WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerated radiation therapy

  1. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  2. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  3. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  4. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.

  5. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the area is stitched shut. Another treatment, called proton-beam radiation therapy , focuses the radiation on the ... after radiation treatment ends. Sore mouth and tooth decay. If you received radiation therapy to the head ...

  6. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway.

  7. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Arya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone is an acceptable option for poor prognostic patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC, we hypothesized that accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy will have similar efficacy without increasing toxicity. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of 300 patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC treated between 1993 and 2009. Patients included in the study were medically or surgically inoperable, were free of metastatic disease at initial workup and did not receive concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group 1 received 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks (Accelerated Radiotherapy (ACRT while group 2 received 60-63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy 1 (STRT1 and group 3 received > 63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy (STRT2. Results There were 119 (39.7% patients in the ACRT group, 90 (30.0% in STRT1 and 91 (30.3% in STRT2. More patients in the ACRT group had KPS ≤ 60 (p 5% (p = 0.002, and had stage 3B disease (p Conclusions Despite the limitations of a retrospective analysis, our experience of accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 15 fractions appears to be an acceptable treatment option for poor performance status patients with stage III inoperable tumors. Such a treatment regimen (or higher doses in 15 fractions should be prospectively evaluated using modern radiation technologies with the addition of sequential high dose chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC.

  8. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avkshtol V

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Avkshtol, Yanqun Dong, Shelly B Hayes, Mark A Hallman, Robert A Price, Mark L Sobczak, Eric M Horwitz,* Nicholas G Zaorsky* Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6–15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5–7 years and acute and late toxicity (<6% grade 3–4 late toxicities. Other outcomes (eg, overall and cancer-specific mortality cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm, and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV. Finally

  9. Measurement of the radiation in the accelerator-therapy room; Messung der Strahlung im Beschleuniger-Therapieraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutz, Hayo [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Photonendosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    The measurement of the scattering radiation in the accelerator-therapy room of the PTB is described. The accelerators are commercial linear accelerators of the firm Elektra of the type ''Precise''. The measurements were performed by means of secondary-normal ionization chambers and a special measurement technique developed in the PTB both with and without the used beam. (HSI)

  10. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2010-10-01

    Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and lateral

  11. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  12. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C M

    2003-12-21

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue.

  13. Stability of a mobile electron linear accelerator system for intraoperative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddar, A Sam

    2005-10-01

    The flexibility of mobile electron accelerators, which are designed to be transported to an operating room and plugged into a normal 3-phase outlet, make them ideal for use in intraoperative radiation therapy. However, their transportability may cause trepidation among potential users, who may question the stability of such an accelerator over a period of use. In order to address this issue, we have studied the short-term stability of the Mobetron system over 20 daily quality assurance trials. Variations in output generally varied within +/-2% for the four energies produced by the unit (4, 6, 9, and 12 MeV) and changes in energy produced an equivalent shift of less than 1 mm on the depth-dose curve. Hours of inactivity, with the Mobetron powered on for use either throughout the day or overnight, led to variations in output of about 1%. Finally, we have tested the long-term stability of the absolute dose output of the Mobetron, which showed a change of about 1% per year.

  14. Postmastectomy Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiation Therapy With (and Without) Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Panteliadou, Marianthi; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M.; Sismanidou, Kyriaki [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) provides major local control and survival benefits. More aggressive radiation therapy schemes may, however, be necessary in specific subgroups, provided they are safely administered. We report the tolerance and efficacy of a highly accelerated and hypofractionated regimen (HypoARC). Methods and Materials: One hundred twelve high-risk patients who had undergone mastectomy received 10 consecutive fractions of 3.5 Gy in 12 days (thoracic wall and axillary/supraclavicular areas). Two consecutive additional fractions of 4 Gy were given to the surgical scar area (electrons 8-10 MeV) and 1 3.5-Gy fraction to the axilla (in cases with extensive nodal involvement). A minimum follow-up of 24 months (median, 44 months) was allowed before analysis. Of 112 patients, 21 (18.7%) refused to receive amifostine, the remaining receiving tolerance-based individualized doses (500-1000 mg/day subcutaneously). Results: By use of a dose individualization algorithm, 68.1%, 11%, and 18.7% of patients received 1000 mg, 750 mg, and 500 mg/day of amifostine. Patchy moist skin desquamation outside and inside the booster fields was noted in 14 of 112 (12.5%) and 26 of 112 (23.2%) patients, respectively. No case of acute pneumonitis was recorded. High amifostine dose offered a significant skin protection. Within a median follow-up time of 44 months, moderate subcutaneous edema outside and within the booster thoracic area was noted in 5 of 112 (4.4%) and 8 of 112 (7.1%) cases, respectively. Intense asymptomatic radiographic findings of in field lung fibrosis were noted in 4 of 112 (3.6%) patients. Amifostine showed a significant protection against lung and soft tissue fibrosis. A 97% projected 5-year local relapse free survival and 84% 5-year disease-specific survival were recorded. Lack of steroid receptor expression, simple human epidermal growth factor 2 positivity, or triple negative phenotype defined higher metastasis rates but had no effect on

  15. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI): are breath-hold and volumetric radiation therapy techniques useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, M.; Osman, S.O.; Hol, S.; Donkers, T.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a selective group of patients accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) might be applied after conservative breast surgery to reduce the amount of irradiated healthy tissue. The role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and voluntary moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (

  16. Laser acceleration of protons from near critical density targets for application to radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Pirozhkov, A S; Thomas, A G R; Willingale, L; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A

    2010-01-01

    Laser accelerated protons can be a complimentary source for treatment of oncological diseases to the existing hadron therapy facilities. We demonstrate how the protons, accelerated from near-critical density plasmas by laser pulses having relatively small power, reach energies which may be of interest for medical applications. When an intense laser pulse interacts with near-critical density plasma it makes a channel both in the electron and then in the ion density. The propagation of a laser pulse through such a self-generated channel is connected with the acceleration of electrons in the wake of a laser pulse and generation of strong moving electric and magnetic fields in the propagation channel. Upon exiting the plasma the magnetic field generates a quasi-static electric field that accelerates and collimates ions from a thin filament formed in the propagation channel. Two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that a 100 TW laser pulse tightly focused on a near-critical density target is able to acce...

  17. Additional dose assessment from the activation of high-energy linear accelerators used in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateia Embarka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that medical linear accelerators generate activation products when operated above certain electron (photon energies. The aim of the present work is to assess the activation behavior of a medium-energy radiotherapy linear accelerator by applying in situ gamma-ray spectrometry and dose measurements, and to estimate the additional dose to radiotherapy staff on the basis of these results. Spectral analysis was performed parallel to dose rate measurements in the isocenter of the linear accelerator, immediately after the termination of irradiation. The following radioisotopes were detected by spectral analysis: 28Al, 62Cu, 56Mn, 64Cu, 187W, and 57Ni. The short-lived isotopes such as 28Al and 62Cu are the most important factors of the clinical routine, while the contribution to the radiation dose of medium-lived isotopes such as 56Mn, 57Ni, 64Cu, and 187W increases during the working day. Measured dose rates at the isocenter ranged from 2.2 µSv/h to 10 µSv/h in various measuring points of interest for the members of the radiotherapy staff. Within the period of 10 minutes, the dose rate decreased to values of 0.8 µSv/h. According to actual workloads in radiotherapy departments, a realistic exposure scenario was set, resulting in a maximal additional annual whole body dose to the radiotherapy staff of about 3.5 mSv.

  18. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  19. Individualized Positron Emission Tomography–Based Isotoxic Accelerated Radiation Therapy Is Cost-Effective Compared With Conventional Radiation Therapy: A Model-Based Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Mathilda L., E-mail: ml.bongers@vumc.nl [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Coupé, Veerle M.H. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uyl-de Groot, Cornelia A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health effects, costs, and cost-effectiveness of positron emission tomography (PET)-based isotoxic accelerated radiation therapy treatment (PET-ART) compared with conventional fixed-dose CT-based radiation therapy treatment (CRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Our analysis uses a validated decision model, based on data of 200 NSCLC patients with inoperable stage I-IIIB. Clinical outcomes, resource use, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Maastro Clinic and the literature. Primary model outcomes were the difference in life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness and cost/utility ratio (ICER and ICUR) of PET-ART versus CRT. Model outcomes were obtained from averaging the predictions for 50,000 simulated patients. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis and scenario analyses were carried out. Results: The average incremental costs per patient of PET-ART were €569 (95% confidence interval [CI] €−5327-€6936) for 0.42 incremental LYs (95% CI 0.19-0.61) and 0.33 QALYs gained (95% CI 0.13-0.49). The base-case scenario resulted in an ICER of €1360 per LY gained and an ICUR of €1744 per QALY gained. The probabilistic analysis gave a 36% probability that PET-ART improves health outcomes at reduced costs and a 64% probability that PET-ART is more effective at slightly higher costs. Conclusion: On the basis of the available data, individualized PET-ART for NSCLC seems to be cost-effective compared with CRT.

  20. The Quality Control of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for ONCOR Siemens Linear Accelerators Using Film Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Jabbari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT has made a significant progress in radiation therapy centers in recent years. In this method, each radiation beam is divided into many subfields that create a field with a modulated intensity. Considering the complexity of this method, the quality control for IMRT is a topic of interest for researchers. This article is about the various steps of planning and quality control of Siemens linear accelerators for IMRT, using film dosimetry. This article in addition to review of the techniques, discusses the details of experiments and possible sources of errors which are not mentioned in the protocols and other references. Materials and Methods This project was carried out in Isfahan Milad hospital which has two Siemens ONCOR linear accelerators. Both accelerators are equipped with Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC which enables us to perform IMRT delivery in the step-and-shoot method. The quality control consists of various experiments related to the sections of radiation therapy. In these experiments, the accuracy of some components such as treatment planning system, imaging device (CT, MLC, control system of accelerator, and stability of the output are evaluated. The dose verification is performed using film dosimetry method. The films were KODAK-EDR2, which were calibrated before the experiments. One of the important steps is the comparison of the calculated dose with planning system and the measured dose in experiments. Results The results of the experiments in various steps have been acceptable according to the standard protocols. The calibration of MLC and evaluation of the leakage through the leaves of MLC was performed by using the film dosimetry and visual check. In comparison with calculated and measured dose, more that 80% of the points have to be in agreement within 3% of the value. In our experiments, between 85 and 90% of the points had such an agreement with IMRT delivery. Conclusion

  1. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  2. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Mereghetti, A.; Sagia, E.; Silari, M.

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on target are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shielding data for the design of future light-ion radiation therapy facilities.

  3. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Polytechnic of Milano, Department of Energy, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mereghetti, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Manchester, Physics and Astronomy Department, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sagia, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou, GR 157 80 Athens (Greece); Silari, M., E-mail: marco.silari@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on target are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shielding data for the design of future light-ion radiation therapy facilities.

  4. Efficacy and toxicity of an accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Valérie J; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara; Vail, David M; Straw, Rodney C

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common feline oral tumor. Standard radiation protocols have been reported to achieve tumor control durations of 1.5-5.5 months (45-165 days). The purpose of this study was to describe the efficacy and toxicity of an accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in cats with oral SCC. Twenty-one cats with histologically confirmed oral SCC and T1-3N0M0 were treated with 10 once-daily fractions (Monday-Friday) of 4.8 Gy. Seventeen cats had macroscopic disease and four were microscopic after incomplete excision. Acute toxicity consisted of grade 2 mucositis in all cats and this was effectively managed using esophageal or gastric tube feeding, pain medication, and antibiotics. Late toxicity effects for cats with available follow-up data included alopecia (4 cats), leukotricia (6), tongue ulceration (1), and oronasal fistula (1). Response could be assessed in 17 cats (seven complete response and five partial response). Four cats (19%) developed metastatic disease without evidence of local progression. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 105 days (1 year PFS of 23%), median local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 219 days (1 year LPFS of 41%), and median overall survival (OS) was 174 days (1 year OS of 29%). Only tumor stage was prognostic, with T1 having a median PFS of 590 days. Findings indicated that this accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol was well tolerated in cats with oral SCC, with manageable adverse events. Tumor response was observed in most cats and long tumor control durations were achieved in some cats.

  5. Special radiation protection aspects of medical accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection aspects relevant to medical accelerators are discussed. An overview is first given of general safety requirements. Next. shielding and labyrinth design are discussed in some detail for the various types of accelerators, devoting more attention to hadron machines as they are far less conventional than electron linear accelerators. Some specific aspects related to patient protection are also addressed. Finally, induced radioactivity in accelerator components and shielding walls is briefly discussed. Three classes of machines are considered: (1) medical electron linacs for 'conventional' radiation therapy. (2) low energy cyclotrons for production of radionuclides mainly for medical diagnostics and (3) medium energy cyclotrons and synchrotrons for advanced radiation therapy with protons or light ion beams (hadron therapy). (51 refs).

  6. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  7. Laser ion acceleration for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Wilkens, J. J.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Korn, G.; Kraft, G.; Kraft, S. D.; Molls, M.; Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2014-12-01

    The paper examines the prospects of using laser plasma as a source of high-energy ions for the purpose of hadron beam therapy — an approach which is based on both theory and experimental results (ions are routinely observed to be accelerated in the interaction of high-power laser radiation with matter). Compared to therapy accelerators like synchrotrons and cyclotrons, laser technology is advantageous in that it is more compact and is simpler in delivering ions from the accelerator to the treatment room. Special target designs allow radiation therapy requirements for ion beam quality to be satisfied.

  8. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  9. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy dose distributions using wavelet threshold de-noising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O; Wickerhauser, M Victor; Picard, Mathieu

    2002-10-01

    The Monte Carlo dose calculation method works by simulating individual energetic photons or electrons as they traverse a digital representation of the patient anatomy. However, Monte Carlo results fluctuate until a large number of particles are simulated. We propose wavelet threshold de-noising as a postprocessing step to accelerate convergence of Monte Carlo dose calculations. A sampled rough function (such as Monte Carlo noise) gives wavelet transform coefficients which are more nearly equal in amplitude than those of a sampled smooth function. Wavelet hard-threshold de-noising sets to zero those wavelet coefficients which fall below a threshold; the image is then reconstructed. We implemented the computationally efficient 9,7-biorthogonal filters in the C language. Transform results were averaged over transform origin selections to reduce artifacts. A method for selecting best threshold values is described. The algorithm requires about 336 floating point arithmetic operations per dose grid point. We applied wavelet threshold de-noising to two two-dimensional dose distributions: a dose distribution generated by 10 MeV electrons incident on a water phantom with a step-heterogeneity, and a slice from a lung heterogeneity phantom. Dose distributions were simulated using the Integrated Tiger Series Monte Carlo code. We studied threshold selection, resulting dose image smoothness, and resulting dose image accuracy as a function of the number of source particles. For both phantoms, with a suitable value of the threshold parameter, voxel-to-voxel noise was suppressed with little introduction of bias. The roughness of wavelet de-noised dose distributions (according to a Laplacian metric) was nearly independent of the number of source electrons, though the accuracy of the de-noised dose image improved with increasing numbers of source electrons. We conclude that wavelet shrinkage de-noising is a promising method for effectively accelerating Monte Carlo dose calculations

  10. Validation of an accelerated 'demons' algorithm for deformable image registration in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Dong, Lei; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Kian Ang, K.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Bonnen, Mark; Chang, Joe Y.; Cheung, Rex

    2005-06-01

    A greyscale-based fully automatic deformable image registration algorithm, originally known as the 'demons' algorithm, was implemented for CT image-guided radiotherapy. We accelerated the algorithm by introducing an 'active force' along with an adaptive force strength adjustment during the iterative process. These improvements led to a 40% speed improvement over the original algorithm and a high tolerance of large organ deformations. We used three methods to evaluate the accuracy of the algorithm. First, we created a set of mathematical transformations for a series of patient's CT images. This provides a 'ground truth' solution for quantitatively validating the deformable image registration algorithm. Second, we used a physically deformable pelvic phantom, which can measure deformed objects under different conditions. The results of these two tests allowed us to quantify the accuracy of the deformable registration. Validation results showed that more than 96% of the voxels were within 2 mm of their intended shifts for a prostate and a head-and-neck patient case. The mean errors and standard deviations were 0.5 mm ± 1.5 mm and 0.2 mm ± 0.6 mm, respectively. Using the deformable pelvis phantom, the result showed a tracking accuracy of better than 1.5 mm for 23 seeds implanted in a phantom prostate that was deformed by inflation of a rectal balloon. Third, physician-drawn contours outlining the tumour volumes and certain anatomical structures in the original CT images were deformed along with the CT images acquired during subsequent treatments or during a different respiratory phase for a lung cancer case. Visual inspection of the positions and shapes of these deformed contours agreed well with human judgment. Together, these results suggest that the accelerated demons algorithm has significant potential for delineating and tracking doses in targets and critical structures during CT-guided radiotherapy.

  11. Radioprotectors and Radiomitigators for Improving Radiation Therapy: The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Gateway for Accelerating Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Pataje G S; Narayanan, Deepa; Hallett, Kory; Bernhard, Eric J; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Evans, Gregory; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Weingarten, Michael; Coleman, C Norman

    2015-09-01

    Although radiation therapy is an important cancer treatment modality, patients may experience adverse effects. The use of a radiation-effect modulator may help improve the outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients undergoing radiation therapy either by enhancing tumor cell killing or by protecting normal tissues. Historically, the successful translation of radiation-effect modulators to the clinic has been hindered due to the lack of focused collaboration between academia, pharmaceutical companies and the clinic, along with limited availability of support for such ventures. The U.S. Government has been developing medical countermeasures against accidental and intentional radiation exposures to mitigate the risk and/or severity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposures (DEARE), and there is now a drug development pipeline established. Some of these medical countermeasures could potentially be repurposed for improving the outcome of radiation therapy and HRQOL of cancer patients. With the objective of developing radiation-effect modulators to improve radiotherapy, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), supported by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), provided funding to companies from 2011 to 2014 through the SBIR contracts mechanism. Although radiation-effect modulators collectively refer to radioprotectors, radiomitigators and radiosensitizers, the focus of this article is on radioprotection and mitigation of radiation injury. This specific SBIR contract opportunity strengthened existing partnerships and facilitated new collaborations between academia and industry. In this commentary, we assess the impact of this funding opportunity, outline the review process, highlight the organ/site-specific disease needs in the clinic for the development of radiation-effect modulators, provide a general understanding of a framework for gathering

  12. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Sagia, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on tar- get are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shi...

  13. Radiation monitoring around accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Shinichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The present status of a network of radiation monitors (NORM) working at KEK is described in detail. NORM consists of there parts; stand-alone radiation monitors (SARM), local-monitoring stations (STATION) and a central data-handling system (CENTER). NORM has developed to a large-scaled monitoring system in which more than 250 SARMs are under operation for monitoring the radiation fields and radioactivities around accelerators in KEK. (author)

  14. Validating Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Pritz, Jakub [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Forster, Kenneth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.Harris@Moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) may be beneficial for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). The goal was to validate the use of intraparenchymal textured gold fiducials in patients receiving APBI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were enrolled on this prospective study that had three or four textured gold intraparenchymal fiducials placed at the periphery of the lumpectomy cavity and were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal APBI. Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were obtained pre- and posttreatment, as were daily online megavoltage (MV) orthogonal images. Intrafraction motion, variations in respiratory motion, and fiducial marker migration were calculated using the 3D coordinates of individual fiducials and a calculated center of mass (COM) of the fiducials. We also compared the relative position of the fiducial COM with the geometric center of the seroma. Results: There was less than 1 mm of intrafraction respiratory motion, variation in respiratory motion, or fiducial marker migration. The change in seroma position relative to the fiducial COM was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The average position of the geometric seroma relative to the fiducial COM pretreatment compared with posttreatment was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The largest daily variation in displacement when using bony landmark was in the anteroposterior direction and two standard deviations (SD) of this variation was 10 mm. The average variation in daily separation between the fiducial pairs from daily MV images was 3 mm {+-} 3 mm therefore 2 SD is 6 mm. Conclusion: Fiducial markers are stable throughout the course of APBI. Planning target volume margins when using bony landmarks should be 10 mm and can be reduced to 6 mm if using fiducials.

  15. A novel schedule of accelerated partial breast radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in elderly patients: survival and toxicity analysis of a prospective clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayan, Mutlay; Nelson, Carl; Gagne, Havaleh; Rubin, Deborah; Heimann, Ruth [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington (United States); Wilson, Karen [University of Vermont Cancer Center, Burlington (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Several accelerated partial breast radiation (APBR) techniques have been investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer (BC); however, the optimal treatment delivery techniques remain unclear. We evaluated the feasibility and toxicity of APBR delivered using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in elderly patients with stage I BC, using a novel fractionation schedule. Forty-two patients aged ≥65 years, with stage I BC who underwent breast conserving surgery were enrolled in a phase I/II study evaluating APBR using IMRT. Forty eligible patients received 40 Gy in 4 Gy daily fractions. Patients were assessed for treatment related toxicities, and cosmesis, before APBR, during, and after completion of the treatment. The median age was 73 years, median tumor size 0.8 cm and the median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year locoregional control was 97.5% and overall survival 90%. Erythema and skin pigmentation was the most common acute adverse event, reported by 27 patients (69%). Twenty-six patients (65%) reported mild pain, rated 1-4/10. This improved at last follow-up to only 2 (15%). Overall the patient and physician reported worst late toxicities were lower than the baseline and at last follow-up, patients and physicians rated cosmesis as excellent/good in 93% and 86 %, respectively. In this prospective trial, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control with daily APBR. The acceptable toxicity profile and cosmetic results of this study support the use of IMRT planned APBR with daily schedule in elderly patients with early stage BC.

  16. Montecarlo simulation code in optimisation of the IntraOperative Radiation Therapy treatment with mobile dedicated accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, M.; Agosteo, S.; Moretti, R.; Andreoli, S.

    2007-06-01

    The principle of optimisation of the EURATOM 97/43 directive foresees that for all medical exposure of individuals for radiotherapeutic purposes, exposures of target volumes shall be individually planned, taking into account that doses of non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable and consistent with the intended radiotherapeutic purpose of the exposure. Treatment optimisation has to be carried out especially in non conventional radiotherapic procedures, as Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) with mobile dedicated LINear ACcelerator (LINAC), which does not make use of a Treatment Planning System. IORT is carried out with electron beams and refers to the application of radiation during a surgical intervention, after the removal of a neoplastic mass and it can also be used as a one-time/stand alone treatment in initial cancer of small volume. IORT foresees a single session and a single beam only; therefore it is necessary to use protection systems (disks) temporary positioned between the target volume and the underlying tissues, along the beam axis. A single high Z shielding disk is used to stop the electrons of the beam at a certain depth and protect the tissues located below. Electron back scatter produces an enhancement in the dose above the disk, and this can be reduced if a second low Z disk is placed above the first. Therefore two protection disks are used in clinical application. On the other hand the dose enhancement at the interface of the high Z disk and the target, due to back scattering radiation, can be usefully used to improve the uniformity in treatment of thicker target volumes. Furthermore the dose above the disks of different Z material has to be evaluated in order to study the optimal combination of shielding disks that allow both to protect the underlying tissues and to obtain the most uniform dose distribution in target volumes of different thicknesses. The dose enhancement can be evaluated using the electron

  17. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  18. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  19. New concept on an integrated interior magnetic resonance imaging and medical linear accelerator system for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Xi, Yan; Jiang, Steve B; Wang, Ge

    2017-01-01

    Image guidance plays a critical role in radiotherapy. Currently, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely used in clinics for this purpose. While this modality can provide an attenuation image for therapeutic planning, low soft-tissue contrast affects the delineation of anatomical and pathological features. Efforts have recently been devoted to several MRI linear accelerator (LINAC) projects that lead to the successful combination of a full diagnostic MRI scanner with a radiotherapy machine. We present a new concept for the development of the MRI-LINAC system. Instead of combining a full MRI scanner with the LINAC platform, we propose using an interior MRI (iMRI) approach to image a specific region of interest (RoI) containing the radiation treatment target. While the conventional CBCT component still delivers a global image of the patient's anatomy, the iMRI offers local imaging of high soft-tissue contrast for tumor delineation. We describe a top-level system design for the integration of an iMRI component into an existing LINAC platform. We performed numerical analyses of the magnetic field for the iMRI to show potentially acceptable field properties in a spherical RoI with a diameter of 15 cm. This field could be shielded to a sufficiently low level around the LINAC region to avoid electromagnetic interference. Furthermore, we investigate the dosimetric impacts of this integration on the radiotherapy beam.

  20. History of hadron therapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-06-01

    In the last 60 years, hadron therapy has made great advances passing from a stage of pure research to a well-established treatment modality for solid tumours. In this paper the history of hadron therapy accelerators is reviewed, starting from the first cyclotrons used in the thirties for neutron therapy and passing to more modern and flexible machines used nowadays. The technical developments have been accompanied by clinical studies that allowed the selection of the tumours which are more sensitive to this type of radiotherapy. This paper aims at giving a review of the origin and the present status of hadron therapy accelerators, describing the technological basis and the continuous development of this application to medicine of instruments developed for fundamental science. At the end the present challenges are reviewed.

  1. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hendee, William R; Hendee, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an upd

  2. Quantification and reduction of peripheral dose from leakage radiation on Siemens Primus accelerators in electron therapy mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Collins; Karotki, Alex; Hunt, Dylan; Holly, Rick

    2010-06-15

    In this work, leakage radiation from EA200 series electron applicators on Siemens Primus accelerators is quantified, and its penetration ability in water and/or the shielding material Xenolite-NL established. Initially, measurement of leakage from 10 x 10 - 25 x 25 cm2 applicators was performed as a function of height along applicator and of lateral distance from applicator body. Relative to central-axis ionization maximum in solid water, the maximum leakage in air observed with a cylindrical ion chamber with 1 cm solid water buildup cap at a lateral distance of 2 cm from the front and right sidewalls of applicators were 17% and 14%, respectively; these maxima were recorded for 18 MeV electron beams and applicator sizes of >or=20 x 20 cm2. In the patient plane, the applicator leakage gave rise to a broad peripheral dose off-axis distance peak that shifted closer to the field edge as the electron energy increases. The maximum peripheral dose from normally incident primary electron beams at a depth of 1 cm in a water phantom was observed to be equal to 5% of the central-axis dose maximum and as high as 9% for obliquely incident beams with angles of obliquity radiation through the shielding material Xenolite-NL showed a 4 mm thick sheet of this material is required to attenuate the leakage from 9 MeV beams by two-thirds, and that for every additional 3 MeV increase in the primary electron beam energy, an additional Xenolite-NL thickness of roughly 2 mm is needed to achieve the aforementioned attenuation level. Finally, attachment of a 1 mm thick sheet of lead to the outer surface of applicator sidewalls resulted in a reduction of the peripheral dose by up to 80% and 74% for 9 and 18MeV beams

  3. Three-Year Outcomes of a Canadian Multicenter Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Conformal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrang, Tanya S., E-mail: tberrang@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Kim, Do-Hoon [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Nichol, Alan [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mohamed, Islam G. [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Southern Interior, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Parhar, Tarnjit [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Wright, J.R. [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Truong, Pauline [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Sussman, Jonathan [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Wai, Elaine [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Whelan, Tim [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To report 3-year toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of a multicenter study of external beam, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and August 2006, 127 women aged {>=}40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer {<=}3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study involving five Canadian cancer centers. Women meeting predefined dose constraints were treated with APBI using 3 to 5 photon beams, delivering 35 to 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions, twice a day, over 1 week. Patients were assessed for treatment-related toxicities, cosmesis, and efficacy before APBI and at specified time points for as long as 3 years after APBI. Results: 104 women had planning computed tomography scans showing visible seromas, met dosimetric constraints, and were treated with APBI to doses of 35 Gy (n = 9), 36 Gy (n = 33), or 38.5 Gy (n = 62). Eighty-seven patients were evaluated with minimum 3-year follow-up after APBI. Radiation dermatitis, breast edema, breast induration, and fatigue decreased from baseline levels or stabilized by the 3-year follow-up. Hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, breast pain, and telangiectasia slightly increased from baseline levels. Most toxicities at 3 years were Grade 1. Only 1 patient had a Grade 3 toxicity with telangiectasia in a skin fold inside the 95% isodose. Cosmesis was good to excellent in 86% (89/104) of women at baseline and 82% (70/85) at 3 years. The 3-year disease-free survival was 97%, with only one local recurrence that occurred in a different quadrant away from the treated site and two distant recurrences. Conclusions: At 3 years, toxicity and cosmesis were acceptable, and local control and disease-free survival were excellent, supporting continued accrual to randomized APBI trials.

  4. Radiative damping in plasma-based accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.; Litvak, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    The electrons accelerated in a plasma-based accelerator undergo betatron oscillations and emit synchrotron radiation. The energy loss to synchrotron radiation may seriously affect electron acceleration. The electron dynamics under combined influence of the constant accelerating force and the classical radiation reaction force is studied. It is shown that electron acceleration cannot be limited by radiation reaction. If initially the accelerating force was stronger than the radiation reaction force, then the electron acceleration is unlimited. Otherwise the electron is decelerated by radiative damping up to a certain instant of time and then accelerated without limits. It is shown that regardless of the initial conditions the infinite-time asymptotic behavior of an electron is governed by a self-similar solution providing that the radiative damping becomes exactly equal to 2/3 of the accelerating force. The relative energy spread induced by the radiative damping decreases with time in the infinite-time limit. The multistage schemes operating in the asymptotic acceleration regime when electron dynamics is determined by the radiation reaction are discussed.

  5. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P. [Cagliari Univ. (Italy). Ist. Medicina Interna; Caponigro, F. [Istituto Medico Legale, Milan (Italy); Ravo, V.; Muto, P. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. Scienze Radiologiche; Crovella, F. [Ospedale Oliveto, Citra (Italy). Div. Chirurgia Generale

    1996-10-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author).

  6. Respiratory Motion Prediction in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Sastry

    Active respiratory motion management has received increasing attention in the past decade as a means to reduce the internal margin (IM) component of the clinical target volume (CTV)—planning target volume (PTV) margin typically added around the gross tumor volume (GTV) during radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Engineering and technical developments in linear accelerator design and respiratory motion monitoring respectively have made the delivery of motion adaptive radiation therapy possible through real-time control of either dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion (gantry based linear accelerator design) or robotic arm motion (robotic arm mounted linear accelerator design).

  7. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that can ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ...

  8. Dosimetric characteristics of electron beams produced by two mobile accelerators, Novac7 and Liac, for intraoperative radiation therapy through Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Sergio; Karaj, Evis; Felici, Giuseppe; Di Martino, Fabio

    2013-01-07

    The Novac7 and Liac are linear accelerators (linacs) dedicated to intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), which produce high energy, very high dose-per-pulse electron beams. The characteristics of the accelerators heads of the Novac7 and Liac are different compared to conventional electron accelerators. The aim of this work was to investigate the specific characteristics of the Novac7 and Liac electron beams using the Monte Carlo method. The Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc has been employed to model the head and simulate the electron beams. The Monte Carlo simulation was preliminarily validated by comparing the simulated dose distributions with those measured by means of EBT radiochromic film. Then, the energy spectra, mean energy profiles, fluence profiles, photon contamination, and angular distributions were obtained from the Monte Carlo simulation. The Spencer-Attix water-to-air mass restricted collision stopping power ratios (sw,air) were also calculated. Moreover, the modifications of the percentage depth dose in water (backscatter effect) due to the presence of an attenuator plate composed of a sandwich of a 2 mm aluminum foil and a 4 mm lead foil, commonly used for breast treatments, were evaluated. The calculated sw,air values are in agreement with those tabulated in the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetric code of practice within 0.2% and 0.4% at zref (reference depth in water) for the Novac7 and Liac, respectively. These differences are negligible for practical dosimetry. The attenuator plate is sufficient to completely absorb the electron beam for each energy of the Novac7 and Liac; moreover, the shape of the dose distribution in water strongly changes with the introduction of the attenuator plate. This variation depends on the energy of the beam, and it can give rise to an increase in the maximum dose in the range of 3%-9%.

  9. Measurements of photon and neutron leakage from medical linear accelerators and Monte Carlo simulation of tenth value layers of concrete used for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan Khalaf

    The x ray leakage from the housing of a therapy x ray source is regulated to be bubble detector of type BD-PND and using Track-Etch detectors. The highest neutron dose equivalent per unit electron dose was at 0° for all electron energies. The neutron leakage from photon beams was the highest between all the machines. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery consists of a summation of small beamlets having different weights that make up each field. A linear accelerator room designed exclusively for IMRT use would require different, probably lower, tenth value layers (TVL) for determining the required wall thicknesses for the primary barriers. The first, second, and third TVL of 60Co gamma rays and photons from 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x ray beams by concrete have been determined and modeled using a Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for cone beams of half-opening angles of 0°, 3°, 6°, 9°, 12°, and 14°.

  10. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  11. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  12. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C

    2001-10-17

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  13. Electromagnetic radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a laser wakefield accelerator is calculated based on Lienard-Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically lies in the infrared range

  14. Electromagnetic radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a laser wakefield accelerator is calculated based on Lienard-Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically lies in the infrared

  15. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer Using a Linear Accelerator Outside of the Operative Suite: An “Image-Guided” Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah, E-mail: samir.hanna@hsl.org.br [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Simões Dornellas de Barros, Alfredo Carlos; Martins de Andrade, Felipe Eduardo; Barbosa Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz [Department of Mastology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Morales Piato, José Roberto [Department of Mastology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Gynecology, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes Pelosi, Edilson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Martella, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Perola Byington, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Fernandes da Silva, João Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiology and Oncology, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To present local control, complications, and cosmetic outcomes of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for early breast cancer, as well as technical aspects related to the use of a nondedicated linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: This prospective trial began in May of 2004. Eligibility criteria were biopsy-proven breast-infiltrating ductal carcinoma, age >40 years, tumor <3 cm, and cN0. Exclusion criteria were in situ or lobular types, multicentricity, skin invasion, any contraindication for surgery and/or radiation therapy, sentinel lymph node involvement, metastasis, or another malignancy. Patients underwent classic quadrantectomy with intraoperative sentinel lymph node and margins evaluation. If both free, the patient was transferred from operative suite to linear accelerator room, and IORT was delivered (21 Gy). Primary endpoint: local recurrence (LR); secondary endpoints: toxicities and aesthetics. Quality assurance involved using a customized shield for chest wall protection, applying procedures to minimize infection caused by patient transportation, and using portal films to check collimator-shield alignment. Results: A total of 152 patients were included, with at least 1 year follow-up. Median age (range) was 58.3 (40-85.4) years, and median follow-up time was 50.7 (12-110.5) months. The likelihood of 5-year local recurrence was 3.7%. There were 3 deaths, 2 of which were cancer related. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year actuarial estimates of overall, disease-free, and local recurrence-free survivals were 97.8%, 92.5%, and 96.3%, respectively. The overall incidences of acute and late toxicities were 12.5% and 29.6%, respectively. Excellent, good, fair, and bad cosmetic results were observed in 76.9%, 15.8%, 4.3%, and 2.8% of patients, respectively. Most treatments were performed with a 5-cm collimator, and in 39.8% of the patients the electron-beam energy used was ≥12 MeV. All patients underwent portal film evaluation, and the shielding was

  16. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P plans, 1.25 versus 1.25 ( P = .98). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri

  17. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Núria, E-mail: nrodriguez@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Dengra, Josefa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Foro, Palmira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with

  18. Dose linearity and uniformity of Siemens ONCOR impression plus linear accelerator designed for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhangle Janhavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For step-and-shoot type delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, beam stability characteristics during the first few monitor units need to be investigated to ensure the planned dose delivery. This paper presents the study done for Siemens ONCOR impression plus linear accelerator before commissioning it for IMRT treatment. The beam stability for 6 and 15 MV in terms of dose monitor linearity, monitor unit stability and beam uniformity is investigated in this work. Monitor unit linearity is studied using FC65G chamber for the range 1-100 MU. The dose per MU is found to be linear for small monitor units down to 1 MU for both 6 and 15 MV beams. The monitor unit linearity is also studied with portal imaging device for the range 1-20 MU for 6 MV beam. The pixel values are within ±1σ confidence level up to 2 MU; for 1 MU, the values are within ±2σ confidence level. The flatness and symmetry analysis is done for both energies in the range of 1-10 MU with Kodak diagnostic films. The flatness and symmetry are found to be within ±3% up to 2 MU for 6 MV and up to 3 MU for 15 MV.

  19. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Upper GI Cancers Search x FIND A RADIATION ONCOLOGIST CLOSE SNIPEND TREATMENT TYPES SNIPSTART Home / Treatment ... novel targeted therapies can act as radiosensitizers. Systemic Radiation Therapy Certain cancers may be treated with radioactive ...

  20. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Radiation therapy uses a beam of high-energy ... Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Hypofractionated Thoracic Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Bing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Hong, Ling-Zhi [Department of Oncology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cai, Xu-Wei; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Fan, Min; Mao, Jing-Fang; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Fu, Xiao-Long, E-mail: xlfu1964@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated hypofractionated thoracic radiation therapy (HypoTRT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy in the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), with the hypothesis that both high radiation dose and short radiation time are important in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated LS-SCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate organ function were eligible. HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction over 30 days was given on the first day of the second or third cycle of chemotherapy. An etoposide/cisplatin regimen was given to 4 to 6 cycles. Patients who had a good response to initial treatment were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. The primary endpoint was the 2-year progression-free survival rate. Results: Fifty-nine patients were enrolled from July 2007 through February 2012 (median age, 58 years; 86% male). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 49.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.3%-62.7%). Median survival time was 28.5 months (95% CI 9.0-48.0 months); the 2-year overall survival rate was 58.2% (95% CI 44.5%-71.9%). The 2-year local control rate was 76.4% (95% CI 63.7%-89.1%). The severe hematologic toxicities (grade 3 or 4) were leukopenia (32%), neutropenia (25%), and thrombocytopenia (15%). Acute esophagitis and pneumonitis of grade ≥3 occurred in 25% and 10% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-eight patients (64%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusion: Our study showed that HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction daily concurrently with etoposide/cisplatin chemotherapy has favorable survival and acceptable toxicity. This radiation schedule deserves further investigation in LS-SCLC.

  2. A Variable Energy CW Compact Accelerator for Ion Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Carol J. [Fermilab; Taylor, J. [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, R. [Huddersfield U.; Schulte, R. [Loma Linda U.

    2016-03-10

    Cancer is the second-largest cause of death in the U.S. and approximately two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy with the majority of the radiation treatments performed using x-rays produced by electron linacs. Charged particle beam radiation therapy, both protons and light ions, however, offers advantageous physical-dose distributions over conventional photon radiotherapy, and, for particles heavier than protons, a significant biological advantage. Despite recognition of potential advantages, there is almost no research activity in this field in the U.S. due to the lack of clinical accelerator facilities offering light ion therapy in the States. In January, 2013, a joint DOE/NCI workshop was convened to address the challenges of light ion therapy [1], inviting more than 60 experts from diverse fields related to radiation therapy. This paper reports on the conclusions of the workshop, then translates the clinical requirements into accelerat or and beam-delivery technical specifications. A comparison of available or feasible accelerator technologies is compared, including a new concept for a compact, CW, and variable energy light ion accelerator currently under development. This new light ion accelerator is based on advances in nonscaling Fixed-Field Alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator design. The new design concepts combine isochronous orbits with long (up to 4m) straight sections in a compact racetrack format allowing inner circulating orbits to be energy selected for low-loss, CW extraction, effectively eliminating the high-loss energy degrader in conventional CW cyclotron designs.

  3. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Is Safe and Effective Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Selected Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, Alan A., E-mail: alanl@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Derhagopian, Robert [Department of Surgery, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Kunal; Panoff, Joseph E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Abitbol, Andre; Wieczorek, D. Jay; Mishra, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Reis, Isildinha; Ferrell, Annapoorna [Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Moreno, Lourdes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility, toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respiratory gating to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in selected Stage I/II breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with node-negative Stage I/II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board approved protocol to receive APBI using IMRT after breast-conserving surgery. The target volume was treated at 3.8 Gy/fraction twice daily for 5 days, to a total dose of 38 Gy. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled for a median follow-up time of 44.8 months. The median tumor size was 0.98 cm (range, 0.08-3 cm). The median clinical target volume (CTV) treated was 71.4 cc (range, 19-231 cc), with the mean dose to the CTV being 38.96 Gy. Acute toxicities included Grade 1 erythema in 44% of patients and Grade 2 in 6%, Grade 1 hyperpigmentation in 31% of patients and Grade 2 in 3%, and Grade 1 breast/chest wall tenderness in 14% of patients. No Grade 3/4 acute toxicities were observed. Grade 1 and 2 late toxicities as edema, fibrosis, and residual hyperpigmentation occurred in 14% and 11% of patients, respectively; Grade 3 telangiectasis was observed in 3% of patients. The overall cosmetic outcome was considered 'excellent' or 'good' by 94% of patients and 97% when rated by the physician, respectively. The local control rate was 97%; 1 patient died of a non-cancer-related cause. Conclusions: APBI can be safely and effectively administered using IMRT. In retrospective analysis, IMRT enabled the achievement of normal tissue dose constraints as outlined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 04-13/NSABP B-13 while providing excellent conformality for the CTV. Local control and cosmesis have remained excellent at current follow-up, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities. Our data suggest that cosmesis is dependent on target volume

  4. Microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Wagner, Hans-Peter; Archer, David W.; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Di Michiel, Marco; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Brauer, Elke; Spanne, Per O.; Gebbers, Jan-Olef; Dixon, Keith; Blattmann, Hans

    1999-10-01

    The central nervous system of vertebrates, even when immature, displays extraordinary resistance to damage by microscopically narrow, multiple, parallel, planar beams of x rays. Imminently lethal gliosarcomas in the brains of mature rats can be inhibited and ablated by such microbeams with little or no harm to mature brain tissues and neurological function. Potentially palliative, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in human infants under three years of age is so fraught with the danger of disrupting the functional maturation of immature brain tissues around the targeted tumor that it is implemented infrequently. Other kinds of therapy for such tumors are often inadequate. We suggest that microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) might help to alleviate the situation. Wiggler-generated synchrotron x-rays were first used for experimental microplanar beam (microbeam) radiation therapy (MRT) at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source in the early 1990s. We now describe the progress achieved in MRT research to date using immature and adult rats irradiated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, and investigated thereafter at the Institute of Pathology of the University of Bern.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation therapy uses ... spread. This is called palliative treatment . Types of radiation therapy External beam radiation therapy: For this treatment, ...

  6. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  7. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  8. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  9. [Heavy particle radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozares, S; Mañeru, F; Pellejero, S

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation formed by heavy particles make it a highly useful tool for therapeutic use. Protons, helium nuclei or carbon ions are being successfully employed in radiotherapy installations throughout the world. This article sets out the physical and technological foundations that make these radiation particles suitable for attacking white volume, as well as the different ways of administering treatment. Next, the main clinical applications are described, which show the therapeutic advantages in some of the pathologies most widely employed in proton and hadron therapy centres at present. Under continuous study, the clinical use of heavy particles appears to be an enormously promising path of advance in comparison with classical technologies, both in tumour coverage and in reducing dosages in surrounding tissue.

  10. Illusory flow in radiation from accelerating charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, Tamas S.; Szendi, Zsuzsanna [RMI, WIGNER Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Schram, Zsolt [University of Debrecen, Department of Theoretical Physics, Debrecen (Hungary); MTA-DE Particle Physics Research Group, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper we analyze the classical electromagnetic radiation of an accelerating point charge moving on a straight line trajectory. Depending on the duration of accelerations, rapidity distributions of photons emerge, resembling the ones obtained in the framework of hydrodynamical models by Landau or Bjorken. Detectable differences between our approach and spectra obtained from hydrodynamical models occur at high transverse momenta due to classical wave interference phenomena included in our model. (orig.)

  11. Illusory Flow in Radiation from Accelerating Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Biro, Tamas S; Schram, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the classical electromagnetic radiation of an accelerating point charge moving on a straight line trajectory. Depending on the duration of accelerations, rapidity distributions of photons emerge, resembling the ones obtained in the framework of hydrodynamical models by Landau or Bjorken. Detectable differences between our approach and spectra obtained from hydrodynamical models occur at high transverse momenta and are due to interference.

  12. Radiative processes of uniformly accelerated entangled atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, G

    2015-01-01

    We study radiative processes of uniformly accelerated entangled atoms, interacting with an electromagnetic field prepared in the Minkowski vacuum state. We discuss the structure of the rate of variation of the atomic energy for two atoms travelling in different hyperbolic world lines. We identify the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the generation of entanglement as well as to the decay of entangled states. Our results resemble the situation in which two inertial atoms are coupled individually to two spatially separated cavities at different temperatures. In addition, for equal accelerations we obtain that the maximally entangled antisymmetric Bell state is a decoherence-free state.

  13. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  15. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THERMOPLASTIC MATERIALS APPLICATIONS IN RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Anca; Moldoveanu, Sinziana; Manea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This is an example of the use of thermoplastic materials in a high-tech medicine field, oncology radiation therapy, in order to produce the rigid masks for positioning and immobilization of the patient during simulation of the treatment procedure, the imaging verification of position and administration of the indicated radiation dose. Implementation of modern techniques of radiation therapy is possible only if provided with performant equipment (CT simulators, linear accelerators of high energy particles provided with multilamellar collimators and imaging verification systems) and accessories that increase the precision of the treatment (special supports for head-neck, thorax, pelvis, head-neck and thorax immobilization masks, compensating materials like bolus type material). The paper illustrates the main steps in modern radiation therapy service and argues the role of thermoplastics in reducing daily patient positioning errors during treatment. As part of quality assurance of irradiation procedure, using a rigid mask is mandatory when applying 3D conformal radiation therapy techniques, radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation or rotational techninques.

  17. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  18. Decline of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Results of a Single-Institution Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, Adam L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ben-David, Merav A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To report the final cosmetic results from a single-arm prospective clinical trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with active-breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Women older than 40 with breast cancer stages 0-I who received breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study evaluating APBI using IMRT administered with deep inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions given twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The planning target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5-cm margin. Cosmesis was scored on a 4-category scale by the treating physician. Toxicity was scored according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0). We report the cosmetic and toxicity results at a median follow-up of 5 years. Results: A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Two patients were excluded because of fair baseline cosmesis. The trial was terminated early because fair/poor cosmesis developed in 7 of 32 women at a median follow-up of 2.5 years. At a median follow-up of 5 years, further decline in the cosmetic outcome was observed in 5 women. Cosmesis at the time of last assessment was 43.3% excellent, 30% good, 20% fair, and 6.7% poor. Fibrosis according to CTCAE at last assessment was 3.3% grade 2 toxicity and 0% grade 3 toxicity. There was no correlation of CTCAE grade 2 or greater fibrosis with cosmesis. The 5-year rate of local control was 97% for all 34 patients initially enrolled. Conclusions: In this prospective trial with 5-year median follow-up, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control using IMRT-planned APBI. Cosmetic outcomes, however, continued to decline, with 26.7% of women having a fair to poor cosmetic result. These results underscore the need for continued cosmetic assessment for patients treated with APBI by technique.

  19. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, J.L.; Juras, R.C.

    1998-11-04

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in eaeh area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundan~ circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several vears at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  20. Antiangiogenic and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ying; Fleischmann, Dominik; Foygel, Kira; Molvin, Lior; Lutz, Amelie M.; Koong, Albert C.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess early treatment effects on computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters after antiangiogenic and radiation therapy in subcutaneously implanted, human colon cancer xenografts in mice and to correlate in vivo CT perfusion parameters with ex vivo assays of tumor vascularity and hypoxia. Materials and Methods Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (perfusion CT, 129 mAs, 80 kV, 12 slices × 2.4 mm; 150 μL iodinated contrast agent injected at a rate of 1 mL/min intravenously) was performed in 100 subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts on baseline day 0. Mice in group 1 (n = 32) received a single dose of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab (10 mg/kg body weight), mice in group 2 (n = 32) underwent a single radiation treatment (12 Gy), and mice in group 3 (n = 32) remained untreated. On days 1, 3, 5, and 7 after treatment, 8 mice from each group underwent a second CT perfusion scan, respectively, after which tumors were excised for ex vivo analysis. Four mice were killed after baseline scanning on day 0 for ex vivo analysis. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and flow extraction product were calculated using the left ventricle as an arterial input function. Correlation of in vivo CT perfusion parameters with ex vivo microvessel density and extent of tumor hypoxia were assessed by immunofluorescence. Reproducibility of CT perfusion parameter measurements was calculated in an additional 8 tumor-bearing mice scanned twice within 5 hours with the same CT perfusion imaging protocol. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients for BF, BV, and flow extraction product from repeated CT perfusion scans were 0.93 (95% confidence interval: 0.78, 0.97), 0.88 (0.66, 0.95), and 0.88 (0.56, 0.95), respectively. Changes in perfusion parameters and tumor volumes over time were different between treatments. After bevacizumab treatment, all 3 perfusion parameters significantly decreased from day 1 (P ≤ 0.006) and remained significantly decreased until day 7 (P ≤ 0

  1. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  2. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  3. Winter therapy for the accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of people are hard at work during the year-end technical stop as all the accelerators are undergoing maintenance, renovation and upgrade operations in parallel.   The new beam absorber on its way to Point 2 before being lowered into the LHC tunnel for installation. The accelerator teams didn’t waste any time before starting their annual winter rejuvenation programme over the winter. At the end of November, as the LHC ion run was beginning, work got under way on the PS Booster, where operation had already stopped. On 14 December, once the whole complex had been shut down, the technical teams turned their attention to the other injectors and the LHC. The year-end technical stop (YETS) provides an opportunity to carry out maintenance work on equipment and repair any damage as well as to upgrade the machines for the upcoming runs. Numerous work projects are carried out simultaneously, so good coordination is crucial. Marzia Bernardini's team in the Enginee...

  4. Cancer therapy with particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    1999-01-01

    This review paper is devoted to conventional radiotherapy and to hadron therapy. In this therapeutical modality, proposed by R. R. Wilson in 1946, the physical selectivity of proton and light ion beams is used to irradiate tissues very close to organs at risk, which cannot be irradiated (the brain and the spinal cord for instance). Also fast neutrons are employed, but they are not suitable for a truly conformal irradiation. Carbon ions have the added advantage, with respect to protons, of the high density of ionization at the end of the range in matter. This property is very valuable for the control of tumours which are radioresistant to both X-rays and protons. After clarifying the general principles, a review is presented of the world hadron therapy centres which are running or are in the design and construction stage. (33 refs).

  5. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic unit of light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation . It can be thought of as a bundle ... 3D-CRT uses very sophisticated computer software and advanced treatment machines to deliver radiation to very precisely shaped target areas. Many other ...

  6. Shearing radiative collapse with expansion and acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Thirukkanesh, S; Maharaj, S D

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a relativistic spherically symmetric radiative star with an accelerating, expanding and shearing interior matter distribution in the presence of anisotropic pressures. The junction condition can be written in standard form in three cases: linear, Bernoulli and Riccati equations. We can integrate the boundary condition in each case and three classes of new solutions are generated. For particular choices of the metric we investigate the physical properties and consider the limiting behaviour for large values of time. The causal temperature can also be found explicitly.

  7. Quantum Radiation of Uniformly Accelerated Spherical Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, V

    2001-01-01

    We study quantum radiation generated by a uniformly accelerated motion of small spherical mirrors. To obtain Green's function for a scalar massless field we use Wick's rotation. In the Euclidean domain the problem is reduced to finding an electric potential in 4D flat space in the presence of a metallic toroidal boundary. The latter problem is solved by a separation of variables. After performing an inverse Wick's rotation we obtain the Hadamard function in the wave-zone regime and use it to calculate the vacuum fluctuations and the vacuum expectation for the energy density flux in the wave zone.

  8. New frontier of laser particle acceleration: driving protons to 80 MeV by radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Choi, Il Woo; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2014-01-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been considered a challenging task in laser particle acceleration. Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration has attracted considerable interests due to its underlying physics and potential for applications such as high-energy density physics, ultrafast radiography, and cancer therapy. Among critical issues to overcome the biggest challenge is to produce energetic protons using an efficient acceleration mechanism. The proton acceleration by radiation pressure is considerably more efficient than the conventional target normal sheath acceleration driven by expanding hot electrons. Here we report the generation of 80-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 x 1020 W/cm2 to ultrathin targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and 3D-PIC simulations. We expect this fast energy scalin...

  9. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ink to highlight the treatment area. This "tattoo" should not be wiped off because it helps ... quickly to reduce exposure. previous continue Common Side Effects of Radiation If your child has cancer, you' ...

  10. Feasibility of using laser ion accelerators in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of using the laser plasma as a source of the high-energy ions for the proton radiation therapy is discussed. The proposal is based on the recent inventions of the effective ions acceleration in the experiments and through numerical modeling of the powerful laser radiation interaction with the gaseous and solid state targets. The principal peculiarity of the dependence of the protons energy losses in the tissues (the Bragg peak of losses) facilities the solution of one of the most important problems of the radiation therapy, which consists in realizing the tumor irradiation by sufficiently high and homogeneous dose with simultaneous minimization of the irradiation level, relative to the healthy and neighbouring tissues and organs

  11. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients.

  12. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafe, Susan, E-mail: susan.chafe@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Moughan, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pass, Helen [Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  13. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K. [Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiation Oncology, Radiodiagnosis and Haematology

    1998-11-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a `pseudotumour` or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 14 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ettinger, David S. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Thoracic Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sause, William T. [Radiation Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  15. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  16. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distribution in early stage NSCLC patients planned for accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy in the NCIC-BR25 protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, V; Bergman, A M; Gill, B; Popescu, I A [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver, 600 W.10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Liu, M; Kristensen, S [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley, 13750 96th Ave, Surrey, BC, V3V 1Z2 (Canada); Teke, T [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road Vancouver, BC, V6 T 1Z1 (Canada)], E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca

    2010-02-07

    The dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for hypofractionated radiation therapy are evaluated by re-calculating with Monte Carlo (MC). Planning guidelines were in strict accordance with the Canadian BR25 protocol which is similar to the RTOG 0236 and 0618 protocols in patient eligibility and total dose, but has a different hypofractionation schedule (60 Gy in 15 fractions versus 60 Gy in 3 fractions). A common requirement of the BR25 and RTOG protocols is that the dose must be calculated by the TPS without tissue heterogeneity (TH) corrections. Our results show that optimizing plans using the pencil beam algorithm with no TH corrections does not ensure that the BR25 planning constraint of 99% of the PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose would be achieved as revealed by MC simulations. This is due to poor modelling of backscatter and lateral electronic equilibrium by the TPS. MC simulations showed that as little as 75% of the PTV was actually covered by the 95% isodose line. The under-dosage of the PTV was even more pronounced if plans were optimized with the TH correction applied. In the most extreme case, only 23% of the PTV was covered by the 95% isodose.

  17. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distribution in early stage NSCLC patients planned for accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy in the NCIC-BR25 protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Bergman, A. M.; Gill, B.; Kristensen, S.; Teke, T.; Popescu, I. A.

    2010-02-01

    The dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for hypofractionated radiation therapy are evaluated by re-calculating with Monte Carlo (MC). Planning guidelines were in strict accordance with the Canadian BR25 protocol which is similar to the RTOG 0236 and 0618 protocols in patient eligibility and total dose, but has a different hypofractionation schedule (60 Gy in 15 fractions versus 60 Gy in 3 fractions). A common requirement of the BR25 and RTOG protocols is that the dose must be calculated by the TPS without tissue heterogeneity (TH) corrections. Our results show that optimizing plans using the pencil beam algorithm with no TH corrections does not ensure that the BR25 planning constraint of 99% of the PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose would be achieved as revealed by MC simulations. This is due to poor modelling of backscatter and lateral electronic equilibrium by the TPS. MC simulations showed that as little as 75% of the PTV was actually covered by the 95% isodose line. The under-dosage of the PTV was even more pronounced if plans were optimized with the TH correction applied. In the most extreme case, only 23% of the PTV was covered by the 95% isodose.

  18. Radiation Therapy of Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong Gyun; Oh, Do Hoon; Ha, Sung Whan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    Purpose: Testicular seminomas are radiosensitive and adjuvant radiation therapy after orchiectomy results in long term survival in early stage diseases. Ten year results of radiation therapy after orchiectomy and results of definitive treatment of recurrent seminoma are presented. Materials and Methods: Between August 1980 and February 1990, 32 patients with testicular seminomas were treated at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Twenty-seven patients received radiation therapy after orchiectomy and 5 patients for treatment of recurrent tumors. Two of postoperatively treated patients and 2 of recurrent patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete treatment. Of the patients treated postoperatively. 18 were stage I, 5 were stage IIA, one was stage IIB, and one was stage IIC. There were 4 ipsilateral and 2 contralateral cryptorchids. Preoperatively, b-HCG levels were elevated in 5 patients. Median dose to pelvic and paraaortic lymph node area was 2900 cGy (1550-4550 cGy). One patient with stage I, 4 with stage IIA, and 1 with stage IIB received prophylactic mediastinal irradiation. Two patients were treated with chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Median follow-up period was 104(3-144) months. Result: Local control rates were 100% at 5 years after orchiectomy. Five year survival rates were 94.4% in Stage I and 100% in Stage II patients. One patient with stage I disease died 3 months after surgery due to mediastinal metastasis. All the 3 patients treated for recurrent disease are alive without disease. Conclusion: Postorchiectomy radiation to the pelvis and para-aortic area remains the treatment of choice for patient with early stage testicular seminoma. Radiation therapy is also an excellent treatment modality for recurrent seminoma.

  19. Khan's the physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2014-01-01

    Expand your understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies with Khan's The Physics of Radiation Therapy, 5th edition, the book that set the standard in the field. This classic full-color text helps the entire radiation therapy team-radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists-develop a thorough understanding of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), high dose-rate remote afterloaders (HDR), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), image-guided radiation therapy (

  20. Sensitizing Osteosarcoma to Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Tewodros Kebede

    Several strategies to enhance the effects of radiation therapy are being explored for various cancers, with multiple molecular pathways and physical approaches suggested to play a role. One approach to improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in tumors is the use of radiosensitizing molecules. Among the key radiosensitizing molecules being explored in various cancers include pharmacologic inhibitors of DNA repair and gold nanoparticles that physically enhance the amount of radiation deposited inside cancer cells. The main goal of this thesis is to explore the role of DNA repair inhibition as a radiosensitizing strategy for osteosarcoma cells. Additionally, the thesis investigates the effects of particle size in the application of gold nanoparticles in osteosarcoma cells to help identify the key parameters relevant to choosing an effective gold nanoparticle-based radiosensitizer.

  1. OPserver: opacities and radiative accelerations on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C.; González, J.; Seaton, M. J.; Buerger, P.; Bellorín, A.; Meléndez, M.; Rodríguez, L. S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.; Palacios, E.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    We report on developments carried out within the Opacity Project (OP) to upgrade atomic database services to comply with e-infrastructure requirements. We give a detailed description of an interactive, online server for astrophysical opacities, referred to as OPserver, to be used in sophisticated stellar modelling where Rosseland mean opacities and radiative accelerations are computed at every depth point and each evolution cycle. This is crucial, for instance, in chemically peculiar stars and in the exploitation of the new asteroseismological data. OPserver, downloadable with the new OPCD_3.0 release from the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg, France, computes mean opacities and radiative data for arbitrary chemical mixtures from the OP monochromatic opacities. It is essentially a client-server network restructuring and optimization of the suite of codes included in the earlier OPCD_2.0 release. The server can be installed locally or, alternatively, accessed remotely from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA. The client is an interactive web page or a subroutine library that can be linked to the user code. The suitability of this scheme in grid computing environments is emphasized, and its extension to other atomic database services for astrophysical purposes is discussed.

  2. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  3. Radiation therapy of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, R C; Gorden, P; Glatstein, E; Roth, J

    1992-09-01

    Conventional megavoltage irradiation of GH-secreting tumors has predictable effects on tumor mass, GH, and pituitary function. 1. Further growth of the tumor is prevented in more than 99% of patients, with only a fraction of a percent of patients requiring subsequent surgery for tumor mass effects. 2. GH falls predictably with time. By 2 years GH falls by about 50% from the baseline level, and by 5 years by about 75% from the baseline level. The initial GH elevation and the size and erosive features of the sella turcica do not affect the percent decrease in GH from the baseline elevation. 3. With prolonged follow-up, further decrease in GH is seen at 10 and 15 years, with the fraction of surviving patients achieving GH levels less than 5 ng/mL approaching 90% after 15 years in our experience. Gender, previous surgery, and hyperprolactinemia do not seem to affect the response to treatment. Patients with initial GH greater than 100 ng/mL are significantly less likely to achieve GH values less than 5 ng/mL during long-term follow-up. 4. Hypopituitarism is a predictable outcome of treatment, is delayed, and may be more likely in patients who have had surgery prior to irradiation. There is no evidence that this complication is more common in patients with acromegaly than in patients with other pituitary adenomas receiving similar treatment. 5. Vision loss due to megavoltage irradiation--using modern techniques and limiting the total dose to 4680 rad given in 25 fractions over 35 days, with individual fractions not exceeding 180 rad--is extremely rare. The reported cases have occurred almost entirely in patients who have received larger doses or higher fractional doses. The theory that patients with acromegaly are prone to radiation-induced injury to the CNS and optic nerves and chiasm because of small vessel disease is not supported by a review of the reported cases. 6. Brain necrosis and secondary neoplasms induced by irradiation are extremely rare. 7. Although

  4. Accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiation with simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for early breast cancer: A phase I/II dosimetric and clinical feasibility study from a tertiary cancer care centre of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodul Mondal

    2017-03-01

    Mini abstract: Simultaneous integrated boost with accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy is a novel approach. Patient selection and technical considerations are of paramount importance. The present study describes successful implementation of this approach.

  5. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  6. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  7. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi; Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  8. The accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sycheva, T.; Taskaev, S.; Zaidi, L.

    2016-11-01

    The accelerator based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is proposed, created and used in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. In 2014, with the support of the Russian Science Foundation created the BNCT laboratory for the purpose to the end of 2016 get the neutron flux, suitable for BNCT. For getting 3 mA 2.3 MeV proton beam, was created a new type accelerator - tandem accelerator with vacuum isolation. On this moment, we have a stationary proton beam with 2.3 MeV and current 1.75 mA. Generation of neutrons is carried out by dropping proton beam on to lithium target as a result of threshold reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. Established facility is a unique scientific installation. It provides a generating of neutron flux, including a monochromatic energy neutrons, gamma radiation, alpha-particles and positrons, and may be used by other research groups for carrying out scientific researches. The article describes an accelerator neutron source, presents and discusses the result of experiments and declares future plans.

  9. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanov, V.M., E-mail: tsakanov@asls.candle.am [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Amatuni, G.A.; Amirkhanyan, Z.G.; Aslyan, L.V.; Avagyan, V.Sh.; Danielyan, V.A.; Davtyan, H.D.; Dekhtiarov, V.S.; Gevorgyan, K.L.; Ghazaryan, N.G.; Grigoryan, B.A.; Grigoryan, A.H.; Hakobyan, L.S. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Haroutiunian, S.G. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Ivanyan, M.I.; Khachatryan, V.G.; Laziev, E.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Manukyan, P.S. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); Margaryan, I.N.; Markosyan, T.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); and others

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  10. Insufficiency fracture after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Ryul; Huh, Seung Jae [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Insufficiency fracture occurs when normal or physiological stress applied to weakened bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Recently, many studies reported the development of IF after radiation therapy (RT) in gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, anal cancer and rectal cancer. The RT-induced insufficiency fracture is a common complication during the follow-up using modern imaging studies. The clinical suspicion and knowledge the characteristic imaging patterns of insufficiency fracture is essential to differentiate it from metastatic bone lesions, because it sometimes cause severe pain, and it may be confused with bone metastasis.

  11. Risk of potential radiation accidental situations at TESLA accelerator installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spasic Jokic, Vesna [TESLA Accelerator Installation, Lab. of Physics, VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia); Orlic, Milan [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Lab. of radioisotopes, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia); Djurovic, Branka [Military Medical Academy, Radiation Protection Dept., Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia)

    2006-07-01

    The main aim of this paper is to recognize some of the numerous risks of potential exposure and to quantify requirements and probability of failure of radiation protection system due to design event tree. Nature of design and construction of Tesla Accelerator Installation (T.A.I.) make possibility of potential exposure as a result of proven design and modification, trade off, human error as well as defense in depth. In the case of potential exposure human risk is the result of two random events: first, the occurrence of the event that causes the exposure, and the second, the appearance of a harmful effect. The highest doses during potential exposure at T.A.I. can be received at the entrance to primary beam space (V.I.N.C.Y. cyclotron vault) as well as in space with target for fluorine production, high energy experimental channels, proton therapy channel and channel for neutron researches. Expected values of prompt radiation equivalent dose rate in the cyclotron vault is considerably high, in order of 10 Sv/h. Serious problem deals with such large research installation is a number of workers, as visiting research workers of different educational levels and people in Institute who are not professionally connected with ionizing radiation. They could cause willing or unwilling opening of the cyclotron vault doors. Considering some possible scenarios we assumed that during 7000 working hours per year it is reasonably to expect 300 unsafe entries per year. It can be concluded that safety system should be designed so that probability of failure of radiation protection system has to be less than 1.9 10{sup -6}. (authors)

  12. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    and whether this difference changed the outcome for palliative patients, 6) use of the Calypso system, and other advanced radiation therapy equipment...use of advanced technology radiation therapy techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, in treating palliative patients. The main obstacle to overcome in...treating low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an electromagnetic localization system. IMRT

  13. Hawking Radiation of an Arbitrarily Accelerating Kinnersley Black Hole: Spin-Acceleration Coupling Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴双清; 闫沐霖

    2003-01-01

    The Hawking radiation of Weyl neutrinos in an arbitrarily accelerating Kinnersley black hole is investigated using a method of the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation.Both the location and temperature of the event horizon depend on the time and on the angles.They are in agreement with the previous results,but thethermal radiation spectrum of massless spinor particles displays a type of spin-acceleration coupling effect.

  14. Characterizing THz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at Femtosecond Linear Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xu-Ling; ZHANG Jian-Bing; LU YU; LUO Feng; LU Shan-Liang; YU Tie-Min; DAI Zhi-Min

    2009-01-01

    The generation and observation of coherent THz synchrotron radiation from femtosecond electron bunches in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics femtosecond accelerator device is reported.We describe the experiment setup and present the first result of THz radiation properties such as power and spectrum.

  15. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  16. RADIATION HAZARD AND PROTECTION OF LOW ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷清章

    1994-01-01

    In this paper,the origin and type of radiation hazards as well as the main aspects of radiation protection for low-energy accelerators are discussed in general,and the problems of radiation protection and the experimental results of the operational monitoring of the five accelecrators in the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology,Sichuan University,namely,one 1.2M cyclofron,two Cockroft-waltons and two Van de Graafts,as well as a powerful electron accelerator for industrial irradiation are described.The discussion and evaluation are made according to the requirments of the national standards GB5172-85.

  17. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aladawi, M.A. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)]. E-mail: Scientific@aec.org.sy; Albarodi, H. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Hammoudeh, A. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Shamma, M. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Sharabi, N. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2006-01-15

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  18. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladawi, M. A.; Albarodi, H.; Hammoudeh, A.; Shamma, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  19. Accelerated neuroregulation for therapy of opiate dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sunatrio

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute weaning from chronic opioid abuse during general anesthesia is usually followed by adrenergic outflow effects. This article is to report our experience with accelerated neuroregulation that reverses the physical and psychological dependency. After a comprehensive psychological and medical examination, 361 heroin dependent patients were admitted to ICU to be hospitalized for a full 24 or 36 hours, including a 6 hour pre-procedure medication process (solbutamol, clonidine, diazepam, ranitidine, omeprazole, vitamin C, octreotide, and ondansetron. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam and propofol iv and maintained with propofol infusion. Naltrexon, clonidine, octreotide, and diazepam were then administered. Anesthesia was maintained for 3 ½ - 5 hours depending on severity of withdrawal symptoms precipitated by naltrexone. Analgetics and sedatives were given as needed afterwards. Upon discharge on the following day, patient was prescribed a regimen of oral naltrexone for 10-12 months. All 361 patients were successfully detoxified without any adverse anesthetic events. The side effects encountered were fatigue, insomnia, drowsy, shivering, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhoea, myalgia, goose bumps and uncomfortable feeling. In most of the patients these symptoms disappeared without any treatment. Symptomatic treatments were needed in 32.7% of patients. In all 166 patients who completed their naltrexone maintenance treatment, craving disappeared in the 10th month. The main problem was the low patient compliance to oral naltrexone, so that only 45.9% of the patients completed their therapy. Conclusion: Accelerated neuroregulation which includes naltrexone maintenance treatment (10-12 months was highly effective to detoxify and to abolish craving in the heroin dependent patients. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 53-8Keywords: detoxification, craving management

  20. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Luo, W; Fourkal, E; Lin, T; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2007-07-07

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 x 10(21) W cm(-2). Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  1. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Luo, W.; Fourkal, E.; Lin, T.; Li, J.; Veltchev, I.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 × 1021 W cm-2. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  2. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  3. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  4. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, S H; Fassò, A; Liu, J C

    2009-11-01

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  5. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  6. Ion acceleration through radiation pressure in quanto-electrodynamical regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Dario; Ridgers, Chris; Laser Plasmas; Fusion Team

    2016-10-01

    The strong radiation pressure carried by high-intensity lasers interacting with plasmas can accelerate ions over very short distances. The resulting compact particle accelerator could find applications in medical physics (radiotherapy) as well as in fundamental physics (hadron interactions). With next-generation multi-petawatt lasers, reaching focused intensity 1023Wcm-2 , ions could potentially reach GeV energies. However, the physics of laser-matter interactions at these extreme intensities is not well understood. In particular, on acceleration by the electromagnetic fields of the laser, the electrons in the plasma start to radiate hard photons prolifically. These hard photons can decay to electron-positron pairs, a cascade of pair production can ensue leading to the formation of an over-dense pair plasma which can absorb the laser-pulse. We have developed a self-consistent theory for both hole boring and light sail radiation pressure ion-acceleration, accounting for radiation-reaction and pair-creation. We show that the key role is played by a pair plasma that arises between the laser and the accelerated ions, strongly modifying the laser absorption.

  7. Accelerated thermal and radiative ageing of hydrogenated NBR for DRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, G. [EUROTEST S.A., Bucharest (Romania). Research, Equipment Testing, Industrial Engineering and Scientific Services; Notingher, P. [Univ. Politehnica, Bucharest (Romania). Faculty of Electrical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The accelerated thermal and gamma radiation ageing of HNBR carbon black-T80 has been studied by measuring the residual deformation under constant deflection -- DRC, in air, using a relevant equation for the relaxation phenomena. The residual deformation under constant deflection during the process of accelerated ageing is increasing but the structure of polymer answers in the proper manner to the mechanical stress. The degradation equations were obtained, using Alfrey model for the relaxation polymer subject to compression and an Arrhenius dependence for the chemical reaction rate. The inverted relaxation time for the thermal degradation is depending on the chemical reaction rate and the dose rate of gamma radiation.

  8. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of EN...

  9. PET-based radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Christina K; Grigsby, Perry W; Huang, Jiayi; Thorstad, Wade L; Parikh, Parag J; Robinson, Clifford G; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we review the literature on the use of PET in radiation treatment planning, with an emphasis on describing our institutional methodology (where applicable). This discussion is intended to provide other radiation oncologists with methodological details on the use of PET imaging for treatment planning in radiation oncology, or other oncologists with an introduction to the use of PET in planning radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonthermal Radiation and Acceleration of Electrons in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, V

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations of excess radiation at extreme ultraviolet and hard X-ray energies straddling the well known thermal soft X-ray emission have provided new tools and puzzles for investigation of the acceleration of nonthermal particles in the intercluster medium of clusters of galaxies. It is shown that these radiations can be produced by the inverse Compton upscattering of the cosmic microwave background photons by the same population of relativistic electrons that produce the well known diffuse radio radiation via the synchrotron mechanism. It is shown that the commonly discussed discrepancy between the value of the magnetic field required for the production of these radiation with that obtained from Faraday rotation measures could be resolved by more realistic models and by considerations of observational selection effects. In a brief discussion of the acceleration process it is argued that the most likely scenario is reacceleration of injected relativistic electrons involving shocks and turbulence. The...

  11. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  12. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by {gamma}-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with {gamma}-ray should be carried out. (author)

  13. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  14. Migratory eosinophilic alveolitis caused by radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Hyeok; Nam, Hae-Seong; Kim, Hun Jung; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, In-Suh; Cho, Jae Hwa; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Kwak, Seung Min; Lee, Hong Lyeol

    2015-05-01

    Although radiation pneumonitis is usually confined to irradiated areas, some studies have reported that radiation-induced lymphocytic alveolitis can also spread to the non-irradiated lung. However, there have been few reports of radiation-induced eosinophilic alveolitis. We report the case of a 27-year-old female with radiation pneumonitis, occurring 4 months after radiation therapy for cancer of the left breast. Clinical and radiological relapse followed withdrawal of corticosteroids. Examination of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patchy airspace consolidations revealed increased eosinophil counts. Finally, clinical and radiological signs resolved rapidly after reintroduction of corticosteroids. Eosinophilic alveolitis may be promoted by radiation therapy. In the present case report, possible mechanisms for radiation-induced eosinophilic alveolitis are also reviewed.

  15. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-08

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  16. Application of Novel Accelerator Research for Particle Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerke, Henrik Hemmestad

    2014-01-01

    This thesis seeks to review the latest trends in hadron therapy devices, and evaluate the potential of novel, researched accelerator concepts for future application. Although the clinical benefits of hadron therapy over photon therapy is unproven or disputed for many cancer types, there are several cases where hadron therapy presents a superior option. Many governments and medical institutions are planning or already executing development of new hadron treatment facilities. However, the highe...

  17. Radiation Fields in the Vicinity of Compact Accelerator Neutron Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Brandon W. Blackburn; Augustine J. Caffrey

    2006-10-01

    Intense pulsed radiation fields emitted from sealed tube neutron generators provide a challenge for modern health physics survey instrumentation. The spectral sensitivity of these survey instruments requires calibration under realistic field conditions while the pulsed emission characteristics of neutron generators can vary from conditions of steady-state operation. As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around neutron generators, experiments and modeling simulations have been performed to assess radiation fields near DD and DT neutron generators. The presence of other materials and material configurations can also have important effects on the radiation dose fields around compact accelerator neutron generators.

  18. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also be careful not to rub away the ink marks needed for your radiation therapy until it’s ... Health Care Professionals Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides ...

  19. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  20. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, eit...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era......., either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...

  1. Breakdown of Acceleration Waves in Radiative Magneto-fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisudan Rai

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of propagation of acceleration waves in an optically thick medium of electrically conducting fluid has been dealt with. During propagation of the waves, the effects of radiation pressure, radiation energy density, and heat transfer through thermal radiation and thermal conduction have been taken into account. The growth equation for the variation of amplitude of the wave has been derived and solved. It has been concluded that all the compressive waves with initial amplitudes greater than a critical value will grow and terminate into a shock wave due to nonlinear steepening, while all expansion waves will decay out. Acritical stage, when the compressive wave will either grow or decay, has also been discussed. The effects of radiation pressure and radiative heat transfer on the shock formation have been discussed and analysed.

  2. Radiation Hardening of LED Luminaires for Accelerator Tunnels

    CERN Document Server

    Devine, James D

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises progress made towards the radiation hardening of LED emergency luminaires for evacuation and emergency response within the underground areas of the CERN accelerator complex. The objective has been to radiation harden existing Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) emergency luminaires to maximise lighting performance, without compromising IEC 60598-2-22 compliance. A systems level approach has been adopted, leading to the development of a diode bridge based AC/DC power converter. Modified COTS luminaires including this converter design have been irradiated (to 100 kGy TID using a Cobalt-60 source), with results of a subsequent photometric analysis presented. Following encouraging tests results, a reference design for the power converter has been released under the CERN Open Hardware License to encourage manufacturer adoption. The paper concludes with areas of interest for future research in further improving the radiation hardness of LED emergency lighting for accelerators with detailed studies...

  3. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references.

  4. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  5. On radiative acceleration in spine-sheath structured blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chhotray, Atul; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Salafia, Om Sharan; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Lazzati, Davide

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that blazar jets are structured, with a fast spine surrounded by a slower sheath or layer. This structured jet model explains some properties of their emission and morphology. Because of their relative motion, the radiation produced by one component is seen amplified by the other, thus enhancing the inverse Compton emission of both. Radiation is emitted anisotropically in the comoving frames, and causes the emitting plasma to recoil. As seen in the observer frame, this corresponds to a deceleration of the fastest component (the spine) and an acceleration of the slower one (the layer). While the deceleration of the spine has already been investigated, here we study for the first time the acceleration of the sheath and find self-consistent velocity profile solutions for both the spine and the sheath while accounting for radiative cooling. We find that the sheath can be accelerated to the velocities required by the observations if its leptons remain energetic in the acceleration region, assu...

  6. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  7. Ion Acceleration by the Radiation Pressure of Slow Electromagnetic Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V; Kando, M; Pegoraro, F; Bulanov, S S; Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W

    2012-01-01

    When the ions are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser pulse, their velocity can not exceed the laser group velocity, in the case when it is less than the speed of light in vacuum. This is demonstrated in two cases corresponding to the thin foil target irradiated by a high intensity laser light and to the hole boring by the laser pulse in the extended plasma accompanied by the collisionless shock wave formation. It is found that the beams of accelerated at the collisionless shock wave front ions are unstable against the Buneman-lke and the Weibel-like instabilities which result in the ion energy spectrum broadening.

  8. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  9. Ocular neuromyotonia after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessell, S.; Lessell, I.M.; Rizzo, J.F. III

    1986-12-15

    Ocular neuromyotonia is a paroxysmal monocular deviation that results from spasm of eye muscles secondary to spontaneous discharges from third, fourth, or sixth nerve axons. We observed this rare disorder in four patients who had been treated with radiation for tumors in the region of the sella turcica and cavernous sinus. Based on these cases and four others identified in the literature it would appear that radiation predisposes to a cranial neuropathy in which ocular neuromyotonia may be the major manifestation. Radiation appears to be the most common cause of ocular neuromyotonia.

  10. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators: implementation of ALARA in design and operation of accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassò, A; Rokni, S

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the historical evolution of the concept of optimisation of radiation exposures, as commonly expressed by the acronym ALARA, and discusses its application to various aspects of radiation protection at high-energy accelerators.

  11. Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms Blogs and Newsletters Health Communications Publications Reports Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer ... Copy This booklet covers: Questions and Answers About Radiation Therapy. Answers common questions, such as what radiation ...

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF PALLIATIVE EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THERAPY FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To improve the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for patients with bladder cancer (BC.Materials and Methods: In the years 1990−2010, 90 patients with BC were treated with palliative external beam radiation therapy (EBRT using three regimens: conventional fractionation in group 1 (n = 37, hypofractionation in group 2 (n = 22 and accelerated dynamic fractionation in group 3 (n = 31.Results: The immediate efficacy of EBRT was evaluated taking into account rapid relief of local symptoms of disease. In group 1, a clinically significant response (hematuria relief was achieved in 63,0 % cases, in group 2 — in 62,5 %, in group 3 — in 91,7 % cases. The 10-year follow-up showed that in group 1, the median survival was 21,8 ± 3,3 months; in groups 2 and 3, the median survival was 27,0 ± 7,8 and 32,6 ± 9,8 months, respectively. In group 2, an increase in the rate of acute radiation reactions was noted, whereas in group 3, palliative EBRT did not produce higher rates and severity of acute radiation reactions and complications.Conclusion: Accelerated dynamic fractionation was found to shorten treatment times and to improve outcomes and quality of life for incurable patients with BC.

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF PALLIATIVE EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THERAPY FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To improve the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for patients with bladder cancer (BC.Materials and Methods: In the years 1990−2010, 90 patients with BC were treated with palliative external beam radiation therapy (EBRT using three regimens: conventional fractionation in group 1 (n = 37, hypofractionation in group 2 (n = 22 and accelerated dynamic fractionation in group 3 (n = 31.Results: The immediate efficacy of EBRT was evaluated taking into account rapid relief of local symptoms of disease. In group 1, a clinically significant response (hematuria relief was achieved in 63,0 % cases, in group 2 — in 62,5 %, in group 3 — in 91,7 % cases. The 10-year follow-up showed that in group 1, the median survival was 21,8 ± 3,3 months; in groups 2 and 3, the median survival was 27,0 ± 7,8 and 32,6 ± 9,8 months, respectively. In group 2, an increase in the rate of acute radiation reactions was noted, whereas in group 3, palliative EBRT did not produce higher rates and severity of acute radiation reactions and complications.Conclusion: Accelerated dynamic fractionation was found to shorten treatment times and to improve outcomes and quality of life for incurable patients with BC.

  14. Nonthermal radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks with low Mach numbers and the ensuing spectral signatures imprinted in radio synchrotron emission. Time-dependent simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of electrons in the test-particle limit have been performed for spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for typical shocks in the intracluster medium. The electron and radiation spectra at the shock location can be described properly by the test-particle DSA predictions with the instantaneous shock parameters. However, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons at the shock gradually decrease as the shock slows down in time. So one needs to be cautious about interpreting observed radio spectra of evolving shocks by simple DSA models in the test-particle regime.

  15. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  16. Hawking radiation of a uniformly accelerating black hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Jun; Cao Jiang-Ling; Zhao Zheng

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Hawking radiation via tunnelling from a uniformly accelerating black hole. Although the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is proportional also to the area of the event horizon, the radius of it, rH, is a function of θ, which leads to the difficulties in the calculation of the emission rate. In order to overcome the mathematical difficulties, we propose a new technique to calculate the emission rate and the result obtained is reasonable.

  17. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  18. Radiation therapy of follicular lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, Masahiko; Nakamura, Naoki; Tsubokura, Takuji; Gomi, Koutarou; Yamashita, Takashi [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital; Shikama, Naoto

    2001-09-01

    The follicular lymphoma, exactly, the cancer of follicular center and germinal center B lymphocytes, is reviewed on its immunological, pathological and genetic diagnoses, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, prognosis factors, therapy and assessment of therapy effects together with respective therapy of follicular small cleaved and follicular mixed small cleaved and large cell lymphoma of grade I, II; and of follicular large cell lymphoma of grade III. The therapy is essentially the radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy and others, of which effect is mainly assessed by CT. In clinical application grade II, III, irradiation of X- and electron rays and their combination is done in a fractionated manner with the maximal dose of around 35 Gy. In clinical disease grade II, III, regimen of irradiation is not fixed. In III, IV, chemotherapy and immunotherapy are major. In recurrence and malignant transformation, there is a report of large dose chemotherapy + whole body irradiation + bone marrow transplantation. (K.H.)

  19. Herpes Zoster infection and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.; Okazaki, A.; Mitsuhashi, N.; Ito, I.; Niibe, H. (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1979, among 3,320 patients with malignant neoplasms, herpes zoster (HZ) occurred in 54 (1.6%) after radiation therapy. The incidence of HZ infection was increased in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (10.0%), malignant lymphoma (5.7%), ovarial tumor (3.7%) and testicular tumor (3.6%). Most of these patients received extensive radiation therapy along the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. The location of HZ infection was divided as follows; HZ infectious lesion located in the area of (I-A) innervated segment of the irradiated nerve root (75.9%), (I-B) irradiated dermatome (5.6%) and (II) not associated with radiation field (18.5%). In 44 patients of I-A and B, HZ infection developed within a year, particularly in three months (22 cases) after the completion of irradiation. This latent period between completing irradiation and the development of HZ infection was likely to be compatible with the period between radiation therapy and earlier radiation injury. Among 10 patients in Group II, 7 patients developed HZ infection more than a year after radiation therapy. The cumulative survival of these patients except for the patients with malignant lymphoma was 66.7% and so HZ infection was considered to have no prognostic significance.

  20. Neutron radiation therapy: application of advanced technology to the treatment of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Maughan, R L; Kota, C; Burmeister, J; Porter, A T; Forman, J D; Blosser, H G; Blosser, E; Blosser, G

    1999-01-01

    The design and construction of a unique superconducting cyclotron for use in fast neutron radiation therapy is described. The clinical results obtained in the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate with this accelerator are presented. Future use of the boron neutron capture reaction as a means of enhancing fast neutron therapy in the treatment of patients with brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme) is also discussed.

  1. Helium-3 and helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Bulanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions (heavier than protons. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (magnetic vortex acceleration and hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He^{3} ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He^{4} with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.

  2. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Derishev, Evgeny V

    2015-01-01

    What are the mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build up and decay in relativistic shocks are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current PIC simulation show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a short length scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplificaiton of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the s...

  3. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, advances in ionizing radiation therapy are competitive to non-ionizing ones, as for example the laser light based therapy, resulting in a synergism that has revolutionized medicine. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive (e.g. through flexible endoscopes) therapeutic procedures in the management of patients represents a very interesting treatment option. Moreover, as the major breakthrough in cancer management is the individualized patient treatment, new biophotonic techniques, e.g. photo-activated drug carriers, help...

  4. Constrictive pericarditis following mediastinal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffee, M.A.; Hamman, J.L.

    1977-02-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of patients with neoplastic disease have received aggressive radiation therapy to the mediastinum. Following this therapy as many as 30% of patients develop pericarditis with effusion, which may later severely compromise cardiovascular function because of constriction and/or tamponade. In a retrospective study, Martin et al found either transient or persistent pericardial effusion in 24 of 81 patients with Hodgkin's disease, Stages I-III B, who underwent upper mantle radiation. Five of the 24 patients eventually required pericardiectomy for signs and symptoms of cardiac tamponade. Most of the retrospective studies of heart disease following radiation therapy demonstrate an increased incidence of cardiac involvement following high doses (over 4000 rads) to the mediastinum; however, acute pericarditis, restrictive disease, and even myocardial infarctions have occurred with a total dose of less than 4000 rads.

  5. Radiation therapy in cholangiocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma can arise in all parts of the biliary tract and this has implications for therapy. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy however local relapse is a major problem. Therefore, adjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy was tested in trials. The SWOG-S0809 trial regimen of chemoradiotherapy which was tested in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and in gallbladder cancer can currently be regarded as highest level of evidence for this indication. In contrast to adjuvant therapy where only conventionally fractionated radiotherapy plays a role, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) today has become a powerful alternative to chemoradiotherapy for definitive treatment due to the ability to administer higher doses of radiotherapy to improve local control. Sequential combinations with chemotherapy are also frequently employed. Nevertheless, in general cholangiocarcinoma is an orphan disease and future clinical trials will have to improve the available level of evidence.

  6. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  7. Eosinophilia following radiation therapy in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Yoshifumi; Hosoya, Ryota; Ohhashi, Tohya; Yamamoto, Keiko; Shiraga, Hiroshi (Saint Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1983-06-01

    Radiation related eosinophilia (R.R.E.) has been observed mainly among the patients who received radiation therapy for uterine cancer, which was said to be the sign of good prognosis. Retrospective study of eosinophilia following radiation therapy was performed in 41 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, brain tumor and so on. Thirty-two per cent of all courses of radiation therapy was associated with R.R.E.. Eosinophil counts increased gradually from two weeks after the start of therapy and reached to maximun on the 33rd day (mean). R.R.E. was seen much more frequently among the patients with brain tumor than those with ALL. And R.R.E. was also related to radiation dose. Patients under 3 years of age showed R.R.E. less frequently comparing to the older age group. Those findings might mean that R.R.E. was strongly related to the host's immunological function. This is the first report about R.R.E. in childhood.

  8. Building immunity to cancer with radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikerwal, Suresh J; Hagekyriakou, Jim; MacManus, Michael; Martin, Olga A; Haynes, Nicole M

    2015-11-28

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic shift in the focus of cancer research toward understanding how the body's immune defenses can be harnessed to promote the effectiveness of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies. The ability of ionizing radiation to elicit anti-cancer immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth has led to the emergence of promising combination-based radio-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. Herein we review the immunoadjuvant properties of localized radiation therapy and discuss how technological advances in radio-oncology and developments in the field of tumor-immunotherapy have started to revolutionize the therapeutic application of radiotherapy.

  9. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    % prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within......PURPOSE: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. METHODS AND MATERIALS...... plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses...

  10. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C L Chow

    2016-01-01

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces(GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are:(1) the treatment time calculator, superficialx-ray treatment time calculator(SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy;(2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator(EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy;(3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy(SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy;(4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and(5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator(PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls the

  11. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  12. Radiation therapy for resistant sternal hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulger, S.; Barut, H.; Tunc, M.; Aydinkarahaliloglu, E. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Aydin, E.; Karaoglanoglu, N. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Thorasic Surgery; Gokcek, A. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-06-15

    Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infectious disease for which there are known treatment procedures and effective antibiotics; however, there are resistant cases that do not respond to medication or surgery. We report a case diagnosed as hydatid disease of the chest wall and treated with radiation therapy (RT) after medical and surgical therapy had failed. In conclusion, RT represents an alternative treatment modality in resistant cases. (orig.)

  13. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duschet, P.; Schwarz, T.; Gschnait, F.

    1988-02-01

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently.

  14. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  15. Beam Phase Detection for Proton Therapy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Getta, Markus; Kolesov, Sergej; Pupeter, Nico; Stephani, Thomas; Timmer, J

    2005-01-01

    The industrial application of proton cyclotrons for medical applications has become one of the important contributions of accelerator physics during the last years. This paper describes an advanced vector demodulating technique used for non-destructive measurements of beam intensity and beam phase over 360°. A computer controlled I/Q-based phase detector with a very large dynamic range of 70 dB permits the monitoring of beam intensity, phase and eventually energy for wide range of beam currents down to -130 dBm. In order to avoid interference from the fundamental cyclotron frequency the phase detection is performed at the second harmonic frequency. A digital low pass filter with adjustable bandwidth and steepness is implemented to improve accuracy. With a sensitivity of the capacitive pickup in the beam line of 30 nV per nA of proton beam current at 250 MeV, accurate phase and intensity measurements can be performed with beam currents down to 3.3 nA.

  16. Big data and comparative effectiveness research in radiation oncology: synergy and accelerated discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eTrifiletti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several advances in large data set collection and processing have the potential to provide a wave of new insights and improvements in the use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The era of electronic health records, genomics, and improving information technology resources creates the opportunity to leverage these developments to create a learning healthcare system that can rapidly deliver informative clinical evidence. By merging concepts from comparative effectiveness research with the tools and analytic approaches of big data, it is hoped that this union will accelerate discovery, improve evidence for decision-making, and increase the availability of highly relevant, personalized information. This combination offers the potential to provide data and analysis that can be leveraged for ultra-personalized medicine and high quality, cutting-edge radiation therapy.

  17. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F., E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gabriel.alo@aceletron.com.br [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Aceletrica Comercio e Representacoes Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Francisco C.A. Da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  18. Accelerated aging and stabilization of radiation-vulcanized EPDM rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basfar, A. A.; Abdel-Aziz, M. M.; Mofti, S.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of different antioxidants and their mixtures on the thermal aging and accelerated weathering of γ-radiation vulcanized EPDM rubber in presence of crosslinking coagent, was investigated. The compounds used were either a synergistic blend of phenolic and phosphite antioxidants, i.e. 1:4 Irganox 1076: Irgafos 168 or a blend of arylamine and quinoline type antioxidants, i.e. 1:1 IPPD: TMQ, at fixed concentration. Tinuvin 622 LD hindered amine light stabilized (HALS) was also used. The response was evaluated by the tensile strength and elongation at break for irradiated samples after thermal aging at 100°C for 28 days and accelerated weathering (Xenon test) up to 200 h.

  19. Radiation Pressure Acceleration: the factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Kando, M; Pegoraro, F; Leemans, W P

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it trans...

  20. Laser-driven ion accelerators for tumor therapy revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, the authors of this report published a first paper on the technical challenges that laser accelerators need to overcome before they could be applied to tumor therapy. Among the major issues were the maximum energy of the accelerated ions and their intensity, control and reproducibility of the laser-pulse output, quality assurance and patient safety. These issues remain today. While theoretical progress has been made for designing transport systems, for tailoring the plumes of laser-generated protons, and for suitable dose delivery, today's best lasers are far from reaching performance levels, in both proton energy and intensity to seriously consider clinical ion beam therapy (IBT) application. This report details these points and substantiates that laser-based IBT is neither superior to IBT with conventional particle accelerators nor ready to replace it.

  1. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Y; Harada, Y; Ikeno, K

    2002-01-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics.

  2. Particle Accelerators and Detectors for medical Diagnostics and Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Braccini, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    This Habilitationsschrift (Habilitation thesis) is focused on my research activities on medical applications of particle physics and was written in 2013 to obtain the Venia Docendi (Habilitation) in experimental physics at the University of Bern. It is based on selected publications, which represented at that time my major scientific contributions as an experimental physicist to the field of particle accelerators and detectors applied to medical diagnostics and therapy. The thesis is structured in two parts. In Part I, Chapter 1 presents an introduction to accelerators and detectors applied to medicine, with particular focus on cancer hadrontherapy and on the production of radioactive isotopes. In Chapter 2, my publications on medical particle accelerators are introduced and put into their perspective. In particular, high frequency linear accelerators for hadrontherapy are discussed together with the new Bern cyclotron laboratory. Chapter 3 is dedicated to particle detectors with particular emphasis on three ...

  3. Radiation therapy for stage IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the outcome and discover predictive factors for patients with stage IVA cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with stage IVA cervical cancer who received definitive radiation therapy between 1992 and 2009. On univariate analysis, statistically significant prognostic factors for improved local control rate (LCR) were absence of pyometra (p=0.037) and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Prognostic factors for improved progression-free survival (PFS) were absence of pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial presentation (p=0.014), and EQD2 at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Patients with stage IVA disease had poor median survival. However adequate radiation dose to point A produced favorable LCR and PFS, therefore efforts should be made to increase the point A dose.

  4. Radiation therapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Anno, Hirofumi; Komai, Satoshi (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    During the decade from 1978 to 1987, 20 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with irradiation of 2000 cGy to the orbital tissue. We examined the effects of the therapy on 17 such patients. Exophthalmos tended to decrease. When the degree of deviation of the exophthalmic eye was small, the effect of therapy tended to be better than when it was large. Two cases that showed an increase in retrobulbar fatty tissue without thickening of the extraocular muscles did not respond as well as those that had thickening of the extraocular muscles. Diplopia tended to improve both subjectively and objectively. Ocular movement improved in 11 of the 17 patients. There were no serious radiation injuries after the radiation therapy, except for some transient swelling of the eyelid. (author).

  5. Terahertz radiation source using an industrial electron linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kalkal, Yashvir

    2015-01-01

    High power ($\\sim 100$ kW) industrial electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for irradiation applications e.g., for pasteurization of food products, disinfection of medical waste, etc. We propose that high power electron beam from such an industrial linac can be first passed through an undulator to generate powerful terahertz (THz) radiation, and the spent electron beam coming out of the undulator can still be used for industrial applications. This will enhance the utilisation of a high power industrial linac. We have performed calculation of spontaneous emission in the undulator to show that for typical parameters, continuous terahertz radiation having power of the order of $\\mu$W can be produced, which may be useful for many scientific applications.

  6. Electron acceleration in the heart of the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Henderson, M G; Morley, S K; Friedel, R H W; Funsten, H O; Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Thorne, R M; Turner, D L; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Larsen, B A; Niehof, J T

    2013-08-30

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA's Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belts and are inconsistent with a predominantly radial acceleration process.

  7. A dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sol Min; Song, Seong Chan; Hyun, Sung Eun; Park, Heung Deuk; Lee, Jaegi; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Gwi Eon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma For the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma, volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy were evaluated to compare these three treatment planning technique. The mean doses to the planning target volume and the femur were calculated to evaluate target coverage and the risk of bone fracture during radiation therapy. Volumetric modulated arc therapy can reduce the dose to the femur without compromising target coverage and reduce the treatment time compared with intensity modulated radiation therapy.

  8. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  9. Radiation Therapy -- What It Is, How It Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Radiation Therapy EASY READING Radiation Therapy -- What It Is, How It Helps This easy-to-read guide offers a ... Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. DONATE Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection ...

  10. Migratory organizing pneumonitis `primed` by radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, J.Y.; Nesme, P.; Guerin, J.C. [Hopital de la Croix Rousse, Service de Pneumologie, Lyon (France); Bejui-Thivolet, F. [Hopital de la Croix Rousse, Laboratorie d`Anatomopatologie, Lyon (France); Loire, R. [Hopital Cardiovasculaire et Pneumologique, Universite Claude Bernard, Laboratoire d`Anatomopathologie, Lyon (France); Cordier, J.F. [Hopital Cardiovasculaire et Pneumologique, Universite Claude Bernard, Service de Pneumologie, Lyon (France)

    1995-02-01

    We report on two women presenting with cough and fever, 4 and 7 months, respectively, after starting breast radiation therapy following surgery for breast carcinoma. Chest roentgenogram and computed tomographic (CT) scan demonstrated alveolar opacities, initially limited to the pulmonary area next to the irradiated breast, but later migrating within both lungs. Intra-alveolar granulation tissue was found in transbronchial lung biopsies. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in dramatic clinical improvment, together with complete clearing of the pulmonary opacities on chest imaging. However, clinical and imaging relapses occurred when corticosteroids were withdrawn too rapidly; with further improvment when they were reintroduced. The reported cases clearly differ from radiation pneumonitis. They were fairly typical of cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis, also called idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, with the exception of the radiation therapy, partially affecting the lung, which had been performed within the previous months. Since focal radiation therapy involving the lung may induce diffuse bilateral lymphocytic alveolitis, we hypothesize that this may `prime` the lung to further injury, leading to cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis. (au) (26 refs.).

  11. Particle acceleration and radiation in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar Wind Nebulae are the astrophysical sources that host the most relativistic shocks in Nature and the only Galactic sources in which we have direct evidence of PeV particles. These facts make them very interesting from the point of view of particle acceleration physics, and their proximity and brightness make them a place where fundamental processes common to different classes of relativistic sources have a better chance to be understood. I will discuss how well we understand the physics of Pulsar Wind Nebulae, describing recent progress and highlighting the main open questions. I will be mostly concerned with the subject of particle acceleration, but, as we will see, in order to clarify the physics of this process, it is important to determine the conditions of the plasma in the nebula. These in turn can only be constrained through detailed modelling of the PWN dynamics and radiation. The shock in the Crab Nebula is probably the most efficient accelerator known, both in terms of conversion of the flow e...

  12. External and internal radiation therapy: Past and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. Treatment modalities comprise radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy can be performed by using external or internal radiation therapy. However, each method has its unique properties which undertakes special role in cancer treatment, this question is brought up that: For cancer treatment, whether external radiation therapy is more efficient or internal radiation therapy one? To answer this question, we need to consider principles and structure of individual methods. In this review, principles and application of each method are considered and finally these two methods are compared with each other.

  13. Comparison of particle-radiation-therapy modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of dose distribution, beam alignment, and radiobiological advantages accorded to high LET radiation were reviewed and compared for various particle beam radiotherapeutic modalities (neutron, Auger electrons, p, ..pi../sup -/, He, C, Ne, and Ar ions). Merit factors were evaluated on the basis of effective dose to tumor relative to normal tissue, linear energy transfer (LET), and dose localization, at depths of 1, 4, and 10 cm. In general, it was found that neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam provided the best merit factors available for depths up to 8 cm. The position of fast neutron therapy on the Merit Factor Tables was consistently lower than that of other particle modalities, and above only /sup 60/Co. The largest body of clinical data exists for fast neutron therapy; results are considered by some to be encouraging. It then follows that if benefits with fast neutron therapy are real, additional gains are within reach with other modalities.

  14. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  15. Design for an accelerator-based orthogonal epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D A; Beynon, T D; Green, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the proposed Birmingham accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In particular, the option of producing a therapy beam at an orthogonal direction to the incoming protons is considered. Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, both with and without a head phantom, have shown that an orthogonal beam geometry is not only acceptable but is indeed beneficial, in terms of a lower mean neutron energy and an enhanced therapeutic ratio for the same useful neutron fluence in the therapy beam. Typical treatment times for various beam options have been calculated, and range from 20 to 48 min with a 5 mA beam of 2.8 MeV protons, if the maximum photon-equivalent dose delivered to healthy tissue is to be 12.6 Gy Eq. The effects of proton beam diameter upon the therapy beam parameters have also been considered.

  16. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operator to administer gamma radiation therapy, with the radiation source located at a distance from the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation...

  17. Radiation protection at Hadron therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccioni, Maorizio

    2011-07-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy is currently under construction in Pavia. It is designed for the treatment of deep-seated tumours (up to a depth of 27 cm of water equivalent) with proton and C-ion beams as well as for both clinical and radiobiological research. The particles will be accelerated by a 7-MeV u(-1) LINAC injector and a 400-MeV u(-1) synchrotron. In the first phase of the project, three treatment rooms will be in operation, equipped with four fixed beams, three horizontal and one vertical. The accelerators are currently undergoing commissioning. The main radiation protection problems encountered (shielding, activation, etc.) are hereby illustrated and discussed in relation to the constraints set by the Italian national authorities.

  18. Helium-3 and Helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Leemans, W P; Bulanov, S V; Margarone, D; Korn, G; Haberer, T

    2015-01-01

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (Magnetic Vortex Acceleration and hole-boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the ...

  19. Assessment of secondary radiation and radiation protection in laser-driven proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faby, Sebastian; Wilkens, Jan J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Physik-Dept.

    2015-09-01

    This work is a feasibility study of a radiation treatment unit with laser-driven protons based on a state-of-the-art energy selection system employing four dipole magnets in a compact shielded beamline. The secondary radiation emitted from the beamline and its energy selection system and the resulting effective dose to the patient are assessed. Further, it is evaluated whether or not such a compact system could be operated in a conventional treatment vault for clinical linear accelerators under the constraint of not exceeding the effective dose limit of 1 mSv per year to the general public outside the treatment room. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 is employed to simulate the secondary radiation generated while irradiating a hypothetical tumor. The secondary radiation inevitably generated inside the patient is taken into account as well, serving as a lower limit. The results show that the secondary radiation emanating from the shielded compact therapy system would pose a serious secondary dose contamination to the patient. This is due to the broad energy spectrum and in particular the angular distribution of the laser-driven protons, which make the investigated beamline together with the employed energy selection system quite inefficient. The secondary radiation also cannot be sufficiently absorbed in a conventional linear accelerator treatment vault to enable a clinical operation. A promising result, however, is the fact that the secondary radiation generated in the patient alone could be very well shielded by a regular treatment vault, allowing the application of more than 100 fractions of 2 Gy per day with protons. It is thus theoretically possible to treat patients with protons in such treatment vaults. Nevertheless, the results show that there is a clear need for alternative more efficient energy selection solutions for laser-driven protons.

  20. Dosimetry in radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Silari, M; Theis, C

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry at high-energy proton accelerators is a difficult task because of the complexity of the stray radiation field. A good knowledge of this mixed radiation field is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for routine area monitoring and to choose the personal dosimeter legally required for estimating the effective dose received by individuals. At the same time, the response function of the detectors to the mixed field must be thoroughly understood. A proper calibration of a device, which may involve a complex series of measurements in various reference fields, is needed. Monte Carlo simulations provide a complementary – and sometimes the principal – mean of determining the response function. The ambient dose equivalent rates during operation range from a few hundreds of μSv per year to a few mSv per year. To measure such rates one needs detectors of high sensitivity and/or capable of integrating over long periods. The main challenge...

  1. Radiation from an accelerating neutral body: The case of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarman, Tolga; Arik, Metin; Kholmetskii, Alexander L.

    2013-11-01

    When an object is bound at rest to an attractional field, its rest mass (owing to the law of energy conservation, including the mass and energy equivalence of the Special Theory of Relativity) must decrease. The mass deficiency coming into play indicates a corresponding rest energy discharge. Thus, bringing an object to a rotational motion means that the energy transferred for this purpose serves to extract just as much rest mass (or similarly "rest energy", were the speed of light in empty space taken to be unity) out of it. Here, it is shown that during angular acceleration, photons of fundamental energy are emitted, while the object is kept on being delivered to a more and more intense rotational accelerational field, being the instantaneous angular velocity of the rotating object. This fundamental energy, as seen, does not depend on anything else (such as the mass or charge of the object), and it is in harmony with Bohr's Principle of Correspondence. This means at the same time, that emission will be achieved, as long as the angular velocity keeps on increasing, and will cease right after the object reaches a stationary rotational motion (a constant centrifugal acceleration), but if the object were brought to rotation in vacuum with no friction. By the same token, one can affirm that even the rotation at a macroscopic level is quantized, and can only take on "given angular velocities" (which can only be increased, bit by bit). The rate of emission of photons of concern is, on the other hand, proportional to the angular acceleration of the object, similarly to the derivative of the tangential acceleration with respect to time. It is thus constant for a "constant angular acceleration", although the energy of the emitted photons will increase with increasing , until the rotation reaches a stationary level, after which we expect no emission --let us stress-- if the object is in rotation in vacuum, along with no whatsoever friction (such as the case of a rotating

  2. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  3. Particle Accelerators and Detectors for medical Diagnostics and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Braccini, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    This Habilitationsschrift (Habilitation thesis) is focused on my research activities on medical applications of particle physics and was written in 2013 to obtain the Venia Docendi (Habilitation) in experimental physics at the University of Bern. It is based on selected publications, which represented at that time my major scientific contributions as an experimental physicist to the field of particle accelerators and detectors applied to medical diagnostics and therapy. The thesis is structur...

  4. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Radiation therapy for unresected gastric lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Kimura, Yoshiko; Itoh, Hisao; Tsuda, Takaharu; Komatsu, Akira; Hamamoto, Ken (Ehime Univ., Ehime (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-05-01

    Six consecutive patients with unresected gastric lymphoma which were treated by radiation therapy between November 1976 and March 1989 were reviewed. Radiation therapy was performed using involved fields, total radiation dosages of which ranged from 25.2 to 36 Gy (mean, 29.3 Gy). Five out of the 6 patients were treated with chemotherapy combined with radiation. Regimen of the chemotherapy was CHOP (cyclophophamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone) in most cases. Three out of the 6 underwent probe laparotomy, but the tumors were diagnosed as unresectable due to locally invading the adjacent structures. They were treated by chemo-radiotherapy and 2 of them are surviving as of the present study (40 and 116 months). The other 3 patients were diagnosed as with clinical stage IV disease and 2 of them were successfully treated with chemo-radiotherapy (21 and 66 months, surviving). These data suggest that unresected gastric lymphomas, which are locally advanced or stage IV disease, are treated by chemo-radiotherapy with high curability without any serious complications. (author).

  6. Heavy ion acceleration in the radiation pressure acceleration and breakout afterburner regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by high-intensity sub-picosecond lasers. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, three laser systems are modeled that cover the range between femtosecond and picosecond pulses. By varying the laser pulse duration we observe a transition from radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) to the relativistic induced transparency (RIT) regime for heavy ions akin to light ions. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. A more detailed study involving variation of peak laser intensity I 0 and pulse duration τFWHM revealed that the transition point from RPA to RIT regime depends on the peak laser intensity on target and occurs for pulse duration {τ }{{F}{{W}}{{H}}{{M}}}{{R}{{P}}{{A}}\\to {{R}}{{I}}{{T}}}[{{f}}{{s}}]\\cong 210/\\sqrt{{I}0[{{W}} {{{cm}}}-2]/{10}21}. The most abundant gold ion and charge-to-mass ratio are Au51+ and q/M ≈ 1/4, respectively, half that of light ions. For ultrathin foils, on the order of one skin depth, we established a linear scaling of the maximum energy per nucleon (E/M)max with (q/M)max, which is more favorable than the quadratic one found previously. The numerical simulations predict heavy ion beams with very attractive properties for applications: high directionality (high fluxes (>1011 ions sr-1) and energy (>20 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  7. The value of radiation therapy for pituitary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Tsutomu [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-09-01

    Following points are discussed in this review. (1) Historical review of our previous therapeutic management. (2) Classification of pituitary adenomas. (3) Clinical analysis of my recent 58 cases. (4) Verification of usefulness of postoperative irradiation which achieved to increase in local control rate. (5) Authoritativeness of radiotherapy. In general, 3 to 4 portal technique or arc therapy were employed. The lateral opposing field technique was avoid to use. The recommended doses using linear accelerator x-ray technique is approximately 5000 cGy in 5 weeks. To prevent radiation hazard; (1) examiner should not use technique of two opposed fields, (2) total doses should not exceed 5000 cGy in 5 to 6 weeks and the use of daily fractions should not exceed 200 cGy. (6) Correlation of hormone secreting tumors and radiation therapy. (7) Problem of radiosurgery and heavy particle. (8) Countermeasure for recurrence cases. (9) Problem of side effects of radiotherapy and its precaution. Complication of radiation for pituitary adenoma found that the significant side effects are negligibly small in recent years. (10) Pituitary tumor are originally slow growing and benign tumor, therefore the response to irradiation takes long time to elapse for final evaluation. For instance, over 80 to 90% of acromegaly patients respond HGH successfully, but this may require from one to several years. (11) Conclusion. (author).

  8. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  9. Radiation therapy of psoriasis and parapsoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1982-09-15

    Selective UV-Phototherapy with lambda 300-320 nm (SUP) as well as oral photochemotherapy with 8-methoxy-psoralen plus UVA-radiation (PUVA intern) are very effective in clearing the lesions of the generalized psoriasis and those of the chronic forms of parapsoriasis. Being treated with 4 suberythemal doses per week psoriasis patients are free or nearly free of symptoms after averagely 6.3 weeks of SUP-therapy or after 5.3 weeks of PUVA orally. The PUVA-therapy is mainly indicated in pustular, inverse and erythrodermic psoriasis as well as in parapsoriasis en plaques and variegata. In all other forms of psoriasis and in pityriasis lichenoides-chronica, we prefer the SUP-therapy because of less acute or chronic side effects, and because of its better practicability. X-rays are indicated in psoriais of nails, grenz-rays in superficial psoriatic lesions of the face, the armpits, the genitals and the anal region.

  10. Particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation in cylindrical waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xiu-Fang; WU Cong-Feng; JIA Qi-Ka

    2015-01-01

    In particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation (PASER),efficient interaction occurs when a train of micro-bunches has periodicity identical to the resonance frequency of the medium.Previous theoretical calculations based on the simplified model have only considered the energy exchange in the boundless condition.Under experimental conditions,however,the gas active medium must be guided by the metal waveguide.In this paper,we have developed a model of the energy exchange between a train of micro-bunches and a gas mixture active medium in a waveguide boundary for the first time,based on the theory of electromagnetic fields,and made detailed analysis and calculations with MathCAD.The results show that energy density can be optimized to a certain value to get the maximum energy exchange.

  11. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eHuppert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy (BCT receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  12. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; Dewyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  13. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves` ophthalmopathy. (author)

  14. The role of Cobalt-60 in modern radiation therapy: Dose delivery and image guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiner L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in modern radiation therapy with techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and image-guid-ed radiation therapy (IMRT and IGRT have been limited almost exclusively to linear accel-erators. Investigations of modern Cobalt-60 (Co-60 radiation delivery in the context of IMRT and IGRT have been very sparse, and have been limited mainly to computer-modeling and treatment-planning exercises. In this paper, we report on the results of experiments using a tomotherapy benchtop apparatus attached to a conventional Co-60 unit. We show that conformal dose delivery is possible and also that Co-60 can be used as the radiation source in megavoltage computed tomography imaging. These results complement our modeling studies of Co-60 tomotherapy and provide a strong motivation for continuing development of modern Cobalt-60 treatment devices.

  15. X-band Linac for a 6 MeV dual-head radiation therapy gantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Shin, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jongchul; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung-Chul; Park, Hyung-dal; Song, Ki-back; Song, Ho-seung; Mun, Sangchul; Ha, Donghyup; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2017-04-01

    We developed a design for a 6 MeV X-band linear accelerator for radiation therapy in a dual-head gantry layout. The dual-head gantry has two linacs that can be operated independently. Each X-band linac accelerates electron bunches using high-power RF and generates X-rays for radiation therapy. It requires a versatile RF system and pulse sequence to accomplish various radiation therapy procedures. The RF system consists of 9.3 GHz, 2 MW X-band magnetron and associated RF transmission components. A test linac was assembled and operated to characterize its RF performance without beam. This paper presents these results along with a description of the gantry linacs and their operational requirements.

  16. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  17. Cherenkov Video Imaging Allows for the First Visualization of Radiation Therapy in Real Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: Lesley.a.jarvis@hitchcock.org [Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Jiang, Shudong [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Hitchcock, Whitney [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Friedman, Oscar D.; Glaser, Adam K.; Jermyn, Michael [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Cherenkov light imaging can visualize radiation therapy in real time during breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: An intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was synchronized to the 3.25-μs radiation pulses of the clinical linear accelerator with the intensifier set × 100. Cherenkov images were acquired continuously (2.8 frames/s) during fractionated whole breast irradiation with each frame an accumulation of 100 radiation pulses (approximately 5 monitor units). Results: The first patient images ever created are used to illustrate that Cherenkov emission can be visualized as a video during conditions typical for breast radiation therapy, even with complex treatment plans, mixed energies, and modulated treatment fields. Images were generated correlating to the superficial dose received by the patient and potentially the location of the resulting skin reactions. Major blood vessels are visible in the image, providing the potential to use these as biological landmarks for improved geometric accuracy. The potential for this system to detect radiation therapy misadministrations, which can result from hardware malfunction or patient positioning setup errors during individual fractions, is shown. Conclusions: Cherenkoscopy is a unique method for visualizing surface dose resulting in real-time quality control. We propose that this system could detect radiation therapy errors in everyday clinical practice at a time when these errors can be corrected to result in improved safety and quality of radiation therapy.

  18. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  19. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  20. Accelerated Hematopoietic Toxicity by High Energy 56Fe Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or x-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. Methods C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of 56Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Results Although onset was more rapid, 56Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)50/30 (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy respectively with relative biologic effectiveness for 56Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. Conclusions 56Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity. PMID:22077279

  1. Personalized Radiation Therapy (PRT) for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews and discusses approaches and strategies of personalized radiation therapy (PRT) for lung cancers at four different levels: (1) clinically established PRT based on a patient's histology, stage, tumor volume and tumor locations; (2) personalized adaptive radiation therapy (RT) based on image response during treatment; (3) PRT based on biomarkers; (4) personalized fractionation schedule. The current RT practice for lung cancer is partially individualized according to tumor histology, stage, size/location, and combination with use of systemic therapy. During-RT PET-CT image guided adaptive treatment is being tested in a multicenter trial. Treatment response detected by the during-RT images may also provide a strategy to further personalize the remaining treatment. Research on biomarker-guided PRT is ongoing. The biomarkers include genomics, proteomics, microRNA, cytokines, metabolomics from tumor and blood samples, and radiomics from PET, CT, SPECT images. Finally, RT fractionation schedule may also be personalized to each individual patient to maximize therapeutic gain. Future PRT should be based on comprehensive considerations of knowledge acquired from all these levels, as well as consideration of the societal value such as cost and effectiveness.

  2. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wady, P.T., E-mail: paul.wady@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Draude, A.; Shubeita, S.M.; Smith, A.D.; Mason, N. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Pimblott, S.M. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5–6 cm{sup 2}, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr–25Ni–Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  3. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  4. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  5. [Radiation therapy for prostate cancer in modern era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide overview of the latest research trend on technique of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3D -CRT) has achieved better outcome of treatment for prostate cancer than 2-dimensional radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) is considered to be superior to 3D-CRT at certain points. Image-guided (IG) radiation therapy (IGRT), mainly IG-IMRT, is investigated what kind of influence it has on an outcome, both tumor control rate and adverse events. Particle therapy is a most ideal therapy theoretically. There is, however, few evidence which revealed that the therapy is superior to any other modalities.

  6. Methods for detecting acceleration radiation in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzker, A; Cirac, J I; Plenio, M B; Reznik, B

    2008-09-12

    We propose and study methods for detecting Unruh-like acceleration radiation effects in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a (1+1)-dimensional setup. The Bogoliubov vacuum of a Bose-Einstein condensate is used to simulate a scalar field theory, and accelerated atom dots or optical lattices serve as detectors of phonon radiation due to acceleration effects. In particular, we study the dispersive effects of the Bogoliubov spectrum on the ideal case of exact thermalization. Our results suggest that acceleration radiation effects can be observed using currently accessible experimental methods.

  7. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  8. Mapping the literature of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2013-04-01

    This study characterizes the literature of the radiation therapy profession, identifies the journals most frequently cited by authors writing in this discipline, and determines the level of coverage of these journals by major bibliographic indexes. Cited references from three discipline-specific source journals were analyzed according to the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Project Protocol of the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to all journal references to identify the most frequently cited journal titles. Journal references constituted 77.8% of the total, with books, government documents, Internet sites, and miscellaneous sources making up the remainder. Although a total of 908 journal titles were cited overall, approximately one-third of the journal citations came from just 11 journals. MEDLINE and Scopus provided the most comprehensive indexing of the journal titles in Zones 1 and 2. The source journals were indexed only by CINAHL and Scopus. The knowledgebase of radiation therapy draws heavily from the fields of oncology, radiology, medical physics, and nursing. Discipline-specific publications are not currently well covered by major indexing services, and those wishing to conduct comprehensive literature searches should search multiple resources.

  9. Potential for heavy particle radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Phillips, T.L.

    1977-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains one of the major forms of cancer treatment. When x rays are used in radiotherapy, there are large variations in radiation sensitivity among tumors because of the possible differences in the presence of hypoxic but viable tumor cells, differences in reoxygenation during treatment, differences in distribution of the tumor cells in their cell cycle, and differences in repair of sublethal damage. When high-LET particles are used, depending upon the LET distribution, these differences are reduced considerably. Because of these differences between x rays and high-LET particle effects, the high-LET particles may be more effective on tumor cells for a given effect on normal cells. Heavy particles have potential application in improving radiotherapy because of improved dose localization and possible advantages of high-LET particles due to their radiobiological characteristics. Protons, because of their defined range, Bragg peak, and small effects of scattering, have good dose localization characteristics. The use of protons in radiotherapy minimizes the morbidity of radiotherapy treatment and is very effective in treating deep tumors located near vital structures. Fast neutrons have no physical advantages over /sup 60/Co gamma rays but, because of their high-LET component, could be very effective in treating tumors that are resistant to conventional radiations. Negative pions and heavy ions combine some of the advantages of protons and fast neutrons.

  10. Potential for heavy particle radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Phillips, T.L.

    1977-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains one of the major forms of cancer treatment. When x rays are used in radiotherapy, there are large variations in radiation sensitivity among tumors because of the possible differences in the presence of hypoxic but viable tumor cells, differences in reoxygenation during treatment, differences in distribution of the tumor cells in their cell cycle, and differences in repair of sublethal damage. When high-LET particles are used, depending upon the LET distribution, these differences are reduced considerably. Because of these differences between x rays and high-LET particle effects, the high-LET particles may be more effective on tumor cells for a given effect on normal cells. Heavy particles have potential application in improving radiotherapy because of improved dose localization and possible advantages of high-LET particles due to their radiobiological characteristics. Protons, because of their defined range, Bragg peak, and small effects of scattering, have good dose localization characteristics. The use of protons in radiotherapy minimizes the morbidity of radiotherapy treatment and is very effective in treating deep tumors located near vital structures. Fast neutrons have no physical advantages over /sup 60/Co gamma rays but, because of their high-LET component, could be very effective in treating tumors that are resistant to conventional radiations. Negative pions and heavy ions combine some of the advantages of protons and fast neutrons.

  11. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  12. Radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideomi; Yamashita; Wataru; Takahashi; Akihiro; Haga; Keiichi; Nakagawa

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy(SBRT)has a locacontrol rate of 95%at 2 years for non-small cell lungcancer(NSCLC)and should improve the prognosis oinoperable patients,elderly patients,and patients withsignificant comorbidities who have early-stage NSCLCThe safety of SBRT is being confirmed in internationalmulti-institutional PhaseⅡtrials for peripheral lungcancer in both inoperable and operable patients,bureports so far have found that SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for early-stage NSCLC and early metastatic lung cancer.Radiation pneumonitis(RP)is oneof the most common toxicities of SBRT.Although mospost-treatment RP is Grade 1 or 2 and either asymptomatic or manageable,a few cases are severe,symptomatic,and there is a risk for mortality.The reportedrates of symptomatic RP after SBRT range from 9%to28%.Being able to predict the risk of RP after SBRT isextremely useful in treatment planning.A dose-effecrelationship has been demonstrated,but suggesteddose-volume factors like mean lung dose,lung V20and/or lung V2.5 differed among the reports.We foundthat patients who present with an interstitial pneumo-nitis shadow on computed tomography scan and high levels of serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein D have a high rate of severe radiation pneumo-nitis after SBRT.At our institution,lung cancer patients with these risk factors have not received SBRT since 2006,and our rate of severe RP after SBRT has de-creased significantly since then.

  13. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, D T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, M J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwan, T J T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, D S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kluge, Thomas [FZD-GERMANY; Bussmann, Micheal [FZD-GERMANY; Bartal, T [UCSD; Beg, F N [UCSD; Gall, B [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Geissel, M [SNL; Korgan, G [NANOLABZ; Kovaleski, S [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Lockard, T [UNIV OF NEVADA; Malekos, S [NANOLABZ; Schollmeier, M [SNL; Sentoku, Y [UNIV OF NEVADA; Cowan, T E [FZD-GERMANY

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  14. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Cowan, T. E.; Gall, B.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Kwan, T. J.; Korgan, G.; Kovaleski, S.; Lockard, T.; Malekos, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schollmeier, M.; Sentoku, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity [1] and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser [2]. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  15. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  16. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  17. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  18. Physical Interpretation of the Schott Energy of An Accelerating Point Charge and the Question of Whether a Uniformly Accelerating Charge Radiates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A core topic in graduate courses in electrodynamics is the description of radiation from an accelerated charge and the associated radiation reaction. However, contemporary papers still express a diversity of views on the question of whether or not a uniformly accelerating charge radiates suggesting that a complete "physical" understanding of the…

  19. Clinical results of radiation therapy for thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasai, Keisuke; Kitakabu, Yoshizumi; Abe, Mitsuyuki (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, Masaji; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Fushiki, Masato

    1992-05-01

    From August 1968 to December 1989, 58 patients with thymoma were treated by radiotherapy using cobalt-60 gamma ray. Eleven cases were treated by radiothrapy alone, 1 by preoperative radiotheapy, 43 by postoperative radiotherapy, and 3 in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy. The following points were clarified: (a) Postoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy were effective; (b) For postoperative radiotherapy, operability was the major factor influencing survival and local control, and Stage I and II tumors resected totally or subtotally as well as Stage III tumors resected totally were good indications for such therapy; (c) The patients with complicating myasthenia gravis had a longer survival time and better local control rate than those without it. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17 patients, and none of them died of this complication. In all cases in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy, dry desquamation was observed within the irradiated field. (author).

  20. The computer simulation of laser proton acceleration for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykov, Vladimir; Baydin, Grigory

    2008-11-01

    The ions acceleration by intensive ultra-short laser pulses has interest in views of them possible applications for proton radiography, production of medical isotopes and hadron therapy. The 3D relativistic PIC-code LegoLPI is developed at RFNC-VNIITF for modeling of intensive laser interaction with plasma. The LegoLPI-code simulations were carried out to find the optimal conditions for generation of proton beams with parameters necessary for hadrons therapy. The performed simulations show that optimal for it may be two-layer foil of aluminum and polyethylene with thickness 100 nm and 50 nm accordingly. The maximum efficiency of laser energy transformation into 200 MeV protons is achieved on irradiating these foils by 30 fs laser pulse with intensity about 2.10^22 W/cm^2. The conclusion is made that lasers with peak power about 0.5-1PW and average power 0.5-1 kW are needed for generation of proton beams with parameters necessary for proton therapy.

  1. Image-guided radiation therapy; Bildgefuehrte Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boda-Heggemann, J.; Wertz, H.; Blessing, M.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Guckenberger, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ganswindt, U.; Belka, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Fuss, M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Program in Image-guided Radiation Therapy, Department of Radiation Medicine, Portland, OR (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Radiotherapy technology has improved rapidly over the past two decades. New imaging modalities, such as positron emission (computed) tomography (PET, PET-CT) and high-resolution morphological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been introduced into the treatment planning process. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with 3D soft tissue depiction directly imaging target and normal structures, is currently replacing patient positioning based on patient surface markers, frame-based intracranial and extracranial stereotactic treatment and partially also 2D field verification methods. On-line 3D soft tissue-based position correction unlocked the full potential of new delivery techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, by safely delivering highly conformal dose distributions that facilitate dose escalation and hypofractionation. These strategies have already resulted in better clinical outcomes, e.g. in prostate and lung cancer and are expected to further improve radiotherapy results. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlentherapie hat in den vergangenen 2 Dekaden von zahlreichen technischen Entwicklungen profitiert. Neue Bildgebungsmodalitaeten wie Positronenemissionstomographie (PET, PET/CT) und hochaufloesende morphologische und funktionelle MR-Sequenzen wurden in den Bestrahlungsplanungsprozess integriert. Die bildgesteuerte Strahlentherapie (''image-guided radiation therapy'', IGRT) ermoeglicht mittlerweile unmittelbar am Beschleuniger auch die 3-D-Darstellung von Weichgewebetumoren und ersetzt die Patientenpositionierung mittels Hautmarkern, rahmenbasierten stereotaktischen Verfahren im Kopf- und Koerperstamm und teilweise auch die 2-D-Verifikation der Bestrahlungsfelder. IGRT gestattet die Realisierung des vollen Potenzials fortgeschrittener Bestrahlungstechniken wie der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie, mit deren Hilfe hochkonformale Dosisverteilungen realisiert werden koennen. Diese Strategien haben zu verbesserten

  2. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  3. Severe prostatic calcification after radiation therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W A; Miller, E V; Sullivan, L D; Chapman, W H

    1979-06-01

    Severe symptomatic prostatic calcification was seen in 3 patients who had carcinoma of the prostate treated initially with transurethral resection, followed in 2 to 4 weeks by definitive radiation therapy. This complication is probably preventable if an interval of 6 weeks is allowed between transurethral resection of the prostate and radiation therapy.

  4. [Importance of sonotomography in radiation therapy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, R; Quast, U; Glaeser, L; Schmitt, G

    1976-08-01

    Ultrasound tomography provides true scale representation of body contours and organ structures. The image supplies substantial, individual geometrical data, essential for computerized radiation treatment planning. The mehtod is described. Typical planning examples for therapy are demonstrated. The value of follow up sonograms for radiation therapy is described. The limitations of the method are pointed out.

  5. Licensing process and implementation of a mobile linear accelerator for treatment of intraoperative radiation therapy; Proceso de licenciamiento e implantacion de un acelerador lineal movil para tratamientos de radioterapia intraoperatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra Diaz, F.; Gonzalez Ruiz, C.; Garcia Marcos, R.; Gallego Franco, P.; Rodriguez Checa, M.; Gomez Calvar, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective is to show how the working procedures, have been defined unambiguously to ensure together with the structure of the installation, and optimally located elements of radiation protection, compliance with the classification of areas, occupation factors and rates expected according to them. (Author)

  6. Occurrence of BOOP outside radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamanishi, Tohru; Oida, Kazukiyo [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan); Morimatu, Takafumi (and others)

    2001-09-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) that occurred outside the radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer. A 74-year-old woman received chemotherapy and a total of 60 Gy of radiation therapy to the right hilum and mediastinum for small cell carcinoma of the suprahilar area of the right lung. Radiation pneumonitis developed within the radiation port 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy. She complained of cough and was admitted 7 months after completion of the radiation therapy. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated peripheral alveolar opacities outside the radiation field on the side contralateral to that receiving the radiation therapy. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed that the total cell count was increased, with a markedly increased percentage of lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed a histologic pattern consistent with BOOP. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of the symptoms and complete resolution of the radiographic abnormalities of the left lung. Although some cases of BOOP following radiation therapy for breast cancer have been reported, none of BOOP after radiation therapy for lung cancer have appeared in the literature. (author)

  7. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  8. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Baskar, Kuo Ann Lee, Richard Yeo, Kheng-Wei Yeoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed.

  9. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W; Thorne, RM; Bortnik, J.; Baker, DN; Reeves, GD; Kanekal, SG; Spence, HE; Green, JC

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations ( > 1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly c...

  10. Present status of radiation processing and its future development by using electron accelerator in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Khac An; Tran Tich Canh; Doan Binh [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology (VINAGAMMA), Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Nguyen Quoc Hien [Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2003-02-01

    In Vietnam, studies on Radiation Processing have been carried out since 1983. Some results are applicable in the field of agriculture, health and foodstuff, some researches were developed to commercial scale and others have high potential for development by using electron accelerator. The paper offers the present status of radiation processing and also give out the growing tendency of using electron accelerator in the future. (author)

  11. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  12. Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

  13. Hawking radiation of scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillani, Usman A.; Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K., E-mail: mani_precious2001@yahoo.com, E-mail: mudassar051@yahoo.com, E-mail: saifullah@qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation of uncharged and charged scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes is studied. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of these particles from the rotation and acceleration horizons of these black holes. Using this method we recover the correct Hawking temperature as well.

  14. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  15. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Takada, Mitsuaki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Funakoshi, Takashi; Doi, Hidetaka; Yanagawa, Shigeo (Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-04-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is an ideal means of exterminating residual tumor after surgical resection. In this study, the clinical results of IOR using a Scanditronix Microtron MM-22 were evaluated in 14 patients with malignant glioma, five of whom had recurrent tumors. Between July, 1985 and October, 1986, 11 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GB) were irradiated 18 times (mean, 1.6 times/case), and three with astrocytoma (Kernohan grade III) underwent IOR once each. The target-absorbed dose at 1 to 2 cm deeper than the tumor resection surface was 15 to 50 Gy. During irradiation, a cotton bolus was placed in the dead space after over 91% of the tumor had been resected. As a rule, external irradiation therapy was also given postoperatively at a dose of 30 to 52 Gy. One patient died of pneumonia and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome 1 month postoperatively. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the ramaining 13 patients were 84.6% and 61.5%, respectively; among the 10 with GB, they were 80% and 50%. Generally, the smaller the tumor size, the better the results. There were no adverse effects, despite the dose 15 to 50 Gy applied temporally to the tumor bed. IOR was especially effective against small, localized tumors, but was not always beneficial in cases of large tumors, particularly those with a contralateral focus. The improved survival rate in this series demonstrates that IOR is significantly effective in the 'induction of remission' following surgical excision of malignant gliomas. (author).

  16. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Volker, E-mail: volker.budach@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Essen (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Dresden (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Erlangen (Germany); Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Olze, Heidi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter [Sostana GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  17. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  18. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  19. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Fractionation Schedules in the Presence of Tumor Repopulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Tsitsiklis, John N; Unkelbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the effect of tumor repopulation on optimal dose delivery in radiation therapy. We are primarily motivated by accelerated tumor repopulation towards the end of radiation treatment, which is believed to play a role in treatment failure for some tumor sites. A dynamic programming framework is developed to determine an optimal fractionation scheme based on a model of cell kill due to radiation and tumor growth in between treatment days. We find that faster tumor growth suggests shorter overall treatment duration. In addition, the presence of accelerated repopulation suggests larger dose fractions later in the treatment to compensate for the increased tumor proliferation. We prove that the optimal dose fractions are increasing over time. Numerical simulations indicate potential for improvement in treatment effectiveness.

  20. Radiation therapy for long-bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadasaki, Kouichi; Tomiyoshi, Hideki; Ooshima, Yoshie; Urashima, Masaki; Mori, Masaki (Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-Bomb Survivors Hospital (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    Efficacy of palliative and prophylactic radiotherapies for metastatic bone pain and pathological fracture was investigated in 14 patients with long bone metastases. Irradiation sites were the femur in 10 patients, the humerus in 2, the radius in one, and the tibia in one. Radiographs showed osteolytic lesion in 13 patients and osteoblastic lesion in one. A total dose of 48.6 Gy to 87.3 Gy was delivered in daily fractional doses of 2 Gy (one patient), 2.5 Gy (3), 3 Gy (6), 4 Gy (2) and 5 Gy (2), 5 days a week. For 13 patients, except for one death within one month after the completion of irradiation, pain relief was attained. Of these patients, 7 (54%) had complete pain relief. In one patient, pathological fracture occurred as early as 10 days after the beginning of irradiation when irradiation efficacy was not attained. In none of the 13 others, was pathological fracture encountered. No side effects were seen at all during or after irradiation. Radiation therapy was an extremely effective means for managing patients with long bone metastases in terms of its palliative and prophylactic role. (N.K.).

  1. Radiation therapy for the solitary plasmacytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cell neoplasms are classically categorized into four groups as: multiple myeloma (MM, plasma-cell leukemias, solitary plasmacytomas (SP of the bone (SPB, and extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP. These tumors may be described as localized or diffuse in presentation. Localized plasma-cell neoplasms are rare, and include SP of the skeletal system, accounting for 2-5% of all plasma-cell neoplasms, and EMP of soft tissue, accounting for approximately 3% of all such neoplasms. SP is defined as a solitary mass of neoplastic plasma cells either in the bone marrow or in various soft tissue sites. There appears to be a continuum in which SP often progresses to MM. The main treatment modality for SP is radiation therapy (RT. However, there are no conclusive data in the literature on the optimal RT dose for SP. This review describes the interrelationship of plasma-cell neoplasms, and attempts to determine the minimal RT dose required to obtain local control.

  2. Radiation therapy for oral verrucous carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Niino, Keiji; Yoshino, Masanari; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Yoshizawa, Nobuo; Takahashi, Koji [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Itagaki, Takatomo; Watarai, Jiro

    2000-12-01

    In order to examine the usefulness of radiotherapy for verrucous carcinoma, eight cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiation therapy were reviewed. Definitive radiotherapy was performed in six patients and preoperative radiotherapy was performed in two patients. Definitive radiotherapy doses ranged from 20 to 60 Gy (median: 47.5 Gy) and preoperative radiotherapy doses were 25 Gy, delivered with a daily fraction size of 2.5 Gy in principle. All cases that received definitive irradiation became CR, but two of these patients underwent local recurrence; one was a patient irradiated with only 20 Gy and the other case underwent local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma. In the cases irradiated with 45 Gy or more, 4 of 5 cases were locally controlled. No patient underwent regional lymph node metastases. One of two patients that received preoperative radiotherapy had local recurrence in spit of a negative surgical margin. Because the radiosensitivity of verrucous carcinoma was often good and anaplastic transformation was not common, radiotherapy can become a radical treatment for verrucous carcinoma. (author)

  3. Insufficiency fractures following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Matsuki, Hirokazu; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Takashi; Shiba, Atsushi; Kishida, Yoshiomi; Iwamoto, Seiji; Nishitani, Hiromu [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, clinical and radiological findings of insufficiency fractures (IF) of the female pelvis following radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the radiation oncology records of 108 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent external beam radiation therapy of the whole pelvis. All patients underwent conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan every 6 months in follow-up after radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide bone scan were added when the patients complained of pelvic pain. Thirteen of 108 patients (12%) developed IF in the irradiated field with a median interval of 6 months (range 3-51) from the completion of external beam radiation therapy. All patients who developed IF were postmenopausal women. Age of the patients who developed IF was significantly higher than that of the other patients. The parts of IF were sacroiliac joints, pubis, sacral body and 5th lumbar vertebra and six of 14 patients had multiple lesions. Treatment with rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs lead to symptomatic relief in all patients, although symptoms lasted from 3 to 20 months. Radiation-induced pelvic IF following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies were frequently observed in the post-menopausal patients within 1 year after external beam radiation therapy. Symmetrical fractures of the bilateral sacroiliac joint and pubis were the characteristic pattern of pelvic IF. All patients healed with conservative treatment, and nobody became non-ambulant. (author)

  4. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  5. Radiative processes for Rindler and accelerating observers and the stress-tensor detector

    CERN Document Server

    De Paola, R

    1996-01-01

    We consider a monopole detector interacting with a massive scalar field. The radiative processes are discussed from the accelerated frame point of view. After this, we obtain the Minkowski vacuum stress tensor measured by the accelerated observer using a non-gravitational stress tensor detector as discussed by Ford and Roman (PRD 48, 776 (1993)). Finally, we analyse radiative processes of the monopole detector travelling in a world line that is inertial in the infinite past and has a constant proper acceleration in the infinite future.

  6. A system for monitoring the radiation effects of a proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorkin, V. M., E-mail: skorkin@inr.ru; Belyanski, K. L.; Skorkin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The system for real-time monitoring of radioactivity of a high-current proton linear accelerator detects secondary neutron emission from proton beam losses in transport channels and measures the activity of radionuclides in gas and aerosol emissions and the radiation background in the environment affected by a linear accelerator. The data provided by gamma, beta, and neutron detectors are transferred over a computer network to the central server. The system allows one to monitor proton beam losses, the activity of gas and aerosol emissions, and the radiation emission level of a linear accelerator in operation.

  7. Operation And Plans On The Accelerator Complex In Kurchatov Center Of Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Korchuganov, V; Kovalchuk, M; Krylov, Yu; Kvardakov, V A; Moseiko, L; Moseiko, N; Novikov, V; Odintsov, D; Rezvov, V; Ushkov, V; Valentinov, A; Vernov, A; Yudin, L; Yupinov, Yu; Zheludeva, S I

    2004-01-01

    Kurchatov Synchrotron Radiation Source began the work as a first dedicated synchrotron radiation facility in Russia in 1999. The accelerator complex includes 80 MeV linac accelerator as an injector and two storage rings: 450 MeV SIBERIA-1 and 2.5 GeV SIBERIA-2, which are used for the experiments in the range of SR from VUV up to hard X-ray. Large progress was achieved in increasing SIBERIA-2 stored current during last year. The SR dose is rising fast and the lifetime is also grown. The report describes the current work and the plans on the accelerator facilities development.

  8. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  9. Radiation protection system installation for the accelerator production of tritium/low energy demonstration accelerator project (APT/LEDA)

    CERN Document Server

    Wilmarth, J E; Tomei, T L

    2000-01-01

    The APT/LEDA personnel radiation protection system installation was accomplished using a flexible, modular proven system which satisfied regulatory orders, project design criteria, operational modes, and facility requirements. The goal of providing exclusion and safe access of personnel to areas where prompt radiation in the LEDA facility is produced was achieved with the installation of a DOE-approved Personnel Access Control System (PACS). To satisfy the facility configuration design, the PACS, a major component of the overall radiation safety system, conveniently provided five independent areas of personnel access control. Because of its flexibility and adaptability the Los-Alamos Neutron- Science-Center-(LANSCE)-designed Radiation Security System (RSS) was efficiently configured to provide the desired operational modes and satisfy the APT/LEDA project design criteria. The Backbone Beam Enable (BBE) system based on the LANSCE RSS provided the accelerator beam control functions with redundant, hardwired, ta...

  10. Clinical applications of advanced rotational radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalichowski, Adrian

    Purpose: With a fast adoption of emerging technologies, it is critical to fully test and understand its limits and capabilities. In this work we investigate new graphic processing unit (GPU) based treatment planning algorithm and its applications in helical tomotherapy dose delivery. We explore the limits of the system by applying it to challenging clinical cases of total marrow irradiation (TMI) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We also analyze the feasibility of alternative fractionation schemes for total body irradiation (TBI) and TMI based on reported historical data on lung dose and interstitial pneumonitis (IP) incidence rates. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to create TMI plans using the new GPU based treatment planning system and the existing CPU cluster based system. Optimization parameters were selected based on clinically used values for field width, modulation factor and pitch. Treatment plans were also created on Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for dose delivery on IX treatment unit. A retrospective review was performed of 42 publications that reported IP rates along with lung dose, fractionation regimen, dose rate and chemotherapy. The analysis consisted of nearly thirty two hundred patients and 34 unique radiation regimens. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine parameters associated with IP and establish does response function. Results: The results showed very good dosimetric agreement between the GPU and CPU calculated plans. The results from SBRT study show that GPU planning system can maintain 90% target coverage while meeting all the constraints of RTOG 0631 protocol. Beam on time for Tomotherapy and flattening filter free RapidArc was much faster than for Vero or Cyberknife. Retrospective data analysis showed that lung dose and Cyclophosphomide (Cy) are both predictors of IP in TBI/TMI treatments. The

  11. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  12. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  13. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H. Omar, E-mail: hwooten@radonc.wustl.edu; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  14. Radiation stability of iron nanoparticles irradiated with accelerated iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V., E-mail: uglov@bsu.by [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Remnev, G.E., E-mail: remnev06@mail.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Kvasov, N.T.; Safronov, I.V.; Shymanski, V.I. [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic processes in nanoparticles after ion irradiation were studied. • The mechanism of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was showed. • The criteria of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was proposed. - Abstract: In the present work the dynamic processes occurring in a nanoscale iron particle exposed to irradiation with iron ions of different energies are studied in detailed. It is shown that the elastic and thermoelastic crystal lattice responses to irradiation form force factors affecting the evolution of defect-impurity system, which, in turn, leads to a decrease in the number of structural defects. Quantitative estimations of the spatial distribution of defects resulting in their migration to the surface were obtained. Such self-organization of nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation can be used as a basis for the production of radiation-resistant nanostructured materials capable of sustaining a long-term radiation influence.

  15. Optimizing patient positioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy in hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siglin, Joshua; Champ, Colin E; Vakhnenko, Yelena; Witek, Matthew E; Peng, Cheng; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Harrison, Amy S; Shi, Wenyin

    2014-01-01

    Sparing the hippocampus during whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) offers potential neurocognitive benefits. However, previously reported intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans use multiple noncoplanar beams for treatment delivery. An optimized coplanar IMRT template for hippocampal-sparing WBRT would assist in clinical workflow and minimize resource utilization. In this study, we sought to determine the optimal patient position to facilitate coplanar treatment planning and delivery of hippocampal-sparing WBRT using IMRT. A variable angle, inclined board was utilized for patient positioning. An anthropomorphic phantom underwent computed tomography simulation at various head angles. The IMRT goals were designed to achieve target coverage of the brain while maintaining hippocampal dose-volume constraints designed to conform to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0933 protocol. Optimal head angle was then verified using data from 8 patients comparing coplanar and noncoplanar WBRT IMRT plans. Hippocampal, hippocampal avoidance region, and whole brain mean volumes were 1.1 cm(3), 12.5 cm(3), and 1185.1 cm(3), respectively. The hippocampal avoidance region occupied 1.1% of the whole brain planning volume. For the 30-degree head angle, a 7-field coplanar IMRT plan was generated, sparing the hippocampus to a maximum dose of 14.7 Gy; D100% of the hippocampus was 7.4 Gy and mean hippocampal dose was 9.3 Gy. In comparison, for flat head positioning the hippocampal Dmax was 22.9 Gy with a D100% of 9.2 Gy and mean dose of 11.7 Gy. Target coverage and dose homogeneity was comparable with previously published noncoplanar IMRT plans. Compared with conventional supine positioning, an inclined head board at 30 degrees optimizes coplanar whole brain IMRT treatment planning. Clinically acceptable hippocampal-sparing WBRT dosimetry can be obtained using a simplified coplanar plan at a 30-degree head angle, thus obviating the need for complex and time consuming noncoplanar

  16. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Oneschuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative interactions. This involves understanding the role and effect on metabolizing enzymes. This review will highlight the present evidence for both the beneficial and negative consequences of the use of natural health products during chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  17. Particle beam radiation therapy:re-introducing the future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Particle radiation therapy is an exciting area of radiotherapy basic and clinical researches. The majority of particle radiotherapy work is being done with proton beams having essential y the same radiobiologic properties as conventional photon/electron radiation but al owing a much more precise control of the radiation dose distribution. However, other charged particles are also playing an increasing role, like neutrons. In this review article we wil summarize the data related to basic and clinical experiences related to particle beam radiation therapy.

  18. The Impact of the Myeloid Response to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gough

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is showing potential as a partner for immunotherapies in preclinical cancer models and early clinical studies. As has been discussed elsewhere, radiation provides debulking, antigen and adjuvant release, and inflammatory targeting of effector cells to the treatment site, thereby assisting multiple critical checkpoints in antitumor adaptive immunity. Adaptive immunity is terminated by inflammatory resolution, an active process which ensures that inflammatory damage is repaired and tissue function is restored. We discuss how radiation therapy similarly triggers inflammation followed by repair, the consequences to adaptive immune responses in the treatment site, and how the myeloid response to radiation may impact immunotherapies designed to improve control of residual cancer cells.

  19. Experimental considerations on the determination of radiation fields in an electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondragon C, L.; Ramirez J, F. J.; Garcia H, J. M.; Torres B, M. A. [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Electronicos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Lopez C, R.; Pena E, R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the different radiation fields in an electron accelerator requires the use of selected radiation detectors, in this work we describe the experimental considerations on the determination of the intensity of electrons and X-rays generated by Bremsstrahlung in an experimental electron accelerator covering the energy range from 80 keV to 485 keV. A lithium- drifted silicon detector, a high-purity germanium detector, a scintillation detector and a Pin diode were used in the experiments. Spectroscopic measurements allowed us to verify the terminal voltage of the accelerator. The Pin photodiode can measure the intensity of X-rays produced, with this information, we could determine its relationship with both the electron beam current and the accelerating voltage of the accelerator. (Author)

  20. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capdessus Remi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  1. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiation, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Rice, Thomas W; Rybicki, Lisa A; Greskovich, John F; Ciezki, Jay P; Carroll, Marjorie A; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2002-05-01

    The low surgical cure rate in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer has prompted an exploration of multimodality treatment strategies. Mature results are presented from a phase II trial of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for these patients. Between 1994 and 1997, 45 patients with surgically demonstrated stage III non-small cell lung cancer underwent induction treatment with a 96 h continuous cisplatin infusion (20 mg/m(2) per day) and a 24 h infusion of paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)) given concurrently with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (1.5 Gy twice daily) to a total dose of 30 Gy. Induction was completed in ten treatment (12 total) days. Surgical resection was scheduled 4 weeks later with a second identical course of chemoradiotherapy given 4-6 weeks post-operatively, to a total radiation dose of 60-63 Gy. Thirty-five patients had stage III(A) disease and ten had stage III(B) disease (eight with N(3) tumors). Induction toxicity included nausea in 89%, dysphagia in 89%, and neutropenia tolerable despite significant myelosuppression. Locoregional control is excellent and survival is better than historical expectations. Patients downstaged to mediastinal node negativity have a prognosis similar to those with de novo stage I(B) and II disease. Distant metastases are the major cause of treatment failure.

  2. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vashek; /Duke U.; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a

  3. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  4. Debate: Pro intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer; Debat: pour la radiotherapie peroperatoire dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gutowski, M.; Rouanet, P.; Saint-Aubert, B. [Departement de chirurgie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The use of intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer patients started about 20 years ago. Several retrospective and prospective studies have been published. Intraoperative radiation therapy was initially given as a boost to the tumour bed, followed by whole-breast irradiation. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique, with local control rates and cosmetic results similar to those obtained with standard treatments. Accelerated partial breast irradiation yields local recurrence rates as low as those observed after whole-breast irradiation. Intraoperative radiation therapy as a single irradiation modality with a unique dose has been investigated in recent prospective studies showing satisfactory local results. Intraoperative radiation therapy can be proposed either as a boost or as a unique treatment in selected cases (tumour size, nodal and hormonal status, patient's age). Intraoperative radiation therapy can be delivered by orthovoltage (50 kV) X-rays from mobile generators, or by electrons from linear accelerators, mobile or fixed, dedicated or not to intraoperative radiation therapy. (authors)

  5. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  6. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@imnc.in2p3.fr [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France); Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N. [Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay, Campus Universitaire, Bât. 101, Orsay 91898 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  7. Shock acceleration and gamma radiation in the intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S

    2004-01-01

    Particle acceleration is expected to take place at shocks that form during the process of large scale structure formation. Electrons accelerated at such shocks can upscatter a small fraction of the photons in the cosmic microwave background up to the gamma ray band. Here we make predictions about the detectability of the $\\gamma$--ray emission from forming clusters of galaxies with future GeV and TeV gamma ray telescopes. We also estimate the contribution of these sources to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background.

  8. Shock acceleration and gamma radiation in the intracluster medium

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Particle acceleration is expected to take place at shocks that form during the process of large scale structure formation. Electrons accelerated at such shocks can upscatter a small fraction of the photons in the cosmic microwave background up to the gamma ray band. Here we make predictions about the detectability of the $\\gamma$--ray emission from forming clusters of galaxies with future GeV and TeV gamma ray telescopes. We also estimate the contribution of these sources to the extragalactic...

  9. Radiation therapy in Kimura's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, J.; Arimizu, N.; Miyoshi, T.; Ogata, H.; Miura, K. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-01-01

    Kimura's disease is a rare disorder which predominantly involves the head and neck region and causes eosinophilia in peripheral blood. It often responds well to corticosteroid therapy but some patients can be resistant; in these patients symptomatic radiation therapy can be of value. We reviewed 10 patients with Kimura's disease who received radiation therapy from 1975 through 1981 in the Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital. Nineteen tumors were irradiated and 15 of them locally controlled. In 5 patients, steroid therapy could be withdrawn. For local control, 25 to 30 Gy seemed to be adequate. (orig.).

  10. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatar Vento, V., E-mail: Vladimir.ThatarVento@gmail.com [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bergueiro, J.; Cartelli, D. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, M. Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, M. Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  11. Controlled study of CCNU and radiation therapy in malignant astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, T J; Bisel, H F; Childs, D S; Layton, D D; Rhoton, A L; Taylor, W F

    1976-02-01

    The authors report 63 patients with biopsy-proved malignant (Grades 3 and 4) astrocytomas who were randomly placed in one of three treatment schedules within 2 weeks of surgery. One group (22 patients) received radiation therapy alone; the second group (22 patients) received 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) orally at intervals of 8 weeks; and the third group (19 patients) received combined radiation and drug therapy. Patients who received radiation therapy, with or without the drug, had a significantly longer survival than did those who received the drug alone. There was no difference in survival between the two groups who received radiation. The nitrosourea derivative CCNU does not seem to be an effective agent in the therapy of primary malignant brain tumors.

  12. Advances in Radiation Therapy in Pediatric Neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Ranjit S; Wolden, Suzanne L

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains a highly effective therapy for many pediatric central nervous system tumors. With more children achieving long-term survival after treatment for brain tumors, late-effects of radiation have become an important concern. In response to this problem, treatment protocols for a variety of pediatric central nervous system tumors have evolved to reduce radiation fields and doses when possible. Recent advances in radiation technology such as image guidance and proton therapy have led to a new era of precision treatment with significantly less exposure to healthy tissues. These developments along with the promise of molecular classification of tumors and targeted therapies point to an optimistic future for pediatric neuro-oncology.

  13. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma; Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Holguin, P.G.; Ferreira, A.M.R., E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.co [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canary, P.C.; Reisner, M. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, A.N.; Souza, H.J.M. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T{sub 1}, four as T{sub 2}, two as T{sub 3}, and two as T{sub 4}. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  14. Superficial Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Sean; Minni, John; Herold, David

    2015-12-01

    Superficial radiation therapy has become more widely available to dermatologists. With the advent of more portable machines, it has become more convenient for dermatology practices to employ in an office-based setting. The goal of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the role of superficial radiation therapy in dermatology practice and to review the current literature surrounding its use in the treatment of both basal and squamous cell carcinomas.

  15. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  16. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduc

  17. 160 MeV laser-accelerated protons from CH2 nano-targets for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Hegelich, B M; Albright, B J; Cheung, M; Dromey, B; Gautier, D C; Hamilton, C; Letzring, S; Munchhausen, R; Palaniyappan, S; Shah, R; Wu, H -C; Yin, L; Fernández, J C

    2013-01-01

    Proton (and ion) cancer therapy has proven to be an extremely effective even supe-rior method of treatment for some tumors 1-4. A major problem, however, lies in the cost of the particle accelerator facilities; high procurement costs severely limit the availability of ion radiation therapy, with only ~26 centers worldwide. Moreover, high operating costs often prevent economic operation without state subsidies and have led to a shutdown of existing facilities 5,6. Laser-accelerated proton and ion beams have long been thought of as a way out of this dilemma, with the potential to provide the required ion beams at lower cost and smaller facility footprint 7-14. The biggest challenge has been the achievement of sufficient particle energy for therapy, in the 150-250 MeV range for protons 15,16. For the last decade, the maximum exper-imentally observed energy of laser-accelerated protons has remained at ~60 MeV 17. Here we the experimental demonstration of laser-accelerated protons to energies exceeding 150 MeV, re...

  18. Accelerated prompt gamma estimation for clinical proton therapy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Brent F. B.; Létang, J. M.; Testa, É.; Sarrut, D.

    2016-11-01

    There is interest in the particle therapy community in using prompt gammas (PGs), a natural byproduct of particle treatment, for range verification and eventually dose control. However, PG production is a rare process and therefore estimation of PGs exiting a patient during a proton treatment plan executed by a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation converges slowly. Recently, different approaches to accelerating the estimation of PG yield have been presented. Sterpin et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 4915-46) described a fast analytic method, which is still sensitive to heterogeneities. El Kanawati et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8067-86) described a variance reduction method (pgTLE) that accelerates the PG estimation by precomputing PG production probabilities as a function of energy and target materials, but has as a drawback that the proposed method is limited to analytical phantoms. We present a two-stage variance reduction method, named voxelized pgTLE (vpgTLE), that extends pgTLE to voxelized volumes. As a preliminary step, PG production probabilities are precomputed once and stored in a database. In stage 1, we simulate the interactions between the treatment plan and the patient CT with low statistic MC to obtain the spatial and spectral distribution of the PGs. As primary particles are propagated throughout the patient CT, the PG yields are computed in each voxel from the initial database, as a function of the current energy of the primary, the material in the voxel and the step length. The result is a voxelized image of PG yield, normalized to a single primary. The second stage uses this intermediate PG image as a source to generate and propagate the number of PGs throughout the rest of the scene geometry, e.g. into a detection device, corresponding to the number of primaries desired. We achieved a gain of around 103 for both a geometrical heterogeneous phantom and a complete patient CT treatment plan with respect to analog MC, at a convergence level of 2% relative

  19. Study on the radiation problem caused by electron beam loss in accelerator tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Quan-Feng; GUO Bing-Qi; ZHANG Jie-Xi; CHEN Huai-Bi

    2008-01-01

    The beam dynamic code PARMELA was used to simulate the transportation process of accelerating electrons in S-band SW linacs with different energies of 2.5, 6 and 20 MeV. The results indicated that in the ideal condition, the percentage of electron beam loss was 50% in accelerator tubes. Also we calculated the spectrum, the location and angular distribution of the lost electrons. Calculation performed by Monte Carlo code MCNP demonstrated that the radiation distribution of lost electrons was nearly uniform along the tube axis, the angular distributions of the radiation dose rates of the three tubes were similar, and the highest leaking dose was at the angle of 160° with respect to the axis. The lower the energy of the accelerator, the higher the radiation relative leakage. For the 2.5 MeV accelerator, the maximum dose rate reached 5% of the main dose and the one on the head of the electron gun was 1%, both of which did not meet the eligible protection requirement for accelerators. We adopted different shielding designs for different accelerators. The simulated result showed that the shielded radiation leaking dose rates fulfilled the requirement.

  20. Radiation protection in large linear accelerators; Seguranca radiologica de aceleradores lineares de grande porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, Jose de Jesus Rivero, E-mail: rivero@con.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Sousa, Fernando Nuno Carneiro de, E-mail: fernandonunosousa@gmail.com [Aceletron Irradiacao lndustrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The electron linear accelerators can be used in industrial applications that require powerful sources of ionizing radiation. They have the important characteristic of not representing a radiation hazard when the accelerators remain electrically disconnected. With the plant in operation, a high reliability defense in depth reduces the risk of radiological accidents to extremely small levels. It is practically impossible that a person could enter into the radiation bunker with the accelerators connected. Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, located in Rio de Janeiro, offers services of irradiation by means of two powerful electron linear accelerators, with 15 kW power and 10 MeV electron energy. Despite the high level of existing radiation safety, a simplified risk study is underway to identify possible sequences of radiological accidents. The study is based on the combined application of the event and fault trees techniques. Preliminary results confirm that there is a very small risk of entering into the irradiation bunker with the accelerators in operation, but the risk of an operator entering into the bunker during a process interruption and remaining there without notice after the accelerators were restarted may be considerably larger. Based on these results the Company is considering alternatives to reduce the likelihood of human error of this type that could lead to a radiological accident. The paper describes the defense in depth of the irradiation process in Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, as well as the models and preliminary results of the ongoing risk analysis, including the additional safety measures which are being evaluated. (author)

  1. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  2. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Sharon [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); Back, Michael [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun [National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore); Lu, Jaide Jay, E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore)

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  3. Investigation of advanced propulsion technologies: The RAM accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    The two principal areas of advanced propulsion investigated are the ram accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater. The concept of the ram accelerator is presented as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerothermodynamics research. The ram accelerator is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled in a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Combustion on and behind the projectile generates thrust which accelerates it to very high velocities. The acceleration can be tailored for the 'soft launch' of instrumented models. The distinctive reacting flow phenomena that have been observed in the ram accelerator are relevant to the aerothermodynamic processes in airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems and are useful for validating sophisticated CFD codes. The recently demonstrated scalability of the device and the ability to control the rate of acceleration offer unique opportunities for the use of the ram accelerator as a large-scale hypersonic ground test facility. The flowing gas radiation receiver is a novel concept for using solar energy to heat a working fluid for space power or propulsion. Focused solar radiation is absorbed directly in a working gas, rather than by heat transfer through a solid surface. Previous theoretical analysis had demonstrated that radiation trapping reduces energy loss compared to that of blackbody receivers, and enables higher efficiencies and higher peak temperatures. An experiment was carried out to measure the temperature profile of an infrared-active gas and demonstrate the effect of radiation trapping. The success of this effort validates analytical models of heat transfer in this receiver, and confirms the potential of this approach for achieving high efficiency space power and propulsion.

  4. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  5. Interactive Visual Intervention Planning: Interactive Visualization for Intervention Planning in Particle Accelerator Environments with Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Intervention planning is crucial for maintenance operations in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation, during which the radiation dose contracted by maintenance workers should be reduced to a minimum. In this context, we discuss the visualization aspects of a new software tool, which integrates interactive exploration of a scene depicting an accelerator facility augmented with residual radiation level simulations, with the visualization of intervention data such as the followed trajectory and maintenance tasks. The visualization of each of these aspects has its effect on the final predicted contracted radiation dose. In this context, we explore the possible benefits of a user study, with the goal of enhancing the visual conditions in which the intervention planner using the software tool is minimizing the radiation dose.

  6. Therapy radiation apparatus for veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parris, D.M.

    1987-03-03

    A radiation device is described for use in veterinary medicine, for treating exterior and interior portions of animal bodies, comprising: (a) power supply means providing selected voltages; (b) high frequency oscillator means; (c) frequency divider means responsive to the oscillator means, and adapted to control switch means for modulating a voltage supply for at least one non-laser broad band infrared radiation diode providing an expanding beam of radiation; and (d) means for applying at least one one-laser broad band infrared radiation diode to a dermal surface of an animal.

  7. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements...

  8. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  9. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  10. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    was used instead. This code makes the assumption that the background ion and electron behaviour can be approximated with a fluid model whilst...electron behaviour occurring from this aperture was also published in High Power Laser Science and Engineering [4]. A significant breakthrough was also...acceleration to transparency. This was published in Physics of Plasmas [12]. Through one- dimensional modelling of the interaction, it was also

  11. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  12. Three-Phase Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Undergoing Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: Dosimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shan; Liu, Xu; Lu, Heming; Huang, Huixian; Shu, Liuyang; Jiang, Hailan; Cheng, Jinjian; Peng, Luxing; Pang, Qiang; Gu, Junzhao; Qin, Jian; Lu, Zhiping; Mo, Ying; Wu, Danling; Wei, Yinglin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy may experience significant anatomic changes throughout the entire treatment course, and adaptive radiation therapy may be necessary to maintain optimal dose delivered both to the targets and to the critical structures. The timing of adaptive radiation therapy, however, is largely unknown. This study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a 3-phase adaptive radiation therapy technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Twenty patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy were recruited prospectively. After fractions 5 and 15, each patient had repeat computed tomography scans, and adaptive replans with recontouring the targets and organs at risk on the new computed tomography images were generated and used for subsequent treatment (replan 1 and replan 2). Two hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans (plan 1 and plan 2) were generated by superimposing the initial plan (plan 0) to each repeated new computed tomography image, reflecting the actual dose delivered to the targets and organs at risk if no changes were made to the original plan. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the adaptive replans (adaptive radiation therapy plans: plan 0 + replan 1 + replan 2) and their corresponding nonadaptive radiation therapy plans (plan 0 + plan 1 + plan 2). Comparing with the nonadaptive radiation therapy plans, the adaptive radiation therapy plans resulted in a significant improvement in conformity index for planning target volumes for primary disease, involved lymph node, high-risk clinical target volume, and low-risk clinical target volume (PTVnx, PTVnd, PTV1, and PTV2, respectively). Median V95 for PTVnx; D95, D99, V100, V95, and V93 for PTVnd; D99 and V100 for PTV1; and D95, D99, V100, V95, and V93 for PTV2 were increased significantly. There were significant dose-volume reductions, including maximum doses to the brainstem and

  13. A New Type of Accelerator for Charged Particle Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, Rob

    2013-01-01

    acceleration of protons and light ions for the treatment of certain cancers. They have unique features as they combine techniques from the existing types of accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons, and hence look to have advantages over both for this application. However, these unique features meant that it was necessary to build one of these accelerators to show that it works and to undertake a detailed conceptual design of a medical machine. Both of these have now been done. This paper will describe the concepts of this type of accelerator, show results from the proof-of-principle machine (EMMA) and described the medical machine (PAMELA).

  14. Electromagnetic Radiation : Variational Methods, Waveguides and Accelerators Including seminal papers of Julian Schwinger

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A

    2006-01-01

    This is a graduate level textbook on the theory of electromagnetic radiation and its application to waveguides, transmission lines, accelerator physics and synchrotron radiation. It has grown out of lectures and manuscripts by Julian Schwinger prepared during the war at MIT's Radiation Laboratory, updated with material developed by Schwinger at UCLA in the 1970s and 1980s, and by Milton at the University of Oklahoma since 1994. The book includes a great number of straightforward and challenging exercises and problems. It is addressed to students in physics, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics seeking a thorough introduction to electromagnetism with emphasis on radiation theory and its applications.

  15. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harmsen, William [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Blanchard, Miran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goetz, Matthew [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jakub, James [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stauder, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yan, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia, E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  16. Radiation therapy: model standards for determination of need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, L.G.; Devins, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    Contents: Health planning process; Health care requirements (model for projecting need for megavoltage radiation therapy); Operational objectives (manpower, megavoltage therapy and treatment planning equipment, support services, management and evaluation of patient care, organization and administration); Compliance with other standards imposed by law; Financial feasibility and capability; Reasonableness of expenditures and costs; Relative merit; Environmental impact.

  17. [Ozone therapy for radiation reactions and skin lesions after neutron therapy in patients with malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V V; Gribova, O V; Musabaeva, L I; Startseva, Zh A; Simonov, K A; Aleinik, A N; Lisin, V A

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the problem of radiation complications from normal tissues in patients after therapy with fast neutrons of 6.3 MeV. The methods of treatment using ozone technologies in patients with radiation reactions and skin lesions on the areas of irradiation after neutron and neutron-photon therapy have been worked out. Ozone therapy showed its harmlessness and increased efficiency of complex treatment of these patients.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  19. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  20. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, D L; Donahue, R J; Ludewigt, B A; Vujic, J

    1998-09-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF3, 7LiF, and D2O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF3 or 7LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to approximately 50% higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a 7LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq.

  1. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  2. Music therapy CD creation for initial pediatric radiation therapy: a mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Philippa; O'Callaghan, Clare; Wheeler, Greg; Grocke, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was used to investigate the effects of a music therapy CD (MTCD) creation intervention on pediatric oncology patients' distress and coping during their first radiation therapy treatment. The music therapy method involved children creating a music CD using interactive computer-based music software, which was "remixed" by the music therapist-researcher to extend the musical material. Eleven pediatric radiation therapy outpatients aged 6 to 13 years were randomly assigned to either an experimental group, in which they could create a music CD prior to their initial treatment to listen to during radiation therapy, or to a standard care group. Quantitative and qualitative analyses generated multiple perceptions from the pediatric patients, parents, radiation therapy staff, and music therapist-researcher. Ratings of distress during initial radiation therapy treatment were low for all children. The comparison between the two groups found that 67% of the children in the standard care group used social withdrawal as a coping strategy, compared to 0% of the children in the music therapy group; this trend approached significance (p = 0.076). MTCD creation was a fun, engaging, and developmentally appropriate intervention for pediatric patients, which offered a positive experience and aided their use of effective coping strategies to meet the demands of their initial radiation therapy treatment.

  3. [The application of total quality management (TQM) in quality management of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui-yao; Fu, Shen; Li, Bin

    2009-03-01

    The strategies and methods of the total quality management (TQM) need to applied in quality management of radiation therapy. We should improve the level of quality control and quality assurance in radiation therapy. By establishing quality control system in radiation therapy, standardization of radiation therapy workflow, strengthening quality control of devices and physical technique and paying attention to safety protection and staff training.

  4. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  5. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radioactive isotope therapy, and materials and the services of technicians administering the treatment. ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and...

  6. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  7. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Rescia, Sergio; Hu, Xueye; Xu, Hao; Mead, Joseph; Lanni, Francesco; Minelli, Marena

    2014-01-01

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detector front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on radiation effects tests conducted on 17 commercially available analog to digital converters and extensive single event effect measurements on specific twelve and fourteen bit ADCs that presented high tolerance to ionizing d...

  8. Radiative damping and electron beam dynamics in plasma-based accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Schroeder, C B; Shadwick, B A; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2006-08-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on electron beam dynamics are studied in the context of plasma-based accelerators. Electrons accelerated in a plasma channel undergo transverse betatron oscillations due to strong focusing forces. These oscillations lead to emission by the electrons of synchrotron radiation, with a corresponding energy loss that affects the beam properties. An analytical model for the single particle orbits and beam moments including the classical radiation reaction force is derived and compared to the results of a particle transport code. Since the betatron amplitude depends on the initial transverse position of the electron, the resulting radiation can increase the relative energy spread of the beam to significant levels (e.g., several percent). This effect can be diminished by matching the beam into the channel, which could require micron sized beam radii for typical values of the beam emittance and plasma density.

  9. Radiative damping and electron beam dynamics in plasma-based accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2006-08-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on electron beam dynamics are studied in the context of plasma-based accelerators. Electrons accelerated in a plasma channel undergo transverse betatron oscillations due to strong focusing forces. These oscillations lead to emission by the electrons of synchrotron radiation, with a corresponding energy loss that affects the beam properties. An analytical model for the single particle orbits and beam moments including the classical radiation reaction force is derived and compared to the results of a particle transport code. Since the betatron amplitude depends on the initial transverse position of the electron, the resulting radiation can increase the relative energy spread of the beam to significant levels (e.g., several percent). This effect can be diminished by matching the beam into the channel, which could require micron sized beam radii for typical values of the beam emittance and plasma density.

  10. Enhanced radiation pressure-assisted acceleration by temporally tuned counter-propagating pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurand, B., E-mail: bastian.aurand@fysik.lth.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kuschel, S.; Jäckel, O.; Rödel, C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Zhao, H.Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, 73000 Lanzhou (China); Herzer, S. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Paz, A.E.; Bierbach, J. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Elkin, B. [Fraunhofer Institut für Grenzflächen-und Bioverfahrenstechnik, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Karmakar, A. [Leibniz-Supercomputing Center, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gibbon, P. [ExtreMe Matter Institut, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Kaluza, M.C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-03-11

    Within the last decade, laser-ion acceleration has become a field of broad interest. The possibility to generate short proton- or heavy ion bunches with an energy of a few tens of MeV by table-top laser systems could open new opportunities for medical or technical applications. Nevertheless, today's laser-acceleration schemes lead mainly to a temperature-like energy distribution of the accelerated ions, a big disadvantage compared to mono-energetic beams from conventional accelerators. Recent results [1] of laser-ion acceleration using radiation-pressure appear promising to overcome this drawback. In this paper, we demonstrate the influence of a second counter-propagating laser pulse interacting with a nm-thick target, creating a well defined pre-plasma.

  11. Targeted Alpha Therapy: The US DOE Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an emerging discipline of cancer therapy that exploits the biochemical differences between normal cells and cancer cells to selectively deliver a lethal dose of radiation to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells relatively unperturbed. A broad overview of targeted alpha therapy including isotope production methods, and associated isotope production facility needs, will be provided. A more general overview of the US Department of Energy Isotope Program's Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy will also be presented focusing on the accelerator-production of 225Ac and final product isolation methodologies for medical applications.

  12. The use of heavy charged particles in the radiation therapy of tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, G

    1995-01-01

    Beams of heavy charged particles like carbon or oxygen ions represent the ultimate tool of external radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors.Small range and lateral scattering and the increase of the energy deposition with penetration depth are the physical basis for a more efficient tumor targeting. High biological efficiency in the tumor is the perequisite for a successful treatment of tumors radioresistant to sparsely ionizing radiation.The possibility to perform target-conform irradiation and to control the achieved actual distribution using PET techniques guarantees that biological highly efficient stopping particles can be restricted to the tumor volume only.Although the physical and radiobiological properties of ion beams are very favorable for therapy, the necessity to produce these particles in an accelerator has restricted the general application of heavy ions up to now.Presently, the heavy ion accelerator SIS at GSI is the only source of heavy ion beams sufficient in enrgy and intensity for therapy in Eu...

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  14. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  15. Reply to the comment on "Exact Expression for Radiation of an Accelerated Charge in Classical Electrodynamics"

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Young-Sea

    2013-01-01

    Flaws and ambiguities are pointed out upon examining the comment attempting to solve a problem as raised recently --- the currently accepted formulation of electromagnetic radiation of an accelerated charge violates the principle of conservation of energy. This problem is not solved by the comment, due to a misunderstanding in the meaning of the total radiated power crossing a sphere. An experiment is suggested to determine whether on not the currently accepted formulation is valid.

  16. Charged particle diffusion and acceleration in Saturn's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to determine, from the observed intensity profiles for protons and electrons in the region of L smaller than 4, whether population of Saturn's innermost trapped radiation zones from an external source is possible. It is found that if diffusion proceeds in an episodic rather than a steady-state manner (long periods of quiescence interrupted by brief periods of rapid diffusion), the basic features of the observed phase space density profiles are qualitatively reproduced for both the trapped protons and electrons.

  17. Emerging Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials for Cancer Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guosheng; Cheng, Liang; Chao, Yu; Yang, Kai; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) including external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and internal radioisotope therapy (RIT) has been widely used for clinical cancer treatment. However, owing to the low radiation absorption of tumors, high doses of ionizing radiations are often needed during RT, leading to severe damages to normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Meanwhile, the RT efficacies are limited by different mechanisms, among which the tumor hypoxia-associated radiation resistance is a well-known one, as there exists hypoxia inside most solid tumors while oxygen is essential to enhance radiation-induced DNA damages. With the development in nanotechnology, there have been great interests in using nanomedicine strategies to enhance radiation responses of tumors. Nanomaterials containing high-Z elements to absorb radiation rays (e.g. X-ray) can act as radio-sensitizers to deposit radiation energy within tumors and promote treatment efficacy. Nanoscale carriers are able to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes into tumors for internal RIT, or chemotherapeutic drugs for synergistically combined chemo-radiotherapy. As uncovered in recent studies, the tumor microenvironment could be modulated by various nanomedicine approaches to overcome hypoxia-associated radiation resistance. Herein, the authors will summarize the applications of nanomedicine for RT cancer treatment, and pay particular attention to the latest development of 'advanced materials' for enhanced cancer RT. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Characteristic, parametric, and diffracted transition X-ray radiation for observation of accelerated particle beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovska, I.; Chehab, R.; Artru, X.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The applicability of X-ray radiation for the observation of accelerated particle beam profiles is studied. Three types of quasi-monochromatic X-ray radiation excited by the particles in crystals are considered: characteristic X-ray radiation, parametric X-ray radiation, diffracted transition X-ray radiation. Radiation is collected at the right angle to the particle beam direction. It is show that the most intensive differential yield of X-ray radiation from Si crystal can be provided by characteristic radiation at incident electron energies up to tens MeV, by parametric radiation at incident electron energies from tens to hundreds MeV, by diffracted transition X-ray radiation at GeV and multi-GeV electron energies. Therefore these kinds of radiation are proposed for application to beam profile observation in the corresponding energy ranges of incident electrons. Some elements of X-ray optics for observation of the beam profile are discussed. The application of the DTR as a source of powerful tunable monochromatic linearly polarized X-ray beam excited by a multi-GeV electron beam on the crystal surface is proposed.

  19. Technical basis of radiation therapy. Practical clinical applications. 5. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Seymour H. [Karolinska Institutet Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncol-Pathol; Perez, Carlos A. [Washington Univ. Medical Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Purdy, James A. [California Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Poortmans, Philip [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    This well-received book, now in its fifth edition, is unique in providing a detailed description of the technological basis of radiation therapy. Another novel feature is the collaborative writing of the chapters by North American and European authors. This considerably broadens the book's perspective and increases its applicability in daily practice throughout the world. The book is divided into two sections. The first covers basic concepts in treatment planning, including essential physics and biological principles related to time-dose-fractionation, and explains the various technological approaches to radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and high and low dose rate brachytherapy. Issues relating to quality assurance, technology assessment, and cost-benefit analysis are also reviewed. The second part of the book discusses in depth the practical clinical applications of the different radiation therapy techniques in a wide range of cancer sites. All of the chapters have been written by leaders in the field. This book will serve to instruct and acquaint teachers, students, and practitioners in the various fields of oncology with the basic technological factors and approaches in radiation therapy. (orig.)

  20. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Geradts, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Georgiade, Gregory S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Wei [Department of Bioinformatics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Groth, Jeff [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Barry, William T. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duffy, Eileen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  1. Deformable image registration in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jong; Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The number of imaging data sets has significantly increased during radiation treatment after introducing a diverse range of advanced techniques into the field of radiation oncology. As a consequence, there have been many studies proposing meaningful applications of imaging data set use. These applications commonly require a method to align the data sets at a reference. Deformable image registration (DIR) is a process which satisfies this requirement by locally registering image data sets into a reference image set. DIR identifies the spatial correspondence in order to minimize the differences between two or among multiple sets of images. This article describes clinical applications, validation, and algorithms of DIR techniques. Applications of DIR in radiation treatment include dose accumulation, mathematical modeling, automatic segmentation, and functional imaging. Validation methods discussed are based on anatomical landmarks, physical phantoms, digital phantoms, and per application purpose. DIR algorithms are also briefly reviewed with respect to two algorithmic components: similarity index and deformation models.

  2. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V; Michalski, Jeff M; Rosen, Mark A; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Shankar, Lalitha K; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C Norman; Deye, James A; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  3. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  4. Hawking Radiation of Dirac Particles on Rindler Horizon to a Uniformly Accelerating Observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJinK-Yi

    2003-01-01

    Following the method of Damour and Ruffini, the Hawking radiation of Dirac particles on Rindler horison to a uniformly accelerating observer is studied this paper. The temperature on Rindler horizon surface and the thermal spectrum formula of Dirac particles are obtained. The result is discussed.

  5. Hawking Radiation of Dirac Particles on Rindler Horizon to a Uniformly Accelerating Observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Yi

    2003-01-01

    Following the method of Damour and Ruffini, the Hawking radiation of Dirac particles on Rindler horizonto a uniformly accelerating observer is studied in this paper. The temperature on Rindler horizon surface and the thermalspectrum formula of Dirac particles are obtained. The result is discussed.

  6. Cone positioning device for oral radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanna, G K; Ivanhoe, J R; Attanasio, R A

    1994-06-01

    This article describes the fabrication and modification of a peroral cone-positioning device. The modification provides added cone stability and prevents tongue intrusion into the radiation field. This device provides a repeatable accurate cone/lesion relationship and the fabrication technique is simplified, accurate, and minimizes patient discomfort.

  7. Cherenkov radiation and dielectric based accelerating structures: Wakefield generation, power extraction and energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanareykin, Alexei

    2010-06-01

    We present here our recent results of the Euclid Techlabs LLC/Argonne National Laboratory/St.Petersburg Electrotechnical University "LETI" collaboration on wakefield high energy acceleration of electron bunches in dielectric based accelerating structures. This program concentrates primarily on Cherenkov radiation studies providing efficient high energy generation aimed at a future 1 TeV collider. We report here on recent experiments in high power Cherenkov radiation and corresponding dielectric material developments and characterizations. Progress in diamond, quartz and microwave low-loss ceramic structure development in GHz and THz frequency ranges is presented. Beam Breakup effects and transverse bunch stability are discussed as well. We e report on recent progress on tunable dielectric based structure development. A special subject of our paper is transformer ratio enhancement schemes providing energy transfer efficiency for the dielectric based wakefield acceleration.

  8. Recording Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in a linear accelerator using a picosecond streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, N. S.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Gurov, S. M.; Dorokhov, V. L.; Zubko, A. E.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Meshkov, O. I.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Shashkov, E. V.; Schelev, M. Ya

    2016-09-01

    Using a picosecond image converter camera with a linear sweep (PS-1/S1 streak camera developed at GPI RAS, Moscow), we have measured temporal parameters of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation pulses. The radiation was generated by relativistic electrons passing through a quartz cone mounted on the axis of a vacuum chamber of a linear accelerator, which is a part of the VEPP-5 injection complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk). The data obtained in these experiments provide an insight into the processes of formation of electron bunches and their 'quality' in a linear accelerator prior to injection of electrons into the accumulator-cooler. A conclusion is made regarding the advisability of streak camera application in tuning the linear accelerators for optimisation of electron bunch parameters.

  9. Accelerator simulation and theoretical modelling of radiation effects (SMoRE)

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This publication summarizes the findings and conclusions of the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on accelerator simulation and theoretical modelling of radiation effects, aimed at supporting Member States in the development of advanced radiation-resistant structural materials for implementation in innovative nuclear systems. This aim can be achieved through enhancement of both experimental neutron-emulation capabilities of ion accelerators and improvement of the predictive efficiency of theoretical models and computer codes. This dual approach is challenging but necessary, because outputs of accelerator simulation experiments need adequate theoretical interpretation, and theoretical models and codes need high dose experimental data for their verification. Both ion irradiation investigations and computer modelling have been the specific subjects of the CRP, and the results of these studies are presented in this publication which also includes state-ofthe- art reviews of four major aspects of the project...

  10. Two Effective Heuristics for Beam Angle Optimization in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmand, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    In radiation therapy, mathematical methods have been used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to critical surrounding structures minimal. This optimization problem can be modeled using mixed integer programming (MIP) whose solution gives the optimal beam orientation as well as optimal beam intensity. The challenge, however, is the computation time for this large scale MIP. We propose and investigate two novel heuristic approaches to reduce the computation time considerably while attaining high-quality solutions. We introduce a family of heuristic cuts based on the concept of 'adjacent beams' and a beam elimination scheme based on the contribution of each beam to deliver the dose to the tumor in the ideal plan in which all potential beams can be used simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of these heuristics for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on a clinical liver case.

  11. Determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swafford, Larry G; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most significant predictors of employee retention in a variety of occupational settings, including health care and education. A national survey of radiation therapy educators (n = 90) has indicated that respondents are not satisfied with their jobs based on data collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). To predict the factors associated with job satisfaction or dissatisfaction, the authors used a nine-item questionnaire derived from the MSQ. Educators were grouped according to their job satisfaction scores, and multiple discriminant analysis was used to determine which factors were predictive of satisfaction among groups of educators. Statistical results indicate that ability utilization, institutional support, compensation, personnel, and job characteristics were key determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy educators. These results may better inform faculty and administration of important factors that can promote job satisfaction and retain faculty in radiation therapy education programs.

  12. Communication skills training for radiation therapists: preparing patients for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, Georgia; O'Connor, Moira; Aranda, Sanchia; Jefford, Michael; Merchant, Susan; York, Debra; Miller, Lisa; Schofield, Penelope

    2016-12-01

    Patients sometimes present for radiation therapy with high levels of anxiety. Communication skills training may assist radiation therapists to conduct more effective consultations with patients prior to treatment planning and treatment commencement. The overall aim of our research is to examine the effectiveness of a preparatory programme 'RT Prepare' delivered by radiation therapists to reduce patient psychological distress. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the communication skills workshops developed for radiation therapists and evaluate participants' feedback. Radiation therapists were invited to participate in two communication skills workshops run on the same day: (1) Consultation skills in radiation therapy and (2) Eliciting and responding to patients' emotional cues. Evaluation forms were completed. Radiation therapists' consultations with patients were then audio-recorded and evaluated prior to providing a follow-up workshop with participants. Nine full day workshops were held. Sixty radiation therapists participated. Positive feedback was received for both workshops with 88% or more participants agreeing or strongly agreeing with all the statements about the different components of the two workshops. Radiation therapists highlighted participating in role play with an actor, discussing issues; receiving feedback; acquiring new skills and knowledge; watching others role play and practicing with checklist were their favourite aspects of the initial workshop. The follow-up workshops provided radiation therapists with feedback on how they identified and addressed patients' psychological concerns; time spent with patients during consultations and the importance of finding private space for consultations. Communication skills training consisting of preparing patients for radiation therapy and eliciting and responding to emotional cues with follow-up workshops has the potential to improve radiation therapists' interactions with patients undergoing

  13. The Role for Radiation Therapy in the Management of Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leachman, Brooke K; Galloway, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    Although there is no consensus regarding the optimal sequencing of external beam radiotherapy and surgery for extremity soft tissue sarcoma, radiation therapy delivered before or after limb-sparing surgery significantly improves local control, particularly for high-grade tumors. Large database analyses suggest that improved local control may translate into an overall survival benefit. Best practices require ample communication between the radiation and surgical teams to ensure appropriate tissues are targeted, unnecessary radiation is avoided, and patients are afforded the best opportunity for cure while maintaining function. Modern experiences with intensity-modulated radiotherapy/image-guided radiation therapy suggest toxicity is reduced through field size reduction and precise targeting, improving the therapeutic ratio. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypofractionated radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in prostate cancer: A systematic review of its safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, L M; Polo-deSantos, M; Rodríguez-Melcón, J I; Angulo, J C; Luengo-Matos, S

    2015-01-01

    New therapeutic alternatives can improve the safety and efficacy of prostate cancer treatment. To assess whether hypofractionated radiation therapy results in better safety and efficacy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Systematic review of the literature through searches on PubMed, Cochrane Library, CRD, ClinicalTrials and EuroScan, collecting indicators of safety and efficacy. We included 2 systematic reviews and a clinical trial. In terms of efficacy, there is considerable heterogeneity among the studies, and no conclusive results were found concerning the superiority of the hypofractionated option over the normal fractionated option. In terms of safety, there were no significant differences in the onset of acute genitourinary complications between the 2 treatments. However, one of the reviews found more acute gastrointestinal complications in patients treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy. There were no significant differences in long-term complications based on the type of radiation therapy used, although the studies did have limitations. To date, there are no conclusive results that show that hypofractionated radiation therapy is more effective or safer than normal fractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling the effect of the radiation reaction force on the acceleration of ultra-thin foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M. J.; Capdessus, R.; King, M.; Del Sorbo, D.; Ridgers, C. P.; McKenna, P.

    2017-05-01

    An investigation of the effects of the radiation reaction force on radiation pressure acceleration is presented. Through 1D(3V) PIC code simulations, it is found that radiation reaction causes a decrease in the target velocity during the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a solid density thin foil of varying thickness. This change in the target velocity can be related to the loss of backwards-directed electrons due to cooling and reflection in the laser field. The loss of this electron population changes the distribution of the emitted synchrotron radiation. We demonstrate that it is the emission of radiation which leads to the observed decrease in target velocity. Through a modification to the light sail equation of motion (which is used to describe radiation pressure acceleration in thin foils), which accounts for the conversion of laser energy to synchrotron radiation, we can describe this change in target velocity. This model can be tested in future experiments with ultra-high intensity lasers, and will lead to a better understanding of the process of relativistically induced transparency in the new intensity regime.

  16. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis.

  17. The physical basis and future of radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortfeld, T; Jeraj, R

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable progress in radiation therapy over the last century has been largely due to our ability to more effectively focus and deliver radiation to the tumour target volume. Physics discoveries and technology inventions have been an important driving force behind this progress. However, there is still plenty of room left for future improvements through physics, for example image guidance and four-dimensional motion management and particle therapy, as well as increased efficiency of more compact and cheaper technologies. Bigger challenges lie ahead of physicists in radiation therapy beyond the dose localisation problem, for example in the areas of biological target definition, improved modelling for normal tissues and tumours, advanced multicriteria and robust optimisation, and continuous incorporation of advanced technologies such as molecular imaging. The success of physics in radiation therapy has been based on the continued “fuelling” of the field with new discoveries and inventions from physics research. A key to the success has been the application of the rigorous scientific method. In spite of the importance of physics research for radiation therapy, too few physicists are currently involved in cutting-edge research. The increased emphasis on more “professionalism” in medical physics will tip the situation even more off balance. To prevent this from happening, we argue that medical physics needs more research positions, and more and better academic programmes. Only with more emphasis on medical physics research will the future of radiation therapy and other physics-related medical specialties look as bright as the past, and medical physics will maintain a status as one of the most exciting fields of applied physics. PMID:21606068

  18. Statistical Decision Theory Applied to Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Schultheiss, T. E.; El-Mahdi, Anas M.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical decision theory has been applied to the treatment planning decision of radiation therapy. The decision involves the choice of parameters which determine the radiation dose distribution. To choose among dose distributions requires a decision rule which reflects the uncertainty of possible outcomes for any specific dose distribution and the various risks associated with each outcome. A relative gravity or morbidity is assigned to each possible complication of treatment. In this stud...

  19. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  20. Khan's lectures handbook of the physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M; Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Khan's Lectures: Handbook of the Physics of Radiation Therapy will provide a digest of the material contained in The Physics of Radiation Therapy. Lectures will be presented somewhat similar to a PowerPoint format, discussing key points of individual chapters. Selected diagrams from the textbook will be used to initiate the discussion. New illustrations will used, wherever needed, to enhance the understanding of important concepts. Discussion will be condensed and often bulleted. Theoretical details will be referred to the textbook and the cited literature. A problem set (practice questions) w

  1. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  2. Study on radiation damage to high energy accelerator components by irradiation in a nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Casta, J; Van de Voorde, M H

    1975-01-01

    The structural and other components used in high energy accelerators are continuously exposed to a wide spectrum of high energy particles and electromagnetic radiation. The resulting radiation damage may severely influence the functional capability of accelerator facilities. In order to arrive at an estimate of the service life of various materials in the radiation field, simulating experiments have to be carried out in a nuclear reactor. A large number of organic and inorganic materials, electronic components, metals, etc., intended specifically for use in 400 GeV proton synchrotron of CERN near Geneva, were irradiated in the ASTRA reactor in Seibersdorf near Vienna. The paper reports on the irradiation facilities available in this reactor for this purpose, on the dosimetry methods used, on the most important materials irradiated and on the results obtained in these experiments. (14 refs).

  3. Phototherapy cabinet for ultraviolet radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, S.N.; Frost, P.

    1981-08-01

    A newly designed cabinet can be used for the treatment of psoriasis with fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) lamps. the new design provides more uniform distribution of UV radiation in both the horizontal and vertical axes, and several safety features have been added. The distribution and uniformity of UV output in this and in a previously described cabinet are compared. The UV output at the vertical center of the older UV light cabinet was six times greater than that at either the top or bottom, while the design of the present cabinet provides uniform UV radiation except for a slight increase at head height and at the level of the lower legs compared with the middle third of the cabinet. The variation in output of the older cabinet may, in part, explain the commonly encountered difficulty in the phototherapy of psoriasis of the scalp and lower extremities.

  4. Cancer of the breast. Radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, R; Deutsch, M

    1979-01-01

    There are many questions that have to be answered concerning the role of radiotherapy in the management of primary breast cancer. Hopefully, prospective clinical trials will provide some answers, but more basic research into the biology of breast cancer and the host-tumor relationship will be needed. There are indications that radiotherapy alone, or following minimal extirpative surgery in selected cases, may be as effective for control of breast cancer as conventional mastectomies. The role of radiotherapy following segmental mastectomy, with or without axillary dissection, needs to be clarified. The possibility exists that high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation such as neutron or pi meson beams may provide better local control than conventional radiation. Thus, it may be possible to treat effectively all primary breast cancers with such radiations and obviate the need for any type of mastectomy. It remains to be demonstrated whether adjuvant chemotherapy is as effective as radiotherapy in preventing chest wall and regional node recurrences. If it is not, there may be a place for both adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of operable cancer of the breast. Likewise, effective chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy may increase the local and regional control achieved with radiotherapy alone and make more primary lesions suitable for treatment without mastectomy. Meyer (1970) recently called attention to the leukopenia and cellualr immune deficiency produced by irradiation to the thorax and mediastinum. Further study is necessary to define exactly how much immunosuppression results from radiotherapy, its clinical significance and what can be done to avoid or counter it. If Stjervsward's thesis (1974) concerning the deleterious effects of radiotherapy on survival is correct, then it is of great importance to identify those patients most likely to be adversely affected by radiotherapy. Conversely, it may be possible in the future to identify a

  5. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Localization System will help to spare toxicity to the heart, 5) a military medical center department, with essentially fixed costs and without financial ...research was presented at the ACRO ( American College of Radiation Oncology) Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL March 17-19, 2016. We continue to analyze...data endpoints as the remaining subjects complete the follow-up phase. Databases have been created for the raw data gained from the Expanded Prostate

  6. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis following breast conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoden, Eisaku; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the frequency, degree and risk factors of radiation-induced dermatitis and pneumonitis in 255 patients receiving breast conserving therapy between April 1987 and April 1998. The majority of the patients underwent a wide excision or quadrantectomy with a level I, II axillary dissection, followed by radiotherapy consisting of 50 Gy/25 Fr/5 weeks to the preserved breast with a 4 MV beam by tangentially opposed portals using the half-field technique. Eleven patients received an additional 10 Gy/5 Fr of electron therapy to the tumor bed. Most of the patients developed radiation dermatitis which was limited to reddening or dry desquamation, with the exception of 14 patients with a localized moist reaction. The skin reaction was transient in all patients and improved with conservative treatments. Radiation pneumonitis appeared on chest X-rays in 30 patients, with a slight appearance in 21 and patchy appearance in 9. Three patients presented with persistent symptoms requiring medication. They were treated with steroids, resulting in complete resolution of the symptoms. A large volume of the chest wall within the irradiation field and a large area of irradiated skin were the risk factors of radiation dermatitis. The volume of irradiated lung significantly correlated with the frequency and degree of radiation pneumonitis. It was preferable that the maximum thickness of the involved lung should not exceed 3 cm. Complicated disease, adjuvant therapy and boost irradiation had no impact on the radiation dermatitis or pneumonitis. (author)

  7. Novel Silicon Devices for Radiation Therapy Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, Mara, E-mail: mara.bruzzi@unifi.it

    2016-02-11

    Modern radiotherapy techniques pose specific constraints in radiation-monitoring and dosimetry due to the occurrence of small radiation fields with high dose gradients, variation in space and time of the dose rate, variation in space and time of the beam energy spectrum. Novel devices coping with these strict conditions are needed. This paper reviews the most advanced technologies developed with silicon-based materials for clinical radiotherapy. Novel Si diodes as Pt-doped Si, epitaxial Si as well as thin devices have optimized performance, their response being independent of the accumulated dose, thus ensuring radiation tolerance and no need of recalibration. Monolithic devices based on segmented Si detectors can be easily tailored to optimize spatial resolution in the large active areas required in clinical radiotherapy. In particular, a monolithic device based on epitaxial p-type silicon, characterized by high spatial resolution and ability to directly measure temporal variations in dose modulation proved to be best viable solution for pre-treatment verifications in IMRT fields.

  8. Postoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma. Results of conventional radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T.; Inoue, T.; Chatani, M.; Hata, K.; Taki, T.; Nii, Y.; Nakagawa, H.

    1987-02-01

    From December 1977 through September 1984, a total of 39 cases of malignant glioma were treated with radiation therapy (RT) postoperatively. Twenty-nine cases were classified into glioblastoma (GM) and 10 astrocytoma (AS) (low grade : 6 and anaplastic : 4) histologically. One third of cases received 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain RT. Another two thirds of cases underwent 60 Gy/30 FRX/6 WKS of whole brain or 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain + additional 20 Gy/10 FRX/2 WKS of localized field RT. Chemotherapy (BLM, MeCCNU and ACNU) was given for 34 cases. Survivals at 3 years for GM and AS were 12 % and 68 %, respectively. Prognostic factors for GM were age, neurologic function (RTOG), AJC-staging T-factor, pre-RT LDH level and volume of residual tumor. Corresponding factors for AS were histological subclassification and neurologic function (RTOG). However, RT dose and field did not impact on survival significantly. Acute adverse effects of RT were otitis media or externa (70 %) and conjunctivitis (8 %). Retinal bleeding was noted in three long-term survivors at 2 years after RT.

  9. Radiation-induced pseudotumor following therapy for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lacey F.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); O' Connor, Mary I. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Menke, David M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and imaging appearance of radiation induced pseudotumors in patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. We retrospectively reviewed the serial magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. A total of 208 exams were reviewed (mean, 8.7 exams per patient) and included all available studies following the start of radiation therapy. Exams were analyzed for the identification of focal signal abnormalities within the surgical bed suggesting local tumor recurrence. Histopathologic correlation was available in nine patients suspected of having local tumor recurrence. Additional information recorded included patient demographics, tumor type and location, radiation type, and dose. The study group consisted of 12 men and 12 women, having an average age of 63 years (range, 39-88 years). Primary tumors were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 13), leiomyosarcoma (n = 6), liposarcoma (n = 3), synovial sarcoma (n = 1), and extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (n = 1). All lesions were high-grade sarcomas, except for two myxoid liposarcomas. Average patient radiation dose was 5,658 cGy (range, 4,500-8,040 cGy). Average follow-up time was 63 months (range, 3-204 months). Focal signal abnormalities suggesting local recurrence were seen in nine (38%) patients. Three of the nine patients with these signal abnormalities were surgically proven to have radiation-induced pseudotumor. The pseudotumors developed between 11 and 61 months following the initiation of radiation therapy (mean, 38 months), with an average radiation dose of 5,527 cGy (range, 5,040-6,500 cGy). MR imaging demonstrated a relatively ill-defined ovoid focus of abnormal signal and intense heterogeneous enhancement with little or no associated mass effect. MR imaging of radiation-induced pseudotumor typically demonstrates a relatively ill-defined ovoid mass-like focus of intense

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of radiation: what is next for cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anita; Simon, Samantha S; Moody, Tomika D; Garnett-Benson, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Despite its former reputation as being immunosuppressive, it has become evident that radiation therapy can enhance antitumor immune responses. This quality can be harnessed by utilizing radiation as an adjuvant to cancer immunotherapies. Most studies combine the standard radiation dose and regimens indicated for the given disease state, with novel cancer immunotherapies. It has become apparent that low-dose radiation, as well as doses within the hypofractionated range, can modulate tumor cells making them better targets for immune cell reactivity. Herein, we describe the range of phenotypic changes induced in tumor cells by radiation, and explore the diverse mechanisms of immunogenic modulation reported at these doses. We also review the impact of these doses on the immune cell function of cytotoxic cells in vivo and in vitro.

  11. The Application of FLUKA to Dosimetry and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Andersen, Victor; Pinsky, Lawrence; Ferrari, Alfredo; Battistoni, Giusenni

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA are useful for many purposes, and one of those is the simulation of the effects of radiation traversing the human body. In particular, radiation has been used in cancer therapy for a long time, and recently this has been extended to include heavy ion particle beams. The advent of this particular type of therapy has led to the need for increased capabilities in the transport codes used to simulate the detailed nature of the treatment doses to the Y O U S tissues that are encountered. This capability is also of interest to NASA because of the nature of the radiation environment in space.[l] While in space, the crew members bodies are continually being traversed by virtually all forms of radiation. In assessing the risk that this exposure causes, heavy ions are of primary importance. These arise both from the primary external space radiation itself, as well as fragments that result from interactions during the traversal of that radiation through any intervening material including intervening body tissue itself. Thus the capability to characterize the details of the radiation field accurately within a human body subjected to such external 'beams" is of critical importance.

  12. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  13. Individual skin care during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, J.S. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie), Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel (Germany); Budach, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Eberhard-Carls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Medizinische Fakultaet Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: In many clinical settings, the irradiated patient feels additional discomfort by the inhibition of washing the treatment portals and interruption of his adapted skin care habits. Material and methods: An analysis of the scientific recommendations as well as an analysis of the skin dose to the irradiated portals has been performed. An individual scheme for skin care under radiation has been developed. Results: A substantial decrease of the skin dose is achieved in many modern radiation techniques. The consequent reduction of severe skin reactions allowed the use of water and mild soaps as has been approved within many radiotherapy departments. This has lead to an individualized concept for skin care under radiation treatment including the allowance of gentle washing. The skin marks may be saved by using highly tolerable adhesive plasters or small tattoo points, if they are not superfluous by using masks or single referee points instead of marks for the field borders. Conclusions: The individualized concept for skin care during radiation may offer improved life quality to the patient and may decrease the acute reactions of the skin at least in some cases. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: In vielen klinischen Situationen erfaehrt der bestrahlte Patient zusaetzliche Belastungen durch das frueher ausgesprochene Waschverbot der Bestrahlungsfelder wie auch durch die Unterbrechung seiner langjaehrigen Hygienegewohnheiten. Material und Methoden: Es wurde eine Analyse der wissenschaftlichen Empfehlungen wie auch der heutzutage bei modernen Bestrahlungstechniken auftretenden Hautdosis durchgefuehrt. Ein individuelles Schema zur Pflege der bestrahlten Haut wurde entwickelt. Ergebnisse: Durch eine Verringerung der Hautdosis und damit der Inzidenz schwerer Hautreaktionen bei modernen Bestrahlungstechniken wird mittlerweile in vielen Abteilungen das `Waschverbot` fuer bestrahlte Haut gelockert. Dies hat zu einem individualisierten Hautpflegekonzept unter der Bestrahlung

  14. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  15. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  16. Controls and Beam Diagnostics for Therapy-Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Eickhoff, H

    2000-01-01

    During the last four years GSI has developed a new procedure for cancer treatment by means of the intensity controlled rasterscan-method. This method includes active variations of beam parameters during the treatment session and the integration of 'on-line' PET monitoring. Starting in 1997 several patients have been successfully treated within this GSI experimental cancer treatment program; within this program about 350 patients shall be treated in the next 5 years. The developments and experiences of this program accompanied by intensive discussions with the medical community led to a proposal for a hospital based light ion accelerator facility for the clinic in Heidelberg. An essential part for patients treatments is the measurement of the beam properties within acceptance and constancy tests and especially for the rasterscan method during the treatment sessions. The presented description of the accelerator controls and beam diagnostic devices mainly covers the requests for the active scanning method, which...

  17. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann [School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students’ experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning.

  18. Surface dose with grids in electron beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-P.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2002-03-01

    This investigation attempts to solve the problem of the lack of skin-sparing effect in electron radiation therapy and to increase the tolerance of skin to radiation using the grid technique. Electron grid therapy involves the mounting of a Cerrobend grid in the electron cone. Film dosimetry was employed to measure the relative surface dose and the percentage depth dose profile of electron grid portals. Various grid hole diameters (d=0.45, 1.0, 1.5 cm) and grid hole spacings (s=0.4, 0.2 cm) were considered for electron beams from 6 to 14 MeV. Experimental results indicate that the electron grid technique can reduce the relative surface dose in electron radiation therapy. Degradations of the relative surface dose depend on the percentage of open area in the grid portal. A proper grid design allows the surface dose to be reduced and the range of nonhomogeneous doses to be limited to a depth at which the target volume can receive a homogeneous dose. The grid technique can lower the surface dose in electron radiation therapy.

  19. Pregnancy after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browde, S; Friedman, M; Nissenbaum, M

    1986-01-01

    A successful pregnancy after intracavitary radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix is described. An additional 13 similar cases from the literature are reviewed. The possible reasons for the occurrence of these pregnancies despite irradiation to the ovaries, cervical canal and endometrium are discussed. The fact is emphasized that no genetic damage to the child was expected.

  20. Radiation therapy for portal venous invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Nakagawa; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Kuni Ohtomo; Hideomi Yamashita; Kenshiro Shiraishi; Naoki Nakamura; Masao Tago; Hiroshi Igaki; Yoshio Hosoi; Shuichiro Shiina; Masao Omata

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the efficacy and safety of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) for this disease and to specify patient subgroups suitable for this treatment.METHODS: Fifty-two patients with HCC received PVI-targeted radiation therapy from January 1995 through December 2003. Portal venous invasion (PVI) was found in the second or lower order branches of the portal vein in 6 patients, in the first branch in 24 patients and in the main trunk in 22 patients. Child classifications of liver function before radiation therapy were A, B, and C for 19, 24 and 2 patients, respectively. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a total dose ranging from 39 to 60 Gy (57.0 Gy in average).RESULTS: Overall survival rates at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 45.1%, 25.3%, 15.2%, 10.1%, and 5.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that Child status, the number of tumor foci, tumor type,transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) after radiation therapy were statistically significant prognostic factors.Multivariate analysis showed that the number of tumor foci and TAE after radiation therapy were statistically significant.CONCLUSION: The results of this study strongly suggest the efficacy of 3-D CRT as treatment for PVI in HCC. 3-D CRT is recommended in combination with postradiation TAE for PVI of HCC with 5 tumor foci or less in the liver and with Child A liver function.

  1. Waiting Lists for Radiation Therapy: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Why waiting lists arise and how to address them remains unclear, and an improved understanding of these waiting list "dynamics" could lead to better management. The purpose of this study is to understand how the current shortage in radiation therapy in Ontario developed; the implications of prolonged waits; who is held accountable for managing such delays; and short, intermediate, and long-term solutions. Methods A case study of the radiation therapy shortage in 1998-99 at Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Relevant documents were collected; semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with ten administrators, health care workers, and patients were conducted, audio-taped and transcribed; and relevant meetings were observed. Results The radiation therapy shortage arose from a complex interplay of factors including: rising cancer incidence rates; broadening indications for radiation therapy; human resources management issues; government funding decisions; and responsiveness to previous planning recommendations. Implications of delays include poorer cancer control rates; patient suffering; and strained doctor-patient relationships. An incompatible relationship exists between moral responsibility, borne by government, and legal liability, borne by physicians. Short-term solutions include re-referral to centers with available resources; long-term solutions include training and recruiting health care workers, improving workload standards, increasing compensation, and making changes to the funding formula. Conclusion Human resource planning plays a critical role in the causes and solutions of waiting lists. Waiting lists have harsh implications for patients. Accountability relationships require realignment.

  2. Radiation therapy of prostate cancer applied with cooling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhata, Akihiko; Ogawa, Katsuaki; Miyazaki, Machiko; Iwai, Hiroshi [Yokosuka National Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Takeda, Takashi

    1995-05-01

    The radio-sensitivity of prostate carcinoma is a resistant one. Also a prostate locates close to rectum, urethra and bladder of which mucus membranes are intermediate sensitive for irradiation, and causes side effects frequently. In this study, we applied with hyperfraction and local membrane cooling to the radiation therapy of the prostate cancer. This brought favorable clinical results with decreased morbidities. (author).

  3. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petrarca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Petrarca, Timothy L JacksonDepartment of Ophthalmology, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET. Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002, with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections.Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, neovascular, radiation therapy, epimacular brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, anti-VEGF

  4. BRCA1 Mutation: A Predictive Marker for Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Charlene; Zhang, Junran, E-mail: Junran.zhang@case.edu

    2015-10-01

    DNA repair, in particular, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is essential for the survival of both normal and cancer cells. An elaborate repair mechanism has been developed in cells to efficiently repair the damaged DNA. The pathways predominately involved in DSB repair are homologous recombination and classic nonhomologous end-joining, although the alternative NHEJ pathway, a third DSB repair pathway, could also be important in certain contexts. The protein of BRCA1 encoded by the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 regulates all DSB repair pathways. Given that DSBs represent the most biologically significant lesions induced by ionizing radiation and that impaired DSB repair leads to radiation sensitivity, it has been expected that cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations should benefit from radiation therapy. However, the clinical data have been conflicting and inconclusive. We provide an overview about the current status of the data regarding BRCA1 deficiency and radiation therapy sensitivity in both experimental models and clinical investigations. In addition, we discuss a strategy to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, the pharmacologic drugs being investigated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  5. Clinical Opportunities in Combining Immunotherapy with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Eric Finkelstein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical work in murine models suggests that local radiotherapy plus intratumoral syngeneic DC injection can mediate immunologic tumor eradication. Radiotherapy affects the immune response to cancer, besides the direct impact on the tumor cells, and other ways to coordinate immune modulation with radiotherapy have been explored. We review here the potential for immune mediated anticancer activity of radiation on tumors. This is mediated by antigen acquisition and presentation by dendritic cells, and through changes of lymphocytes’ activity. Recent work has implemented the combination of external beam radiation (EBRT with intratumoral injection of dendritic cells (DC. This included a pilot study of coordinated intraprostatic, autologous DC injection together with radiation therapy with five HLA-A2(+ subjects with high-risk, localized prostate cancer; the protocol used androgen suppression, external beam radiation therapy (25 fractions, 45 Gy, DC injections after fractions 5, 15, and 25, and then interstitial radioactive implant. Another was a phase II trial using neo-adjuvant cell death-inducing EBRT plus intra-tumoral DC in soft tissue sarcoma, to test if this would increase immune activity toward soft tissue sarcoma associated antigens. Clinical experience using radiation therapies combined with other systemic immune treatments are additionally surveyed, including use of investigational recombinant vaccinia and fowlpox, interleukin-2, toll like receptor 9 (TLR9 agonists and lymphocyte checkpoint inhibitors directed at PD1 and at CTLA4.

  6. Multi-pass Accelerator-Recuperator (MARS) as Coherent X-ray Synchrotron Radiation Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulipanov, Gennady; Skrinsky, Alexander; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    Creation of a fully spatial coherent 4th generation SR source is possible in case of a shift from the electron storage rings to accelerators with energy recovery. However, in practice, all the projects assume the use of a single-turn version (ERL) compared to our first proposal of 1997 to use a multi-turn accelerator-recuperator (MARS). The purpose of this report is presentation of the modern conception of MARS and comparison of the ERL and MARS based radiation sources from the viewpoint of their realization in practice.

  7. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  8. Study of the Synchrotron Radiation Emission from the NRL Modified Betatron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tab Jay

    1990-01-01

    Incoherent synchrotron radiation from a relativistic electron beam circulating in the magnetic field configuration of the NRL modified betatron accelerator has been studied numerically and experimentally. Numerical studies show that, for relativistic electron energies up to approximately 2 MeV, the single particle spectrum of radiation is dominated by a peak in the intensity distribution at the Doppler -shifted cyclotron frequency about the toroidal field. This intensity distribution very closely approximates the distribution for a linear helical electron trajectory with relativistic velocity along the axis of the helix. The radiated electric field oscillations, however, are 'modulated' due to the curvature of the major radius. As the electrons accelerate above an energy of a few MeV, the modulation width becomes so narrow that even the fast gyro-oscillation about the toroidal field produces no significant variation in the total radiated fields. Thus, the amplitude, polarization, and frequency content in the spectrum approaches that of a purely circular orbit. Experimental studies of the radiation have been conducted by monitoring the temporal evolution of radiated power during acceleration using fixed-frequency heterodyne receivers. Radiation was measured for electron beam energies in the range of 0.5 MeV to about 10 MeV, trapped beam currents up to approximately 500 A, and for values of toroidal guide field in the range of approximately 1900 to 3500 Gauss. At electron energies less than about 2 MeV, the polarization, amplitude, scaling with trapped beam current, and the temporal evolution of measured radiation during acceleration are in very good agreement with the predicted single particle spectrum. Furthermore, there is no evidence of collective emission at least within the frequency ranges 8 to 12 GHz and 26 to 40 GHz. The only significant discrepancy between the experimental and predicted results is the apparent absence of the horizontally polarized radiation

  9. Pelvic radiation therapy: Between delight and disaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirsten; AL; Morris; Najib; Y; Haboubi

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades radiotherapy was established as one of the best and most widely used treatmentmodalities for certain tumours. Unfortunately that came with a price. As more people with cancer survive longer an ever increasing number of patients are living with the complications of radiotherapy and have become, in certain cases, difficult to manage. Pelvic radiation disease(PRD) can result from ionising radiationinduced damage to surrounding non-cancerous tissues resulting in disruption of normal physiological functions and symptoms such as diarrhoea, tenesmus, incontinence and rectal bleeding. The burden of PRDrelated symptoms, which impact on a patient’s quality of life, has been under appreciated and sub-optimally managed. This article serves to promote awareness of PRD and the vast potential there is to improve current service provision and research activities.

  10. Study on neutron radiation field of carbon ions therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ions offer significant advantages for deep-seated local tumors therapy due to their physical and biological properties. Secondary particles, especially neutrons caused by heavy ion reactions should be carefully considered in treatment process and radiation protection. For radiation protection purposes, the FLUKA Code was used in order to evaluate the radiation field at deep tumor therapy room of HIRFL in this paper. The neutron energy spectra, neutron dose and energy deposition of carbon ion and neutron in tissue-like media was studied for bombardment of solid water target by 430MeV/u C ions. It is found that the calculated neutron dose have a good agreement with the experimental date, and the secondary neutron dose may not exceed one in a thousand of the carbon ions dose at Bragg peak area in tissue-like media.

  11. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  13. Protection Strategy of Sensitive Body Organs in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Abolfath, Ramin M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate protection strategies of sensitive body anatomy against the irradiation to the cancerous moving tumors in intensity modulated radiation therapy. Inspired by optimization techniques developed in statistical physics and dynamical systems, we deploy a method based on variational principles and formulate an efficient genetic algorithm which enable us to search for global minima in a complex landscape of irradiation dose delivered to the radiosensitive organs at risk. We take advantage of the internal motion of body anatomy during radiation therapy to reduce the unintentional delivery of the radiation to sensitive organs. We show that the accurate optimization of the control parameters, compare to the conventional IMRT and widely used delivery based on static anatomy assumption, leads to a significant reduction of the dose delivered to the organs at risk.

  14. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  15. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Nathan W. [Summer Intern, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (United States); Karlin, Nina J. [Division of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gray, Richard J. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Giant calcified meningioma after radiation therapy; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenke, Kiichiro; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ohta, Shinsuke; Sakaki, Saburo (Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine); Matsui, Seishi

    1993-09-01

    We presented a case of secondary giant meningioma with dense calcification (brain stone) after radiation therapy for primary ependymoma removed 25 years before. A 31-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of generalized convulsion. He had received extirpation of an ependymoma in the left frontoparietal region and postoperative radiation therapy 25 years before. Skull X-ray and CT revealed a giant brain stone in the left parietal region. It was totally removed en bloc. Photomicrograph of the specimen showed proliferation of arachnoid cell-like tumor cells in narrow spaces surrounded by marked calcified lesions which showed partial ossification. The etiology and therapy of this tumor were discussed. (author).

  17. Brilliant radiation sources by laser-plasma accelerators and optical undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Alexander

    2012-09-06

    This thesis investigates the use of high-power lasers for synchrotron radiation sources with high brilliance, from the EUV to the hard X-ray spectral range. Hereby lasers accelerate electrons by laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA), act as optical undulators, or both. Experimental evidence shows for the first time that LWFA electron bunches are shorter than the driving laser and have a length scale comparable to the plasma wavelength. Furthermore, a first proof of principle experiment demonstrates that LWFA electrons can be exploited to generate undulator radiation. Building upon these experimental findings, as well as extensive numerical simulations of Thomson scattering, the theoretical foundations of a novel interaction geometry for laser-matter interaction are developed. This new method is very general and when tailored towards relativistically moving targets not being limited by the focusability (Rayleigh length) of the laser, while it does not require a waveguide. In a theoretical investigation of Thomson scattering, the optical analogue of undulator radiation, the limits of Thomson sources in scaling towards higher peak brilliances are highlighted. This leads to a novel method for generating brilliant, highly tunable X-ray sources, which is highly energy efficient by circumventing the laser Rayleigh limit through a novel traveling-wave Thomson scattering (TWTS) geometry. This new method suggests increases in X-ray photon yields of 2-3 orders of magnitudes using existing lasers and a way towards efficient, optical undulators to drive a free-electron laser. The results presented here extend far beyond the scope of this work. The possibility to use lasers as particle accelerators, as well as optical undulators, leads to very compact and energy efficient synchrotron sources. The resulting monoenergetic radiation of high brilliance in a range from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard X-ray radiation is of fundamental importance for basic research, medical

  18. Indications for radiation therapy in hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Teruki; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Sato, Takeo (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)); Miyahara, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    With the aim of determining indications for radiotherapy in hypopharyngeal carcinoma, a retrospective analysis was made on 79 patients treated between 1977 and 1985. The patients were followed up for a median of 6 yr. and 2 mo. with a range of 3 yr. and 2 mo. to 8 yr. and 11 mo.. According to the UICC TNM classification system (1987), 11 patients were T1, 31 T2, 23 T3, and 14 T4; and 23 patients were N0, 18 N1, 9 N2a, 15 N2b, 7 N2c, and 7 N3. Radiotherapy was administered with radical intent (n=14), with palliative intent (n=11), preoperatively (n=32), and postoperatively (n=22). The 5-year survival rate was 23% in the radically treated group, 0% in the palliatively treated group, 31% in the preoperatively treated group, and 49% in the postoperatively treated group. It also depended significantly on N staging: 55% for N0 patients vs 28% for N1 patients and 29% for N2a-b patients. The most common recurrence or relapse occurred in the cervical lymph nodes, followed by distant and local sites. For N1-3 patients, local control was significantly better in the group treated with combined radiotherapy and surgery (36% for neck dissection and 70% for radical neck dissection), as compared with 9% for radiation alone. Patients receiving 50 Gy or more had significantly higher local control than those receiving less than 50 Gy (55% vs 22%). Patients of stage NO had lymph node metastases in the area irradiated with less than 50 Gy. The results revealed the following indications: (1) lesions of early T stage and N0 confined to the posterior wall or the upper half of the piriform recess for radical radiotherapy (less than 10% of all cases); (2) potentially curable lesions of N0-N2b, regardless of T stages, for pre- or post-operative radiotherapy; (3) the other advanced lesions for palliative radiotherapy. Radiation of 50 Gy or more combined with neck dissection was proposed in local control for N1-3 patients. (N.K.).

  19. Measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field spectrum by Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometers and unfolding program

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanjia; Ma, Zhongjian; Guo, Siming; Yan, Mingyang; Shi, Haoyu; Xu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.

  20. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EXPONENTIALLY ACCELERATED VERTICAL PLATE WITH UNIFORM MASS DIFFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthucumaraswamy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on unsteady free convective flow of a viscous incompressible flow past an exponentially accelerated infinite isothermal vertical plate with uniform mass diffusion have been studied. An exact solution to the dimensionless governing equations has been obtained by the Laplace transform method. The effects of velocity, temperature and concentration are studied for different parameters like the thermal radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with an increase in the parameter ‘a’.

  1. Remarks on Hawking radiation as tunneling from a uniformly accelerating black hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng; Jian-Song Hou; Shu-Zheng Yang

    2008-03-01

    Motivated by the Hamilton-Jacobi method of Angheben et al, we investigate the Hawking tunneling radiation from a uniformly accelerating rectilinear black hole for which the horizons and entropy are functions of . After several coordinate transformations, we conclude that when the self-gravitational interaction and energy conservation are taken into account, the actual radiation spectrum deviates from the thermal one and the tunneling rate is the function of though it is still related to the change of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  2. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets.

  3. Occurrence of BOOP outside radiation field after tangential radiation therapy for breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamanishi, Tohru; Gohma, Iwao; Oida, Kazukiyo [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)] (and others)

    2000-07-01

    We report three cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) that occurred outside the radiation field after radiation therapy using tangential fields for breast carcinoma. All patients complained of a cough between 14 and 20 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Fever also developed in two of the three. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated peripheral alveolar opacities outside the radiation field on the same side as the radiation therapy. Laboratory data showed an increased level of C-reactive protein and an increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed an elevated total cell count with a very high percentage of lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed a histologic pattern consistent with BOOP. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in rapid clinical improvement and complete resolution of the radiographic abnormalities. This pulmonary disorder appears to be induced by radiation, especially when a tangential field is employed for breast carcinoma, though the etiology has not been fully investigated. It is important to be aware of this type of pulmonary complication in patients given radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. (author)

  4. Proton Acceleration with Double-Layer Targets in the Radiation Pressure Dominant Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hai-Yang; WANG Cheng; LIU Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Acceleration of protons by a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiating on a double-layer target is investigated by a theoretical model and particle-in-cell simulations.The target is made up of a heavy ion layer coated with a proton layer on the rear surface.The results show that when the first layer is transparent induced by the hole-boring effect, the whole proton layer is accelerated by the transmitted laser pulse to high energy with low energy spread.The quality of the proton beam generated from a double-layer target is better than that from a single-layer target.The improvement is attributed to the flat top structure of the electrostatic field caused by the electrons injected into the second layer.It is easier to control the spectrum quality by using a double-layer target rather than using a single-layer one when the radiation pressure acceleration is dominant.

  5. Radiation from Particles Accelerated in Relativistic Jet Shocks and Shear-flows

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, K -I; Dutan, I; Zhang, B; Meli, A; Choi, E J; Min, K; Niemiec, J; Mizuno, Y; Medvedev, M; Nordlund, A; Frederiksen, J T; Sol, H; Pohl, M; Hartmann, D

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated particle acceleration and emission from shocks and shear flows associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet plasma propagating into an unmagnetized ambient plasma. Strong electro-magnetic fields are generated in the jet shock via the filamentation (Weibel) instability. Shock field strength and structure depend on plasma composition (($e^{\\pm}$ or $e^-$- $p^+$ plasmas) and Lorentz factor. In the velocity shear between jet and ambient plasmas, strong AC ($e^{\\pm}$ plasmas) or DC ($e^-$- $p^+$ plasmas) magnetic fields are generated via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI), and the magnetic field structure also depends on the jet Lorentz factor. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in shock generated magnetic fields. The spectra depend on the jet's initial Lorentz factor and temperature via the resulting particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. Our ongoing "Global" jet simulations containing shocks and velocity shears will ...

  6. Complications following linear accelerator based stereotactic radiation for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane; Roed, Henrik; Ohlhues, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    Primarily, gamma knife centers are predominant in publishing results on arteriovenous malformations (AVM) treatments including reports on risk profile. However, many patients are treated using a linear accelerator-most of these at smaller centers. Because this setting is different from a large...... gamma knife center, the risk profile at Linac departments could be different from the reported experience. Prescribed radiation doses are dependent on AVM volume. This study details results from a medium sized Linac department center focusing on risk profiles....

  7. Accelerated expansion in the effective field theory of a radiation dominated universe

    OpenAIRE

    Balthazar, Bruno; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2014-01-01

    We construct the effective field theory of a perfect fluid in the early universe. Focusing on the case where the fluid has the equation of state of radiation, we show that it may lead to corrections to the background dynamics that can dominate over those of an effective field theory of gravity alone. We describe the periods of accelerated expansion, in the form of inflationary and bounce solutions, that arise in the background dynamics and discuss their regime of validity within EFT.

  8. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  9. Anaemia and radiation therapy; Anemie et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, F. [Clinique d' Oncologie et de Radiotherapie, INSERM U619, 37 - Tours (France); Lartigau, E. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2004-11-01

    Anaemia is frequent in cancer and may increase tumour hypoxia that stimulates angiogenesis. However, erythropoietin is a hypoxia-inducible stimulator of erythropoiesis which seems to improve quality of life in cancer patients. Two recent phase III randomized studies showed negative results using erythropoietin in head and neck cancer patients and in metastatic breast cancer patients with impaired specific survival. In vitro and in vivo experiments have provided erythropoietin-receptor expression in endothelial cancer cells including malignant tumours of the breast, prostate, cervix, lung, head and neck, ovary, melanoma, stomach, gut, kidney etc. Biologic effect of erythropoietin and its receptor linkage induces proliferation of human breast cancer and angiogenesis and may limit anti-tumour effect of cancer treatment, in part, by tumour vascularization improvement. In addition, the use of exogenous erythropoietin could be able to favour tumour progression by improving tumour oxygenation and nutriment supply. If erythropoietin receptor were functional in human cancer. the assessment of erythropoietin receptor expression on tumour cell may help to select patients benefiting from exogenous erythropoietin. However. the relationship between erythropoietin receptor expression, tumour growth and exogenous erythropoietin. requires more studies. The results of recent clinical trials suggest that using erythropoietin should be avoided in non-anemic patients and discussed in patients receiving curative therapy. (authors)

  10. Orthovoltage intraoperative radiation therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapp Daniel S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To analyze the outcomes of patients from a single institution treated with surgery and orthovoltage intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 23 consecutive patients from 1990-2001 treated with IORT to 23 discrete sites with median and mean follow up of 6.5 and 21 months, respectively. Most tumors were located in the head of the pancreas (83% and sites irradiated included: tumor bed (57%, vessels (26%, both the tumor bed/vessels (13% and other (4%. The majority of patients (83% had IORT at the time of their definitive surgery. Three patients had preoperative chemoradiation (13%. Orthovoltage X-rays (200-250 kVp were employed via individually sized and beveled cone applicators. Additional mean clinical characteristics include: age 64 (range 41-81; tumor size 4 cm (range 1.4-11; and IORT dose 1106 cGy (range 600-1500. Post-operative external beam radiation (EBRT or chemotherapy was given to 65% and 76% of the assessable patients, respectively. Outcomes measured were infield control (IFC, loco-regional control (LRC, distant metastasis free survival (DMFS, overall survival (OS and treatment-related complications. Results Kaplan-Meier (KM 2-year IFC, LRC, DMFS and OS probabilities for the whole group were 83%, 61%, 26%, and 27%, respectively. Our cohort had three grade 3-5 complications associated with treatment (surgery and IORT. Conclusions Orthovoltage IORT following tumor reductive surgery is reasonably well tolerated and seems to confer in-field control in carefully selected patients. However, distant metastases remain the major problem for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  11. Hospital-based proton linear accelerator for particle therapy and radioisotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    1991-05-01

    Taking advantage of recent advances in linear accelerator technology, it is possible for a hospital to use a 70 MeV proton linac for fast neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy, proton therapy for ocular melanomas, and production of radiopharmaceuticals. The linac can also inject protons into a synchrotron for proton therapy of deep-seated tumors. With 180 μA average current, a single linac can support all these applications. This paper presents a conceptual design for a medical proton linac, switchyard, treatment rooms, and isotope production rooms. Special requirements for each application are outlined and a layout for sharing beam among the applications is suggested.

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  13. Assessing the Impact of Earth Radiation Pressure Acceleration on Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielberg, Kristin; Forootan, Ehsan; Lück, Christina; Kusche, Jürgen; Börger, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The orbits of satellites are influenced by several external forces. The main non-gravitational forces besides thermospheric drag, acting on the surface of satellites, are accelerations due to the Earth and Solar Radiation Pres- sure (SRP and ERP, respectively). The sun radiates visible and infrared light reaching the satellite directly, which causes the SRP. Earth also emits and reflects the sunlight back into space, where it acts on satellites. This is known as ERP acceleration. The influence of ERP increases with decreasing distance to the Earth, and for low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites ERP must be taken into account in orbit and gravity computations. Estimating acceler- ations requires knowledge about energy emitted from the Earth, which can be derived from satellite remote sensing data, and also by considering the shape and surface material of a satellite. In this sensitivity study, we assess ERP accelerations based on different input albedo and emission fields and their modelling for the satellite missions Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). As input fields, monthly 1°x1° products of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant En- ergy System (CERES), L3 are considered. Albedo and emission models are generated as latitude-dependent, as well as in terms of spherical harmonics. The impact of different albedo and emission models as well as the macro model and the altitude of satellites on ERP accelerations will be discussed.

  14. Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy after pneumonectomy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouette, R.; Causse, N.; Elkhadri, M.; Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Houlard, J.P.; Racaldini, L.; Demeaux, H.

    1995-12-01

    Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy would allow to decrease the normal tissue dose while maintaining the same target dose as standard treatment. To evaluate the feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction for ten patients with pneumonectomy for lung cancer, we determined the dose distribution to the normal tissue with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-DCRT) and conventional treatment planning (CTP). Dose-volume histograms for target and normal tissue (lung, heart) were used for comparison of the different treatment planning. The mean percentages of lung and heart volumes which received 40 Gy with 3-DCRT were respectively 63% and 37% of the mean percentage of lung and volumes which received the same dose with CTP. These preliminary results suggest that conformal therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing risk to normal tissue.

  15. Models of Metal Poor Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations I. Evolution and Abundance Anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, O; Richer, J; Turcotte, S; Turck-Chièze, S; Van den Berg, D A; Berg, Don A. Vanden

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary models have been calculated for Pop II stars of 0.5 to 1.0$M_\\odot$ from the pre-main-sequence to the lower part of the giant branch. Rosseland opacities and radiative accelerations were calculated taking into account the concentration variations of 28 chemical species, including all species contributing to Rosseland opacities in the OPAL tables. The effects of radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion and gravitational settling are included. While models were calculated both for Z=0.00017 and 0.0017, we concentrate on models with Z=0.00017 in this paper. These are the first Pop II models calculated taking radiative acceleration into account. It is shown that, at least in a 0.8$M_\\odot$ star, it is a better approximation not to let Fe diffuse than to calculate its gravitational settling without including the effects of $g_{rad}(Fe)$. In the absence of any turbulence outside of convection zones, the effects of atomic diffusion are large mainly for stars more massive than 0.7$M_\\odot$. Overabundan...

  16. Neutrophils, a candidate biomarker and target for radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernberg, Antoine; Blanchard, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-08-23

    Neutrophils are the most abundant blood-circulating white blood cells, continuously generated in the bone marrow. Growing evidence suggests they regulate the innate and adaptive immune system during tumor evolution. This review will first summarize the recent findings on neutrophils as a key player in cancer evolution, then as a potential biomarker, and finally as therapeutic targets, with respective focuses on the interplay with radiation therapy. A complex interplay: Neutrophils have been associated with tumor progression through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation has cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, but the sensitivity to radiation therapy in vivo differ from isolated cancer cells in vitro, partially due to the tumor microenvironment. Different microenvironmental states, whether baseline or induced, can modulate or even attenuate the effects of radiation, with consequences for therapeutic efficacy. Inflammatory biomarkers: Inflammation-based scores have been widely studied as prognostic biomarkers in cancer patients. We have performed a large retrospective cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy (1233 patients), with robust relationship between baseline blood neutrophil count and 3-year's patient's overall survival in patients with different cancer histologies. (Pearson's correlation test: p = .001, r = -.93). Therapeutic approaches: Neutrophil-targeting agents are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Neutrophils either can exert antitumoral (N1 phenotype) or protumoral (N2 phenotype) activity, depending on the Tumor Micro Environment. Tumor associated N2 neutrophils are characterized by high expression of CXCR4, VEGF, and gelatinase B/MMP9. TGF-β within the tumor microenvironment induces a population of TAN with a protumor N2 phenotype. TGF-β blockade slows tumor growth through activation of CD8 + T cells, macrophages, and tumor associated neutrophils with an antitumor N1 phenotype. This supports

  17. The effect of radiation therapy on hemophilic arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon; Kim, Sang Gi; Shin, Dong Oh [School of Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Repetitive bleeding into the joint space is the cause of debilitative hemophilic arthropathy. To interrupt this process, we treated the hemophilic patients suffering from repetitive joint bleeding with radiation therapy. From 1997 to 2001, a total of 41 joints from 37 hemophilic arthropathy patients were treated with radiation therapy at KyungHee University Hospital. The treated joints were 35 ankles, 3 knees and 3 elbows, respectively. The age of the patients ranged from 4 to 27 years (median age: 11 years). The radiation dose ranged from 900 cGy to 2360 cGy (median dose: 900 cGy). The fraction size was 150 cGy, 180 cGy or 200 cGy. The number of bleeding in one year before and after radiotherapy was compared. There was a tendency of frequent bleeding for the patients younger than 11 ({rho} 0.051) but there was also a tendency for more improvement in this group ({rho} 0.057). The number of joint bleedings was related with joint pain ({rho} 0.012) and joint swelling ({rho} = 0.033) but not with the Arbold-Hilgartner stage ({rho} 0.739),cartilage destruction ({rho} = 0.718) and synovial hypertrophy ({rho} = 0.079). The number of bleeding was reduced in thirty-three cases, and eight cases showed no improvement after radiation therapy. The average number of bleeding in a month was 2.52 before radiotherapy, but this was reduced to 1.4 after radiotherapy ({rho} = 0.017). Radiation therapy was effective for the hemophilia patients with repetitive joint bleeding to decrease the bleeding frequency and to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  18. Immunotherapy and radiation therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Evan W; Katz, Sharyn I; Cengel, Keith A; Simone, Charles B

    2017-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a particularly aggressive thoracic malignancy with limited survival following combination chemotherapy. As a result, there has been increased interested in immunotherapy for mesothelioma, both in the first-line and salvage settings. Early investigations of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon alfa-2a/b have been limited by modest response rates and toxicity, whereas cytokine gene therapy is currently being investigated and shows early promise. The most prominent class of immunotherapies to be trialed with mesothelioma in the past half-decade has been immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPI). Early results are encouraging, particularly for agents targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathways. With the increasing recognition of the immune potential of mesothelioma, interest in the immunomodulatory properties of radiation therapy has emerged. The combination of immunotherapy and radiation therapy may allow for complimentary immunologic effects that can enhance antitumor response. This article reviews the existing literature on the efficacy of immunotherapy for MPM, describes the rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation therapy, and discusses early literature on this treatment combination.

  19. Immunotherapy and radiation therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sharyn I.; Cengel, Keith A.; Simone, Charles B.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a particularly aggressive thoracic malignancy with limited survival following combination chemotherapy. As a result, there has been increased interested in immunotherapy for mesothelioma, both in the first-line and salvage settings. Early investigations of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon alfa-2a/b have been limited by modest response rates and toxicity, whereas cytokine gene therapy is currently being investigated and shows early promise. The most prominent class of immunotherapies to be trialed with mesothelioma in the past half-decade has been immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPI). Early results are encouraging, particularly for agents targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathways. With the increasing recognition of the immune potential of mesothelioma, interest in the immunomodulatory properties of radiation therapy has emerged. The combination of immunotherapy and radiation therapy may allow for complimentary immunologic effects that can enhance antitumor response. This article reviews the existing literature on the efficacy of immunotherapy for MPM, describes the rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation therapy, and discusses early literature on this treatment combination. PMID:28529903

  20. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach...Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly and quantification by...tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However, it has not been

  1. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  2. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Cooper

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79. However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Daniel; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  4. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki [Osaka Dental Univ., Hirakata (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  5. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowska, Irena [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a {sup 235}U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs.

  6. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within 20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shielding and Radiation Protection in Ion Beam Therapy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Andrew J.; Rightnar, Steven

    Radiation protection is a key aspect of any radiotherapy (RT) department and is made even more complex in ion beam therapy (IBT) by the large facility size, secondary particle spectra and intricate installation of these centers. In IBT, large and complex radiation producing devices are used and made available to the public for treatment. It is thus the responsibility of the facility to put in place measures to protect not only the patient but also the general public, occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed personnel working within the facility, and electronics installed within the department to ensure maximum safety while delivering maximum up-time.

  8. Toward robust adaptive radiation therapy strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böck, Michelle; Eriksson, Kjell; Forsgren, Anders; Hårdemark, Björn

    2017-06-01

    -at-risk protection. In case of unpredictably larger treatment errors, the first strategy in combination with at most weekly adaptation performs best at notably improving treatment quality in terms of target coverage and organ-at-risk protection in comparison with a non-adaptive approach and the other adaptive strategies. The authors present a framework that provides robust plan re-optimization or margin adaptation of a treatment plan in response to interfractional geometric errors throughout the fractionated treatment. According to the simulations, these robust adaptive treatment strategies are able to identify candidates for an adaptive treatment, thus giving the opportunity to provide individualized plans, and improve their treatment quality through adaptation. The simulated robust adaptive framework is a guide for further development of optimally controlled robust adaptive therapy models. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Advances in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy physics with intensity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S

    2000-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a specific form of conformal radiation therapy, is currently attracting a lot of attention, and there are high expectations for this class of treatment techniques. Several new technologies are in development, but physicists are still working to improve the physical basis of radiation therapy.

  10. Observation of radiation degradation of electrical insulators in the CERN particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Ch.; Coste, V.; Fontaine, A.; Tavlet, M.

    1999-05-01

    For the selection of polymer-based materials to be used in radiation environments, radiation tests have been performed at the European Organization for Particle Physics Research (CERN) for several decades. According to the recommendations of the IEC Standard 544, mechanical tests are carried out, and the radiation degradation is measured after accelerated irradiations. It is well known that during long-term exposures, oxygen and moisture are allowed to diffuse in the materials and hence to induce more severe degradation; this phenomenon is known as the `dose-rate effect'. During machine shut-downs, samples of rigid and flexible polymeric insulators (magnet-coil resins and cable insulations) have been taken out and tested after several years of exposure in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and in the Large Electron-Position Collider (LEP). The mechanical test results are compared to the ones after the accelerated qualification tests, and to the ones of a study conducted in 1991 to estimate the lifetime of cables in the radiation environment of LEP 200. They confirm that thermoplastics are more sensitive to long-term irradiations than the thermosetting resins and the composites, but that the dose-rate effect cannot be neglected in the latter.

  11. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical proper...

  12. Molecular Imaging Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Spontaneous Nasal Tumors in Canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Deveau, Michael A. [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kubicek, Lyndsay [Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); White, Pamela [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chappell, Richard J. [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies have so far focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy each or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy each to the gross tumor volume. Patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-, fluorothymidine (FLT)-, and Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM)-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging before therapy and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to conventional maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) measurements, imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumor. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed but was restricted to 2 predictor variables due to the limited number of patients. The best bivariable model was selected according to pseudo-R{sup 2}. Results: The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=.011), midtreatment FLT SUV{sub mean} (P=.018), and midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.006). Large decreases in FLT SUV{sub mean} from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=.013). In the bivariable model, the best 2-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.022) in

  13. Accounting for radiation quality in heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerer, A.M. [LMU, Muenchen (Germany). Radiobiological Inst.]|[Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearbiologie

    1997-09-01

    This introductory contribution outlines the need for models and their use in radiotherapy dose planning. The linear-quadratic dose relation is now predominantly used in therapy dose planning. In Section I it is linked to the earlier quantitative scheme for conventional radiotherapy. In Section II two major approaches are presented in a form that makes them comparable; the section can be read by itself, if this comparison alone is of interest. Models for therapy planning are tools, largely of empirical character; they do not need to elucidate unknown mechanisms of radiation action. The emphasis is, therefore, on the computational scheme, not on its interpretation. (orig.)

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: radiation dosage constraint at the anterior mandible.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, H.W.; Jong, J.M. de; Granzier, M.E.; Nieman, F.H.; Baat, C. de; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Because the survival of endosseous implants in irradiated bone is lower than in non-irradiated bone, particularly if the irradiation dose exceeds 50Gy, a study was carried out to assess the irradiation dose in the anterior mandible, when intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used. The hypo

  15. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  16. Applications of Accelerators and Radiation Sources in the Field of Space Research and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campajola, Luigi; Di Capua, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Beyond their important economic role in commercial communications, satellites in general are critical infrastructure because of the services they provide. In addition to satellites providing information which facilitates a better understanding of the space environment and improved performance of physics experiments, satellite observations are also used to actively monitor weather, geological processes, agricultural development and the evolution of natural and man-made hazards. Defence agencies depend on satellite services for communication in remote locations, as well as for reconnaissance and intelligence. Both commercial and government users rely on communication satellites to provide communication in the event of a disaster that damages ground-based communication systems, provide news, education and entertainment to remote areas and connect global businesses. The space radiation environment is an hazard to most satellite missions and can lead to extremely difficult operating conditions for all of the equipment travelling in space. Here, we first provide an overview of the main components of space radiation environment, followed by a description of the basic mechanism of the interaction of radiation with matter. This is followed by an introduction to the space radiation hardness assurance problem and the main effects of natural radiation to the microelectronics (total ionizing dose, displacement damage and the single-event effect and a description of how different effects occurring in the space can be tested in on-ground experiments by using particle accelerators and radiation sources. We also discuss standards and the recommended procedures to obtain reliable results.

  17. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C [Wayne State University, Grosse Pointe, MI (United States); Borras, C [Radiological Physics and Health Services, Washington, DC (United States); Carlson, D [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how

  18. Impact of dose calculation algorithm on radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhou; Chen; Ying; Xiao; Jun; Li

    2014-01-01

    The quality of radiation therapy depends on the ability to maximize the tumor control probability while minimizing the normal tissue complication probability.Both of these two quantities are directly related to the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems.The commonly used dose calculation algorithms in the treatment planning systems are reviewed in this work.The accuracy comparisons among these algorithms are illustrated by summarizing the highly cited research papers on this topic.Further,the correlation between the algorithms and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability values are manifested by several recent studies from different groups.All the cases demonstrate that dose calculation algorithms play a vital role in radiation therapy.

  19. [Ameloblastoma of the maxillary sinus treated with radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehal, Asmaa; Lobo, Rosabel; Naim, Asmaa; Azinovic, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign aggressive odontogenic tumor which requires early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. It commonly affects the mandible and radical surgery is the gold standard treatment. We report the case of a patient with ameloblastoma in extremely advanced phase affecting the maxillary sinus who was treated with intensity modulated conformal radiation therapy. Patient's evolution was marked by complete remission maintained after 24 months follow-up. Maxillary ameloblastoma is not well documented in the literature. It is usually diagnosed at the later stage when optimal surgery cannot be performed. This case study aimed to demonstrate that radiation therapy is a real therapeutic alternative in the treatment of advanced and inoperable forms of ameloblastoma.

  20. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrici, Luisa; Algoet, Yvon; Bruno, Luca; Magistris, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  2. Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Zhang, X.-J.; Li, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-06-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.

  3. Oxygenation-Enhanced Radiation Therapy of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    fluorocarbons in lung surfactant therapy. Artif . Cells, Blood Substitutes, Biotechnol. 2007, 35, 211-220. (11) Rapoport, N.; Gao, Z.; Kennedy, A. Multifunctional...potential blood oxygen careers and are currently approved for limited use during heart surgery [4], the key difference of the proposed approach compared...be achieved by targeted, localized heating, sonication, and radiation. Because O2 solubility in PFC is substantially higher than in blood , oxygen

  4. Massive osteolysis of the right clavicle developing after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, W.L.; Buzdar, A.U.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1988-07-15

    This report describes an unusual case of clavicular osteolysis, a late complication of radiation therapy for breast cancer, and demonstrates the diagnostic implications that radiotherapy changes can pose. Radiotherapy to the chest wall produces a spectrum of alterations in bone over time, ranging from early roentgenographic findings of osteoporosis and trabecular thickening to spontaneous fractures and changes that may be confused with metastatic disease or postirradiation sarcoma.

  5. Protection Strategy of Sensitive Body Organs in Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfath, Ramin M.; Papiez, Lech

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate protection strategies of sensitive body anatomy against the irradiation to the cancerous moving tumors in intensity modulated radiation therapy. Inspired by optimization techniques developed in statistical physics and dynamical systems, we deploy a method based on variational principles and formulate an efficient genetic algorithm which enable us to search for global minima in a complex landscape of irradiation dose delivered to the radiosensitive organs at risk....

  6. A practical three-dimensional dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Pengyi; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There is a pressing need for a practical three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system, convenient for clinical use, and with the accuracy and resolution to enable comprehensive verification of the complex dose distributions typical of modern radiation therapy. Here we introduce a dosimetry system that can achieve this challenge, consisting of a radiochromic dosimeter (PRESAGE™) and a commercial optical computed tomography (CT) scanning system (OCTOPUS™). PRESAGE™ is a transparent material with com...

  7. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken.

  8. Postprostatectomy radiation therapy: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Mark V; Champ, Colin E; Den, Robert B; Scher, Eli D; Shen, Xinglei; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Lallas, Costas D; Knudsen, Karen E; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-12-01

    While the majority of men with localized prostate cancer who undergo a radical prostatectomy will remain disease free, men with certain clinical and pathological features are known to be at an increased risk for developing a biochemical recurrence and, ultimately, distant metastatic disease. The optimal management of these patients continues to be a source of controversy. To date, three randomized Phase III trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for patients with certain adverse pathological features results in an improvement in several clinically-relevant end points, including biochemical recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Despite the evidence from these trials showing a benefit for ART, many believe that ART results in overtreatment and unwarranted treatment morbidity for a significant number of patients. Many physicians, therefore, instead advocate for close observation followed by early salvage radiation therapy (SRT) at the time of a biochemical recurrence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence for and to distinguish between ART and early SRT. We will also highlight current and future areas of research for this patient population, including radiation treatment dose escalation, hypofractionation and androgen deprivation therapy. We will also discuss the cost-effectiveness of ART and early SRT.

  9. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Gu, Y. Q.; Ma, W. J.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  10. Injectable Colloidal Gold in a Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate Gelating Matrix with Potential Use in Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Binderup, Tina; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy relies on the ability to deliver high radiation doses to tumor cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. Advanced irradiation techniques, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), rely on the ability to locate tumors to optimize the therapeu......External beam radiation therapy relies on the ability to deliver high radiation doses to tumor cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. Advanced irradiation techniques, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), rely on the ability to locate tumors to optimize...

  11. Micro-Mini & Nano-Dosimetry & Innovative Technologies in Radiation Therapy (MMND&ITRO2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    hazard prediction. New compact accelerator technologies for the delivery of proton and heavy ion therapy and relevant QA dosimetry instrumentation were an additional focus of MMND 2016. The ITRO program this year was dedicated to clinical aspects of innovative SBRT for cancer treatment. It represented a unique opportunity to learn from didactic lectures as well as case based discussions with world leaders in the field in the relaxed atmosphere of Hobart. As well as the outstanding scientific program, MMND ITRO 2016 included an Australian beach BBQ to celebrate Australia Day on the evening of 26th January and an exciting social program on 29th January followed by the conference dinner and great Australian hospitality. The MMND workshop represents an important next step for improving current cancer treatments with radiation and the development of new radiation based cancer treatments.

  12. Topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus do not accelerate photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice after UVA or simulated solar radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C.M.; Philipsen, P.A.; Poulsen, T.;

    2009-01-01

    the absence of carcinogenic effect of tacrolimus alone and in combination with simulated solar radiation (SSR) on hairless mice. The aim of this study is to determine whether pimecrolimus accelerates photocarcinogenesis in combination with SSR or pimecrolimus and tacrolimus accelerate photocarcinogenesis...

  13. NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, F. B.; Desrosiers, M. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Coursey, B. M.; Bergstrom, P. M.; Seltzer, S. M.

    2003-08-01

    NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources.

  14. Spallation radiation damage and dosimetry for accelerator transmutation of waste applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ferguson, P.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Proposals are currently being made for systems to treat radioactive waste based on the use of accelerator-driven neutron sources. A linear proton accelerator with energies as high as 1600 MeV and currents up to 250 ma are anticipated for the driver. The neutron fluxes may reach up to 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s as generated by the spallation reactions that occur when the protons strike target materials. Calculations are described to determine radiation fluxes and flux spectra inherent in such systems and to estimate likely radiation effects on system components. The calculations use LAHET, a Monte Carlo high-energy transport code, and MCNP, a generalized-geometry, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code. Cross sections for displacement and helium production are presented for spallation neutrons of energies from 21 MeV to 1600 MeV for Inconel 718 (Ni plus 18.5, 18.5, 5.1, and 3 wt % of Cr, Fe, Nb, and Mo, respectively), an alloy that is used for the proton beam entry window in several accelerators. In addition, results for this alloy are presented for the primary knocked-on atom (PKA) spectrum and the transmutation yield for 1600 MeV incident neutrons.

  15. Cherenkov radiation in a surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhong; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    We report on our theoretical investigations of Cherenkov-type emission of surface phonon polaritons (SPPs) by relativistic electron bunches. The polaritons are confined by a planar waveguide comprised of two SiC slabs separated by an air gap. The SPPs are generated in the spectral range known as the reststrahlen band, where the dielectric permittivity of SiC is negative. Two surface modes of the radiation are analyzed: the longitudinal (accelerating) and the transverse (deflecting) ones. Both form Cherenkov cones that are different in the magnitude of the cone angle and the central frequency. However, both exhibits rapid spatial oscillations and beats behind the moving charge. Moreover, the longitudinal mode forms a reversed Cherenkov radiation cone due the negative group velocity for sufficiently small air gaps, but the transverse mode does not. The wakefield acceleration of electron beam inside the structure is also studied. Transverse instabilities and BBU effects can be suppressed by flat driver beam, meanwhile the longitudinal mode can support accelerating fields >1 GeV.

  16. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  17. Contribution of radiation treatment to the breast conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Sho; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Satoru; Hoshina, Masao (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Nishi, Tsunehiro; Kawahito, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Junichi

    1991-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by irradiation for the early breast cancer has become the alternative therapy to mastectomy in European countries and U.S.A., but not yet commonly employed in our country. Sixty-one breasts in 60 patients treated with the above mentioned therapy from September 1983 to April 1991 were surveyed. Although the distant metastases of bone and pleura were found in one patient about four years after the therapy, neither failure of local control nor death was disclosed among them. Moderate fibrotic change with slight telangiectsia was found in only one patient. Otherwise, late effect of radiation was generally found to be mild and acceptable. (author) 59 refs.

  18. Radiation hardness of the storage phosphor europium doped potassium chloride for radiation therapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driewer, Joseph P.; Chen, Haijian; Osvet, Andres; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An important property of a reusable dosimeter is its radiation hardness, that is, its ability to retain its dosimetric merits after irradiation. The radiation hardness of europium doped potassium chloride (KCl:Eu2+), a storage phosphor material recently proposed for radiation therapy dosimetry, is examined in this study. Methods: Pellet-style KCl:Eu2+ dosimeters, 6 mm in diameter, and 1 mm thick, were fabricated in-house for this study. The pellets were exposed by a 6 MV photon beam or in a high dose rate 137Cs irradiator. Macroscopic properties, such as radiation sensitivity, dose response linearity, and signal stability, were studied with a laboratory photostimulated luminescence (PSL) readout system. Since phosphor performance is related to the state of the storage centers and the activator, Eu2+, in the host lattice, spectroscopic and temporal measurements were carried out in order to explore radiation-induced changes at the microscopic level. Results: KCl:Eu2+ dosimeters retained approximately 90% of their initial signal strength after a 5000 Gy dose history. Dose response was initially supralinear over the dose range of 100–700 cGy but became linear after 60 Gy. Linearity did not change significantly in the 0–5000 Gy dose history spanned in this study. Annealing high dose history chips resulted in a return of supralinearity and a recovery of sensitivity. There were no significant changes in the PSL stimulation spectra, PSL emission spectra, photoluminescence spectra, or luminescence lifetime, indicating that the PSL signal process remains intact after irradiation but at a reduced efficiency due to reparable radiation-induced perturbations in the crystal lattice. Conclusions: Systematic studies of KCl:Eu2+ material are important for understanding how the material can be optimized for radiation therapy dosimetry purposes. The data presented here indicate that KCl:Eu2+ exhibits strong radiation hardness and lends support for further investigations

  19. Distributed Optical Fiber Radiation and Temperature Sensing at High Energy Accelerators and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090137; Brugger, Markus

    The aim of this Thesis is to investigate the feasibility of a distributed optical fiber radiation sensing system to be used at high energy physics accelerators and experiments where complex mixed-field environments are present. In particular, after having characterized the response of a selection of radiation sensitive optical fibers to ionizing radiation coming from a 60Co source, the results of distributed optical fiber radiation measurements in a mixed-field environment are presented along with the method to actually estimate the dose variation. This study demonstrates that distributed optical fiber dosimetry in the above mentioned mixed-field radiation environment is feasible, allowing to detect dose variations of about 10-15 Gy with a 1 m spatial resolution. The proof of principle has fully succeeded and we can now tackle the challenge of an industrial installation taking into account that some optimizations need to be done both on the control unit of the system as well as on the choice of the sensing f...

  20. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  1. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  2. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  3. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression’s controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy.

  4. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  5. Towards radiation pressure acceleration of protons using linearly polarized ultrashort petawatt laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton/ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5x1019 W/cm2 to 3.3x1020 W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW laser pulses on 10- to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness was examined. The experiments demonstrated, for the first time with linearly polarized light, a transition from the target normal sheath acceleration to radiation pressure acceleration and showed a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3x1020 W/cm2. The experimental results were further supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Based on the deduced proton energy scaling, proton beams having an energy of ~ 200 MeV should be feasible at a laser intensity of 1.5x1021 W/cm2.

  6. Acceleration and radiation of ultra-high energy protons in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vannoni, G; Gabici, S; Kelner, S R; Prosekin, A

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are believed to be capable to accelerate protons at accretion shocks to energies exceeding 10^18 eV. At these energies, the losses caused by interactions of cosmic rays with photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) become effective and determine the maximum energy of protons and the shape of the energy spectrum in the cutoff region. The aim of this work is the study of the formation of the energy spectrum of accelerated protons at accretion shocks of galaxy clusters and of the characteristics of their broad band emission. The proton energy distribution is calculated self-consistently via a time-dependent numerical treatment of the shock acceleration process which takes into account the proton energy losses due to interactions with the CMBR. We calculate the energy distribution of accelerated protons, as well as the flux of broad-band emission produced by secondary electrons and positrons via synchrotron and inverse Compton scattering processes. We find that the downstre...

  7. Laser-plasma accelerator and femtosecond photon sources-based ultrafast radiation chemistry and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y. A.

    2017-02-01

    The initial distribution of energy deposition triggered by the interaction of ionizing radiations (far UV and X rays, electron, proton and accelerated ions) with molecular targets or integrated biological systems is often decisive for the spatio-temporal behavior of radiation effects that take place on several orders of magnitude. This contribution deals with an interdisciplinary approach that concerns cutting-edge advances on primary radiation events, considering the potentialities of innovating strategies based on ultrafast laser science, from femtosecond photon sources to laser-driven relativistic particles acceleration. Recent advances of powerful TW laser sources (~ 1019 Wcm‑2) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultrashort relativistic particle beams in the energy domain 2.5–150 MeV open exciting opportunities for the development of high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF). Early radiation damages being dependent on the survival probability of secondary electrons and radial distribution of short-lived radicals inside ionization clusters, a thorough knowledge of these processes involves the real-time probing of primary events in the temporal range 10‑14–10‑11 s. In the framework of a closed synergy between low-energy radiation femtochemistry (LERF) and the emerging domain of HERF, the paper focuses on early phenomena that occur in the prethermal regime of low-energy secondary electrons, considering very short-lived quantum effects in aqueous environments. A high dose-rate delivered by femtosecond electron beam (~ 1011–1013 Gy s‑1) can be used to investigate early radiation processes in native ionization tracks, down to 10‑12 s and 10‑9 m. We explain how this breakthrough favours the innovating development of real-time nanodosimetry in biologically relevant environments and open new perspectives for spatio-temporal radiation biophysics. The emerging domain of HERF would provide guidance for understanding the specific bioeffects of

  8. Radiation Field Forming for Industrial Electron Accelerators Using Rare-Earth Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Khankin, V. V.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Yurov, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the radiation field forming system for industrial electron accelerators, which would have uniform distribution of linear charge density at the surface of an item being irradiated perpendicular to the direction of its motion. Its main element is non-linear quadrupole lens made with the use of rare-earth magnetic materials. The proposed system has a number of advantages over traditional beam scanning systems that use electromagnets, including easier product irradiation planning, lower instantaneous local dose rate, smaller size, lower cost. Provided are the calculation results for a 10 MeV industrial electron accelerator, as well as measurement results for current distribution in the prototype build based on calculations.

  9. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine] (and others)

    2002-02-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  10. GPU-based high-performance computing for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Ziegenhein, Peter; Jiang, Steve B

    2014-02-21

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. The graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of study has been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this paper, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented.

  11. Reducing ion energy spread in hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using two-ion-species targets

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, S M; Sheng, Z M

    2014-01-01

    The generation of fast ion beams in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by intense laser pulses has been studied for targets with different ion components. We find that the oscillation of the longitudinal electric field for accelerating ions can be effectively suppressed by using a two-ion-species target, because fast ions from a two-ion-species target are distributed into more bunches and each bunch bears less charge. Consequently, the energy spread of ion beams generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration can be greatly reduced down to 3.7% according to our numerical simulation.

  12. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  13. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  14. Shielding evaluation and acceptance testing of a prefabricated, modular, temporary radiation therapy treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzell, Gary A

    2004-01-01

    We have recently commissioned a temporary radiation therapy facility that is novel in two aspects: it was constructed using modular components, and the LINAC was installed in one of the modular sections before it was lifted into position. Additional steel and granular fill was added to the modular sections on-site during construction. The building will be disassembled and removed when no longer needed. This paper describes the radiation shielding specifications and survey of the facility, as well as the ramifications for acceptance testing occasioned by the novel installation procedure. The LINAC is a Varian 21EX operating at 6 MV and 18 MV. The radiation levels outside the vault satisfied the design criteria, and no anomalous leakage was detected along the joints of the modular structure. At 18 MV and 600 monitor units (MU) per minute, the radiation level outside the primary barrier walls was 8.5 micro Sv/h of photons; there were no detectable neutrons. Outside the direct-shielded door, the levels were 0.4 micro Sv/h of photons and 3.0 micro Sv/h of neutrons. The isocentricity of the accelerator met the acceptance criteria and was not affected by its preinstallation into an integrated baseframe and subsequent transport to the building site.

  15. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Slattery, Stuart [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  16. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M., E-mail: evanstm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mosher, Scott W., E-mail: moshersw@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Slattery, Stuart R., E-mail: sslattery@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53716 (United States); Hamilton, Steven P., E-mail: hamiltonsp@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  17. Some aspects of radiation protection near high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Tuyn, Jan Willem Nicolaas

    1977-01-01

    The CERN site near Geneva borders Satigny and Meyrin in Switzerland and Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Prevention in France. The 600 MeV proton synchrocyclotron (SC) has been in operation since 1957, the 28 GeV proton synchrotron (PS) since 1960, and the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) since 1971. A fourth large accelerator, the 400 GeV super proton synchrotron (SPS), will soon be in service. The internal and external radiation protection problems caused by these machines, together with the solutions, are reviewed in the light of experience. (5 refs).

  18. Induced radioactivity of materials by stray radiation fields at an electron accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Rokni, S H; Gwise, T; Liu, J C; Roesler, S

    2002-01-01

    Samples of soil, water, aluminum, copper and iron were irradiated in the stray radiation field generated by the interaction of a 28.5 GeV electron beam in a copper-dump in the Beam Dump East facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The specific activity induced in the samples was measured by gamma spectroscopy and other techniques. In addition, the isotope production in the samples was calculated with detailed Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. The calculated activities are compared to the experimental values and differences are discussed.

  19. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Moon, Hye Seong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Chong Il; Ahn, Jung Ja [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  20. Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable

  1. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Luxemburgo Hospital, Mario Penna Institute, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  2. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Instituto Mario Penna, Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Hospital Luxemburgo

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  3. Failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Hong, Sung Woo; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    This report details a case of 8-year-old girl showing failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomysarcoma at the age of 4. The observed results were as follows: 1. Past history revealed that she had received for a total radiation dose od 4430 cGy, 29 fractions in 6 weeks and chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin D and cytoxan, followed as maintenance phase for 2 years. 2. The patient was symptom-free and appointed for the treatment of multiple dental caries. 3. Oral examination showed hypoplastic enamel on whole erupted permanent teeth and showed retarded eruption. 4. Conventional radiograms showed failure of root development including abrupt cessation of root formation and root agenesis, and microdobtia, missing teeth, irregular enamel, dislocation of the impacted teeth. Additional finding showed good healing bone pattern on the left mandibular ramus and angle area. 5. Cehalometric analysis revealed failure of bite raising due to incomplete eruption of all the first molars and made it possible to suspect entrapped mandibular growth and then Class II tendency growth. 6. There was correlation between the time of chemo-radiation therapy and the damage of the teeth.

  4. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260 nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2 mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20 TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9 × 10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1 × 10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130 MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  5. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  6. Feasibility of low energy radiative capture experiments at the LUNA underground accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bemmerer, D; Lemut, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Cruz, J; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Limata, B; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Alvarez, C R; Schumann, F; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    The LUNA (Laboratory Underground for Nuclear Astrophysics) facility has been designed to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest. It is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Two electrostatic accelerators, with 50 and 400 kV maximum voltage, in combination with solid and gas target setups allowed to measure the total cross sections of the radiative capture reactions $^2$H(p,$\\gamma$)3He and $^{14}$N(p,$\\gamma$)$^{15}$O within their relevant Gamow peaks. We report on the gamma background in the Gran Sasso laboratory measured by germanium and bismuth germanate detectors, with and without an incident proton beam. A method to localize the sources of beam induced background using the Doppler shift of emitted gamma rays is presented. The feasibility of radiative capture studies at energies of astrophysical interest is discussed for several experimental scenarios.

  7. Introduction of Parallel GPGPU Acceleration Algorithms for the Solution of Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, William F.; Liu, Xu

    2011-01-01

    General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is a recent technique that allows the parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate calculations performed sequentially by the central processing unit (CPU). To introduce GPGPU to radiative transfer, the Gauss-Seidel solution of the well-known expressions for 1-D and 3-D homogeneous, isotropic media is selected as a test case. Different algorithms are introduced to balance memory and GPU-CPU communication, critical aspects of GPGPU. Results show that speed-ups of one to two orders of magnitude are obtained when compared to sequential solutions. The underlying value of GPGPU is its potential extension in radiative solvers (e.g., Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates) at a minimal learning curve.

  8. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron linear accelerator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YASHVIR KALKAL; VINIT KUMAR

    2017-04-01

    High-power $(\\sim 100 kW)$ industrial electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for irradiations, e.g., for pasteurization of food products, disinfection of medical waste, etc.We propose that high-power electron beam from such an industrial linac can first pass through an undulator to generate useful terahertz (THz) radiation, and the spent electron beam coming out of the undulator can still be used for the intended industrial applications. This will enhance the utilization of a high-power industrial linac. We have performed calculation of spontaneous emission in the undulator to show that for typical parameters, continuous terahertz radiation having power of the order of $\\mu$W can be produced, which may be useful for many scientific applications such as multispectral imaging of biological samples, chemical samples etc.

  9. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2017-04-01

    High-power (˜ 100 kW) industrial electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for irradiations, e.g., for pasteurization of food products, disinfection of medical waste, etc. We propose that high-power electron beam from such an industrial linac can first pass through an undulator to generate useful terahertz (THz) radiation, and the spent electron beam coming out of the undulator can still be used for the intended industrial applications. This will enhance the utilization of a high-power industrial linac. We have performed calculation of spontaneous emission in the undulator to show that for typical parameters, continuous terahertz radiation having power of the order of μW can be produced, which may be useful for many scientific applications such as multispectral imaging of biological samples, chemical samples etc.

  10. $\\sigma$CDM coupled to radiation. Dark energy and Universe acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Abbyazov, Renat R; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Chiral Cosmological Model (CCM) coupled to cold dark matter (CDM) has been investigated as $\\sigma$CDM model to study the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Dark sector fields (as Dark Energy content) coupled to cosmic dust were considered as the source of Einstein gravity in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Such model had a beginning at the matter-dominated era. The purposes of our present investigation are two folds: to extend > of the $\\sigma$CDM for earlier times to radiation-dominated era and to take into account variation of the exponential potential via variation of the interaction parameter $\\lambda $. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to investigate possible values of initial conditions constrained by the measured amount of the dark matter, dark energy and radiation component today. Our analysis includes dark energy contribution to critical density, the ratio of the kinetic and potential energies, deceleration parameter, effective equation of state ...

  11. Evaluation and redesign of radiation shielding in a radionuclide production facility at a particle accelerator / Onalenna Kegopotsemang

    OpenAIRE

    Kegopotsemang, Onalenna

    2004-01-01

    iThemba LABS is a particle accelerator facility housing a radionuclide production facility that uses a 66 MeV proton beam to produce radionuclides for medical and industrial use. Ionising radiation is produced by a variety of sources at Themba LABS. Ionising is a health hazard. High doses can cause acute radiation syndrome, i.e. "radiation sickness". Lower doses cannot cause acute symptom, but carry a risk of radiation-related cancer. Ionising radiation is also detrimental to materials, and c...

  12. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  13. Implementation of remote 3-dimensional image guided radiation therapy quality assurance for radiation