. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Iraj, E-mail: i_jabbari@ast.ui.ac.ir [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 8174673441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 8174673441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Central Iran Research Complex, NSTRI, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein [Central Iran Research Complex, NSTRI, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-21

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  20. Accelerate!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  1. X-band Dielectric Loaded Rf Driven Accelerator Structures Theoretical And Experimental Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, P

    2001-01-01

    An important area of application of high-power radio frequency (RF) and microwave sources is particle acceleration. A major challenge for the current worldwide research and development effort in linear accelerator is the search for a compact and affordable very-high-energy accelerator technology for the next generation supercolliders. It has been recognized for sometime that dielectric loaded accelerator structures are attractive candidates for the next generation very-high-energy linear accelerators, because they possess several distinct advantages over conventional metallic iris- loaded accelerator structures. However, some fundamental issues, such as RF breakdown in the dielectric, Joule heating, and vacuum properties of dielectric materials, are still the subjects of intense investigation, requiring the validation by experiments conducted at high power levels. An X-band traveling-wave accelerator based on dielectric-lined waveguide has been designed and constructed. Numerical calculation, bench measuremen...

  2. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  3. Structural visualization of the p53/RNA polymerase II assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sameer K; Qiao, Zhen; Song, Lihua; Jani, Vijay; Rice, William; Eng, Edward; Coleman, Robert A; Liu, Wei-Li

    2016-11-15

    The master tumor suppressor p53 activates transcription in response to various cellular stresses in part by facilitating recruitment of the transcription machinery to DNA. Recent studies have documented a direct yet poorly characterized interaction between p53 and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Therefore, we dissected the human p53/Pol II interaction via single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, structural docking, and biochemical analyses. This study reveals that p53 binds Pol II via the Rpb1 and Rpb2 subunits, bridging the DNA-binding cleft of Pol II proximal to the upstream DNA entry site. In addition, the key DNA-binding surface of p53, frequently disrupted in various cancers, remains exposed within the assembly. Furthermore, the p53/Pol II cocomplex displays a closed conformation as defined by the position of the Pol II clamp domain. Notably, the interaction of p53 and Pol II leads to increased Pol II elongation activity. These findings indicate that p53 may structurally regulate DNA-binding functions of Pol II via the clamp domain, thereby providing insights into p53-regulated Pol II transcription.

  4. Crystal-Structure-Guided Design of Self-Assembling RNA Nanotriangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerneke, Mark A; Dibrov, Sergey M; Hermann, Thomas

    2016-03-14

    RNA nanotechnology uses RNA structural motifs to build nanosized architectures that assemble through selective base-pair interactions. Herein, we report the crystal-structure-guided design of highly stable RNA nanotriangles that self-assemble cooperatively from short oligonucleotides. The crystal structure of an 81 nucleotide nanotriangle determined at 2.6 Å resolution reveals the so-far smallest circularly closed nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The assembly of the nanotriangle architecture involved RNA corner motifs that were derived from ligand-responsive RNA switches, which offer the opportunity to control self-assembly and dissociation.

  5. Protein structure prediction: assembly of secondary structure elements by basin-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Vancea, Ioan; Kamat, Sanjay G; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-10-20

    The prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure remains a challenging task. One possible approach to this problem is the application of basin-hopping global optimization combined with an all-atom force field. In this work, the efficiency of basin-hopping is improved by introducing an approach that derives tertiary structures from the secondary structure assignments of individual residues. This approach is termed secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping and benchmarked for three miniproteins: trpzip, trp-cage and ER-10. For each of the three miniproteins, the secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping approach successfully and reliably predicts their three-dimensional structure. When it is applied to larger proteins, correctly folded structures are obtained. It can be concluded that the assembly of secondary structure elements using basin-hopping is a promising tool for de novo protein structure prediction.

  6. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  7. Hierarchical assembly may be a way to make large information-rich structures

    CERN Document Server

    Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly in the laboratory can now yield `information-rich' nanostructures in which each component is of a distinct type and has a defined spatial position. Ensuring the thermodynamic stability of such structures requires inter-component interaction energies to increase logarithmically with structure size, in order to counter the entropy gained upon mixing component types in solution. However, self-assembly in the presence of strong interactions results in general in kinetic trapping, so suggesting a limit to the size of an (equilibrium) structure that can be self-assembled from distinguishable components. Here we study numerically a two-dimensional hierarchical assembly scheme already considered in experiment. We show that this scheme is immune to the kinetic traps associated with strong `native' interactions (interactions designed to stabilize the intended structure), and so, in principle, offers a way to make large information-rich structures. In this scheme the size of an assembled structure scales e...

  8. Oceanographic structure drives the assembly processes of microbial eukaryotic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Comte, Jérôme; Babin, Marcel; Forest, Alexandre; Matsuoka, Atsushi; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-03-17

    Arctic Ocean microbial eukaryote phytoplankton form subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM), where much of the annual summer production occurs. This SCM is particularly persistent in the Western Arctic Ocean, which is strongly salinity stratified. The recent loss of multiyear sea ice and increased particulate-rich river discharge in the Arctic Ocean results in a greater volume of fresher water that may displace nutrient-rich saltier waters to deeper depths and decrease light penetration in areas affected by river discharge. Here, we surveyed microbial eukaryotic assemblages in the surface waters, and within and below the SCM. In most samples, we detected the pronounced SCM that usually occurs at the interface of the upper mixed layer and Pacific Summer Water (PSW). Poorly developed SCM was seen under two conditions, one above PSW and associated with a downwelling eddy, and the second in a region influenced by the Mackenzie River plume. Four phylogenetically distinct communities were identified: surface, pronounced SCM, weak SCM and a deeper community just below the SCM. Distance-decay relationships and phylogenetic structure suggested distinct ecological processes operating within these communities. In the pronounced SCM, picophytoplanktons were prevalent and community assembly was attributed to water mass history. In contrast, environmental filtering impacted the composition of the weak SCM communities, where heterotrophic Picozoa were more numerous. These results imply that displacement of Pacific waters to greater depth and increased terrigenous input may act as a control on SCM development and result in lower net summer primary production with a more heterotroph dominated eukaryotic microbial community.

  9. Temperature Triggered Structural Transitions in Surfactant organized Self Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J. Linet; Balamurugan, S.; Sajeevan, Ajin C.; Sreejith, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    Preparation & characterization of tunable fluids is an emerging area with potential application in many fields. Surfactants self assemble in aqueous solution to give a rich variety of phase structures, the size and shape of which can be tuned by additives like salts, alcohols, amines, aromatics etc or external stimuli such as light, temperature etc. The addition of long chain aliphatic alcohol has significant influence on the surfactant aggregation, as it promotes morphological growth of micelles. The cationic surfactant, Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) with nonanol in presence of potassium bromide (KBr) shows thermo tunable viscosity behaviour and optical switching behaviour. The solution is visually observed to transform from a turbid and less viscous phase at low temperature to clear and considerably viscous phase at high temperature. Temperature induced changes in turbidity and viscosity are consistent with the transition from vesicle to worm like micelle. It is also worth emphasizing that the transition is thermo reversible, so that vesicles that are disrupted into micelles upon heating can be reformed upon cooling. The thermo tunable transition from turbid to transparent state and the concomitant changes in viscosity are promising for the use in smart windows, monitoring of tumor growth or in other stimuli based application.

  10. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, S; Marcelli, A; Sarti, S; Dolgashev, V A; Tantawi, S; Yeremian, A D; Higashi, Y; Grimaldi, M G; Romano, L; Ruffino, F; Parodi, R; Cibin, G; Marrelli, C; Migliorati, M; Caliendo, C

    2012-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders. To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress. In this contribution we describe chemical composition, deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering. The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value. Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering, XANES and photoemission spectroscopy. We will also present a three cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer $\\sim$ 500 nm thick designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  11. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Bini; B.Spataro; A.Marcelli; S.Sarti; V.A.Dolgashev; S.Tantawi; A.D.Yeremian

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders.To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress.In this contribution we describe chemical composition,deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering.The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value.Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering,XANES and photoemission spectroscopy.We will also consider multiple cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  12. High Voltage Operation of Helical Pulseline Structures for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, William; Reginato, Lou

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept for the acceleration of heavy ions using a helical pulseline requires the launching of a high voltage traveling wave with a waveform determined by the beam transport physics in order to maintain stability and acceleration.* This waveform is applied to the front of the helix, creating over the region of the ion bunch a constant axial acceleration electric field that travels down the line in synchronism with the ions. Several methods of driving the helix have been considered. Presently, the best method of generating the waveform and also maintaining the high voltage integrity appears to be a transformer primary loosely coupled to the front of the helix, generating the desired waveform and achieving a voltage step-up from primary to secondary (the helix). This can reduce the drive voltage that must be brought into the helix enclosure through the feedthroughs by factors of 5 or more. The accelerating gradient is limited by the voltage holding of the vacuum insulator, and the material and helix g...

  13. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  14. Tuning The Cells Of The Accelerating Structure With Rf-quadrupole Doublets

    CERN Document Server

    Bomko, V A; Dyachenko, A F; Kobets, A F; Marynina, E D; Ptukhina, Z E; Tishkin, S S; Zajtsev, B V

    2004-01-01

    The versions of the high frequency quadrupole doublets (RFQD) in heavy ion linear accelerators are discussed. Advantages of focusing of this type over magnetic quadrupoles lie in the simplicity of the structure, and high efficiency and reliability of focusing. In the multi-gap structures, focusing periods contain a sequence of focusing and accelerating cells. The elaborated technique of the local cell adjustment provides the high acceleration rate. Various RFQD versions for the specific peculiarities of accelerating interdigital H-structures are dicussed. Application of the RFQD will allow to increase the efficiency of ion beam focusing and to expand the energy range of the ion being accelerated over 10 MeV/u.

  15. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimidula, A. [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA44AD (United Kingdom); Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S., E-mail: bsxie@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Welsch, C. P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA44AD (United Kingdom); Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Xia, G.; Mete, O. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA44AD (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokai 319-1188 (Japan); Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  16. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  17. Assembly and Test of a Support Structure for 3.5 m Long Nb3Sn Racetrack Coils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin,P.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.W.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Lietzke, A.F.; Lizarazo, J.; Muratore, J.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Thomas, R.; Wanderer, P.J.

    2007-08-27

    The LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is currently developing 4 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnets for a possible upgrade of the LHC Interaction Regions (IR). In order to provide a reliable test bed for the fabrication and test of long Nb{sub 3}Sn coils, LARP has started the development of the long racetrack magnet LRS01. The magnet is composed of two 3.6 m long racetrack coils contained in a support structure based on an aluminum shell pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders and interference keys. For the phase-one test of the assembly procedure and loading operation, the structure was pre-stressed at room temperature and cooled down to 77 K with instrumented, solid aluminum 'dummy coils'. Mechanical behavior and stress homogeneity were monitored with strain gauges mounted on the shell and the dummy coils. The dummy coils were replaced with reacted and impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn coils in a second assembly procedure, followed by cool-down to 4.5 K and powered magnet test. This paper reports on the assembly and loading procedures of the support structure as well as the comparison between strain gauge data and 3D model predictions.

  18. Assembly and Test of a Support Structure for 3.6 m Long Nb3Sn Racetrack Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.W.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Lietzke, A.F.; Lizarazo, J.; Muratore, J.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Thomas, R.; Wanderer, P.J.; Ferracin, P.

    2008-06-01

    The LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is currently developing 4 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnets for a possible upgrade of the LHC Interaction Regions (IR). In order to provide a reliable test bed for the fabrication and test of long Nb{sub 3}Sn coils, LARP has started the development of the long racetrack magnet LRS01. The magnet is composed of two 3.6 m long racetrack coils contained in a support structure based on an aluminum shell pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders and interference keys. For the phase-one test of the assembly procedure and loading operation, the structure was pre-stressed at room temperature and cooled down to 77 K with instrumented, solid aluminum 'dummy coils'. Mechanical behavior and stress homogeneity were monitored with strain gauges mounted on the shell and the dummy coils. The dummy coils were replaced with reacted and impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn coils in a second assembly procedure, followed by cool-down to 4.5 K and powered magnet test. This paper report on the assembly and loading procedures of the support structure as well as the comparison between strain gauge data and 3D model predictions.

  19. Self-assembly of conjugated oligomers and polymers at the interface: structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lirong; Yang, Liu; Lei, Shengbin

    2012-08-01

    In this review, we give a brief account on the recent scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of interfacial structures and properties of π-conjugated semiconducting oligomers and polymers, either at the solid-air (including solid-vacuum) or at the solid-liquid interface. The structural aspects of the self-assembly of both oligomers and polymers are highlighted. Conjugated oligomers can form well ordered supramolecular assemblies either at the air-solid or liquid-solid interface, thanks to the relatively high mobility and structural uniformity in comparison with polymers. The backbone structure, substitution of side chains and functional groups can affect the assembling behavior significantly, which offers the opportunity to tune the supramolecular structure of these conjugated oligomers at the interface. For conjugated polymers, the large molecular weight limits the mobility on the surface and the distribution in size also prevents the formation of long range ordered supramolecular assembly. The submolecular resolution obtained on the assembling monolayers enables a detailed investigation of the chain folding at the interface, both the structural details and the effect on electronic properties. Besides the ability in studying the assembling structures at the interfaces, STM also provides a reasonable way to evaluate the distribution of the molecular weight of conjugated polymers by statistic of the contour length of the adsorbed polymer chains. Both conjugated oligomers and polymers can form composite assemblies with other materials. The ordered assembly of oligomers can act as a template to controllably disperse other molecules such as coronene or fullerene. These investigations open a new avenue to fine tune the assembling structure at the interface and in turn the properties of the composite materials. To summarize scanning tunneling microscopy has demonstrated its surprising ability in the investigation of the assembling structures and properties of

  20. Improving rotation behaviour of robotic structures for micro-assembly.

    OpenAIRE

    Hériban, David; Thiebault, Arnaud; Gauthier, Michaël; Fortier, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Serial micro-assembly requires high precision robots able to produce translations and rotations to position and orient objects during assembly. In micro-scale, the translation ranges required are typically up to the millimeter and can be obtained with smart devices (piezomotor, etc...). In the other hand, the rotation ranges stay identical to the macroscale (eg. 90°) and require standard guidings like ball bearings which induce disturbances on the linear position. Thus...

  1. SLAB symmetric dielectric micron scale structures for high gradient electron acceleration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-06-12

    A class of planar microstructure is proposed which provide high accelerating gradients when excited by an infrared laser pulse. These structures consist of parallel dielectric slabs separated by a vacuum gap; the dielectric or the outer surface coating are spatially modulated at the laser wavelength along the beam direction so as to support a standing wave accelerating field. We have developed numerical and analytic models of the accelerating mode fields in the structure. We show an optimized coupling scheme such that this mode is excited resonantly with a large quality factor. The status of planned experiments on fabricating and measuring these planar structures will be described.

  2. Design and validation of wireless acceleration sensor network for structural health monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yan; Ou Jinping

    2006-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is proposed to monitor the acceleration of structures for the purpose of structural health monitoring of civil engineering structures. Using commercially available parts, several modules are constructed and integrated into complete wireless sensors and base stations. The communication protocol is designed and the fusion arithmetic of the temperature and acceleration is embedded in the wireless sensor node so that the measured acceleration values are more accurate. Measures are adopted to finish energy optimization, which is an important issue for a wireless sensor network. The test is performed on an offshore platform model, and the experimental results are given to show the feasibility of the designed wireless sensor network.

  3. Particle motion of accelerated electrons in standing-wave RF structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, A. F. J.; Corstens, J. M.; Botman, J. I. M.; Hagedoorn, H. L.; Theuws, W. H. C.

    1999-05-01

    A Hamiltonian theory has been formulated, which is used to calculate accelerated particle motion in standing-wave RF structures. In particular, these calculations have been applied to the Eindhoven racetrack microtron accelerating cavity. The calculations are in excellent agreement with simulations performed by particle-tracking codes.

  4. Symposium on the Occassion of 70th Birthday of Juwen Wang : High Gradient Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings volume, for the symposium in honor of Junwen Wang's 70th anniversary, is dedicated to his many important achievements in the field of accelerator physics.It includes the discussions of recent advances and challenging problems in the field of high gradient accelerating structure development.

  5. EM characterization of Damping materials for CLIC RF accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) characterization of materials up to high frequencies is a major requirement for the correct modelling of many accelerator components: collimators, kickers, high order modes damping devices for accelerating cavities. Different methods and techniques have been used in the past and a unique setup for all kind of materials and frequencies range does not exist. In this note the details of our measurements setup and the different applied methods are described. This work will focus on the coaxial line setup that can be used in a wide range of frequencies. Reflection and transmission methods will be analyzed and discussed. Measurements of silicon carbide (SiC) CerasicB1, EkasicF and EkasicP will be presented

  6. Parameters of the Disk Loaded Waveguide structure for intermediate particles acceleration in the intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, V

    2013-01-01

    The Disk Loaded Waveguide (DLW) is the mostly used high frequency structure for acceleration of lightweight particles - electrons in the high energy range. In some physical experiments acceleration of more heavy particles - muons to medium energies is required. DLW parameters are considered for particle velocity 0.04 < \\beta < 1 both for the fundamental and the nearest backward spatial harmonics. Physical and technical restrictions for DLW application in the low \\beta range and lower frequency (the L-band range) are analyzed. Basing on particularities of acceleration with Traveling Wave (TW), deep optimization of DLW cells dimensions, the choice of optimal operating phase advance for each DLW section and combination of forward and backward TW modes, it is possible to create simple, cost effective acceleration system for acceleration in the velocity range 0.2 < \\beta < 1 intermediate particles, in some parameters overcoming accelerating system with RF cavities in Standing Wave (SW) mode. Design cri...

  7. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  8. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  9. rf breakdown measurements in electron beam driven 200 GHz copper and copper-silver accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; O'Shea, Brendan; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in subterahertz high-gradient traveling-wave accelerating structures. We present the experimental results of rf tests of 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, made of copper and copper-silver. These experiments were carried out at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. The traveling-wave structure is an open geometry, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated by a gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 160 to 235 GHz. When the beam travels off axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the longitudinal field. We measure the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and use this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. Furthermore, we present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures. The breakdown rate of the copper structure is 10-2 per pulse, with a peak surface electric field of 500 MV /m and a rf pulse length of 0.3 ns, which at a relatively large gap of 1.5 mm, or one wavelength, corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 56 MV /m . For the same breakdown rate, the copper-silver structure has a peak electric field of 320 MV /m at a pulse length of 0.5 ns. For a gap of 1.1 mm, or 0.74 wavelengths, this corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 50 MV /m .

  10. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, B.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Alesini, D.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Chimenti, V.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC; Haase, A.; /SLAC; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Marrelli, C.; /Rome U.; Mostacci, A.; /Rome U.; Parodi, R.; /INFN, Genoa; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  11. Technological issues and high gradient test results on X-band molybdenum accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, B., E-mail: bruno.spataro@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V. [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Higashi, Y. [KEK 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A. [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Fundamental and Applied Science for Engineering, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00185 Rome (Italy); Parodi, R. [INFN-Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Yeremian, A.D. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-11-21

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  12. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  13. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-22

    This report consists of two parts. In the first part we describe a study of the heating of microprotrusions on surfaces of accelerating structures. This ;process is believed to lead to breakdown in these structures. Our study revealed that for current accelerator parameters melting should not occur due to space charge limitations of the current emitted by a protrusion. The second part describes a novel concept to develop THz range sources based on harmonic cyclotron masers for driving future colliders. This work was stimulated by a recent request of SLAC to develop high power, high-efficiency sources of sub-THz radiation for future high-gradient accelerators.

  14. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to improve...

  15. Dynamic transformation of self-assembled structures using anisotropic magnetized hydrogel microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Satoru; Takinoue, Masahiro; Iwase, Eiji; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a system through which the self-assembly of anisotropic hydrogel microparticles is achieved, which also enables dynamic transformation of the assembled structures. Using a centrifuge-based microfluidic device, anisotropic hydrogel microparticles encapsulating superparamagnetic materials on one side are fabricated, which respond to a magnetic field. We successfully achieve dynamic assembly using these hydrogel microparticles and realize three different self-assembled structures (single and double pearl chain structures, and close-packed structures), which can be transformed to other structures dynamically via tuning of the precessional magnetic field. We believe that the developed system has potential application as an effective platform for a dynamic cell manipulation and cultivation system, in biomimetic autonomous microrobot organization, and that it can facilitate further understanding of the self-organization and complex systems observed in nature.

  16. Efficient low-beta H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency room-temperature RF accelerating structures for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light by merging two well-known ideas: H-mode cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we have found that the H-mode structures with PMQ focusing provide a very efficient and practical accelerator for light-ion beams of considerable currents. Such accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications such as a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of a few MeV.

  17. Collisionless shocks in space plasmas structure and accelerated particles

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are an important feature of solar system plasmas, from the solar corona out to the edge of the heliosphere. This engaging introduction to collisionless shocks in space plasmas presents a comprehensive review of the physics governing different types of shocks and processes of particle acceleration, from fundamental principles to current research. Motivated by observations of planetary bow shocks, interplanetary shocks and the solar wind termination shock, it emphasises the physical theory underlying these shock waves. Readers will develop an understanding of the complex interplay between particle dynamics and the electric and magnetic fields that explains the observations of in situ spacecraft. Written by renowned experts in the field, this up-to-date text is the ideal companion for both graduate students new to heliospheric physics and researchers in astrophysics who wish to apply the lessons of solar system shocks to different astrophysical environments.

  18. Acceleration of Amide Bond Rotation by Encapsulation in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Water-Soluble Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-08

    The hydrophobic interior cavity of a self-assembled supramolecular assembly exploits the hydrophobic effect for the encapsulation of tertiary amides. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments reveal that the free energy barrier for rotation around the C-N amide bond is lowered by up to 3.6 kcal/mol upon encapsulation. The hydrophobic cavity of the assembly is able to stabilize the less polar transition state of the amide rotation process. Carbon-13 labeling studies showed that the {sup 13}C NMR carbonyl resonance increases with temperature for the encapsulated amides which suggests that the assembly is able to favor a twisted for of the amide.

  19. Assembly and structure of neurofilaments isolated from bovine spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟向军; 陈建国; 刘洁; 庞世瑾; 翟中和

    1999-01-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are neuron-specific intermediate filaments. The NFs were isolated from bovine spinal cord by differential centrifugation. The NFs were detected with electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Under STM, two kinds of sidearm of NFs were revealed: one was short, the other was long. They were arrayed along the 10-nm width core filaments one by one. The intervals between two adjacent long sidearms or two short sidearms were 20—22 nm, while those between two adjacent long and short sidearms were 10—11 nm. It was proposed that the rod domain of NF triplet prnteins was 3/4-staggered. The assembly properties of NF triplet proteins were also studied. Immuno-colloidal-gold labeling assay showed that NF-M and NF-H are able to co-assemble into long filaments with NF-L. NF-M and NF-H can also co-constitute into winding filaments.

  20. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, William M.; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such “addressable complexity,” we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  1. Coherent phase space matching for staging plasma and traditional accelerator using longitudinally tailored plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Hogan, M J

    2014-01-01

    For the further development of plasma based accelerators, phase space matching between plasma acceleration stages and between plasma stages and traditional accelerator components becomes a very critical issue for high quality high energy acceleration and its applications in light sources and colliders. Without proper matching, catastrophic emittance growth in the presence of finite energy spread may occur when the beam propagating through different stages and components due to the drastic differences of transverse focusing strength. In this paper we propose to use longitudinally tailored plasma structures as phase space matching components to properly guide the beam through stages. Theoretical analysis and full 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are utilized to show clearly how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Very good agreements between theory and simulations are obtained.

  2. Thermal joining studies of CLIC accelerating structures and Establishment of a test bench and studies of thermomechanical behaviour of a CLIC two beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    The assembly procedure of the CLIC accelerating structures is constituted of several steps, involving ultra-precision machining, heating cycles at very high temperatures and many quality controls necessary to fulfil the very tight technical requirements. Diverse issues are related to the diffusion bonding process of CLIC accelerating structures; due to diffusion creep mechanisms occurring at high temperature and low stress, residual deformations might be present at the end of the joining process. A theoretical and experimental approach is presented here in order to understand this issue further and feedback on the design process. As a second issue tackled here, the final alignment of CLIC is also affected by the power dissipation occurring in the module during the normal operation modes and resulting in time-varying non-uniform thermal fields. The thermo-mechanical models of CLIC two-beam modules developed in the past are then useful to predict the structural deformations affecting the final alignment of the ...

  3. Self-Assembly of Ternary Particles for Tough Colloidal Crystals with Vivid Structure Colors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binfu Bao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly of colloidal spheres is the most frequently used method for structural colors, but the chroma of the structural colors is usually so low that people cannot observe it under natural conditions. This paper presents a facile method for fabrications of vivid structural colors by doping carbon black into the self-assembly of colloidal polymer spheres and nanosilica particles. This approach can generate very gorgeous structural colors which can be very easily seen under natural conditions. The fabrication conditions for the self-assembly of composite dispersions of polymer/silica/carbon black were optimized to obtain colloidal crystals with vivid colors. Thus, robust mechanical properties, large-scale, and brilliant structural colors can guarantee the obtained crystal films to find practical applications, which are demonstrated by the fact that the successful applications of structural colors beautify the original simple and tedious surface of bamboo strand board (BSB.

  4. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1.

  5. An Update on the DOE Early Career Project on Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Madrid, Michael A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Frank P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tuzel, Walter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boulware , Chase H. [Niowave, Inc; Grimm, Terry [Niowave, Inc.

    2012-06-07

    We performed fabrication of two SRF PBG resonators at 2.1 GHz and demonstrated their proof-of-principle operation at high gradients. Measured characteristics of the resonators were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrated that SRF PBG cavities can be operated at 15 MV/m accelerating gradients. We completed the design and started fabrication of the 16-cell PBG accelerating structure at 11.7 GHz for wakefield testing at AWA.

  6. Summary Report of Working Group 7: Electromagnetic-Structure Based Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, E.; /SLAC; Musumeci, P.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-02

    We detail the most pressing physics and technical issues confronting short-wavelength acceleration. We review new acceleration concepts that are proposed and under development, and recent progress on technical issues such as structure fabrication and material damage. We outline key areas where work is still needed before a reliable assessment of the value of working at wavelengths below 1 cm can be made. Possible ways to enhance collaboration and progress in this important area are also discussed.

  7. H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O'Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H-mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

  8. Cherenkov radiation and dielectric based accelerating structures: Wakefield generation, power extraction and energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanareykin, Alexei

    2010-06-01

    We present here our recent results of the Euclid Techlabs LLC/Argonne National Laboratory/St.Petersburg Electrotechnical University "LETI" collaboration on wakefield high energy acceleration of electron bunches in dielectric based accelerating structures. This program concentrates primarily on Cherenkov radiation studies providing efficient high energy generation aimed at a future 1 TeV collider. We report here on recent experiments in high power Cherenkov radiation and corresponding dielectric material developments and characterizations. Progress in diamond, quartz and microwave low-loss ceramic structure development in GHz and THz frequency ranges is presented. Beam Breakup effects and transverse bunch stability are discussed as well. We e report on recent progress on tunable dielectric based structure development. A special subject of our paper is transformer ratio enhancement schemes providing energy transfer efficiency for the dielectric based wakefield acceleration.

  9. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andrews, Heather Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Conclusions and future plans are: LANL is funded to do dielectric accelerator research starting in FY17; Preliminary studied identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs: high beam current and small emittance; Additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths: Fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials; We start in October and welcome collaborations: DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  10. Thermal and structural stability of medium energy target carrier assembly for NOvA at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Ader, C.; Anderson, K.; Hylen, J.; Martens, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The NOvA project will upgrade the existing Neutrino at Main Injector (NuMI) project beamline at Fermilab to accommodate beam power of 700 kW. The Medium Energy (ME) graphite target assembly is provided through an accord with the State Research Center of Russia Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) at Protvino, Russia. The effects of proton beam energy deposition within beamline components are considered as thermal stability of the target carrier assembly and alignment budget are critical operational issues. Results of finite element thermal and structural analysis involving the target carrier assembly is provided with detail regarding the target's beryllium windows.

  11. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Lombriser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar–tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar–tensor modification of gravity.

  12. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar-tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  13. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-06-26

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies.

  14. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-08-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within +/-3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m-1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  15. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C E; Adli, E; Allen, J; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Xu, X; Yakimenko, V

    2016-08-16

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m(-1) to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  16. Cumulative Laws,Team Assembling Mechanisms Determining Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; LIU Qi; YE Qi

    2008-01-01

    A number of researching works have shed light on the field of complex networks recently.We investigate a wide range of real-world networks and find several interesting phenomena.Firstly,almost all of these networks evolve by overlapping new small graphs on former networks.Secondly,not only the degree sequence of the mature network follows a power-law distribution,but also the distribution of the cumulative occurrence times during the growing process are revealed to have a heavy tail.Existing network evolving models do not provide interpretation to these phenomena.We suggest a model based on the team assembling mechanism,which is extracted from the growing processes of real-world networks and requires simple parameters,and produces networks exhibiting these properties observed in the present study and in previous works.

  17. Self-assembly of hierarchically ordered structures in DNA nanotube systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Martin; Schnauß, Jörg; Tschirner, Teresa; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Moebius-Winkler, Maximilian; Käs, Josef A.; Smith, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The self-assembly of molecular and macromolecular building blocks into organized patterns is a complex process found in diverse systems over a wide range of size and time scales. The formation of star- or aster-like configurations, for example, is a common characteristic in solutions of polymers or other molecules containing multi-scaled, hierarchical assembly processes. This is a recurring phenomenon in numerous pattern-forming systems ranging from cellular constructs to solutions of ferromagnetic colloids or synthetic plastics. To date, however, it has not been possible to systematically parameterize structural properties of the constituent components in order to study their influence on assembled states. Here, we circumvent this limitation by using DNA nanotubes with programmable mechanical properties as our basic building blocks. A small set of DNA oligonucleotides can be chosen to hybridize into micron-length DNA nanotubes with a well-defined circumference and stiffness. The self-assembly of these nanotubes to hierarchically ordered structures is driven by depletion forces caused by the presence of polyethylene glycol. This trait allowed us to investigate self-assembly effects while maintaining a complete decoupling of density, self-association or bundling strength, and stiffness of the nanotubes. Our findings show diverse ranges of emerging structures including heterogeneous networks, aster-like structures, and densely bundled needle-like structures, which compare to configurations found in many other systems. These show a strong dependence not only on concentration and bundling strength, but also on the underlying mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Similar network architectures to those caused by depletion forces in the low-density regime are obtained when an alternative hybridization-based bundling mechanism is employed to induce self-assembly in an isotropic network of pre-formed DNA nanotubes. This emphasizes the universal effect inevitable

  18. Self-Assembly of Nanocomponents into Composite Structures: Derivation and Simulation of Langevin Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pankavich, Stephen; Miao, Yinglong; Ortoleva, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on ...

  19. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Chingakham R. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan [University of Kansas, Del Shankel Structural Biology Center, Lawrence, KS 66047 (United States); Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P. [IMCA-CAT Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 435A, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Roelofs, Jeroen, E-mail: jroelofs@ksu.edu [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  20. Fibrillar structures formed by covalently bound, short, β-stranded peptides on self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Jason W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-03-24

    The ability to maintain or reproduce biomolecular structures on inorganic substrates has the potential to impact diverse fields such as sensing and molecular electronics, as well as the study of biological self-assembly and structure-function relationships. Because the structure and self-assembly of biomolecules are exquisitely sensitive to their local chemical and electrostatic environment, the goal of reproducing or mimicking biological function in an abiological environment, including at a surface, is challenging. However, simple and well-characterized chemical modifications of prepared surfaces can be used to tune surface chemistry, structure, electrostatics, and reactivity of inorganic materials to facilitate biofunctionalization and function. Here, we describe the covalent attachment of 13-residue β-stranded peptides containing alkyne groups to a flat gold surface functionalized with an azide-terminated self-assembled monolayer through a Huisgen cycloaddition, or "click", reaction. The chemical composition and structural morphology of these surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incidence angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroism, and atomic force microscopy. The surface-bound β-strands self-assemble into antiparallel β-sheets to form fibrillar structures 24.9 ± 1.6 nm in diameter and 2.83 ± 0.74 nm in height on the reactive surface. The results herein provide a platform for studying and controlling the self-assembly process of biomolecules into larger supermolecular structures while allowing tunable control through chemical functionalization of the surface. Interest in the mechanisms of formation of fibrillar structures has most commonly been associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, but fibrils may actually represent the thermodynamic low-energy conformation of a much larger class of peptides and proteins. The protocol developed here is an

  1. Exact Length Distribution of Filamentous Structures Assembled from a Finite Pool of Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbage, David; Kondev, Jané

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling filamentous structures made of protein subunits are ubiquitous in cell biology. These structures are often highly dynamic, with subunits in a continuous state of flux, binding to and falling off of filaments. In spite of this constant turnover of their molecular parts, many cellular structures seem to maintain a well-defined size over time, which is often required for their proper functioning. One widely discussed mechanism of size regulation involves the cell maintaining a finite pool of protein subunits available for assembly. This finite pool mechanism can control the length of a single filament by having assembly proceed until the pool of free subunits is depleted to the point when assembly and disassembly are balanced. Still, this leaves open the question of whether the same mechanism can provide size control for multiple filamentous structures that are assembled from a common pool of protein subunits, as is often the case in cells. We address this question by solving the steady-state master equation governing the stochastic assembly and disassembly of multifilament structures made from a shared finite pool of subunits. We find that, while the total number of subunits within a multifilament structure is well-defined, individual filaments within the structure have a wide, power-law distribution of lengths. We also compute the phase diagram for two multifilament structures competing for the same pool of subunits and identify conditions for coexistence when both have a well-defined size. These predictions can be tested in cell experiments in which the size of the subunit pool or the number of filament nucleators is tuned.

  2. Nanoscale superstructures assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): programmable construction, structural diversity, and emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Hua; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-11-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an essential tool in biotechnology laboratories and is becoming increasingly important in other areas of research. Extensive data obtained over the last 12 years has shown that the combination of PCR with nanoscale dispersions can resolve issues in the preparation DNA-based materials that include both inorganic and organic nanoscale components. Unlike conventional DNA hybridization and antibody-antigen complexes, PCR provides a new, effective assembly platform that both increases the yield of DNA-based nanomaterials and allows researchers to program and control assembly with predesigned parameters including those assisted and automated by computers. As a result, this method allows researchers to optimize to the combinatorial selection of the DNA strands for their nanoparticle conjugates. We have developed a PCR approach for producing various nanoscale assemblies including organic motifs such as small molecules, macromolecules, and inorganic building blocks, such as nanorods (NRs), metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). We start with a nanoscale primer and then modify that building block using the automated steps of PCR-based assembly including initialization, denaturation, annealing, extension, final elongation, and final hold. The intermediate steps of denaturation, annealing, and extension are cyclic, and we use computer control so that the assembled superstructures reach their predetermined complexity. The structures assembled using a small number of PCR cycles show a lower polydispersity than similar discrete structures obtained by direct hybridization between the nanoscale building blocks. Using different building blocks, we assembled the following structural motifs by PCR: (1) discrete nanostructures (NP dimers, NP multimers including trimers, pyramids, tetramers or hexamers, etc.), (2) branched NP superstructures and heterochains, (3) NP satellite-like superstructures, (4) Y-shaped nanostructures and DNA

  3. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  4. Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Carron, G; Luong, M; Millich, Antonio; Rugo, E; Syratchev, I V; Thorndahl, L

    2000-01-01

    For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 ms pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed for the CLIC main beam, and the "Slotted Iris - Constant Aperture" structure. Both use 4 SiC loads per cell for effective higher-order mode damping. A full-size prototype of the TDS structure has been built and tested successfully at full power. A first prototype of the SICA structure is being built

  5. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sanchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-di...

  6. Role of rf electric and magnetic fields in heating of micro-protrusions in accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nusinovich, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    It is known that high-gradient operation in metallic accelerating structures causes significant deterioration of structure surfaces that, in turn, greatly increases the probability of microwave breakdown. At the same time, the physical reason for this deterioration so far is not well understood. In the present paper, the role of two effects is analyzed, viz. (a) the microwave heating caused by penetration of the rf magnetic field into microprotrusion of a radius on the order of the skin depth and (b) the Joule heating caused by the field emitted current, i.e. the effect of the rf electric field magnified by a sharp protrusion. Corresponding expressions for the power densities of both effects are derived and the criterion for evaluating the dominance of one of these two is formulated. This criterion is analyzed and illustrated by the discussion of an example with parameters typical for recent experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory.

  7. Engineering design and fabrication of tapered damped X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Solodko, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Grudiev, A; Atieh, S; Taborelli, M

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating structures (AS) are one of the main components of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC), under study at CERN. Each accelerating structure contains about 30 copper discs, which form the accelerating cavity. The requirements of different technical systems, such as vacuum and cooling, have to be considered during the engineering design. A fully featured AS is very challenging and requires several technologies. Different damping methods, waveguides, vacuum manifolds, slots and chokes, result in various design configurations. In the CLIC AS each cell is damped by means of four waveguides coupled to the cell. The vacuum manifolds combine a number of functions such as damping, vacuum pumping and cooling. A silicon carbide absorber, fixed inside of each manifold, is required for effective damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). This paper describes the engineering design of the X-band AS with damping material, and focuses on few technical solutions.

  8. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Gallé, G.; Scott, S. A.; Pérez, J. R. Sánchez; Lagally, M. G.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Faure, J.

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  9. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  10. Parallel dynamics and evolution: Protein conformational fluctuations and assembly reflect evolutionary changes in sequence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure is dynamic: the intrinsic flexibility of polypeptides facilitates a range of conformational fluctuations, and individual protein chains can assemble into complexes. Proteins are also dynamic in evolution: significant variations in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure can be observed among divergent members of a protein family. Recent work has highlighted intriguing similarities between these structural and evolutionary dynamics occurring at various levels. Here we review evidence showing how evolutionary changes in protein sequence and structure are often closely related to local protein flexibility and disorder, large-scale motions and quaternary structure assembly. We suggest that these correspondences can be largely explained by neutral evolution, while deviations between structural and evolutionary dynamics can provide valuable functional insights. Finally, we address future prospects for the field and practical applications that arise from a deeper understanding of the intimate relationship between protein structure, dynamics, function and evolution.

  11. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel assembly of the PWR nuclear power plant is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the fuel assembly (FA of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant-1 (CHASNUPP-1 at room temperature in air. The non-linear contact and structural tensile analysis have been performed using ANSYS 13.0, in order to determine the fuel assembly (FA elongation behaviour as well as the location and values of the stress intensity and stresses developed in axial direction under applied tensile load of 9800 N or 2 g being the fuel assembly handling or lifting load [Y. Zhang et al., Fuel assembly design report, SNERDI, China, 1994]. The finite element (FE model comprises spacer grids, fuel rods, flexible contacts between the fuel rods and grid's supports system and guide thimbles with dash-pots and flow holes, in addition to the spot welds between spacer grids and guide thimbles, has been developed using Shell181, Conta174 and Targe170 elements. FA is a non-straight structure. The actual behavior of the geometry is non-linear due to its curvature or design tolerance. It has been observed that fuel assembly elongation values obtained through FE analysis and experiment [SNERDI Tech. Doc., Mechanical strength and calculation for fuel assembly, Technical Report, F3.2.1, China, 1994] under applied tensile load are comparable and show approximately linear behaviors. Therefore, it seems that the permanent elongation of fuel assembly may not occur at the specified load. Moreover, the values of stresses obtained at different locations of the fuel assembly are also comparable with the stress values of the experiment determined at the same locations through strain gauges. Since the results of both studies (analytical and experimental are comparable, therefore, validation of the FE methodology is confirmed. The stress intensity of the FE model and maximum stresses developed along the guide thimbles in axial direction are

  12. Phase-mixing self-injection into wakefield acceleration structure driven in a rising density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    We model the phase-mixing self-injection of electrons into the plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a longitudinally rising density gradient. In several laser-plasma acceleration experiments a long tail of accelerated electrons of different energies is experimentally observed. Self-injection is the process where some of the plasma electrons lose coherence with the wave due to non-linearities. The non-linearity is inherently and intentionally induced in the plasma oscillations due to the variation of the restoring force along the rising density gradient. These electrons then get trapped in and propagate with the accelerating phase of the plasma-wave. The onset of trapping is shown to scale with the gradient of the rising density and the amplitude of oscillations using the phase-mixing model. We computationally verify the phase-mixing model in planar geometry using PIC codes. The trapping of electrons in cylindrical electron plasma oscillations in the non-linear regime is verified with scaling similar to the planar geometry phase-mixing model. A full theory of longitudinal phase-mixing of radial oscillations is currently underway. The importance of this work for laser-plasma acceleration lies in consistently accelerating just the desired mono-energetic bunch. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0010012 and the National Science Foundation under NSF-PHY-0936278. Done...processed 1928 records...14:16:38

  13. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  14. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-12-01

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here, we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic-level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry and small angle X-ray scattering revealed alternative assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will probably require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. These results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.

  15. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  16. Prediction of welding distortion during assembly process of thin plate structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yu; Deng De'an; Jiang Xiaoling

    2005-01-01

    Ships and automobiles are fabricated from thin plates. To assemble parts, welding is commonly employed.However, welding distortion in large thin-plate panel structure is usually cased by buckling due to the residual stress. In this study, an elastic finite element method for predicting the welding distortion of three-dimensional thin-plate structures with considering welding sequence was proposed. In this method, the inherent strain was employed to model the local shrinkage due to welding itself, and the interface element was introduced to simulate the assembly process. The proposed method was applied to study the influence of welding sequence on the buckling distortion of the large thin-plate panel structure during assembly.

  17. Crystal structure of an invertebrate cytolysin pore reveals unique properties and mechanism of assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Savory, Peter; Rojko, Nejc; Kisovec, Matic; Wood, Neil; Hambley, Richard; Pugh, Jonathan; Wallace, E. Jayne; McNeill, Luke; Bruce, Mark; Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M.; Mehmood, Shahid; Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Robinson, Carol V.; Jayasinghe, Lakmal; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-05-01

    The invertebrate cytolysin lysenin is a member of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins that includes many representatives from pathogenic bacteria. Here we report the crystal structure of the lysenin pore and provide insights into its assembly mechanism. The lysenin pore is assembled from nine monomers via dramatic reorganization of almost half of the monomeric subunit structure leading to a β-barrel pore ~10 nm long and 1.6-2.5 nm wide. The lysenin pore is devoid of additional luminal compartments as commonly found in other toxin pores. Mutagenic analysis and atomic force microscopy imaging, together with these structural insights, suggest a mechanism for pore assembly for lysenin. These insights are relevant to the understanding of pore formation by other aerolysin-like pore-forming toxins, which often represent crucial virulence factors in bacteria.

  18. Designed post-self-assembly structural and functional modifications of a truncated tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao-Rong; Lan, Wen-Jie; Wang, Ming; Cook, Timothy R; Stang, Peter J

    2011-10-26

    Post-self-assembly modifications of a discrete metal-organic supramolecular structure have been developed. Such modifications allow the properties of the self-assembled supramolecular species to be changed in a simple and efficient manner (>90% yield). Initiated by the application of chemical stimuli, the post-self-assembly modifications described herein result in three distinct changes to the supramolecular system: an individual building-block component change, an overall structural modification, and a functional evolution of a [6+4] metal-organic supramolecular structure. The three modifications have been carefully examined by a range of characterization methods, including NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, pulsed field gradient spin echo NMR measurements, electrochemical analysis, and computational simulations.

  19. Experimental Study Of X-band Dielectric-loaded Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, C

    2005-01-01

    A joint Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) program is under way to investigate X- band dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, using high-power 11.424GHz radiation from the NRL Magnicon facility. As an advanced accelerator concepts, the dielectric-loaded accelerator offers the potential for a simple, inexpensive alternative to high-gradient RF linear accelerators. In this thesis, a comprehensive account of X-band DLA structure design, including theoretical calculation, numerical simulation, fabrication and testing, is presented in detail. Two types of loading dielectrics, alumina and MgxCa1−xTiO 3 (MCT), are investigated. For alumina (with dielectric constant 9.4), no RF breakdown has been observed up to 5 MW of drive power (equivalent to 8MV/m accelerating gradient) in the high power RF testing at NRL, but multipactor was observed to absorb a large fraction of the incident microwave power. Experimental results on suppression of multipactor using TiN coating o...

  20. An Ag(I) energetic metal-organic framework assembled with the energetic combination of furazan and tetrazole: synthesis, structure and energetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiao-Ni; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Yang, Qi; Han, Jing; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2016-04-28

    A novel Ag(I) energetic MOF [Ag16(BTFOF)9]n·[2(NH4)]n () assembled with Ag(iI ions and a furazan derivative, 4,4'-oxybis[3,3'-(1H-5-tetrazol)]furazan (H2BTFOF) was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized, featuring a three-dimensional porous structure incorporating ammonium cations. The thermal stability and energetic properties were determined, revealing that the 3D energetic MOF had an outstanding insensitivity (IS > 40 J), an ultrahigh detonation pressure (P) of 65.29 GPa and a detonation velocity (D) of 11.81 km cm(-3). In addition, the self-accelerating decomposition temperature (TSADT) and the critical temperature of thermal explosion (Tb) are also discussed in detail. The finding exemplifies that the assembly strategy plays a decisive role in the density and energetic properties of MOF-based energetic materials.

  1. Optimum frequency and gradient for the CLIC main linac accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Grudiev, A; Wuensch, Walter

    2006-01-01

    A novel procedure for the optimization of CLIC main linac parameters including operating frequency and the accelerating gradient is presented. The optimization procedure takes into account both beam dynamics and high power rf constraints. Beam dynamics constraints are given by emittance growth due to short- and long-range transverse wakefields. RF constraints are given by rf breakdown and pulsed surface heating limitations of the accelerating structure. Interpolation of beam and structure parameters in a wide range allows hundreds of millions of accelerating structures to be analyzed to find the structure with the highest ratio of luminosity to main linac input power, which is used as the figure of merit. The frequency and gradient have been varied in the ranges 12-30 GHz and 90-150 MV/m respectively. It is shown that the optimum frequency lies in the range from 16 to 20 GHz depending on the accelerating gradient and that the optimum gradient is below 100 MV/m. Based on our current understanding of the constr...

  2. The C-Band accelerating structures for SPARC photoinjector energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesini, D.; Boni, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Lollo, V.; Marcellini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spizzo, V.; Mostacci, A.; Campogiani, G.; Persichelli, S.; Enomoto, A.; Higo, T.; Kakihara, K.; Kamitani, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Sugimura, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Verdú-Andrés, S.

    2013-05-01

    The use of C-Band structures for electron acceleration and production of high quality beams has been proposed and adopted in several linac projects all over the world. The two main projects that adopted such type of structures are the Japanese Free Electron Laser (FEL) project in Spring-8 and the SwissFEL project at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Also the energy upgrade of the SPARC photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Italy) from 150 to more than 240 MeV will be done by replacing a low gradient S-Band accelerating structure with two C-band structures. The structures are Traveling Wave (TW) and Constant Impedance (CI), have symmetric axial input couplers and have been optimized to work with a SLED RF input pulse. The paper presents the design criteria of the structures, the realization procedure and the low and high power RF test results on a prototype. The high power tests have been carried out by the Frascati INFN Laboratories in close collaboration with the Japanese Laboratory KEK. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of the operation of the prototype at 50 MV/m with about 10-6 breakdowns per pulse per meter. Such high gradients have not been reached before in C-Band systems and demonstrated the possibility to use C-band accelerators, if needed, at such high field level. The results of the internal inspection of the structure after the high power test are also presented.

  3. Colloidal assembly in Leidenfrost drops for noniridescent structural color pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Che Ho; Kang, Hyelim; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-07-22

    Noniridescent structural color pigments have great potential as alternatives to conventional chemical color pigments in many coloration applications due to their nonbleaching and color-tunable properties. In this work, we report a novel method to create photonic microgranules composed of glassy packing of silica particles and small fraction of carbon black nanoparticles, which show pronounced structural colors with low angle-dependency. To prepare isotropic random packing in each microgranule, a Leidenfrost drop, which is a drop levitated by its own vapor on a hot surface, is employed as a template for fast consolidation of silica particles. The drop randomly migrates over the hot surface and rapidly shrinks, while maintaining its spherical shape, thereby consolidating silica particles to granular structures. Carbon black nanoparticles incorporated in the microgranules suppress incoherent multiple scattering, thereby providing improved color contrast. Therefore, photonic microgranules in a full visible range can be prepared by adjusting the size of silica particles with insignificant whitening.

  4. Atomic structure and handedness of the building block of a biological assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Habenstein, Birgit; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-12-26

    Noncovalent supramolecular assemblies possess in general several unique subunit-subunit interfaces.The basic building block of such an assembly consists of several subunits and contains all unique interfaces. Atomic-resolution structures of monomeric subunits are typically accessed by crystallography or solution NMR and fitted into electron microscopy density maps. However, the structure of the intact building block in the assembled state remains unknown with this hybrid approach. Here, we present the solid-state NMR atomic structure of the building block of the type III secretion system needle. The building block structure consists of a homotetrameric subunit complex with three unique supramolecular interfaces. Side-chain positions at the interfaces were solved at atomic detail. The high-resolution structure reveals unambiguously the helical handedness of the assembly, determined to be right-handed for the type III secretion system needle.Additionally, the axial rise per subunit could be extracted from the tetramer structure and independently validated by mass-per-length measurements.

  5. Inflatable shape changing colonies assembling versatile smart space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Thomas; Hilbich, Daniel; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    Various plants have the ability to follow the sun with their flowers or leaves during the course of a day via a mechanism known as heliotropism. This mechanism is characterised by the introduction of pressure gradients between neighbouring motor cells in the plant's stem, enabling the stem to bend. By adapting this bio-inspired mechanism to mechanical systems, a new class of smart structures can be created. The developed overall structure is made up of a number of cellular colonies, each consisting of a central pressure source surrounded by multiple cells. After launch, the cellular arrays are deployed in space and are either preassembled or alternatively are attached together during their release or afterwards. A central pressure source is provided by a high-pressure storage unit with an integrated valve, which provides ingress gas flow to the system; the gas is then routed through the system via a sequence of valve operations and cellular actuations, allowing for any desired shape to be achieved within the constraints of the deployed array geometry. This smart structure consists of a three dimensional adaptable cellular array with fluid controlling Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) components enabling the structure to change its global shape. The proposed MEMS components include microvalves, pressure sensors, mechanical interconnect structures, and electrical routing. This paper will also give an overview of the system architecture and shows the feasibility and shape changing capabilities of the proposed design with multibody dynamic simulations. Example applications of this lightweight shape changing structure include concentrators, mirrors, and communications antennas that are able to dynamically change their focal point, as well as substructures for solar sails that are capable of steering through solar winds by altering the sails' subjected area.

  6. Optical properties of a grating-nanorod assembly structure for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhihao; Cheng, Qiang; Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Luo, Zixue

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a grating-nanorod assembly structure that can be applied to silicon solar cells. The optical properties of the assembly structure are examined by applying the finite difference time domain method in the 300-1100 nm wavelength region, where the average spectral absorptance of the structure can reach 0.955. This high absorptance is attributed to guided mode resonance and microcavity effect. The transient and steady-state magnetic field distribution of the structure reveals the underlying mechanisms of such extraordinary phenomena. Absorptance is further investigated at different diameters and lengths of the nanorod component. The effects of incident angle on absorptance are also discussed. The solar cells of the structure can yield an optimum conversion efficiency of 25.91%. Thus, the proposed structure can be applied to silicon solar cells.

  7. Simulation of variation characteristics at thermostabilization of 27 GHz biperiodical accelerating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluchevskaya, Y. D.; Polozov, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    It was proposed to develop the biperiodical accelerating structure with operating frequency of 27 GHz to assess the possibility of design a compact accelerating structure for medical application. It is necessary to do the more careful simulation of variation characteristics this case because of decrease of wavelength 3-10 times in comparison with conventional structures 10 and 3 cm ranges. Results of such study are presented in the article. Also a combination of high electromagnetic fields and long pulses at a high operating frequency leads to the temperature increase in the structure, thermal deformation and significant change of the resonator characteristics, including the frequency of the RF pulse. Development results of three versions of system of temperature stabilization also discuses.

  8. From structure to function : Protein assemblies dissected by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates some of the possibilities mass spectrometry can provide to gain new insight into structure and function of protein complexes. While technologies in native mass spectrometry are still under development, it already allows research on complete proteins and protein complexes up

  9. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  10. Direct current electric field assembly of colloidal crystals displaying reversible structural color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aayush A; Ganesan, Mahesh; Jocz, Jennifer; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-08-26

    We report the application of low-voltage direct current (dc) electric fields to self-assemble close-packed colloidal crystals in nonaqueous solvents from colloidal spheres that vary in size from as large as 1.2 μm to as small as 0.1 μm. The assemblies are created rapidly (∼2 min) from an initially low volume fraction colloidal particle suspension using a simple capacitor-like electric field device that applies a steady dc electric voltage. Confocal microscopy is used to observe the ordering that is produced by the assembly method. This spatial evidence for ordering is consistent with the 6-fold diffraction patterns identified by light scattering. Red, green, and blue structural color is observed for the ordered assemblies of colloids with diameters of 0.50, 0.40, and 0.29 μm, respectively, consistent with spectroscopic measurements of reflectance. The diffraction and spectrophotometry results were found to be consistent with the theoretical Bragg's scattering expected for closed-packed crystals. By switching the dc electric field from on to off, we demonstrate reversibility of the structural color response on times scales ∼60 s. The dc electric field assembly method therefore represents a simple method to produce reversible structural color in colloidal soft matter.

  11. Enhanced Proton Acceleration by an Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Structured Dynamic Plasma Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Zigler, A; Botton, M; Nahum, E; Schleifer, E; Baspaly, A; Pomerantz, Y; Abicht, F; Branzel, J; Priebe, G; Steinke, S; Andreev, A; Schnuerer, M; Sandner, W; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P; Ledingham, K W D

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a notably enhanced acceleration of protons to high energy by relatively modest ultrashort laser pulses and structured dynamical plasma targets. Realized by special deposition of snow targets on sapphire substrates and using carefully planned pre-pulses, high proton yield emitted in a narrow solid angle with energy above 21MeV were detected from a 5TW laser. Our simulations predict that using the proposed scheme protons can be accelerated to energies above 150MeV by 100TW laser systems.

  12. Structural properties of self-assembled polymeric micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.

    1998-01-01

    At present, the thermodynamic understanding of complex copolymer systems is undergoing important developments. Block copolymers aggregate in selective solvents into micelles of various form and size depending on molecular architecture and interaction parameters. The micelles constitute the basis...... for a variety of novel mesophases, including biocontinuous phases and networks of ordered cross-linking micelles. Research has focused on structural studies of block copolymer systems, using small-angle scattering of X-rays and neutrons....

  13. Astronaut Ross Approaches Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure (ACCESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The crew assigned to the STS-61B mission included Bryan D. O'Conner, pilot; Brewster H. Shaw, commander; Charles D. Walker, payload specialist; mission specialists Jerry L. Ross, Mary L. Cleave, and Sherwood C. Spring; and Rodolpho Neri Vela, payload specialist. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis November 28, 1985 at 7:29:00 pm (EST), the STS-61B mission's primary payload included three communications satellites: MORELOS-B (Mexico); AUSSAT-2 (Australia); and SATCOM KU-2 (RCA Americom). Two experiments were conducted to test assembling erectable structures in space: EASE (Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity), and ACCESS (Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure). In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), EASE and ACCESS were developed and demonstrated at MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). In this STS-61B onboard photo, astronaut Ross, perched on the Manipulator Foot Restraint (MFR) approaches the erected ACCESS. The primary objective of these experiments was to test the structural assembly concepts for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction.

  14. A two-fluid model for black-hole accretion flows: particle acceleration and disc structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason P.; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-02-01

    Hot, tenuous advection-dominated accretion flows around black holes are ideal sites for the Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles at standing shock waves in the accretion disc. Previous work has demonstrated that the shock-acceleration process can be efficient enough to power the observed, strong outflows in radio-loud active galaxies such as M87. However, the dynamical effect (back-reaction) on the flow, exerted by the pressure of the relativistic particles, has not been previously considered, and this effect can have a significant influence on the disc structure. We reexamine the problem by developing a new, two-fluid model for the structure of the accretion disc that includes the dynamical effect of the relativistic particle pressure, combined with the pressure of the background (thermal) gas. The new model is analogous to the two-fluid model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova-driven shock waves. As part of the model, we also develop a new set of shock jump conditions, which are solved along with the hydrodynamic conservation equations to determine the structure of the accretion disc. The solutions include the formation of a mildly relativistic outflow (jet) at the shock radius, driven by the relativistic particles accelerated in the disc. One of our main conclusions is that in the context of the new two-fluid accretion model, global smooth (shock-free) solutions do not exist, and the disc must always contain a standing shock wave, at least in the inviscid case considered here.

  15. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus assembles into structured filamentous virion particles independently of host cytoskeleton and related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fyza Y Shaikh

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a single-stranded RNA virus that assembles into viral filaments at the cell surface. Virus assembly often depends on the ability of a virus to use host proteins to accomplish viral tasks. Since the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail (FCT is critical for viral filamentous assembly, we hypothesized that host proteins important for viral assembly may be recruited by the FCT. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that filamin A interacted with FCT, and mammalian cell experiments showed it localized to viral filaments but did not affect viral replication. Furthermore, we found that a number of actin-associated proteins also were excluded from viral filaments. Actin or tubulin cytoskeletal rearrangement was not necessary for F trafficking to the cell surface or for viral assembly into filaments, but was necessary for optimal viral replication and may be important for anchoring viral filaments. These findings suggest that RSV assembly into filaments occurs independently of actin polymerization and that viral proteins are the principal drivers for the mechanical tasks involved with formation of complex, structured RSV filaments at the host cell plasma membrane.

  17. In situ monitoring of structural changes during colloidal self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yaw Koon; Wong, Chee Cheong

    2006-01-31

    Reflectance spectroscopy is utilized to monitor structural changes during the self-assembly of a monodisperse colloidal system at the meniscus of a sessile drop on an inert substrate. Treating the ordered colloidal structure as a photonic crystal is equivalent to monitoring the changes in the photonic band gap (PBG) as the colloidal system self-assembles heterogeneously into a crystal through solvent evaporation in ambient conditions. Using a modified Bragg's law model of the photonic crystal, we can trace the structural evolution of the self-assembling colloidal system. After a certain induction period, a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure emerges, albeit with a lattice parameter larger than that of a true close-packed structure. This FCC structure is maintained while the lattice parameter shrinks continuously with further increase in the colloidal concentration due to drying. When the structure reaches a lattice parameter 1.09 times the size of that of a true close-packed structure, it undergoes an abrupt decrease in lattice spacing, apparently similar to those reported for lattice-distortive martensitic transformations. This abrupt final lattice shrinkage agrees well with the estimated Debye screening length of the electric double layer of charged colloids and could be the fundamental reason behind the cracking commonly seen in colloidal crystals.

  18. Dynamic behavior of time-delayed acceleration feedback controller for active vibration control of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fang; Chen, Wei-dong; Shao, Min-qiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the design problem of the controller with time-delayed acceleration feedback. On the basis of the reduction method and output state-derivative feedback, a time-delayed acceleration feedback controller is proposed. Stability boundaries of the closed-loop system are determined by using Hurwitz stability criteria. Due to the introduction of time delay into the controller with acceleration feedback, the proposed controller has the feature of not only changing the mass property but also altering the damping property of the controlled system in the sense of equivalent structural modification. With this feature, the closed-loop system has a greater logarithmic decrement than the uncontrolled one, and in turn, the control behavior can be improved. In this connection, the time delay in the acceleration feedback control is a positive factor when satisfying some given conditions and it could be actively utilized. On the ground of the analysis, the developed controller is implemented on a cantilever beam for different controller gain-delay combinations, and the control performance is evaluated with the comparison to that of pure acceleration feedback controller. Simulation and experimental results verify the ability of the controller to attenuate the vibration resulting from the dominant mode.

  19. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model.

  20. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities of employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Andrews, Heather L.; Herman, Matthew J.; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Weis, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of a stand-alone practical dielectric laser accelerator (DLA) requires innovation in two major critical components: high-current ultra-low-emittance cathodes and efficient laser accelerator structures. LANL develops two technologies that in our opinion are applicable to the novel DLA architectures: diamond field emitter array (DFEA) cathodes and additive manufacturing of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. This paper discusses the results of testing of DFEA cathodes in the field-emission regime and the possibilities for their operation in the photoemission regime, and compares their emission characteristics to the specific needs of DLAs. We also describe recent advances in additive manufacturing of dielectric woodpile structures using a Nanoscribe direct laser-writing device capable of maskless lithography and additive manufacturing, and the development of novel infrared dielectric materials compatible with additive manufacturing.

  1. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andrews, Heather Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Among the stated conclusions are the following: preliminary study identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs--high beam current and small emittance; additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths (fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials). Future plans include DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  2. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  3. SbsB structure and lattice reconstruction unveil Ca2+ triggered S-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Ekaterina; Fronzes, Rémi; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Van Gerven, Nani; Papapostolou, David; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Howorka, Stefan; Remaut, Han

    2012-07-05

    S-layers are regular two-dimensional semipermeable protein layers that constitute a major cell-wall component in archaea and many bacteria. The nanoscale repeat structure of the S-layer lattices and their self-assembly from S-layer proteins (SLPs) have sparked interest in their use as patterning and display scaffolds for a range of nano-biotechnological applications. Despite their biological abundance and the technological interest in them, structural information about SLPs is limited to truncated and assembly-negative proteins. Here we report the X-ray structure of the SbsB SLP of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 by the use of nanobody-aided crystallization. SbsB consists of a seven-domain protein, formed by an amino-terminal cell-wall attachment domain and six consecutive immunoglobulin-like domains, that organize into a φ-shaped disk-like monomeric crystallization unit stabilized by interdomain Ca(2+) ion coordination. A Ca(2+)-dependent switch to the condensed SbsB quaternary structure pre-positions intermolecular contact zones and renders the protein competent for S-layer assembly. On the basis of crystal packing, chemical crosslinking data and cryo-electron microscopy projections, we present a model for the molecular organization of this SLP into a porous protein sheet inside the S-layer. The SbsB lattice represents a previously undescribed structural model for protein assemblies and may advance our understanding of SLP physiology and self-assembly, as well as the rational design of engineered higher-order structures for biotechnology.

  4. Synthesis of GoldMag particles with assembled structure and their applications in immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Yali; ZHANG; Lianying; SU; Jing; ZHANG; Caifeng; LI; Qi; CUI; Ting; JIN; Boquan; CHEN; Chao

    2006-01-01

    Micrometer-sized Fe3O4 particles and nano-sized gold particles were first synthesized by methods of self-aggregation of surface-chemically modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles and citrate reduction of the Au3+ to Au0, respectively. Interaction between these two types of particles resulted in the assembly of nano-sized gold particles on the surface of the micrometer-sized Fe3O4 particles, forming an assembled structure with the Fe3O4 core particles around which are attached nano-sized gold particles. The Fe3O4/Au structure is named GoldMag particles with assembled structure. The synthetic process, structure, and magnetic property of the GoldMag particles were analyzed. GoldMag particles with assembled structure have an irregular shape, rough surface with a diameter of 2-3 (m. These particles exhibit the superparamagnetic property with saturated magnetization of 41 A·m2/kg. In a single step, antibodies could be readily immobilized onto the surface of the particles with a high binding capacity. The GoldMag particles can be used as a novel carrier in immunoassays. The maximum quantity of human IgG immobilized onto GoldMag particles was 330 (g/mg. In order to validate the quality of the GoldMag particles as immunoassay carriers, an immunoassay system was used. The relative amount of immobilized human IgG was measured by HRP-labeled anti human IgG. The coefficient of variation within parallel samples of each group was below 6% and the coefficient of variation of means between five groups carried out separately was below 7%. Based on the sandwich method, the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also analyzed by qualitative and quantitative detection, respectively. The result indicated that the GoldMag particles with assembled structure were an ideal carrier in immunoassay.

  5. Self-assembled Structures of a Multifunctional, Structured Block Copolymer in Solution; A SANS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Senanayake, Manjula; Osti, Naresh; He, Lilin; Heller, William; Perahia, Dvora

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembly of multi block copolymer in solutions is controlled by a delicate balance between inherent phase segregation due to incompatibility of the blocks and the interactions of the individual blocks with the solvent. We investigated the association of ABCBA penta-block copolymers, in solution using Small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The ABCBA penta-block comprises of centered randomly sulfonated polystyrene block to which rubbery polyisoprene is connected, terminated by blocks of polystyrene decorated with tertiary butyl group, kindly provided by Kraton LLC. The SANS studies have shown that the penta-block forms ellipsoidal core-shell structures with the sulfonated polystyrene in the core and Gaussian decaying chains of swollen polyisoprene and tertiary butyl polystyrene in the corona. The size of the micelle, the thickness of the corona and the aggregation number increased with increasing the solution concentration and temperature, while the solvent fraction in the core decreased. The dilute solutions promptly responded to thermal fluctuations. However, the temperature effects disappeared with increasing the solution concentration.

  6. A Structural analysis of M protein in coronavirus assembly and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Neuman, Benjamin; Kiss, Gabriella; H. Kunding, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The M protein of coronavirus plays a central role in virus assembly, turning cellular membranes into workshops where virus and host factors come together to make new virus particles. We investigated how M structure and organization is related to virus shape and size using cryo-electron microscopy...

  7. Linear hydrogen adsorbate structures on graphite induced by self-assembled molecular monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Combined scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations reveal a method to induce linear structures of hydrogen adsorbates on graphite by covering the surface with a self-assembled molecular monolayer of cyanuric acid and exposing it to atomic hydrogen...

  8. Tissue engineering by self-assembly of cells printed into topologically defined structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Norotte, Cyrille; Damon, Brook; Marga, Francoise; Neagu, Adrian; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L; Kachurin, Anatoly; Church, Kenneth H; Park, Hyoungshin; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the principles of biological self-assembly is indispensable for developing efficient strategies to build living tissues and organs. We exploit the self-organizing capacity of cells and tissues to construct functional living structures of prescribed shape. In our technology, multicellular spheroids (bio-ink particles) are placed into biocompatible environment (bio-paper) by the use of a three-dimensional delivery device (bio-printer). Our approach mimics early morphogenesis and is based on the realization that the genetic control of developmental patterning through self-assembly involves physical mechanisms. Three-dimensional tissue structures are formed through the postprinting fusion of the bio-ink particles, in analogy with early structure-forming processes in the embryo that utilize the apparent liquid-like behavior of tissues composed of motile and adhesive cells. We modeled the process of self-assembly by fusion of bio-ink particles, and employed this novel technology to print extended cellular structures of various shapes. Functionality was tested on cardiac constructs built from embryonic cardiac and endothelial cells. The postprinting self-assembly of bio-ink particles resulted in synchronously beating solid tissue blocks, showing signs of early vascularization, with the endothelial cells organized into vessel-like conduits.

  9. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael

    2014-12-19

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  10. High-throughput SHAPE and hydroxyl radical analysis of RNA structure and ribonucleoprotein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Jennifer L; Duncan, Caia D S; Weeks, Kevin M

    2009-01-01

    RNA folds to form complex structures vital to many cellular functions. Proteins facilitate RNA folding at both the secondary and tertiary structure levels. An absolute prerequisite for understanding RNA folding and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly reactions is a complete understanding of the RNA structure at each stage of the folding or assembly process. Here we provide a guide for comprehensive and high-throughput analysis of RNA secondary and tertiary structure using SHAPE and hydroxyl radical footprinting. As an example of the strong and sometimes surprising conclusions that can emerge from high-throughput analysis of RNA folding and RNP assembly, we summarize the structure of the bI3 group I intron RNA in four distinct states. Dramatic structural rearrangements occur in both secondary and tertiary structure as the RNA folds from the free state to the active, six-component, RNP complex. As high-throughput and high-resolution approaches are applied broadly to large protein-RNA complexes, other proteins previously viewed as making simple contributions to RNA folding are also likely to be found to exert multifaceted, long-range, cooperative, and nonadditive effects on RNA folding. These protein-induced contributions add another level of control, and potential regulatory function, in RNP complexes.

  11. Rapid excavation with a newly developed retaining system:Spiral assembly steel structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关成立; 杨宇友; 王成彪

    2015-01-01

    The spiral assembly steel structure, a newly developed retaining wall for the rapid excavation of small-sized foundation pits in unsaturated soil, is presented. This new type of retaining structure is prefabricated in the factory and is assembled on site in the excavation of a pit. This retaining structure is composed of several prefabricated steel structural units, in which the adjacent steel structural units are joined with connectors. Each steel structural unit has one steel pipe in the radial direction and is welded to a single piece of steel plate. After full installation in situ, the retaining structure becomes a cylindrical steel structure. With the protection afforded by this new type of retaining structure, excavation work can be completed within 24 h to a depth up to 5 m. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of this new retaining structure, field construction tests were conducted in Beijing, China. The test construction was monitored. The monitoring program included measuring stress in the structure, lateral earth pressure, and lateral deformation of the surrounding soil. The monitoring data from the field test were compared with the theoretical results. The results show that the proposed new structure is reliable and effective.

  12. Double hydrogen bond mediating self-assembly structure of cyanides on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongping; Xiang, Feifei; Lu, Yan; Wei, Sheng; Li, Chao; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lacheng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Cyanides with different numbers of -C≡N, 1,2,4,5-Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and 2,3-Dicyanonaphthalene (2,3-DCN) deposited on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces, have been investigated by room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (RTSTM), respectively. High resolution STM images show double hydrogen bond is the main driving force to form variety of self-assembly structures, indicating the double hydrogen bond affects the electron distribution of cyanides and leads to a more stable structure with lower energy. In addition, the difference between Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces in their lattice structure induces a bigger assembly structural change of 2,3-DCN than that of 1,2,4,5-TCNB, which confirms the fact that the opposite double hydrogen bond formation formed by 1,2,4,5-TCNB is more stable than the neighboring double hydrogen bond formation formed by molecule 2,3-DCN.

  13. Self-Assembled Structures of Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles on Solid Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yulan; HE Shengtai; HUANG Keyang

    2011-01-01

    With a two-phase method,well-dispersed 5.2 nm Ag nanoparticles with narrow size distribution (±0.5 nm) are synthesized.The assembled structures of colloidal Ag nanoparticles on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG),silicon chip and microscopic glass have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM).With different spin-coating speeds and concentrations of colloidal silver nanoparticles,various assembly structures could form on those substrates.On HOPG,Ag nanoparticles were absorbed and aligned along single-atom-height step edges to form a linear one-layer structure.And on silicon chip and microscopic glass,one-layer closed packing fractal structure and two-layer closed packing ring were observed respectively.

  14. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  15. Manipulating the dimensional assembly pattern and crystalline structures of iron oxide nanostructures with a functional polyolefin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingliang; Yuan, Tingting; Wang, Yiran; Guleria, Abhishant; Wei, Suying; Zhang, Guoqi; Sun, Luyi; Liu, Jingjing; Yu, Jingfang; Young, David P; Lin, Hongfei; Khasanov, Airat; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-01-28

    Controlled crystalline structures (α- and γ-phase) and assembly patterns (1-D, 2-D and 3-D) were achieved in the synthesized iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric surfactant-polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) with different concentrations. In addition, the change of the crystalline structure from the α- and γ-phase also led to the significantly increased saturation magnetization and coercivity.

  16. p54nrb/NonO and PSF promote U snRNA nuclear export by accelerating its export complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hiroto; McCloskey, Asako; Shinmyozu, Kaori; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-04-01

    The assembly of spliceosomal U snRNPs in metazoans requires nuclear export of U snRNA precursors. Four factors, nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export (PHAX), the export receptor CRM1 and RanGTP, gather at the m(7)G-cap-proximal region and form the U snRNA export complex. Here we show that the multifunctional RNA-binding proteins p54nrb/NonO and PSF are U snRNA export stimulatory factors. These proteins, likely as a heterodimer, accelerate the recruitment of PHAX, and subsequently CRM1 and Ran onto the RNA substrates in vitro, which mediates efficient U snRNA export in vivo. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation for U snRNA export and, hence, spliceosomal U snRNP biogenesis.

  17. Management of research reactor; dynamic characteristics analysis for reactor structures related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chang Kee; Shim, Joo Sup [Shinwa Technology Information, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study is to deduce the dynamic correlation between the fuel assembly and the reactor structure. Dynamic characteristics analyses for reactor structure related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly have been performed For the dynamic characteristic analysis, the in-air models of the round and hexagonal flow tubes, 18-element and 36-element fuel assemblies, and reactor structure were developed. By calculating the hydrodynamic mass and distributing it on the in-air models, the in-water models of the flow tubes, the fuel assemblies, and the reactor structure were developed. Then, modal analyses for developed in-air and in-water models have been performed. Especially, two 18-element fuel assemblies and three 36-element fuel assemblies were included in the in-water reactor models. For the verification of the modal analysis results, the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the fuel assembly were compared with those obtained from the experiment. Finally the analysis results of the reactor structure were compared with them performed by AECL Based on the reactor model without PCS piping, the in-water reactor model including the fuel assemblies was developed, and its modal analysis was performed. The analysis results demonstrate that there are no resonance between the fuel assembly and the reactor structures. 26 refs., 419 figs., 85 tabs. (Author)

  18. Hierarchical Structures from Inorganic Nanocrystal Self-Assembly for Photoenergy Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pei Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly has emerged as a powerful strategy for controlling the structure and physicochemical properties of ensembles of inorganic nanocrystals. Hierarchical structures from nanocrystal assembly show collective properties that differ from individual nanocrystals and bulk samples. Incorporation of structural hierarchy into nanostructures is of great importance as a result of enhancing mass transportation, reducing resistance to diffusion, and high surface areas for adsorption and reaction, and thus much effort has been devoted to the exploration of various novel organizing schemes through which inorganic porous structure with architectural design can be created. In this paper, the recent research progress in this field is reviewed. The general strategies for the synthesis of hierarchical structures assembled from nanobuilding blocks are elaborated. The well-defined hierarchical structures provide new opportunities for optimizing, tuning, and/or enhancing the properties and performance of these materials and have found applications in photoenergy utilization including photodegradation, photocatalytic H2 production, photocatalytic CO2 conversion, and sensitized solar cells, and these are discussed illustratively.

  19. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  20. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespenheide, B. M.; Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    2004-11-01

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespenheide, B M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Jacobs, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Thorpe, M F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  2. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Beleggia, Marco; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices....... As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic "superspin." Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins...... oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder...

  3. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  4. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  5. Bio-Inspired Structural Colors Produced via Self-Assembly of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Yue, Xiujun; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-05-26

    Structural colors arising from interactions of light with submicron scale periodic structures have been found in many species across all taxa, serving multiple biological functions including sexual signaling, camouflage, and aposematism. Directly inspired by the extensive use of self-assembled melanosomes to produce colors in avian feathers, we set out to synthesize and assemble polydopamine-based synthetic melanin nanoparticles in an effort to fabricate colored films. We have quantitatively demonstrated that synthetic melanin nanoparticles have a high refractive index and broad absorption spanning across the UV-visible range, similar to natural melanins. Utilizing a thin-film interference model, we demonstrated the coloration mechanism of deposited films and showed that the unique optical properties of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide advantages for structural colors over other polymeric nanoparticles (i.e., polystyrene colloidal particles).

  6. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  7. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at the location of the target. Here, a comparison between the measured and calculated eigenvalues reveals a relative difference of around 10% in C/E values. A special mention is made of the fact that the reaction rate analyses in the subcritical systems demonstrate apparently the actual effect of moving the tungsten target into the core on neutron multiplication. A series of further ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons needs to be carried out to evaluate the accuracy of subcritical multiplication parameters.

  8. Enhancing Target Normal Sheath Accelerated Ions with Micro-structured Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin; Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Rubin, Trevor; Handler, Abraham; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Daskalova, Rebecca; Cochran, Ginevra; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) of ions has been widely studied due to its fundamental importance, use as a probe, and for possible applications such as cancer therapy and neutron generation. Much of this work has been conducted on thin foils with peak ion energy and yield optimized using laser parameters such as energy and spot size. Micro-structured targets, however, have demonstrated increased peak ion energy and yield by controlling and enhancing mechanisms preferential to TNSA. Novel micro-structured targets were developed using optical lithography techniques on thin substrates at the OSU NanoSystem Laboratory. Variable structure height (0.5-2 micron) and transverse patterning (up to 1 micron resolution) permit the survey of a range of structured target variables in the study of ion acceleration. We describe the development of these targets and an experiment investigating the enhancement of TNSA ions from lithography produced micro-structured targets conducted at the Scarlet Laser Facility. Experimental results show increased proton and Carbon yield >2 MeV and higher peak Carbon energy from structured targets. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  10. Synthesis, electrochemistry, STM investigation of oligothiophene self-assemblies with superior structural order and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Yinghao; Yarotski, Dmitry; Li, Hao; Xu, Ping; Yen, Hung-Ju; Tretiak, Sergei; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Three oligothiophene (terthiophene, tetrathiophene and pentathiophene) derivatives are synthesized and their monolayer self-assemblies on gold (Au) are prepared via Au-S covalent bond. Our UV-Vis experimental characterization of solution reveals the dependence of the optical properties on the conjugation length of the oligothiophenes, which compares well with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) simulations of spectra of individual chromophores. Photoluminescent spectra of thin films show pronounced red shifts compared to that of solutions, suggesting strong inter-oligomer interactions. The comparative studies of cyclic voltammograms of tetrathiophene from solution, cast film and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) indicate presence of one, two, and three oxidized species in these samples, respectively, suggesting a very strong electronic coupling between tetrathiophene molecules in the SAM. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of SAMs of the tetrathiophene on an atomically flat Au surface exhibits formation of monolayer assemblies with molecular order, and the molecular packing appears to show an overlay of oligothiophene molecules on top of another one. In contrast, the trimer and pentamer images show only aggregated species lacking long-range order on the molecular level. Such trends in going from disordered-ordered-disordered monolayer assemblies are mainly due to a delicate balance between inter-chromophore π-π couplings, hydrophobic interaction and the propensity to form Au-S covalent bond. Such hypothesis has been validated by our computational results suggesting different interaction patterns of oligothiophenes with odd numbered and even numbered thiophene repeat units placed in a dimer configuration. Observed correlations between oligomer geometry and structural order of monolayer assembly elucidate important structure-property relationships and have implications for these molecular structures in organic optoelectronic devices and energy

  11. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, 5900 Harper Rd, Solon, Ohio 44139, USA; High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Gold, S. H. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Fischer, Richard [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2016-05-09

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at 8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  12. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  13. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  14. Cluster perturbation theory for the self-assembly of associating fluids into complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bennett D

    2014-12-01

    Wertheim's two-density thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) has proven to be an indispensable statistical mechanical tool in the description of associating fluids with a single association site. TPT was developed to enforce the monovalence of the hydrogen bond and only recently has been extended to account for divalent association sites. It has been shown through experiment and molecular simulation that certain one-site associating fluids can self-assemble into complex extended supramolecular structures as a result of multiple bonding of association sites. In this paper we reorganize TPT into a form that is more easily applied to complex associated structures. The derived theory is general to all possible self-assemble structures. We obtain the free energy and bonding fractions in a general way in terms of single-cluster partition functions and averages. The new formalism removes any reference to graph theory allowing for the conceptually straightforward application of the two-density formalism to complex self-assembled structures.

  15. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S. [University of Maryland; Antonsen, Thomas M. [University of Maryland; Kishek, Rami [University of Maryland

    2014-07-25

    This final report summarizes the research performed during the time period from 8/1/2010 to 7/31/2013. It consists of two parts describing our studies in two directions: (a) analysis of factors limiting operation of dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures where the main problem is the occurrence of multipactor on dielectric surfaces, and (b) studies of effects associated with either RF magnetic or RF electric fields which may cause the RF breakdown in high-gradient metallic accelerating structures. In the studies of DLA structures, at least, two accomplishments should be mentioned: the development of a 3D non-stationary, self-consistent code describing the multipactor phenomena and yielding very good agreement with some experimental data obtained in joint ANL/NRL experiments. In the metallic structures, such phenomena as the heating and melting of micro-particles (metallic dust) by RF electric and magnetic fields in single-shot and rep-rate regimes is analyzed. Also, such processes in micro-protrusions on the structure surfaces as heating and melting due to the field emitted current and the Nottingham effect are thoroughly investigated with the account for space charge of emitted current on the field emission from the tip.

  16. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  17. Accelerated corrosion test and corrosion failure distribution model of aircraft structural aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-lin; MU Zhi-tao; JIN Ping

    2006-01-01

    Based on corrosion damage data of 10 years for a type of aircraft aluminum alloy, the statistical analysis was conducted by Gumbel, Normal and two parameters Weibull distribution function. The results show that aluminum alloy structural member has the corrosion history of pitting corrosion-intergranular corrosion-exfoliation corrosion, and the maximum corrosion depth is in conformity to normal distribution. The accelerated corrosion test was carried out with the complied equivalent airport accelerated environment spectrum. The corrosion damage failure modes of aluminum alloy structural member indicate that the period of validity of the former protective coating is about 2.5 to 3 years, and that of the novel protective coating is about 4.0 to 4.5 years. The corrosion kinetics law of aluminum spar flange was established by fitting corrosion damage test data. The law indicates two apparent corrosion stages of high strength aluminum alloy section material: pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion/exfoliation corrosion.The test results agree with the statistical fit result of corrosion data collected from corrosion member in service. The fractional error is 5.8% at the same calendar year. The accelerated corrosion test validates the corrosion kinetics law of aircraft aluminum alloy in service.

  18. High Power RF Induced Thermal Fatigue in the High Gradient CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Heikkinen, S; Neupert, N; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subjected to cyclic thermal stresses possibly resulting in surface break up by fatigue. Various high strength alloys from the group of high conductivity copper alloys have been selected and have been tested in different states, with different surface treatments and in different stress ratios. Low to medium cycle fatigue data (up to 108 cycles) of fully compressive surface thermal stresses has been collected by means of a pulsed laser surface heating apparatus. The surface damage has been characterized by SEM observations and roughness measurements. High cycle fatigue data, up to 7x1010 cycles, of varying stress ratio has been collected in high frequency bulk fatigue tests using an ultrasonic apparatus. Up-to-date results from these experiments are presented.

  19. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  20. Polymorphism in Self-Assembled Structures of 9-Anthracene Carboxylic Acid on Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface self-assembly process of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (AnCA on Ag(111 was investigated using STM. Depending on the molecular surface density, four spontaneously formed and one annealed AnCA ordered phases were observed, namely a straight belt phase, a zigzag double-belt phase, two simpler dimer phases, and a kagome phase. The two high-density belt phases possess large unit cells on the scale length of 10 nm, which are seldom observed in molecular self-assembled structures. This structural diversity stems from a complicated competition of different interactions of AnCA molecules on metal surface, including intermolecular and molecular-substrate interactions, as well as the steric demand from high molecular surface density.

  1. Thermally-nucleated self-assembly of water and alcohol into stable structures at hydrophobic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Giofrè, Daniele; José Segura, Juan; Stellacci, Francesco; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-10-01

    At the interface with solids, the mobility of liquid molecules tends to be reduced compared with bulk, often resulting in increased local order due to interactions with the surface of the solid. At room temperature, liquids such as water and methanol can form solvation structures, but the molecules remain highly mobile, thus preventing the formation of long-lived supramolecular assemblies. Here we show that mixtures of water with methanol can form a novel type of interfaces with hydrophobic solids. Combining in situ atomic force microscopy and multiscale molecular dynamics simulations, we identify solid-like two-dimensional interfacial structures that nucleate thermally, and are held together by an extended network of hydrogen bonds. On graphite, nucleation occurs above ~35 °C, resulting in robust, multilayered nanoscopic patterns. Our findings could have an impact on many fields where water-alcohol mixtures play an important role such as fuel cells, chemical synthesis, self-assembly, catalysis and surface treatments.

  2. Structural mimics of viruses through peptide/DNA co-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rong; Chau, Ying

    2014-12-31

    A synthetic mimic of viral structure has been constructed by the synergistic co-assembly of a 16-amino acid peptide and plasmid DNA. The rational design of this short peptide, including segments for binding DNA and forming β-sheet, is inspired by viral capsid protein. The resulting nanostructures, which we term nanococoons, appear as ellipsoids of virus-like dimension (65 × 47 nm) and display repeating stripes of ∼4 nm wide. We propose that the co-assembly process involves DNA as a template to assist the organization of peptide strands by electrostatic interaction, while the bilayer β-sheets and their lateral association stabilize the peptide "capsid" and organize the DNA within. The hierarchy affords an extremely stable structure, protecting peptide and DNA against enzymatic digestion. It opens a new and facile avenue to fabricate viral alternatives with diverse functions.

  3. A new approach for cell formation and scheduling with assembly operations and product structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Bahador Aryanezhad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new formulation model for cellular manufacturing system (CMS design problem is proposed. The proposed model of this paper considers assembly operations and product structure so that it includes the scheduling problem with the formation of manufacturing cells, simultaneously. Since the proposed model is nonlinear, a linearization method is applied to gain optimal solution when the model is solved using direct implementation of mixed integer programming. A new genetic algorithm (GA is also proposed to solve the resulted model for large-scale problems. We examine the performance of the proposed method using the direct implementation and the proposed GA method. The results indicate that the proposed GA approach could provide efficient assembly and product structure for real-world size problems.

  4. Multi-stacks of epitaxial GeSn self-assembled dots in Si: Structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Fischer, I. A.; Schulze, J. [Institute for Semiconductor Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Benedetti, A. [CACTI, Univ. de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende 15, Vigo (Spain); Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Univ. de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain)

    2015-03-28

    We report on the growth and structural and morphologic characterization of stacked layers of self-assembled GeSn dots grown on Si (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperature T = 350 °C. Samples consist of layers (from 1 up to 10) of Ge{sub 0.96}Sn{sub 0.04} self-assembled dots separated by Si spacer layers, 10 nm thick. Their structural analysis was performed based on transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman scattering. We found that up to 4 stacks of dots could be grown with good dot layer homogeneity, making the GeSn dots interesting candidates for optoelectronic device applications.

  5. Multi-stacks of epitaxial GeSn self-assembled dots in Si: Structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, F.; Fischer, I. A.; Benedetti, A.; Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I.; Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S.; Schulze, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the growth and structural and morphologic characterization of stacked layers of self-assembled GeSn dots grown on Si (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperature T = 350 °C. Samples consist of layers (from 1 up to 10) of Ge0.96Sn0.04 self-assembled dots separated by Si spacer layers, 10 nm thick. Their structural analysis was performed based on transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman scattering. We found that up to 4 stacks of dots could be grown with good dot layer homogeneity, making the GeSn dots interesting candidates for optoelectronic device applications.

  6. Bio-inspired hierarchical self-assembly of nanotubes into multi-dimensional and multi-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Lu, Qinghua; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2011-12-01

    As inspired from nature's strategy to prepare collagen, herein we report a hierarchical solution self-assembly method to prepare multi-dimensional and multi-scale supra-structures from the building blocks of pristine titanate nanotubes (TNTs) around 10 nm. With the help of amylose, the nanotubes was continuously self-assembled into helically wrapped TNTs, highly aligned fibres, large bundles, 2D crystal facets and 3D core-shell hybrid crystals. The amyloses work as the glue molecules to drive and direct the hierarchical self-assembly process extending from microscopic to macroscopic scale. The whole self-assembly process as well as the self-assembly structures were carefully characterized by the combination methods of 1H NMR, CD, Hr-SEM, AFM, Hr-TEM, SAED pattern and EDX measurements. A hierarchical self-assembly mechanism was also proposed.As inspired from nature's strategy to prepare collagen, herein we report a hierarchical solution self-assembly method to prepare multi-dimensional and multi-scale supra-structures from the building blocks of pristine titanate nanotubes (TNTs) around 10 nm. With the help of amylose, the nanotubes was continuously self-assembled into helically wrapped TNTs, highly aligned fibres, large bundles, 2D crystal facets and 3D core-shell hybrid crystals. The amyloses work as the glue molecules to drive and direct the hierarchical self-assembly process extending from microscopic to macroscopic scale. The whole self-assembly process as well as the self-assembly structures were carefully characterized by the combination methods of 1H NMR, CD, Hr-SEM, AFM, Hr-TEM, SAED pattern and EDX measurements. A hierarchical self-assembly mechanism was also proposed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the A/TNTs and TNT crystals. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11151e

  7. Self-Assembled, Iridescent, Crustacean-Mimetic Nanocomposites with Tailored Periodicity and Layered Cuticular Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baochun; Walther, Andreas

    2015-11-24

    Natural high-performance materials inspire the pursuit of ordered hard/soft nanocomposite structures at high fractions of reinforcements and with balanced molecular interactions. Herein, we develop a facile, waterborne self-assembly pathway to mimic the multiscale cuticle structure of the crustacean armor by combining hard reinforcing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with soft poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We show iridescent CNC nanocomposites with cholesteric liquid-crystal structure, in which different helical pitches and photonic band gaps can be realized by varying the CNC/PVA ratio. We further show that multilayered crustacean-mimetic materials with tailored periodicity and layered cuticular structure can be obtained by sequential preparation pathways. The transition from a cholesteric to a disordered structure occurs for a critical polymer concentration. Correspondingly, we find a transition from stiff and strong mechanical behavior to materials with increasing ductility. Crack propagation studies using scanning electron microscopy visualize the different crack growth and toughening mechanisms inside cholesteric nanocomposites as a function of the interstitial polymer content for the first time. Different extents of crack deflection, layered delamination, ligament bridging, and constrained microcracking can be observed. Drawing of highly plasticized films sheds light on the mechanistic details of the transition from a cholesteric/chiral nematic to a nematic structure. The study demonstrates how self-assembly of biobased CNCs in combination with suitable polymers can be used to replicate a hierarchical biological structure and how future design of these ordered multifunctional nanocomposites can be optimized by understanding mechanistic details of deformation and fracture.

  8. Polymer-virus core-shell structures prepared via co-assembly and template synthesis methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUTHIWANGCHAROEN; Nisaraporn; PREVELIGE; Peter; E.Jr

    2010-01-01

    Bionanoparticles(BNPs),consisting of virus and virus-like assemblies,have attracted much attention in the biomedical field for their applications such as imaging and targeted drug delivery,owing to their well-defined structures and well-controlled chemistries.BNPs-based core-shell structures provide a unique system for the investigation of biological interactions such as protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions.However,it is still a challenge to prepare the BNPs-based core-shell structures.Herein,we describe(i) co-assembly method and(ii) template synthesis method in the development of polymer-BNPs core-shell structures.These two methods can be divided into three different systems.In system A,different polymers including poly(2-vinylpyridine)(P2VP),poly(4-vinylpyridine)(P4VP) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)(PCL-b-P2VP) can form a raspberry-like structure with BNPs.In system B,polystyrene(PS) spheres end capped with free amine and BNPs can form a core-shell structure.In System C,layer-by-layer(LBL) method is used to prepare positive charged PS particles,which can be used as a template to form the core-shell structures with BNPs.These two methods may open a new way for preparing novel protein-based functional materials for potential applications in the biomedical field.

  9. Thermally-nucleated self-assembly of water and alcohol into stable structures at hydrophobic interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Giofrè, Daniele; José Segura, Juan; Stellacci, Francesco; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    At the interface with solids, the mobility of liquid molecules tends to be reduced compared with bulk, often resulting in increased local order due to interactions with the surface of the solid. At room temperature, liquids such as water and methanol can form solvation structures, but the molecules remain highly mobile, thus preventing the formation of long-lived supramolecular assemblies. Here we show that mixtures of water with methanol can form a novel type of interfaces with hydrophobic s...

  10. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  11. Structure of a strong supernova shock wave and rapid electron acceleration confined in its transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Shimada, Nobue; Amano, Takanobu; 10.1063/1.3322828

    2010-01-01

    A new rapid energization process within a supernova shock transition region (STR) is reported by utilizing numerical simulation. Although the scale of a STR as a main dissipation region is only several hundreds of thousands km, several interesting structures are found relating to generation of a root of the energetic particles. The nonlinear evolution of plasma instabilities lead to a dynamical change in the ion phase space distribution which associates with change of the field properties. As a result, different types of large-amplitude field structures appear. One is the leading wave packet and another is a series of magnetic solitary humps. Each field structure has a microscopic scale (~ the ion inertia length). Through the multiple nonlinear scattering between these large-amplitude field structures, electrons are accelerated directly. Within a STR, quick thermalization realizes energy equipartition between the ion and electron, hot electrons play an important role in keeping these large-amplitude field str...

  12. Thermodynamic and structural analysis of microtubule assembly: the role of GTP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulevic, B; Correia, J J

    1997-03-01

    that assembly with GTP/2 M glycerol and with taxol is consistent with conformational rearrangements in 3-6% of the total amino acids in the heterodimer. In addition, taxol binding contributes to the thermodynamics of the overall process by reducing the delta H degree and delta S degree for microtubule assembly. In the presence of GMPCPP or GMPCP, tubulin subunits associate with extensive conformational rearrangement, corresponding to 10% and 26% of the total amino acids in the heterodimer, respectively, which gives rise to a large loss of configurational entropy. An alternative, and probably preferable, interpretation of these data is that, especially with GMPCP-tubulin, additional isomerization or protonation events are induced by the presence of the methylene moiety and linked to microtubule assembly. Structural analysis shows that GTP hydrolysis is not required for sheet closure into a microtubule cylinder, but only increases the probability of this event occurring. Sheet extensions and sheet polymers appear to have a similar average length under various conditions, suggesting that the minimum cooperative unit for closure of sheets into a microtubule cylinder is approximately 400 nm long. Because of their low level of occurrence, sheets are not expected to significantly affect the thermodynamics of assembly.

  13. Comparative self-assembly studies and self-sorting of two structurally isomeric naphthalene-diimide (NDI)-gelators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindita Das; Mijanur Rahaman Molla; Suhrit Ghosh

    2011-11-01

    We have reported here a comparative self-assembly and gelation studies of two isomeric bis-amide functionalized NDI-derivatives. In one case (NDI-1) the two amide groups were placed symmetrically on either side of the chromophore while for the other system (NDI-2) they were located on same side. In non-polar solvent both isomers formed self-assembled structures by synergistic effect of -stacking and hydrogen-bonding. The propensity for self-assembly of NDI-1 was greater due to symmetrical placement of two amide groups on either arms of this chromophore which allowed -stacking in tandem with hydrogen-bonding, while NDI-2 formed thermally more stable self-assembled fibres possibly due to location of two amide groups in close proximity along single arm of this chromophore. The structural difference in these two isomers lead to distinctly different morphology of their respective self-assembled structures which was further reflected on their gelation properties. Morphology of the self-assembled array of NDI-1 showed organized and regular entangled bundles of nanorods which imparted better gelation ability to this chromophore while the self-assembled fibres of NDI-2 showed less ordered and irregular fibres. We also probed self- assembly of these two chromophores in their mixture which revealed orthogonal assembly of the individual chromophores and no molecular mixing was noticed.

  14. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (UMM)

    2011-07-25

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage {psi}29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of {psi}29 DNA.

  15. Structural Integrity Evaluation of In-Pool Assembly in Cold Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seok Hoon; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, J. W.; Kim, Y. K

    2007-03-15

    The condition for the transient operation was defined to provide the design data of the load combination, which is needed for the fatigue analysis and the component design for the In-Pool Assembly. Although the moderator vessel is classified by the Safety Class 3, the evaluation of the structural integrity was performed by the design procedure of ASME Sec. III, NB based on the concept of the design by analysis. The material for the moderator vessel and vacuum vessel is AL6061 T6. The material properties is prepared by ASME Sec. II, Part D,but those over the temperature were made using the extrapolation and the conservative value. Code Case N-519 was applied to provide the design stress intensity in condition of low temperature. The structural analysis of the vacuum tube was carried out for the vacuum pressure vessel, upper flange and bolt and the material of the upper flange and the bolt is SA182 F304 and SA193 B8, respectively. The detail analysis considering the load combination according to the service level was performed to evaluate the structural integrity. Also, the fracture mechanics evaluation for the In-Pool Assembly was carried out to guarantee the integrity of the In-Pool Assembly from the rapid fracture damage.

  16. Towards the assembly of structurally precise graphene nanoribbons for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J.; Arslan, Hasan; Crick, Colin; Saathoff, Jonathan D.; Clancy, Paulette; Dichtel, William R.; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Graphene's lack of band gap has been a bottleneck that limits its use in transistors. One promising approach to open up a gap in its band structure is to narrow the width of graphene, i.e., make ``nanoribbons.'' Bottom-up synthesis is a most promising method to produce structurally precise nanoribbons. But the assembly and patterning of these nanoribbons remains a challenge. In this study, we demonstrate a method for the assembly of structurally precise graphene nanoribbons. We observe preferential adsorption of nanoribbons on gold surfaces as opposed to silicon dioxide surfaces with aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Importantly, we can tune the coverage of graphene nanoribbons through appropriate surface treatments. Graphene nanoribbon adsorption on a gold surface that had been modified with pentafluorobenzenethiol, for example, is higher than that on ozone-cleaned gold, as evidenced by higher D and G band intensities in its Raman spectra. The ability to tune the surface coverage through surface treatment provides a unique opportunity to assemble and pattern graphene nanoribbons for electronic applications.

  17. Fabrication of First 4-m Coils for the LARP MQXFA Quadrupole and Assembly in Mirror Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holik, E. F. [Angelo State U.; Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Anerella, M. [Brookhaven; Bossert, R. [Fermilab; Cavanna, E. [CERN; Cheng, D. [LBNL, Berkeley; Dietderich, D. R. [LBNL, Berkeley; Ferracin, P. [CERN; Ghosh, A. K. [Brookhaven; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo [CERN; Krave, S. [Fermilab; Nobrega, A. [Fermilab; Perez, J. C. [CERN; Pong, I. [LBNL, Berkeley; Sabbi, G. L. [LBNL, Berkeley; Santini, C. [Fermilab; Schmalzle, J. [Brookhaven; Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven; Wang, X. [LBNL, Berkeley; Yu, M. [Fermilab

    2017-01-23

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program is constructing prototype interaction region quadrupoles as part of the US in-kind contribution to the Hi-Lumi LHC project. The low-beta MQXFA Q1/Q3 coils have a 4-m length and a 150 mm bore. The design is first validated on short, one meter models (MQXFS) developed as part of the longstanding Nb3Sn quadrupole R&D by LARP in collaboration with CERN. In parallel, facilities and tooling are being developed and refined at BNL, LBNL, and FNAL to enable long coil production, assembly, and cold testing. Long length scale-up is based on the experience from the LARP 90 mm aperture (TQ-LQ) and 120 mm aperture (HQ and Long HQ) programs. A 4-m long MQXF practice coil was fabricated, water jet cut and analyzed to verify procedures, parts, and tooling. In parallel, the first complete prototype coil (QXFP01a) was fabricated and assembled in a long magnetic mirror, MQXFPM1, to provide early feedback on coil design and fabrication following the successful experience of previous LARP mirror tests.

  18. Acceleration of vascular sprouting from fabricated perfusable vascular-like structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Osaki

    Full Text Available Fabrication of vascular networks is essential for engineering three-dimensional thick tissues and organs in the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we describe the fabrication of perfusable vascular-like structures by transferring endothelial cells using an electrochemical reaction as well as acceleration of subsequent endothelial sprouting by two stimuli: phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and fluidic shear stress. The electrochemical transfer of cells was achieved using an oligopeptide that formed a dense molecular layer on a gold surface and was then electrochemically desorbed from the surface. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, adhered to gold-coated needles (ϕ600 μm via the oligopeptide, were transferred to collagen gel along with electrochemical desorption of the molecular layer, resulting in the formation of endothelial cell-lined vascular-like structures. In the following culture, the endothelial cells migrated into the collagen gel and formed branched luminal structures. However, this branching process was strikingly slow (>14 d and the cell layers on the internal surfaces became disrupted in some regions. To address these issues, we examined the effects of the protein kinase C (PKC activator, PMA, and shear stress generated by medium flow. Addition of PMA at an optimum concentration significantly accelerated migration, vascular network formation, and its stabilization. Exposure to shear stress reoriented the cells in the direction of the medium flow and further accelerated vascular network formation. Because of the synergistic effects, HUVECs began to sprout as early as 3 d of perfusion culture and neighboring vascular-like structures were bridged within 5 d. Although further investigations of vascular functions need to be performed, this approach may be an effective strategy for rapid fabrication of perfusable microvascular networks when engineering three-dimensional fully

  19. Diverse supramolecular structures formed by self‐assembling proteins of the B acillus subtilis spore coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuo; Wan, Qiang; Krajcikova, Daniela; Tang, Jilin; Tzokov, Svetomir B.; Barak, Imrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial spores (endospores), such as those of the pathogens C lostridium difficile and B acillus anthracis, are uniquely stable cell forms, highly resistant to harsh environmental insults. B acillus subtilis is the best studied spore‐former and we have used it to address the question of how the spore coat is assembled from multiple components to form a robust, protective superstructure. B . subtilis coat proteins (CotY, CotE, CotV and CotW) expressed in E scherichia coli can arrange intracellularly into highly stable macro‐structures through processes of self‐assembly. Using electron microscopy, we demonstrate the capacity of these proteins to generate ordered one‐dimensional fibres, two‐dimensional sheets and three‐dimensional stacks. In one case (CotY), the high degree of order favours strong, cooperative intracellular disulfide cross‐linking. Assemblies of this kind could form exquisitely adapted building blocks for higher‐order assembly across all spore‐formers. These physically robust arrayed units could also have novel applications in nano‐biotechnology processes. PMID:25872412

  20. Accelerating universe and the time-dependent fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    I start with assuming a gravitational scalar field as the dark-energy supposed to be responsible for the accelerating universe. Also from the point of view of unification, a scalar field implies a time-variability of certain “constants” in Nature. In this context I once derived a relation for the time-variability of the fine-structure constant α: Δα/α =ζ Ƶ(α/π) Δσ, where ζ and Ƶ are the constants of the order one, while σ on the right-hand side is the scalar field in action in the accelerating universe. I use the reduced Planckian units with c=ℏ =MP(=(8π G)-1/2)=1. I then compared the dynamics of the accelerating universe, on one hand, and Δα/α derived from the analyses of QSO absorption lines, Oklo phenomenon, also different atomic clocks in the laboratories, on the other hand. I am here going to discuss the theoretical background of the relation, based on the scalar-tensor theory invented first by Jordan in 1955.

  1. Thermally Induced Ultra High Cycle Fatigue of Copper Alloys of the High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    In order to keep the overall length of the compact linear collider (CLIC), currently being studied at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), within reasonable limits, i.e. less than 50 km, an accelerating gradient above 100 MV/m is required. This imposes considerable demands on the materials of the accelerating structures. The internal surfaces of these core components of a linear accelerator are exposed to pulsed radio frequency (RF) currents resulting in cyclic thermal stresses expected to cause surface damage by fatigue. The designed lifetime of CLIC is 20 years, which results in a number of thermal stress cycles of the order of 2.33•1010. Since no fatigue data existed in the literature for CLIC parameter space, a set of three complementary experiments were initiated: ultra high cycle mechanical fatigue by ultrasound, low cycle fatigue by pulsed laser irradiation and low cycle thermal fatigue by high power microwaves, each test representing a subset of the original problem. High conductiv...

  2. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors.

  3. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Felicie F; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

     The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...

  4. CLUSTER: concept study and design of a low-medium {beta} accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaldi, U. [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 (Italy); Citterio, A. [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca (Italy); Crescenti, M.; Giuliacci, A. [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 (Italy); Tronci, C. [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 (Italy); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Zennaro, R. [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A novel linear accelerating structure is proposed particularly suited for hadrontherapy applications. The main features are compactness, due to the high frequency and consequent large gradients, and good power efficiency, especially at low beam velocities, obtained by using coupled H-mode cavities. The structure is called CLUSTER which stands for 'Coupled cavity Linac USing Transverse Electric Radial field'. In order to compare the performances of this structure with other hadrontherapy linac designs operating at high frequencies, a conceptual study has been performed by choosing the frequency of 3 GHz. Moreover a proof of principle of the radiofrequency behaviour of the cavity has been obtained by RF measurements on a prototype running at 1 GHz.

  5. High-Gradient test results from a CLIC prototype accelerating structure : TD26CC

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, A; Farabolini, W; Grudiev, A; Kovermann, J; Montessinos, E; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wegner, R; Wuensch, W; Solodko, A; Woolley, B

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study has progressively tested prototype accelerating structures which incorporate an ever increasing number of features which are needed for a final version ready to be installed in a linear collider. The most recent high power test made in the CERN X-band test stand, Xbox-1, is of a CERN-built prototype which includes damping features but also compact input and output power couplers, which maximize the overall length to active gradient ratio of the structure. The structure’s high-gradient performance, 105 MV/m at 250 ns pulse length and low breakdown rate, matches previously tested structures validating both CERN fabrication and the compact coupler design.

  6. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity milkweed fibers have intra fiber porosities of 0.81 and 0.83, respectively. All the fiber assemblies showed higher oil sorption capacity with the high density oil as compared to the diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents.

  7. A STUDY ON APPLICABILITY OF GROUND RESPONSE ACCELERATION METHOD TO DEEP VERTICAL UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mai; Shiba, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuaki

    This paper discusses the applicability of ground response acceleration method to seismic analysis for deep vertical underground structures. To examine the applicability, an analysis of relationships between response of ground and the shaft was conducted. It was found from the analysis that vertical axial stress of the shaft was not correspond with shear stress of ground. Accordingly, it was concluded that the axial stress was not evaluated correctly by the existing method. Therefore, to extend the applicability of the method, ground responses correlated with the axial stress were analyzed and a new method using these ground responses was proposed.

  8. Drying-Mediated Self-Assembly of Highly Ordered Complex Structures: From Polymers to Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqun

    2009-03-01

    Drying of a sessile drop containing nonvolatile solutes readily self-assembles into a number of concentric ``coffee rings'' by repetitive ``stick-slip'' motion of the three-phase contact line. However, due mainly to lack of control over the evaporation process of the drop, the challenge remains to use evaporative self-assembly to rationally ``synthesize'' ``coffee rings'' of different shapes and sizes of high regularity and fidelity. Here, we report a facile, robust, and one-step evaporation method for producing in a precisely controllable manner versatile microstructures possessing high regularity, dispensing with the need for lithographic techniques and externally applied fields. Polymer or nanocrystal solutions are confined in a simple geometry comprised of a curved surface placed upon a flat substrate. By changing the shape of the upper surface of the imposed geometry, the controlled, evaporative self-assembly of polymer or nanocrystal solutions yields a variety of complex, intriguing, and well-ordered structures over large areas. As such, this method represents a significant advance in creating regularly organized, complex structures with potential applications in microelectronics, optoelectronics, and biotechnology, among other areas.

  9. High Leverage Technologies for In-Space Assembly of Complex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Doris; Bowman, Lynn M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Gilman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In-space assembly (ISA), the ability to build structures in space, has the potential to enable or support a wide range of advanced mission capabilities. Many different individual assembly technologies would be needed in different combinations to serve many mission concepts. The many-to-many relationship between mission needs and technologies makes it difficult to determine exactly which specific technologies should receive priority for development and demonstration. Furthermore, because enabling technologies are still immature, no realistic, near-term design reference mission has been described that would form the basis for flowing down requirements for such development and demonstration. This broad applicability without a single, well-articulated mission makes it difficult to advance the technology all the way to flight readiness. This paper reports on a study that prioritized individual technologies across a broad field of possible missions to determine priority for future technology investment.

  10. Structure and function of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways

    CERN Document Server

    Mortezaei, Narges; Shao, Paul P; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared to CFA/I fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and to Pfimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to un...

  11. Centrifugation-assisted Assembly of Colloidal Silica into Crack-Free and Transferrable Films with Tunable Crystalline Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen; Chen, Min; Yang, Shu; Wu, Limin

    2015-07-10

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles into colloidal films has many actual and potential applications. While various strategies have been developed to direct the assembly of colloidal particles, fabrication of crack-free and transferrable colloidal film with controllable crystal structures still remains a major challenge. Here we show a centrifugation-assisted assembly of colloidal silica spheres into free-standing colloidal film by using the liquid/liquid interfaces of three immiscible phases. Through independent control of centrifugal force and interparticle electrostatic repulsion, polycrystalline, single-crystalline and quasi-amorphous structures can be readily obtained. More importantly, by dehydration of silica particles during centrifugation, the spontaneous formation of capillary water bridges between particles enables the binding and pre-shrinkage of the assembled array at the fluid interface. Thus the assembled colloidal films are not only crack-free, but also robust and flexible enough to be easily transferred on various planar and curved substrates.

  12. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Stasiewicz, K; Eliasson, B; Strumik, M; Yamauchi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  13. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P.; Koppelman, David M.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J.; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  14. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249.

  15. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249.

  16. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Laboratory

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  17. Structure and Property Changes in Self-Assembled Lubricin Layers Induced by Calcium Ion Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George W; Thapa, Rajiv; Holt, Stephen A; Wang, Xiaoen; Garvey, Christopher J; Tabor, Rico F

    2017-03-14

    Lubricin (LUB) is a "mucin-like" glycoprotein found in synovial fluids and coating the cartilage surfaces of articular joints, which is now generally accepted as one of the body's primary boundary lubricants and antiadhesive agents. LUB's superior lubrication and antiadhesion are believed to derive from its unique interfacial properties by which LUB molecules adhere to surfaces (and biomolecules, such as hyaluronic acid and collagen) through discrete interactions localized to its two terminal end domains. These regionally specific interactions lead to self-assembly behavior and the formation of a well-ordered "telechelic" polymer brush structure on most substrates. Despite its importance to biological lubrication, detailed knowledge on the LUB's self-assembled brush structure is insufficient and derived mostly from indirect and circumstantial evidence. Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to directly probe the self-assembled LUB layers, confirming the polymer brush architecture and resolving the degree of hydration and level of surface coverage. While attempting to improve the LUB contrast in the NR measurements, the LUB layers were exposed to a 20 mM solution of CaCl2, which resulted in a significant change in the polymer brush structural parameters consisting of a partial denaturation of the surface-binding end-domain regions, partial dehydration of the internal mucin-domain "loop", and collapse of the outer mucin-domain surface region. A series of atomic force microscopy measurements investigating the LUB layer surface morphology, mechanical properties, and adhesion forces in phosphate-buffered saline and CaCl2 solutions reveal that the structural changes induced by calcium ion interactions also significantly alter key properties, which may have implications to LUB's efficacy as a boundary lubricant and wear protector in the presence of elevated calcium ion concentrations.

  18. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  19. Artificial intelligence approach to planning the robotic assembly of large tetrahedral truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homemdemello, Luiz S.

    1992-01-01

    An assembly planner for tetrahedral truss structures is presented. To overcome the difficulties due to the large number of parts, the planner exploits the simplicity and uniformity of the shapes of the parts and the regularity of their interconnection. The planning automation is based on the computational formalism known as production system. The global data base consists of a hexagonal grid representation of the truss structure. This representation captures the regularity of tetrahedral truss structures and their multiple hierarchies. It maps into quadratic grids and can be implemented in a computer by using a two-dimensional array data structure. By maintaining the multiple hierarchies explicitly in the model, the choice of a particular hierarchy is only made when needed, thus allowing a more informed decision. Furthermore, testing the preconditions of the production rules is simple because the patterned way in which the struts are interconnected is incorporated into the topology of the hexagonal grid. A directed graph representation of assembly sequences allows the use of both graph search and backtracking control strategies.

  20. Effects of particle self-assembly and structural disjoining pressure on wetting kinetics of nanofluid droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui; Hu, Han; Duan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Ying

    2013-11-01

    The wettability of nanofluids, fluids containing suspensions of nanometer-sized particles, is of particular interest to microfluidic systems. Previous studies showed that the self-assembly of nanoparticles in the vicinity of the contact line gives rise to a structural disjoining pressure, which greatly affects the wettability of nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger. In this study, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate was studied via molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effects nanoparticle self-assembly. To mimic the effect of structural disjoining pressure, the excess disjoining pressure was calculated for a pure water film on a gold substrate with a smooth surface on one end and ordered nano-pillar structures on the other. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The spreading enhancement of nanofluids due to the presence of structural disjoining pressure as a result of nanoparticle ordering is not the case for this nano-droplet spreading system. NSFC (No. 21176133) and the US National Science Foundation (Grant No. CAREER-0968927 and No. DMR-1104835).

  1. Structural Investigations of Surfaces and Orientation-SpecificPhenomena in Nanocrystals and Their Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruguete, Deborah Michiko [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Studies of colloidal nanocrystals and their assemblies are presented. Two of these studies concern the atomic-level structural characterization of the surfaces, interfaces, and interiors present in II-VI semiconductor nanorods. The third study investigates the crystallographic arrangement of cobalt nanocrystals in self-assembled aggregates. Crystallographically-aligned assemblies of colloidal CdSe nanorods are examined with linearly-polarized Se-EXAFS spectroscopy, which probes bonding along different directions in the nanorod. This orientation-specific probe is used, because it is expected that the presence of specific surfaces in a nanorod might cause bond relaxations specific to different crystallographic directions. Se-Se distances are found to be contracted along the long axis of the nanorod, while Cd-Se distances display no angular dependence, which is different from the bulk. Ab-initio density functional theory calculations upon CdSe nanowires indicate that relaxations on the rod surfaces cause these changes. ZnS/CdS-CdSe core-shell nanorods are studied with Se, Zn, Cd, and S X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is hypothesized that there are two major factors influencing the core and shell structures of the nanorods: the large surface area-to-volume ratio, and epitaxial strain. The presence of the surface may induce bond rearrangements or relaxations to minimize surface energy; epitaxial strain might cause the core and shell lattices to contract or expand to minimize strain energy. A marked contraction of Zn-S bonds is observed in the core-shell nanorods, indicating that surface relaxations may dominate the structure of the nanorod (strain might otherwise drive the Zn-S lattice to accommodate the larger CdS or CdSe lattices via bond expansion). EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that Cd-Se bond relaxations might be anisotropic, an expected phenomenon for a rod-shaped nanocrystal. Ordered self-assembled aggregates of cobalt nanocrystals are

  2. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  3. Methodology for the structural design of single spoke accelerating cavities at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Donato; Wands, Robert H.; Merio, Margherita; Ristori, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Fermilab is planning to upgrade its accelerator complex to deliver a more powerful and intense proton-beam for neutrino experiments. In the framework of the so-called Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), we are designing and developing a cryomodule containing superconducting accelerating cavities, the Single Spoke Resonators of type 1 (SSR1). In this paper, we present the sequence of analysis and calculations performed for the structural design of these cavities, using the rules of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC). The lack of an accepted procedure for addressing the design, fabrication, and inspection of such unique pressure vessels makes the task demanding and challenging every time. Several factors such as exotic materials, unqualified brazing procedures, limited nondestructive examination, and the general R&D nature of these early generations of cavity design, conspire to make it impractical to obtain full compliance with all ASME BPVC requirements. However, the presented approach allowed us to validate the design of this new generation of single spoke cavities with values of maximum allowable working pressure that exceeds the safety requirements. This set of rules could be used as a starting point for the structural design and development of similar objects.

  4. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  5. Laser Acceleration and Deflection of 96.3 keV Electrons with a Silicon Dielectric Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Leedle, Kenneth J; Byer, Robert L; Harris, James S

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultra-small and ultrafast science, but their size and cost has prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives like the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a five nanojoule, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and sub-optical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercial lasers and sub-femtosecond electron beam experiments.

  6. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem,, E-mail: wazim_me@hotmail.com; Murtaza, Ghulam; Elahi, Nadeem

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Finite element model of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly produced, using Shell181 elements. • Non-linear contact and buckling analysis have been performed. • Structural integrity and stress measurement of fuel assembly is calculated. • Calculated stresses and deformations, are compared with test results. • Results of both studies are comparable, which validate finite element methodology. - Abstract: Fuel assembly of the PWR nuclear power plant is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the fuel assembly (FA) of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant-1 (CHASNUPP-1) at room temperature in air. Non-linear contact and buckling analyses have been performed using ANSYS 13.0, in-order to determine the FA's deformation behaviour as well as the location/values of the maximum stress intensity and stresses developed in axial direction under applied compression load of 7350 N or 1.6 g being the FA's handling load (Zhang et al., 1994). The finite element (FE) model comprises spacer grids, fuel rods, flexible contact between the fuel rods and grids’ supports system (springs and dimples) and guide thimbles with dash-pots and flow holes, in addition to the spot welds between spacer grids and guide thimbles, has been developed using Shell181, Conta174 and Targe170 elements. FA is a non-straight structure. The actual behaviour of the geometry is non-linear. The value of the perturbation force is related to the geometry of the model and/or the tolerance defined for the geometry. Therefore, a sensitivity study has been made to determine the appropriate value of an arbitrary perturbation load. It has been observed that FA deformation values obtained through FE analysis and experiment (SNERDI Tech Doc, 1994) under applied compression load are comparable and show linear behaviours. Therefore, it is confirmed that buckling of FA will not occur at the specified load. Moreover, the values of stresses obtained

  7. Convergence acceleration for partitioned simulations of the fluid-structure interaction in arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Lars; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Düster, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We present a partitioned approach to fluid-structure interaction problems arising in analyses of blood flow in arteries. Several strategies to accelerate the convergence of the fixed-point iteration resulting from the coupling of the fluid and the structural sub-problem are investigated. The Aitken relaxation and variants of the interface quasi-Newton -least-squares method are applied to different test cases. A hybrid variant of two well-known variants of the interface quasi-Newton-least-squares method is found to perform best. The test cases cover the typical boundary value problem faced when simulating the fluid-structure interaction in arteries, including a strong added mass effect and a wet surface which accounts for a large part of the overall surface of each sub-problem. A rubber-like Neo Hookean material model and a soft-tissue-like Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden material model are used to describe the artery wall and are compared in terms of stability and computational expenses. To avoid any kind of locking, high-order finite elements are used to discretize the structural sub-problem. The finite volume method is employed to discretize the fluid sub-problem. We investigate the influence of mass-proportional damping and the material model chosen for the artery on the performance and stability of the acceleration strategies as well as on the simulation results. To show the applicability of the partitioned approach to clinical relevant studies, the hemodynamics in a pathologically deformed artery are investigated, taking the findings of the test case simulations into account.

  8. Secondary Structure Transition and Critical Stress for a Model of Spider Silk Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesa, Tristan; Perry, Carole C; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-08

    Spiders spin their silk from an aqueous solution to a solid fiber in ambient conditions. However, to date, the assembly mechanism in the spider silk gland has not been satisfactorily explained. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to model Nephila clavipes MaSp1 dragline silk formation under shear flow and determine the secondary structure transitions leading to the experimentally observed fiber structures. While no experiments are performed on the silk fiber itself, insights from this polypeptide model can be transferred to the fiber scale. The novelty of this study lies in the calculation of the shear stress (300-700 MPa) required for fiber formation and identification of the amino acid residues involved in the transition. This is the first time that the shear stress has been quantified in connection with a secondary structure transition. By study of molecules containing varying numbers of contiguous MaSp1 repeats, we determine that the smallest molecule size giving rise to a "silk-like" structure contains six polyalanine repeats. Through a probability analysis of the secondary structure, we identify specific amino acids that transition from α-helix to β-sheet. In addition to portions of the polyalanine section, these amino acids include glycine, leucine, and glutamine. The stability of β-sheet structures appears to arise from a close proximity in space of helices in the initial spidroin state. Our results are in agreement with the forces exerted by spiders in the silking process and the experimentally determined global secondary structure of spidroin and pulled MaSp1 silk. Our study emphasizes the role of shear in the assembly process of silk and can guide the design of microfluidic devices that attempt to mimic the natural spinning process and predict molecular requirements for the next generation of silk-based functional materials.

  9. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  10. Exhaustive analysis of the modular structure of the spliceosomal assembly network: a petri net approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortfeldt, Ralf H; Schuster, Stefan; Koch, Ina

    2011-01-01

    Spliceosomes are macro-complexes involving hundreds of proteins with many functional interactions. Spliceosome assembly belongs to the key processes that enable splicing of mRNA and modulate alternative splicing. A detailed list of factors involved in spliceosomal reactions has been assorted over the past decade, but, their functional interplay is often unknown and most of the present biological models cover only parts of the complete assembly process. It is a challenging task to build a computational model that integrates dispersed knowledge and combines a multitude of reaction schemes proposed earlier. Because for most reactions involved in spliceosome assembly kinetic parameters are not available, we propose a discrete modeling using Petri nets, through which we are enabled to get insights into the system's behavior via computation of structural and dynamic properties. In this paper, we compile and examine reactions from experimental reports that contribute to a functional spliceosome. All these reactions form a network, which describes the inventory and conditions necessary to perform the splicing process. The analysis is mainly based on system invariants. Transition invariants (T-invariants) can be interpreted as signaling routes through the network. Due to the huge number of T-invariants that arise with increasing network size and complexity, maximal common transition sets (MCTS) and T-clusters were used for further analysis. Additionally, we introduce a false color map representation, which allows a quick survey of network modules and the visual detection of single reactions or reaction sequences, which participate in more than one signaling route. We designed a structured model of spliceosome assembly, which combines the demands on a platform that i) can display involved factors and concurrent processes, ii) offers the possibility to run computational methods for knowledge extraction, and iii) is successively extendable as new insights into spliceosome

  11. Infrared light-induced protein crystallization. Structuring of protein interfacial water and periodic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, Magdalena; Marchel, Mateusz; Juknaité, Lina; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Romão, Maria João; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N.

    2017-01-01

    We show that a physical trigger, a non-ionizing infrared (IR) radiation at wavelengths strongly absorbed by liquid water, can be used to induce and kinetically control protein (periodic) self-assembly in solution. This phenomenon is explained by considering the effect of IR light on the structuring of protein interfacial water. Our results indicate that the IR radiation can promote enhanced mutual correlations of water molecules in the protein hydration shell. We report on the radiation-induced increase in both the strength and cooperativeness of H-bonds. The presence of a structured dipolar hydration layer can lead to attractive interactions between like-charged biomacromolecules in solution (and crystal nucleation events). Furthermore, our study suggests that enveloping the protein within a layer of structured solvent (an effect enhanced by IR light) can prevent the protein non-specific aggregation favoring periodic self-assembly. Recognizing the ability to affect protein-water interactions by means of IR radiation may have important implications for biological and bio-inspired systems.

  12. Structural architecture of the CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 signalosome: nucleation-induced filamentous assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qi; Yang, Chenghua; Zheng, Chao; Fontán, Lorena; David, Liron; Yu, Xiong; Bracken, Clay; Rosen, Monica; Melnick, Ari; Egelman, Edward H; Wu, Hao

    2013-09-26

    The CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome mediates antigen receptor-induced NF-κB signaling to regulate multiple lymphocyte functions. While CARMA1 and Bcl10 contain caspase recruitment domains (CARDs), MALT1 is a paracaspase with structural similarity to caspases. Here we show that the reconstituted CBM signalosome is a helical filamentous assembly in which substoichiometric CARMA1 nucleates Bcl10 filaments. Bcl10 filament formation is a highly cooperative process whose threshold is sensitized by oligomerized CARMA1 upon receptor activation. In cells, both cotransfected CARMA1/Bcl10 complex and the endogenous CBM signalosome are filamentous morphologically. Combining crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron microscopy, we reveal the structure of the Bcl10 CARD filament and the mode of interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirmed the observed interfaces in Bcl10 filament assembly and MALT1 activation in vitro and NF-κB activation in cells. These data support a paradigm of nucleation-induced signal transduction with threshold response due to cooperativity and signal amplification by polymerization.

  13. Structural insights into the assembly of CARMA1 and BCL10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwei Li

    Full Text Available The CBM complex (CARMA1, BCL10 and MALT1 plays a crucial role in B and T lymphocyte activation. CARMA1 serves as a scaffold for BCL10, MALT1 and other effector proteins and regulates various signaling pathways related to the immune response. The assembly of CARMA1 and BCL10 is mediated through a CARD-CARD interaction. Here, we report the crystal structure of the CARD domain of CARMA1 at a resolution of 1.75 Å. The structure consists of six helices, as previously determined for CARD domains. Structural and computational analysis identified the binding interface between CARMA1-CARD and BCL10-CARD, which consists of a basic patch in CARMA1 and an acidic patch in BCL10. Site-directed mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitation and an NF-κB activation assay confirmed that the interface is necessary for association and downstream signaling. Our studies provide molecular insight into the assembly of CARMA1 and BCL10.

  14. Comparing the structural stability of PbS nanocrystals assembled in fcc and bcc superlattice allotropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Kaifu; Wang, Zhongwu; Hanrath, Tobias

    2012-07-04

    We investigated the structural stability of colloidal PbS nanocrystals (NCs) self-assembled into superlattice (SL) allotropes of either face-centered cubic (fcc) or body-centered cubic (bcc) symmetry. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis showed that the NC packing density is higher in the bcc than in the fcc SL; this is a manifestation of the cuboctahedral shape of the NC building block. Using the high-pressure rock-salt/orthorhombic phase transition as a stability indicator, we discovered that the transition pressure for NCs in a bcc SL occurs at 8.5 GPa, which is 1.5 GPa higher than the transition pressure (7.0 GPa) observed for a fcc SL. The higher structural stability in the bcc SL is attributed primarily to the effective absorption of loading force in specific SL symmetry and to a lesser extent to the surface energy of the NCs. The experimental results provide new insights into the fundamental relationship between the symmetry of the self-assembled SL and the structural stability of the constituent NCs.

  15. A structural view on spider silk proteins and their role in fiber assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagn, Franz

    2012-06-01

    Spider silk is the toughest known biomaterial and even outrivals modern synthetic high-performance materials. The question of understanding fiber formation is how the spider can prevent premature and fatal aggregation processes inside its own body and how the chemical and mechanical stimuli used to induce the fiber formation process translate into structural changes of the silk material, finally leading to controlled and irreversible aggregation. Here, the focus will be on the structure and function of the highly conserved N-domains and C-terminal domains of spider dragline silk which, unlike the very long repetitive sequence elements, adopt a folded conformation in solution and are therefore able to control intermolecular interactions and aggregation between other spider silk molecules. The structures of these domains add valuable details for the construction of a molecular picture of the complicated and highly optimized silk assembly process that might be beneficial for large-scale in vitro fiber formation attempts with recombinant silk material.

  16. Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Studies: Structure and Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructures in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Seung

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) techniques are among the most powerful to characterize self-assembling soft materials (colloids, polymers, and microemulsions, etc.) at the nanometer scale, without any need for implicit models or assumptions about the structure. We can even visualize structure under dynamic conditions, capturing each stage of development. In this thesis, cryo-EM has been used to investigate the formation and structure of a variety of self-assembling soft materials. Visualization is complemented by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, and conductivity measurements. In each case, cryo-EM provides new insights, not otherwise available, into the nanostructure development. Self-assembly phenomena at the molecular level are critical to the performance of tremendous number of applied systems ranging from personal care products to industrial products. To evaluate these self-assembled materials, multiple characterization techniques are required. We investigated aggregation behavior of cesium dodecyl sulfate (CsDS) ionic surfactant in aqueous solution. Coupled with the real space data from cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and the inverse space data from SAXS, the experimental result of CsDS in aqueous solution gave a new insight in CsDS micellar structures and their development as a function of concentration. Cryo-TEM showed the presence of the liquid-like hydrocarbon core in the CsDS micelles and relatively thick shell structures at a low CsDS concentration. The core-shell sphere structure micelle shifted to core-shell cylindrical micelle structure at high concentration. The morphology and structure of paclitaxel silicate (PTX) prodrug, encapsulated with amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) diblock copolymers were studied. The six different silicate PTX prodrug candidates were characterized with cryo-TEM. Direct imaging with cryo-TEM illustrated structure of prodrug

  17. Reversible Self-Assembly of Hydrophilic Inorganic Polyelectrolytes into Highly Conservative, Vesicle-like Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Melissa; Bhatt, Anish; Liu, Guang; Liu, Tianbo

    2007-03-01

    The hydrophilic polyoxometalate (POM) macroanions are inorganic polyelectrolytes which offer a direct connection between simple ions and organic polyelectrolytes. POM solutions are perfect model systems for studying polyelectrolyte solutions because they are identical in size, shape, mass and charges, with easily tunable charge density. Many types of POM macroanions are highly soluble but undergo reversible self-assembly to form uniform, stable, soft, single-layer vesicle-like ``blackberry'' structures containing >1000 individual POMs in dilute solutions. The driving force of the blackberry formation is likely counterion-mediated attraction (like-charge attraction). The blackberry size can be accurately controlled by solvent quality, or the charge density on macroions. Many unexpected phenomena have been observed in these novel systems. Blackberry structures may be analogous to virus shell structures formed by capsid proteins. References: Nature, 2003, 426, 59; JACS, 2002, 124, 10942; 2003, 125, 312; 2004, 126, 16690; 2005, 127, 6942; 2006, 128, 10103.

  18. Crystalline structures and misfit strain inside Er silicide nanocrystals self-assembled on Si(001) substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Wu, Yueqin; Song, Junqiang; Li, Juan; Huang, Han; Zou, Jin; Cai, Qun

    2011-06-17

    The morphology and crystalline structure of Er silicide nanocrystals self-assembled on the Si(001) substrate were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the nanowires and nanorods formed at 630 °C has dominant hexagonal AlB(2)-type structure, while inside the nanoislands self-organized at 800 °C the tetragonal ThSi(2)-type structure is prevalent. The lattice analysis via cross-sectional high-resolution TEM demonstrated that internal misfit strain plays an important role in controlling the growth of nanocrystals. With the relaxation of strain, the nanoislands could evolve from a pyramid-like shape into a truncated-hut-like shape.

  19. Structure and property of multiple amino acids assembled on the surface of a CNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuihong; Yang, Guangwu; Jiang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids were placed with maximal filling on the surface of a CNT via hydrogen bonding and H/π interactions. The interaction structures and properties of assembled complexes were investigated via the density functional tight-binding method. The structural parameters and interaction energies were analyzed to identify the weak interaction strengths. We found that the H/π interactions between amino acids and CNTs play more important roles than the hydrogen bonds between amino acids in stabilizing the complex structures. The effect of CNT chirality and amino acid type were also studied. Furthermore, the HOMOs and LUMOs of the representative complexes were also studied to illustrate the interactions. Our data is helpful in the modification of CNTs by biomolecules.

  20. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  1. Assembl y of Poly-3-Hexylthiophene Nano-Crystallites into Low Dimensional Structures Using Indandione Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fahmi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive polymer poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT needles were self-assembled using a second component (indandione derivatives as a linking agent to enhance their long range alignment. The morphologies of the hybrid organic/organic materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Both linear and branched structures could be produced, with the degree of branching depending upon the linker used. Incorporation of indandione derivatives broadened the UV absorbance band of P3HT without significant change to its photoluminescence. This hybrid material could open a promising avenue in photovoltaic applications due to its interesting morphologies and optical properties.

  2. Making a Self-feeding Structure by Assembly of Digital Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussat-Blanc, Sylvain; Luga, Hervé; Duthen, Yves

    In Nature, the intrinsic cooperation between organism's parts is capital. Most living systems are composed of organs, functional units specialized for specific actions. In our last research, we developed an evolutionary model able to generate artificial organs. This paper deals with the assembly of organs. We show, through experimentation, the development of an artificial organism composed of four digital organs able to produce a self-feeding organism. This kind of structure has applications in the mophogenetic-engineering of future nano and bio robots.

  3. Thermal performance of direct illumination high-power LED backlight units with different assembling structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Cen, Jiwen; Cao, Wenjiong; Jiang, Fangming

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a detailed study about the heat dissipation performance of direct illumination high-power light emitting diode (LED) backlight units with two different assembling structures, one of which is traditional and the other is new. The traditional structure, referred to by structure-1, consists of multiple LEDs being directly welded to the printed circuit board (PCB), where the PCB is used as a physical support, an electrical connector and also as a heat dissipation medium. The new structure, referred to by structure-2, places the LEDs directly on the cooling boss; in this case the PCB plays mainly the role of an electrical connector. Thermal characteristics related to the two backlight units are analyzed in terms of thermal resistance network, numerically simulated and experimentally tested. The obtained results by different methods accord with each other reasonably well and all indicate that both structures can meet the requirements of heat dissipation for backlight units at an ambient temperature of 30 °C. Among the two structures, the LED junction temperature of structure-1 backlight unit is 7-8 °C higher and the temperature distribution in the back plane of the backlight unit is also more uniform.

  4. Determination of the Acceleration Region Size in a Loop-structured Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jingnan; Kontar, Eduard P; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung-producing electrons in solar flares, we analyze the evolution of the flare loop size with respect to energy at a variety of times. A GOES M3.7 loop-structured flare starting around 23:55 on 2002 April 14 is studied in detail using \\textit{Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager} (\\textit{RHESSI}) observations. We construct photon and mean-electron-flux maps in 2-keV energy bins by processing observationally-deduced photon and electron visibilities, respectively, through several image-processing methods: a visibility-based forward-fit (FWD) algorithm, a maximum entropy (MEM) procedure and the uv-smooth (UVS) approach. We estimate the sizes of elongated flares (i.e., the length and width of flaring loops) by calculating the second normalized moments of the intensity in any given map. Employing a collisional model with an extended acceleration region, we fit the loop lengths as a function of energy in both the photon and electron domains....

  5. Genesis of the "Critical-Acceleration of MOND" and Its Role in "Formation of Structures"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tank H. K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As an attempt to explain the “flattening of galaxies rotation-curves”, Milgrom proposed a Modification of Newtonian Dynamics MOND, in which he needed a new constant of nature a 0 , termed as “critical-acceleration-of MOND”, in his best-fit empirical formula. But so far it has been an ad-hoc introduction of a new constant. Whereas this article pro- poses: (i a genesis of this constant; (ii explains its recurrences in various physical sit- uations; and (iii its role in determining the size and radii of various structures, like: the electron, the proton, the nucleus-of-atom, the globular-clusters, the spiral-galaxies, the galactic-clusters and the whole universe. In this process we get a new interpretation of “the cosmological-red-shift”, that the linear part of the cosmological-red-shift may not be due to “metric-expansion-of-space”; and even the currently-believed “accelerated- expansion” may be slowing down with time.

  6. The African and Pacific Superplume Structures Constrained by Assembly and Breakup of Pangea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Zhong, S.; Leng, W.; Li, Z.

    2009-12-01

    African hemisphere before the assembly of Pangea is predominated by the cold downwelling structure resulting from plate convergence between Gondwana and Laurussia and the cold Africa hemisphere changes to hot due to the return flows from the circum-Pangea subduction after Pangea formation. Based on our results, we suggest that the African superplume structure may be formed no earlier than ~230 Ma ago (i.e., ~100 Ma after the assembly of Pangea).

  7. Characterization of dermal structural assembly in normal and pathological connective tissues by intrinsic signal multiphoton optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubovitsky, Julia G.; Xu, Xiaoman; Sun, Chung-ho; Andersen, Bogi; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2008-02-01

    Employing a reflectance multi-photon microscopy (MPM) technique, we developed novel method to quantitatively study the three-dimensional assembly of structural proteins within bulk of dermal ECMs. Using a structurally simplified model of skin with enzymatically dissected epidermis, we find that low resolution MPM clearly discriminates between normal and pathological dermis. High-resolution images revealed that the backscattered MPM signals are affected by the assembly of collagen fibrils and fibers within this system. Exposure of tissues to high concentrations of potentially denaturing chemicals also resulted in the reduction of SHG signals from structural proteins which coincided with the appearance of aggregated fluorescent structures.

  8. Investigating the Structure-Property Relationships of Aqueous Self-Assembled Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, Daniel Vincent

    The components of all living organisms are formed through aqueous self-assembly of organic and inorganic materials through physical interactions including hydrophobic, electrostatic, and hydrogen bonding. In this dissertation, these physical interactions were exploited to develop nanostructured materials for a range of applications. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) self-assemble into varying structures depending on the physical interactions of the peptides and tails. PA aggregation was investigated by cryo-TEM to provide insight on the effects of varying parameters, including the number and length of the lipid tails as well as the number, length, charge, hydrophobicity, and the hydrogen bonding ability of the peptides. It was determined that cylindrical micelles are most commonly formed, and that specific criteria must be met in order to form spherical micelles, nanoribbons, vesicles or less ordered aggregates. Controlling the aggregated structure is necessary for many applications---particularly in therapeutics. Additionally, two-headed PAs were designed to act as a catalyst and template for biomimetic mineralization to control the formation of inorganic nanomaterials. Finally, injectable hydrogels made from ABA triblock copolymers were synthesized with the A blocks being functionalized with either guanidinium or sulfonate groups. These oppositely charged polyelectrolyte endblocks formed complex coacervate domains, which served as physical crosslinks in the hydrogel network. The mechanical properties, the network structure, the nature of the coacervate domain and the kinetics of hydrogel formation were investigated as a function of polymer concentration, salt concentration, pH and stoichiometry with rheometry, SAXS and SANS. It was shown that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels was highly dependent on the structural organization of the coacervate domains and that the properties could be tuned with polymer and salt concentration. Polymer and salt concentration were

  9. Ordered assembly of NiCo₂O₄ multiple hierarchical structures for high-performance pseudocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingwen; Xing, Jiachao; Gao, Yanfang; Lv, Xiaojun; He, Yongmei; Guo, Zihan; Li, Yueming

    2014-07-23

    The design and development of nanomaterials has become central to the advancement of pseudocapacitive performance. Many one-dimensional nanostructures (1D NSs), two-dimensional nanostructures (2D NSs), and three-dimensional hierarchical structures (3D HSs) composed of these building blocks have been synthesized as pseudocapacitive materials via different methods. However, due to the unclear assembly mechanism of these NSs, reports of HSs simultaneously assembled from two or more types of NSs are rare. In this article, NiCo2O4 multiple hierarchical structures (MHSs) composed of 1D nanowires and 2D nanosheets are simply grown on Ni foam using an ordered two-step hydrothermal synthesis followed by annealing processing. The low-dimensional nanowire is found to hold priority in the growth order, rather than the high-dimensional nanosheet, thus effectively promoting the integration of these different NSs in the assembly of the NiCo2O4 MHSs. With vast electroactive surface area and favorable mesoporous architecture, the NiCo2O4 MHSs exhibit a high specific capacitance of up to 2623.3 F g(-1), scaled to the active mass of the NiCo2O4 sample at a current density of 1 A g(-1). A nearly constant rate performance of 68% is achieved at a current density ranging from 1 to 40 A g(-1), and the sample retains approximately 94% of its maximum capacitance even after 3000 continuous charge-discharge cycles at a consistently high current density of 10 A g(-1).

  10. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Galip Akay

    2016-01-01

    A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV) induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous s...

  11. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, John J.; Buksa, John J.

    1995-09-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment. Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  12. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  13. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  14. A Near-Atomic Structure of the Dark Apoptosome Provides Insight into Assembly and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Yu, Zhiheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Akey, Christopher W

    2017-01-03

    In Drosophila, the Apaf-1-related killer (Dark) forms an apoptosome that activates procaspases. To investigate function, we have determined a near-atomic structure of Dark double rings using cryo-electron microscopy. We then built a nearly complete model of the apoptosome that includes 7- and 8-blade β-propellers. We find that the preference for dATP during Dark assembly may be governed by Ser325, which is in close proximity to the 2' carbon of the deoxyribose ring. Interestingly, β-propellers in V-shaped domains of the Dark apoptosome are more widely separated, relative to these features in the Apaf-1 apoptosome. This wider spacing may be responsible for the lack of cytochrome c binding to β-propellers in the Dark apoptosome. Our structure also highlights the roles of two loss-of-function mutations that may block Dark assembly. Finally, the improved model provides a framework to understand apical procaspase activation in the intrinsic cell death pathway.

  15. Understanding the structure and performance of self-assembled triblock terpolymer membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, MaryTheresa M.

    2013-10-01

    Nanoporous membranes represent a possible route towards more precise particle and macromolecular separations, which are of interest across many industries. Here, we explored membranes with vertically-aligned nanopores formed from a poly(isoprene-. b-styrene-. b-4 vinyl pyridine) (ISV) triblock terpolymer via a hybrid self-assembly/nonsolvent induced phase separation process (S-NIPS). ISV concentration, solvent composition, and evaporation time in the S-NIPS process were varied to tailor ordering of the selective layer and produce enhanced water permeability. Here, water permeability was doubled over previous versions of ISV membranes. This was achieved by increasing volatile solvent concentration, thereby decreasing the evaporation period required for self-assembly. Fine-tuning was required, however, since overly-rapid evaporation did not yield the desired pore structure. Transport models, used to relate the in-. situ structure to the performance of these materials, revealed narrowing of pores and blocking by the dense region below. It was shown that these vertically aligned nanoporous membranes compare favorably with commercial ultrafiltration membranes formed by NIPS and track-etching processes, which suggests that there is practical value in further developing and optimizing these materials for specific industrial separations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  16. HIV Rev Assembly on the Rev Response Element (RRE: A Structural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Rausch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Rev is an ~13 kD accessory protein expressed during the early stage of virus replication. After translation, Rev enters the nucleus and binds the Rev response element (RRE, a ~350 nucleotide, highly structured element embedded in the env gene in unspliced and singly spliced viral RNA transcripts. Rev-RNA assemblies subsequently recruit Crm1 and other cellular proteins to form larger complexes that are exported from the nucleus. Once in the cytoplasm, the complexes dissociate and unspliced and singly-spliced viral RNAs are packaged into nascent virions or translated into viral structural proteins and enzymes, respectively. Rev binding to the RRE is a complex process, as multiple copies of the protein assemble on the RNA in a coordinated fashion via a series of Rev-Rev and Rev-RNA interactions. Our understanding of the nature of these interactions has been greatly advanced by recent studies using X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and single particle electron microscopy as well as biochemical and genetic methodologies. These advances are discussed in detail in this review, along with perspectives on development of antiviral therapies targeting the HIV-1 RRE.

  17. Assembling structures and dynamics properties of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) at water-titanium oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangzhi; Pan, Gang; Zhang, Meiyi

    2013-09-01

    The surface-associated structures and growth modes of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) at water-rutile TiO2 interfaces were defined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results showed that a compact PFOS layer was generated at the rutile surfaces, and the assembling structures and dynamic profiles were crystal-face-dependent. PFOS molecules were attached to the (110) and (001) surfaces mainly by the sulfonate headgroups. A well-defined monolayer was formed on the (110) surface with the perfluorinated alkyl chains nearly perpendicular to the substrate, whereas the C-F chains were inclined at an angle (30-75°) and formed a hemicylinder-like configuration on the (001) surface. On the other hand, the perfluorinated amphiphiles interacted with the (100) plane through both the sulfonate headgroups (relatively strong electrostatic attraction) and the C-F tailgroups (weak van der Waals forces) and yielded an irregular assembling pattern. Water molecules were mostly concentrated more than 17.0 Å away from the solid surfaces and formed a continuous solvent layer, suggesting the super hydrophobicity of perfluorinated alkyl chains. A counterion-bridging mechanism suggested in surfactant adsorption was observed at the molecular scale, where the sulfonate headgroups were linked together by the potassium ions at the surfaces and caused the formation of surface aggregates.

  18. Self-assembled wiggling nano-structures and the principle of maximum entropy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, A; Hubler, A; Bezryadin, A

    2015-02-09

    While behavior of equilibrium systems is well understood, evolution of nonequilibrium ones is much less clear. Yet, many researches have suggested that the principle of the maximum entropy production is of key importance in complex systems away from equilibrium. Here, we present a quantitative study of large ensembles of carbon nanotubes suspended in a non-conducting non-polar fluid subject to a strong electric field. Being driven out of equilibrium, the suspension spontaneously organizes into an electrically conducting state under a wide range of parameters. Such self-assembly allows the Joule heating and, therefore, the entropy production in the fluid, to be maximized. Curiously, we find that emerging self-assembled structures can start to wiggle. The wiggling takes place only until the entropy production in the suspension reaches its maximum, at which time the wiggling stops and the structure becomes quasi-stable. Thus, we provide strong evidence that maximum entropy production principle plays an essential role in the evolution of self-organizing systems far from equilibrium.

  19. Post-directed-self-assembly membrane fabrication for in situ analysis of block copolymer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Segal-Peretz, T.; Xiong, S.; Kline, R. J.; Arges, C. G.; Nealey, P. F.

    2016-10-01

    Full characterization of the three-dimensional structures resulting from the directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) remains a difficult challenge. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography and resonant soft x-ray scattering have emerged as powerful and complementary methods for through-film characterization; both techniques require samples to be prepared on specialized membrane substrates. Here we report a generalizable process to implement BCP DSA with density multiplication on silicon nitride membranes. A key feature of the process developed here is that it does not introduce any artefacts or damage to the polymer assemblies as DSA is performed prior to back-etched membrane formation. Because most research and applications of BCP lithography are based on silicon substrates, process variations introduced by implementing DSA on a silicon nitride/silicon stack versus silicon were identified and mitigated. Using full-wafers, membranes were fabricated with different sizes and layouts to enable both TEM and x-ray characterization. Finally, both techniques were used to characterize structures resulting from the DSA of lamella-forming BCP with density multiplication.

  20. Thermally-nucleated self-assembly of water and alcohol into stable structures at hydrophobic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Giofrè, Daniele; José Segura, Juan; Stellacci, Francesco; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    At the interface with solids, the mobility of liquid molecules tends to be reduced compared with bulk, often resulting in increased local order due to interactions with the surface of the solid. At room temperature, liquids such as water and methanol can form solvation structures, but the molecules remain highly mobile, thus preventing the formation of long-lived supramolecular assemblies. Here we show that mixtures of water with methanol can form a novel type of interfaces with hydrophobic solids. Combining in situ atomic force microscopy and multiscale molecular dynamics simulations, we identify solid-like two-dimensional interfacial structures that nucleate thermally, and are held together by an extended network of hydrogen bonds. On graphite, nucleation occurs above ∼35 °C, resulting in robust, multilayered nanoscopic patterns. Our findings could have an impact on many fields where water-alcohol mixtures play an important role such as fuel cells, chemical synthesis, self-assembly, catalysis and surface treatments. PMID:27713413

  1. Assembly of alginate microfibers to form a helical structure using micromanipulation with a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Hu, Chengzhi; Li, Pengyun; Nakajima, Masahiro; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    Helical structures assembled using alginate microfibers have a promising spatial architecture mimicking in vivo vessels for culturing vascular cells. However, the helical structure can only be assembled at the macroscale, since a microassembly-based approach has not yet been developed. In this paper, we propose a magnetic-field-based micromanipulation method to fabricate a helical microstructure. By microfluidic spinning, alginate microfibers encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized to enable the control of an electromagnetic needle (EMN). We developed a microrobotic system to actuate a micropipette to fix a free end of the microfiber, and then move the EMN to reel the microfiber around a micropillar. The motion of the EMN is guided using an upright microscope and a side-view camera. Because of the limitation of operation space, a spacer sleeve was designed to keep the tip of the EMN attracted to the microfiber, and simultaneously to keep the other part of the EMN isolated from the microfiber. To ensure the availability of the microfiber for continuously coiling, we enable the EMN tip to slide on the surface of the microfiber without changing the tensioning of the microfiber for positioning control. Furthermore, stable and repeatable micromanipulation was achieved to form multi-turn microfiber coils based on the motion planning of the EMN. Finally, we successfully fabricated a helical microstructure that can be applied in vascular tissue engineering in the future.

  2. Test facility for investigation of heating of 30 GHz accelerating structure imitator for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    Elzhov, A V; Kaminsky, A K; Kuzikov, S V; Perelshtejn, E A; Peskov, N Yu; Petelin, M I; Sedykh, S N; Sergeev, A P; Sergeev, A S; Syratchev, I V; Zaitsev, N I

    2004-01-01

    Since 2001 an experimental test facility for investigation of lifetime of a copper material, with respect to multiple RF pulse actions, was set up on the basis of the JINR (Dubna) FEM oscillator, in collaboration with IAP RAS (Nizhny Novgorod). A high-Q copper cavity, which simulates the parameters of the accelerating structure of the collider CLIC at an operating frequency of 30GHz, is used in the investigation. The experimental setup consists of a wavebeam injector - FEM oscillator (power of similar to 25MW, pulse duration up to 200ns, spectral bandwidth not higher than 0.1%), a quasi-optic two-mirror transmission line, a wave-type converter, and a testing cavity. The frequency and transmission features of the components of the quasi-optic line were analyzed.

  3. Experimental study of DC vacuum breakdown and application to high-gradient accelerating structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Shipman, Nicholas; Jones, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a leading candidate for the next generation high energy linear collider. As any breakdown would result in a partial or full loss of luminosity for the pulse in which it occurs, obtaining a low breakdown rate in CLIC accelerating structures is a critical requirement for the successful operation of the proposed collider. This thesis presents investigations into the breakdown phenomenon primarily in the low breakdown rate regime of interest to CLIC, performed using the CERN DC spark systems between 2011 and 2014. The design, construction and commissioning of several new pieces of hardware, as well as the development of improved techniques to measuring the inter-electrode gap distance are detailed. These hardware improvements were fundamental in enabling the exciting new experiments mentioned below, which in turn have provided significant additional insight into the phenomenon of breakdown. Experiments were performed to measure fundamental parameters of individual breakdowns...

  4. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  5. An improved phase-control system for superconducting low-velocity accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Microphonic fluctuations in the rf eigenfrequency of superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures must be compensated by a fast-tuning system in order to control the rf phase. The tuning system must handle a reactive power proportional to the product of the tuning range and the rf energy content of the resonant cavity. The accelerating field level of many of the SC cavities forming the ATLAS linac has been limited by the rf power capacity of the presently used PIN-diode based fast-tuner. A new system has been developed, utilizing PIN diodes operating immersed in liquid nitrogen, with the diodes controlled by a high-voltage VMOS FET driver. The system has operated at reactive power levels above 20 KVA, a factor of four increase over an earlier design. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  6. A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); College of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054 (China); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

  7. Regulated self-assembly of epitaxial silicon-germanium quantum structures and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervelde, Thomas Edwin

    Most proposed next generation architectures use quantum dots (QDs) in their design. Current lithography techniques either do not have the resolution required or are too time intensive for practical creation of these architectures. This has led many to suggest that the answer lies in self-assembly of QDs. Many unresolved issues, however, remain before we can implement this concept. The four areas of research discussed in this dissertation improve the fundamental understanding of processes involved in self-assembly. Once we had established that our system was producing the highest quality samples, we were able to say with confidence that the structures we observed were due to intrinsic phenomena, and not the result of contamination. In addition, because the existing standard curves lacked the sensitivity associated with modern analytical equipment, we employed more exploratory techniques (i.e. combinatorial epitaxy) to establish base growth conditions and define the evolution of structures. The examination of various growth conditions yielded the discovery of quantum fortresses (QFs), a novel, self-assembled, Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA)-like structure. We mapped the possible conditions under which these QFs form to gain a further understanding of their evolution. Additionally, we electrically tested their ability to act as SETs and quantum mechanically calculated growth conditions that result in those QFs that would best function as a QCA unit cell. To form a QCA circuit, QFs need to align in specific configurations. We investigated the fundamentals of a new technique to direct QF alignment. We demonstrated that FIB-mediated disruption of 1/10th ML or less is sufficient to guide island formation through the creation of preferential binding sites and denuded zones. In addition, we investigated the effect of altering growth conditions on the ability of large-scale features to align QDs. We also examined the ability of QDs to self-order into superlattice structures

  8. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, David J.; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Noro, Massimo G.; Notman, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1) the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2) new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3) evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4) identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general. PMID:26181054

  9. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Bray

    Full Text Available Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1 the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2 new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3 evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4 identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general.

  10. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle

  11. Structural features of anodic oxide films formed on aluminum substrate coated with self-assembled microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asoh, Hidetaka [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kogakuin University, 2665-1 Nakano, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)], E-mail: asoh@cc.kogakuin.ac.jp; Uchibori, Kota; Ono, Sachiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kogakuin University, 2665-1 Nakano, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The structural features of anodic oxide films formed on an aluminum substrate coated with self-assembled microspheres were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the first anodization in neutral solution, the growth of a barrier-type film was partially suppressed in the contact area between the spheres and the underlying aluminum substrate, resulting in the formation of ordered dimple arrays in an anodic oxide film. After the subsequent second anodization in acid solution at a voltage lower than that of the first anodization, nanopores were generated only within each dimple. The nanoporous region could be removed selectively by post-chemical etching using the difference in structural dimensions between the porous region and the surrounding barrier region. The mechanism of anodic oxide growth on the aluminum substrate coated with microspheres through multistep anodization is discussed.

  12. Star PolyMOCs with Diverse Structures, Dynamics, and Functions by Three-Component Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yufeng [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Department of Chemistry, the University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road Hong Kong SAR China; Gu, Yuwei [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Keeler, Eric G. [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Park, Jiwon V. [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Griffin, Robert G. [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA; Johnson, Jeremiah A. [Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA USA

    2016-12-05

    We report star polymer metal–organic cage (polyMOC) materials whose structures, mechanical properties, functionalities, and dynamics can all be precisely tailored through a simple three-component assembly strategy. The star polyMOC network is composed of tetra-arm star polymers functionalized with ligands on the chain ends, small molecule ligands, and palladium ions; polyMOCs are formed via metal–ligand coordination and thermal annealing. The ratio of small molecule ligands to polymer-bound ligands determines the connectivity of the MOC junctions and the network structure. The use of large M12L24 MOCs enables great flexibility in tuning this ratio, which provides access to a rich spectrum of material properties including tunable moduli and relaxation dynamics.

  13. Star PolyMOCs with Diverse Structures, Dynamics, and Functions by Three-Component Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Yuwei; Keeler, Eric G; Park, Jiwon V; Griffin, Robert G; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2017-01-02

    We report star polymer metal-organic cage (polyMOC) materials whose structures, mechanical properties, functionalities, and dynamics can all be precisely tailored through a simple three-component assembly strategy. The star polyMOC network is composed of tetra-arm star polymers functionalized with ligands on the chain ends, small molecule ligands, and palladium ions; polyMOCs are formed via metal-ligand coordination and thermal annealing. The ratio of small molecule ligands to polymer-bound ligands determines the connectivity of the MOC junctions and the network structure. The use of large M12 L24 MOCs enables great flexibility in tuning this ratio, which provides access to a rich spectrum of material properties including tunable moduli and relaxation dynamics.

  14. Sequence dependence of kinetics and morphology of collagen model peptide self-assembly into higher order structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The process of self-assembly of the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 into higher order structure resembles the nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril formation in many features, but the irregular morphology of the self-assembled peptide contrasts with the ordered fibers and networks formed by collagen in vivo. The amino acid sequence in the central region of the (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 peptide was varied and found to affect the kinetics of self-assembly and nature of the higher order st...

  15. Evaluation of seismic acceleration responses of base-isolated and nonisolated structures varying with mechanical characteristics of foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Bong; Lee, Jae Han; Ku, Kyung Hoi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-05-01

    The evaluation of acceleration responses of isolated and nonisolated structures according to mechanical features of soils is important. The kinds of soils taken in analyses are soft, medium and hard rocks, and a fixed base condition is also taken for the comparison. The horizontal isolation frequency used is 0.5 Hz. The time history analyses of reference power plant using 1940 El Centro horizontal (NS) and vertical earthquakes are performed to investigate the seismic responses varying with soil characteristics for isolated and nonisolated structures. The horizontal acceleration responses of the horizontal isolated-structures show almost similar values irrespective of the various kinds of soils and are largely decreased in the frequency ranges above 2 hz. The vertical natural frequency, 21Hz of high damping rubber bearing does not affect the vertical acceleration responses in case of soft rock, but largely affects in hard rock condition. For nonisolated structures, the acceleration responses are decreased in both horizontal and vertical directions by taking into account the soils in the analysis model. The extent of reduction of acceleration responses is larger in vertical direction than in horizontal one, as the stiffness of rock becomes softer. 8 tabs., 21 figs., 8 refs. (Author) .new.

  16. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  17. Structural investigations of self-assembled monolayers for organic electronics: results from X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khassanov, Artoem; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Schmaltz, Thomas; Magerl, Andreas; Halik, Marcus

    2015-07-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been established as crucial interlayers and electronically active layers in organic electronic devices, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), and nonvolatile memories (NVMs). The use of self-assembling functionalized organic molecules is beneficial due to mainly three advantages compared with common thin film deposition approaches. (1) Molecular self-assembly occurs with surface selectivity, determined by the interaction between the functional anchor group of the organic molecules and the target surface. (2) The film thickness of the resulting layers is perfectly controllable on the angstrom scale, due to the self-terminating film formation to only a single molecular layer. And finally, (3) the wide variability in the chemical structure of such molecules enables different SAM functionalities for devices, ranging from electrical insulation to charge storage to charge transport. The SAM approach can be further expanded by employing several functionalized molecules to create mixed SAMs with consequently mixed properties. The function of SAMs in devices depends not only on the chemical structure of the molecules but also on their final arrangement and orientation on the surface. A reliable and nondestructive in-depth characterization of SAMs on nonconductive oxide surfaces is still challenging because of the very small thickness and the impracticality of methods such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this Account, we illustrate how X-ray reflectivity (XRR) provides analytical access to major questions of SAM composition, morphology, and even formation by means of investigations of pure and mixed SAMs based on phosphonic acids (PAs) of various chain structures on flat alumina (AlOx) surfaces. XRR is an analytical method that provides access to spatially averaged structural depth profiles over a relatively

  18. Designing DNA-grafted particles that self-assemble into desired crystalline structures using the genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Babji; Vo, Thi; Zhang, Yugang; Gang, Oleg; Kumar, Sanat; Venkatasubramanian, Venkat

    2013-11-12

    In conventional research, colloidal particles grafted with single-stranded DNA are allowed to self-assemble, and then the resulting crystal structures are determined. Although this Edisonian approach is useful for a posteriori understanding of the factors governing assembly, it does not allow one to a priori design ssDNA-grafted colloids that will assemble into desired structures. Here we address precisely this design issue, and present an experimentally validated evolutionary optimization methodology that is not only able to reproduce the original phase diagram detailing regions of known crystals, but is also able to elucidate several previously unobserved structures. Although experimental validation of these structures requires further work, our early success encourages us to propose that this genetic algorithm-based methodology is a promising and rational materials-design paradigm with broad potential applications.

  19. Strain-responsive structural colored elastomers by fixing colloidal crystal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tatsunori; Katsura, Chihiro; Sugimoto, Hideki; Nakanishi, Eiji; Inomata, Katsuhiro

    2013-11-12

    Colloidal crystal assembly film was prepared by using monodispersed colloidal particles of cross-linked random copolymer of methyl methacrylate and ethyl acrylate prepared by soap-free emulsion polymerization. The colloidal crystal film exhibited structural color when swollen with ethyl acrylate monomer. The structural color was maintained even after polymerization of the swelling monomer and cross-linker, suggesting the colloidal crystalline order was successfully fixed and embedded in the matrix of poly(ethyl acrylate) elastomer. Stretching deformation of the structural colored elastomer induced a sensitive change to shorter wavelength color. Peak wavelength of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the stretched elastomer revealed an excellent proportional relationship with film thickness. In the swollen colloidal crystal film, ethyl acrylate was absorbed in the colloidal particle; therefore, poly(ethyl acrylate) chain should be penetrating into the colloidal particle after the polymerization of the matrix elastomer. This interpenetrated polymer network structure was considered to be effective for the rubber-like elasticity and sensitive strain-responsive color-changing phenomena of the structural colored elastomer.

  20. Morphology and structural dynamics of amyloid beta 42 assembly in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Jinsheng He; Shuhan Guo; Jingdong Song; Jianguo Gu; Tao Hong

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β42 (Aβ42) aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.However, the morphology and structural dynamics in different stages of Aβ42 assembly are not well known.To investigate the dynamic properties of morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of A(3 in vitro, transmission electron microscopy, western blot analysis and circular dichroism were used to observe the changes in morphology, immunoreactivity and secondary structure during Ap aggregation, respectively.Results demonstrated that at 24 hours following Ap42 aggregation in vitro, the structures of spherical granules from 5 to 10 nm and coils from 20 to 30 nm were visualized by transmission electron microscopy.Different immunoreactivities of the oligomers and fibers were detected by western blot analysis.The dynamic changes of the a-helix to β-sheet were confirmed by circular dichroism spectra.The dynamic properties of the morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of Aβ42 in vitro were analyzed,which contributed to the identification of stable conditions of Aβ42 oligomer formation.

  1. Transient structures of keratins from hoof and horn influence their self association and supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Balaraman, Madhan; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Keratins as fibrous proteins, offer structural integrity to various tissues in providing the functional role of protection or load bearing. This work is a prelude to understand the structure - property correlation for a wide variety of keratins. The kinetics of aggregation of bovine hoof keratin (KF) and horn keratin (KR) were monitored by different biophysical methods. pH dependent studies indicated that initially both keratins existed in pre-aggregated form and the efficiency of aggregation decreased with increasing pH. The size of the aggregates was found to be larger in KF compared to KR. UV-vis and particle size analysis clearly revealed that the pre-aggregated forms of KF and KR dissociated to intermediate transient structures with smaller aggregate size, which acted as stronger nucleating agents for further self association of the keratins to form higher order supramolecular assemblies. Conformational analysis indicated that there was no significant conformational change during the aggregation of KF and KR. Morphology of the KF aggregates showed fractal arrangement while KR aggregates formed an ordered structure with no particular arrangement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows an interesting and unique observation on changes in the structure during self-association of keratins.

  2. Structural instability of shell-like assemblies of a keplerate-type polyoxometalate induced by ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Sandra J; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-11-19

    We demonstrate a new structural instability of shell-like assemblies of polyoxometalates. Besides the colloidal instability, that is, the formation of aggregates that consist of many single layered POM-shells, these systems also display an instability on a structural scale within the shell-like assemblies. This instability occurs at significantly lower ionic strength than the colloidal stability limit and only becomes evident after a relatively long time. For the polyoxometalate, abbreviated as {Mo(72)Fe(30)}, it is shown that the structural stability limit of POM-shells lies between a NaCl concentration of 1.00 and 5.00 mM in aqueous solution.

  3. Impacts of fullerene derivatives on regulating the structure and assembly of collagen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lina; Kang, Seung-Gu; Pan, Jun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Fei; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-07-01

    During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 can enhance the rigidity of the native structure of collagen molecules and promote the formation of an oligomer or a microfibril. The interaction with Gd@C82(OH)22 may regulate further the assembly of collagen fibrils and change the biophysical properties of collagen. The control run with fullerene derivatives C60(OH)24 also indicates that C60(OH)24 can influence the structure and assembly of collagen molecules as well, but to a lesser degree. Both fullerene derivatives can form hydrogen bonds with multiple collagen molecules acting as a ``fullerenol-mediated bridge'' that enhance the interaction within or among collagen molecules. Compared to C60(OH)24, the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen is stronger, resulting in particular biomedical effects for regulating the biophysical properties of collagen fibrils.During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction

  4. Supramolecular Aggregate as a High-Efficiency Gene Carrier Mediated with Optimized Assembly Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Duan, Junkun; Cai, Lingguang; Ma, Dong; Xue, Wei

    2016-11-02

    For cancer gene therapy, a safe and high-efficient gene carrier is a must. To resolve the contradiction between gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity, many polymers with complex topological structures have been synthesized, although their synthesis processes and structure control are difficult as well as the high molecular weight also bring high cytotoxicity. We proposed an alternative strategy that uses supramolecular inclusion to construct the aggregate from the small molecules for gene delivery, and to further explore the relationship between the topological assembly structure and their ability to deliver gene. Herein, PEI-1.8k-conjugating β-CD through 6-hydroxyl (PEI-6-CD) and 2-hydroxyl (PEI-2-CD) have been synthesized respectively and then assembled with diferrocene (Fc)-ended polyethylene glycol (PEG-Fc). The obtained aggregates were then used to deliver MMP-9 shRNA plasmid for MCF-7 cancer therapy. It was found that the higher gene transfection efficiency can be obtained by selecting PEI-2-CD as the host and tuning the host/guest molar ratios. With the rational modulation of supramolecular architectures, the aggregate played the functions similar to macromolecules which exhibit higher transfection efficiency than PEI-25k, but show much lower cytotoxicity because of the nature of small/low molecules. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed that the aggregate could deliver MMP-9 shRNA plasmid effectively into MCF-7 cells and then downregulate MMP-9 expression, which induced the significant MCF-7 cell apoptosis, as well inhibit MCF-7 tumor growth with low toxicity. The supramolecular aggregates maybe become a promising carrier for cancer gene therapy and also provided an alternative strategy for designing new gene carriers.

  5. Directed self-assembly of large scaffold-free multi-cellular honeycomb structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R, E-mail: Jeffrey_Morgan@Brown.edu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brown University, G-B 393, Biomed Center, 171 Meeting St, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three-dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micro-mold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer-aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in the cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multi-cellular honeycomb within 24 h. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high-density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies.

  6. Ag nanoparticles formed by femtosecond pulse laser ablation in water: self-assembled fractal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillán, Jesica M. J. [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina); Fernández van Raap, Marcela B., E-mail: raap@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Mendoza Zélis, Pedro; Coral, Diego [CONICET, Instituto de Física La Plata (IFLP) (Argentina); Muraca, Diego [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin” (IFGW) (Brazil); Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B., E-mail: lucias@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    We report for the first time on the formation of self-assembled fractals of spherical Ag nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by femtosecond pulse laser ablation of a solid silver target in water. Fractal structures grew both in two and three Euclidean dimensions (d). Ramified-fractal assemblies of 2 nm height and 5–14 μm large, decorated with Ag Nps of 3 nm size, were obtained in a 2d geometry when highly diluted drops of colloidal suspension were dried at a fast heating rate over a mica substrate. When less-diluted drops were dried at slow heating rate, isolated single Nps or rosette-like structures were formed. Fractal aggregates about 31 nm size in 3d geometry were observed in the as-prepared colloidal suspension. Electron diffraction and optical extinction spectroscopy (OES) analyses performed on the samples confirmed the presence of Ag and Ag{sub 2}O. The analysis of the optical extinction spectrum, using the electrostatic approximation of Mie theory for small spheres, showed the existence of Ag bare core, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O and air–Ag core–shell Nps, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O being the most frequent type [69 % relative abundance (r.a.)]. Core-size and shell-thickness distribution was derived from OES. In situ scattering measurements of the Ag colloidal suspension, carried out by small-angle X-ray scattering, indicate a mass fractal composed of packaged 〈D{sub SAXS}〉 = (5 ± 1) nm particles and fractal dimension d{sub f} = 2.5. Ex situ atomic force microscopy imaging displayed well-ramified structures, which, analyzed with box-counting method, yield a fractal dimension d{sub f} = 1.67. The growing behavior of these 2d and 3d self-assembled fractals is consistent with the diffusion-limited aggregation model.

  7. Zinc promotes clot stability by accelerating clot formation and modifying fibrin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sara J; Xia, Jing; Wu, Huayin; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, David A; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-03-01

    Zinc released from activated platelets binds fibrin(ogen) and attenuates fibrinolysis. Although zinc also affects clot formation, the mechanism and consequences are poorly understood. To address these gaps, the effect of zinc on clot formation and structure was examined in the absence or presence of factor (F) XIII. Zinc accelerated a) plasma clotting by 1.4-fold, b) fibrinogen clotting by 3.5- and 2.3-fold in the absence or presence of FXIII, respectively, c) fragment X clotting by 1.3-fold, and d) polymerisation of fibrin monomers generated with thrombin or batroxobin by 2.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively. Whereas absorbance increased up to 3.3-fold when fibrinogen was clotted in the presence of zinc, absorbance of fragment X clots was unaffected by zinc, consistent with reports that zinc binds to the αC-domain of fibrin(ogen). Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed a two-fold increase in fibre diameter in the presence of zinc and in permeability studies, zinc increased clot porosity by 30-fold with or without FXIII. Whereas FXIII increased clot stiffness from 128 ± 19 Pa to 415 ± 27 Pa in rheological analyses, zinc reduced clot stiffness by 10- and 8.5-fold in the absence and presence of FXIII, respectively. Clots formed in the presence of zinc were more stable and resisted rupture with or without FXIII. Therefore, zinc accelerates clotting and reduces fibrin clot stiffness in a FXIII-independent manner, suggesting that zinc may work in concert with FXIII to modulate clot strength and stability.

  8. A Discussion on Structural Poverty in the Western Ethnic Region during the Period of Accelerated Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    During the period of accelerated so-cial transformation,except for those factors such as geographical environment,natural disaster and per-sonal reasons, the key factor for poverty in the western ethnic region of China is structural. Moreo-ver,this kind of structural poverty normally is inte-grated with other factors,such as natural disasters, culture, etc. This makes the poverty issue in the western ethnic region more prominent than in other areas. Structural poverty creates not only a butterfly effect on poverty, but also creates serious social harm. The biggest harm is that it is difficult for the group that is poor to integrate into society, and to find relief from their poverty. On the other hand, structural poverty increases misunderstanding and distrust between the social classes and groups. Firstly, the poverty during the period of social transformation is mainly reflected in the gap be-tween the east and west, the gap between urban and rural areas,the gap between industries,and the gap among the different groups. During the period of transformation,the gap between the western and eastern areas became bigger and bigger, and the western area became a symbol of poverty. Second-ly,with regard to the gap between urban and rural areas, the gap became even larger. Thirdly, the negative social psychological problem caused by poverty led to social breakdown. Because the west-ern ethnic minority region is in a poor and back-ward situation,the minority people’s sense of pride has been gradually replaced with a sense of inferi-ority. People feel that their development is restrict-ed, and they have become a marginalized social group. The economic gaps between the western ethnic minority region and the eastern region, as well as the internal gaps within the western ethnic minority region, have caused misunderstandings a-mong the different regions and within the same eth-nic group. The entire society’s anxiety level with re-gard to the wealth is increasing. The rich

  9. An accelerated stochastic vortex structure method for particle collision and agglomeration in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizaji, Farzad F.; Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the response of interacting particles, droplets, or bubbles to subgrid-scale fluctuations in turbulent flows is a long-standing challenge in multiphase flow simulations using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach. The problem also arises for large-eddy simulation for sufficiently small values of the Kolmogorov-scale particle Stokes number. This paper expands on a recently proposed stochastic vortex structure (SVS) method for modeling of turbulence fluctuations for colliding or otherwise interacting particles. An accelerated version of the SVS method was developed using the fast multipole expansion and local Taylor expansion approach, which reduces computation speed by two orders of magnitude compared to the original SVS method. Detailed comparisons are presented showing close agreement of the energy spectrum and probability density functions of various fields between the SVS computational model, direct numerical simulation (DNS) results, and various theoretical and experimental results found in the literature. Results of the SVS method for particle collision rate and related measures of particle interaction exhibit excellent agreement with DNS predictions for homogeneous turbulent flows. The SVS method was also used with adhesive particles to simulate formation of particle agglomerates with different values of the particle Stokes and adhesion numbers, and various measures of the agglomerate structure are compared to the DNS results.

  10. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  11. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  12. Template Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Supramolecular Assembly of Hexaaza Macrocyclic Copper(II) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Ju Chang [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lough, Alan J. [Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Two new hexaaza macrocyclic copper(II) complexes were prepared by a template method and structurally characterized. In the solid state, they were self-assembled by intermolecular interactions to form the corresponding supramolecules 1 and 2, respectively. In the structure of 1, the copper(II) macrocycles are bridged by a tp ligand to form a macrocyclic copper(II) dimer. The dimer extends its structure by intermolecular forces such as hydrogen bonds and C-H···π interactions, resulting in the formation of a double stranded 1D supramolecule. In 2, the basic structure is a monomeric copper(II) macrocycle with deprotonated imidazole pendants. An undulated 1D hydrogen bonded array is achieved through hydrogen bonds between imidazole pendants and secondary amines, where the imidazole pendants act as a hydrogen bond acceptor. The 1D hydrogen bonded supramolecular chain is supported by C-H···π interactions between the methyl groups of acetonitrile ligands and imidazole pendants of the copper(II) macrocycles. In both complexes, the introduction of imidazoles to the macrocycle as a pendant plays an important role for the formation of supramolecules, where they act as intermolecular hydrogen bond donors and/or acceptors, C-H···π and π-π interactions.

  13. Self-assembled dual-sided hemispherical nano-dimple-structured broadband antireflection coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Kun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Ping; He, Yi-Xuan; Yang, Hongta

    2016-11-01

    A non-lithography-based approach is developed in this study for assembling monolayer close-packed hemispherical nano-dimple arrays on both sides of a PET film by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett technology. The resulting gratings greatly suppress specular reflection and therefore enhance specular transmission for a broad range of visible wavelengths, resulting from a gradual change in the effective refractive index at air/PET interface. The experimental results reveal that the antireflection properties of the as-fabricated coatings are affected by the size of the nano-dimples. Moreover, both optical performances of single-sided and dual-sided nano-dimple-structured coatings have been investigated in this study.

  14. The structure and dynamics of self-assembling colloidal monolayers in oscillating magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Koser, Alison E; Arratia, Paulo E

    2013-01-01

    Many fascinating phenomena such as large-scale collective flows, enhanced fluid mixing and pattern formation have been observed in so-called active fluids, which are composed of particles that can absorb energy and dissipate it into the fluid medium. For active particles immersed in liquids, fluid-mediated viscous stresses can play an important role on the emergence of collective behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate their role in the dynamics of self-assembling magnetically-driven colloidal particles which can rapidly form organized hexagonal structures. We find that viscous stresses reduce hexagonal ordering, generate smaller clusters, and significantly decrease the rate of cluster formation, all while holding the system at constant number density. Furthermore, we show that time and length scales of cluster formation depend on the Mason number (Mn), or ratio of viscous to magnetic forces, scaling as t / Mn and L / Mn^(1/2). Our results suggest that viscous stresses hinder collective behavior in a se...

  15. Hierarchical structural control of visual properties in self-assembled photonic-plasmonic pigments

    CERN Document Server

    Koay, Natalie; Kay, Theresa M; Nerger, Bryan A; Miles-Rossouw, Malaika; Shirman, Tanya; Vu, Thy L; England, Grant; Phillips, Katherine R; Utech, Stefanie; Vogel, Nicolas; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple one-pot co-assembly method for the synthesis of hierarchically structured pigment particles consisting of silica inverse-opal bricks that are doped with plasmonic absorbers. We study the interplay between the plasmonic and photonic resonances and their effect on the visual appearance of macroscopic collections of photonic bricks that are distributed in randomized orientations. Manipulating the pore geometry tunes the wavelength- and angle-dependence of the scattering profile, which can be engineered to produce angle-dependent Bragg resonances that can either enhance or contrast with the color produced by the plasmonic absorber. By controlling the overall dimensions of the photonic bricks and their aspect ratios, their preferential alignment can either be encouraged or suppressed. This causes the Bragg resonance to appear either as uniform color travel in the former case or as sparse iridescent sparkle in the later case. By manipulating the surface chemistry of these photonic bricks, which ...

  16. 载人航天某装置人机交互式结构优化设计%Structural optimization using human-computer interaction for an aerospace assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 刘洪英; 马爱军; 胡清华; 冯雪梅; 石蒙; 董睿; 赵亚雄

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of the structural optimization of a complicated structure under dynamic response constraints, a human-computer interaction method is proposed to take the advantages of human and computer in the structural optimization, and it is used in the structural optimization of an aerospace assembly. The assembly, after the structural optimization, exhibits remarkable performance improvement in that the first integral vibration frequency increases 41.1% and the maximal the frequency response acceleration of cared points drops 24.3% under the sinusoidal vibration test load conditions while the mass remains essentially unchanged. The result satisfies the requirement of the optimal design and proves the effectiveness and feasibility of the method.%为了解决复杂结构在动力学响应约束下优化的难题,综合人工以及计算机在复杂结构优化中的优点,提出一种人机交互式优化方法用于载人航天某复杂装置的优化设计。经过结构优化后的装置,在质量保持基本不变的情况下一阶振动频率提升41.1%,正弦试验条件下关心节点的最大加速度响应值减小24.3%,优化效果明显,满足优化设计要求,验证了该优化设计方法的可行、有效。

  17. Hierarchical assemblies of soft matters from polymers and liquid crystals on structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honglawan, Apiradee

    Hierarchical, multifunctional materials hold important keys to numerous advanced technologies, including electronics, optics, and medicine. This thesis encompasses generation of hierarchical structures with novel morphologies and functions through self-assembly directed by lithographically fabricated templates. Here, two soft materials, amphiphilic random copolymers of photopolymerized acryloyl chloride (ranPAC) and smectic-A liquid crystal (SmA-LC) molecule, 4'(5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,12-heptadecaflu-orododecyloxy)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester, are synthesized as model systems to investigate the governing principles at the topographic surface/interface. The ranPAC can self-organize into nanomicelles with high regularity and stability, typically not possible in random copolymer systems. The morphology can be controlled by the photopolymerization conditions and solvent; the crosslinked shell makes the micelles robust against drying and storage. Using SU-8 micropillar arrays with spatially controlled surface chemistry as templates, we construct hierarchical microporous structures with tunable pore size and symmetry (e.g. square array), and uncover a new evaporative assembly method. By functionalizing the ranPAC nanovesicles with cationic poly(ethyleneimines), we encapsulate the anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and mRNA at a high payload, which are delivered to HEK 293T cells in vitro at a low cytotoxicity level. SmA-LC are characterized by arrangement of molecules into thin layers with the long molecular axis parallel to the layer normal, forming a close-packed hexagonal array of topological defects known as focal conic domains (FCDs) in a thin film. Using a series of SU-8 micropillar arrays with different size, shape, height, and symmetry as topological templates, we investigate the epitaxial and hierarchical assemblies of FCDs; whether the system favors confinement or "pillar edge-pinning" depends on balance of the elastic energy

  18. Self-Assembly of Crystalline Structures of Magnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Fabrication of Nanostructured Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaozheng; Wang, Jianchao; Furlani, Edward P

    2015-10-14

    A theoretical study is presented of the template-assisted formation of crystalline superstructures of magnetic-dielectric core-shell particles. The templates produce highly localized gradient fields and a corresponding magnetic force that guides the assembly with nanoscale precision in particle placement. The process is studied using two distinct and complementary computational models that predict the dynamics and energy of the particles, respectively. Both mono- and polydisperse colloids are studied, and the analysis demonstrates for the first time that although the particles self-assemble into ordered crystalline superstructures, the particle formation is not unique. There is a Brownian motion-induced degeneracy in the process wherein various distinct, energetically comparable crystalline structures can form for a given template geometry. The models predict the formation of hexagonal close packed (HCP) and face centered cubic (FCC) structures as well as mixed phase structures due to in-plane stacking disorders, which is consistent with experimental observations. The polydisperse particle structures are less uniform than the monodisperse particle structures because of the irregular packing of different-sized particles. A comparison of self-assembly using soft- and hard-magnetic templates is also presented, the former being magnetized in a uniform field. This analysis shows that soft-magnetic templates enable an order-of-magnitude more rapid assembly and much higher spatial resolution in particle placement than their hard-magnetic counterparts. The self-assembly method discussed is versatile and broadly applies to arbitrary template geometries and multilayered and multifunctional mono- and polydisperse core-shell particles that have at least one magnetic component. As such, the method holds potential for the bottom-up fabrication of functional nanostructured materials for a broad range of applications. This work provides unprecedented insight into the assembly

  19. ConnectViz: Accelerated Approach for Brain Structural Connectivity Using Delaunay Triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality and long-term disability in the world. Normal functioning of the brain is dependent on the adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients to the brain complex network through the blood vessels. Stroke, occasionally a hemorrhagic stroke, ischemia or other blood vessel dysfunctions can affect patients during a cerebrovascular incident. Structurally, the left and the right carotid arteries, and the right and the left vertebral arteries are responsible for supplying blood to the brain, scalp and the face. However, a number of impairment in the function of the frontal lobes may occur as a result of any decrease in the flow of the blood through one of the internal carotid arteries. Such impairment commonly results in numbness, weakness or paralysis. Recently, the concepts of brain's wiring representation, the connectome, was introduced. However, construction and visualization of such brain network requires tremendous computation. Consequently, previously proposed approaches have been identified with common problems of high memory consumption and slow execution. Furthermore, interactivity in the previously proposed frameworks for brain network is also an outstanding issue. This study proposes an accelerated approach for brain connectomic visualization based on graph theory paradigm using compute unified device architecture, extending the previously proposed SurLens Visualization and computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma frameworks. The accelerated brain structural connectivity framework was evaluated with stripped brain datasets from the Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. Significantly, our proposed framework is able to generate and extract points and edges of datasets, displays nodes and edges in the datasets in form of a network and clearly maps data volume to the corresponding brain surface. Moreover, with the framework, surfaces of the dataset were simultaneously displayed with the

  20. Bionic optimization in structural design stochastically based methods to improve the performance of parts and assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Gekeler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The book provides suggestions on how to start using bionic optimization methods, including pseudo-code examples of each of the important approaches and outlines of how to improve them. The most efficient methods for accelerating the studies are discussed. These include the selection of size and generations of a study’s parameters, modification of these driving parameters, switching to gradient methods when approaching local maxima, and the use of parallel working hardware. Bionic Optimization means finding the best solution to a problem using methods found in nature. As Evolutionary Strategies and Particle Swarm Optimization seem to be the most important methods for structural optimization, we primarily focus on them. Other methods such as neural nets or ant colonies are more suited to control or process studies, so their basic ideas are outlined in order to motivate readers to start using them. A set of sample applications shows how Bionic Optimization works in practice. From academic studies on simple fra...

  1. Assembly of Complex Nano-Structure from Single Atoms —Chemical Identification, Manipulation and Assembly by AFM—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Seizo; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Ooyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Abe, Masayuki; Pou, Pablo; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) under noncontact and nearcontact regions operated at room-temperature (RT) in ultrahigh vacuum, is used as a tool for topography-based atomic discrimination and atomic-interchange manipulations of two intermixed atomic species on semiconductor surfaces. Noncontact AFM topography based site-specific force curves provide the chemical covalent bonding forces between the tip apex and the atoms at the surface. Here, we introduced an example related to topography-based atomic discrimination using selected Sn and Si adatoms in Sn/Si(111)-(√3 ×√3 ) surface. Recently, under nearcontact region, we found a lateral atom-interchange manipulation phenomenon at RT in Sn/Ge(111)-c(2×8) intermixed sample. This phenomenon can interchange an embedded Sn atom with a neighbor Ge atom at RT. Using the vector scan method under nearcontact region, we constructed “Atom Inlay”, that is, atom letters “Sn” consisted of 19 Sn atoms embedded in Ge(111)-c(2×8) substrate. Using these methods, now we can assemble compound semiconductor nanostructures atom-by-atom.

  2. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The large scale structure of galaxies and comparison to mock universes

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Baldry, Ivan; Bauer, Amanda E; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael; Cluver, Michelle; Colless, Matthew; Foster, Caroline; Hopkins, Andrew; Van Kampen, Eelco; Kelvin, Lee; Lara-Lopez, Maritza A; Liske, Jochen; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; Loveday, Jon; McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Merson, Alexander; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    From a volume limited sample of 45,542 galaxies and 6,000 groups with $z \\leq 0.213$ we use an adapted minimal spanning tree algorithm to identify and classify large scale structures within the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Using galaxy groups, we identify 643 filaments across the three equatorial GAMA fields that span up to 200 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length, each with an average of 8 groups within them. By analysing galaxies not belonging to groups we identify a secondary population of smaller coherent structures composed entirely of galaxies, dubbed `tendrils' that appear to link filaments together, or penetrate into voids, generally measuring around 10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length and containing on average 6 galaxies. Finally we are also able to identify a population of isolated void galaxies. By running this algorithm on GAMA mock galaxy catalogues we compare the characteristics of large scale structure between observed and mock data; finding that mock filaments reproduce observed ones extremely well. This p...

  3. Self-Assembled Structures of Benzoic Acid on Au(111) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thu-Hien; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy combined with cyclic voltammetry were employed to explore the self-assembly of benzoic acid (BA) on a Au(111) substrate surface in a 0.1-M HClO4 solution. At the negatively charged surface, BA molecules form two highly ordered physisorbed adlayers with their phenyl rings parallel to the substrate surface. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy images reveal the packing arrangement and internal molecular structures. The striped pattern and zigzag structure of the BA adlayers are composed of parallel rows of dimers, in which two BA molecules are bound through a pair of O-H···O hydrogen bonds. Increasing the electrode potential further to positive charge densities of Au(111) leads to the desorption of the physisorbed hydrogen-bonded networks and the formation of a chemisorbed adlayer. BA molecules change their orientation from planar to upright fashion, which is accompanied by the deprotonation of the carboxyl group. Furthermore, potential-induced formation and dissolution of BA adlayers were also investigated. Structural transitions between the various types of ordered adlayers occur according to a nucleation and growth mechanism.

  4. Self-assembly of "Mickey Mouse" shaped colloids into tube-like structures: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Joost R; Avvisati, Guido; Hagemans, Fabian; Vissers, Teun; Kraft, Daniela J; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K

    2015-02-14

    The self-assembly of anisotropic patchy particles with a triangular shape was studied by experiments and computer simulations. The colloidal particles were synthesized in a two-step seeded emulsion polymerization process, and consist of a central smooth lobe connected to two rough lobes at an angle of ∼90°, resembling the shape of a "Mickey Mouse" head. Due to the difference in overlap volume, adding an appropriate depletant induces an attractive interaction between the smooth lobes of the colloids only, while the two rough lobes act as steric constraints. The essentially planar geometry of the Mickey Mouse particles is a first geometric deviation of dumbbell shaped patchy particles. This new geometry enables the formation of one-dimensional tube-like structures rather than spherical, essentially zero-dimensional micelles. At sufficiently strong attractions, we indeed find tube-like structures with the sticky lobes at the core and the non-sticky lobes pointing out as steric constraints that limit the growth to one direction, providing the tubes with a well-defined diameter but variable length both in experiments and simulations. In the simulations, we found that the internal structure of the tubular fragments could either be straight or twisted into so-called Bernal spirals.

  5. Self-assembled structure of cyanine dyes: J-aggregates characteristicson optical information storing microcrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiaoli; LI Xiaowei; LAI Weidong; MENG Tao; FENG Xiaomin; ZHANG Jixian

    2006-01-01

    Dye sensitization is a fundamental function for solar cell and silver halide (AgX) microcrystal to increase the optoelectronic conversion efficiency. In this paper, the spectral properties and self-assembled structure of three types of cyanine dyes, adsorbed both on (100) surface of 0.4 μm AgBr cubic crystal and (111) surface of 1.8 μm AgBr tabular crystal, were studied with combination ofspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. Rectangular aggregation structure is formed on the crystal faces of (100) and (111) for both anionic and cationic dyes, while herringbone-stacking structure is formed by anionic-cationic dye, and a J-band spectrum is correspondingly detected. The photoelectron property of dye-sensitized samples was also investigated with microwave absorption and dielectric spectrum detection technology. After excited by a 355 nm fast-pulse laser, the photoelectron decay process of anionic-cationic dye sensitized sample is the fastest. This indicates that the affection of anionic-cationic dye aggregates to the photoelectron decay is the biggest, and the sensitization is more efficient.

  6. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  7. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cozzi

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468 encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans Apoptosome Reveals an Octameric Assembly of CED-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, S.; Li, H.; Pang, Y.; Hu, Q., Liu, Q., Li, H.; Zhou, Y.; He, T.; Liang, Q.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, X.; Luo, G.; Wang, J.; Yan, N.; Shi, Y.

    2010-04-30

    The CED-4 homo-oligomer or apoptosome is required for initiation of programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans by facilitating autocatalytic activation of the CED-3 caspase zymogen. How the CED-4 apoptosome assembles and activates CED-3 remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structure of the complete CED-4 apoptosome and show that it consists of eight CED-4 molecules, organized as a tetramer of an asymmetric dimer via a previously unreported interface among AAA{sup +} ATPases. These eight CED-4 molecules form a funnel-shaped structure. The mature CED-3 protease is monomeric in solution and forms an active holoenzyme with the CED-4 apoptosome, within which the protease activity of CED-3 is markedly stimulated. Unexpectedly, the octameric CED-4 apoptosome appears to bind only two, not eight, molecules of mature CED-3. The structure of the CED-4 apoptosome reveals shared principles for the NB-ARC family of AAA{sup +} ATPases and suggests a mechanism for the activation of CED-3.

  9. Design, realization and test of C-band accelerating structures for the SPARC_LAB linac energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M. E.; Boni, R.; Brönnimann, M.; Cardelli, F.; Chimenti, P.; Clementi, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Kalt, R.; Lollo, V.; Palumbo, L.; Piersanti, L.; Schilcher, T.

    2016-11-01

    The energy upgrade of the SPARC_LAB photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy) has been originally conceived replacing one low gradient (13 MV/m) 3 m long SLAC type S-band traveling wave (TW) section with two 1.4 m long C-band accelerating sections. Due to the higher gradients reached by such structures, a higher energy beam can be obtained within the same accelerator footprint length. The use of C-band structures for electron acceleration has been adopted in a few FEL linacs in the world, among others, the Japanese Free Electron Laser at SPring-8 and the SwissFEL at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The C-band sections are traveling wave, constant impedance structures with symmetric input and output axial couplers. Their design has been optimized for the operation with a SLED RF pulse compressor. In this paper we briefly review their design criteria and we focus on the construction, tuning, low and high-power RF tests. We also illustrate the design and realization of the dedicated low level RF system that has been done in collaboration with PSI in the framework of the EU TIARA project. Preliminary experimental results appear to confirm the operation of such structures with accelerating gradients larger than 35 MV/m.

  10. Molecular Processes Underlying the Structure and Assembly of Thin Films and Nanoparticles at Complex interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-06-03

    differences in how water behaves at hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAMS)/water interfaces relative to the organic liquid/water interfaces. Several monolayer films have been examined in these studies using a combination of vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), contact angle measurements and AFM. At the hydrocarbon monolayer/water interface we find that water has a weak bonding interaction with the monolayer film that results in an orientation of water at the terminus of these hydrocarbon chains. The water-film interaction is still present for fluorinated films but it is found to be considerably weaker. Hydration and Surfactant Adsorption at Salt/Water Interfaces This set of studies has examined the molecular characteristics of the CaF2/water interface using VSFS. Our first studies detailed the structure and orientation of water molecules adsorbed at this mineral surfaces including studies of the surface in the presence of aqueous solutions of salts. These studies have been followed by a series of static and time-resolved studies of the adsorption of carboxylic acid containing organics at this surface, specifically carboxylic acid surfactants and acetic acid. In the latter we have developed a new method for time resolved studies that involve sequential wavelength tuning and automated control of spatial beam overlap at the target can probe amplitude changes of sum-frequency resonances in widely spaced infrared regions. This offers great advantages for the study of the synchronism of molecular processes at interfaces. This approach is particularly suitable to investigate the synchronization of interfacial processes such as surfactant adsorption at charged mineral surfaces. Macromolecular Assembly at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces Macromolecular assembly at the interface between water and a hydrophobic surface underlies some of the most important biological and environmental processes on the planet. Our work has examined polymer adsorption and assembly of

  11. Ion Acceleration at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and its Global Impact on Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2016-07-01

    The ion plasma pressures at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter are significant players in the electrodynamic force-balance that governs the structure and dynamics of these magnetospheres. There are many similarities between the physical mechanisms that are thought to heat the ion plasma to temperatures that even exceed those of the solar corona. In this presentation we compare the ion acceleration mechanisms at the three planetary magnetospheres and discuss their global impacts on magnetopsheric structure. At Earth, bursty-bulk flows, or "bubbles", have been shown to accelerate protons and O+ to high energies by the earthward moving magnetic dipolarization fronts. O+ ions display a more non-adiabatic energization in response to these fronts than protons do as they are energized and transported in to the ring-current region where they reach energies of several 100's keV. We present both in-situ measurements from the NASA Van Allen Probes Mission and global Energetic Neutral (ENA) images from the High-Energy Neutral Atom (HENA) Camera on board the IMAGE Mission, that illustrate these processes. The global impact on the magnetospheric structure is explored by comparing the empirical magnetic field model TS07d for given driving conditions with global plasma pressure distributions derived from the HENA images. At Saturn, quasi-periodic energization events, or large-scale injections, occur beyond about 9 RS around the post-midnight sector, clearly shown by the Ion and Neutral Atom Camera (INCA) on board the Cassini mission. In contrast to Earth, the corotational drift dominates even the energetic ion distributions. The large-scale injections display similar dipolarization front features can be found and there are indications that like at Earth the O+ responds more non-adiabatically than protons do. However, at Saturn there are also differences in that there appears to be energization events deep in the inner magnetosphere (6-9 RS) preferentially occurring in the pre

  12. Structural analysis of plate-type fuel assemblies and development of a non-destructive method to assess their integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caresta, Mauro, E-mail: mcaresta@yahoo.it [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Wassink, David [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights 2234, NSW (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A plate-type fuel assembly is made of thin plates mounted in a box-like structure. • Drag force from the coolant can shift the plates. • A non invasive method is proposed to test the strength of the plate connections. • The natural frequencies’ shift is used to assess the fuel integrity. -- Abstract: This work is concerned with the structural behaviour and the integrity of parallel plate-type nuclear fuel assemblies. A plate-type assembly consists of several thin plates mounted in a box-like structure and is subjected to a coolant flow that can result in a considerable drag force. A finite element model of an assembly is presented to study the sensitivity of the natural frequencies to the stiffness of the plates’ junctions. It is shown that the shift in the natural frequencies of the torsional modes can be used to check the global integrity of the fuel assembly while the local natural frequencies of the inner plates can be used to estimate the maximum drag force they can resist. Finally a non-destructive method is developed to assess the resistance of the inner plates to bear an applied load. Extensive computational and experimental results are presented to prove the applicability of the method presented.

  13. Structural change and growth accelerations in Asia and Latin America : a new sectoral data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, M.P.; de Vries, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of economic growth have moved from explaining average trends in long-term growth to study growth accelerations and decelerations. In this paper we argue that the standard shift-share analysis is inadequate to measure the contribution of sectors to accelerations in productivity. We pre

  14. Control over Structure and Function of Peptide Amphiphile Supramolecular Assemblies through Molecular Design and Energy Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantakitti, Faifan

    Supramolecular chemistry is a powerful tool to create a material of a defined structure with tunable properties. This strategy has led to catalytically active, bioactive, and environment-responsive materials, among others, that are valuable in applications ranging from sensor technology to energy and medicine. Supramolecular polymers formed by peptide amphiphiles (PAs) have been especially relevant in tissue regeneration due to their ability to form biocompatible structures and mimic many important signaling molecules in biology. These supramolecular polymers can form nanofibers that create networks which mimic natural extracellular matrices. PA materials have been shown to induce growth of blood vessels, bone, cartilage, and nervous tissue, among others. The work described in this thesis not only studied the relationship between molecular structure and functions of PA assemblies, but also uncovered a powerful link between the energy landscape of their supramolecular self-assembly and the ability of PA materials to interact with cells. In chapter 2, it is argued that fabricating fibrous nanostructures with defined mechanical properties and decoration with bioactive molecules is not sufficient to create a material that can effectively communicate with cells. By systemically placing the fibronectin-derived RGDS epitope at increasing distances from the surface of PA nanofibers through a linker of one to five glycine residues, integrin-mediated RGDS signaling was enhanced. The results suggested that the spatial presentation of an epitope on PA nanofibers strongly influences the bioactivity of the PA substrates. In further improving functionality of a PA-based scaffold to effectively direct cell growth and differentiation, chapter 3 explored the use of a cell microcarrier to compartmentalize and simultaneously tune insoluble and soluble signals in a single matrix. PA nanofibers were incorporated at the surface of the microcarrier in order to promote cell adhesion, while

  15. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto (IBS); (BBRI); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  16. Structure of a longitudinal actin dimer assembled by tandem w domains: implications for actin filament nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-10-15

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  17. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  18. Aggressive, accelerated subdomain smoothers for Stokes flow with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanan, Patrick; May, Dave; Schenk, Olaf; Rupp, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Scalable solvers for mantle convection and lithospheric dynamics with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure typically require the use of a multigrid method. To leverage new hybrid CPU-accelerator architectures on leadership compute clusters, multigrid hierarchies which can reduce communication and use high available arithmetic intensity are at a premium, motivating more aggressive coarsening schemes and smoothers. We present results of a comparative study of two competitive GPU-enabled subdomain smoothers within an additive Schwarz method. Chebyshev-Jacobi smoothing has been shown to be an effective smoother, and its nature as a low-communication method built from basic linear algebra routines allows its use on a wide range of devices with current libraries. ILU smoothing is also of interest and is known to provide robust smoothing in some cases, but has traditionally been difficult to use in a fine-grained parallel environment. However, a recently-introduced variant by Chow and Patel allows for incomplete factorizations to be computed and applied in these environments, hence allowing us to study them as well. We use and extend the pTatin3D, PETSc, and ViennaCL libraries to integrate promising methods into a realistic application framework.

  19. Influence of solidification accelerators on structure formation of anhydrite-containing binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikanova, L., E-mail: alasmit@mail.ru; Volkova, O., E-mail: v.olga.nikitina@gmail.com; Kudyakov, A.; Sarkisov, Y.; Tolstov, D. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya sq., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The article presents results of scientific analysis of chemical additives influence on acid fluoride binder. It was found that the influence of sulfate nature additives on the process of hydration and solidification of the binder is similar to influence of additives on indissoluble anhydrite. Additives with SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anion NO{sup −} are more efficient. The mentioned additives according to accelerating effect belong to the following succession: K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} > Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} > FeSO{sub 4} > MgSO{sub 4}. Facilitation of the process of hydration and solidification of the binder, increase in density and durability of the binder (32 MPa) is to the greatest extent achieved with the introduction of 2% sodium sulfate additive of the binder’s mass into the composition of the binder along with the ultrasonic treatment of water solution. Directed crystal formation process with healing of porous structure by new growths presented as calcium sulfate dehydrate and hydroglauberite provides positive effect.

  20. Molecular Processes Underlying the Structure and Assembly of Thin Films and Nanoparticles at Complex interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-06-03

    differences in how water behaves at hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAMS)/water interfaces relative to the organic liquid/water interfaces. Several monolayer films have been examined in these studies using a combination of vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), contact angle measurements and AFM. At the hydrocarbon monolayer/water interface we find that water has a weak bonding interaction with the monolayer film that results in an orientation of water at the terminus of these hydrocarbon chains. The water-film interaction is still present for fluorinated films but it is found to be considerably weaker. Hydration and Surfactant Adsorption at Salt/Water Interfaces This set of studies has examined the molecular characteristics of the CaF2/water interface using VSFS. Our first studies detailed the structure and orientation of water molecules adsorbed at this mineral surfaces including studies of the surface in the presence of aqueous solutions of salts. These studies have been followed by a series of static and time-resolved studies of the adsorption of carboxylic acid containing organics at this surface, specifically carboxylic acid surfactants and acetic acid. In the latter we have developed a new method for time resolved studies that involve sequential wavelength tuning and automated control of spatial beam overlap at the target can probe amplitude changes of sum-frequency resonances in widely spaced infrared regions. This offers great advantages for the study of the synchronism of molecular processes at interfaces. This approach is particularly suitable to investigate the synchronization of interfacial processes such as surfactant adsorption at charged mineral surfaces. Macromolecular Assembly at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces Macromolecular assembly at the interface between water and a hydrophobic surface underlies some of the most important biological and environmental processes on the planet. Our work has examined polymer adsorption and assembly of

  1. Particle transport and acceleration in a time-varying electromagnetic field with a multi-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, Lev [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsoyusnaya Street 84/32, Moscow (Russian Federation); Artemyev, Anton [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsoyusnaya Street 84/32, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Malova, Helmi [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsoyusnaya Street 84/32, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Milovanov, Alexander V. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsoyusnaya Street 84/32, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zimbardo, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Unita di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2008-10-06

    We present the results of a numerical study of particle transport and acceleration by an ensemble of electromagnetic waves with a multi-scale spatio-temporal structure. We explore the dependence of acceleration and transport on the properties of turbulence. We found that an initially Maxwellian distribution of particle velocities evolves into a heavy-tailed distribution, which resembles the ubiquitous kappa-distribution, often used in non-thermal plasma phenomenology. The results of this study may be used to explain plasma heating and energization in turbulent current sheets such as the current sheets often observed in the Earth's magnetotail and discussed in relation to solar corona.

  2. Diffusion-coupled molecular assembly: structuring of coordination polymers across multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kenji; Reboul, Julien; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-22

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) are an intriguing class of molecular-based materials because of the designability of framework scaffolds, pore sizes and pore surface functionalities. Besides the structural designability at the molecular scale, the structuring of PCPs into mesoscopic/macroscopic morphologies has attracted much attention due to the significance for the practical applications. The structuring of PCPs at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale has been so far demonstrated by the spatial localization of coordination reactions on the surface of templates or at the phase boundaries. However, these methodologies have never been applied to the fabrication of solid-solution or multivariate metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), in which multiple components are homogeneously mixed. Herein, we demonstrate the structuring of a box-type superstructure comprising of a solid-solution PCP by integrating a bidirectional diffusion of multiple organic ligands into molecular assembly. The parent crystals of [Zn2(ndc)2(bpy)]n were placed in the DMF solution of additional organic component of H2bdc, and the temperature was rapidly elevated up to 80 °C (ndc = 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). The dissolution of the parent crystals induced the outward diffusion of components; contrariwise, the accumulation of the other organic ligand of H2bdc induced the inward diffusion toward the surface of the parent crystals. This bidirectional diffusion of multiple components spatially localized the recrystallization at the surface of cuboid parent crystals; therefore, the nanocrystals of a solid-solution PCP ([Zn2(bdc)1.5(ndc)0.5(bpy)]n) were organized into a mesoscopic box superstructure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the box superstructures enhanced the mass transfer kinetics for the separation of hydrocarbons.

  3. In vitro study on the alterations of brain tubulin structure and assembly affected by magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadras, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Afrasiabi, Ali; Naghshineh, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Mokhtari, Farzad

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, considerable efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of memory, cognition, and relevant neurodegenerative diseases in the human brain. Several studies have shown the importance of microtubule proteins in the memory mechanism and memory dysfunction. Microtubules possess dynamicity, which is essential for functions of neuronal networks. Microtubule-associated proteins, i.e., tau, play vital roles in microtubule stability. On the other hand, the ferromagnetic mineral magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) has been detected in the normal human brain, and elevated levels of magnetite are also observed in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Therefore, we propose that a relationship between microtubule organization in axons and brain magnetite nanoparticles is possible. In this study we found alterations of microtubule polymerization in the presence of increasing concentrations of magnetite through transmission electron microscopy images and a turbidimetry method. Structural changes of microtubule and tau protein, as an essential microtubule-associated protein for tubulin assembly, were detected via circular dichroism spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence, and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorometry. We predicted three possible binding sites on tau protein and one possible binding site on tubulin dimer for magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite also causes the morphology of PC12 cells to change abnormally and cell viability to decrease. Finally, we suggest that magnetite changes microtubule dynamics and polymerization through two paths: (1) changing the secondary and tertiary structure of tubulin and (2) binding to either tubulin dimer or tau protein and preventing tau-tubulin interaction.

  4. Silica promoted self-assembled mesoporous aluminas. Impact of the silica precursor on the structural, textural and acidic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Lidia Lopez; Zarubina, Valeriya; Mayoral, Alvaro; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of silica addition on the structural, textural and acidic properties of an evaporation induced self-assembled (EISA) mesoporous alumina. Two silica addition protocols were applied while maintaining the EISA synthesis route. The first route is based on the addition

  5. Translation of dicarboxylate structural information to fluorometric optical signals through self-assembly of guanidinium-tethered oligophenylenevinylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takao; Roy, Bappaditya; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2014-10-20

    Although self-assembly has realized the spontaneous formation of nanoarchitectures, the nanoscopic expression of chemical structural information at the molecular level can alternatively be regarded as a tool to translate molecular structural information with high precision. We have found that a newly developed guanidinium-tethered oligophenylenevinylene exhibits characteristic fluorescence (FL) responses toward L- and meso-tartarate, wherein the different self-assembly modes, termed J- or H-type aggregation, are directed according to the molecular information encoded as the chemical structure. This morphological difference originates from the geometric anti versus gauche conformational difference between L- and meso-tartarate. A similar morphological difference can be reproduced with the geometric C=C bond difference between fumarate and maleate. In the present system, the dicarboxylate structural information is embodied in the inherent threshold concentration of the FL response, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the maximum FL wavelength. These results indicate that self-assembly is meticulous enough to sense subtle differences in molecular information and thus demonstrate the potential ability of self-assembly for the expression of a FL sensory system.

  6. Structural variation in two human genomes mapped at single-nucleotide resolution by whole genome de novo assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng; Luo, Ruibang;

    2011-01-01

    Here we use whole-genome de novo assembly of second-generation sequencing reads to map structural variation (SV) in an Asian genome and an African genome. Our approach identifies small- and intermediate-size homozygous variants (1-50 kb) including insertions, deletions, inversions and their precise...

  7. Charge Transport Across Insulating Self-Assembled Monolayers: Non-equilibrium Approaches and Modeling To Relate Current and Molecular Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjani, F.; Thijssen, J.M.; Whitesides, G.M.; Ratner, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines charge transport by tunneling across a series of electrically insulating molecules with the structure HS(CH2)4CONH(CH2)2R) in the form of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), supported on silver. The molecules examined were studied experimentally by Yoon et al. (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed

  8. Structural Diversity of Metallosupramolecular Assemblies Based on the Bent Bridging Ligand 4,4′-Dithiodipyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger W. Seidel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available 4,4′-Dithiodipyridine (dtdp, also termed 4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide, is a bridging ligand of the 4,4′-bipyridine type. The introduction of the disulfide moiety inevitably leads to a relatively rigid angular structure, which exhibits axial chirality. More than 90 metal complexes containing the dtdp ligand have been crystallographically characterised until now. This review focuses on the preparation and structural diversity of discrete and polymeric metallosupramolecular assemblies constructed from dtdp as bridging ligands. These encompass metallamacrocycles with M2L2 topology and coordination polymers with periodicity in one or two dimensions. One-dimensional coordination polymers represent the vast majority of the metallosupramolecular structures obtained from dtdp. These include repeated rhomboids, zigzag, helical and arched chains among other types. In this contribution, we make an attempt to provide a comprehensive account of the structural data that are currently available for metallosupramolecular assemblies based on the bent bridging ligand dtdp.

  9. Self-assembly of silica colloidal crystal thin films with tuneable structural colours over a wide visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal crystal (CC) thin films that produce structural colours over a wide visible spectrum have been self-assembled from silica nanoparticles (SNPs) using a natural sedimentation method. A series of colloidal suspensions containing uniform SNPs (207-350 nm) were prepared using the Stöber method. The prepared silica suspensions were directly subjected to natural sedimentation at an elevated temperature. The SNPs were deposited under the force of gravity and self-assembled into an ordered array. The solid CC thin films produced structural colours over a wide visible spectrum from red to violet. Visual inspection and colorimetric measurements indicated that the structural colour of the CC thin film is tuneable by varying the SNPs diameters and the viewing angles. The closely packed face-centred cubic (fcc) structure of the CC thin film was confirmed using SEM imaging and was in agreement with the intense colour observed from the film surface.

  10. Structure-property relationships in the design, assembly and applications of polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rmaile, Hassan H.

    Ultrathin films consisting of an alternating sequence of positively and negatively charged polyelectrolytes have been prepared by means of the electrostatic layer-by-layer sequential assembly technique. To augment their typical applications in the water treatment, personal care as well as the pulp and paper industry, the structure and the design of these polyelectrolytes were tailored synthetically to satisfy the requirements of different types of applications. Some were used for surface modifications, hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings, corrosion protection, conducting and biocompatible surfaces. Others were found to be very efficient for membrane and chromatographic applications. The ease with which these multilayer coatings can be constructed, their robustness and stability make them very good candidates for industrial applications. The dissertation focuses mainly on the structure-property relationships of these polyelectrolytes and their corresponding thin films. Various polyelectrolytes were synthesized or modified in a strategic approach and gave novel and promising properties. Some of them exhibited permeabilities that were higher than any membranes reported in the literature. Also, some are potentially very useful for designing drug delivery systems such as tablets or encapsulations since they were shown to control the permeability of sample drugs and vitamins very efficiently based on their sensitivity to pH changes. Other synthesized polyelectrolytes proved to be very effective in preventing protein adsorption or promoting cell growth and differentiation. Some systems were very useful as robust stationary phases for simple chiral separations in capillary electrochromatography. Along with modifications and improvements, the approach might one day be applied commercially for chiral separations using high performance liquid chromatography and replace currently used stationary phases. Last but not least, the potential for these polyelectrolytes and their

  11. Highly symmetric interfacial structures in Rayleigh Taylor instability with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh Taylor instability in a power-law time dependent acceleration field is investigated for a flow with the symmetry group p6mm (hexagonal) in the plane normal to acceleration. The Regular asymptotic solutions form a one-parameter family and the physically significant solution is identified with the one having the fastest growth and being stable (bubble tip velocity). Two distinct regimes are identified dependent on the acceleration exponent, the RM-type regime, where the dynamics is identical to conventional RM instability and is dominated by initial conditions, and the RT-type regime where the dynamics is dominated by the acceleration term. For the latter, the time dependence has profound effects on the dynamics. In the RT non-linear regime, the time dependence has no consequence on the morphology of the bubbles but the growth rate (bubble tip velocity) evolves as power law with the exponent set by the acceleration. The solutions for a one-parameter family, and are convergent with exponential decay of Fourier amplitudes close to the physical solution. The solutions are stable at maximum tip velocity and flat bubbles are unstable, and the growth/decay of perturbations is no longer purely exponential and depends on the acceleration exponent. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  12. Highly symmetric interfacial coherent structures in Rayleigh Taylor instability with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    Rayleigh Taylor instability in a power-law time dependent acceleration field is investigated theoretically for a flow with the symmetry group p6mm (hexagon) in the plane normal to acceleration. In the nonlinear regime, regular asymptotic solutions form a one-parameter family. The physically significant solution is identified with the one having the fastest growth and being stable (bubble tip velocity). Two distinct regimes are identified depending on the acceleration exponent. Particularly, the RM-type regime, where the dynamics is identical to conventional RM instability and is dominated by initial conditions, and the RT-type regime where the dynamics is dominated by the acceleration term. For the latter, the time dependence has profound effects on the dynamics. In the RT non-linear regime, the time dependence has no consequence on the morphology of the bubbles; the growth rate (bubble tip velocity) evolves as power law with the exponent set by the acceleration. The solutions for a one-parameter family, and are convergent with exponential decay of Fourier amplitudes. The solutions are stable at maximum tip velocity, whereas flat bubbles are unstable, and the growth/decay of perturbations is no longer purely exponential and depends on the acceleration exponent. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  13. A new chicken genome assembly provides insight into avian genome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3) built from combined long single molecule sequencing t...

  14. Self-assembly of the hydrophobin SC3 proceeds via two structural intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vocht, Marcel L. de; Reviakine, Ilya; Ulrich, Wolf-Peter; Bergsma-Schutter, Wilma; Wösten, Han A.B.; Vogel, Horst; Brisson, Alain; Wessels, Joseph G.H.; Robillard, George T.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrophobins self assemble into amphipathic films at hydrophobic–hydrophilic interfaces. These proteins are involved in a broad range of processes in fungal development. We have studied the conformational changes that accompany the self-assembly of the hydrophobin SC3 with polarization-modulation in

  15. Structural analysis of the human SYCE2-TEX12 complex provides molecular insights into synaptonemal complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Owen R; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2012-07-01

    The successful completion of meiosis is essential for all sexually reproducing organisms. The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a large proteinaceous structure that holds together homologous chromosomes during meiosis, providing the structural framework for meiotic recombination and crossover formation. Errors in SC formation are associated with infertility, recurrent miscarriage and aneuploidy. The current lack of molecular information about the dynamic process of SC assembly severely restricts our understanding of its function in meiosis. Here, we provide the first biochemical and structural analysis of an SC protein component and propose a structural basis for its function in SC assembly. We show that human SC proteins SYCE2 and TEX12 form a highly stable, constitutive complex, and define the regions responsible for their homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Biophysical analysis reveals that the SYCE2-TEX12 complex is an equimolar hetero-octamer, formed from the association of an SYCE2 tetramer and two TEX12 dimers. Electron microscopy shows that biochemically reconstituted SYCE2-TEX12 complexes assemble spontaneously into filamentous structures that resemble the known physical features of the SC central element (CE). Our findings can be combined with existing biological data in a model of chromosome synapsis driven by growth of SYCE2-TEX12 higher-order structures within the CE of the SC.

  16. TREN (Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine): an effective scaffold for the assembly of triple helical collagen mimetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Juliann; De Capua, Antonia; Locardi, Elsa; Goodman, Murray

    2002-11-27

    A new scaffold, TREN-(suc-OH)(3) where TREN is tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and suc is the succinic acid spacers, was incorporated to assemble triple helices composed of Gly-Nleu-Pro sequences (Nleu denotes N-isobutylglycine). Extensive biophysical studies which include denaturation studies, CD and NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling demonstrated that TREN-[suc-(Gly-Nleu-Pro)(n)-NH(2)](3) (n = 5 and 6) form stable triple helical structures in solution. A comparative analysis of TREN-assembled and KTA-assembled collagen mimetics (KTA denotes Kemp triacid, 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid) indicates that the flexibility of the TREN scaffold is superior to the KTA scaffold in inducing triple helicity. This effect most likely arises from the flexibility of the TREN scaffold which allows the three peptide chains to adjust their register for a tighter triple helical packing.

  17. Crystal Structure of Prp5p Reveals Interdomain Interactions that Impact Spliceosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase Prp5p facilitates U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP binding to the intron branch site region during spliceosome assembly. We present crystal structures of S. cerevisiae Prp5p alone and in complex with ADP at 2.12 Å and 1.95 Å resolution. The three-dimensional packing of Prp5p subdomains differs strikingly from that so far observed in other DEAD-box proteins: two RecA-like subdomains adopt an “open state” conformation stabilized by extensive interactions involving sequences that flank the two subdomains. This conformation is distinct from that required for ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this, Prp5p mutations that destabilize interdomain interactions exhibited increased ATPase activity in vitro and inhibited splicing of suboptimal branch site substrates in vivo, whereas restoration of interdomain interactions reversed these effects. We conclude that the Prp5p open state conformation is biologically relevant and that disruption of the interdomain interaction facilitates a large-scale conformational change of Prp5p during U2 snRNP-branch site recognition.

  18. Self-assembled micro-structured sensors for food safety in paper based food packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakovirta, M., E-mail: marko.hakovirta@storaenso.com; Aksoy, B.; Hakovirta, J.

    2015-08-01

    Natural self-assembled microstructured particles (diatomaceous earth) were used to develop a gas sensor paper with detection mechanism based on visible and distinct color changes of the sensor paper when exposed to volatile basic nitrogen compounds. The coating formulation for paper was prepared by applying diatomites, polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH), and pH sensitive dyes on acidic paper substrate. The surface coating was designed to allow a maximum gas flow through the diatomite sensors. The produced sensor paper was tested for sensitivity using different ammonia concentrations and we observed a sensitivity lower limit at 63 ppm. As a comparison, the results show comparable sensitivity levels to carbon nanotube based sensor technologies reported in literature. - Highlights: • Novel sensor paper was developed using micro-structured diatomaceous earth and pH sensitive dye. • The functionality is based on pH sensitive dye to indicate spoilage of meat or fish by color change. • Diatomaceous earth was successfully immobilized to the polyvinyl alcohol coating. • The coating was engineered to maximize the exposure of the diatom morphology. • The sensor paper achieved very high sensitivities for ammonia gas detection.

  19. Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shian Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride, we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine (PVBT and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine (PVBA, respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems.

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights into cooperative assembly of dimeric Notch transcription complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, Kelly L.; Hass, Matthew; McArthur, Debbie G.; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G.; Aster, Jon C.; Kopan, Raphael; Blacklow, Stephen C. (WU); (BWH); (DFCI)

    2010-11-12

    Ligand-induced proteolysis of Notch produces an intracellular effector domain that transduces essential signals by regulating the transcription of target genes. This function relies on the formation of transcriptional activation complexes that include intracellular Notch, a Mastermind co-activator and the transcription factor CSL bound to cognate DNA. These complexes form higher-order assemblies on paired, head-to-head CSL recognition sites. Here we report the X-ray structure of a dimeric human Notch1 transcription complex loaded on the paired site from the human HES1 promoter. The small interface between the Notch ankyrin domains could accommodate DNA bending and untwisting to allow a range of spacer lengths between the two sites. Cooperative dimerization occurred on the human and mouse Hes5 promoters at a sequence that diverged from the CSL-binding consensus at one of the sites. These studies reveal how promoter organizational features control cooperativity and, thus, the responsiveness of different promoters to Notch signaling.

  1. Oscillatory behaviors and hierarchical assembly of contractile structures in intercalating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in the size of the apical cell surface have been associated with apical constriction and tissue invagination. However, it is currently not known if apical oscillatory behaviors are a unique property of constricting cells or if they constitute a universal feature of the force balance between cells in multicellular tissues. Here, we set out to determine whether oscillatory cell behaviors occur in parallel with cell intercalation during the morphogenetic process of axis elongation in the Drosophila embryo. We applied multi-color, time-lapse imaging of living embryos and SIESTA, an integrated tool for automated and semi-automated cell segmentation, tracking, and analysis of image sequences. Using SIESTA, we identified cycles of contraction and expansion of the apical surface in intercalating cells and characterized them at the molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. We demonstrate that apical oscillations are anisotropic, and this anisotropy depends on the presence of intact cell-cell junctions and spatial cues provided by the anterior-posterior patterning system. Oscillatory cell behaviors during axis elongation are associated with the hierarchical assembly and disassembly of contractile actomyosin structures at the medial cortex of the cell, with actin localization preceding myosin II and with the localization of both proteins preceding changes in cell shape. We discuss models to explain how the architecture of cytoskeletal networks regulates their contractile behavior and the mechanisms that give rise to oscillatory cell behaviors in intercalating cells.

  2. Optical and structural properties of InGaAs self assembled quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Siverns, P D

    2001-01-01

    The success of 2D quantum well (QW) based optical devices has prompted research into further reducing the dimensionality to produce 0D quantum dots (QDs). This thesis investigates self-assembled InAs/GaAs QDs using optical and structural techniques. The effects of stacking QD layers are examined and the growth conditions necessary for emission at the technologically important wavelength of 1.3 mu m. In addition hydrogenation of QWs and QDs is shown to improve the optical efficiency by passivating defects in the barriers. Bilayers of QDs grown with different spacer layers were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A redshift in the emission energy and narrowing of the linewidth was observed for the stacked dots and attributed to changes in the localised strain caused by vertical correlation. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements revealed the dots to be indium rich areas within a 2D 'confining layer' rather than the accepted view of pyramidal struct...

  3. Polarization switching and patterning in self-assembled peptide tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bdikin, Igor; Bystrov, Vladimir; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Gracio, José; Kopyl, Svitlana; Wojtas, Maciej; Mishina, Elena; Sigov, Alexander; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled peptide nanotubes are unique nanoscale objects that have great potential for a multitude of applications, including biosensors, nanotemplates, tissue engineering, biosurfactants, etc. The discovery of strong piezoactivity and polar properties in aromatic dipeptides [A. Kholkin, N. Amdursky, I. Bdikin, E. Gazit, and G. Rosenman, ACS Nano 4, 610 (2010)] opened up a new perspective for their use as biocompatible nanoactuators, nanomotors, and molecular machines. Another, as yet unexplored functional property is the ability to switch polarization and create artificial polarization patterns useful in various electronic and optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate that diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes are indeed electrically switchable if annealed at a temperature of about 150 °C. The new orthorhombic antipolar structure that appears after annealing allows for the existence of a radial polarization component, which is directly probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements. Observation of the relatively stable polarization patterns and hysteresis loops via PFM testifies to the local reorientation of molecular dipoles in the radial direction. The experimental results are complemented with rigorous molecular calculations and create a solid background of electric-field induced deformation of aromatic rings and corresponding polarization switching in this emergent material.

  4. Space structure capturing and assembling by experimental free-floating robot satellite (EFFORTS) simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.

    1993-09-01

    In order to study and validate practical availability of control schemes for in-orbit operational free-floating robots, a research group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the Experimental Free-FlOating RoboT Satellite (EFFORTS-I and II) simulators, which enable to examine 2-dimensional pseudo-micro gravity motion dynamics by air lift system. The robot model comprising a satellite base body and articulated manipulator arms with grippers and wrist force sensors, makes horizontal motion without mechanical disturbances or external forces. This paper presents the control methods and experimental results for spacecraft/manipulator control paying attention to the reaction dynamics, and assembly and deployment operation of space structures. The paper focuses the discussion of (1) hardware design of EFFORTS simulators, (2) dynamic modeling and a basic control concept for space free-floating manipulators, (3) satellite attitude control coordinating with manipulator dynamics, (4) practical force control for dexterous manipulation, and (5) experimental results on above topics.

  5. Sequence dependence of kinetics and morphology of collagen model peptide self-assembly into higher order structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The process of self-assembly of the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 into higher order structure resembles the nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril formation in many features, but the irregular morphology of the self-assembled peptide contrasts with the ordered fibers and networks formed by collagen in vivo. The amino acid sequence in the central region of the (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 peptide was varied and found to affect the kinetics of self-assembly and nature of the higher order structure formed. Single amino acid changes in the central triplet produced irregular higher order structures similar to (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, but the rate of self-association was markedly delayed by a single change in one Pro to Ala or Leu. The introduction of a Hyp-rich hydrophobic sequence from type IV collagen resulted in a more regular suprastructure of extended fibers that sometimes showed supercoiling and branching features similar to those seen for type IV collagen in the basement membrane network. Several peptides, where central Pro-Hyp sequences were replaced by charged residues or a nine-residue hydrophobic region from type III collagen, lost the ability to self-associate under standard conditions. The inability to self-assemble likely results from loss of imino acids, and lack of an appropriate distribution of hydrophobic/electrostatic residues. The effect of replacement of a single Gly residue was also examined, as a model for collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta and Alport syndrome. Unexpectedly, the Gly to Ala replacement interfered with self-assembly of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, while the peptide with a Gly to Ser substitution self-associated to form a fibrillar structure. PMID:18441232

  6. Still Heart Encodes a Structural HMT, SMYD1b, with Chaperone-Like Function during Fast Muscle Sarcomere Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal Prill

    Full Text Available The vertebrate sarcomere is a complex and highly organized contractile structure whose assembly and function requires the coordination of hundreds of proteins. Proteins require proper folding and incorporation into the sarcomere by assembly factors, and they must also be maintained and replaced due to the constant physical stress of muscle contraction. Zebrafish mutants affecting muscle assembly and maintenance have proven to be an ideal tool for identification and analysis of factors necessary for these processes. The still heart mutant was identified due to motility defects and a nonfunctional heart. The cognate gene for the mutant was shown to be smyd1b and the still heart mutation results in an early nonsense codon. SMYD1 mutants show a lack of heart looping and chamber definition due to a lack of expression of heart morphogenesis factors gata4, gata5 and hand2. On a cellular level, fast muscle fibers in homozygous mutants do not form mature sarcomeres due to the lack of fast muscle myosin incorporation by SMYD1b when sarcomeres are first being assembled (19hpf, supporting SMYD1b as an assembly protein during sarcomere formation.

  7. Functional architectures based on self-assembly of bio-inspired dipeptides: Structure modulation and its photoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengjun; Liu, Kai; Li, Junbai; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-01

    Getting inspiration from nature and further developing functional architectures provides an effective way to design innovative materials and systems. Among bio-inspired materials, dipeptides and its self-assembled architectures with functionalities have recently been the subject of intensive studies. However, there is still a great challenge to explore its applications likely due to the lack of effective adaptation of their self-assembled structures as well as a lack of understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms. In this context, taking diphenylalanine (FF, a core recognition motif for molecular self-assembly of the Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptides) as a model of bio-inspired dipeptides, recent strategies on modulation of dipeptide-based architectures were introduced with regard to both covalent (architectures modulation by coupling functional groups) and non-covalent ways (controlled architectures by different assembly pathways). Then, applications are highlighted in some newly emerging fields of innovative photoelectronic devices and materials, such as artificial photosynthetic systems for renewable solar energy storage and renewable optical waveguiding materials for optoelectronic devices. At last, the challenges and future perspectives of these bio-inspired dipeptides are also addressed.

  8. Accelerated Unification

    OpenAIRE

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew; Georgi, Howard

    2001-01-01

    We construct four dimensional gauge theories in which the successful supersymmetric unification of gauge couplings is preserved but accelerated by N-fold replication of the MSSM gauge and Higgs structure. This results in a low unification scale of $10^{13/N}$ TeV.

  9. Insight into structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex by utilizing the genome of a eukaryotic thermophile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amlacher, Stefan; Sarges, Phillip; Flemming, Dirk;

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is composed of ~30 nucleoporins (Nups), remain elusive. Here, we report the genome of the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum (ct) and identify the complete repertoire of Nups therein. The the......Despite decades of research, the structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is composed of ~30 nucleoporins (Nups), remain elusive. Here, we report the genome of the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum (ct) and identify the complete repertoire of Nups therein....... The thermophilic proteins show improved properties for structural and biochemical studies compared to their mesophilic counterparts, and purified ctNups enabled the reconstitution of the inner pore ring module that spans the width of the NPC from the anchoring membrane to the central transport channel. This module...... of a thermophilic eukaryote for studying complex molecular machines....

  10. Self-assembled nanostructures of amphiphilic zinc(II) salophen complexes: role of the solvent on their structure and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Ivan Pietro; Malandrino, Graziella; Di Bella, Santo

    2014-07-14

    This contribution explores the effect of several solvent properties, such as volatility, polarity, and Lewis basicity on the formation of molecular self-assembled nanostructures in the solid state, obtained either by casting of related solutions or by complete solvent evaporation, using seven solvents representative of common classes of coordinating organic solvents, of an amphiphilic Zn(II) Schiff-base complex. In all cases, the existence of well-defined X-ray diffraction patterns, for both the cast and powder samples, indicates a strong tendency towards the molecular self-assembly of such complexes. While nanostructures formed in acetone, THF, pyridine, and DMF have a lamellar organization, those formed in ACN, ethanol, and DMSO exhibit a 2D columnar square structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis indicates that nanostructures formed in volatile acetone, THF, ACN, and ethanol solvents show a fibrous morphology, while those formed in less volatile pyridine, DMF, and DMSO have a ribbon appearance. Overall, the results indicate that while the formation of such nanostructures is independent of the Lewis basicity of the solvent, the solvent polarity affects their structure - more polar solvents favour higher symmetry structures - and the solvent volatility influences their morphology and ordering in the cast films - lower volatility of the solvent parallels the formation of much more ordered structures. Therefore, the appropriate choice of solvent allows control of the structure, morphology, and ordering of these molecular assemblies.

  11. Fabrication of hierarchical hybrid structures using bio-enabled layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilova, Marketa; Karaca, Banu Taktak; Park, James; Jia, Carol; Wilson, Brandon R; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2012-05-01

    Development of versatile and flexible assembly systems for fabrication of functional hybrid nanomaterials with well-defined hierarchical and spatial organization is of a significant importance in practical nanobiotechnology applications. Here we demonstrate a bio-enabled self-assembly technique for fabrication of multi-layered protein and nanometallic assemblies utilizing a modular gold-binding (AuBP1) fusion tag. To accomplish the bottom-up assembly we first genetically fused the AuBP1 peptide sequence to the C'-terminus of maltose-binding protein (MBP) using two different linkers to produce MBP-AuBP1 hetero-functional constructs. Using various spectroscopic techniques, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), we verified the exceptional binding and self-assembly characteristics of AuBP1 peptide. The AuBP1 peptide tag can direct the organization of recombinant MBP protein on various gold surfaces through an efficient control of the organic-inorganic interface at the molecular level. Furthermore using a combination of soft-lithography, self-assembly techniques and advanced AuBP1 peptide tag technology, we produced spatially and hierarchically controlled protein multi-layered assemblies on gold nanoparticle arrays with high molecular packing density and pattering efficiency in simple, reproducible steps. This model system offers layer-by-layer assembly capability based on specific AuBP1 peptide tag and constitutes novel biological routes for biofabrication of various protein arrays, plasmon-active nanometallic assemblies and devices with controlled organization, packing density and architecture.

  12. Development and testing of a deuterium gas target assembly for neutron production via the H-2(d,n)He-3 reaction at a low-energy accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feautrier, D.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a deuterium gas target intended for use at a low-energy accelerator facility to produce neutrons for basic research and various nuclear applications. The principle source reaction is H-2(d,n)He-3. It produces a nearly mono-energetic group of neutrons. However, a lower-energy continuum neutron spectrum is produced by the H-2(d;n,p)H-2 reaction and also by deuterons which strike various components in the target assembly. The present target is designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) minimize unwanted background neutron production from the target assembly, (2) provide a relatively low level of residual long-term activity within the target components, (3) have the capacity to dissipate up to 150 watts of beam power with good target longevity, and (4) possess a relatively modest target mass in order to minimize neutron scattering from the target components. The basic physical principles that have to be considered in designing an accelerator target are discussed and the major engineering features of this particular target design are outlined. The results of initial performance tests on this target are documented and some conclusions concerning the viability of the target design are presented.

  13. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renliang; Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures.

  14. Structures of self-assembled amphiphilic peptide-heterodimers: effects of concentration, pH, temperature and ionic strength

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Zhongli

    2010-01-01

    The amphiphilic double-tail peptides AXG were studied regarding secondary structure and self-assembly in aqueous solution. The two tails A = Ala 6 and G = Gly6 are connected by a central pair X of hydrophilic residues, X being two aspartic acids in ADG, two lysines in AKG and two arginines in ARG. The peptide AD (Ala6Asp) served as a single-tail reference. The secondary structure of the four peptides was characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy under a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.01-0.8 mM), temperatures (20-98 °C), pHs (4-9.5) and ionic strengths. In salt-free water both ADG and AD form a β-sheet type of structure at high concentration, low pH and low temperature, in a peptide-peptide driven assembly of individual peptides. The transition has a two-state character for ADG but not for AD, which indicates that the added tail in ADG makes the assembly more cooperative. By comparison the secondary structures of AKG and ARG are comparatively stable over the large range of conditions covered. According to dynamic light scattering the two-tail peptides form supra-molecular aggregates in water, but high-resolution AFM-imaging indicate that ordered (self-assembled) structures are only formed when salt (0.1 M NaCl) is added. Since the CD-studies indicate that the NaCl has only a minor effect on the peptide secondary structure we propose that the main role of the added salt is to screen the electrostatic repulsion between the peptide building blocks. According to the AFM images ADG and AKG support a correlation between nanofibers and a β-sheet or unordered secondary structure, whereas ARG forms fibers in spite of lacking β-sheet structure. Since the AKG and ARG double-tail peptides self-assemble into distinct nanostructures while their secondary structures are resistant to environment factors, these new peptides show potential as robust building blocks for nano-materials in various medical and nanobiotechnical applications. © 2010 The Royal Society

  15. Ceramic Composite Mechanical Fastener System for High-Temperature Structural Assemblies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Phase I, the feasibility of a novel thermal stress-free ceramic composite mechanical fastener system suitable for assembly of high-temperature composite...

  16. 3.5A cryoEM structure of hepatitis B virus core assembled from full-length core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuekui Yu

    Full Text Available The capsid shell of infectious hepatitis B virus (HBV is composed of 240 copies of a single protein called HBV core antigen (HBc. An atomic model of a core assembled from truncated HBc was determined previously by X-ray crystallography. In an attempt to obtain atomic structural information of HBV core in a near native, non-crystalline environment, we reconstructed a 3.5Å-resolution structure of a recombinant core assembled from full-length HBc by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM and derived an atomic model. The structure shows that the 240 molecules of full-length HBc form a core with two layers. The outer layer, composed of the N-terminal assembly domain, is similar to the crystal structure of the truncated HBc, but has three differences. First, unlike the crystal structure, our cryoEM structure shows no disulfide bond between the Cys61 residues of the two subunits within the dimer building block, indicating such bond is not required for core formation. Second, our cryoEM structure reveals up to four more residues in the linker region (amino acids 140-149. Third, the loops in the cryoEM structures containing this linker region in subunits B and C are oriented differently (~30° and ~90° from their counterparts in the crystal structure. The inner layer, composed of the C-terminal arginine-rich domain (ARD and the ARD-bound RNAs, is partially-ordered and connected with the outer layer through linkers positioned around the two-fold axes. Weak densities emanate from the rims of positively charged channels through the icosahedral three-fold and local three-fold axes. We attribute these densities to the exposed portions of some ARDs, thus explaining ARD's accessibility by proteases and antibodies. Our data supports a role of ARD in mediating communication between inside and outside of the core during HBV maturation and envelopment.

  17. Structure, Function, Self-Assembly and Origin of Simple Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins perform such essential cellular functions as transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, transduction of environmental signals, regulation of cell fusion, recognition of other cells, energy capture and its conversion into high-energy compounds. In fact, 30-40% of genes in modem organisms codes for membrane proteins. Although contemporary membrane proteins or their functional assemblies can be quite complex, their transmembrane fragments are usually remarkably simple. The most common structural motif for these fragments is a bundle of alpha-helices, but occasionally it could be a beta-barrel. In a series of molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigated self-organizing properties of simple membrane proteins based on these structural motifs. Specifically, we studied folding and insertion into membranes of short, nonpolar or amphiphatic peptides. We also investigated glycophorin A, a peptide that forms sequence-specific dimers, and a transmembrane aggregate of four identical alpha-helices that forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel was investigated. Many peptides are attracted to water-membrane interfaces. Once at the interface, nonpolar peptides spontaneously fold to a-helices. Whenever the sequence permits, peptides that contain both polar and nonpolar amino also adopt helical structures, in which polar and nonpolar amino acid side chains are immersed in water and membrane, respectively. Specific identity of side chains is less important. Helical peptides at the interface could insert into the membrane and adopt a transmembrane conformation. However, insertion of a single helix is unfavorable because polar groups in the peptide become completely dehydrated upon insertion. The unfavorable free energy of insertion can be regained by spontaneous association of peptides in the membrane. The first step in this process is the formation of dimers, although the most common are aggregates of 4

  18. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  19. Structural assembly effects of Pt nanoparticle-carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposites on the enhancement of biohydrogen fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoa, Le Quynh, E-mail: hoa@p.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sugano, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Masato [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tamiya, Eiichi, E-mail: tamiya@ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: In this work, we designed various polyaniline (PANI) nanocomposites with platinum (Pt) nanoparticle-decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), employed them as anodic catalysts, and studied their structural assembly effects with regard to enhancing biohydrogen fuel cell performance. Of two proposed structures, the PANI/Pt/MWCNTs multilayer nanocomposites showed superior electrocatalytic activities in the hydrogen oxidation reaction and in fuel cell power density relative to the Pt/MWCNTs-PANI core-shell design. These enhancements were attributed to the active interface formed between the Pt nanoparticles and polyaniline nanofibers, where the higher electronic and ionic conductivities of the thin PANI nanofiber layers in contact with Pt active sites were better than with the PANI bound Pt/MWCNTs. We also investigated the change in the electronic state of the composites and the charge-transfer rate caused by varying the structural assembly. Finally, the role of each catalyst component was examined to understand its individual effect on fuel cell performance and to understand its structural assembly effect on enhanced power density.

  20. X-band accelerator structures: On going R&D at the INFN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Marcelli, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); RICMASS, Rome International Center for Materials Science Superstripes, Via dei Sabelli 119A, 00185 Rome (Italy); Spataro, B. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yeremian, A.D. [SLAC-National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Higashi, Y. [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami-gun, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Rosenzweig, J. [UCLA-Department of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sarti, S. [University of Rome Sapienza, Dipartimento di Fisica, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Caliendo, C. [Istituto di Acustica e Sensoristica, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Castorina, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); University of Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e Informatica, 95126 Catania (Italy); Cibin, G. [Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110DE (United Kingdom); Carfora, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Leonardi, O. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rigato, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Campostrini, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The next generation of accelerators, from the compact to the large infrastructure dedicated to high energy physics, is highly demanding in terms of accelerating gradients. To upgrade performances of X band linacs at 11.424 GHz many resources are devoted to achieve high accelerating gradients and at the same time to obtain a high reliability. In the framework of a three-year funded project by the Vth Committee of the INFN to the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) and to the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL). Within a broad international collaboration the LNF has been involved in the design, manufacture and test of compact high power standing wave (SW) sections operating at high frequency while LNL is actively involved in the development of new materials and multilayers using PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) methods. We will report about the status of the accelerating device and of the different ongoing R&D activities and characterization procedures such as tests of different materials and metallic coatings.

  1. Chemical, electrochemical, and structural stability of low-density self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, David K; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-09-25

    The stability of low-density self-assembled monolayers of mercaptohexadecanoic acid on gold is studied under a variety of storage conditions--air at room temperature, argon at room temperature and 4 degrees C, and ethanol at room temperature. The structural monotony of the low-density monolayers was assessed by monitoring the alkyl chains of LDSAMs by grazing-angle Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a function of time. Independently of the storage conditions, both symmetric and asymmetric methylene stretches at 2923 and 2852 cm-1 decreased after 4 weeks to 2919 and 2849 cm-1, respectively. These data suggest an increased ordering of the alkyl chains that is distinctly different from that of conventional high-density monolayers of mercaptohexadecanoic acid included as a reference in this study. As a further extension of this observation, the electrochemical barrier properties of the low-density monolayers were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and did not change significantly for any of the storage conditions over a period of 4 weeks. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to assess the chemical changes in the low-density monolayers over time. The chemical composition was essentially unaltered for all storage conditions. Specifically, oxidation of the sulfur headgroup, a common cause of monolayer degradation, was excluded for all test conditions on the basis of XPS analysis. This study confirms excellent storage stability for low-density monolayers under commonly used storage conditions and bridges an important technological gap between these systems and conventional high-density systems.

  2. Secondary Structures of Ubiquitin Ions Soft-Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-09

    The secondary structures of multiply charged ubiquitin ions soft-landed onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces were studied using in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Two charge states of ubiquitin, 5+ and 13+, were mass selected separately from a mixture of different charge states produced by electrospray ionization (ESI). The low 5+ charge state represents a native-like folded state of ubiquitin, while the high 13+ charge state assumes an extended, almost linear conformation. Each of the two charge states was soft-landed onto a CH3- and COOH-terminated SAM of alkylthiols on gold (HSAM and COOH-SAM). HSAM is a hydrophobic surface known to stabilize helical conformations of soft-landed protonated peptides, whereas COOH-SAM is a hydrophilic surface that preferentially stabilizes β-sheet conformations. IRRAS spectra of the soft-landed ubiquitin ions were acquired as a function of time during and after ion soft-landing. Similar to smaller peptide ions, helical conformations of ubiquitin are found to be more abundant on HSAM, while the relative abundance of β-sheet conformations increases on COOH-SAM. The initial charge state of ubiquitin also has a pronounced effect on its conformation on the surface. Specifically, on both surfaces, a higher relative abundance of helical conformations and lower relative abundance of β-sheet conformations is observed for the 13+ charge state compared to the 5+ charge state. Time-resolved experiments indicate that the α-helical band in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state slowly increases with time on the HSAM surface and decreases in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state on COOH-SAM. These results further support the preference of the hydrophobic HSAM surface toward helical conformations and demonstrate that soft-landed protein ions may undergo slow conformational changes during and after deposition.

  3. Electricity producing property and bacterial community structure in microbial fuel cell equipped with membrane electrode assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubaba, Owen; Araki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Sakamoto, Hisatoshi; Matsuda, Atsunori; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    It is important for practical use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to not only develop electrodes and proton exchange membranes but also to understand the bacterial community structure related to electricity generation. Four lactate fed MFCs equipped with different membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were constructed with paddy field soil as inoculum. The MEAs significantly affected the electricity-generating properties of the MFCs. MEA-I was made with Nafion 117 solution and the other MEAs were made with different configurations of three kinds of polymers. MFC-I equipped with MEA-I exhibited the highest performance with a stable current density of 55 ± 3 mA m⁻². MFC-III equipped with MEA-III with the highest platinum concentration, exhibited the lowest performance with a stable current density of 1.7 ± 0.1 mA m⁻². SEM observation revealed that there were cracks on MEA-III. These results demonstrated that it is significantly important to prevent oxygen-intrusion for improved MFC performance. By comparing the data of DGGE and phylogenetic analyzes, it was suggested that the dominant bacterial communities of MFC-I were constructed with lactate-fermenters and Fe(III)-reducers, which consisted of bacteria affiliated with the genera of Enterobacter, Dechlorosoma, Pelobacter, Desulfovibrio, Propioniferax, Pelosinus, and Firmicutes. A bacterium sharing 100% similarity to one of the DGGE bands was isolated from MFC-I. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate shared 98% similarity to gram-positive Propioniferax sp. P7 and it was confirmed that the isolate produced electricity in an MFC. These results suggested that these bacteria are valuable for constructing the electron transfer network in MFC.

  4. Production of Structural Colors with High Contrast and Wide Viewing Angles from Assemblies of Polypyrrole Black Coated Polystyrene Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ge, Dengteng; Wu, Gaoxiang; Liao, Zhiwei; Yang, Shu

    2016-06-29

    Structural color with wide viewing angles has enormous potential applications in pigment, ink formulation, displays, and sensors. However, colors obtained from colloidal assemblies with low refractive index contrast or without black additives typically appear pale. Here, we prepare polypyrrole (PPy) black coated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles and demonstrate well-defined colors with high color contrast and wide viewing angles under ambient light. Depending on the loading of pyrrole during polymerization, PPy nanogranules of different sizes and coverages are grafted to the surface of PS nanoparticles. The bumpy particles can self-assemble into quasi-amorphous arrays, resulting in low angle dependent structure colors under ambient light. The color can be tuned by the size of the PS nanoparticles, and the presence of the PPy black on PS nanoparticles enhances the color contrast by suppressing incoherent and multiple scattering.

  5. VESICULAR TRANSPORT. A structure of the COPI coat and the role of coat proteins in membrane vesicle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonova, S O; Diestelkoetter-Bachert, P; von Appen, A; Hagen, W J H; Beck, R; Beck, M; Wieland, F; Briggs, J A G

    2015-07-10

    Transport of material within cells is mediated by trafficking vesicles that bud from one cellular compartment and fuse with another. Formation of a trafficking vesicle is driven by membrane coats that localize cargo and polymerize into cages to bend the membrane. Although extensive structural information is available for components of these coats, the heterogeneity of trafficking vesicles has prevented an understanding of how complete membrane coats assemble on the membrane. We combined cryo-electron tomography, subtomogram averaging, and cross-linking mass spectrometry to derive a complete model of the assembled coat protein complex I (COPI) coat involved in traffic between the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum. The highly interconnected COPI coat structure contradicted the current "adaptor-and-cage" understanding of coated vesicle formation.

  6. Application and Implementation of the Structured Assembly Process Planning in A Auto Enterprise Based on TS16949

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jiakun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Process planning is the key link that connects the product design and manufacture. In order to continually improve the effectiveness and efficiency of process planning an auto enterprise in consistent with the process management requirements of TS16949, the requirements for assembly process planning is analysed and the main problems affecting the design and production efficiency are discussed. The infrastructure of the structured process planning and management platform is constructed combing the management technology and TS16949 quality system, then the structured PPPR (product, process, plant and resourcemodel is reintegrated to analyze the relationships among the objects with the object-oriented method. In the end, with the principles of maintaining conveniently and operating practically, the assembly process planning and management system is implemented according to the characteristics of the process in the enterprise, and the main function modules of the system are described.

  7. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  8. Mechanism of N-octadecyl-N'-maleoyl-L-phenylalanine self-assembled into supramolecular structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Zu Zhang; Xin Jian Fu; Hong Wang; Ya Jiang Yang

    2008-01-01

    N-Octadecyl-N'-maleoyl-L-phenylalanine (ODMA-L-Phe) was synthesized through the condensation, deprotection and aeid-ylation reaction of BOC-L-phenylalanine, octadecylamine and maleic anhydride. ODMA-L-Phe can self-assemble in some organic solvents and turned them into thermally reversible physical supramolecular organogels. The morphology of ODMA-L-Phe aggregates was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The aggregates of ODMA-L-Phe were needle-like fibrils with diameters of approximately 100-200 nm. The mechanism of ODMA-L-Phe self-assembly in organic solvents was investigated using 1H NMR and circular dichroism (CD). The results indicated that hydrogen bonding was one of the main driving forces for the self-assembly of ODMA-L-Phe.

  9. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  10. Self-assembly structure formation on patterned InP surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembly of polystyrene spheres guided by patterned n-type InP substrates has been investigated. InP surfaces were patterned using a variety of methods including wet chemical etching,sputter coating,thermal evaporation,and photo lithography. The self-assembly of polystyrene spheres depended on the appearance of patterns and was affected by the deposition techniques (sputter coating and thermal evaporation) of Au micro-squares. SEM and AFM were used to characterize the surface morphologies.

  11. Evaluating the link between self-assembled mesophase structure and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Stephanie; Fong, Wye-Khay; Kirby, Nigel; Hanley, Tracey; Boyd, Ben J

    2011-12-12

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline materials are of increasing interest for use as drug delivery systems. The intricate nanostructure of the reversed bicontinuous cubic (V(2)) and inverse hexagonal (H(2)) liquid crystal matrices have been shown to provide diffusion controlled release of actives of varying size and polarity. In this study, we extend the understanding of release to other self-assembled phases, the micellar cubic phase (I(2)) and inverse micelles (L(2)). The systems are comparable as they were all prepared from the one lipid, glyceryl monooleate (GMO), which sequentially forms all four phases with increasing hexadecane (HD) content in excess water. Phase identity was confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data indicated that four mesophases were formed with increasing HD content at 25°C: V(2) phase (Pn3m space group) formed at 0-4% (w/w) HD, H(2) phase formed at 4-25% (w/w) HD, I(2) phase (Fd3m space group) formed at 25-40% (w/w) HD and finally L(2) phase formed at >40% (w/w) HD. Analogous compositions using phytantriol rather than GMO as the core lipid did not produce the I(2) phase, with only V(2) to H(2) to L(2) transitions being apparent with increasing HD concentration. In order to relate the liquid crystal phase structure to drug release rate, in vitro release tests were conducted by incorporating radio-labelled glucose as a model hydrophilic drug into the four GMO-based mesophases. It was found that the drug release followed first-order diffusion kinetics and was fastest from V(2) followed by L(2), H(2), and I(2). Drug release was shown to be significantly faster from bicontinuous cubic phase than the other mesophases, indicating that the state of the water compartments, whether open or closed, has a great influence on the rate of drug release. It is envisioned that liquid crystalline mesophases with slower release characteristics will more likely have potential applications as sustained release drug delivery systems, and hence

  12. Reduced-order computational model in nonlinear structural dynamics for structures having numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency range. Application to fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Brie, N., E-mail: nicolas.brie@edf.fr [EDF R and D, Département AMA, 1 avenue du général De Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A ROM of a nonlinear dynamical structure is built with a global displacements basis. • The reduced order model of fuel assemblies is accurate and of very small size. • The shocks between grids of a row of seven fuel assemblies are computed. -- Abstract: We are interested in the construction of a reduced-order computational model for nonlinear complex dynamical structures which are characterized by the presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency band. This high modal density makes the use of the classical modal analysis method not suitable. Therefore the reduced-order computational model is constructed using a basis of a space of global displacements, which is constructed a priori and which allows the nonlinear dynamical response of the structure observed on the stiff part to be predicted with a good accuracy. The methodology is applied to a complex industrial structure which is made up of a row of seven fuel assemblies with possibility of collisions between grids and which is submitted to a seismic loading.

  13. Electrochemical and structural characterization of self-assembled thiol monolayers on gold.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sondag-Huethorst, J.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers on gold are used as model systems in a fundamental study of the potential-dependent wetting and of the galvanic metal deposition. For using such monolayers as model systems, well-defined and ordered monolayers are required. In order to control the quality of the

  14. On the mass assembly of low-mass galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    De Rossi, Maria E; Tissera, Patricia B; Gonzalez-Samaniego, Alejandro; Pedrosa, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations are studied in order to analyse generic trends for the stellar, baryonic and halo mass assembly of low-mass galaxies (M_* 2, the overall properties of simulated galaxies are not in large disagreement with those derived from observations.

  15. Exciton spectra and the microscopic structure of self-assembled porphyrin nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaming, S. M.; Augulis, R.; Stuart, M. C. A.; Knoester, J.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical properties of tubular aggregates formed by self-assembly of zwitterionic meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS(4)) molecules are studied through a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. The interest in these systems, with diameters of 18 nm and lengths extending u

  16. Self-assembling iron oxyhydroxide/oxide tubular structures: laboratory-grown and field examples from Rio Tinto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M.; Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Flores, Erika; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio; Sobrón, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    Rio Tinto in southern Spain has become of increasing astrobiological significance, in particular for its similarity to environments on early Mars. We present evidence of tubular structures from sampled terraces in the stream bed at the source of the river, as well as ancient, now dry, terraces. This is the first reported finding of tubular structures in this particular environment. We propose that some of these structures could be formed through self-assembly via an abiotic mechanism involving templated precipitation around a fluid jet, a similar mechanism to that commonly found in so-called chemical gardens. Laboratory experiments simulating the formation of self-assembling iron oxyhydroxide tubes via chemical garden/chemobrionic processes form similar structures. Fluid-mechanical scaling analysis demonstrates that the proposed mechanism is plausible. Although the formation of tube structures is not itself a biosignature, the iron mineral oxidation gradients across the tube walls in laboratory and field examples may yield information about energy gradients and potentially habitable environments.

  17. Structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysik, Antoni J

    2015-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and vacuum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is reported. Direct evidence is provided for the ability of the surfactant dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) to prevent charge-induced unfolding of the membrane protein (PagP) in the gas-phase. Restraints obtained by IMS are used to map the surfactant positions onto the protein surface. Surfactants occupying more exposed positions at the apexes of the β-barrel structure are most in-line with the experimental observations. MD simulations provide additional evidence for this assembly organization through surfactant inversion and migration on the protein structure in the absence of solvent. Surfactant migration entails a net shift from apolar membrane spanning regions to more polar regions of the protein structure with the DDM molecule remaining attached to the protein via headgroup interactions. These data provide evidence for the role of protein-DDM headgroup interactions in stabilizing membrane protein structure from gas-phase unfolding.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Calculations of Two-Dimensional Dielectric Photonic Band Gap Structures and Cavities for Laser Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalova, Ksenia R; Liang Qian, Bao

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric photonic band gap (PBG) structures have many promising applications in laser acceleration. For these applications, accurate determination of fundamental and high order band gaps is critical. We present the results of our recent work on analytical calculations of two-dimensional (2D) PBG structures in rectangular geometry. We compare the analytical results with computer simulation results from the MIT Photonic Band Gap Structure Simulator (PBGSS) code, and discuss the convergence of the computer simulation results to the analytical results. Using the accurate analytical results, we design a mode-selective 2D dielectric cylindrical PBG cavity with the first global band gap in the frequency range of 8.8812 THz to 9.2654 THz. In this frequency range, the TM01-like mode is shown to be well confined.

  19. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  20. A New Chicken Genome Assembly Provides Insight into Avian Genome Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley C. Warren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3, built from combined long single molecule sequencing technology, finished BACs, and improved physical maps. In overall assembled bases, we see a gain of 183 Mb, including 16.4 Mb in placed chromosomes with a corresponding gain in the percentage of intact repeat elements characterized. Of the 1.21 Gb genome, we include three previously missing autosomes, GGA30, 31, and 33, and improve sequence contig length 10-fold over the previous Gallus_gallus-4.0. Despite the significant base representation improvements made, 138 Mb of sequence is not yet located to chromosomes. When annotated for gene content, Gallus_gallus-5.0 shows an increase of 4679 annotated genes (2768 noncoding and 1911 protein-coding over those in Gallus_gallus-4.0. We also revisited the question of what genes are missing in the avian lineage, as assessed by the highest quality avian genome assembly to date, and found that a large fraction of the original set of missing genes are still absent in sequenced bird species. Finally, our new data support a detailed map of MHC-B, encompassing two segments: one with a highly stable gene copy number and another in which the gene copy number is highly variable. The chicken model has been a critical resource for many other fields of study, and this new reference assembly will substantially further these efforts.

  1. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Structure in PKS 2155-304: Optical Polarimetric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    de Almeida, U Barres; Dominici, T P; Abraham, Z; Franco, G A P; Daniel, M K; Chadwick, P M; Boisson, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present multiband optical polarimetric observations of the VHE blazar PKS 2155-304 made simultaneously with a H.E.S.S./Fermi high-energy campaign in 2008, when the source was found to be in a low state. The intense daily coverage of the dataset allowed us to study in detail the temporal evolution of the emission and we found that the particle acceleration timescales are decoupled from the changes in the polarimetric properties of the source. We present a model in which the optical polarimetric emission originates at the polarised mm-wave core and propose an explanation for the lack of correlation between the photometric and polarimetric fluxes. The optical emission is consistent with an inhomogeneous synchrotron source in which the large scale field is locally organised by a shock in which particle acceleration takes place. Finally, we use these optical polarimetric observations of PKS 2155-304 at a low state to propose an origin for the quiescent gamma-ray flux of the object, in an attempt t...

  2. Polynomial chaos expansion in structural dynamics: Accelerating the convergence of the first two statistical moment sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquelin, E.; Adhikari, S.; Sinou, J.-J.; Friswell, M. I.

    2015-11-01

    Polynomial chaos solution for the frequency response of linear non-proportionally damped dynamic systems has been considered. It has been observed that for lightly damped systems the convergence of the solution can be very poor in the vicinity of the deterministic resonance frequencies. To address this, Aitken's transformation and its generalizations are suggested. The proposed approach is successfully applied to the sequences defined by the first two moments of the responses, and this process significantly accelerates the polynomial chaos convergence. In particular, a 2-dof system with respectively 1 and 2 parameter uncertainties has been studied. The first two moments of the frequency response were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, polynomial chaos expansion and Aitken's transformation of the polynomial chaos expansion. Whereas 200 polynomials are required to have a good agreement with Monte Carlo results around the deterministic eigenfrequencies, less than 50 polynomials transformed by the Aitken's method are enough. This latter result is improved if a generalization of Aitken's method (recursive Aitken's transformation, Shank's transformation) is applied. With the proposed convergence acceleration, polynomial chaos may be reconsidered as an efficient method to estimate the first two moments of a random dynamic response.

  3. Discovery, genotyping and characterization of structural variation and novel sequence at single nucleotide resolution from de novo genome assemblies on a population scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shujia; Rao, Junhua; Ye, Weijian;

    2015-01-01

    present a novel approach implemented in a single software package, AsmVar, to discover, genotype and characterize different forms of structural variation and novel sequence from population-scale de novo genome assemblies up to nucleotide resolution. Application of AsmVar to several human de novo genome...... assemblies captures a wide spectrum of structural variants and novel sequences present in the human population in high sensitivity and specificity. Our method provides a direct solution for investigating structural variants and novel sequences from de novo genome assemblies, facilitating the construction...... of population-scale pan-genomes. Our study also highlights the usefulness of the de novo assembly strategy for definition of genome structure....

  4. Hierarchical structures based on self-assembling beta-hairpin peptides and their application as biomaterials and hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Aysegul

    Self-assembly represents a robust and powerful paradigm for the bottom-up construction of nanostructures. Self-assembled peptide hydrogels are emerging as promising routes to novel multifunctional materials. The 20 amino acid MAX1and MAX8 peptides self-assemble into a three dimensional network of entangled, branched fibrils rich in beta-sheet secondary structure with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. These hydrogels form self-supporting structures that shear thin upon application of shear and then immediately recover to a solid hydrogel upon cessation of shear which facilitates the local delivery of the hydrogel into a site in vivo. Templated condensation of silica precursors on self-assembled nanoscale peptide fibrils with various surface functionalities can be used to mimic biosilicification. This template-defined approach towards biomineralization was utilized for the controlled fabrication of 3D hybrid nanostructures. We report a study on the structure-property relationship of self-assembled peptide hydrogels where mineralization of individual fibrils through sol-gel chemistry was achieved. The nanostructure and consequent mechanical characteristics of these hybrid networks can be modulated by changing the stoichiometric parameters of the sol-gel process. Construction of such organic-inorganic hybrid networks by sol-gel processing of self-assembled peptide hydrogels has improved mechanical properties and resulted in materials with ˜ 3 orders of magnitude higher stiffness. The physical characterization of the hybrid networks via electron microscopy and small angle scattering is detailed and correlated with changes in the network mechanical behavior. The resultant high fidelity templating process suggests that the peptide substrate can be used to template the coating of other functional inorganic materials. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels encapsulating an anti-tumorigenic drug, curcumin, have been prepared and demonstrated to be

  5. Design and optimization of Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej

    2016-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac uses waveguide damped structure as its baseline design. The current baseline structure design written in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report is named "CLIC-G." Recent activities on the CLIC-G design including high power tests on structure prototypes and the study of machining cost assessment had raised the need of reoptimizing the structure design to minimize the machining cost and the pulse surface temperature rise. This work presents optimization of the structure geometry, high-order-mode (HOM) damping loads and the design of a HOM-free power splitter for the input coupler. Compared to the current baseline design CLIC-G, the new structure design reduced the pulse surface temperature rise, input power and manufacturing cost and achieves better suppression to the long range transverse wakefield. Cell disks and damping loads for the new structure design are also more compact than those of the CLIC-G design.

  6. [Molecular Dynamics of Self-assembling and Rheology of Superhelical Structure of Protofiber of Spider Web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Orshanskiy, I A

    2015-01-01

    In this study we suggested a dynamics simulation for the formation of protofiber of spider web nanofiber. It was shown that a bundle of parallel polyalanine β-strands of sufficient length is arranged through self-assembly into a stable right-handed super helix. By numerical analysis we investigated the rheological properties and provided in nonlinear regime a generalization of the model of Singer for description of the rheological behaviour of super helix.

  7. DNA origami: a quantum leap for self-assembly of complex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Nangreave, Jeanette;

    2011-01-01

    The spatially controlled positioning of functional materials by self-assembly is one of the fundamental visions of nanotechnology. Major steps towards this goal have been achieved using DNA as a programmable building block. This tutorial review will focus on one of the most promising methods: DNA...... origami. The basic design principles, organization of a variety of functional materials and recent implementation of DNA robotics are discussed together with future challenges and opportunities....

  8. Self-assembled quantum dot structures in a hexagonal nanowire for quantum photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Dou, Xiu-Ming; Wei, Bin; Zha, Guo-Wei; Shang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Li; Su, Dan; Xu, Jian-Xing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Sun, Bao-Quan; Ji, Yuan; Han, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-05-01

    Two types of quantum nanostructures based on self-assembled GaAs quantumdots embedded into GaAs/AlGaAs hexagonal nanowire systems are reported, opening a new avenue to the fabrication of highly efficient single-photon sources, as well as the design of novel quantum optics experiments and robust quantum optoelectronic devices operating at higher temperature, which are required for practical quantum photonics applications.

  9. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, M; Rakshit, S; Shafraz, O; Borghi, N; Harmon, R M; Green, K J; Sivasankar, S; Nelson, W J

    2014-05-15

    Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes comprise two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollin (Dsc) and desmoglein (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly is not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell-cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca2+-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca2+-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca2+-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly via homophilic Ca2+- and W2/strand swap-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 may be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca2+-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes.

  10. Structure and Properties of Self-assembled Narural Rubber/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zheng; FENG Chunfang; LUO Yongyue; YI Zhifeng; KONG Lingxue

    2011-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) composites were prepared by combining self-assembly and latex compounding techniques.The acid-treated MWCNTs (H2SO4∶HNO3=3∶1,volume ratio) were self-assembled with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) through electrostatic adhesion.In the second assembling,NR/MWCNTs composites were developed by mixing MWCNTs/PDDA solution with NR latex.The results show that MWCNTs are homogenously distributed throughout the NR matrix as single tube and present a great interfacial adhesion with NR phase when MWCNTs contents are less than 3 wt%.Moreover,the addition of the MWCNTs brings about the remarkable enhancement in tensile strength and crosslink density compared with the NR host,and the data peak at 2 wt% MWCNTs loadings.When more MWCNTs are loaded,aggregations of MWCNTs are gradually generated,and the tensile strength and crosslink both decrease to a certain extent.

  11. Structural Performance Assessment Based on Statistical and Wavelet Analysis of Acceleration Measurements of a Building during an Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the analysis of structural health monitoring (SHM system based on acceleration measurements during an earthquake. The SHM system is applied to assess the performance investigation of the administration building in Seoul National University of Education, South Korea. The statistical and wavelet analysis methods are applied to investigate and assess the performance of the building during an earthquake shaking which took place on March 31, 2014. The results indicate that (1 the acceleration, displacement, and torsional responses of the roof recording point on the top floor of the building are more dominant in the X direction; (2 the rotation of the building has occurred at the base recording point; (3 95% of the energy content of the building response is shown in the dominant frequency range (6.25–25 Hz; (4 the wavelet spectrum illustrates that the roof vibration is more obvious and dominant during the shaking; and (5 the wavelet spectrum reveals the elasticity responses of the structure during the earthquake shaking.

  12. The Summary for Optimization of the Annular Coupled Structure Accelerating Module Physical Design for High Intensity Hadron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    The normal conducting Annular Coupled Structure (ACS) is applied for 190-400 MeV part of high intensity proton linac for the J-PARC. The ACS operating frequency is 972 MHz. The J-PARC ACS is strongly based on the results of previous investigations, especially results of Japan Hadron Project (JHP) research program in KEK. However, the design was revised and optimized to meet the requirements of reliability, operation efficiency and cost reduction. The cells shape of accelerating cells was optimized in total energy range to have high shunt impedance value together with the careful matching with the decreased coupling cells. The design of the bridge coupler cells was optimized to simplify mass production and shape of RF input cell together with matching window were optimized for higher operational reliability. Collected and adjusted all together, these modifications result in the significant effect. The ACS module design doesn't lose to another possible accelerating structures in RF parameters and dimensions. Pr...

  13. Accelerating the transition towards sustainability dynamics into supply chain relationship management and governance structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Seuring, Stefan; Zhu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    , sustainable, post-fossil carbon societies by working with all relevant stakeholders. This Special Volume of Journal of Cleaner Production is focused upon on diverse types of supply chain relationships, governance mechanisms, and innovations, which can foster effective and efficient sustainable supply chain......Stakeholders and competitive priorities drive profit and non-profit organizations towards the implementation of sustainability-related measures, in their internal operations, and in their supply chains planning. It is believed by some that investments in sustainability may help them to attain more...... successful futures by maintaining a healthy balance among economic, environmental, and social resources/dimensions. Consequently, some organizations have begun to integrate these dimensions in recent years. Researchers and practitioners are also working to accelerate the transition for more equitable...

  14. Effects on the structure of the universe of an accelerating expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, G A

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental results from supernovae Ia observations have been interpreted to show that the rate of expansion of the universe is increasing. Other recent experimental results find strong indications that the universe is ``flat.'' In this paper, I investigate some solutions of Einstein's field equations which go smoothly between Schwarzschild's relativistic gravitational solution near a mass concentration to the Friedmann-Lemaitre expanding universe solution. In particular, the static, curved-space extension of the Lemaitre- Schwarzschild solution in vacuum is given. Uniqueness conditions are discussed. One of these metrics preserves the ``cosmological equation.'' We find that when the rate of expansion of the universe is increasing, space is broken up into domains of attraction. Outside a domain of attraction, the expansion of the universe is strong enough to accelerate a test particle away from the domain boundary. I give a domain-size--mass relationship. This relationship may very well be important t...

  15. Water-Regulated Self-Assembly Structure Transformation and Gelation Behavior Prediction Based on a Hydrazide Derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Ran, Xia; Li, Qiuyue; Gao, Qiongqiong; Guo, Lijun

    2016-08-05

    Herein, we report the water-regulated supramolecular self-assembly structure transformation and the predictability of the gelation ability based on an azobenzene derivative bearing a hydrazide group, namely, N-(3,4,5-tributoxyphenyl)-N'-4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azophenyl] benzohydrazide (BNB-t4). The regulation effects are demonstrated in the morphological transformation from spherical to lamellar particles then back to spherical in different solvent ratios of n-propanol/water. The self-assembly behavior of BNB-t4 was characterized by minimum gelation concentration, microstructure, thermal, and mechanical stabilities. From the spectroscopy studies, it is suggested that gel formation of BNB-t4 is mainly driven by intermolecular hydrogen bonding, accompanied with the contribution from π-π stacking as well as hydrophobic interactions. The successfully established correlation between the self-assembly behavior and solubility parameters yields a facile way to predict the gelation performance of other molecules in other single or mixed solvents.

  16. Structure and performance of cationic assembly dispersed in amphoteric surfactants solution as a shampoo for hair damaged by coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Yasuo; Nishida, Yuichi; Isoda, Masanori; Yamagata, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Naoki; Takada, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, hair coloring gains popularity as a trend of consumer's hair care. This coloring frequently damages hair. In response to this, a new shampoo-base was developed for repairing hair damaged by coloring. The new shampoo-base was prepared by dispersing cationic assembly in a solution of amphoteric surfactants. The mixture of behenyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C22TAC) and behenyl alcohol (C22OH) was applied as the cationic assembly, which are dispersed in amido propyl betaine laurate (LPB) solution. LPB, which behaves as an amphoteric surfactant, was used as the wash-base. It was verified from the results on the measurements of DSC, calorimeter polarization, cryo-SEM and X-ray diffraction that the cationic assembly has a crystalline structure in the LPB solution. The new shampoo-base was highly efficient to change the color-damaged hair from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The friction level of the hair washed with the new shampoo-base recovered to the same state as that of healthy hair. The exfoliation of cuticle was reduced after washing with the new shampoo-base.

  17. A stringent restriction from the growth of large-scale structure on apparent acceleration in inhomogeneous cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Ishak, Mustapha; Troxel, M A

    2013-01-01

    Probes of cosmic expansion constitute the main basis for arguments to support or refute a possible apparent acceleration due to uneven dynamics in the universe as described by inhomogeneous cosmological models. We present in this Letter a separate argument based on results from the study of the growth rate of large-scale structure in the universe as modeled by the Szekeres inhomogeneous cosmological models. We use the models in all generality with no assumptions of spherical or axial symmetries. We find that Szekeres inhomogeneous models that fit well the observed expansion history fail to explain the observed late-time suppression of the growth of structure unless a cosmological constant is added to the dynamics.

  18. A Method for Reducing Noise Radiated from Structures with Vibration Absorbers by Using an Accelerated Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李连进; 葛为民

    2004-01-01

    A method for reducing noise radiated from structures by vibration absorbers is presented. Since usual design method for the absorbers is invalid for noise reduction, the peaks of noise power in the frequency domain as cost functions are applied. Hence, the equations for obtaining optimal parameters of the absorbers become nonlinear expressions. To have the parameters, an accelerated neural network procedure has been presented. Numerical calculations have been carried out for a plate-type cantilever beam with a large width, and experimental tests have been also performed for the same beam. It is clarified that the present method is valid for reducing noise radiated from structures. As for the usual design method for the absorbers, model analysis has been given, so the number of absorbers should be the same as that of the considered modes. While the nonlinear problem can be dealt with by the present method, there is no restriction on the number of absorbers or the model number.

  19. Dendritic structure DNA for specific metal ion biosensor based on catalytic hairpin assembly and a sensitive synergistic amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Jing, Pei; Xue, Shuyan; Xu, Wenju

    2017-01-15

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemical biosensing to Pb(2+) was proposed based on the high specificity of DNAzymes to Pb(2+). The response signal was efficiently amplified by the catalytic hairpin assembly induced by strand replacement reaction and the formation of dendritic structure DNA (DSDNA) by layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, in the presence of Pb(2+), the substrate strand (S1) of the Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes was specifically cleaved by Pb(2+). Secondly, one of the two fragments (rS1) introduced into the electrode surface was hybridized with a hairpin DNA (H1) and further replaced by another hairpin DNA (H2) by the hybridization reaction of H1 with H2. The released rS1 then induced the next hybridization with H1. After repeated cycles, the catalytic recycling assembly of H2 with H1 was completed. Thirdly, two bioconjugates of Pt@Pd nanocages (Pt@PdNCs) labeled with DNA S3/S4 and electroactive toluidine blue (Tb) (Tb-S3-Pt@PdNCs and Tb-S4-Pt@PdNCs) were captured onto the resultant electrode surface through the hybridization of S3 and H2, S3 and S4, resulting in the formation of DSDNA triggered by layer-by-layer assembly. This formed DSDNA greatly facilitated the immobilization of manganese(III) meso-tetrakis (4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) as mimicking enzyme. Under the synergistic catalysis of Pt@PdNCs and MnTMPyP to H2O2 reduction, the effective signal amplification of the developed Pb(2+) biosensor was achieved. As a result, the sensitive detection of the proposed electrochemical strategy for Pb(2+) was greatly improved in the range of 0.1pM-200nM with a detection limit of 0.033pM.

  20. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. Findings We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs. As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. Conclusions ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU.