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Sample records for acarbose

  1. Acarbose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acarbose comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken three times a day. It is very important to take each dose ... for diabetes, digoxin (Lanoxin), diuretics ('water pills'), estrogens, isoniazid, medications for high blood pressure or colds, oral ...

  2. Compound list: acarbose [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acarbose ACA 00116 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/acarbose.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...acarbose.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/acarbose.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  3. [Acarbose and propofol: a dangerous combination?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Honor, E; Polo-Romero, F J; Sánchez-Beteta, P; Martínez-Peguero, J; Santisteban-López, Y; Beato-Pérez, J L

    2014-02-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a rare complication following the use of propofol and can be potentially serious if an early diagnosis is not made. Propofol is being increasingly used in daily practice, not only in surgery, but also in outpatient sedation procedures, such as endoscopy. Acarbose is a well-known drug used in type 2 diabetes treatment, particularly in the early phase. A case is reported on a patient who suffered an acute hepatitis secondary to the use of propofol in ophthalmology surgery, a hepatitis probably enhanced by prior use of acarbose, a drug that also can cause hepatotoxicity. An early diagnosis and it was resolved without complications. This case could contribute to improve pre-anesthetic evaluation of patients who will be undergoing sedation with propofol in order to avoid the possible appearance of hepatitis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of Ammonium Salt and Fermentation pH on Acarbose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of ammonium salts and fermentation pH on the biosynthesis of acarbose by Streptomyces M37. Methods: Different ammonium salts were added to the fermentation broth of Streptomyces M37 to explore their effects on acarbose production. The concentration and addition time of ammonium ...

  5. Enhanced acarbose production by Streptomyces M37 using a two-stage fermentation strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ren

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the effect of pH on Streptomyces M37 growth and its acarbose biosynthesis ability. We observed that low pH was beneficial for cell growth, whereas high pH favored acarbose synthesis. Moreover, addition of glucose and maltose to the fermentation medium after 72 h of cultivation promoted acarbose production. Based on these results, a two-stage fermentation strategy was developed to improve acarbose production. Accordingly, pH was kept at 7.0 during the first 72 h and switched to 8.0 after that. At the same time, glucose and maltose were fed to increase acarbose accumulation. With this strategy, we achieved an acarbose titer of 6210 mg/L, representing an 85.7% increase over traditional batch fermentation without pH control. Finally, we determined that the increased acarbose production was related to the high activity of glutamate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  6. Positive effects of acarbose in the diabetic rat are not altered by feeding schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B E; Vasselli, J R; Katovich, M J

    1998-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that chronic dietary treatment with acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, improves glucose homeostasis in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat. In this study we evaluated the effects of 4 weeks of acarbose treatment on glucose homeostasis in STZ-diabetic rats for both meal-fed (three times daily) and ad libitum feeding conditions. Sprague Dawley male rats (n = 58) were started on a daily meal-feeding paradigm consisting of three 2-h feeding periods: 0700 to 0900 hours, 1300 to 1500 hours, and 1900 to 2100 hours. Following 2 weeks of adaptation, half of the animals were switched to ad libitum feeding. The feeding paradigm itself (meal fed versus ad lib.) affected neither body weight nor daily food intake. Twenty animals from each feeding group then received STZ (60 mg/kg i.v.), whereas control animals received vehicle injections only. Two days later, the diet of 10 STZ-treated animals from each paradigm was supplemented with acarbose (40 mg of BAY G 5421/100-g diet), and the groups were treated for 4 weeks. Untreated diabetic rats had lower body weight than vehicle-injected control rats at all time points after STZ treatment. Acarbose treatment delayed this effect on body weight. STZ treatment induced hyperphagia regardless of feeding paradigm, which was significantly attenuated by acarbose only for the first week of treatment. Untreated diabetic rats had fasting blood glucose values 4 times those of vehicle-injected controls in both the meal-fed and ad libitum-fed conditions. Acarbose significantly lowered fasting blood glucose in the treated STZ groups. Blood glucose was also assessed 0, 90, and 180 min following the start of a meal. The postprandial rise in blood glucose was significantly reduced in acarbose-treated meal-fed diabetic rats, to values not significantly different from those of vehicle-injected control rats. During the fourth week of treatment glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly higher in untreated

  7. Beneficial effects of dietary acarbose in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katovich, M J; Meldrum, M J; Vasselli, J R

    1991-12-01

    Diabetes is characterized by hyperphagia, polydipsia, polyuria, and elevations in blood and urinary glucose. It has also been documented that beta-adrenergic responsiveness is reduced in diabetes. The intestinal glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose (BAY G 5421), decreases postprandial glycemia by delaying carbohydrate absorption. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic acarbose treatment (20 and 40 mg/100 g of diet) on the metabolic and adrenergic parameters altered in streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, intravenously [IV] )-induced diabetes. Metabolic parameters were measured daily for 8 weeks. Diabetic rats were hyperphagic, polydipsic, and polyuric within 1 week of STZ treatment. Acarbose treatment did not consistently effect the food intake but did reduce water intake, urinary output, blood glucose, and the urinary loss of glucose associated with STZ-induced diabetes. Adrenergic responses were assessed by monitoring the increase in tail skin temperature (TST) associated with administration of isoproterenol. Diabetic rats were less responsive than controls and acarbose treatment restored responses toward that of the controls. Additionally, 3H-NE release from the tail artery was elevated in the diabetic rat and restored to normal in the acarbose-treated animals. Collectively these data suggest that acarbose treatment is effective in reducing the severity of metabolic and autonomic complications associated with STZ-induced diabetes.

  8. Treatment with acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, reduces increased albumin excretion in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M P; Vasselli, J R; Neuman, R G; Witt, J

    1995-10-01

    1. We examined the effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in streptozotocin diabetic rats. 2. Treatment with acarbose for 8 weeks after induction of diabetes prevented the significant increase in UAE observed in untreated diabetic rats relative to nondiabetic controls. 3. Acarbose significantly reduced integrated glycemia, which correlated with albumin excretion rates, and exerts a salutary effect on diabetic renal dysfunction.

  9. Insulin binding and glucose transport in adipocytes of acarbose-treated Zucker lean and obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, J R; Flory, T; Fried, S K

    1987-01-01

    The intestinal glucosidase inhibitor acarbose was administered as a dietary admix (30 mg/100 g chow diet) to male Zucker obese and lean rats. After 15 weeks, epidiymal fat pads were removed and adipocytes isolated by collagenase digestion. Equilibrium binding of A-14 tyrosine 125I-insulin, and transport of U-14C-glucose was determined was adipocytes incubated for 50 min at 37 degrees C in 0-16000 pM insulin. Insulin binding/cell was enhanced two-fold in lean (P less than 0.01) and obese (n.s.) drug groups. In drug-treated leans, increased sensitivity of glucose transport to submaximally stimulating concentrations of insulin was observed (P less than 0.02). For both genotypes, acarbose mildly decreased insulin levels and body weight gain, although adipocyte size was unaffected. Results indicate that enhanced insulin binding accompanies metabolic improvements induced by acarbose in lean Zucker rats.

  10. [Effect of acarbose on glycemia and pancreatic hormone secretion induced by usual meals in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, E; Guardiola, E

    1992-11-01

    Acarbose is a pseudotetrasaccharide of bacterial origin which, in a competitive and reversible way, inhibits intestinal alphaglycosidase. Following such mechanism of action, carbohydrates are not split to monosaccharides and, therefore, cannot be absorbed as easily as in normal conditions. Controlled clinical trials have shown the therapeutic usefulness of Acarbose in the treatment of mon-insulin dependent as well as insulin dependent Diabetes, specially in reducing postprandial hyperglycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Acarbose when it is used in a diet with a time-schedule and calorie distribution typical of a Spanish environment. A cross-over simple-blind study design was followed, in which 8 healthy volunteers, with ages between 23 and 29 years, took at 8:30 a.m. a 530 Kcal breakfast (18% of the daily total), at 13:30 p.m. a 1.400 Kcal lunch (40%), and at 21:00 p.m. a 1.070 Kcal dinner (36%). Before each of the meals 100 mg of Acarbose (or placebo, following a randomized distribution) were administered, and blood samples were drawn-10, 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 minutes, in which glucose levels, insulin, pancreatic polypeptide and glucagon were determined. When Acarbose was administered statistically significant differences in glycemia and insulin postprandial figures were observed. It is concluded that when Acarbose is administered at a 100 mg dose (t.i.d.) together with a diet with a typically spanish calorie distribution and time-schedule, it produces a significant lowering in the postprandial glucose and insulin raises.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia increases cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury: prevention by the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Stefan; Calvillo, Laura; Tillmanns, Jochen; Elbing, Inka; Dienesch, Charlotte; Bischoff, Hilmar; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2005-04-01

    Protective effects of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose have been reported for various diabetic complications. In the STOP-NIDDM study, even patients without overt diabetes, but with impaired glucose tolerance, had a reduction in cardiovascular events when treated with acarbose. Therefore, we investigated the effect of repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia on the cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo. Mice were treated daily by single applications of placebo, sucrose (4 g/kg body weight), or sucrose + acarbose (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage for 7 days. Acarbose treatment significantly reduced the sucrose-induced increase in plasma glucose concentration. Subsequently, animals underwent 30 min of ischemia by coronary artery ligation and 24 h of reperfusion in vivo. In the sucrose group, ischemia/reperfusion damage was significantly increased (infarct/area at risk, placebo vs. sucrose, 38.8+/-7.5% vs. 62.2+/-4.8%, P<0.05). This was prevented by acarbose treatment (infarct/area at risk 30.7+/-7.2%). While myocardial inflammation was similar in all groups, oxidative stress as indicated by a significant increase in lipid peroxides was enhanced in the sucrose, but not in the sucrose + acarbose group. In summary, repetitive postprandial hyperglycemia increases ischemia/reperfusion damage. This effect can be prevented by treatment with the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose.

  12. Reassessment of acarbose as a transition state analogue inhibitor of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosi, Renee; Sham, Howard; Uitdehaag, Joost C.M.; Ruiterkamp, Richard; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Withers, Stephen G.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of several different active site mutants of Bacillus circulans cyclodextrin,glycosyltransferase to the inhibitor acarbose has been investigated through measurement of Ki values. The mutations represent several key amino acid positions, most of which are believed to play important roles

  13. Effect of Acarbose on Control of Metabolic Parameters in Patients with Diabetes Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziaee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Acarbose is an intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that delays absorption of carbohydrates. Findings of some studies show that it has been effective in better control of blood glucose in patients with diabetes type 1. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of administration of acarbose on glycemic & lipid parameters and daily insulin requirements and tolerability in type 1 diabetic patient.Materials & Methods: This was a clinical trial randomized double blind placebo controlled study. Performed on patients with history of at least 1 year diabetes type 1 and had HbA1c≥7.5%. Patients with Cr≥2, partial GI obstruction or IBD were excluded from the study. 45 patients were randomized to be administered acarbose or placebo for 12 weeks. Initial dose of acarbose was 25 mg T.D.S for 2 weeks, and then it was increased to 50 mg T.D.S for 10 weeks. BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, TG and Insulin dosage were investigated monthly.Results: The values of BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol, and TG & Insulin requirements decreased significantly in the case group compared to the controls (P=0.003, P=0.005, P<0.001, P=0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively; but no significant changes were observed in HDL &LDL levels. Conclusion: Administration of acarbose together with insulin to type 1 diabetic patient can be valuable in improving metabolic control (BMI, FBS, 2hpp, HbA1c, Total cholesterol and TG.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:5-10

  14. Acarbose improved severe postprandial hypotension in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, E; Goda, K; Nagata, K; Kitaoka, H; Ohsawa, N; Hanafusa, T

    2001-01-01

    Postprandial hypotension (PPH) is defined as a decrease of systolic blood pressure by more than 20 mmHg after meals. Severe PPH is a troublesome diabetic complication, which has no established means of treatment. We encountered a patient who had diabetes mellitus complicated by severe PPH and attempted to treat this problem using several medications (octreotide, midodrine hydrochloride, and acarbose). A 58-year-old male with diabetic triopathy complained of orthostatic dizziness and vertigo after meals. The blood pressure was monitored for 24 h with an ambulatory blood pressure monitor, revealing that the systolic blood pressure decreased markedly after breakfast and dinner by 45 and 50 mmHg, respectively. PPH was not improved by a subcutaneous injection of octreotide. Administration of midodrine hydrochloride reduced the frequency of hypotensive episodes from twice to once daily, but the magnitude of the postprandial fall in blood pressure was still around 30 mmHg. After the patient started to receive acarbose therapy, the postprandial fall in blood pressure was diminished to 18 mmHg and his symptoms largely disappeared. For the treatment of PPH in diabetic patients, our experience suggests that it may be appropriate to try first on alpha-glucosidase inhibitor like acarbose.

  15. Efficacy of acarbose and metformin in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients stratified by HbA1c levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Na; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Xin; Yang, Wen-Ying

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the therapeutic efficacy of acarbose and metformin is correlated with baseline HbA1c levels in Chinese patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Data for 711 subjects were retrieved from the MARCH (Metformin and AcaRbose in Chinese as initial Hypoglycemic treatment) trial database and reviewed retrospectively. Patients were grouped according to baseline HbA1c levels (8%) and the results for these three groups were compared between acarbose and metformin treatments. Acarbose and metformin treatment significantly improved T2DM-associated parameters (weight, fasting plasma glucose [FPG], postprandial glucose [PPG], glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1], HOMA-IR, and total cholesterol) across all HbA1c levels. Acarbose decreased PPG and HOMA-β significantly more than metformin, but only in subjects with lower baseline HbA1c (PPG in the HbA1c levels (P HbA1c groups (all P HbA1c levels, whereas metformin induced greater reductions in FPG. These results may help guide selection of initial therapy based on baseline HbA1c. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Effect of a combination of Phaseolus vulgaris L. extract and acarbose on postprandial glucose level after cooked rice intake in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Zulkarnain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study was aimed to measure the effects of combination Phaseolus vulgaris extract and acarbose compared to acarbose alone on postprandial glucose concentration in healthy volunteers after cooked rice intake.Methods Blood sample were obtained at several time points up to three hours after cooked rice intake. The parameter for postprandial glucose concentration is the area under the curve (AUC of glucose concentration vs.time for three hours after cooked rice intake.Results After taking this combination, postprandial glucose concentration was reduced by 21.6%, while the reduction by acarbose alone was 22.9%.Conclusions The reduction of postprandial glucose concentration after administration of this combination was not significantly different compared to that after administration of acarbose alone. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 25-30Keywords: Phaseolus vulgaris extract, acarbose, postprandial glucose concentration

  17. Acarbose monotherapy and weight loss in Eastern and Western populations with hyperglycaemia: an ethnicity-specific meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Tong, Y; Zhang, Y; Huang, L; Wu, T; Tong, N

    2014-11-01

    To demonstrate if weight loss achieved with acarbose in individuals with hyperglycaemia differs between Eastern and Western populations. Databases and reference lists of clinical trials on acarbose were searched. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials of acarbose monotherapy in populations with hyperglycaemia of more than 12-week duration that provided data on body weight (BW) or body mass index (BMI). A total of 34 trials (6082 participants) were included. The effect of acarbose on BW was superior to that of placebo [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.78 to -0.25], nateglinide (WMD = -1.33, 95% CI -1.51 to -0.75) and metformin (WMD = -0.67, 95% CI -1.14 to -0.20). Compared with placebo, there was a significantly greater weight loss of 0.92 kg (p Eastern populations (WMD = -1.20, 95% CI -1.51 to -0.75) than that in Western populations (WMD = -0.28, 95% CI -0.59 to 0.03). Across all studies, the acarbose group achieved a significantly larger absolute weight loss of (change from baseline) 1.35 kg (p Eastern populations (WMD = -2.26, 95% CI -2.70 to -1.81) than in Western populations (WMD = -0.91, 95% CI -1.36 to -0.47). Nevertheless, the possible risk of bias in Eastern studies may influence the results. The effect of acarbose on weight loss seems to be more pronounced in Eastern than in Western populations with hyperglycaemia, and is superior to that of placebo, nateglinide and metformin across both ethnicities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Kinetic analysis of inhibition of glucoamylase and active site mutants via chemoselective oxime immobilization of acarbose on SPR chip surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Jørgen; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2013-01-01

    shown that at pH 7.0 the association and dissociation rate constants for the acarbose-glucoamylase interaction are 104M−1s−1 and 103s−1, respectively, and that the conformational change to a tight enzyme–inhibitor complex affects the dissociation rate constant by a factor of 102s−1. Additionally......, the acarbose-presenting SPR surfaces could be used as a glucoamylase sensor that allowed rapid, label-free affinity screening of small carbohydrate-based inhibitors in solution, which is otherwise difficult with immobilized enzymes or other proteins....

  19. Reconstruction and in silico analysis of an Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 genome-scale metabolic model for acarbose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali eWang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 produces the -glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of its cellular metabolism, a genome-scale metabolic model of strain SE50/110, iYLW1028, was reconstructed on the bases of the genome annotation, biochemical databases, and extensive literature mining. Model iYLW1028 comprises 1028 genes, 1128 metabolites and 1219 reactions. 122 and 81 genes were essential for cell growth on acarbose synthesis and sucrose media, respectively, and the acarbose biosynthetic pathway in SE50/110 was expounded completely. Based on model predictions, the addition of arginine and histidine to the media increased acarbose production by 78% and 59%, respectively. Additionally, dissolved oxygen has a great effect on acarbose production based on model predictions. Furthermore, genes to be overexpressed for the overproduction of acarbose were identified, and the deletion of treY eliminated the formation of by-product component C. Model iYLW1028 is a useful platform for optimizing and systems metabolic engineering for acarbose production in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110.

  20. Satiety in the obese Zucker rat: effects of carbohydrate type and acarbose (Bay g 5421).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, C A; Vasselli, J R

    1989-09-01

    Despite the obese Zucker rat's hyperphagia on carbohydrate diets such as laboratory chow, this laboratory has found that its satiety response to glucose and other simple sugars is comparable to that of its lean control rat. To further investigate carbohydrate satiety in the Zucker rat, the short-term feeding behavior of obese and lean rats was observed following intragastric infusions (7.2 kcal in 10 ml) of corn starch and the starch hydrolysates Polycose and dextrin. There were no reliable between-genotype differences in the feeding inhibitory effects of Polycose and dextrin. However, in obese rats, the satiety effect of corn starch was delayed and reduced compared to that observed in lean rats (p less than 0.04). To modify the effect of corn starch, rats were administered 0.2 or 0.6 mg/infusion of the carbohydrate digestive inhibitor acarbose (Bay g 5421). Acarbose significantly reduced the satiety effect of corn starch in lean rats (p less than 0.001), and further attenuated satiety in obese rats (p less than 0.02). Since secretion of pancreatic amylase, the enzyme that initiates starch digestion, is decreased in obese rats, this result suggests that alterations of digestive and/or absorptive processes may underlie the obese rat's impaired satiety response to complex carbohydrate.

  1. Synergistic effects of acarbose and an Oroxylum indicum seed extract in streptozotocin and high-fat-diet induced prediabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenlong; Sang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Bowei; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Qinmin; Xiu, Zhilong; Dong, Yuesheng

    2017-03-01

    Prediabetes is defined as blood glucose levels above normal but below diabetes thresholds, and up to 70% of individuals with prediabetes will eventually develop diabetes if left untreated. Acarbose, the first FDA approved anti-prediabetes agent, has some disadvantages, such as reducing the risk of diabetes by only 36%, side effects and limited effects on complications. The aim of this study is to develop a new agent to treat prediabetes and to investigate the anti-prediabetes effects and mechanisms of acarbose and an Oroxylum indicum seed extract (OISE) in prediabetic mice. The combined drugs can reduce the dose of acarbose by 80% and reduce the risk of diabetes by 75%, which is one fold higher than acarbose monotherapy. The combined drugs showed synergistic anti-prediabetes effects and could be effective in preventing the complications of prediabetes. The combined drugs could improve glucose tolerance, improve lipid metabolism and reduce oxidative stress and tissue damage. For the mechanisms, the combined drugs can reduce synergistically postprandial hyperglycaemia by inhibiting α-glucosidase. Furthermore, baicalein in OISE was demonstrated to be a major component in reducing oxidative stress and chrysin was the primary compound that activated PPARγ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure of Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase crystallized with and without the substrate analogue acarbose and maltose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne-Iversen, Louise; Hobley, Timothy John; Kaasgaard, Svend G.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) was studied in two different crystal forms. The first crystal form was obtained by crystallisation of BHA at room temperature in the presence of acarbose and maltose - data was collected at cryogenic temperatures to a resolution of 1.9 Å...

  3. Acarbose Monotherapy and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention in Eastern and Western Prediabetes: An Ethnicity-specific Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruijie; Li, Yi; Lv, Qingguo; Wu, Taixiang; Tong, Nanwei

    2015-08-01

    Acarbose is effective in delaying or preventing the progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to assess differences in the preventive effects of acarbose in Eastern and Western populations with prediabetes. We performed a systematic search of databases and reference lists of clinical trials conducted through August 2013. Randomized controlled trials of acarbose alone, with a minimum intervention duration of 3 years and which provided data on T2DM incidence, were included for analysis. Analyses were conducted by using Review Manager version 5.1 software. Eight randomized controlled trials with 2628 participants were included. Acarbose decreased the occurrence of T2DM (number needed to treat [NNT], 6.7). Compared with the control (placebo and/or lifestyle intervention), the incidence of T2DM was significantly lower in the Eastern group (NNT, 5.9) than in the Western group (NNT, 11.1) (P Eastern group (NNT, 4.3) than in the Western group (NNT, 25) (P = 0.004, I(2) = 92%). Among those remaining prediabetic, there was no significant difference between the subtotal estimates for the subgroups (P = 0.17, I(2) = 46.5%). There was no positive correlation between preventive effect and dose, and no difference in studies with varying follow-up durations within and across either ethnic group. The preventive effect of acarbose on the development of diabetes seems superior in Eastern populations with prediabetes compared with Western populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An observational study of acarbose treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes from the Middle East and Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihabi AR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdul R Shihabi,1 Essam M Moussa,2 Hania Sobierajska,3 Birgit Schmidt4 1Al Ain Centre, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; 2New Jeddah Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Etihad Airways Medical Centre, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Leverkusen, Germany Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing dramatically in the Middle East and North Africa region. However, there are few trials that have determined the effect of antidiabetic treatment in an observational setting in these countries. Methods: This was a noninterventional study performed in Morocco in 2006–2007 and in the Middle East in 2005–2006 to observe the efficacy and safety of acarbose in patients with pretreated or untreated type 2 diabetes. Glycemic parameters (fasting blood glucose, one-hour postprandial blood glucose, and HbA1c were recorded within a 3-month period. The observation period included an initial visit at the start of acarbose therapy and up to three follow-ups. Results: Acarbose was effective in reducing glycemic parameters in patients from Morocco (n = 1082 and the Middle East (n = 1737. The mean one-hour postprandial blood glucose decreased by 35.5% to 165.4 ± 47.9 mg/dL in the Middle East and by 35.5% to 179.0 ± 49.9 mg/dL in Morocco. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased by 30.8% to 126.6 ± 34.2 mg/dL (Middle East and by 34.5% to 150.6 ± 47.1 mg/dL (Morocco. The absolute reduction in HbA1c was 1.3% in the Middle East (final value 7.4% and 1.0% in Morocco (final value 7.5%. Overall, 107 patients (Middle East and 26 patients (Morocco experienced minor drug-related adverse events, which were mainly gastrointestinal. The tolerability of acarbose was rated as very good/good by 80.8% in the Middle East and by 68.6% in Morocco. Conclusion: This study illustrates the efficacy and safety of acarbose in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients in an observational setting. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, acarbose, Glucobay®, Glucor

  5. Effects of a glucosidase inhibitor (acarbose, BAY g 5421) on the development of obesity and food motivated behavior in Zucker (fafa) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, J R; Haraczkiewicz, E; Maggio, C A; Greenwood, M R

    1983-07-01

    BAY g 5421 (acarbose) inhibits carbohydrate digestion in the gut, thereby reducing the rate of glucose absorption. This experiment tested whether long term administration of acarbose to developing Zucker "fatty" (fafa) rats would, by reducing several lipogenic factors, attenuate lipid deposition and reduce the hyperphagia and increased food motivated behavior of these animals. From 7 to 20 weeks of life groups of fatty and lean (FaFa) control rats were fed 0, 20 or 40 mg acarbose/100 g maintenance diet (45% carbohydrate, 35% fat, 20% protein calories), while an additional fatty and lean group were pair-fed to respective 40 mg acarbose groups. Lean groups fed acarbose exhibited dose dependent reductions of body weight, insulin, triglycerides, retroperitoneal and epididymal pad weight, adipocyte size, LPL activity/cell (retroperitoneal pad only), and lipid deposition both in total grams of fat and as a percentage of carcass weight. Fatty groups fed acarbose exhibited dose dependent reductions of insulin, blood glucose, retroperitoneal pad weight, and, at one of the two doses used, significantly lowered body weight, (40 mg), triglycerides (20 mg) and cholesterol (20 mg). However, acarbose-fed fatty groups failed to show significant reductions of adipocyte size, number or LPL activity/cell in retroperitoneal and epididymal fat pads, and maintained their obese body composition, on a percentage basis, at levels not significantly different from that of the 0 mg fatty control group. Acarbose administration led to an initial dose dependent reduction of food intake in both genotypes, which persisted for the lean groups. Fatties fed the 20 mg dose showed a gradual tendency (ns) towards increased daily intake, lever pressed at elevated rates for food pellets, and refed at faster rates following fasting. Fatties fed the 40 mg dose maintained their daily intake at fatty control levels, did not lever press at elevated rates, and showed significantly reduced refeeding following

  6. alpha-Glucosidase inhibition (acarbose) fails to enhance secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36 amide) and to delay gastric emptying in Type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hücking, K; Kostic, Z; Pox, C

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acarbose is able to enhance GLP-1 release and delay gastric emptying in normal subjects. The effect of alpha-glucosidase inhibition on GLP-1 has been less evident in Type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of acarbose on GLP-1 release and gas...

  7. Will acarbose improve the metabolic abnormalities of insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Lintott, C J; Zimmet, P; Campbell, L; Bowen, K; Welborn, T

    1999-03-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 105; age 36-71 years) on diet therapy alone, and with quite good glycaemic control (mean HbA1c approximately 7.0%) were randomized to receive acarbose (100 mg three times daily) or placebo for 16 weeks, and changes in clinical and metabolic parameters indicative of Syndrome X were monitored. Fasting levels of glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), true insulin, proinsulin, fibrinogen and lipids were measured four times weekly, and glucose, insulin, proinsulin and triglyceride responses to a standardized 1.6 MJ breakfast were determined at 0, 1 and 2 h post meal. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Fasting levels of glucose (P fasting glucose and triglyceride levels, lowers HbA1c and limits the glycaemic and insulin response to food in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus with Syndrome X. Pharmacological agents that improve the metabolic environment and reduce insulin resistance have the potential to limit the progression of atherogenesis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Differential effects of sugars and the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose (Bay g 5421) on satiety in the Zucker obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, C A; Decarr, L B; Vasselli, J R

    1987-01-01

    To examine the satiety responses of Zucker obese and lean rats to simple sugars, adult male rats were given equicaloric intragastric infusions of fructose, glucose, and sucrose. All three sugars reduced the short-term intakes of both genotypes, although no reliable between-genotype differences in the satiety effects of the sugars were observed. Within each genotype, fructose had a larger satiety effect than sucrose. To examine a potential basis for the observed effects, rats were given sucrose infusions containing the intestinal glucosidase inhibitor acarbose (Bay g 5421). In obese rats, addition of a low dose of acarbose increased the satiety effect of sucrose infusion. Delaying carbohydrate absorption via acarbose administration may alter gastrointestinal and/or postabsorptive satiety processes, and may prove useful as a probe for investigating the nature of satiety signals.

  9. Hydrogen gas production is associated with reduced interleukin-1β mRNA in peripheral blood after a single dose of acarbose in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamasawa, Atsuko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Hariya, Natsuyo; Saito, Miyoko; Ishida, Hidenori; Doguchi, Satako; Yanagiya, Syoko; Osonoi, Takeshi

    2015-09-05

    Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, leads to the production of hydrogen gas, which reduces oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the effects of a single dose of acarbose immediately before a test meal on postprandial hydrogen gas in breath and peripheral blood interleukin (IL)-1β mRNA expression in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Sixteen Japanese patients (14 men, 2 women) participated in this study. The mean±standard deviation age, hemoglobin A1c and body mass index were 52.1±15.4 years, 10.2±2.0%, and 27.7±8.0kg/m(2), respectively. The patients were admitted into our hospital for 2 days and underwent test meals at breakfast without (day 1) or with acarbose (day 2). We performed continuous glucose monitoring and measured hydrogen gas levels in breath, and peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA levels before (0min) and after the test meal (hydrogen gas: 60, 120, 180, and 300min; IL-1β: 180min). The induction of hydrogen gas production and the reduction in peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA after the test meal were not significant between days 1 (without acarbose) and 2 (with acarbose). However, the changes in total hydrogen gas production from day 1 to day 2 were closely and inversely associated with the changes in peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA levels. Our results suggest that an increase in hydrogen gas production is inversely associated with a reduction of the peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA level after a single dose of acarbose in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transglycosylation reactions of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with acarbose and various acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwa Park, K; Jeong Kim, M; Seob Lee, H; Kim, D [Department of Food Science and Technology and Research Center for New Bio-Materials in Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Soo Han, N; Robyt, J F [Laboratory for Carbohydrate Chemistry and Enzymology, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-12-15

    It was observed that Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase cleaved the first glycosidic bond of acarbose to produce glucose and a pseudotrisaccharide (PTS) that was transferred to C-6 of the glucose to give an {alpha}-(1-6) glycosidic linkage and the formation of isoacarbose. The addition of a number of different carbohydrates to the digest gave transfer products in which PTS was primarily attached {alpha}-(1-6) to d-glucose, d-mannose, d-galactose, and methyl {alpha}-d-glucopyranoside. With d-fructopyranose and d-xylopyranose, PTS was linked {alpha}-(1-5) and {alpha}-(1-4), respectively. PTS was primarily transferred to C-6 of the nonreducing residue of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, and gentiobiose. Lesser amounts of {alpha}-(1-3) and/or {alpha}-(1-4) transfer products were also observed for these carbohydrate acceptors. The major transfer product to sucrose gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-4) to the glucose residue. {alpha},{alpha}-Trehalose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4). Maltitol gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the glucopyranose residue. Raffinose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the d-galactopyranose residue. Maltotriose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the nonreducing end glucopyranose residue. Xylitol gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-5) as the major product and d-glucitol gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) as the only product. The structures of the transfer products were determined using thin layer-chromatography, high-performance ion chromatography, enzyme hydrolysis, methylation analysis and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. The best acceptor was gentiobiose, followed closely by maltose and cellobiose, and the weakest acceptor was d-glucitol. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Transglycosylation reactions of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with acarbose and various acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa Park, K.; Jeong Kim, M.; Seob Lee, H.; Kim, D.; Soo Han, N.; Robyt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    It was observed that Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase cleaved the first glycosidic bond of acarbose to produce glucose and a pseudotrisaccharide (PTS) that was transferred to C-6 of the glucose to give an α-(1-6) glycosidic linkage and the formation of isoacarbose. The addition of a number of different carbohydrates to the digest gave transfer products in which PTS was primarily attached α-(1-6) to d-glucose, d-mannose, d-galactose, and methyl α-d-glucopyranoside. With d-fructopyranose and d-xylopyranose, PTS was linked α-(1-5) and α-(1-4), respectively. PTS was primarily transferred to C-6 of the nonreducing residue of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, and gentiobiose. Lesser amounts of α-(1-3) and/or α-(1-4) transfer products were also observed for these carbohydrate acceptors. The major transfer product to sucrose gave PTS linked α-(1-4) to the glucose residue. α,α-Trehalose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4). Maltitol gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the glucopyranose residue. Raffinose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the d-galactopyranose residue. Maltotriose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the nonreducing end glucopyranose residue. Xylitol gave PTS linked α-(1-5) as the major product and d-glucitol gave PTS linked α-(1-6) as the only product. The structures of the transfer products were determined using thin layer-chromatography, high-performance ion chromatography, enzyme hydrolysis, methylation analysis and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The best acceptor was gentiobiose, followed closely by maltose and cellobiose, and the weakest acceptor was d-glucitol. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Effects of acarbose on cardiovascular and diabetes outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance (ACE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Rury R; Coleman, Ruth L; Chan, Juliana C N; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Feng, Huimei; Ge, Junbo; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Gray, Richard; Huo, Yong; Lang, Zhihui; McMurray, John J; Rydén, Lars; Schröder, Stefan; Sun, Yihong; Theodorakis, Michael J; Tendera, Michal; Tucker, Lynne; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wei, Yidong; Yang, Wenying; Wang, Duolao; Hu, Dayi; Pan, Changyu

    2017-11-01

    The effect of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance is unknown. We aimed to assess whether acarbose could reduce the frequency of cardiovascular events in Chinese patients with established coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance, and whether the incidence of type 2 diabetes could be reduced. The Acarbose Cardiovascular Evaluation (ACE) trial was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 4 trial, with patients recruited from 176 hospital outpatient clinics in China. Chinese patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned (1:1), in blocks by site, by a centralised computer system to receive oral acarbose (50 mg three times a day) or matched placebo, which was added to standardised cardiovascular secondary prevention therapy. All study staff and patients were masked to treatment group allocation. The primary outcome was a five-point composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, and hospital admission for heart failure, analysed in the intention-to-treat population (all participants randomly assigned to treatment who provided written informed consent). The secondary outcomes were a three-point composite outcome (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and non-fatal stroke), death from any cause, cardiovascular death, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal or non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, hospital admission for heart failure, development of diabetes, and development of impaired renal function. The safety population comprised all patients who received at least one dose of study medication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00829660, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry, number ISRCTN91899513. Between March 20, 2009

  13. Comparison of the hypoglycemic effect of acarbose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus consuming an Eastern or Western diet: a systematic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qibo; Tong, Yuzhen; Wu, Taixiang; Li, Jieqing; Tong, Nanwei

    2013-06-01

    Because of its mechanism of action, the starch content of a diet might alter the hypoglycemic effect of acarbose. We aimed to determine whether differences in this hypoglycemic effect existed between individuals consuming Eastern and Western diets with significantly different starch contents, a systematic meta-analysis of studies comparing acarbose with placebo or other hypoglycemic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was performed. Records were retrieved from the Cochrane clinical controlled trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Wanfang, Chinese Technical Periodicals, and ongoing trials databases, and full texts and reference lists were screened. Because no study has directly compared patients consuming different types of diet, fixed- and random-effect models were used to indirectly compare the hypoglycemic effect of acarbose monotherapy with that of placebo and/or comparator drugs in patients with T2DM consuming an Eastern (Eastern Asia) or Western (including Europe and North America) diet. A total of 46 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results revealed that, compared with placebo, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were reduced to a significantly greater extent (1.02%) in the Eastern diet (mean [SD], 1.54% [2.00%]) than in the Western diet (mean [SD], 0.52% [1.20%]) P Eastern (P = 0.20) and Western (P = 0.10) diet groups was similar to that of sulfonylureas, and HbA1c levels were reduced significantly more (0.39%; P Eastern than in the Western diet group. The ability of acarbose to reduce HbA1c levels was similar to those of metformin and nateglinide/repaglinide, but a comparison of its efficacy with different diets was difficult because of the inclusion of few studies in these categories. Analysis of all included studies revealed that acarbose achieved a greater absolute reduction of HbA1c levels in the Eastern diet (mean [SD], 1.26% [1.20%]) than in the Western diet (mean [SD], 0.62% [1.28%]; P Eastern diet trials may have affected the

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Acarbose and TZQ-F, a New Kind of Traditional Chinese Medicine to Treat Diabetes, Chinese Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yuhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethnopharmacological Relevance. TZQ-F has been traditionally used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as a formula for the treatment of diabetes. Aim of the Study. This study aims to compare the pharmacologic effects and gastrointestinal adverse events between TZQ-F and acarbose. Methods. The double-blind randomized placebo-controlled fivefold crossover study was performed in 20 healthy male volunteers. Plasma glucose, plasma IRI, and plasma C-peptide were measured to assess the pharmacologic effects. Flatus and bowel activity were measured to assess the adverse event of gastrointestinal effect. Results. 3 and 4 tablets of TZQ decreased the Cmax of plasma glucose compared with that of the previous day and with placebo. 3 tablets also decreased Cmax of plasma C-peptide compared with placebo. 4 tablets increased Cmax of plasma insulin after breakfast and the AUC of plasma C-peptide after breakfast and dinner. 2 tablets did not decrease plasma glucose and elevated the Cmax and AUC of C-peptide after breakfast and dinner, respectively. Acarbose 50 mg decreased the Cmax of plasma insulin and C-peptide after breakfast and the Cmax of plasma glucose and C-peptide after dinner. The subjects who received TZQ did not report any abdominal adverse events. Conclusions. 3 tablets of TZQ have the same effects as the acarbose.

  15. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, improves glycamic control and reduces body weight in type 2 diabetes: Findings on indian patients from the pooled data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycemia (PPG. The higher carbohydrate in the Indian diets lead to greater prandial glycemic excursion, increased glucosidase, and incretin activity in the gut and may need special therapeutic strategies to tackle these glucose peaks. This is the subgroup analysis of Indian subjects who participated in the GlucoVIP study that investigated the effectiveness and tolerability of acarbose as add-on or monotherapy in a range of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 1996 Indian patients were included in the effectiveness analysis. After 12.5 weeks (mean, the mean change in 2-hour PPG from baseline was −74.4 mg/dl, mean HbA1c decreased by -1.0%, and mean fasting blood glucose decreased by -37.9 mg/dl. The efficacy of acarbose was rated "very good" or "good" in 91.1% of patients, and tolerability as "very good" or "good" in 88.0% of patients. The results of this observational study suggest that acarbose was effective and well tolerated in the Indian patients with T2DM.

  16. Glycemic excursions are positively associated with HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Shi-Dou; Su, Shih-Li; Tu, Shih-Te; Tseng, Yao-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between glycemic excursions before treatment and HbA1c reduction after treatment intensification with acarbose or glibenclamide in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Patients receiving single or dual oral antidiabetic drug treatment with an HbA1c of 7.0-11.0 % (53-97 mmol/mol) were switched to metformin monotherapy (500 mg, t.i.d.) for 8 weeks, followed by randomization to either acarbose (100 mg, t.i.d.) or glibenclamide (5 mg, t.i.d.) as add-on treatment for 16 weeks. Glycemic excursions were assessed as mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) with 72-h ambulatory continuous glucose monitoring. Treatment efficacy was evaluated as relative HbA1c reduction (%), calculated as (baseline HbA1c - post-treatment HbA1c)/baseline HbA1c × 100. Fifty patients (mean [±SD] age 53.5 ± 8.2 years, 48 % men, mean baseline HbA1c 8.4 ± 1.2 %) were analyzed. Baseline MAGE was positively correlated with relative HbA1c reduction from baseline in patients treated with acarbose (r = 0.421, P = 0.029) but not glibenclamide (r = 0.052, P = 0.813). Linear regression analysis revealed that the association between baseline MAGE and relative HbA1c reduction from baseline (β = 0.125, P = 0.029) in patients treated with acarbose remained significant after adjustment for several confounders (P HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose, but not glibenclamide. These findings highlight the importance of glycemic excursions in individualized treatment for patients with T2D. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine (SJTU), Chinese Society of Endocrinology and Chinese Endocrinologist Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Saxagliptin versus Acarbose as Second-Line Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuyan; Zeng, Yuhang; Yu, Demin; Hu, Xiaoqian; Dong, Hengjin

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the long-term cost-effectiveness of saxagliptin+metformin (SAXA+MET) versus acarbose+metformin (ACAR+MET) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled on MET alone. Systematic literature reviews were performed to identify studies directly comparing SAXA+MET versus ACAR+MET, and to obtain diabetes-related events costs which were modified by hospital surveys. A Cardiff Diabetes Model was used to estimate the long-term economic and health treatment consequences in patients with T2DM. Costs (2014 Chinese yuan) were calculated from the payer's perspective and estimated over a patient's lifetime. SAXA+MET predicted lower incidences of most cardiovascular events, hypoglycemia events and fatal events, and decreased total costs compared with ACAR+MET. For an individual patient, the quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained with SAXA+MET was 0.48 more than ACAR+MET at a cost saving of ¥18,736, which resulted in a cost saving of ¥38,640 per QALY gained for SAXA+MET versus ACAR+MET. Results were robust across various univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. SAXA+MET is a cost-effective treatment alternative compared with ACAR+MET for patients with T2DM in China, with a little QALYs gain and lower costs. SAXA is an effective, well-tolerated drug with a low incidence of adverse events and ease of administration; it is anticipated to be an effective second-line therapy for T2DM treatment.

  18. A prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multi-centric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, S; Hariharan, R S; Madhavan, R; Periyandavar, I; Samra, S S

    2010-11-01

    The present study was a prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multicentric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 229 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled at 5 medical centers across India. They received either acarbose (50 mg) + metformin (500 mg) bid/tid (n=115) or metformin monotherapy (500 mg) bid/ tid (n=114) for 12 weeks. Primary objective was to evaluate safety and tolerability based on the adverse events reported. Secondary objective was efficacy assessment based on changes in fasting, post prandial blood glucose and HbA1c values. In the acarbose + metformin group 10 patients reported 14 adverse events while in metformin group 9 patients reported 10 adverse events. No patient reported any serious adverse event or was withdraw from study because of adverse events. In the acarbose plus metformin group fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from a baseline of 158.85 +/- 18.14 mg/dl to 113.55 +/- 19.38 mg/dl (p fasting blood glucose decreased from a baseline of 158.31 +/- 26.53 mg/dl to 130.55 +/- 28.31 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 27.76 +/- 22.91 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) decreased from a baseline of 264.65 +/- 34.03 mg/dl to 173.22 +/- 31.40 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 91.43 +/- 28.65 mg/dl) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group PPBG decreased from a baseline of 253.56 +/- 36.28 mg/dl to 205.36 +/- 39.49 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 48.20 +/- 32.72 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased from a baseline of 9.47 +/- 0.69% to 7.71 +/- 0.85% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.76 +/- 1.11) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group HbAlc decreased from a baseline of 9.32 +/- 0.65% to 8.26 +/- 0.68% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.06 +/- 0.66) at 12 weeks. The

  19. Effect of Acarbose, Sitagliptin and combination therapy on blood glucose, insulin, and incretin hormone concentrations in experimentally induced postprandial hyperglycemia of healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akihiro; Ueda, Kaori; Lee, Peter; Oda, Hitomi; Ishioka, Katsumi; Arai, Toshiro; Sako, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    Acarbose (AC) and Sitagliptin (STGP) are oral hypoglycemic agents currently used either alone or in conjunction with human diabetic (Type 2) patients. AC has been used with diabetic cats, but not STGP thus far. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the potential use of AC or STGP alone and in combination for diabetic cats, by observing their effect on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and incretin hormone (active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and total glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)) concentrations in five healthy cats, following ingestion of a meal with maltose. All treatments tended (pglucose area under the curve (AUC), with an accompanying significant reduction (pAUC as compared to no treatment. Meanwhile, a significant increase (pAUC was observed with STGP (100% higher) and combined treatment (130% greater), as compared to either AC or no treatment. Lastly, a significant reduction (pAUC was observed with STGP (21% reduction) and combined treatment (7% reduction) as compared to control. Overall, AC, STGP, or combined treatment can significantly induce positive post-prandial changes to insulin and incretin hormone levels of healthy cats. Increasing active GLP-1 and reducing postprandial hyperglycemia appear to be the principal mechanisms of combined treatment. Considering the different, but complementary mechanisms of action by which AC and STGP induce lower glucose and insulin levels, combination therapy with both these agents offers great potential for treating diabetic cats in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coste-efectividad de la adición de acarbosa al tratamiento de pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 en España Cost-effectiveness of the addition of acarbose to the treatment of patients with type-2 diabetes in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Piñol

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Evaluar el coste-efectividad de la adición de acarbosa al tratamiento de pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 en España. Métodos: Se utilizó el CORE Diabetes Model (modelo de simulación informática publicado y validado para proyectar a largo plazo los resultados clínicos y de costes de la DM2. Las probabilidades de transición y los riesgos se obtuvieron de distintas publicaciones. Los efectos del tratamiento y las características basales de la cohorte se obtuvieron de un metaanálisis. Los costes directos se extrajeron de diversas publicaciones y se proyectaron a lo largo de la vida de los pacientes bajo la perspectiva del Sistema Nacional de Salud de España. Los costes y beneficios fueron descontados en un 3% anual. Se realizaron análisis de sensibilidad. Resultados: El tratamiento con acarbosa se asoció con mejoras en la esperanza de vida (0,23 años y en los años de vida ajustados por calidad (AVAC (0,21 años. Los costes directos fueron en promedio, por paciente, de 468 € más caros con acarbosa que con placebo. La razón de coste-efectividad incremental fue de 2.002 €/año de vida ganado y de 2.199 €/AVAC ganado. La curva de aceptabilidad mostró que con una disponibilidad a pagar de 20.000 €, generalmente aceptada como muy buen valor monetario, el tratamiento con acarbosa se asoció con una probabilidad del 93,5% de ser coste-efectiva. Conclusiones: Este estudio económico a largo plazo mostró que la adición de acarbosa al tratamiento de pacientes con DM2 produjo mejoras en la esperanza de vida y en los AVAC de estos pacientes.Objectives: To assess the cost-effectiveness of the addition of acarbose to existing treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 in Spain. Methods: The CORE Diabetes Model (a published and validated computer simulation model was used to project long-term clinical and cost outcomes in DM2. Transition probabilities and risk adjustments were derived from published

  1. Análisis de la relación coste-efectividad de la acarbosa en el tratamiento de pacientes con intolerancia a la glucosa Cost-effectiveness analysis of acarbose in the treatment of patients with impaired glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Sabés

    2004-12-01

    comparado y el horizonte temporal del estudio y utilizar alguna medida de resultados en salud que tenga en cuenta los efectos del tratamiento.Objective: To perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment with acarbose in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT in comparison with conventional treatment (based on medical counseling on diet and health and without drug treatment from the perspective of the public payer. Material and method: A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using data on efficacy, the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 and cardiovascular events from the STOP-NIDDM clinical trial of acarbose treatment vs. placebo. The study used a decision tree analysis to estimate the health and economic impact of the two alternative treatments in a population of 1,000 patients over a period of 40 months. Resource use and cost data refer to the Spanish health care system. Results: In the base case, acarbose treatment was slightly dominant over conventional treatment since it achieved improved outcomes at an even lower cost. Sensitivity analysis revealed that acarbose treatment lost dominance due to a moderately positive cost-effectiveness ratio for avoided progression to DM2 in some scenarios. The cost-effectiveness ratio was particularly sensitive to the cost of cardiovascular treatments, the risk of progression to DM2, the daily doses of acarbose, and the publicly funded share of the cost of this drug. Conclusions: Acarbose treatment in patients diagnosed with IGT appeared to be the dominant alternative compared with conventional treatment. The cost per avoided progression to DM2 and per additional individual free of a cardiovascular event was moderately low in some of the scenarios included in the sensitivity analysis. For a more comprehensive evaluation of the possible treatment of patients with IGT, the alternatives under comparison and the time horizon of the study would need to be increased and more refined health outcome measures, comprising

  2. Modification of the metabolic parameters and microalbuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 treated with acarbose

    OpenAIRE

    González Sarmiento, E.; Ergueta Martín, P.; Fernández Martínez, I.; Hinojosa Mena-Bernal, M.C.; Zurro Muñoz, I.; Zurro Hernández, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la influencia de la acarbosa en la microalbuminuria y parámetros metabólicos en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Material y métodos: Hemos estudiado 92 pacientes con diabetes tipo 2, tratados con acarbosa, sola o con insulina o antidiabéticos orales. Hemos determinado los valores de Hb A1c, colesterol total, colesterol HDL, colesterol LDL, triglicéridos y microalbuminuria, antes y después del tratamiento con acarbosa. Resultados: Los pacientes presentaron de forma ...

  3. The alpha-amylase inhibitor acarbose does not affect the parasitoid Venturia canescens when incorporated into the diet of its host Ephestia kuehniella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaufnerová, J.; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Hubert, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 1 (2007), s. 17-25 ISSN 0013-8703 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/04/1286; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06073 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OC842.20 Program:1P Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Ichneumonidae * Lepidoptera * Pyralidae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2007

  4. Managing ulcerative colitis by increasing hydrogen production via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main side-effect of treatment with Acarbose, flatulence, occurs when undigested carbohydrates are fermented by colonic bacteria, resulting in considerable amounts of hydrogen. We found that the enteric benefits of Acarbose are partly due to be their ability to neutralise oxidative stress via increased production of H2 in ...

  5. oxadiazole-5-thiol derivatives. 2. Anti-bacterial, enzyme- inhibitory an

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Antibacterial activities of the compounds were evaluated using broth dilution ... butyrylcholinesterase (BchE) and lipoxygenase (LOX) using acarbose, eserine and baicalien as .... ºC, absorbance was measured at 400 nm using.

  6. Prolonged successful therapy for hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myint, K S; Greenfield, J R; Farooqi, I S

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery (GBS) is increasingly recognised. However, its pathophysiology remains unclear. Some patients require pancreatectomy. Medical therapy with calcium channel blockers, acarbose and diazoxide has been reported to be beneficial...

  7. In Vitro Screening of α-Amylase Inhibition by Selected Terpenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    insulin it produces. Thus, retardation of ... diabetes. Some inhibitors currently in clinical use are acarbose and miglitol. However ... important in the treatment of diabetes because they are free ... resulting in a less homogenized emulsion of the.

  8. Coste-efectividad de la adición de acarbosa al tratamiento de pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 en España Cost-effectiveness of the addition of acarbose to the treatment of patients with type-2 diabetes in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Carme Piñol; Stephane Roze; William Valentine; Thomas Evers

    2007-01-01

    Objetivos: Evaluar el coste-efectividad de la adición de acarbosa al tratamiento de pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2) en España. Métodos: Se utilizó el CORE Diabetes Model (modelo de simulación informática publicado y validado) para proyectar a largo plazo los resultados clínicos y de costes de la DM2. Las probabilidades de transición y los riesgos se obtuvieron de distintas publicaciones. Los efectos del tratamiento y las características basales de la cohorte se obtuvieron de un m...

  9. Role of metabolic control on diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Célia Sperandéo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was studying the influence of glucose metabolic control on diabetic nephropathy. The authors observed the effect of acarbose, insulin, and both drugs on the metabolic control and development of mesangial enlargement of kidney glomeruli in alloxan-diabetic rats. METHODS: Five groups of Wistar rats were used: normal rats (N, non-treated alloxan-diabetic rats (D, alloxan-diabetic rats treated with acarbose (AD, alloxan-diabetic rats treated with insulin (ID, and alloxan-diabetic rats treated with insulin plus acarbose (IAD. The following parameters were evaluated: body weight; water and food intake; diuresis; blood and urine glucose levels; and the kidney lesions: mesangial enlargement and tubule cell vacuolization. Renal lesions were analysed using a semi-quantitative score 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after diabetes induction. RESULTS: Diabetic rats showed a marked increase of glycemia, urinary glucose levels, diuresis, water and food intake, and weight loss, while the treated diabetic rats showed significant decreased levels of these parameters. The most satisfactory metabolic control was that of diabetic rats treated with acarbose + insulin. There was a significant mesangial enlargement in diabetic rats compared to normal rats from the third up to the 12th month after diabetes induction, with a significant difference between the animals treated with acarbose + insulin and non-treated diabetic rats. A difference between the animals treated with acarbose or insulin alone and non-treated diabetics rats was not seen. CONCLUSIONS: The authors discuss the results stressing the role of diabetic metabolic control in the prevention of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Dgroup: DG01803 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01803 DGroup Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor -bose ... D00216 ... Acarbose (...e (USAN) D09779 ... Emiglitate (JAN/INN) Antidiabetic agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ATC code: A10BF Antidiabetics GAA [HSA:2548] [KO:K12316] GANC [HSA:2595] [KO:K12317] MGAM [HSA:8972] [KO:K12047] ...

  11. Drug: D00216 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etic agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glu...cosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor... D00216 Drug Acarbose (JAN/USAN/INN); Precose (TN) ... C25H43NO18 D00216.gif ... Actinoplanes [TAX:1865] Antidiab

  12. New α-Glucosidase inhibitors from Croton bonplandianum Croton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26.7 μg/mL, relative to that of the positive control, acarbose (IC50, 38.2 µg/mL). Conclusion: The ... Chemicals, reagents and instrumentation α-Glucosidase ... measurements performed on the MAT 312 mass ... the extraction process, 20.2 g of.

  13. α-Glucosidase inhibitory hydrolyzable tannins from Eugenia jambolana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Raed; Li, Liya; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-08-24

    Three new hydrolyzable tannins including two gallotannins, jamutannins A (1) and B (2), and an ellagitannin, iso-oenothein C (3), along with eight known phenolic compounds were isolated from the seeds of Eugenia jambolana fruit. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. All compounds isolated were evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory effects compared to the clinical drug acarbose.

  14. Anti-hyperglycemic effect and glucose tolerance of guajava (Psidium guajava L.) leaf ethanol extract in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanis Musdja, Muhammad; Mahendra, Feizar; Musir, Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally guava (Psidium guajava L) leaf is used for treatment of various ailments like diarrhea, wounds, rheumatism, anti-allergy, ant-spasmodic, etc, as folk medicine. The aim of this research is to know the effect of hypoglycemia and glucose tolerance of ethanol extract of guava leaf against male white rat. The guajava leaf was obtained from Balitro Bogor. Preparation of guajava leaf extract was done by cold maceration extraction technique using ethanol 70%. Male albino rats were made into diabetics using the alloxan method. Rats were divided into 6 groups, as a comparative drug for anti-hyperglycemic used glibenclamid and as a comparative drug for glucose tolerance used acarbose. The result of blood glucometer test showed that ethanol extract 70% of guajava leaf had effect as anti-hyperglycemic and glucose tolerance with no significant difference with glibenclamid drug as anti-hyperglycemic and acarbose as glucose tolerance drug.

  15. Traditionally used plants in diabetes therapy: phytotherapeutics as inhibitors of alpha-amylase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Funke

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia. There are many and diverse therapeutic strategies in the management of Type 2 diabetes. The inhibition of alpha-amylase activity is only one possibility to lower postprandial blood glucose levels. In our in-vitro studies we could demonstrate that different plants, mostly traditionally used in common diabetic therapy in Africa or Europe, are able to inhibit alpha-amylase, which is responsible for the breakdown of oligosaccharides into monosaccharides which are absorbed. An inhibition of alpha-amylase activity of 90% was seen with the extract of the leaves of Tamarindus indica. To quantify inhibtion rates, acarbose was used (IC50: 23.2 µM. Highest inhibition level of acarbose in our testmodel was about 85%. Additionally tests with pure polyphenolic compounds might explain the biological activity of the selected plants.

  16. Liver alpha-amylase gene expression as an early obesity biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojbafan, Marzieh; Afsartala, Zohreh; Amoli, Mahsa M; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide, for which preventive and therapeutic means are still needed. Alpha-amylase is a digestive enzyme whose inhibition has been targeted as a potential anti-obesity strategy. However, alpha-amylase gene expression has not been particularly attended to, and in contrast with pancreatic and salivary amylases, fewer studies have focused on liver alpha-amylase. The present study aimed at investigating the expression of alpha-amylase gene in obese and normal mice at RNA and protein level as well as acarbose effect on this gene expression in hepatocyte cell culture. Control and case groups were fed by normal mouse pellet and high-fat diet respectively, during 8 weeks. After this period, serum biochemical parameters including glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, AST, ALT and alpha-amylase were assayed. Liver alpha-amylase gene was analyzed by real time PCR, and liver enzyme was assayed with Bernfeld and ELISA methods Hepatocyte cell culture derived from both group were also treated by acarbose and alpha-amylase activity and gene expression was analyzed by above mentioned methods. All biochemical factors showed an increase in obese mice, but the increase in ALT and AST were not statistically significant. Alpha-amylase levels were also increased in obese mice, both at RNA and protein level, while a decrease was seen in obese mice derived hepatocytes after acarbose treatment. Elevated liver alpha-amylase levels may be indicative of initial stages of obesity and the use of acarbose could be considered as a treatment of obesity which could be potentially effective at multiple levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  17. Effect of O-methylated and glucuronosylated flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on α-glucosidase inhibitory activity: structure-activity relationship and synergistic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Abdelly, Chedly; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-03-01

    O-Methylated and glucuronosylated flavonoids were isolated from Tamarix gallica as α-glucosidase inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids suggests that catechol moiety and glucuronic acid at C-3 are factors in the increase in α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Furthermore, rhamnetin, tamarixetin, rhamnazin, KGlcA, KGlcA-Me, QGlcA, and QGlcA-Me exhibit synergistic potential when applied with a very low concentration of acarbose to α-glucosidase from rat intestine.

  18. Oral Hypoglycaemic Drugs in Alloxan-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Balogh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the alpha-glycosidase inhibitor acarbose, the insulin sensitiser metformin and the insulin secretiser gliclazide on blood glucose level of dogs were examined in experimental diabetes. Dogs were randomly divided into three groups. During the first week of the experimental period control blood glucose data were determined. During the subsequent five weeks, the first group (n = 6 was administered acarbose (200 mg/dog/day, the second (n = 5 was treated with metformin (1700 mg/dog/day, and the third was given gliclazide (160 mg/dog/day. The drug was administered twice daily when feeding at 7:00 and 15:00 h. The average difference between postprandial and fasting blood glucose was determined for the treated and the control period, and the statistical significance of their difference (mean decrease was evaluated by two-sampled t-test. The mean decrease in blood glucose was 0.49 mmol/l (P = 0.09 for acarbose, 1.15 mmol/l (P = 0.01 for metformin, and 0.08 mmol/l (P = 0.88 for gliclazide. According to the results of statistical evaluation, metformin was the only drug that caused a significant decrease in postprandial blood glucose.

  19. Characterization of a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash eZibaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM and anterior midgut (AM. A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35 ºC. Also, the enzyme had Vmax values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and Km values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether N, N, N′, N′-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones.

  20. Resultados preliminares do uso de anti-hiperglicemiantes orais no diabete melito gestacional Preliminary results of the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs on gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carl Silva

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar a eficácia da glibenclamida e da acarbose com insulina no tratamento do diabete melito gestacional (DMG em relação ao controle glicêmico materno, peso do recém-nascido (RN e hipoglicemia neonatal. MÉTODOS: trata-se de ensaio clínico randomizado, prospectivo e aberto. Foram incluídas 57 pacientes com diagnóstico de DMG, que necessitaram de terapêutica complementar à dietoterapia e à atividade física. As gestantes foram aleatoriamente alocadas em um de três grupos com terapêuticas diferentes: um grupo controle conduzido com insulinoterapia, outro com glibenclamida e outro com acarbose. O período do estudo foi de sete meses (1º de outubro de 2003 a 1º de maio de 2004. Os desfechos primários avaliados foram o nível glicêmico materno após o inicio do tratamento, a necessidade de troca de terapêutica para controle glicêmico, peso do RN e presença de hipoglicemia neonatal. A análise estatística foi realizada pelo teste estatístico ANOVA, com nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: as características maternas foram semelhantes nos três grupos estudados. O controle glicêmico não foi obtido em três pacientes que utilizaram glibenclamida (15% e em sete das usuárias de acarbose (38,8%. Não houve diferença quanto à glicemia em jejum e pós-prandial e no peso médio do RN entre os três grupos. A incidência de fetos grandes para a idade gestacional foi de 5,2, 31,5 e 11,1% nos grupos tratados com insulina, glibenclamida e acarbose, respectivamente. A hipoglicemia neonatal ocorreu em seis RN, sendo quatro deles do grupo glibenclamida (21,0%. CONCLUSÕES: a glibenclamida foi mais eficiente para o controle glicêmico que a acarbose, mas ambos foram menos eficientes que a insulina. Os RN de pacientes alocadas no grupo glibenclamida apresentaram maior incidência de macrossomia e de hipoglicemia neonatal quando comparados com os RN cujas mães receberam outros tratamentos.PURPOSE: to compare the

  1. Genetic engineering in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 - development of an intergeneric conjugation system for the introduction of actinophage-based integrative vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gren, Tetiana; Ortseifen, Vera; Wibberg, Daniel; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Bednarz, Hanna; Niehaus, Karsten; Zemke, Till; Persicke, Marcus; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-08-20

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose is used for treatment of diabetes mellitus type II, and is manufactured industrially with overproducing derivatives of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110, reportedly obtained by conventional mutagenesis. Despite of high industrial significance, only limited information exists regarding acarbose metabolism, function and regulation of these processes, due to the absence of proper genetic engineering methods and tools developed for this strain. Here, a basic toolkit for genetic engineering of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 was developed, comprising a standardized protocol for a DNA transfer through Escherichia coli-Actinoplanes intergeneric conjugation and applied for the transfer of ϕC31, ϕBT1 and VWB actinophage-based integrative vectors. Integration sites, occurring once per genome for all vectors, were sequenced and characterized for the first time in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. Notably, in case of ϕC31 based vector pSET152, the integration site is highly conserved, while for ϕBT1 and the VWB based vectors pRT801 and pSOK804, respectively, no sequence similarities to those in other bacteria were detected. The studied plasmids were proven to be stable and neutral with respect to strain morphology and acarbose production, enabling future use for genetic manipulations of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. To further broaden the spectrum of available tools, a GUS reporter system, based on the pSET152 derived vector, was also established in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. α-Glucosidase inhibitory effect of resveratrol and piceatannol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Albert J; Rimando, Agnes M; Mizuno, Cassia S; Mathews, Suresh T

    2017-09-01

    Dietary polyphenols have been shown to inhibit α-glucosidase, an enzyme target of some antidiabetic drugs. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and wine, has been reported to inhibit the activity of yeast α-glucosidase. This triggered our interest to synthesize analogs and determine their effect on mammalian α-glucosidase activity. Using either sucrose or maltose as substrate resveratrol, piceatannol and 3'-hydroxypterostilbene showed strong inhibition of mammalian α-glucosidase activity; pinostilbene, cis-desoxyrhapontigenin and trans-desoxyrhapontigenin had moderate inhibition. Compared to acarbose (IC 50 3-13 μg/ml), piceatannol and resveratrol inhibited mammalian α-glucosidase to a lesser extent (IC 50 14-84 and 111-120 μg/ml, respectively). 3'-Hydroxypterostilbene (IC 50 105-302 μg/ml) was 23-35-fold less potent than acarbose. We investigated the effect of piceatannol and resveratrol on postprandial blood glucose response in high-fat-fed C57Bl/6 mice. Animals administered resveratrol (30 mg/kg body weight [BW]) or piceatannol (14 mg/kg BW) 60 min prior to sucrose or starch loading had a delayed absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in significant lowering of postprandial blood glucose concentrations, similar to the antidiabetic drug acarbose, while no significant effect was observed with the glucose-loaded animals. Our studies demonstrate that the dietary polyphenols resveratrol and piceatannol lower postprandial hyperglycemia and indicate that inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidase activity may be a potential mechanism contributing to their antidiabetic property. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. α-/β-Glucosidase and α-Amylase Inhibitory Activities of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Ethanol Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisca Evalina Gondokesumo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease, characterized by hyperglycemia due to disturbance in both insulin secretion and function. One of theurapeutic approaches is to reduce blood glucose levels by inhbiting α-/β-glucosidase and α-amylase involved in carbohydrate digestion. Thus, inhibition of these enzymes play important role in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. has been known to have several medicinal properties and potency as an antidiabetics agents. This reseacrh aimed to observe antidiabetic properties of roselle ethanol extract (REE towards α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and α-amylase. Materials and Methods: REE was done with maceration technique using diluent of 70% ethanol. Antidiabetic properties were measured by inhibitory activity of α-amylase, α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase. Results: REE was able to inhibit α-/β-glucosidase and α-amylase in the highest concentration with inhibition percentage of 72.68, 47.34 and 73.08% respectively, and were comparable with Acarbose of 81.49, 50.97, 73.08%. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50 of α-/β-glucosidase and α-amylase of REE were 15.81, 41.77, 18.09 μg/mL respectively, and Acarbose were 9.45, 22.57, 3.64 μg/mL respectively. Conclusions: REE inhibits α-/β-glucosidase and α-amylase. Keywords: Roselle, Acarbose, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, antidiabetic

  4. α-Glucosidase inhibitory activities of isoflavanones, isoflavones, and pterocarpans from Mucuna pruriens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendup, Tshewang; Prachyawarakorn, Vilailak; Pansanit, Acharavadee; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Kittakoop, Prasat

    2014-05-01

    Three new isoflavanones (1-3) and thirteen known compounds (4-16) were isolated from the roots of Mucuna pruriens. The absolute configurations of isoflavanones 1-3 and parvisoflavanone (4), lespedeol C (5), and uncinanone C (6) were addressed by a circular dichroism technique. Isoflavanones, isoflavones, and pterocarpans of M. pruriens were found to be α-glucosidase inhibitors. Medicarpin (7) and parvisoflavone B (9) were potent α-glucosidase inhibitors (twofold less active than the standard drug acarbose). The production of bioactive metabolites in M. pruriens seems to be season-dependent. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Improvement in C-reactive protein and advanced glycosylation end-products in poorly controlled diabetics is independent of glucose control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Isa, S H; Najihah, I; Nazaimoon, W M Wan; Kamarudin, N A; Umar, N A; Mat, N H; Khalid, B A K

    2006-04-01

    We studied the efficacy of four different treatment regimens (sulphonylurea and metformin+/-acarbose versus glimepiride and rosiglitazone versus glimepiride and bedtime NPH insulin versus multiple actrapid and NPH insulin injections) in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes subjects on hs-CRP, VCAM-1 and AGE at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment. Multiple insulin injections rapidly improved HbA(1c) by 0.6+/-0.9% (pimprovement in blood glucose. AGE improved in all groups irrespective of type of treatment, glycaemic control and CRP levels. Our data indicate rapid glycaemic control alone does not necessarily result in improvement in markers of inflammation in type 2 diabetes patients.

  6. Einfluss repetitiver postprandialer Hyperglykämien auf den kardialen Ischämie- und Reperfusionsschaden

    OpenAIRE

    Elbing, Inka Lena

    2008-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit befasste sich daher mit dem Effekt von Acarbose auf die durch Ischämie und Reperfusion verursachten myokardialen Schäden nach Saccharosebelastung bei gesunden Mäusen in vivo. Aus den Ergebnissen dieser Arbeit lässt sich ableiten, dass eine wiederholte postprandiale Hyperglykämie bei nicht - diabetischen Tieren ausreicht, um die durch Ischämie und Reperfusion verursachten Myokardschäden signifikant zu erhöhen. Dies kann durch eine Behandlung mit dem a - Glucosidase - Hem...

  7. Inhibitory activities of Moringa oleifera leaf extract against α-glucosidase enzyme in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Laga, A.; Arif, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    Alpha-glucosidase is a key enzyme in the final process of breaking carbohydrates into glucose. Inhibition of α-glucosidase affected more absorption of glucose, so it can reduce hyperglycemia condition. The aims of this study is to determine the effectiveness of inhibition wet and dried Moringa oleifera leaf extract through α-glucosidase activity in vitro. The effectiveness study of inhibition on the activity of α-glucosidase enzyme obtained from white glutinous rice (Oryza sativa glutinosa) was carried out using wet and dried kelor leaf extract of 13% (w/v) with 10 mM α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) substrate. A positive control used 1% acarbose and substrate without addition of extract was a negative control. Inhibitory activity was measured using spectrophotometers at a wavelength of 400 nm. The result showed that the inhibition activity against α-glucosidase enzyme of dried leaf extract, wet leaf extract and acarbose was 81,39%, 83,94%, and 95,4%, respectively on pH 7,0. The effectiveness inhibition of the wet Moringa leaf extract was greater than the dried leaf extract. The findings suggest that M. oleifera leaf has the potential to be developed as an alternative food therapy for diabetics.

  8. Traditional Medicinal Herbs and Food Plants Have the Potential to Inhibit Key Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes In Vitro and Reduce Postprandial Blood Glucose Peaks In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fawzi Mahomoodally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that some medicinal herbs and food plants commonly used in the management of diabetes can reduce glucose peaks by inhibiting key carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. To this effect, extracts of Antidesma madagascariense (AM, Erythroxylum macrocarpum (EM, Pittosporum senacia (PS, and Faujasiopsis flexuosa (FF, Momordica charantia (MC, and Ocimum tenuiflorum (OT were evaluated for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects based on starch-iodine colour changes and PNP-G as substrate, respectively. Only FF and AM extracts/fractions were found to inhibit α-amylase activity significantly (P<0.05 and coparable to the drug acarbose. Amylase bioassay on isolated mouse plasma confirmed the inhibitory potential of AM and FF extracts with the ethyl acetate fraction of FF being more potent (P<0.05 than acarbose. Extracts/fractions of AM and MC were found to inhibit significantly (P<0.05 α-glucosidase activity, with IC50 comparable to the drug 1-deoxynojirimycin. In vivo studies on glycogen-loaded mice showed significant (P<0.05 depressive effect on elevation of postprandial blood glucose following ingestion of AM and MC extracts. Our findings tend to provide a possible explanation for the hypoglycemic action of MC fruits and AM leaf extracts as alternative nutritional therapy in the management of diabetes.

  9. Aqueous Extract of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. Vinegar Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Normoglycemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Adlin Yusoff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nypa fruticans Wurmb. vinegar, commonly known as nipa palm vinegar (NPV has been used as a folklore medicine among the Malay community to treat diabetes. Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect. Thus, this study is conducted to evaluate the effect of AE on postprandial hyperglycemia in an attempt to understand its mechanism of antidiabetic action. AE were tested via in vitro intestinal glucose absorption, in vivo carbohydrate tolerance tests and spectrophotometric enzyme inhibition assays. One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL. Further in vivo confirmatory tests showed AE (500 mg/kg to cause a significant suppression in postprandial hyperglycemia 30 min following respective glucose (2 g/kg, sucrose (4 g/kg and starch (3 g/kg loadings in normal rats, compared to the control group. Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose. The findings suggested that NPV exerts its anti-diabetic effect by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the small intestine through selective inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, therefore suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia.

  10. Synthesis and in vitro study of benzofuran hydrazone derivatives as novel alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Imran, Syahrul; Afifi, Muhammad; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Rahim, Fazal; Ullah, Hayat; Zaman, Khalid; Vijayabalan, Shantini

    2017-12-01

    The α-amylase acts as attractive target to treat type-2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore in discovering a small molecule as α-amylase inhibitor, we have synthesized benzofuran carbohydrazide analogs (1-25), characterized through different spectroscopic techniques such as 1 HNMR and EI-MS. All screened analog shows good α-amylase inhibitory potentials with IC 50 value ranging between 1.078±0.19 and 2.926±0.05µM when compared with acarbose having IC 50 =0.62±0.22µM. Only nine analogs among the series such as analogs 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 21, 23 and 24 exhibit good inhibitory potential with IC 50 values 1.644±0.128, 1.078±0.19, 1.245±0.25, 1.843±0.19, 1.350±0.24, 1.629±0.015, 1.353±0.232, 1.359±0.119 and 1.488±0.07µM when compare with standard drug acarbose. All other analogs showed good to moderate α-amylase inhibitory potentials. The SAR study was conducted on the basis of substituent difference at the phenyl ring. The binding interaction between analogs and active site of enzyme was confirmed by docking studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis, α-glucosidase inhibition and molecular docking study of coumarin based derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Afifi, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Sultan, Sadia; Rahim, Fazal; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2018-04-01

    We have synthesized seventeen Coumarin based derivatives (1-17), characterized by 1 HNMR, 13 CNMR and EI-MS and evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory potential. Among the series, all derivatives exhibited outstanding α-glucosidase inhibition with IC 50 values ranging between 1.10 ± 0.01 and 36.46 ± 0.70 μM when compared with the standard inhibitor acarbose having IC 50 value 39.45 ± 0.10 μM. The most potent derivative among the series is derivative 3 having IC 50 value 1.10 ± 0.01 μM, which are many folds better than the standard acarbose. The structure activity relationship (SAR) was mainly based upon by bring about difference of substituent's on phenyl part. Molecular docking studies were carried out to understand the binding interaction of the most active compounds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Perspectives of the use of antihyperglycemic preparations in patients with metabolic syndrome and prediabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, M N; Shishkova, V N

    2007-01-01

    The state of prediabetes comprises two types of impairment of carbohydrate metabolism: impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance. According to International Diabetes Federation at present number of patients with prediabtes is almost 2 times greater than that of patients with diabetes. Risk of development of diabetes and cardiovascular complications in patients with prediabtes is 2 times higher than in persons with normal blood glucose level. Impaired glucose tolerance is also one of main components of metabolic syndrome. For prevention of risk of development of diabetes and cardiovascular complications besides life style changes it is necessary to influence insulin resistance and normalize carbohydrate metabolism. When life style changes are ineffective the use of antihyperglycemic drugs is essential. Antihyperglycemic preparations metformin, acarbose, thiazolidinediones do not affect function of pancreatic beta-cells and do not cause hypoglycaemia. This allows to use these drugs in patients without diabetes but having insulin resistance and prediabetes. Therapeutic effect of metformin and rosiglitazone is related to improvement of sensitivity to insulin in insulin dependent tissues, suppression of glyconeogenesis in the liver, and enhancement of pancreatic beta-cells function. Action of acarbose is based on local inhibition of intestinal enzyme alpha-glycosidase, what leads to diminishment of postprandial hyperglycemia peak. Results of DPP, STOP-NIDDM and DREAM trials have demonstrated high efficacy of antihyperglycemic preparations in prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Reclamation of Marine Chitinous Materials for the Production of α-Glucosidase Inhibitors via Microbial Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Bon Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Six kinds of chitinous materials have been used as sole carbon/nitrogen (C/N sources for producing α-glucosidase inhibitors (aGI by Paenibacillus sp. TKU042. The aGI productivity was found to be highest in the culture supernatants using demineralized crab shell powder (deCSP and demineralized shrimp shell powder (deSSP as the C/N source. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 and maximum aGI activity of fermented deCSP (38 µg/mL, 98%, deSSP (108 µg/mL, 89%, squid pen powder (SPP (422 µg/mL, 98%, and shrimp head powder (SHP (455 µg/mL, 92% were compared with those of fermented nutrient broth (FNB (81 µg/mL, 93% and acarbose (1095 µg/mL, 74%, a commercial antidiabetic drug. The result of the protein/chitin ratio on aGI production showed that the optimal ratio was 0.2/1. Fermented deCSP showed lower IC50 and higher maximum inhibitory activity than those of acarbose against rat intestinal α-glucosidase.

  14. Triterpenes as uncompetitive inhibitors of α-glucosidase from flowers of Punica granatum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah El Dine, Riham; Ma, Qiong; Kandil, Zeinab A; El-Halawany, Ali M

    2014-01-01

    The α-glucosidase and maltase inhibitory effects of Punica granatum L. flowers (PGF) were investigated. The methanol extract (PGFMe), n-hexane extract (PGFH), chloroform extract (PGFC) and the remaining water fraction (PGFW) were assayed for their α-glucosidase and maltase inhibitory effects. PGFW showed potent α-glucosidase inhibition with IC₅₀ of 0.8 μg/mL followed by PGFMe (IC₅₀ of 4.0 μg/mL) then PGFC (IC₅₀ of 5.21 μg/mL) in comparison to acarbose (0.9 μM). Due to its selectivity towards α-glucosidase, PGFC was subjected to bioactivity-guided isolation of its main active constituents. Five known compounds (1-5) were identified as β-sitosterol (1), oleanolic acid (2), ursolic acid (3), p-coumaric acid (4) and apigenin (5). Ursolic and oleanolic acids showed potent α-glucosidase inhibition (IC₅₀ of 39.0 and 35.0 μM, respectively), while they did not show significant maltase inhibition. Kinetic study using the double Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that ursolic acid uncompetitively inhibited α-glucosidase in comparison with acarbose as a competitive inhibitor.

  15. In vitro studies on the hypoglycemic potential of Ficus racemosa stem bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna

    2010-02-01

    Medicinal plants have been reported to play an important role in modulating glycemic responses and have preventive and therapeutic implications. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the antidiabetic effect of medicinal plants such as inhibition of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes, manipulation of glucose transporters, beta-cell regeneration and enhancing insulin-releasing activity. The present investigation evaluated the possible mechanism of action through which Ficus racemosa stem bark (Moraceae) exerts its hypoglycemic effect using suitable in vitro techniques. Ficus racemosa bark (FRB) exhibited significantly higher (P FRB, as reflected by a significantly lower (P system containing FRB compared to the control and acarbose. Furthermore, FRB significantly increased (P < or = 0.01) the rate of glucose transport across the yeast cell membrane and also in isolated rat hemi-diaphragm. The findings indicate F. racemosa bark to possess strong hypoglycemic effect and hence can be utilized as an adjunct in the management of diabetes mellitus.

  16. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) volatile oil inhibits key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, P C; Arimboor, Ranjith; Indulekha, P S; Menon, A Nirmala

    2012-11-01

    Anti-diabetic capacity of Curcuma longa volatile oil in terms of its ability to inhibit glucosidase activities was evaluated. Turmeric volatile oils inhibited glucosidase enzymes more effectively than the reference standard drug acarbose. Drying of rhizomes was found to enhance α-glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1.32-0.38 μg/ml) and α-amylase (IC₅₀ = 64.7-34.3 μg/ml) inhibitory capacities of volatile oils. Ar-Turmerone, the major volatile component in the rhizome also showed potent α-glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 0.28 μg) and α-amylase (IC₅₀ = 24.5 μg) inhibition.

  17. α-Glucosidase inhibition by flavonoids: an in vitro and in silico structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Carina; Freitas, Marisa; Ribeiro, Daniela; Oliveira, Eduardo F T; Sousa, Joana L C; Tomé, Sara M; Ramos, Maria J; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Pedro A; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2017-12-01

    α-Glucosidase inhibitors are described as the most effective in reducing post-prandial hyperglycaemia (PPHG) from all available anti-diabetic drugs used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. As flavonoids are promising modulators of this enzyme's activity, a panel of 44 flavonoids, organised in five groups, was screened for their inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase, based on in vitro structure-activity relationship studies. Inhibitory kinetic analysis and molecular docking calculations were also applied for selected compounds. A flavonoid with two catechol groups in A- and B-rings, together with a 3-OH group at C-ring, was the most active, presenting an IC 50 much lower than the one found for the most widely prescribed α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose. The present work suggests that several of the studied flavonoids have the potential to be used as alternatives for the regulation of PPHG.

  18. Report: screening of selected medicinal plants for their enzyme inhibitory potential - a validation of their ethnopharmacological uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Ayub; Zakiullah; Shah, Yasar; Khan, Abad

    2014-05-01

    In present study four medicinal plants namely Valeriana wallichii, Xanthium strumarium, Achyranthes aspera and Duchesnea indica belonging to different families were collected in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and crude extract and subsequent fractions were analyzed for their inhibitory potential against acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Valeriana wallichii, Xanthium strumarium and Achyranthes aspera were significantly active against cholinesterases. Chloroform and ethylacetate fractions of Valeriana wallichii exhibited significant activity against acetylcholinesterase (IC50: 61μg/ml) and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes (IC50: 58μg/ml), respectively. Similarly ethylacetate fraction of Achyranthes aspera showed significant activity against acetylcholinesterase (IC50: 61 μg/ml) and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes (IC50: 61 μg/ml), respectively. In case of α-glucosidase enzyme, the chloroform fraction of Xanthium strumarium exhibited significant inhibitory activity (IC50: 72 μg/ml) as compared to the standard compound acarbose (IC50: 483 μg/ml). Duchesnea indica showed no such activities.

  19. Maplexins, new α-glucosidase inhibitors from red maple (Acer rubrum) stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunpeng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Liya; Kandhi, Vamsikrishna; Cech, Nadja B; Xie, Mingyong; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen gallic acid derivatives including five new gallotannins, named maplexins A-E, were isolated from red maple (Acer rubrum) stems. The compounds were identified by spectral analyses. The maplexins varied in number and location of galloyl groups attached to 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol. The isolates were evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Maplexin E, the first compound identified with three galloyl groups linked to three different positions of 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol, was 20 fold more potent than the α-glucosidase inhibitory drug, Acarbose (IC(50)=8 vs 160 μM). Structure-activity related studies suggested that both number and position of galloyls attached to 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol were important for α-glucosidase inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Usefulness of continuous glucose monitoring for the diagnosis of hypoglycemia after a gastric bypass in a patient previously treated for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaire, Hélène; Dubet, Audrey; Chauveau, Marie-Emilie; Anduze, Yves; Fernandes, Martine; Melki, Vincent; Ritz, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is rare after a gastric bypass and can be taken for a dumping syndrome. There is no report in the literature of the contribution of continuous glucose monitoring to the diagnosis of hypoglycemia in these circumstances. The present case report shows that continuous glucose monitoring can be a useful tool for the diagnosis and the management of such episodes. Continuous glucose monitoring revealed hypoglycemic episodes in free living circumstances that were not present during 72-h fasting. These episodes followed wide hyperglycemic swings. No such episode resumed over 8 months after specific dietary advices and treatment by 50 mg TID of acarbose. Because hypoglycemia can be difficult to diagnose from dumping syndrome, continuous glucose monitoring is a very useful tool revealing the episodes in free living circumstances and can be used to monitor the treatment success.

  1. New Biflavonoids with α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activities from Boesenbergia rotunda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutputsorn Chatsumpun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Roots of Boesenbergia rotunda (L. Mansf. are prominent ingredients in the cuisine of several Asian countries, including Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, and China. An extract prepared from the roots of this plant showed strong inhibitory activity against enzymes α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase and was subjected to chromatographic separation to identify the active components. Three new biflavonoids of the flavanone-chalcone type (9, 12, and 13 were isolated, along with 12 known compounds. Among the 15 isolates, the three new compounds showed stronger inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase than the drug acarbose but displayed lower pancreatic lipase inhibitory effect than the drug orlistat. The results indicated the potential of B. rotunda roots as a functional food for controlling after-meal blood glucose levels.

  2. Red Maple (Acer rubrum) Aerial Parts as a Source of Bioactive Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-08-01

    The bark and stems of red maple (Acer rubrum) are reported to contain bioactive phenolics but its aerial parts, namely, flowers and leaves, remain largely unexplored. This is unfortunate considering that various parts of the red maple were used for traditional medicinal purposes by the indigenous peoples of eastern North America, where this species is found. Herein, we report the identification of twenty-five (1-25) phenolics, including two new galloyl derivatives (1 and 2), from red maple flowers and leaves. Of these, ten compounds (1-10), including the new compounds, were isolated and identified by NMR and HRESIMS data while the remaining fifteen compounds (11-25) were identified by HPLC-DAD analyses (by comparison with chemical standards). The isolates (1-10), along with the clinical drug, acarbose, were evaluated for their alpha-glucosidase enzyme inhibitory activities.

  3. Evaluation of alpha- amylase inhibition by Urtica dioica and Juglans regia extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Mahsa; Jahanshahi, Samaneh; Moein, Soheila; Moein, Mahmood Reza

    2014-06-01

    One strategy for the treatment of diabetes is inhibition of pancreatic α- amylase. Plants contains different chemical constituents with potential for inhibition of α-amylase and hence maybe used as therapeutic. Urtica dioica and Juglans regia Linn were tested for α-amylase inhibition. Different concentrations of leaf aqueous extracts were incubated with enzyme substrate solution and the activity of enzyme was measured. For determination of the type of inhibition, Dixon plot was depicted. Acarbose was used as the standard inhibitor. Both plant extracts showed time and concentration dependent inhibition of α-amylase. 60% inhibition was seen with 2 mg/ml of U. dioica and 0.4 mg/ml of J. regia aqueous extract. Dixon plots revealed the type of α-amylase inhibition by these two extracts as competitive inhibition. Determination of the type of α-amylase inhibition by these plant extracts could provide by successful use of plant chemicals as drug targets.

  4. α-Glucosidase inhibitors and phytotoxins from Streptomyces xanthophaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Yun; Deng, Shan; Cao, Lin; Xue, Quan-Hong; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2017-09-01

    Twenty-four metabolites 1-24 were isolated from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces xanthophaeus. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their NMR data with literature data reported. Daidzein (1), genistein (2) and gliricidin (3) inhibited α-glucosidase in vitro with IC 50 values of 174.2, 36.1 and 47.4 μM, respectively, more potent than the positive control, acarbose. Docking study revealed that the amino acid residue Thr 215 is the essential binding site for active ligands 2. In addition, the phytotoxic effects of all compounds were assayed on radish seedlings, five of which, 3, 8, 13, 15 and 18, inhibited the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings with inhibitory rates of >60% at a concentration of 100 ppm, which was comparable or superior to the positive control glyphosate. This is the first report of the phytotoxicity of the compounds.

  5. Insights into the "pair of sugar tongs" surface binding site in barley alpha-amylase isozymes and crystallization of appropriate sugar tongs mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranier, S.; Deville, K.; Robert, X.

    2005-01-01

    of an additional surface binding site called a "pair of sugar tongs" due to the sugar capturing by Tyr380 which is situated in domain C of AMYL For the first time, a biological role for the domain C was suggested as well as a hypothetical explanation of enzymatic differences between the two barley a......-amylase isozymes. However, no sugar was bound at the "sugar tongs" site in the AMY2/acarbose complex. Comparative studies of this domain on the basis of sequence, secondary structure and spatial organization allow to propose factors needed for such a site. One of the most obvious is the replacement of Ser378(AMY1......, surface plasmon resonance sugar binding experiments have proven unambiguously that this residue cannot totally explain the lack of the "pair of sugar tongs" and other tracks must be studied as, for example, the differences in orientation of Asp381 and the critical role of His395, both good candidates...

  6. PENGHAMBAT α AMILASE: JENIS, SUMBER, DAN POTENSI PEMANFAATANNYA DALAM KESEHATAN [α Amylase Inhibitors: Types, Sources, and Their Potential Utilization for Health Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiasih Wahyuntari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYAlpha amylase inhibitors affect carbohydrate metabolism in digestive system. The inhibitors induce carbohydrate tolerance, fullness and prolonging gastric emptying that might be used to aid in diabetic and obesity treatment. There are two types of α- amylase inhibitors, proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous ones. Proteinaceous inhibitor is classified into seven classes including legumes, lectin, knottin, cereal, Kunitz, -thionin and thaumatin types. Plant proteinaceous inhibitors are present in cereals and legumes. Some non-proteinaceous inhibitors include flavonid, polyphenols, organic acid that might be produced by microbes or extracted from plants such as acarbose, saponin dan cardiac glycoside, gallic acid, proto-catechuic acid, caffeic acid, ellagic acid, ferulic acid, quercetin hibiscus acid and α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin.

  7. A new flavone glucoside together with known ellagitannins and flavones with anti-diabetic and anti-obesity activities from the flowers of pomegranate (Punica granatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Tian, Li

    2018-03-03

    A new flavone glucoside tricetin 4'-O-β-glucopyranoside (1) and four known ellagitannins and flavones tricetin (2), luteolin (3), ellagic acid (4), and granatin B (5) were isolated from the flowers of Punica granatum L. (Lythraceae). Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR as well as mass spectrometry analyses. Among all tested compounds, tricetin (2) exhibited the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity that was comparable to the anti-diabetic drug acarbose. Comparative structure-function analysis of tri-, tetra-, and pentahydroxy flavones [apigenin, luteolin (3), and tricetin (2), respectively] suggested that a greater number of hydroxyl groups on the flavone molecule enhanced its suppression of α-glucosidase, α-amylase, and lipase activities.

  8. Lanostane triterpenes from the mushroom Ganoderma resinaceum and their inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian-Qiang; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Wang, Shen-Fei; Wang, Ying; Li, Shao-Ping

    2018-05-01

    Eighteen previously undescribed lanostane triterpenes and thirty known analogues were obtained from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma resinaceum. Resinacein C was isolated from a natural source for the first time. The structures of all the above compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparisons of their spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, in an in vitro assay, Resinacein C, ganoderic acid Y, lucialdehyde C, 7-oxo-ganoderic acid Z 3 , 7-oxo-ganoderic acid Z, and lucidadiol showed strong inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase compared with the positive control drug acarbose. The structure-activity relationships of ganoderma triterpenes on α-glucosidase inhibition showed that the C-24/C-25 double bond is necessary for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Moreover, the carboxylic acid group at C-26 and the hydroxy group at C-15 play important roles in enhancing inhibitory effects of these triterpenes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effect of Phenolic Compounds from Elderflowers on Glucose- and Fatty Acid Uptake in Human Myotubes and HepG2-Cells

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    Giang Thanh Thi Ho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is manifested by progressive metabolic impairments in tissues such as skeletal muscle and liver, and these tissues become less responsive to insulin, leading to hyperglycemia. In the present study, stimulation of glucose and oleic acid uptake by elderflower extracts, constituents and metabolites were tested in vitro using the HepG2 hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line and human skeletal muscle cells. Among the crude extracts, the 96% EtOH extract showed the highest increase in glucose and oleic acid uptake in human skeletal muscle cells and HepG2-cells. The flavonoids and phenolic acids contained therein were potent stimulators of glucose and fatty acid uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Most of the phenolic constituents and several of the metabolites showed high antioxidant activity and showed considerably higher α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition than acarbose. Elderflower might therefore be valuable as a functional food against diabetes.

  10. Vildagliptin Improves Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilatation in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poppel, Pleun C.M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Smits, Paul; Tack, Cees J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen subjects with type 2 diabetes (age 59.8 ± 6.8 years, BMI 29.1 ± 4.8 kg/m2, HbA1c 6.97 ± 0.61) on oral blood glucose–lowering treatment were included. Participants received vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. or acarbose 100 mg t.i.d. for four consecutive weeks in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each treatment period, we measured forearm vasodilator responses to intra-arterially administered acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent vasodilator). RESULTS Infusion of acetylcholine induced a dose-dependent increase in forearm blood flow in the experimental arm, which was higher during vildagliptin (3.1 ± 0.7, 7.9 ± 1.1, and 12.6 ± 1.4 mL ⋅ dL−1 ⋅ min−1 in response to three increasing dosages of acetylcholine) than during acarbose (2.0 ± 0.7, 5.0 ± 1.2, and 11.7 ± 1.6 mL ⋅ dL−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively; P = 0.01 by two-way ANOVA). Treatment with vildagliptin did not significantly change the vascular responses to sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS Four weeks’ treatment with vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in subjects with type 2 diabetes. This observation might have favorable cardiovascular implications. PMID:21788633

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Capparis spinosa Extract on Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Selfayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose level caused due to deficiency of insulin secretion or insulin function. The inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes such as α-amylase can be an important strategy for decrease postprandial blood glucose level in patients with type II diabetes. Plants contains different chemical constituents with potential for inhibition of α-amylase and hence maybe used as therapeutic. Objectives The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the ethanolic extract of Capparis spinosa on pancreatic α-amylase activities to find out the relevance of the plant in controlling blood sugar. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, root and leaves of C. spinosa were tested for α-amylase inhibition. Different concentrations (1.56, 3.12, 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/mL of extracts were incubated with enzyme substrate solution and the spectrometric method used for measure enzyme activity. Also acarbose was used as the standard inhibitor. Results Both root and leaves extracts showed inhibition of α-amylase (root = 97.31% and leaves = 98.92%. The root and leaves extracts of C. spinosa exhibited appreciable α-amylase inhibitory activity with an IC50 values 5.93 mg/mL and 3.89 mg/mL respectively, when compared with acarbose (IC50 value 0.038 mg/mL. Conclusions This study supports that root and leaves extracts of C. spinosa exhibit considerable α-amylase inhibitory activities. These results could be useful for developing functional foods by combination of plant-based foods for treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  12. Cyanobacterial pigments as natural anti-hyperglycemic agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonmoy Ghosh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines for controlling postprandial hyperglycemia includes herbs and plant extracts as well as synthetic drugs like acarbose. Synthetic drug molecules frequently have side effects such as flatulence and diarrhea. Cyanobacterial pigments have excellent anti-oxidant and free radical scavenging properties. Thus, α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting activities of purified pigments and crude extracts from three cyanobacterial species, Lyngbya, Microcoleus and Synechocystis sp., were investigated. Lyngbya extract had the highest total anti-oxidant activity (TAC before digestion (48.26 ± 0.04 µg AAE ml-1 while purified lycopene had the highest TAC after digestion (154.16 ± 0.96 µg AAE ml-1. The Microcoleus extract had the highest ABTS scavenging activity before digestion (98.23 ± 0.25 % while purified C-phycocyanin (C-PC had the highest ABTS scavenging after digestion (99.69 ±0.04 %. None of the digested or undigested extracts performed better than acarbose in inhibiting α-amylase but the digested Microcoleus extract was able to inhibit its activity by ~35 %. The purified pigments gave inhibitory activities ranging from ~ 8 – 16 %. The Lyngbya extract had the highest inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase both before and after digestion (62.22 ± 0.02 and 97.82 ± 0.03 % respectively. Purified C-phycoerythrin (C-PE, C-PC, lycopene and myxoxanthophyll could inhibit α-glucosidase in a range of ~83 – 96 %. Considering the potent inhibitory activities of purified pigments against both α-amylase and α-glucosidase, cyanobacterial pigments could be used as food additives for their dual advantage of anti-oxidant and anti-hyperglycemic activities.

  13. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Polyphenols isolated from Acacia mearnsii bark with anti-inflammatory and carbolytic enzyme inhibitory activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Jia; GRACE Mary H; ESPOSITO Debora; KOMARNYTSKY Slavko; WANG Fei; LILA Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the polyphenols isolated from Acacia mearnsii bark crude extract (B) and fractions (B1-B7) obtained by high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and evaluate their anti-inflammatory and carbolytic enzymes (α-glucosidase and α-amylase) inhibitory activities.Fractions B4,B5,B6,B7 (total phenolics 850.3,983.0,843.9,and 572.5 mg·g-1,respectively;proanthocyanidins 75.7,90.5,95.0,and 44.8 mg·g-1,respectively) showed significant activities against reactive oxygen species (ROS),nitric oxide (NO) production,and expression of pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7.All the extracts suppressed α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities,two primary enzymes responsible for carbohydrate digestion.A.mearnsii bark samples possessed significantly stronger inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase enzyme (IC50 of 0.4-1.4 tg·mL-1) than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 141.8 μg·mL-1).B6 and B7 (IC5017.6 and 11.7 μg·mL-1,respectively) exhibited α-amylase inhibitory activity as efficacious as acarbose (IC50 15.4 μg·mL-1).Moreover,B extract,at 25 μg·mL-l,significantly decreased the non-mitochondrial oxidative burst that is often associated with inflammatory response in human monocytic macrophages.

  15. Ashanti pepper (Piper guineense Schumach et Thonn) attenuates carbohydrate hydrolyzing, blood pressure regulating and cholinergic enzymes in experimental type 2 diabetes rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu; Adefegha, Omowunmi Monisola

    2017-01-01

    Ashanti pepper (Piper guineense Schumach et Thonn) seed is well known in folkloric medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with little or no scientific documentation for its action. This study investigated the effect of Ashanti pepper seed on some enzymes relevant to carbohydrate hydrolysis, blood regulation and the cholinergic system, as well as the blood glucose level, lipid profile, antioxidant parameters, and hepatic and renal function markers in T2DM rats. T2DM was induced by feeding rats with high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 days followed by a single intraperitoneal dose of 35 mg/kg body weight of streptozotocin (STZ). Three days after STZ induction, diabetic rats were placed on a dietary regimen containing 2%-4% Ashanti pepper. Reduced blood glucose level with decreased α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activities were observed in Ashanti pepper seed and acarbose-treated rat groups when compared to that of the diabetic control rat group. Furthermore, the results revealed that inclusion of 2%-4% Ashanti pepper seed in diabetic rat fed group diets may ameliorate the lipid profile, antioxidant status, and hepatic and renal function in T2DM rats as much as in the acarbose-treated groups. In addition, a chromatographic profile of the seed revealed the presence of quercitrin (116.51 mg/g), capsaicin (113.94 mg/g), dihydrocapsaicin (88.29 mg/g) and isoquercitrin (74.89 mg/g). The results from this study clearly suggest that Ashanti pepper could serve as a promising source of phenolic compounds with great alternative therapeutic potentials in the management of T2DM.

  16. Increased glucose metabolism and alpha-glucosidase inhibition in Cordyceps militaris water extract-treated HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yun Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Kim, Tae Woo; Park, Jae Bong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Recent living condition improvements, changes in dietary habits, and reductions in physical activity are contributing to an increase in metabolic syndrome symptoms including diabetes and obesity. Through such societal developments, humankind is continuously exposed to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and the number of the victims is increasing. This study investigated Cordyceps militaris water extract (CMW)-induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells and the effect of CMW treatment on glucose metabolism. MATERIALS/METHODS Colorimetric assay kits were used to determine the glucokinase (GK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, glucose uptake, and glycogen content. Either RT-PCR or western blot analysis was performed for quantitation of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1α), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B (Akt), phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, GK, PDH, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) expression levels. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of acarbose and CMW were evaluated by absorbance measurement. RESULTS CMW induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells by increasing GLUT2 through HNF-1α expression stimulation. Glucose in the cells increased the CMW-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. In turn, glycolysis was stimulated, and glyconeogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, by studying the mechanism of action of PI3k, Akt, and GSK-3β, and measuring glycogen content, the study confirmed that the glucose was stored in the liver as glycogen. Finally, CMW resulted in a higher level of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than that from acarbose. CONCLUSION CMW induced the uptake of glucose into HepG2 cells, as well, it induced metabolism of the absorbed glucose. It is concluded that CMW is a candidate or potential use in diabetes prevention and treatment. PMID:28584574

  17. In vitro and in vivo α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting activities of the protein extracts from two varieties of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.).

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    Poovitha, Sundar; Parani, Madasamy

    2016-07-18

    α-amylase and α-glucosidase digest the carbohydrates and increase the postprandial glucose level in diabetic patients. Inhibiting the activity of these two enzymes can control postprandial hyperglycemia, and reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Bitter gourd or balsam pear is one of the important medicinal plants used for controlling postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetes patients. However, there is limited information available on the presence of α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting compounds. In the current study, the protein extracts from the fruits of M. charantia var. charantia (MCC) and M. charantia var. muricata (MCM) were tested for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting activities in vitro, and glucose lowering activity after oral administration in vivo. The protein extract from both MCC and MCM inhibited the activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase through competitive inhibition, which was on par with Acarbose as indicated by in vitro percentage of inhibition (66 to 69 %) and IC50 (0.26 to 0.29 mg/ml). Both the protein extracts significantly reduced peak blood glucose and area under the curve in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, which were orally challenged with starch and sucrose. Protein extracts from the fruits of the two varieties of bitter gourd inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro and lowered the blood glucose level in vivo on par with Acarbose when orally administrated to Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Further studies on mechanism of action and methods of safe and biologically active delivery will help to develop an anti-diabetic oral protein drug from these plants.

  18. Estudios de intervención dirigidos a disminuir el riesgo de padecer diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Intervention studies aimed at lowering the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    José Luis Valenciaga Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios de intervención en población de riesgo, dirigidos a disminuir la frecuencia de la aparición de la diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM 2, son considerados orientadores para el enfoque del trabajo con esos pacientes. El objetivo del presente estudio es revisar los resultados de investigaciones dirigidas a disminuir el riesgo de padecer DM 2. Los sujetos estudiados presentaban alguna de las siguientes condiciones: glucosa alterada en ayunas (GAA o tolerancia a la glucosa alterada (TGA, antecedente personal de diabetes gestacional y síndrome metabólico. Se citan, entre otros, DPP (diabetes prevention program, DPS (diabetes prevention study, STOP-NIDDM (study to prevent non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, Hiperglucemia en ayunas, DAISI (dutch acarbose intervention trial, Da Quing (estudio chino, TRIPOD (troglitazone In the prevention of diabetes, intervención, XENDOS (xenical in the prevention of diabetes in obese subjects, WOSCOPS (west of scotland coronary prevention study, EDIT (early diabetes intervención trial, NAVIGATOR (nateglinide and valsartan in impaired glucose tolerance outcomes research, DREAM (diabetes reduction assessment with ramipril and rosiglitazone medication. Estos consistían en cambios de estilo de vida (fundamentalmente ejercicios físicos sistemáticos y orientaciones nutricionales y/o intervenciones terapéuticas. Se concluye que en personas con 25 o más años de edad de ambos sexos, con riesgo de padecer DM 2, la adopción de un estilo de vida saludable logra disminuir el riesgo de padecer el síndrome diabético. En sujetos con alto riesgo de DM 2, los fármacos que reportan mejores y más consistentes resultados son el metformin y la acarbosa. Otros como la nateglidina, rosiglitazona, ramipril y valsartan, se están investigando actualmente.Intervention studies on population at risk aimed at lowering the frequency of occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM2 are considered as guiding lines for the work

  19. Chemical Constituents of Malaysian U. cordata var. ferruginea and Their in Vitro α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities

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    Nur Hakimah Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Continuing our interest in the Uncaria genus, the phytochemistry and the in-vitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Malaysian Uncaria cordata var. ferruginea were investigated. The phytochemical study of this plant, which employed various chromatographic techniques including recycling preparative HPLC, led to the isolation of ten compounds with diverse structures comprising three phenolic acids, two coumarins, three flavonoids, a terpene and an iridoid glycoside. These constituents were identified as 2-hydroxybenzoic acid or salicylic acid (1, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3, scopoletin or 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-coumarin (4, 3,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin (5, quercetin (6, kaempferol (7, taxifolin (8, loganin (9 and β-sitosterol (10. Structure elucidation of the compounds was accomplished with the aid of 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectral data and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS. In the α-glucosidase inhibitory assay, the crude methanolic extract of the stems of the plant and its acetone fraction exhibited strong α-glucosidase inhibition activity of 87.7% and 89.2%, respectively, while its DCM fraction exhibited only moderate inhibition (75.3% at a concentration of 1 mg/mL. The IC50 values of both fractions were found to be significantly lower than the standard acarbose suggesting the presence of potential α-glucosidase inhibitors. Selected compounds isolated from the active fractions were then subjected to α-glucosidase assay in which 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and quercetin showed strong inhibitory effects against the enzyme with IC50 values of 549 and 556 μg/mL compared to acarbose (IC50 580 μg/mL while loganin and scopoletin only showed weak α-glucosidase inhibition of 44.9% and 34.5%, respectively. This is the first report of the isolation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and loganin from the genus

  20. Thyroid cancer risk is not increased in diabetic patients.

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    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated thyroid cancer risk with regards to diabetes status and diabetes duration, and with the use of anti-diabetic drugs including sulfonylurea, metformin, insulin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, by using a population-based reimbursement database in Taiwan. METHODS: A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance was recruited. After excluding patients with type 1 diabetes, 999730 subjects (495673 men and 504057 women were recruited into the analyses. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI for independent variables including age, sex, diabetes status/duration, anti-diabetic drugs, other medications, comorbidities, living regions, occupation and examinations that might potentially lead to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in various models. RESULTS: The diabetic patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving potential detection examinations (6.38% vs. 5.83%, P<0.0001. After multivariable-adjustment, the OR (95% CI for diabetes status was 0.816 (0.652-1.021; and for diabetes duration <1 year, 1-3 years, 3-5 years and ≥ 5 years vs. non-diabetes was 0.071 (0.010-0.507, 0.450 (0.250-0.813, 0.374 (0.203-0.689 and 1.159 (0.914-1.470, respectively. Among the anti-diabetic agents, only sulfonylurea was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, OR (95% CI: 1.882 (1.202-2.947. The OR (95% CI for insulin, metformin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone was 1.701 (0.860-3.364, 0.696 (0.419-1.155, 0.581 (0.202-1.674, 0.522 (0.069-3.926 and 0.669 (0.230-1.948, respectively. Furthermore, patients with benign thyroid disease or other cancer, living in Kao-Ping/Eastern regions, or receiving potential detection examinations might have a significantly higher risk; and male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, vascular complications or use of statin, aspirin or non-steroidal anti

  1. Lactucaxanthin - a potential anti-diabetic carotenoid from lettuce (Lactuca sativa) inhibits α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity in vitro and in diabetic rats.

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    Gopal, Sowmya Shree; Lakshmi, Magisetty Jhansi; Sharavana, Gurunathan; Sathaiah, Gunaseelan; Sreerama, Yadahally N; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2017-03-22

    Intestinal and pancreatic α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitors offer an approach to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia through the control of dietary starch breakdown in digestion. This study hypothesized that lactucaxanthin (Lxn) in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) inhibits the activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. In this study, the interaction of Lxn with α-amylase and α-glucosidase in silico and its inhibitory effect on these enzymes were studied using in vitro and STZ-induced diabetic rat models. Lxn was isolated from lettuce with 96% purity confirmed by HPLC and LCMS. The in silico analysis showed that Lxn has a lower binding energy (-6.05 and -6.34 kcal mol -1 ) with α-amylase and α-glucosidase compared to their synthetic inhibitors, acarbose (-0.21 kcal mol -1 ) and miglitol (-2.78 kcal mol -1 ), respectively. In vitro α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition assays revealed that Lxn had IC 50 values of 435.5 μg mL -1 and 1.84 mg mL -1 , but acarbose has values of 2.5 and 16.19 μg mL -1 . The in vivo results showed an increased activity for α-amylase and α-glucosidase in the intestine (4.7 and 1.30 fold, p < 0.05) and pancreas (1.3 and 1.48 fold, p < 0.05) of STZ induced diabetic rats compared to normal rats. Whereas the activity decreased (p < 0.05) in the Lxn fed diabetic rats, except for the intestinal α-glucosidase activity (1.69 ± 0.12 PNP per min per mg protein). This was confirmed by the low blood glucose level (239.4 ± 18.2 mg dL -1 ) in diabetic rats fed Lxn compared to the diabetic group (572.2 ± 30.5 mg dL -1 , p < 0.05). Lxn significantly inhibited (p < 0.05) the activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase and could be of medical and nutritional relevance in the treatment of diabetes.

  2. Induction of Diverse Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Trichoderma sp. (Strain 307 by Co-Cultivation with Acinetobacter johnsonii (Strain B2

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    Liuhong Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new sesquiterpenes, microsphaeropsisin B (1 and C (2, and two new de-O-methyllasiodiplodins, (3R, 7R-7-hydroxy-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (4 and (3R-5-oxo-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (5, together with one new natural product (6 and twelve known compounds (3, 7–17, were isolated from the co-cultivation of mangrove endophytic fungus Trichoderma sp. 307 and aquatic pathogenic bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii B2. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, electronic circular dichroism, Mo2(AcO4-induced circular dichroism, and comparison with reported data. All of the isolated compounds were tested for their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity. New compounds 4 and 5 exhibited potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 25.8 and 54.6 µM, respectively, which were more potent than the positive control (acarbose, IC50 = 703.8 µM. The good results of the tested bioactivity allowed us to explore α-glucosidase inhibitors in lasiodiplodins.

  3. Determination of a-glucosidase inhibitory activity from selected Fabaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Pitakbut, Thanet

    2015-09-01

    Nineteen plants from Fabaceae family, which were used in Thai traditional medicine for treatment of diabetes, were determined of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity via enzymatic reaction. In this reaction, α-glucosidase was used as enzyme, which, reacted with the substrate, p-nitrophenol-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG). After that the product, p-nitro phenol (pNP) will be occurred and observed the yellow colour at 405 nm. In this study, acarbose was used as positive standard which, inhibited this enzyme with IC₅₀ as 331 ± 4.73 μg/ml. Caesalpinia pulcherrima leaves showed the highest activity with IC₅₀ as 436.97 ± 9.44 μg/ml. Furthermore, Bauhinia malabarica leaves presented moderately activity with IC₅₀ as 745.08 ± 11.15 μg/ml. However, the other plants showed mild to none activity of α-glucosidase inhibition. Accordingly, this study can support anti-diabetes of these plants in traditional medicine and it will be the database of the biological activity of Fabaceae plant.

  4. Quickly Screening for Potential α-Glucosidase Inhibitors from Guava Leaves Tea by Bioaffinity Ultrafiltration Coupled with HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Yufeng; Luo, You; Huang, Kuiying; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2018-02-14

    Guava leaves tea (GLT) has a potential antihyperglycemic effect. Nevertheless, it is unclear which compound plays a key role in reducing blood sugar. In this study, GLT extract (IC 50 = 19.37 ± 0.21 μg/mL) exhibited a stronger inhibitory potency against α-glucosidase than did acarbose (positive control) at IC 50 = 178.52 ± 1.37 μg/mL. To rapidly identify the specific α-glucosidase inhibitor components from GLT, an approach based on bioaffinity ultrafiltration combined with high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (BAUF-HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS) was developed. Under the optimal bioaffinity ultrafiltration conditions, 11 corresponding potential α-glucosidase inhibitors with high affinity degrees (ADs) were screened and identified from the GLT extract. Quercetin (IC 50 = 4.51 ± 0.71 μg/mL) and procyanidin B3 (IC 50 = 28.67 ± 5.81 μg/mL) were determined to be primarily responsible for the antihyperglycemic effect, which further verified the established screening method. Moreover, structure-activity relationships were discussed. In conclusion, the BAUF-HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS method could be applied to determine the potential α-glucosidase inhibitors from complex natural products quickly.

  5. Biologic Propensities and Phytochemical Profile of Vangueria madagascariensis J. F. Gmelin (Rubiaceae: An Underutilized Native Medicinal Food Plant from Africa

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    Nelvana Ramalingum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vangueria madagascariensis (VM, consumed for its sweet-sour fruits, is used as a biomedicine for the management of diabetes and bacterial infections in Africa. The study aims to assess the potential of VM on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, glucose movement, and antimicrobial activity. The antioxidant properties were determined by measuring the FRAP, iron chelating activity, and abilities to scavenge DPPH, HOCl, ∙OH, and NO radicals. Leaf decoction, leaf methanol, and unripe fruit methanol extracts were observed to significantly inhibit α-amylase. Active extracts against α-glucosidase were unripe fruit methanol, unripe fruit decoction, leaf decoction, and ripe fruit methanol, which were significantly lower than acarbose. Kinetic studies revealed a mixed noncompetitive type of inhibition. Leaf methanolic extract was active against S. aureus and E. coli. Total phenolic content showed a strong significant positive correlation (r=0.88 with FRAP. Methanolic leaf extract showed a more efficient NO scavenging potential and was significantly lower than ascorbic acid. Concerning ∙OH-mediated DNA degradation, only the methanol extracts of leaf, unripe fruit, and ripe fruit had IC50 values which were significantly lower than α-tocopherol. Given the dearth of information on the biologic propensities of VM, this study has established valuable primary information which has opened new perspectives for further pharmacological research.

  6. Bauhinia forficata Link authenticity using flavonoids profile: relation with their biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Vinholes, Juliana; Silva, Sara T; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-09-15

    HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) was used to ascertain the authenticity of two certified and two commercial Bauhinia forficata Link samples. Different flavonoids profiles were obtained, involving 39 compounds. Just kaempferol-3-O-(2-rhamnosyl)rutinoside was found in all analysed samples. Five compounds were common to the certified samples of B. forficata Link and B. forficata Link subsp. pruinosa (Vogel) Fortunato & Wunderlin, being kaempferol derivatives the most representative ones. The phenolic composition of B. forficata Link subsp. pruinosa (Vogel) Fortunato & Wunderlin is described herein for the first time, accounting for eight compounds, while 10 new compounds were identified in B. forficata Link. Commercial B. forficata Link showed higher contents of quercetin derivatives, in addition to the presence of myricetin derivatives and flavonoids-(galloyl)glycosides, for which the MS fragmentation pattern is reported for the first time. B. forficata Link and the two commercial samples were able to inhibit α-glucosidase, with EC(50) values lower than that found for acarbose. Mild effects on cholinesterases were observed with the certified samples, while commercial ones were more effective. The same behaviour was observed concerning the scavenging of DPPH, nitric oxide and superoxide radicals. The presence of high contents of quercetin derivatives in commercial samples seems to directly influence their biological properties. The differences between phenolic profiles and their relation with the authenticity of commercial samples are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. KAPASITAS ANTIOKSIDAN DAN INHIBITOR ALFA GLUKOSIDASE EKSTRAK UMBI BAWANG DAYAK [Antioxidant and Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Properties of Bawang Dayak Bulb Extracts

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    Andi Early Febrinda*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bawang dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia is an indigenous plant in Borneo traditionally used by Dayak tribes to treat any kind of degenerative deseases including diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this research was to measure antioxidant and antidiabetic capacities of water and ethanolic extracts of bawang dayak bulb. Parameters evaluated in this research were phytochemical screening, total phenolics, flavonoid content, DPPH free-radical scavenging activity, and alpha glucosidase inhibiting (AGI activity. The result showed that the total phenolics and flavonoid content in bawang dayak ethanolic extract (217.71 mg GAE/g and 65.35 mg QE/g were higher than that of the water extract (139.93 mg GAE/g and 16.95 mg QE/g. The ethanolic extract also had higher antioxidant and AGI activities (IC50 112 and 241 ppm than that of the water extract (IC50 526 and 505 ppm. In addition, the IC50 values for AGI in bawang dayak ethanolic extract was lower than acarbose which is known as a commercial antidiabetic agent.

  8. Phlorotannins from Alaskan Seaweed Inhibit Carbolytic Enzyme Activity

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    Joshua Kellogg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively. The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia.

  9. Insulin sensitizing and alpha-glucoamylase inhibitory action of sennosides, rheins and rhaponticin in Rhei Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Bong; Ko, Byoung Seob; Park, Seong Kyu; Jang, Jin Sun; Park, Sunmin

    2006-01-25

    Extracts from Rhei Rhizoma extracts (RR) have been reported to attenuate metabolic disorders such as diabetic nephropathy, hypercholesterolemia and platelet aggregation. With this study we investigated the anti-diabetic action of 70% ethanol RR extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and determined the action mechanism of active compounds of RR in vitro. In the diabetic mice, serum glucose levels at fasting and post-prandial states and glucose area under the curve at modified oral glucose tolerance tests were lowered without altering serum insulin levels, indicating that RR contained potential anti-diabetic agents. The fractions fractionated from RR extracts by XAD-4 column revealed that 60%, 80% and 100% methanol fractions enhanced insulin sensitivity and inhibited alpha-glucoamylase activity. The major compounds of these fractions were sennosides, rhein and rhaponticin. Rhaponticin and rhein enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Rhaponticin increased adipocytes with a differentiating effect similar to pioglitazone, but rhein and sennoside B decreased triglyceride accumulation. Sennoside A and B inhibited alpha-glucoamylase activity as much as acarbose. In conclusion, a crude extract of RR improves glucose intolerance by enhancing insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and decreasing carbohydrate digestion via inhibiting alpha-glucoamylase activity. Rhein and rhaponticin are potential candidates for hypoglycemic agents.

  10. Effect of domestic cooking on the starch digestibility, predicted glycemic indices, polyphenol contents and alpha amylase inhibitory properties of beans (Phaseolis vulgaris) and breadfruit (Treculia africana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinedum, E; Sanni, S; Theressa, N; Ebere, A

    2018-01-01

    The effect of processing on starch digestibility, predicted glycemic indices (pGI), polyphenol contents and alpha amylase inhibitory properties of beans (Phaseolis vulgaris) and breadfruit (Treculia africana) was studied. Total starch ranged from 4.3 to 68.3g/100g, digestible starch ranged from 4.3 to 59.2 to 65.7g/100g for the raw and processed legumes; Resistance starch was not detected in most of the legumes except in fried breadfruit and the starches in both the raw and processed breadfruit were more rapidly digested than those from raw and cooked beans. Raw and processed breadfruit had higher hydrolysis curves than raw and processed beans with the amylolysis level in raw breadfruit close to that of white bread. Raw beans had a low glycemic index (GI); boiled beans and breadfruit had intermediate glycemic indices respectively while raw and fried breadfruit had high glycemic indices. Aqueous extracts of the food samples had weak α-amylase inhibition compared to acarbose. The raw and processed legumes contained considerable amounts of dietary phenols and flavonoids. The significant correlation (r=0.626) between α-amylase inhibitory actions of the legumes versus their total phenolic contents suggests the contribution of the phenolic compounds in these legumes to their α-amylase inhibitory properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Chemical Constituents from Leaves of Hibiscus syriacus and Their α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Ji, Xiao-ying; Xu, Fei; Li, Qian-rong; Yin, Hao

    2015-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Hibiscus syriacus leaves and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Column chromatography including macroporous resins, silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 were used for the isolation and purification of all compounds. Spectroscopic methods including physical and chemical properties, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR were used for the identification of structures. Their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were detected by a 96-well microplate. 15 compounds were isolated and identified as β-sitosterol(1), β-daucostero (2), β-amyrin (3), oleanolic acid (4), stigmast-4-en-3-one (5), friedelin (6), syriacusin A (7), kaempferol (8), isovitexin (9), vitexin (10), apigenin (11), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (12), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (13), vitexin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (14) and rutin (15). All the compounds are isolated from the leaves of Hibiscus syriacus for the first time. Taking acarbose as positive control, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of 15 compounds were evaluated. Compounds 7 and 9 have shown strong α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 of 39.03 ± 0.38 and 32.12 ± 0.62 mg/L, inhibition ratio of 94.95% and 97.15%, respectively.

  12. Antidiabetic Indian Plants: A Good Source of Potent Amylase Inhibitors

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    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG. Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L. Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L. (syn: Sanctum; Syzygium cumini (L. Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana; Linum usitatissimum (L. and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor.

  13. Monoalkylated barbiturate derivatives: X-ray crystal structure, theoretical studies, and biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Assem; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Ghawas, Hussain Mansur; Yousuf, Sammer; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Wadood, Abdul

    2017-08-01

    Barbiturate derivatives are privileged structures with a broad range of pharmaceutical applications. We prepared a series of 5-monoalkylated barbiturate derivatives (3a-l) and evaluated, in vitro, their antioxidant (DPPH assay), and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Compounds 3a-l were synthesized via Michael addition. The structure of compound 3k was determined using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, and geometric parameters were calculated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. Further, the structural analysis of 3k were also investigated. Biological studies revealed that compounds 3b (IC50 = 133.1 ± 3.2 μM), 3d (IC50 = 305 ± 7.7 μM), and 3e (IC50 = 184 ± 2.3 μM) have potent α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors and showed greater activity than the standard drug acarbose (IC50 = 841 ± 1.73 μM). Compounds 3a-3i were found to show weak antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radicals (IC50 = 91 ± 0.75 to 122 ± 1.0 μM) when tested against a standard antioxidant, gallic acid (IC50 = 23 ± 0.43 μM).

  14. Patient characteristics related to metabolic disorders and chronic complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized at the Qingdao Endocrine and Diabetes Hospital from 2006 to 2012 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhu; Gao, Weiguo; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Jia; Hammar, Niklas; Cabrera, Claudia S; Wu, Xiaoli; Qiao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    To study the clinical characteristics related to metabolic disorders and complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized in the Qingdao Endocrine and Diabetes Hospital from 2006 to 2012 in Qingdao, China. Data from 14,289 (51% males) type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized between 2006 and 2012 were collected and analysed. Information on patients' demographic, anthropometric, laboratory and disease histories were extracted from electronic medical records. The mean age of the patients was 60.5 years, with median diabetes duration of 9.0 years. Mean haemoglobin A1c was 8.4%, where 1.9% had hypertriglyceridaemia. Retinopathy was diagnosed in 51.1% of patients, nephropathy in 21.6%, neuropathy in 50.4%, hypertension in 77.4%, coronary heart disease in 27.6% and peripheral vascular disease in 58.6%. Once hospitalized, 71.1% of patients underwent insulin injection treatments, either mono-therapy or combined with other anti-diabetic drugs. Metformin was prescribed to 36.9% of patients, followed by acarbose 29.9%, thiazolidinediones 18.1%, meglitinides 14.8% and sulfonylureas 10.7%. Inadequate control of hyperglycaemia, poor metabolic profiles and diabetic complications were common challenges for long-term diabetes management in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Metal based biologically active compounds: Design, synthesis, DNA binding and antidiabetic activity of 6-methyl-3-formyl chromone derived hydrazones and their metal (II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jessica Elizabeth; Shahid, Muhammad; Prathapachandra Kurup, M R; Velayudhan, Mohanan Puzhavoorparambil

    2017-10-01

    Two chromone hydrazone ligands HL 1 and HL 2 were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1 H NMR & 13 C NMR, electronic absorption and mass spectra. The reactions of the chromone hydrazones with transition metals such as Ni, Cu, and Zn (II) salts of acetate afforded mononuclear metal complexes. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared chromone hydrazone metal (II) complexes were done by elemental, IR, electronic, EPR spectra and thermo gravimetric analyses as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The spectroscopic data showed that the ligand acts as a mono basic bidentate with coordination sites are azomethine nitrogen and hydrazonic oxygen, and they exhibited distorted geometry. The biological studies involved antidiabetic activity i.e. enzyme inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, Calf Thymus - DNA (CT-DNA) interaction and molecular docking. Potential capacity of synthesized compounds to inhibit the α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity was assayed whereas DNA interaction studies were carried out with the help UV-Vis absorption titration and viscosity method. The docking studies of chromone hydrazones show that they are minor groove binders. Complexes were found to be good DNA - intercalates. Chromone hydrazones and its transition metal complexes have shown comparable antidiabetic activity with a standard drug acarbose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of an α-Glucosidase Inhibitor from Musa spp. (Baxijiao Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanwu Sheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of α-glucosidase inhibitors is considered to be an effective strategy in the treatment of diabetes. Using a bioassay-guided fractionation technique, five Bacillus stearothermophilus α-glucosidase inhibitors were isolated from the flowers of Musa spp. (Baxijiao. Using NMR spectroscopy analysis they were identified as vanillic acid (1, ferulic acid (2, β-sitosterol (3, daucosterol (4 and 9-(4′-hydroxyphenyl-2-methoxyphenalen-1-one (5. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of compounds 1–5 were 2004.58, 1258.35, 283.67, 247.35 and 3.86 mg/L, respectively. Compared to a known α-glucosidase inhibitor (acarbose, IC50 = 999.31 mg/L, compounds 3, 4 and 5 showed a strong α-glucosidase inhibitory effect. A Lineweaver-Burk plot indicated that compound 5 is a mixed-competitive inhibitor, while compounds 3 and 4 are competitive inhibitors. The inhibition constants (Ki of compounds 3, 4 and 5 were 20.09, 2.34 and 4.40 mg/L, respectively. Taken together, these data show that the compounds 3, 4 and 5 are potent α-glucosidase inhibitors.

  17. Turmerin, the antioxidant protein from turmeric (Curcuma longa) exhibits antihyperglycaemic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, P C; Arimboor, Ranjith; Raghu, K G; Menon, A Nirmala

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of proteinaceous inhibitors are present in plants to protect themselves from hydrolytic enzymes. In this study, turmerin, a water-soluble peptide in turmeric rhizomes, was evaluated for its inhibitory potential against glucosidase and its antioxidant (AO) capacity. Turmerin inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities with IC₅₀ values 31 and 192 µg mL⁻¹, respectively. Under the experimental conditions, those values for a standard glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, were 81 and 296 µg mL⁻¹, respectively. The AO capacity of turmerin was evaluated using in vitro assay systems. Turmerin showed good DPPH (IC₅₀ = 29 µg mL⁻¹) and superoxide (IC₅₀ = 48 µg mL⁻¹) and moderate ABTS (IC₅₀ = 83 µg mL⁻¹) radical scavenging and Fe(II) chelation (IC₅₀ = 101 µg mL⁻¹) capacities. The inhibitory potential showed by turmerin against enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, as well as its moderate AO capacity, could rationalise the traditional usage of turmeric rhizome preparations against diabetes.

  18. Xanthium strumarium as an Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1β, Protein Glycation and ABTS⁺ for Diabetic and Its Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yoon, Ha Na; Lim, Soon Sung

    2016-09-16

    Phytochemical investigation of the natural products from Xanthium strumarium led to the isolation of fourteen compounds including seven caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) derivatives. The individual compounds were screened for inhibition of α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β), advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and ABTS⁺ radical scavenging activity using in vitro assays. Among the isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (18.42 μM), PTP1β (1.88 μM), AGEs (82.79 μM), and ABTS⁺ (6.03 μM). This effect was marked compared to that of the positive controls (acarbose 584.79 μM, sumarin 5.51 μM, aminoguanidine 1410.00 μM, and trolox 29.72 μM respectively). In addition, 3,5-di-O-CQA (88.14 μM) and protocatechuic acid (32.93 μM) had a considerable inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase and ABTS⁺. Based on these findings, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid was assumed to be potentially responsible for the anti-diabetic actions of X. strumarium.

  19. Xanthium strumarium as an Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1β, Protein Glycation and ABTS+ for Diabetic and Its Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the natural products from Xanthium strumarium led to the isolation of fourteen compounds including seven caffeoylquinic acid (CQA derivatives. The individual compounds were screened for inhibition of α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, and ABTS+ radical scavenging activity using in vitro assays. Among the isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (18.42 μM, PTP1β (1.88 μM, AGEs (82.79 μM, and ABTS+ (6.03 μM. This effect was marked compared to that of the positive controls (acarbose 584.79 μM, sumarin 5.51 μM, aminoguanidine 1410.00 μM, and trolox 29.72 μM respectively. In addition, 3,5-di-O-CQA (88.14 μM and protocatechuic acid (32.93 μM had a considerable inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase and ABTS+. Based on these findings, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid was assumed to be potentially responsible for the anti-diabetic actions of X. strumarium.

  20. Chemical and Biological Analysis of Malaysian Sting less Bee Propolis Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhamizah Ibrahim; Nurul Farah Shakila Mohd Niza; Muhammad Muslim Mohd Rodi; Abdul Jamil Zakaria; Zhari Ismail; Khamsah Suryati Mohd; Khamsah Suryati Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate chemical and biological profile of methanol extracts from Malaysian propolis produced by two commonly found sting less bee species, Heterotrigona itama (MHI) and Geniotrigona thoracica (MGT). Test samples were analyzed for physicochemical parameters such as moisture, fat, crude fibre, crude protein, carbohydrate and ash content. Tests for phyto chemical screening by thin layer chromatography of both extracts revealed that presence of terpenoids, flavonoids, phenols and essential oils but steroids, saponin and coumarins only occur in MHI. Both extracts displayed a characteristic profile and vary from each other. Accordingly, MHI possess higher antioxidant activity with an IC_5_0 of 15.0 ± 0.21 μg/ mL compared to MGT with IC_5_0 of 270.0 ± 0.19 μg/ mL. MHI showed moderate nitric oxide scavenging activity, while MGT only showed mild inhibition. Antidiabetic activity was determined by α-glucosidase inhibition and found significantly better than that of acarbose (positive control). In conclusion, data gathered in this study revealed that bee species play role in determining the chemical and biological profile of particular propolis and should put into account in decision of further development for propolis. (author)

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  2. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  3. Phlorotannins from Alaskan Seaweed Inhibit Carbolytic Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Joshua; Grace, Mary H.; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively). The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS) was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:25341030

  4. Bioactive diterpenoids and flavonoids from the aerial parts of Scoparia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yang, Qi-Ming; Hu, Hai-Jun; Yang, Li; Yang, Ying-Bo; Chou, Gui-Xin; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2014-07-25

    Six new diterpenoids, 4-epi-7α-O-acetylscoparic acid A (1), 7α-hydroxyscopadiol (2), 7α-O-acetyl-8,17β-epoxyscoparic acid A (3), neo-dulcinol (4), dulcinodal-13-one (5), and 4-epi-7α-hydroxydulcinodal-13-one (6), and a new flavonoid, dillenetin 3-O-(6″-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (10), along with 12 known compounds, were isolated from the aerial parts of Scoparia dulcis. The 7S absolute configuration of the new diterpenoids 1-4 and 6 was deduced by comparing their NOESY spectra with that of a known compound, (7S)-4-epi-7-hydroxyscoparic acid A (7), which was determined by the modified Mosher's method. The flavonoids scutellarein (11), hispidulin (12), apigenin (15), and luteolin (16) and the terpenoids 4-epi-scopadulcic acid B (9) and betulinic acid (19) showed more potent α-glucosidase inhibitory effects (with IC50 values in the range 13.7-132.5 μM) than the positive control, acarbose. In addition, compounds 1, 11, 12, 15, 16, and acerosin (17) exhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonistic activity, with EC50 values ranging from 0.9 to 24.9 μM.

  5. Polyketides with α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from a Mangrove Endophytic Fungus, Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayue; Yang, Qin; Xia, Guoping; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Hanxiang; Ma, Lin; Lu, Yongjun; He, Lei; Xia, Xuekui; She, Zhigang

    2015-08-28

    Five new compounds, pinazaphilones A and B (1, 2), two phenolic compounds (4, 5), and penicidone D (6), together with the known Sch 1385568 (3), (±)-penifupyrone (7), 3-O-methylfunicone (8), 5-methylbenzene-1,3-diol (9), and 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (10) were obtained from the culture of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1, which was isolated from a fresh branch of the mangrove plant Cerbera manghas collected from the South China Sea. Their structures were determined by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectroscopic data. Structures of compounds 4 and 7 were further confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment using Cu Kα radiation. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-3 were assigned by quantum chemical calculations of the electronic circular dichroic spectra. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 inhibited α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 28.0, 16.6, 2.2, and 14.4 μM, respectively, and are thus more potent than the positive control, acarbose.

  6. The role of incretin-based therapies in prediabetes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Azar, Sami T

    2014-12-01

    Prediabetes, a high-risk state for future development of diabetes, is prevalent globally. Abnormalities in the incretin axis are important in the progression of B-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Incretin based therapy was found to improve B cell mass and glycaemic control in addition to having multiple beneficial effects on the systolic and diastolic blood pressure, weight loss in addition to their other beneficial effects on the liver and cardiovascular system. In prediabetes, several well-designed preventive trials have shown that lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions such as metformin, thiazolidinediones (TZD), acarbose and, nateglinide and orlistat, are effective in reducing diabetes development. In recent small studies, incretin based therapy (DPP IV inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists) have also been extended to patients with prediabetes since it was shown to better preserve B-cell function and mass in animal studies and in clinical trials and it was also shown to help maintain good long term metabolic control. Because of the limited studies and clinical experience, their side effects and costs currently guidelines do not recommend incretin-based therapies as an option for treatment in patients with prediabetes. With future clinical trials and studies they may be recommended for patients with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of anti-hyperglycemic effect of Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuansheng; Cheng, Delin; Wang, Linbo; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Yuepeng; Li, Kejuan; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic effect of ethanol extract from Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root (AKE).An in vitro evaluation was performed by using rat intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase), the key enzymes linked with type 2 diabetes. And an in vivo evaluation was also performed by loading maltose, sucrose, glucose to normal rats. As a result, AKE showed concentration-dependent inhibition effects on rat intestinal maltase and rat intestinal sucrase with IC(50) values of 1.83 and 1.03mg/mL, respectively. In normal rats, after loaded with maltose, sucrose and glucose, administration of AKE significantly reduced postprandial hyperglycemia, which is similar to acarbose used as an anti-diabetic drug. High contents of total phenolics (80.49 ± 0.05mg GAE/g extract) and total flavonoids (430.69 ± 0.91mg RE/g extract) were detected in AKE. In conclusion, AKE possessed anti-hyperglycemic effects and the possible mechanisms were associated with its inhibition on α-glucosidase and the improvement on insulin release and/or insulin sensitivity as well. The anti-hyperglycemic activity possessed by AKE maybe attributable to its high contents of phenolic and flavonoid compounds.

  8. New Gallotannin and other Phytochemicals from Sycamore Maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Tu, Zong-cai; Yuan, Tao; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B; Wang, Hui; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-11-01

    The maple (Acer) genus is a reported source of bioactive (poly)phenols, including gallotannins, but several of its members, such as the sycamore maple (A. pseudoplatanus), remain uninvestigated. Herein, thirty-nine compounds, including a new gallotannin, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-6-O-(p-hydroxybenzoyl)-β-D- glucopyranoside (1), and thirty-eight (2-39) known compounds, consisting of four gallotannins, one ellagitannin, thirteen flavonoids, eight hydroxycinnamic acids, ten benzoic acid derivatives, and two sesquiterpenoids, were isolated from sycamore maple leaves. Their structures were determined based on NMR and mass spectral analyses. The isolates were evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Among the isolates, the gallotannins were the most potent α-glucosidase inhibitors with thirteen-fold more potent activity compared with the clinical drug, acarbose (IC50 = 16-31 vs. 218 µM). Similarly, the gallotannins showed the highest antioxidant activities, followed by the other phenolic sub-classes, while the sesquiterpenoids were inactive.

  9. Nanoencapsulation of dietary flavonoid fisetin: Formulation and in vitro antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibition activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, Mario; Syed, Deeba N; Pala, Nicolino; Mariani, Alberto; Marceddu, Salvatore; Brunetti, Antonio; Mukhtar, Hasan; Sanna, Vanna

    2016-11-01

    The bioactive flavonoid fisetin (FS) is a diet-derived antioxidant that is being increasingly investigated for its health-promoting effects. Unfortunately, the poor physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties affect and limit the clinical application. In this study, novel polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), based on Poly-(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and PLGA-PEG-COOH, encapsulating FS were formulated as suitable oral controlled release systems. Results showed NPs having a mean diameter of 140-200nm, and a percent loading of FS ranging from 70 to 82%. In vitro release studies revealed that NPs are able to protect and preserve the release of FS in gastric simulated conditions, also controlling the release in the intestinal medium. Moreover, the DPPH and ABTS scavenging capacity of FS, as well as α-glucosidase inhibition activity, that resulted about 20-fold higher than commercial Acarbose, were retained during nanoencapsulation process. In summary, our developed NPs can be proposed as an attractive delivery system to control the release of antioxidant and anti-hyperglycemic FS for nutraceutical and/or therapeutic application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of alpha- amylase inhibition by Urtica dioica and Juglans regia extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Rahimzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:One strategy for the treatment of diabetes is inhibition of pancreatic α- amylase. Plants contains different chemical constituents with potential for inhibition of α-amylase and hence maybe used as therapeutic. Materials and Methods: Urtica dioica and Juglans regia Linn were tested for α-amylase inhibition. Different concentrations of leaf aqueous extracts were incubated with enzyme substrate solution and the activity of enzyme was measured. For determination of the type of inhibition, Dixon plot was depicted. Acarbose was used as the standard inhibitor. Results: Both plant extracts showed time and concentration dependent inhibition of α-amylase. 60% inhibition was seen with 2 mg/ml of U. dioica and0.4 mg/ml of J. regia aqueous extract. Dixon plots revealed the type of α-amylase inhibition by these two extracts as competitive inhibition. Conclusion: Determination of the type of α-amylase inhibition by these plant extracts could provide by successful use of plant chemicals as drug targets.

  11. Evaluation of a Standardized Extract from Morus alba against α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Effect and Postprandial Antihyperglycemic in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Li, Hong Mei; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of a standardized extract of the leaves of Morus alba (SEMA), the present study was designed to investigate the α-glucosidase inhibitory effect and acute single oral toxicity as well as evaluate blood glucose reduction in animals and in patients with impaired glucose tolerance in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. SEMA was found to inhibit α-glucosidase at a fourfold higher level than the positive control (acarbose), in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, blood glucose concentration was suppressed by SEMA in vivo. Clinical signs and weight changes were observed when conducting an evaluation of the acute toxicity of SEMA through a single-time administration, with clinical observation conducted more than once each day. After administration of the SEMA, observation was for 14 days; all of the animals did not die and did not show any abnormal symptoms. In addition, the inhibitory effects of rice coated with SEMA were evaluated in a group of impaired glucose tolerance patients on postprandial glucose and a group of normal persons, and results showed that SEMA had a clear inhibitory effect on postprandial hyperglycemia in both groups. Overall, SEMA showed excellent potential in the present study as a material for improving postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:27974904

  12. Chemical Constituents of Muehlenbeckia tamnifolia (Kunth) Meisn (Polygonaceae) and Its In Vitro α-Amilase and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Naranjo, María; Suárez, Alirica; Gilardoni, Gianluca; Cartuche, Luis; Flores, Paola; Morocho, Vladimir

    2016-11-02

    The phytochemical investigation of Muehlenbeckia tamnifolia , collected in Loja-Ecuador, led to the isolation of nine known compounds identified as: lupeol acetate ( 1 ); cis - p -coumaric acid ( 2 ); lupeol ( 3 ); β-sitosterol ( 4 ) trans - p -coumaric acid ( 5 ); linoleic acid ( 6 ) (+)-catechin ( 7 ); afzelin ( 8 ) and quercitrin ( 9 ). The structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on analysis of NMR and MS data, as well as comparison with the literature. The hypoglycemic activity of crude extracts and isolated compounds was assessed by the ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. The hexane extract showed weak inhibitory activity on α-amylase, with an IC 50 value of 625 µg·mL -1 , while the other extracts and isolated compounds were inactive at the maximum dose tested. The results on α-glucosidase showed more favorable effects; the hexanic and methanolic extracts exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with IC 50 values of 48.22 µg·mL -1 and 19.22 µg·mL -1 , respectively. Four of the nine isolated compounds exhibited strong inhibitory activity with IC 50 values below 8 µM, much higher than acarbose (377 uM). Linoleic acid was the most potent compound (IC 50 = 0.42 µM) followed by afzelin, (+)-catechin and quercitrin.

  13. Acarviosine-simmondsin, a novel compound obtained from acarviosine-glucose and simmondsin by Thermus maltogenic amylase and its in vivo effect on food intake and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin-Sook; Kim, Hye-Young; Abbott, Thomas P; Moon, Tae-Wha; Lee, Soo-Bok; Park, Cheon-Seok; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2003-03-01

    Simmondsin was modified with acarviosine-glucose using the transglycosylation activity of Thermus maltogenic amylase to synthesize a novel compound with both antiobesity and hypoglycemic activity. The LC/MS and 13C NMR analyses confirmed that the structure of the major transglycosylation product was acarviosine-simmondsin (Acv-simmondsin), in which acarviosine was attached to the glucose moiety of simmondsin by an alpha-(1,6)-glycosidic linkage. It was found that Acv-simmondsin was a potent competitive inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase with the Ki value of 0.69 microM and a mixed type inhibitor of alpha-amylase with the Ki and KI of 20.78 microM and 26.31 microM, respectively. The administration of Acv-simmondsin (0.1 g/100 g diet/day) to mice for 5 days significantly reduced food intake by 35%, compared to 25% with simmondsin in control obese mice. Acv-simmondsin (50 mg/kg BW) suppressed the postprandial blood glucose response to sucrose (1 g/kg BW) by 74%, compared to 71% with acarbose, in normal rats.

  14. Inhibitory Potential of Five Traditionally Used Native Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants on α-Amylase, α-Glucosidase, Glucose Entrapment, and Amylolysis Kinetics In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carene M. N. Picot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Five traditionally used antidiabetic native medicinal plants of Mauritius, namely, Stillingia lineata (SL, Faujasiopsis flexuosa (FF, Erythroxylum laurifolium (EL, Elaeodendron orientale (EO, and Antidesma madagascariensis (AM, were studied for possible α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory property, glucose entrapment, and amylolysis kinetics in vitro. Only methanolic extracts of EL, EO, and AM (7472.92±5.99, 1745.58±31.66, and 2222.96±13.69 μg/mL, resp. were found to significantly (P<0.05 inhibit α-amylase and were comparable to acarbose. EL, EO, AM, and SL extracts (5000 μg/mL were found to significantly (P<0.05 inhibit α-glucosidase (between 87.41±3.31 and 96.87±1.37% inhibition. Enzyme kinetic studies showed an uncompetitive and mixed type of inhibition. Extracts showed significant (P<0.05 glucose entrapment capacities (8 to 29% glucose diffusion retardation index (GDRI, with SL being more active (29% GDRI and showing concentration-dependent activity (29, 26, 21, 14, and 5%, resp.. Amylolysis kinetic studies showed that methanolic extracts were more potent inhibitors of α-amylase compared to aqueous extracts and possessed glucose entrapment properties. Our findings tend to provide justification for the hypoglycaemic action of these medicinal plants which has opened novel avenues for the development of new phytopharmaceuticals geared towards diabetes management.

  15. Oxindole based oxadiazole hybrid analogs: Novel α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Rahim, Fazal; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2018-02-01

    Inhibition of α-glucosidase is an effective strategy for controlling post-prandial hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. Beside these α-glucosidase inhibitors has been also used as anti-obesity and anti-viral drugs. Keeping in view the greater importance of α-glucosidase inhibitors here in this study we are presenting oxindole based oxadiazoles hybrid analogs (1-20) synthesis, characterized by different spectroscopic techniques including 1 H NMR and EI-MS and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. All compounds were found potent inhibitors for the enzyme with IC 50 values ranging between 1.25 ± 0.05 and 268.36 ± 4.22 µM when compared with the standard drug acarbose having IC 50 value 895.09 ± 2.04 µM. Our study identifies novel series of potent α-glucosidase inhibitors and further investigation on this may led to the lead compounds. A structure activity relationship has been established for all compounds. The interactions of the active compounds and enzyme active site were established with the help of molecular docking studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and study of the α-amylase inhibitory potential of thiadiazole quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Tariq Javid, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Ullah, Hayat; Rahim, Fazal; Khan, Fahad; Islam Mohammad, Jahidul; Mohammed Khan, Khalid

    2017-10-01

    α-Amylase is a target for type-2 diabetes mellitus treatment. However, small molecule inhibitors of α-amylase are currently scarce. In the course of developing small molecule α-amylase inhibitors, we designed and synthesized thiadiazole quinoline analogs (1-30), characterized by different spectroscopic techniques such as 1 HNMR and EI-MS and screened for α-amylase inhibitory potential. Thirteen analogs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 30 showed outstanding α-amylase inhibitory potential with IC 50 values ranges between 0.002±0.60 and 42.31±0.17μM which is many folds better than standard acarbose having IC 50 value 53.02±0.12μM. Eleven analogs 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19 and 24 showed good to moderate inhibitory potential while seven analogs 8, 13, 16, 20, 21 and 29 were found inactive. Our study identifies novel series of potent α-amylase inhibitors for further investigation. Structure activity relationship has been established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis of piperazine sulfonamide analogs as diabetic-II inhibitors and their molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Irshad, Maryam; Imran, Syahrul; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Rahim, Fazal; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Nawaz, Faisal; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Piperazine Sulfonamide analogs (1-19) have been synthesized, characterized by different spectroscopic techniques and evaluated for α-amylase Inhibition. Analogs 1-19 exhibited a varying degree of α-amylase inhibitory activity with IC 50 values ranging in between 1.571 ± 0.05 to 3.98 ± 0.397 μM when compared with the standard acarbose (IC 50  = 1.353 ± 0.232 μM). Compound 1, 2, 3 and 7 showed significant inhibitory effects with IC 50 value 2.348 ± 0.444, 2.064 ± 0.04, 1.571 ± 0.05 and 2.118 ± 0.204 μM, respectively better than the rest of the series. Structure activity relationships were established. Molecular docking studies were performed to understand the binding interaction of the compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Biology-oriented drug synthesis (BIODS) of 2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl aryl ether derivatives, in vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity and in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Rahim, Fazal; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Ullah, Hayat; Khan, Fahad; Salar, Uzma; Javid, Muhammad Tariq; Vijayabalan, Shantini; Zaman, Khalid; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2017-10-01

    A new library of 2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl aryl ether derivatives (1-23) were synthesized and characterized by EI-MS and 1 H NMR, and screened for their α-amylase inhibitory activity. Out of twenty-three derivatives, two molecules 19 (IC 50 =0.38±0.82µM) and 23 (IC 50 =1.66±0.14µM), showed excellent activity whereas the remaining compounds, except 10 and 17, showed good to moderate inhibition in the range of IC 50 =1.77-2.98µM when compared with the standard acarbose (IC 50 =1.66±0.1µM). A plausible structure-activity relationship has also been presented. In addition, in silico studies was carried out in order to rationalize the binding interaction of compounds with the active site of enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and in silico study of tris-indole hybrid scaffold with oxadiazole ring: As potential leads for the management of type-II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Rahim, Fazal; Imran, Syahrul; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Ullah, Hayat; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Javid, Muhammad Tariq; Salar, Uzma; Ali, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2017-10-01

    Discovery of α-glucosidase inhibitors has been actively pursued with the aim to develop therapeutics for the treatment of type-II diabetes mellitus and the other carbohydrate mediated disease. In continuation of our drug discovery research on potential antidiabetic agents, we synthesized novel tris-indole-oxadiazole hybrid analogs (1-21), structurally characterized by various spectroscopic techniques such as 1 H NMR, EI-MS, and 13 C NMR. Elemental analysis was found in agreement with the calculated values. All compounds were evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibiting potential and showed potent inhibitory activity in the range of IC 50 =2.00±0.01-292.40±3.16μM as compared to standard acarbose (IC 50 =895.09±2.04µM). The pharmacokinetic predictions of tris-indole series using descriptor properties showed that almost all compounds in this series indicate the drug aptness. Detailed binding mode analyses with docking simulation was also carried out which showed that the inhibitors can be stabilized by the formation of hydrogen bonds with catalytic residues and the establishment of hydrophobic contacts at the opposite side of the active site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polyoxygenated Cyclohexenoids with Promising α-Glycosidase Inhibitory Activity Produced by Phomopsis sp. YE3250, an Endophytic Fungus Derived from Paeonia delavayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Jiang, Bo-Guang; Li, Xiao-Nian; Wang, Ya-Ting; Liu, Si-Si; Zheng, Kai-Xuan; He, Jian; Wu, Shao-Hua

    2018-02-07

    Seven new polyoxygenated cyclohexenoids, namely, phomopoxides A-G (1-7), were isolated from the fermentation broth extract of an endophytic fungal strain Phomopsis sp. YE3250 from the medicinal plant Paeonia delavayi Franch. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic interpretation. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 4 were confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis and chemical derivative approach. All isolated compounds showed weak cytotoxic activities toward three human tumor cell lines (Hela, MCF-7, and NCI-H460) and weak antifungal activities against five pathogenic fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Pyricularia oryzae, Fusarium avenaceum, and Hormodendrum compactum). In addition, compounds 1-7 showed a promising α-glycosidase inhibitory activity with IC 50 values of 1.47, 1.55, 1.83, 2.76, 2.88, 3.16, and 2.94 mM, respectively, as compared with a positive control of acarbose (IC 50 = 1.22 mM).

  1. [Rational therapy of Type II diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, M; Fischer, S

    1996-12-01

    Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is a genetically determined form of diabetes, due to impaired insulin secretion by the B-cells as well as to insulin resistance of the peripheral tissues. According to the glucose toxicity theory hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia exist in a vicious circle. Therefore, it is a major therapeutical aim to put the B-cell to rest and improve insulin sensitivity by a strict control of fasting blood glucose and of postprandial hyperglycemia. Furthermore, associated abnormalities within the metabolic syndrome, such as hypertension, dyslipoproteinemia and hemostatic disorders should be corrected to avoid vessel complications. Therefore, it should be started with basic measures as body weight reduction, carbohydrate-rich and fat-poor diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve acceptable glycemic control, antihyperglycemic drugs (acarbose, metformin) are indicated, eventually in a combination with small doses of short-acting sulfonylureas. Further impairment of insulin secretion is the indication for sulfonylurea and/or insulin application. HbA1c of 7 to 7.5% should be the goal of antidiabetic therapy, also for patients in advanced age. The main criterion for the choice of antidiabetics is the present insulin secretion capacity. Simple indicators in this respect are changes of body weight, plasma triglycerides and C-Peptide after i.v. glucagon stimulation. Application of insulin in combination with other antidiabetics or in the form of intensified insulin therapy should not be too much postponed.

  2. Enzyme inhibitory and radical scavenging effects of some antidiabetic plants of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Nilüfer; Hoçbaç, Sanem; Orhan, Didem Deliorman; Asian, Mustafa; Ergun, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Ethnopharmacological field surveys demonstrated that many plants, such as Gentiana olivieri, Helichrysum graveolens, Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus communis var. saxatilis, Viscum album (ssp. album, ssp. austriacum), are used as traditional medicine for diabetes in different regions of Anatolia. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antidiabetic effects of some selected plants, tested in animal models recently. Materials and Methods: α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzyme inhibitory effects of the plant extracts were investigated and Acarbose was used as a reference drug. Additionally, radical scavenging capacities were determined using 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) ABTS radical cation scavenging assay and total phenolic content of the extracts were evaluated using Folin Ciocalteu method. Results: H. graveolens ethanol extract exhibited the highest inhibitory activity (55.7 % ± 2.2) on α-amylase enzyme. Additionally, J. oxycedrus hydro-alcoholic leaf extract had potent α-amylase inhibitory effect, while the hydro-alcoholic extract of J. communis fruit showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50: 4.4 μg/ml). Conclusion: Results indicated that, antidiabetic effect of hydro-alcoholic extracts of H. graveolens capitulums, J. communis fruit and J. oxycedrus leaf might arise from inhibition of digestive enzymes. PMID:25140204

  3. Modulation of hyperglycemia and TNFα-mediated inflammation by helichrysum and grapefruit extracts in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Ana Laura; Etxeberria, Usune; Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Aumueller, Eva; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    Type-2 diabetes is associated with a chronic low-grade systemic inflammation accompanied by an increased production of adipokines/cytokines by obese adipose tissue. The search for new antidiabetic drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as insulin sensitizers, insulin secretagogues and α-glucosidase inhibitors, has directed the focus on the potential use of flavonoids in the management of type-2 diabetes. Thirty six diabetic male C57BL/6J db/db mice were fed a standard diet and randomly assigned into four experimental groups: non-treated control, (n = 8); acarbose (5 mg per kg bw, n = 8); helichrysum (1 g per kg bw, n = 10) and grapefruit (0.5 g per kg bw, n = 10) for 6 weeks. The mRNA expression in pancreas, liver and epididymal adipose tissue was determined by RT-PCR. DNA methylation was quantified in epididymal fat using pyrosequencing. Mice supplemented with helichrysum and grapefruit extracts showed a significant decrease in fasting glucose levels (p helichrysum and grapefruit extracts improved hyperglycemia through the regulation of glucose metabolism in the liver and reduction of the expression of proinflammatory genes in the liver and visceral fat. The hypermethylation of TNFα in adipose tissue may contribute to reduce the inflammation associated with diabetes and obesity.

  4. Aqueous Extract of Annona macroprophyllata: A Potential α-Glucosidase Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindis, F.; González-Trujano, M. E.; González-Andrade, M.; Aguirre-Hernández, E.; Villalobos-Molina, R.

    2013-01-01

    Annona genus contains plants used in folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes. In the present study, an aqueous extract prepared from Annona macroprophyllata (Annonaceae, also known as A. diversifolia) leaves was evaluated on both the activity of yeast α-glucosidase (an in vitro assay) and sucrose tolerance in Wistar rats. The results have shown that the aqueous extract from A. macroprophyllata inhibits the yeast α-glucosidase with an IC50 = 1.18 mg/mL, in a competitive manner with a K i = 0.97 mg/mL, a similar value to that of acarbose (K i = 0.79 mg/mL). The inhibitory activity of A. macroprophyllata was reinforced by its antihyperglycemic effect, at doses of 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg in rats. Chromatographic analysis identified the flavonoids rutin and isoquercitrin in the most polar fractions of A. macroprophyllata crude extract, suggesting that these flavonoids are part of the active constituents in the plant. Our results support the use of A. macroprophyllata in Mexican folk medicine to control postprandial glycemia in people with diabetes mellitus, involving active constituents of flavonoid nature. PMID:24298552

  5. Chemical Composition and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Vietnamese Citrus Peels Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hai Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inhibition of α-glucosidase is an important factor to control postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Citrus essential oils (CEO are among the most widely used essential oils, and some of them exhibited promising antidiabetic effect. However, the α-glucosidase inhibition of CEO has not been investigated so far. The present work aims to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibition of essential oils from six Vietnamese Citrus peels. Methods. The chemical composition of essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from six Citrus peels was analyzed by GC-MS. All essential oils were tested for their inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase using p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Results. In Buddha’s hand and lime peels, the major components were limonene (59.0–61.31% and γ-terpinene (13.98–23.84% while limonene (90.95–95.74% was most abundant in pomelo, orange, tangerine, and calamondin peels. Among the essential oils, the Buddha’s hand oil showed the most significant α-glucosidase inhibitory effect with the IC50 value of 412.2 μg/mL. The combination of the Buddha’s hand essential oil and the antidiabetic drug acarbose increased the inhibitory effect. Conclusions. The results suggested the potential use of Buddha’s hand essential oil as an alternative in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients.

  7. Patient with pontine warning syndrome and bilateral posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capsular warning syndrome was first described in 1993, featured with repetitive episodes of motor and/or sensory dysfunction without cortical signs. Recently, it has been demonstrated that clinically typical capsular warning syndrome can be associated with pontine infarct and the term “pontine warning syndrome� was coined. Case Presentation A 54-year-old woman with a history of hypertension was seen with profound left-sided hemiplegia. She had had 3 episodes of left-sided weakness before complete hemiplegia. Her speech was slurred. Left central facial palsy and hemiglossoplegia were presented. Her left plantar response was extensor and bilateral posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia was seen on neurologic examination. Biochemical tests revealed hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia on the next day. MRI demonstrated an acute right paramedian pontine infarct. The patient was commenced on oral clopidogrel, atorvastatin and acarbose. After 23 days of hospitalization, she was discharged with severe left hemiplegia. Conclusions 1 Pontine warning syndrome may be underestimated and understudied. 2 Posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a rare clinical sign in cerebrovascular diseases, while it can help to locate a brainstem lesion rather than an internal capsular one. 3 Blood pressure lowing administration may be improper for patients with pontine warning syndrome.

  8. 2-Aryl benzimidazoles: Synthesis, In vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity, and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Akande Akinsola; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Salar, Uzma; Aboaba, Sherifat Adeyinka; Kanwal; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Fatima, Itrat; Taha, Mohammad; Wadood, Abdul; Mohammad, Jahidul Isalm; Khan, Huma; Perveen, Shahnaz

    2018-04-25

    Despite of many diverse biological activities exhibited by benzimidazole scaffold, it is rarely explored for the α-amylase inhibitory activity. For that purpose, 2-aryl benzimidazole derivatives 1-45 were synthesized and screened for in vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity. Structures of all synthetic compounds were deduced by various spectroscopic techniques. All compounds revealed inhibition potential with IC 50 values of 1.48 ± 0.38-2.99 ± 0.14 μM, when compared to the standard acarbose (IC 50  = 1.46 ± 0.26 μM). Limited SAR suggested that the variation in the inhibitory activities of the compounds are the result of different substitutions on aryl ring. In order to rationalize the binding interactions of most active compounds with the active site of α-amylase enzyme, in silico study was conducted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced Glucose Uptake in Human Liver Cells and Inhibition of Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Nordic Berry Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang Thanh Thi Ho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A Western lifestyle with low physical activity and a diet rich in sugar, fat and processed food contribute to higher incidences of diabetes and obesity. Enhanced glucose uptake in human liver cells was observed after treatment with phenolic extracts from different Nordic berries. All berry extracts showed higher inhibition against α-amylase and α-glucosidase than the anti-diabetic agent acarbose. Total phenolic content and phenolic profiles in addition to antioxidant activities, were also investigated. The berries were extracted with 80% methanol on an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE and then purified by C-18 solid phase extraction (SPE. Among the ASE methanol extracts, black chokeberry, crowberry and elderberry extracts showed high stimulation of glucose uptake in HepG2 cells and also considerable inhibitory effect towards carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. SPE extracts with higher concentrations of phenolics, resulted in increased glucose uptake and enhanced inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase compared to the ASE extracts. Crowberry and cloudberry were the most potent 15-lipoxygenase inhibitors, while bog whortleberry and lingonberry were the most active xanthine oxidase inhibitors. These results increase the value of these berries as a component of a healthy Nordic diet and have a potential benefit against diabetes.

  10. Exenatide augments first- and second-phase insulin secretion in response to intravenous glucose in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehse, Frauke; Trautmann, Michael; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: First-phase insulin secretion (within 10 min after a sudden rise in plasma glucose) is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The incretin mimetic exenatide has glucoregulatory activities in DM2, including glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of the study was to determine whether exenatide can restore a more normal pattern of insulin secretion in subjects with DM2. DESIGN: Fasted subjects received iv insulin infusion to reach plasma glucose 4.4-5.6 mmol/liter. Subjects received iv exenatide (DM2) or saline (DM2 and healthy volunteers), followed...... by iv glucose challenge. PATIENTS: Thirteen evaluable DM2 subjects were included in the study: 11 males, two females; age, 56 +/- 7 yr; body mass index, 31.7 +/- 2.4 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c, 6.6 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- sd) treated with diet/exercise (n = 1), metformin (n = 10), or acarbose (n = 2). Controls...

  11. Effect of Long-Term Dietary Arginyl-Fructose (AF on Hyperglycemia and HbA1c in Diabetic db/db Mice

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    Kwang-Hyoung Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that Amadori compounds exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering sucrose-induced hyperglycemia in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present study we extended our recent findings to evaluate whether α-glucosidase inhibitor arginyl-fructose (AF lowers blood glucose level in diabetic db/db mice, a genetic model for type 2 diabetes. The db/db mice were randomly assigned to high-carbohydrate diets (66.1% corn starch with and without AF (4% in the diet for 6 weeks. Changes in body weight, blood glucose level, and food intake were measured daily for 42 days. Dietary supplementation of AF resulted in a significant decrease of blood glucose level (p < 0.001 and body weight (p < 0.001. The level of HbA1c, a better indicator of plasma glucose concentration over prolonged periods of time, was also significantly decreased for 6-week period (p < 0.001. Dietary treatment of acarbose® (0.04% in diet, a positive control, also significantly alleviated the level of blood glucose, HbA1c, and body weight. These results indicate that AF Maillard reaction product improves postprandial hyperglycemia by suppressing glucose absorption as well as decreasing HbA1c level.

  12. Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) peel: A better source of antioxidants and a-glucosidase inhibitors than pulp, flake and seed, and phytochemical profile by HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Tu, Zong-Cai; Xie, Xing; Wang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Sha, Xiao-Mei; Lu, Yu

    2017-11-01

    Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) peel is an underutilized by-product in both, the production and processing of jackfruit. This research compared the antioxidant and hypoglycemic potential of jackfruit peel with jackfruit pulp, flake and seed for the first time. The phytochemical profile of peel extract was characterized with HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS. Results revealed that peel extract exhibited the highest total phenolic and total flavonoid content, and the phenolics was 4.65, 4.12 and 4.95 times higher than that of pulp, flake and seed extract, respectively. The strongest DPPH and ABTS + scavenging ability, α-glucosidase inhibition were also found in peel extract, and the α-glucosidase inhibition was about 11.8-fold of that of acarbose. The HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS analysis led to the tentative identification of 53 compounds, prenylflavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids and glycosides are the predominant bioactive compounds. Above results reveal promising potential of jackfruit peel as a new source of natural antioxidants and hypoglycemic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enzyme inhibitory and radical scavenging effects of some antidiabetic plants of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Orhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Ethnopharmacological field surveys demonstrated that many plants, such as Gentiana olivieri, Helichrysum graveolens, Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus  communis var. saxatilis, Viscum album (ssp. album, ssp. austriacum, are used as traditional medicine for diabetes in different regions of Anatolia. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antidiabetic effects of some selected plants, tested in animal models recently. Materials and Methods: α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzyme inhibitory effects of the plant extracts were investigated and Acarbose was used as a reference drug. Additionally, radical scavenging capacities were determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid ABTS radical cation scavenging assay and total phenolic content of the extracts were evaluated using Folin Ciocalteu method. Results: H. graveolens ethanol extract exhibited the highest inhibitory activity (55.7 % ± 2.2 on α-amylase enzyme. Additionally, J. oxycedrus hydro-alcoholic leaf extract had potent α-amylase inhibitory effect, while the hydro-alcoholic extract of J. communis fruit showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50: 4.4 μg/ml. Conclusion:Results indicated that, antidiabetic effect of hydro-alcoholic extracts of H. graveolens capitulums, J. communis fruit and J. oxycedrus leaf might arise from inhibition of digestive enzymes.

  14. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Nicola Villanova,2 Federica Agostini,2 Rebecca Marzocchi,2 Valentina Soverini,2 Giulio Marchesini21Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2Diseases of Metabolism, S Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate.Methods and results: Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol® in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action.Conclusion: Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.Keywords: berberine, silymarin, glycosylated hemoglobin, diabetes

  15. A physarum-inspired prize-collecting steiner tree approach to identify subnetworks for drug repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yahui; Hameed, Pathima Nusrath; Verspoor, Karin; Halgamuge, Saman

    2016-12-05

    Drug repositioning can reduce the time, costs and risks of drug development by identifying new therapeutic effects for known drugs. It is challenging to reposition drugs as pharmacological data is large and complex. Subnetwork identification has already been used to simplify the visualization and interpretation of biological data, but it has not been applied to drug repositioning so far. In this paper, we fill this gap by proposing a new Physarum-inspired Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree algorithm to identify subnetworks for drug repositioning. Drug Similarity Networks (DSN) are generated using the chemical, therapeutic, protein, and phenotype features of drugs. In DSNs, vertex prizes and edge costs represent the similarities and dissimilarities between drugs respectively, and terminals represent drugs in the cardiovascular class, as defined in the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system. A new Physarum-inspired Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree algorithm is proposed in this paper to identify subnetworks. We apply both the proposed algorithm and the widely-used GW algorithm to identify subnetworks in our 18 generated DSNs. In these DSNs, our proposed algorithm identifies subnetworks with an average Rand Index of 81.1%, while the GW algorithm can only identify subnetworks with an average Rand Index of 64.1%. We select 9 subnetworks with high Rand Index to find drug repositioning opportunities. 10 frequently occurring drugs in these subnetworks are identified as candidates to be repositioned for cardiovascular diseases. We find evidence to support previous discoveries that nitroglycerin, theophylline and acarbose may be able to be repositioned for cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we identify seven previously unknown drug candidates that also may interact with the biological cardiovascular system. These discoveries show our proposed Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree approach as a promising strategy for drug repositioning.

  16. Fruit Wines Inhibitory Activity Against α-Glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Uros; Grozdanic, Nada; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Pejin, Boris; Nastasijevic, Branislav; Markovic, Bojan; Dordevic, Brizita

    2017-01-01

    Fruit wines are well known for their profound health-promoting properties including both enzyme activations and inhibitions. They may act preventive in regard to diabetes melitus and other chronic diseases. Potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of fruit wines made from blueberry, black chokeberry, blackberry, raspberry and sour cherry was the subject of this study. In order to increase the alcohol content due to enriched extraction of total phenolics, sugar was added in the fruit pomace of the half of the examined fruit wine samples. Compared with acarbose used as a positive control (IC50 = 73.78 µg/mL), all fruit wine samples exhibited higher α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Indeed, blueberry wine samples stood out, both prepared with IC50 = 24.14 µg/mL, lyophilised extract yield 3.23% and without IC50 = 46.39 µg/mL, lyophilised extract yield 2.89% and with addition of sugar before fermentation. Chlorogenic acid predominantly contributed to α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the blueberry, black chokeberry and sour cherry wine samples. However, ellagic acid, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor possessing a planar structure, only slightly affected the activity of the blueberry wine samples, due to the lower concentration. In addition to this, molecular docking study of chlorogenic acid pointed out the importance of binding energy (-8.5 kcal/mol) for the inhibition of the enzyme. In summary, fruit wines made from blueberry should be primarily taken into consideration as a medicinal food targeting diabetes mellitus type 2 in the early stage, if additional studies would confirm their therapeutic potential for the control of postprandial hyperglycemia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. The role of lipid and carbohydrate digestive enzyme inhibitors in the management of obesity: a review of current and emerging therapeutic agents

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    Tucci S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sonia A Tucci, Emma J Boyland, Jason CG HalfordKissileff Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behaviour, School of Psychology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Obesity is a global epidemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality in adults and ill health in children. A proven successful approach in weight management has been the disruption of nutrient digestion, with orlistat having been used to treat obesity for the last 10 years. Although orlistat-induced weight loss remains modest, it produces meaningful reductions in risk factors for obesity-related conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, this lipase inhibitor is free of the serious side effects that have dogged appetite-suppressing drugs. This success had driven investigation into new generation nutraceuticals, supplements and pharmaceutical agents that inhibit the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and fats within the gut. This review focuses on agents purported to inhibit intestinal enzymes responsible for macronutrient digestion. Except for some synthetic products, the majority of agents reviewed are either botanical extracts or bacterial products. Currently, carbohydrate digestion inhibitors are under development to improve glycemic control and these may also induce some weight loss. However, colonic fermentation induced side effects, such as excess gas production, remain an issue for these compounds. The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, and the α-amylase inhibitor phaseolamine, have been used in humans with some promising results relating to weight loss. Nonetheless, few of these agents have made it into clinical studies and without any clinical proof of concept or proven efficacy it is unlikely any will enter the market soon.Keywords: lipase, amylase, saccharidases, overweight, orlistat, Alli®, digestion, body weight

  18. Rapid Screening for α-Glucosidase Inhibitors from Gymnema sylvestre by Affinity Ultrafiltration–HPLC-MS

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    Mingquan Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae has been known to posses potential anti-diabetic activity, and the gymnemic acids were reported as the main bioactive components in this plant species. However, the specific components responsible for the hypoglycemic effect still remain unknown. In the present study, the in vitro study revealed that the extract of G. sylvestre exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase with IC50 at 68.70 ± 1.22 μg/mL compared to acarbose (positive control at 59.03 ± 2.30 μg/mL, which further indicated the potential anti-diabetic activity. To this end, a method based on affinity ultrafiltration coupled with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UF-HPLC-MS was established to rapidly screen and identify the α-glucosidase inhibitors from G. sylvestre. In this way, 9 compounds with higher enrichment factors (EFs were identified according to their MS/MS spectra. Finally, the structure-activity relationships revealed that glycosylation could decrease the potential antisweet activity of sapogenins, and other components except gymnemic acids in G. sylvestre could also be good α-glucosidase inhibitors due to their synergistic effects. Taken together, the proposed method combing α-glucosidase and UF-HPLC-MS presents high efficiency for rapidly screening and identifying potential inhibitors of α-glucosidase from complex natural products, and could be further explored as a valuable high-throughput screening (HTS platform in the early anti-diabetic drug discovery stage.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Antidiabetic Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms (Agaricomycetes).

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    Singh, Varinder; Bedi, Gurleen Kaur; Shri, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Management of type 2 diabetes by delaying or preventing glucose absorption using natural products is gaining significant attention. Edible mushrooms are well documented for their nutritional and medicinal properties. This investigation was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic activity of aqueous extracts of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms, namely, Pleurotus ostreatus, Calocybe indica, and Volvariella volvacea, using in vitro models (α-amylase inhibition assay, glucose uptake by yeast cells, and glucose adsorption capacity). The most active extract was subsequently examined in vivo using the oral starch tolerance test in mice. All prepared extracts showed dose-dependent inhibition of α-amylase and an increase in glucose transport across yeast cells. C. indica extract was the most active α-amylase inhibitor (half-maximal inhibitory concentration, 18.07 ± 0.75 mg/mL) and exhibited maximum glucose uptake by yeast cells (77.53 ± 0.97% at 35 mg/mL). All extracts demonstrated weak glucose adsorption ability. The positive in vitro tests for C. indica paved the way for in vivo studies. C. indica extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced postprandial blood glucose peaks in mice challenged with starch. The extract (400 mg/kg) and acarbose normalized blood glucose levels at 180 minutes, when they were statistically similar to values in normal mice. Thus, it may be concluded that the antidiabetic effect of C. indica is mediated by inhibition of starch metabolism (α-amylase inhibition), increased glucose uptake by peripheral cells (promotion of glucose uptake by yeast cells), and mild entrapment (adsorption) of glucose. Hence, C. indica can be developed as antidiabetic drug after detailed pharmacological studies.

  20. Cultivar evaluation and effect of fermentation on antioxidant capacity and in vitro inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase by highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corombosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle H; Lucius, Anita; Meyer, Tessa; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2011-08-24

    The berry fruits of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) contain bioactive compounds with potential health benefits. The objective was to evaluate blueberries grown in southern Illinois as well as the effect of fermentation, at two different temperatures, on chemical and physical parameters. Fruits from fifteen blueberry cultivars were analyzed. Fruit diameter ranged from 12.8 mm to 18.7 mm, pH from 2.6 to 3.7, reducing sugars from 6.4% to 15.2%, total sugars from 13.9% to 21.6%, total polyphenols from 0.39 to 1.00 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g blueberry and antioxidant capacity from 5.8 to 10.9 μM Trolox equivalents (TE)/g. In vitro α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory capacity relative to the positive control acarbose, a known anti-diabetic drug, showed a range from 91.8 to 103.3% for α-amylase and from 103.2% to 190.8% for α-glucosidase. Wines prepared from several of these blueberry cultivars were analyzed throughout fermentation and compared at room temperature and cold temperature fermentation for pH (3.5 to 6.3), °Brix (13.6 to 29.7), total polyphenols (375.4 to 657.1 μg GAE/mL wine), and antioxidant capacity (4.5 to 25.1 mM TE). The wines were also tested for their in vitro capacity to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase and maintained similar inhibitory action as the berries. Highbush blueberry cultivars and their fermented beverages are good natural sources of antioxidants and starch-degrading enzyme inhibitors important for type 2 diabetes management.

  1. Separation, Identification, and Antidiabetic Activity of Catechin Isolated from Arbutus unedo L. Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabti, Hanae Naceiri; Jaradat, Nidal; Fichtali, Ismail; Ouedrhiri, Wessal; Jodeh, Shehdeh; Ayesh, Samar; Cherrah, Yahia; Faouzi, My El Abbes

    2018-04-12

    Phytopharmaceuticals play an essential role in medicine, since the need to investigate highly effective and safe drugs for the treatment of diabetes mellitus disease remains a significant challenge for modern medicine. Arbutus unedo L. root has various therapeutic properties, and has been used widely in the traditional medicine as an antidiabetic agent. The current study aimed to isolate the pharmacologically active compound from A. unedo roots using accelerated solvent extraction technology, to determine its chemical structure using different instrumental analytical methods, and also to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The roots of A. unedo were exhaustively extracted by high-pressure static extraction using the Zippertex ® technology (Dionex-ASE, Paris, France), and the extract was mixed with XAD-16 resin to reach quantifiable amounts of active compounds which were identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), ¹H NMR (300 MHz), and 13 C NMR. The antidiabetic activity of the isolated compound was evaluated using the α-glucosidase inhibitory assay. The active compound was isolated, and its structure was identified as catechin using instrumental analysis.The results revealed that the isolated compound has potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with an IC 50 value of 87.55 ± 2.23 μg/mL greater than acarbose. This was used as a positive control, which has an IC 50 value of 199.53 ± 1.12 μg/mL. According to the results achieved, the roots of A. unedo were considered the best source of catechin and the Zippertex ® technology method of extraction is the best method for isolation of this therapeutic active compound. In addition, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity results confirmed the traditional use of A. unedo roots as an antidiabetic agent. Future clinical trials and investigations of antidiabetic and other pharmacological effects such as anticancer are required.

  2. Separation, Identification, and Antidiabetic Activity of Catechin Isolated from Arbutus unedo L. Plant Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanae Naceiri Mrabti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytopharmaceuticals play an essential role in medicine, since the need to investigate highly effective and safe drugs for the treatment of diabetes mellitus disease remains a significant challenge for modern medicine. Arbutus unedo L. root has various therapeutic properties, and has been used widely in the traditional medicine as an antidiabetic agent. The current study aimed to isolate the pharmacologically active compound from A. unedo roots using accelerated solvent extraction technology, to determine its chemical structure using different instrumental analytical methods, and also to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The roots of A. unedo were exhaustively extracted by high-pressure static extraction using the Zippertex® technology (Dionex-ASE, Paris, France, and the extract was mixed with XAD-16 resin to reach quantifiable amounts of active compounds which were identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC, 1H NMR (300 MHz, and 13C NMR. The antidiabetic activity of the isolated compound was evaluated using the α-glucosidase inhibitory assay. The active compound was isolated, and its structure was identified as catechin using instrumental analysis.The results revealed that the isolated compound has potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 87.55 ± 2.23 μg/mL greater than acarbose. This was used as a positive control, which has an IC50 value of 199.53 ± 1.12 μg/mL. According to the results achieved, the roots of A. unedo were considered the best source of catechin and the Zippertex® technology method of extraction is the best method for isolation of this therapeutic active compound. In addition, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity results confirmed the traditional use of A. unedo roots as an antidiabetic agent. Future clinical trials and investigations of antidiabetic and other pharmacological effects such as anticancer are required.

  3. Inhibitory activity of phenolic-rich pistachio green hull extract-enriched pasta on key type 2 diabetes relevant enzymes and glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalegani, Sajjad; Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Sarteshnizi, Roghayeh

    2018-03-01

    Phenolic compounds as agro-industrial by-products have been associated with health benefits since they exhibit high antioxidant activity and anti-diabetic properties. In this study, polyphenol-rich extract from pistachio green hull (PGH) was evaluated for antioxidant activity and its ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity in vitro. The effect of PGH extract powder on in vitro starch digestibility was also evaluated. The results showed that PGH had stronger antioxidant activity than Trolox. The inhibitory effect of PGH extract against α-amylase from porcine pancreas was dose dependent and the IC 50 value was ~174μgGAE/mL. The crude PGH extract was eight times more potent on baker yeast α-glucosidase activity (IC 50 ~6μgGAE/mL) when compared to acarbose, whereas the IC 50 value of PGH extract against rat intestinal maltase activity obtained ~2.6mgGAE/mL. The non-tannin fraction of PGH extract was more effective against α-glucosidase than tannin fraction whereas the α-amylase inhibitor was concentrated in the tannin fraction. In vitro starch digestibility and glycemic index (GI) of pasta sample supplemented with PGH extract powder (1.5%) was significantly lower than the control pasta. The IC 50 value of PGH extract obtained from cooked pasta against α-amylase and α-glucosidase was increased. These results have important implications for the processing of PGH for food industry application and therefore could comply with glucose control diets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiheng [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Di [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xia, Lian [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Chen, Xuefeng [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Li, Guoliang, E-mail: 61254368@163.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Qiu, Nannan [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10{sup −8} M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  5. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

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    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate α-glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE and Nopal dry power (NADP in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD. The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1 nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control; (2 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control; (3 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE; and (4 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone. In results, NPWE and NADP had IC50 values of 67.33 and 86.68 μg/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05 μg/mL while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model (P<0.05. Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower (P<0.05 than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  6. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Il-Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate α -glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE) and Nopal dry power (NADP) in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1) nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control); (2) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control); (3) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE); and (4) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone). In results, NPWE and NADP had IC 50 values of 67.33 and 86.68  μ g/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05  μ g/mL) while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model ( P < 0.05). Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  7. Stability and function of interdomain linker variants of glucoamylase 1 from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, J; Christensen, T; Frandsen, T P; Mirgorodskaya, E; McGuire, K A; Driguez, H; Roepstorff, P; Sigurskjold, B W; Svensson, B

    2001-08-07

    Several variants of glucoamylase 1 (GA1) from Aspergillus niger were created in which the highly O-glycosylated peptide (aa 468--508) connecting the (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel catalytic domain and the starch binding domain was substituted at the gene level by equivalent segments of glucoamylases from Hormoconis resinae, Humicola grisea, and Rhizopus oryzae encoding 5, 19, and 36 amino acid residues. Variants were constructed in which the H. resinae linker was elongated by proline-rich sequences as this linker itself apparently was too short to allow formation of the corresponding protein variant. Size and isoelectric point of GA1 variants reflected differences in linker length, posttranslational modification, and net charge. While calculated polypeptide chain molecular masses for wild-type GA1, a nonnatural proline-rich linker variant, H. grisea, and R. oryzae linker variants were 65,784, 63,777, 63,912, and 65,614 Da, respectively, MALDI-TOF-MS gave values of 82,042, 73,800, 73,413, and 90,793 Da, respectively, where the latter value could partly be explained by an N-glycosylation site introduced near the linker C-terminus. The k(cat) and K(m) for hydrolysis of maltooligodextrins and soluble starch, and the rate of hydrolysis of barley starch granules were essentially the same for the variants as for wild-type GA1. beta-Cyclodextrin, acarbose, and two heterobidentate inhibitors were found by isothermal titration calorimetry to bind to the catalytic and starch binding domains of the linker variants, indicating that the function of the active site and the starch binding site was maintained. The stability of GA1 linker variants toward GdnHCl and heat, however, was reduced compared to wild-type.

  8. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Breakdown of mucin as barrier to digestive enzymes in the ischemic rat small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Chang

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the epithelial/mucosal barrier in the small intestine has been associated with different pathologies that originate and/or develop in the gastrointestinal tract. We showed recently that mucin, the main protein in the mucus layer, is disrupted during early periods of intestinal ischemia. This event is accompanied by entry of pancreatic digestive enzymes into the intestinal wall. We hypothesize that the mucin-containing mucus layer is the main barrier preventing digestive enzymes from contacting the epithelium. Mucin breakdown may render the epithelium accessible to pancreatic enzymes, causing its disruption and increased permeability. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of mucin as a protection for epithelial integrity and function. A rat model of 30 min splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO was used to study the degradation of two mucin isoforms (mucin 2 and 13 and two epithelial membrane proteins (E-cadherin and toll-like receptor 4, TLR4. In addition, the role of digestive enzymes in mucin breakdown was assessed in this model by luminal inhibition with acarbose, tranexamic acid, or nafamostat mesilate. Furthermore, the protective effect of the mucin layer against trypsin-mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelium was studied in vitro. Rats after SAO showed degradation of mucin 2 and fragmentation of mucin 13, which was not prevented by protease inhibition. Mucin breakdown was accompanied by increased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran as well as degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4. Addition of mucin to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro protected against trypsin-mediated degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4 and reduced permeability of FITC-dextran across the monolayer. These results indicate that mucin plays an important role in the preservation of the mucosal barrier and that ischemia but not digestive enzymes disturbs mucin integrity, while digestive enzymes actively mediate epithelial cell

  10. Novel benzoxazine-based aglycones block glucose uptake in vivo by inhibiting glycosidases.

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    Hanumantharayappa Bharathkumar

    Full Text Available Glycoside hydrolases catalyze the selective hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and their conjugates. β-glucosidases occur in all domains of living organisms and constitute a major group among glycoside hydrolases. On the other hand, the benzoxazinoids occur in living systems and act as stable β-glucosides, such as 2-(2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H-one-β-D-gluco-pyranose, which hydrolyse to an aglycone DIMBOA. Here, we synthesized the library of novel 1,3-benzoxazine scaffold based aglycones by using 2-aminobenzyl alcohols and aldehydes from one-pot reaction in a chloroacetic acid catalytic system via aerobic oxidative synthesis. Among the synthesized benzoxazines, 4-(7-chloro-2,4-dihydro-1H-benzo[d][1,3]oxazin-2-ylphenol (compound 7 exhibit significant inhibition towards glucosidase compared to acarbose, with a IC50 value of 11.5 µM. Based upon results generated by in silico target prediction algorithms (Naïve Bayesian classifier, these aglycones potentially target the additional sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (where a log likelihood score of 2.70 was observed. Furthermore, the in vitro glucosidase activity was correlated with the in silico docking results, with a high docking score for the aglycones towards the substrate binding site of glycosidase. Evidently, the in vitro and in vivo experiments clearly suggest an anti-hyperglycemic effect via glucose uptake inhibition by 4-(7-chloro-2,4-dihydro-1H-benzo[d][1,3]oxazin-2-ylphenol in the starved rat model. These synthetic aglycones could constitute a novel pharmacological approach for the treatment, or re-enforcement of existing treatments, of type 2 diabetes and associated secondary complications.

  11. High performance liquid chromatography profiling of health-promoting phytochemicals and evaluation of antioxidant, anti-lipoxygenase, iron chelating and anti-glucosidase activities of wetland macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Wong, Fai-Chu; Sit, Nam-Weng; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2014-08-01

    The phytochemistry and bioactivity of wetland macrophytes are underexplored. Plants are known as the natural sources of phytochemical beneficial to health. The objective of this study is to analyze the phytochemical profiles and bioactivities of 10 extracts prepared from different plant parts of wetland macrophytes Hanguana malayana, Ludwigia adscendens and Monochoria hastata. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the phytochemical profile of the extracts. Antioxidant assay such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power were performed. Bioactivity assays carried out were anti-lipoxygenase, anti-glucosidase, and iron chelating. Leaf extract of L. adscendens had the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (half of maximal effective concentration [EC50] =0.97 mg/mL) and NO (EC50 = 0.31 mg/mL) scavenging activities. The extract also exhibited the highest iron chelating (EC50 = 3.24 mg/mL) and anti-glucosidase (EC50 = 27.5 μg/mL) activities. The anti-glucosidase activity of L. adscendens leaf extract was comparable or superior to those of acarbose, myricetin and quercetin. Correlation between iron chelating and radical scavenging activities among the extracts implies the presence of dual-function phytoconstituents with concurrent iron chelating and radical scavenging activities. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of p-coumaric acid (p-CA), gallic acid (GA) and myricetin in all or most extracts. M. hastata fruit and leaf extracts had the highest p-hydroxybenzoic acid content. Antioxidant and anti-glucosidase activities of the extracts were correlated with p-CA, GA, and myricetin contents. Our study demonstrated that wetland macrophytes H. malayana, L. adscendens and M. hastata are potential sources of health-promoting phytochemicals with potent therapeutically-relevant bioactivities.

  12. Anti-aging drugs reduce hypothalamic inflammation in a sex-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Cady, Gillian; Miller, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Aging leads to hypothalamic inflammation, but does so more slowly in mice whose lifespan has been extended by mutations that affect GH/IGF-1 signals. Early-life exposure to GH by injection, or to nutrient restriction in the first 3 weeks of life, also modulate both lifespan and the pace of hypothalamic inflammation. Three drugs extend lifespan of UM-HET3 mice in a sex-specific way: acarbose (ACA), 17-α-estradiol (17αE2), and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), with more dramatic longevity increases in males in each case. In this study, we examined the effect of these anti-aging drugs on neuro-inflammation in hypothalamus and hippocampus. We found that age-associated hypothalamic inflammation is reduced in males but not in females at 12 months of age by ACA and 17αE2 and at 22 months of age in NDGA-treated mice. The three drugs blocked indices of hypothalamic reactive gliosis associated with aging, such as Iba-1-positive microglia and GFAP-positive astrocytes, as well as age-associated overproduction of TNF-α. This effect was not observed in drug-treated female mice or in the hippocampus of the drug-treated animals. On the other hand, caloric restriction (CR; an intervention that extends the lifespan in both sexes) significantly reduced hypothalamic microglia and TNF-α in both sexes at 12 months of age. Together, these results suggest that the extent of drug-induced changes in hypothalamic inflammatory processes is sexually dimorphic in a pattern that parallels the effects of these agents on mouse longevity and that mimics the changes seen, in both sexes, of long-lived nutrient restricted or mutant mice. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Carbohydrases in the digestive system of the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamari, Mahboob; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Darvishzadeh, Ali; Chougule, Nanasaheb P

    2014-04-01

    The spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris, is a generalist predator of insects and has been used in biological control. However, information on the digestion of food in this insect is lacking. Therefore, we have studied the digestive system in P. maculiventris, and further characterized carbohydrases in the digestive tract. The midgut of all developmental stages was composed of anterior, median, and posterior regions. The volumes of the anterior midgut decreased and the median midgut increased in older instars and adults, suggesting a more important role of the median midgut in food digestion. However, carbohydrase activities were predominant in the anterior midgut. In comparing the specific activity of carbohydrases, α-amylase activity was more in the salivary glands (with two distinct activity bands in zymograms), and glucosidase and galactosidase activities were more in the midgut. Salivary α-amylases were detected in the prey hemolymph, demonstrating the role of these enzymes in extra-oral digestion. However, the catalytic efficiency of midgut α-amylase activity was approximately twofold more than that of the salivary gland enzymes, and was more efficient in digesting soluble starch than glycogen. Midgut α-amylases were developmentally regulated, as one isoform was found in first instar compared to three isoforms in fifth instar nymphs. Starvation significantly affected carbohydrase activities in the midgut, and acarbose inhibited α-amylases from both the salivary glands and midgut in vitro and in vivo. The structural diversity and developmental regulation of carbohydrases in the digestive system of P. maculiventris demonstrate the importance of these enzymes in extra-oral and intra-tract digestion, and may explain the capability of the hemipteran to utilize diverse food sources. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reguladores prandiales de la glucemia Prandial glycemia regulators

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    José A. Mesa Pérez

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Se hizo una revisión actualizada sobre un nuevo grupo de drogas que actúan por vías diferentes y por distintos mecanismos de acción regulan la hiperglucemia posprandial en los pacientes con diabetes mellitus. Se destacó la repaglinida, agente secretagogo insulínico independiente de las sulfonilureas, que ayuda a restaurar la fisiología del fallo en el pico secretor insulínico inicial, en pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 y de la acarbosa, agente inhibidor de las alfas glucosidadas intestinales. La hiperglucemia posprandial es determinante en la aparición de las complicaciones vasculares, por lo cual se concluyó que estos grupos de medicamentos ayudarían a alcanzar un mejor control metabólico y representan nuevas opciones medicamentosas en el arsenal terapéutico para la diabetes mellitus tipo 2.An updated review on a new group of drugs that act by different ways and that regulate postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic patiens by different mechanisms of action was made. The roles played by repaglinide, an insulin secretagogue agent independent of sulphonilureas that helps to restore the physiology of the failure in the initial insulin secreting peak in type 2 diabetics, and by acarbose, an intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, were stressed. As postprandial hyperglycemia is determinant in the appearance of vascular complications, it was concluded that these groups of drugs may help to attain a better metabolic control and that they represent new drug options to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Bioactive 30-Noroleanane Triterpenes from the Pericarps of Akebia trifoliata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new 30-noroleanane triterpenes, 2α,3β,20α-trihydroxy-30-norolean-12-en-28-oic acid (1, 2α,3β-dihydroxy-23-oxo-30-norolean-12,20(29-dien-28-oic acid (2, were isolated from the pericarps of Akebia trifoliata, together with four known ones, 3β-akebonoic acid (3, 2α,3β-dihydroxy-30-noroleana-12,20(29-dien-28-oic acid (4, 3α-akebonoic acid (5 and quinatic acid (6. Their structures were established on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, and they were all isolated from the pericarps of A. trifoliata for the first time. Compounds 3−6 showed in vitro bacteriostatic activity against four assayed Gram-positive bacterial strains. In particular 3 showed antibacterial activity toward MRSA with a MIC value 25 μg/mL, which was more potent than kanamycin (MIC 125 μg/mL. No compounds showed antibacterial activity toward the three Gram-negative bacteria tested. Compounds 4 and 5 showed interesting in vitro growth inhibitory activity against human tumor A549 and HeLa cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 8.8 and 5.6 μM, respectively. Compounds 1, 2, 5 and 6 were further revealed to show significant in vitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values from 0.035 to 0.367 mM, which were more potent than the reference compound acarbose (IC50 0.409 mM.

  16. Diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats: diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mot, T.,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a disease of humans and animals, which causes increased levels of blood sugar (glucose. Normally,glucose is brought into the cells by a hormone - insulin.The cells then metabolize glucose to make energy used for all functions of the body. Animals suffering from DM either lack insulin, or the cells cannotuse the insulin that is there. As a result, blood glucose levels increase, and the cells have to use other substances for energy. When blood glucose levels become too high, glucose is found in the urine, causing increased frequency of urination and increased drinking. When blood glucose remains elevated over a period of time, other metabolic changes can occur, such as weight loss, acidosis, seizures, coma, blindness, cataracts, and nerve damage. Animals that are eating normally and not showing signs of illness may only require a blood or urine test to diagnose DM. Concurrent diseases (such as infection, Cushing’s disease, hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis, gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatic lipidosis, or kidney disease make diabetes more difficult to diagnose and manage. A complete blood screen and other specific tests may be recommended to obtain the diagnosis and baseline values for treatment and future monitoring. The treatment for diabetes in dogs is similar to the treatment for diabetes in humans, through diet and insulin therapy. Dogs and cats with DM are usually treated with insulin. Insulin is a protein and, as such, not suitable for oral administration. Thus, it is administered once or several times daily by the subcutaneous route. Adjustment of the blood glucose concentration demands long hospital care, and subsequently the owner constantly has to keep a strict schedule at home. In veterinary practice the main groups of oral antidiabetic (used in human medicine either are: carbohydrate absorption inhibitors (e.g. acarbose; insulin sensitisers (biguanides such as metformin, thiazolidinedions

  17. High performance liquid chromatography profiling of health-promoting phytochemicals and evaluation of antioxidant, anti-lipoxygenase, iron chelating and anti-glucosidase activities of wetland macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Wong, Fai-Chu; Sit, Nam-Weng; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2014-01-01

    Background: The phytochemistry and bioactivity of wetland macrophytes are underexplored. Plants are known as the natural sources of phytochemical beneficial to health. Objective: The objective of this study is to analyze the phytochemical profiles and bioactivities of 10 extracts prepared from different plant parts of wetland macrophytes Hanguana malayana, Ludwigia adscendens and Monochoria hastata. Materials and Methods: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the phytochemical profile of the extracts. Antioxidant assay such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power were performed. Bioactivity assays carried out were anti-lipoxygenase, anti-glucosidase, and iron chelating. Results: Leaf extract of L. adscendens had the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (half of maximal effective concentration [EC50] =0.97 mg/mL) and NO (EC50 = 0.31 mg/mL) scavenging activities. The extract also exhibited the highest iron chelating (EC50 = 3.24 mg/mL) and anti-glucosidase (EC50 = 27.5 μg/mL) activities. The anti-glucosidase activity of L. adscendens leaf extract was comparable or superior to those of acarbose, myricetin and quercetin. Correlation between iron chelating and radical scavenging activities among the extracts implies the presence of dual-function phytoconstituents with concurrent iron chelating and radical scavenging activities. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of p-coumaric acid (p-CA), gallic acid (GA) and myricetin in all or most extracts. M. hastata fruit and leaf extracts had the highest p-hydroxybenzoic acid content. Antioxidant and anti-glucosidase activities of the extracts were correlated with p-CA, GA, and myricetin contents. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that wetland macrophytes H. malayana, L. adscendens and M. hastata are potential sources of health-promoting phytochemicals with potent therapeutically-relevant bioactivities. PMID:25298659

  18. Study of Antiglycation, Hypoglycemic, and Nephroprotective Activities of the Green Dwarf Variety Coconut Water (Cocos nucifera L.) in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Isabella F D; Silva, Railmara P; Chaves Filho, Adriano de B; Dantas, Lucas S; Bispo, Vanderson S; Matos, Isaac A; Otsuka, Felipe A M; Santos, Aline C; Matos, Humberto Reis

    2015-07-01

    Coconut water (CW) is a natural nutritious beverage, which contains several biologically active compounds that are traditionally used in the treatment of diarrhea and rehydration. Several works with CW have been related with antioxidant activity, which is very important in the diabetic state. To evaluate the hypoglycemic and nephroprotective activities of CW, alloxan-induced diabetic rats were pre- and post-treated by gavage with CW (3 mL/kg), caffeic acid (CA) (10 and 15 mg/kg), and acarbose (Acb) (714 μg/kg) during a period of 16 days. Body weight, blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and Amadori products in plasma and kidney homogenates were evaluated in all groups and used as parameters for the monitoring of the diabetic state. The results showed that rats of the CW+diabetic group had maintenance in blood glucose compared with the control group (P<.05) in addition to a decrease of HbA1c levels and increase of body weight when compared with the diabetic group rats (P<.05). The animals of the CA and CA+diabetic groups did not have significant variation of body weight (P<.05) during the experiment; however, they showed decrease in their HbA1c and urea levels in plasma as well as Amadori products in kidney homogenates when compared with the diabetic group (P<.05). Our results indicate that CW has multiple beneficial effects in diabetic rats for preventing hyperglycemia and oxidative stress caused by alloxan.

  19. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apovian CM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroline M ApovianMedicine and Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine; Nutrition and Weight Management Center; and Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients.Keywords: bariatric, diabetes, incretin, insulin, obesity, oral antidiabetes agents

  20. Total phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential and α-glucosidase inhibition by Tunisian Euphorbia paralias L.

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    Malek Besbes Hlila

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the potential antioxidant and anti-α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Tunisian Euphorbia paralias L. leaves and stems extracts and their composition of total polyphenol and flavonoids. Methods: The different samples were tested for their antiradical activities by using 2, 2’- azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays. In α-glucosidase activity, α-glucosidase (0.3 IU/mL and substrate, 2500 µmol/ L p-nitrophenyl α-D-glucopyranoside were used; absorbance was registered at 405 nm. Results: The leaves acetonic extract exhibited the strongest α-glucosidase inhibition [IC50 = (0.0035 ± 0.001 µg/mL], which was 20-fold more active than the standard product (acarbose [IC50 = (0.07 ± 0.01 µg/mL]. Acetonic extract of the leaves exhibited the highest quantity of total phenolic [(95.54 ± 0.04 µg gallic acid equivalent/mg] and flavonoid [(55.16 ± 0.25 µg quercetin equivalent/mg]. The obtained findings presented also that this extract was detected with best antioxidant capacity [IC50 = (0.015 ± 0.01 µg/mL] against DPPH and a value of IC50 equal to (0.02 ± 0.01 µg/mL against ABTS. Positive relationship between polyphenolic content of the tested Euphorbia paralias L. leaves and stems extracts and its antioxidant activity (DPPH and ABTS was detected. Elevated positive linear correlation was got between ABTS and total phenolic (R2 = 0.751. Conclusions: The findings clearly demonstrate that the use of a polar solvent enables extraction of significant quantities of phenol compounds and flavonoids.

  1. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Weiheng; Wu, Di; Xia, Lian; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Guoliang; Qiu, Nannan; Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao; Wu, Yongning

    2017-01-01

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10"−"8 M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  2. Postprandial hypoglycemic syndrome

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    Т.V. Chaychenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial hypoglycemic syndrome, or reactive hypoglycemia, — vegetative symptoms, such as weakness, fatigue, hunger, nausea, palpitations, anxiety, tremor, sweating occurring one to two hours after ingestion. The syndrome is poorly described in literature and most of the information is disparate. Laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of postprandial reactive hypoglycemia are quite controversial, but most authors tend to consider that it is a blood glucose level, which is below 3.9 mmol/l for two hours after meal. Hypoglycemia is an unbalance between glucose influx to the circulation (from endogenous glucose production or exogenous glucose delivery and glucose efflux. The balance between glucose intake and consumption is controlled by a complex balance of glycoregulatory hormones. Insulin, glucagon and adrenaline are effective for several minutes, but cortisol and growth hormone — for seve-ral hours. This explains the presence of immediate and delayed various effects: adrenergic, neuroglycopenic ones and gastroin-testinal discomfort. Postprandial syndrome mechanisms are similar to post-gastric bypass patients with morbid obesity. The most likely cause of reactive hypoglycemia is post-prandial hypersecretion of insulin under the influence of glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, which is a component of the enteroendocrine system and acts at the cephalic phase of satiety. Both post-gastric bypass and relatively healthy individuals have symptoms after the meal rich of simple carbohydrates. Symptoms could be effectively reduced by low glycemic index diet rich of dietary fibers. When the effect is insufficient, it is recommended to use acarbose as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, which is the main stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Thus, obesity epidemics based on the inadequate nutritional habits in the children makes the postprandial syndrome feasible, and it requires further studies. At the same time, healthy diet can significantly improve

  3. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, M; Arbain, D; Islam, A K M Shafiqul; Ahmad, M S; Ahmad, M N

    2016-12-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosensor is inhibited by bioactive compounds in the medicinal plant extracts. The capability of medicinal plants to inhibit the AG enzyme on the electrode correlates to the potential of the medicinal plants to inhibit the production of glucose from the carbohydrate in the human body. Thus, the inhibition indicates the antidiabetic potential of the medicinal plants. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated to measure the antidiabetic potential of three medicinal plants such as Tebengau (Ehretis laevis), Cemumar (Micromelum pubescens), and Kedondong (Spondias dulcis) and acarbose (commercial antidiabetic drug) via cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and spectrophotometry. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) response for the inhibition of the AG enzyme activity by Tebengau plant extracts showed a linear relation in the range from 0.423-8.29 μA, and the inhibition detection limit was 0.253 μA. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.422 μA/mg Tebengau plant extracts) and rapid response (22 s). The biosensor retains approximately 82.16 % of its initial activity even after 30 days of storage at 4 °C.

  4. Experience with FreeStyle Libre Flash glucose monitoring system in management of refractory dumping syndrome in pregnancy shortly after bariatric surgery

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    Peter Novodvorsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is an effective therapy for obesity but is associated with long-term complications such as dumping syndromes and nutritional deficiencies. We report a case of a 26-year-old caucasian female, with history of morbid obesity and gestational diabetes (GDM, who became pregnant 4 months after Roux-en-Y bypass surgery. She developed GDM during subsequent pregnancy, which was initially managed with metformin and insulin. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia causing sleep disturbance and daytime somnolence occured at 19 weeks of pregnancy (19/40. Treatment with rapid-acting carbohydrates precipitated further hypoglycaemia. Laboratory investigations confirmed hypoglycaemia at 2.2 mmol/L with appropriately low insulin and C-peptide, intact HPA axis and negative IgG insulin antibodies. The patient was seen regularly by the bariatric dietetic team but concerns about compliance persisted. A FreeStyle Libre system was used from 21/40 enabling the patient a real-time feedback of changes in interstitial glucose following high or low GI index food intake. The patient declined a trial of acarbose but consented to an intraveneous dextrose infusion overnight resulting in improvement but not complete abolishment of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemias subsided at 34/40 and metformin and insulin had to be re-introduced due to high post-prandial blood glucose readings. An emergency C-section was indicated at 35 + 1/40 and a small-for-gestational-age female was delivered. There have been no further episodes of hypoglycaemia following delivery. This case illustrates challenges in the management of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first use of FreeStyle Libre in dumping syndrome in pregnancy following bariatric surgery with troublesome nocturnal hypoglycaemia.

  5. Geomfinder: a multi-feature identifier of similar three-dimensional protein patterns: a ligand-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Vivanco, Gabriel; Valdés-Jiménez, Alejandro; Besoaín, Felipe; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Since the structure of proteins is more conserved than the sequence, the identification of conserved three-dimensional (3D) patterns among a set of proteins, can be important for protein function prediction, protein clustering, drug discovery and the establishment of evolutionary relationships. Thus, several computational applications to identify, describe and compare 3D patterns (or motifs) have been developed. Often, these tools consider a 3D pattern as that described by the residues surrounding co-crystallized/docked ligands available from X-ray crystal structures or homology models. Nevertheless, many of the protein structures stored in public databases do not provide information about the location and characteristics of ligand binding sites and/or other important 3D patterns such as allosteric sites, enzyme-cofactor interaction motifs, etc. This makes necessary the development of new ligand-independent methods to search and compare 3D patterns in all available protein structures. Here we introduce Geomfinder, an intuitive, flexible, alignment-free and ligand-independent web server for detailed estimation of similarities between all pairs of 3D patterns detected in any two given protein structures. We used around 1100 protein structures to form pairs of proteins which were assessed with Geomfinder. In these analyses each protein was considered in only one pair (e.g. in a subset of 100 different proteins, 50 pairs of proteins can be defined). Thus: (a) Geomfinder detected identical pairs of 3D patterns in a series of monoamine oxidase-B structures, which corresponded to the effectively similar ligand binding sites at these proteins; (b) we identified structural similarities among pairs of protein structures which are targets of compounds such as acarbose, benzamidine, adenosine triphosphate and pyridoxal phosphate; these similar 3D patterns are not detected using sequence-based methods; (c) the detailed evaluation of three specific cases showed the versatility

  6. Phenolic constituents and modulatory effects of Raffia palm leaf (Raphia hookeri extract on carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes linked to type-2 diabetes

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    Felix A. Dada

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to investigate the effects of Raffia palm (Raphia hookeri leaf extract on enzymes linked to type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and pro-oxidant induced oxidative stress in rat pancreas. The extract was prepared and its α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects were determined. Radical [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH] scavenging and Fe2+-chelating abilities, and inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas homogenate were assessed. Furthermore, total phenol and flavonoid contents, reducing property, and high performance liquid chromatography diode array detector (HPLC-DAD fingerprint of the extract were also determined. Our results revealed that the extract inhibited α-amylase (IC50 = 110.4 μg/mL and α-glucosidase (IC50 = 99.96 μg/mL activities in concentration dependent manners which were lower to the effect of acarbose (amylase: IC50 = 18.30 μg/mL; glucosidase: IC50 = 20.31 μg/mL. The extract also scavenged DPPH radical, chelated Fe2+ and inhibited Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas all in concentration dependent manners with IC50 values of 402.9 μg/mL, 108.9 μg/mL and 367.0 μg/mL respectively. The total phenol and flavonoid contents were 39.73 mg GAE/g and 21.88 mg QAE/g respectively, while the reducing property was 25.62 mg AAE/g. The HPLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorogenic acid (4.17 mg/g and rutin (5.11 mg/g as the major phenolic compounds in the extract. Therefore, the ability of the extract to inhibit carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes and protect against pancreatic oxidative damage may be an important mechanisms supporting its antidiabetic properties and could make Raffia palm leaf useful in complementary/alternative therapy for management of T2DM. However, further studies such as in vivo should be carried out.

  7. PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and DPP-IV inhibitory effects for chromene derivatives from the leaves of Smilax china L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Le, Duc Dat; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Ali, Md Yousof; Choi, Jae-Sue; Min, Byung Sun; Shin, Heung Mook; Rhee, Hae Ik; Woo, Mi Hee

    2016-06-25

    Two new flavonoids, bismilachinone (11) and smilachinin (14), were isolated from the leaves of Smilax china L. together with 14 known compounds. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic methods. The PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and DPP-IV inhibitory activities of compounds 1-16 were evaluated at the molecular level. Among them, compounds 4, 7, and 10 showed moderate DPP-IV inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 20.81, 33.12, and 32.93 μM, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, 6, 11, 12, and 16 showed strong PTP1B inhibitory activities, with respective IC50 values of 7.62, 10.80, 0.92, 2.68, 9.77, and 24.17 μM compared with the IC50 value for the positive control (ursolic acid: IC50 = 1.21 μM). Compounds 2-7, 11, 12, 15, and 16 showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, with respective IC50 values of 8.70, 81.66, 35.11, 35.92, 7.99, 26.28, 11.28, 62.68, 44.32, and 70.12 μM. The positive control, acarbose, displayed an IC50 value of 175.84 μM. In the kinetic study for the PTP1B enzyme, compounds 6, 11, and 12 displayed competitive inhibition with Ki values of 3.20, 8.56, and 5.86 μM, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, and 16 showed noncompetitive inhibition with Ki values of 18.75, 5.95, and 22.86 μM, respectively. Molecular docking study for the competitive inhibitors (6, 11, and 12) radically corroborates the binding affinities and inhibition of PTP1B enzymes. These results indicated that the leaves of Smilax china L. may contain compounds with anti-diabetic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antioxidant and Inhibitory Effects of Saponin Extracts from Dianthus basuticus Burtt Davy on Key Enzymes Implicated in Type 2 Diabetes In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, Mikhail Olugbemiro; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    Dianthus basuticus is a plant of South African origin with various acclaimed pharmaceutical potentials. This study explored the antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of saponin extract from D. basuticus in vitro . Antioxidant activity of saponin was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (*NO)-free radical scavenging activity while antidiabetic potentials were measured by the α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of the saponin extract. The results showed that the saponin extract, compared with quercetin, displayed better DPPH (IC 50 = 6.95 mg/ml) and NO (IC 50 = 3.31 mg/ml) radical scavenging capabilities. Similarly, the saponin extracts elicited stronger α-glucosidase (IC 50 = 3.80 mg/ml) and moderate α-amylase (IC 50 = 4.18 mg/ml) inhibitory activities as compared to acarbose. Saponin exhibited a competitive mode of inhibition on α-amylase with same maximum velocity (Vmax) of 0.0093 mM/min for saponin compared with control 0.0095 mM/min and different the Michaelis constant (Km) values of 2.6 × 10 -6 mM and 2.1 × 10 -5 mM, respectively, while for α-glucosidase, the inhibition was uncompetitive, Vmax of 0.027 mM/min compared with control 0.039 mM/min and Km values of 1.02 × 10 -6 mM and 1.38 × 10 -6 mM, respectively. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of bioactive like β- and α-amyrin, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, methyl commate, and olean-12-en-3-beta-ol. Overall, the data suggested that the saponin extract from D. basuticus has potentials as natural antioxidants and antidiabetics. Saponin extract from Dianthus basuticus displayed promising antidiabetic and antioxidant activitySaponin competitively and uncompetitively inhibited a-amylase and a-glucosidase, respectivelyThe stronger inhibition of α-glucosidase and moderate inhibition of α-amylase by saponin extract from D. basuticus is promising good antidiabetes compared with existing drugs with associated side effects

  9. Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Potential of Antidiabetic Herb Alternanthera sessilis: Comparative Analyses of Leaf and Callus Solvent Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Khoo, Chee-Siong; Tee, Chong-Siang; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera sessilis is a medicinal herb which is consumed as vegetable and used as traditional remedies of various ailments in Asia and Africa. This study aimed to investigate the antiglucosidase and antioxidant activity of solvent fractions of A. sessilis leaf and callus. Leaf and callus methanol extracts were fractionated to produce hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water fractions. Antiglucosidase and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activities as well as total phenolic (TP), total flavonoid (TF), and total coumarin (TC) contents were evaluated. Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis was performed on leaf and callus fractions with the strongest antiglucosidase activity. Leaf ethyl acetate fraction (LEF) had the strongest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.55 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 10.81 μg/mL) activity among leaf fractions. Callus ethyl acetate fraction (CEF) and chloroform fraction had the highest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.25 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 34.12 μg/mL) activity, respectively, among callus fractions. LEF and CEF were identified as noncompetitive and competitive α-glucosidase inhibitors, respectively. LEF and CEF had greater antiglucosidase activity than acarbose. Leaf fractions had higher phytochemical contents than callus fractions. LEF had the highest TP, TF, and TC contents. Antiglucosidase and antioxidant activities of leaf fractions correlated with phytochemical contents. LEF had potent antiglucosidase activity and concurrent antioxidant activity. CEF had the highest antiglucosidase activity among all fractions. Callus culture is a promising tool for enhancing production of potent α-glucosidase inhibitors. Leaf ethyl acetate fraction (LEF) had the strongest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.55 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 10.81 μg/mL) activity among leaf fractionsCallus ethyl acetate fraction (CEF) and chloroform fraction had the highest antiglucosidase (EC 50 0.25 mg/mL) and radical scavenging (EC 50 34.12

  10. Phytochemical Compositions and In vitro Assessments of Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Potentials of Fractions from Ehretia cymosa Thonn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundajo, Akintayo; Ashafa, Anofi Tom

    2017-10-01

    Ehretia cymosa Thonn. is a popular medicinal plant used in different parts of West Africa for the treatment of various ailments including diabetes mellitus. The current study investigates bioactive constituents and in vitro antioxidant and antidiabetic potentials of fractions from extract of E. cymosa . Phytochemical investigation and antioxidant assays were carried out using standard procedures. Antidiabetic potential was assessed by evaluating the inhibitory effects of the fractions on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, while bioactive constituent's identification was carried out using gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. The phytochemistry tests of the fractions revealed the presence of tannins, phenols, flavonoids, steroids, terpene, alkaloid, and cardiac glycosides. Methanol fraction shows higher phenolic (27.44 mg gallic acid/g) and flavonoid (235.31 mg quercetin/g) contents, while ethyl acetate fraction revealed higher proanthocyanidins (28.31 mg catechin/g). Methanol fraction displayed higher ( P fractions displayed higher inhibition ( P fraction also inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in competitive and noncompetitive modes, respectively. The GC-MS chromatogram of the methanol fraction revealed 24 compounds, which include phytol (1.78%), stearic acid (1.02%), and 2-hexadecyloxirane (34.18%), which are known antidiabetic and antioxidant agents. The results indicate E. cymosa leaves as source of active phytochemicals with therapeutic potentials in the management of diabetes. E. cymosa fractions possess antioxidant and antidiabetic activities. Hence, it is a source of active phytochemicals with therapeutic potentials in the management of diabetesThe high flavonoid, phenolic, and proanthocyanidin contents of fractions from E. cymosa also contribute to its antioxidant and antidiabetic propertiesMethanol fraction of E. cymosa displayed better antidiabetic activities compared to acarbose as revealed by their half maximal

  11. Effects of Onion (Allium cepa L. Extract Administration on Intestinal α-Glucosidases Activities and Spikes in Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in SD Rats Model

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    Sun-Ho Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diets high in calories and sweetened foods with disaccharides frequently lead to exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose. This state induces immediate oxidant stress and free radicals which trigger oxidative stress-linked diabetic complications. One of the therapeutic approaches for decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia is to retard absorption of glucose by the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes,α-amylase and α-glucosidases, in the digestive organs. Therefore, the inhibitory activity of Korean onion (Allium cepa L. extract against rat intestinal α-glucosidases, such as sucrase, maltase, and porcine pancreatic α-amylase were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The content of quercetin in ethyl alcohol extract of onion skin (EOS was 6.04 g/100 g dried weight of onion skin. The in vitro half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 of EOS and quercetin, a major phenolic in onion, on rat intestinal sucrase were 0.40 and 0.11 mg/mL, respectively. The postprandial blood glucose lowering effects of EOS and quercetin were compared to a known type 2 diabetes drug (Acarbose, a strong α-glucosidase inhibitor in the Sprague-Dawley (SD rat model. In rats fed on sucrose, EOS significantly reduced the blood glucose spike after sucrose loading. The area under the blood glucose-time curve (AUClast in EOS-treated SD rats (0.5 g-EOS/kg was significantly lower than in untreated SD rats (259.6 ± 5.1 vs. 283.1 ± 19.2 h·mg/dL. The AUClast in quercetin-treated SD rats (0.5 g-quercetin/kg was similar to in EOS-treated group (256.1 ± 3.2 vs. 259.6 ± 5.1 h·mg/dL. Results from this study indicates that although quercetin does have blood glucose lowering potential via α-glucosidase inhibition, there are other bioactive compounds present in onion skin. Furthermore, the effects of two weeks administration of EOS in a high carbohydrate-dietary mixture (Pico 5053 on sucrase and maltase activities in intestine were evaluated in SD rat model

  12. Ultrasonic extraction of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica and their antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Peng; Yang, Xiaoman; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Sun, Huili; Chen, Deke; Pan, Jianyu

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, ultrasonic extraction technique (UET) is used to improve the yield of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica (LJPs). And their antioxidative as well as glycosidase inhibitory activities are investigated. Box-Behnken design (BBD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to optimize ultrasonic extraction for polysaccharides. The optimized conditions are obtained as extraction time at 54 min, ultrasonic power at 1050 W, extraction temperature at 80°C and ratio of material to solvent at 1:50 (g mL-1). Under these optimal ultrasonic extraction conditions, an actual experimental yield (5.75% ± 0.3%) is close to the predicted result (5.67%) with no significant difference ( P > 0.05). Vitro antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities tests indicate that the crude polysaccharides (LJP) and two major ethanol precipitated fractions (LJP1 and LJP2) are in a concentration-dependent manner. LJP2 (30%-60% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) possesses the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and moderate scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (66.09% ± 2.19%, 3.0 mg mL-1). Also, the inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (59.08% ± 3.79%, 5.0 mg mL-1) is close to that of acarbose (63.99% ± 3.27%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP1 (30% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) exhibits the strongest scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (99.80% ± 0.00%, 3.0 mg mL-1) and moderate α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (47.76% ± 1.92%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP shows the most remarkable DPPH scavenging activity (66.20% ± 0.11%, 5.0 mg mL-1) but weakest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (37.77% ± 1.30%, 5.0 mg mL-1). However, all these LJPs exert weak inhibitory effects against α-amylase. These results show that UET is an effective method for extracting bioactive polysaccharides from seaweed materials. LJP1 and LJP2 can be developed as a potential ingredient in hypoglycemic agents or functional food for the management of

  13. Antidiabetic and antioxidant functionality associated with phenolic constituents from fruit parts of indigenous black jamun (Syzygium cumini L.) landraces.

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    Gajera, H P; Gevariya, Shila N; Hirpara, Darshna G; Patel, S V; Golakiya, B A

    2017-09-01

    Fruit phenolics are important dietary antioxidant and antidiabetic constituents. The fruit parts (pulp, seed, seed coat, kernel) of underutilized indigenous six black jamun landraces ( Syzygium cumini L.), found in Gir forest region of India and differed in their fruit size, shape and weight, are evaluated and correlated with antidiabetic, DPPH radical scavenging and phenolic constituents. The α-amylase inhibitors propose an efficient antidiabetic strategy and the levels of postprandial hyperglycemia were lowered by restraining starch breakdown. The sequential solvent systems with ascending polarity-petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, methanol and water were performed for soxhlet extraction by hot percolation method and extractive yield was found maximum with methanolic fruit part extracts of six landraces. The methanolic extracts of fruit parts also evidenced higher antidiabetic activity and hence utilized for further characterization. Among the six landraces, pulp and kernel of BJLR-6 (very small, oblong fruits) evidenced maximum 53.8 and 98.2% inhibition of α-amylase activity, respectively. The seed attained inhibitory activity mostly contributed by the kernel fraction. The inhibition of DPPH radical scavenging activity was positively correlated with phenol constituents. An HPLC-PDA technique was used to quantify the seven individual phenolics. The seed and kernel of BJLR-6 exhibited higher individual phenolics-gallic, catechin, ellagic, ferulic acids and quercetin, whereas pulp evidenced higher with gallic acid and catechin as α-amylase inhibitors. The IC 50 value indicates concentration of fruit extracts exhibiting ≥50% inhibition on porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) activity. The kernel fraction of BJLR6 evidenced lowest (8.3 µg ml -1 ) IC 50 value followed by seed (12.9 µg ml -1 ), seed coat (50.8 µg ml -1 ) and pulp (270 µg ml -1 ). The seed and kernel of BJLR-6 inhibited PPA at much lower concentrations than standard acarbose (24.7

  14. Starch Hydrolysis, Polyphenol Contents, and In Vitro Alpha Amylase Inhibitory Properties of Some Nigerian Foods As Affected by Cooking

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    Sani Saidu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cooking on starch hydrolysis, polyphenol contents, and in vitro α-amylase inhibitory properties of mushrooms (two varieties Russula virescens and Auricularia auricula-judae, sweet potato (Ipomea batatas, and potato (Solanum tuberosum was investigated. The total, resistant, and digestible starch contents of the raw and cooked food samples (FS ranged from 6.4 to 64.9; 0 to 10.1; and 6.4 to 62.7 g/100 g, respectively, while their percentages of starch digestibility (DS values expressed as percentages of total starch hydrolyzed ranged from 45.99 to 100. Raw and boiled unpeeled potato, raw and boiled peeled potato, raw A. auricula-judae, and sweet potato showed mild to high α-amylase inhibition (over a range of concentration of 10–50 mg/mL, which was lower than that of acarbose (that had 69% inhibition of α-amylase over a range of concentration of 2–10 mg/mL, unlike raw R. virescens, boiled A. auricula-judae, and boiled sweet potatoes that activated α-amylase and boiled R. virescens that gave 0% inhibition. The FS contained flavonoids and phenols in addition. The significant negative correlation (r = −0.55; P = 0.05 between the α-amylase inhibitory properties of the raw and cooked FS versus their SD indicates that the α-amylase inhibitors in these FS also influenced the digestibility of their starches. In addition, the significant positive correlation between the α-amylase inhibitory properties of the raw and cooked FS versus their resistant starch (RS (r = 0.59; P = 0.01 contents indicates that the RS constituents of these FS contributed to their α-amylase inhibitory properties. The study showed the usefulness of boiled unpeeled potato, boiled potato peeled, and raw sweet potato as functional foods for people with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Cancer risk in patients aged 30 years and above with type 2 diabetes receiving antidiabetic monotherapy: a cohort study using metformin as the comparator

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    Chen YC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ching Chen,1 Victor C Kok,1,2 Ching-Hsuan Chien,1 Jorng-Tzong Horng,1,3 Jeffrey J P Tsai11Department of Biomedical Informatics, Asia University, Taichung, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Kuang Tien General Hospital, Taichung, 3Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, TaiwanIntroduction: Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin reduces incident cancer development. Few cohort studies have evaluated the risk of subsequent cancer development in diabetic cohorts receiving antidiabetic monotherapy. We conducted a population-based study in patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic monotherapy.Methods: We identified a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetics aged ≥30 years receiving hypoglycemic monotherapy (n=7,325 from the 1998–2007 Longitudinal Health Insurance Dataset. Patients were grouped according to the antidiabetic therapy they received into metformin (n=2,223, sulfonylurea (n=3,965, glitazone (n=53, meglitinide (n=128, acarbose (n=150, and insulin (n=806 groups. Patients with preexisting cancer were excluded. All patients were followed up until cancer development, dropout, death, or until December 31, 2008. Cox’s model was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs adjusted for age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, smoking-related comorbidities, alcohol use disorders, morbid obesity, pancreatitis, hypertension, monthly income, and urbanization level. The log-rank test was used to compare cumulative cancer incidence. Two-sided P-values <0.05 were required to reject the null hypothesis.Results: The overall median follow-up duration was 2.5 years (interquartile range, 3.6 years. Totally, 367 and 124 cancers developed in the sulfonylurea and metformin groups, respectively, representing an adjusted HR of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–1.67; P<0.005. No significant differences were observed between other groups. Increased adjusted HRs

  16. In-vitro alpha amylase inhibitory activity of the leaf extracts of Adenanthera pavonina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaratne, M Nirmali; Punchihewa, J C; Wickramaratne, D B M

    2016-11-15

    Diabetes has caused a major burden to the health sector in the developing countries and has shown an increasing trend among the urban population. It is estimated that most patients are with type II diabetes which could be easily treated with dietary changes, exercise, and medication. Sri Lanka carries a long history ayurvedic medicine where it uses the plant for treating many diseases. Therefore it is important to screen medicinal plants scientifically so they could be used safely and effectively in the traditional medical system and also be used for further investigations. Adenanthera pavonina is a plant used in the Ayurvedic medical system in Sri Lanka for treating many diseases including diabetics. We evaluated the anti-diabetic properties and the antioxidant properties of Adenanthera pavonina leaves. The methanol extract of the leaves was sequentially extracted with petroleum ether and thereafter was partitioned between EtOAc, and water. The α-amylase inhibition assay was performed using the 3,5- dinitrosalicylic acid method. The antioxidant activities were measured using the DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the total phenolic content using Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent. The cytotoxicity of the extract was evaluated using the Brine shrimp bioassay. The IC 50 values of α amylase inhibitory activity of MeOH, EtOAc, petroleum ether, and water were 16.16 ± 2.23, 59.93 ± 0.25, 145.49 ± 4.86 and 214.85 ± 9.72 μg/ml respectively and was similar to that of Acarbose (18.63 ± 1.21 (μg/ml). Antioxidant activities were also determined and the EtOAc fraction showed the highest total phenolic content (34. 62 ± 1.14 mg/g extract) and the highest DPPH scavenging activity with an IC 50 of 249.92 ± 3.35 μg/ml. The leaf extracts of Adenanthera pavonina exhibit remarkable α-amylase inhibitory activity in the crude methanolic extract. Hence leaves of Adenanthera pavonina has a potential to be used as a regular green vegetable and

  17. DPPH Radical Scavenging and Postprandial Hyperglycemia Inhibition Activities and Flavonoid Composition Analysis of Hawk Tea by UPLC-DAD and UPLC-Q/TOF MSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Xu, Lijia; Hu, Huagang; Yang, Yinjun; Zhang, Xinyao; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Peigen

    2017-10-13

    Hawk tea ( Litsea coreana Lévl. var. Lanuginosa (Migo) Yen C. Yang & P.H. Huang), a very popular herbal tea material, has attracted more and more attention due to its high antioxidant properties and possible therapeutic effect on type II diabetes mellitus. The raw materials of Hawk tea are usually divided into three kinds: bud tea (BT), primary leaf tea (PLT) and mature leaf tea (MLT). In this study, the DPPH radical scavenging activity and the antimicrobial properties of these three kinds of Hawk tea from different regions were comparatively investigated, and a ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic coupled with a photodiode array detector (UPLC-DAD) method was employed for comparison of the three major flavonoid constituents, including hyperoside, isoquercitrin and astragalin, in different samples of Hawk tea. At the same time, the effect of methanol extract (ME) of PLT on the mouse postprandial blood glucose and the effect of ME and its different fractions (petroleum ether fraction (PE), ethyl acetate fraction (EA), n -butanol fraction ( n -BuOH), and water fraction (WF)) on the activity of α-glucosidase were studied. The results showed that Hawk BT and Hawk PLT possessed the higher radicals scavenging activity than Hawk MLT, while the antibacterial activity against P. vulgaris of PLT and MLT was higher than Hawk BT. The contents of the three major flavonoid constituents in samples of Hawk PLT are higher than Hawk BT and Hawk MLT. The mouse postprandial blood glucose levels of the middle dose (0.5 g/kg) group and the high dose (1 g/kg) group with oral administration of the ME of PLT were significantly lower than the control group. What's more, the inhibitory effect of ME of PLT and its EA and n -BuOH fractions on α-glucosidase was significantly higher than that of acarbose. Rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was used to identify the flavonoids in Hawk PLT, and a total of 20

  18. DPPH Radical Scavenging and Postprandial Hyperglycemia Inhibition Activities and Flavonoid Composition Analysis of Hawk Tea by UPLC-DAD and UPLC-Q/TOF MSE

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    Xuan Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hawk tea (Litsea coreana Lévl. var. Lanuginosa (Migo Yen C. Yang & P.H. Huang, a very popular herbal tea material, has attracted more and more attention due to its high antioxidant properties and possible therapeutic effect on type II diabetes mellitus. The raw materials of Hawk tea are usually divided into three kinds: bud tea (BT, primary leaf tea (PLT and mature leaf tea (MLT. In this study, the DPPH radical scavenging activity and the antimicrobial properties of these three kinds of Hawk tea from different regions were comparatively investigated, and a ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic coupled with a photodiode array detector (UPLC-DAD method was employed for comparison of the three major flavonoid constituents, including hyperoside, isoquercitrin and astragalin, in different samples of Hawk tea. At the same time, the effect of methanol extract (ME of PLT on the mouse postprandial blood glucose and the effect of ME and its different fractions (petroleum ether fraction (PE, ethyl acetate fraction (EA, n-butanol fraction (n-BuOH, and water fraction (WF on the activity of α-glucosidase were studied. The results showed that Hawk BT and Hawk PLT possessed the higher radicals scavenging activity than Hawk MLT, while the antibacterial activity against P. vulgaris of PLT and MLT was higher than Hawk BT. The contents of the three major flavonoid constituents in samples of Hawk PLT are higher than Hawk BT and Hawk MLT. The mouse postprandial blood glucose levels of the middle dose (0.5 g/kg group and the high dose (1 g/kg group with oral administration of the ME of PLT were significantly lower than the control group. What’s more, the inhibitory effect of ME of PLT and its EA and n-BuOH fractions on α-glucosidase was significantly higher than that of acarbose. Rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS was used to identify the flavonoids in Hawk PLT, and a total of

  19. Effects of Syzygium aromaticum-derived triterpenes on postprandial blood glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats following carbohydrate challenge.

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    Andile Khathi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Recent reports suggest that the hypoglycaemic effects of the triterpenes involve inhibition of glucose transport in the small intestine. Therefore, the effects of Syzygium spp-derived triterpenes oleanolic acid (OA and maslinic acid (MA were evaluated on carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in STZ-induced diabetic rats and consequences on postprandial hyperglycaemia after carbohydrate loading. METHODS: We determined using Western blot analysis the expressions of α-amylase and α-glucosidase and glucose transporters SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine intestines isolated from diabetic rats treated with OA/MA for 5 weeks. In vitro assays were used to assess the inhibitory activities of OA and MA against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and sucrase. RESULTS: OA and MA ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia in carbohydrate loaded diabetic rats as indicated by the significantly small glucose area under the curve (AUC in treated diabetic animals compared with that in untreated diabetic rats. Western blotting showed that OA and MA treatment not only down-regulated the increase of SGLT1 and GLUT2 expressions in the small intestine of STZ-induced diabetic rats, but also inhibited small intestine α-amylase, sucrase and α-glucosidase activity. IC50 values of OA against α-amylase (3.60 ± 0.18 mmol/L, α-glucosidase (12.40 ± 0.11 mmol/L and sucrase (11.50 ± 0.13 mmol/L did not significantly differ from those of OA and acarbose. CONCLUSIONS: The results of suggest that OA and MA may be used as potential supplements for treating postprandial hyperglycemia. NOVELTY OF THE WORK: The present observations indicate that besides improving glucose homeostasis in diabetes, OA and MA suppress postprandial hyperglycaemia mediated in part via inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysis and reduction of glucose transporters in the gastrointestinal tract. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase can significantly decrease the postprandial hyperglycaemia after a mixed

  20. Pomegranate juice, but not an extract, confers a lower glycemic response on a high-glycemic index food: randomized, crossover, controlled trials in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimi, Asimina; Nyambe-Silavwe, Hilda; Gauer, Julia S; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Williamson, Gary

    2017-12-01

    Background: Low-glycemic index diets have demonstrated health benefits associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Objectives: We tested whether pomegranate polyphenols could lower the glycemic response of a high-glycemic index food when consumed together and the mechanism by which this might occur. Design: We compared the acute effect of a pomegranate juice and a polyphenol-rich extract from pomegranate (supplement) on the bread-derived postprandial blood glucose concentration in 2 randomized, crossover, controlled studies (double-blinded for the supplements), each on 16 healthy volunteers. An additional randomized, crossover, controlled study on 16 volunteers consuming constituent fruit acids in a pH-balanced solution (same pH as pomegranate) and bread was conducted to determine any contributions to postprandial responses caused by acidic beverages. Results: As primary outcome, the incremental area under the curve for bread-derived blood glucose (-33.1% ± 18.1%, P = 0.000005) and peak blood glucose (25.4% ± 19.3%, P = 0.0004) were attenuated by pomegranate juice, compared with a control solution containing the equivalent amount of sugars. In contrast, the pomegranate supplement, or a solution containing the malic and citric acid components of the juice, was ineffective. The pomegranate polyphenol punicalagin was a very effective inhibitor of human α-amylase in vitro, comparable to the drug acarbose. Neither the pomegranate extract nor the individual component polyphenols inhibited 14 C-D-glucose transport across differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers, but they inhibited uptake of 14 C-glucose into Xenopus oocytes expressing the human glucose transporter type 2. Further, some of the predicted pomegranate gut microbiota metabolites modulated 14 C-D-glucose and 14 C-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into hepatic HepG2 cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that pomegranate polyphenols, when present in a beverage but not in a supplement, can reduce the

  1. Synthesis, structure combined with conformational analysis, biological activities and docking studies of bis benzylidene cyclohexanone derivatives

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    Gehad Lotfy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of bis benzylidne cyclohexanone derivatives 2,6-di(4-fluorobenzylidenecyclohexanone 3a and (2E,6E‐2,6‐bis({[4‐(trifluoromethylphenyl]methylidene}cyclohexanone 3b. Compound 3b crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21/n with unit cell parameters a = 29.3527(12 Å, b = 8.3147(3 Å, c = 32.7452(14 Å, β = 112.437(2°, and V = 7386.8(5 Å3, Z = 16, and Rint = 0.072 at T = 100 K. The asymmetric unit contains four independent molecules, each of which has slight differences in the bond lengths and angles. One non-classical C11D–H11F⋯F3A hydrogen bond connects the molecules. Density functional theory was used to optimize the structures and calculate the natural charges, dipole moments, frontier molecular orbitals, and NMR and UV–Vis spectroscopic properties, which are discussed and compared with the experimental data. The synthetic derivatives were evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and we found that compound 3a (IC50 = 96.3 ± 0.51 μM is a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor, showing superior activity to the standard drug acarbose (IC50 = 841 ± 1.73 μM. Compound 3b (IC50 = 7.92 ± 1.3 μg/mL was found to be a potent antileishmanial compound, especially compared to the antileishmanial drugs pentamidine (IC50 = 5.09 ± 0.04 μM and amphotericine B (IC50 = 0.29 ± 0.05 μg/mL. In addition, 3a and 3b have cytotoxic effects against PC3 (prostate cancer, HeLa (cervical cancer, and MCF-3 (breast cancer cell lines. Docking study for compounds activity was performed with Openeye software in order to understanding their pose of interaction in the target receptors.

  2. Chemical analysis of Punica granatum fruit peel and its in vitro and in vivo biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathikannan, Kaliyan; Venkatadri, Babu; Khusro, Ameer; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Agastian, Paul; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Choi, Han Sung; Kim, Young Ock

    2016-07-30

    The medical application of pomegranate fruits and its peel is attracted human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro α-Glucosidase inhibition, antimicrobial, antioxidant property and in vivo anti-hyperglycemic activity of Punica granatum (pomegranate) fruit peel extract using Caenorhabditis elegans. Various invitro antioxidant activity of fruit peel extracts was determined by standard protocol. Antibacterial and antifungal activities were determined using disc diffusion and microdilution method respectively. Anti-hyperglycemic activity of fruit peel was observed using fluorescence microscope for in vivo study. The ethyl acetate extract of P. granatum fruit peel (PGPEa) showed α-Glucosidase inhibition upto 50 % at the concentration of IC50 285.21 ± 1.9 μg/ml compared to hexane and methanol extracts. The total phenolic content was highest (218.152 ± 1.73 mg of catechol equivalents/g) in ethyl acetate extract. PGPEa showed more scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) with IC50 value 302.43 ± 1.9 μg/ml and total antioxidant activity with IC50 294.35 ± 1.68 μg/ml. PGPEa also showed a significant effecton lipid peroxidation IC50 208.62 ± 1.68 μg/ml, as well as high reducing power. Among the solvents extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of fruit peel showed broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Ethyl acetate extract supplemented C.elegans worms showed inhibition of lipid accumulation similar to acarbose indicating good hypoglycemic activity. The normal worms compared to test (ethyl acetate extract supplemented) showed the highest hypoglycaemic activity by increasing the lifespan of the worms. GC-MS analysis of PGPEa showed maximum amount of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 4-fluorobenzyl alcohol (48.59 %). In the present investigation we observed various biological properties of pomegranate fruit peel. The results clearly indicated that pomegranate peel extract could be used in preventing

  3. Selected Tea and Tea Pomace Extracts Inhibit Intestinal α-Glucosidase Activity in Vitro and Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Vivo

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    Jungbae Oh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE and tea pomace extracts (TPE by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD

  4. NEW IN THE TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

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    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major medical and social problem almost in all countries of the world. Currently, there are more and more various pharmacological agents that make management of the glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes extremely difficult. Therefore, when the physician is faced with the choice of glucose-lowering therapy, he should be clearly aware of all the options in contemporary treatment. 11 groups of hypoglycemic agents are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes The biguanides. According to modern concepts, biguanides inhibit the oxidation of glucose by stimulating anaerobic glycolysis. Both in the consensus of ADA / EASD, and in the IDF recommendations metformin may be the drug of the choice for hypoglycemic therapy of diabetes type 2. Sulfonylurea derivatives: glibenclamide, glimepiride, gliquidone, Glipizide. They belong to a group of secretagogues, as their action is based on the ability to stimulate the secretion of insulin by ß-cells of the pancreas. Prandial glucose regulators. Meglitinides (repaglinide and nateglinide stimulate insulin secretion by ß-cells. Due to the rapid normalization of stimulated insulin level after taking the drugs the risk of hypoglycaemia between meals is minimized. Insulin sensitayzers. Thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance of peripheral tissues by binding to receptors, activating peroxisome proliferation (PPARg in the nuclear membrane. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose, miglitol, voglibose competitively inhibits intestinal enzymes (α-glucosidase. It consequently slows carbohydrate absorption from foods and supply of glucose into the blood. Incretin mimetics. Analogues of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulate the biosynthesis and secretion of insulin, regulate food consumption, support ß-cells in a healthy state, suppress glucagon secretion, depending on the glucose levels, affect the rate of gastric emptying, stimulat proliferation of

  5. Synthesis, reactions and biological activity of some new bis-heterocyclic ring compounds containing sulphur atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The derivatives of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene belong to a significant category of heterocyclic compounds, which have shown a wide spectrum of medical and industrial application. Results A new building block with two electrophilic center of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives 2 has been reported by one-pot reaction of diketone derivative 1 with Br2/AcOH in excellent yield. A variety of heteroaromatics having bis(1H-imidazo[1,2a] benzimidazole), bis(1H-imidazo[1,2-b][1,2,4]triazole)-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives, dioxazolo-, dithiazolo-, and 1H-imidazolo-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives as well pyrrolo, thiazolo -3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives have been designed, synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for their biological activity. Compounds 3–9 showed good bioassay result. These new derivatives were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against PC-3 cell lines, in vitro antioxidant potential and β-glucuronidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Compound 3 (IC50 = 56.26 ± 3.18 μM) showed a potent DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant activity and found to be more active than standard N-acetylcystein (IC50 = 105.9 ± 1.1 μM). Compounds 8a (IC50 = 13.2 ± 0.34 μM) and 8b (IC50 = 14.1 ± 0.28 μM) found as potent inhibitor of α-glucusidase several fold more active than the standard acarbose (IC50 = 841 ± 1.73 μM). Most promising results were obtained in β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibition assay. Compounds 5 (IC50 = 0.13 ± 0.019 μM), 6 (IC50 = 19.9 ± 0.285 μM), 8a (IC50 = 1.2 ± 0.0785 μM) and 9 (IC50 = 0.003 ± 0.09 μM) showed a potent inhibition of β-glucuronidase. Compound 9 was found to be several hundred fold more active than standard D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (IC50 = 45.75 ± 2.16 μM). Conclusions Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological activity of a series of

  6. Selected essential oils inhibit key physiological enzymes and possess intracellular and extracellular antimelanogenic properties in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaahira Aumeeruddy-Elalfi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs extracted from six medicinal herbs and food plants [Cinnamomum zeylanicum (CZ, Psiadia arguta (PA, Psiadia terebinthina (PT, Citrus grandis (CGp, Citrus hystrix (CH, and Citrus reticulata (CR] were studied for any inhibitory potential against key physiological enzymes involved in diabetes (α-glucosidase, skin aging (collagenase and elastase, and neurodegenerative disorders (acetylcholinesterase. Kinetic studies of the active EOs on the aforementioned enzymes were determined using Lineweaver–Burk plots. The intracellular and extracellular antimelanogenic potential of the EOs were evaluated on B16F10 mouse melanocytes. CH and CR were found to significantly inhibit (2.476 ± 0.13 μg/mL and 3.636 ± 0.10 μg/mL, respectively acetylcholinesterase, compared with galantamine (3.989 ± 0.16 μg/mL. CH inhibited collagenase (50% inhibitory concentration 28.71 ± 0.16 μg/mL compared with the control (24.45 ± 0.19 μg/mL. The percentage inhibition in the elastase assay of CH was 63.21% compared to the positive control (75.09%. In addition, CH, CR, CGp, CZ, and PT were found to significantly inhibit α-glucosidase (276.70 ± 0.73 μg/mL, 169.90 ± 0.58 μg/mL, 240.60 ± 6.50 μg/mL, 64.52 ± 0.69 μg/mL, and 313.0 ± 5.0 μg/mL, respectively, compared to acarbose (448.80 ± 0.81 μg/mL. Active EOs showed both uncompetitive and competitive types of inhibition. The EOs also inhibited intracellular (50% inhibitory concentration 15.92 ± 1.06 μg/mL, 23.75 ± 4.47 μg/mL, and 28.99 ± 5.70 μg/mL for CH, CR, and CGp, respectively and extracellular (< 15.625 μg/mL for CH, CR, CGp, and PT melanin production when tested against B16F10 mouse melanocytes. Results from the present study tend to show that EOs extracted from these medicinal plants can inhibit key enzymes and may be potential candidates for cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  7. [A 50-year history of new drugs in Japan-the development and progress of anti-diabetic drugs and the epidemiological aspects of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hikaru; Murai, Yuriko; Ozawa, Terutaka

    2003-01-01

    recombinant products prevailed throughout the 1990s. Human insulin analogues (i.e., Insulin lispro and Insulin aspart) appeared in 2001. These are applied for after-meal glycosmia owing to their ultrarapid onset of activity. Self-injection by DM patients was legalized in 1981. To make the infection technique sure and easy, cartridge (pen-type) and disposable kit-type needles were devised in the 1990s. 2) Oral hypoglycemic drugs: Instead of the exclusive parenteral usage of insulins, there was also demand for oral dosage forms. The first of the sulfonyrlurea (SU) group, BZ-55, was used for DM clinically in 1955 in Germany. But it was soon withdrawn because of its antibacterial action. This led to the development of various SU groups. Tolbutamide (1956), chlorpropamide (1959), acetohexamide (1964) and tolazamide (1961) were introduced to Japan as first-generation SUs. Then glyclopyramide (Kyorin, 1965), glybenclamide (1971), gliclazide (1984) and glimepiride (1999) appeared as the second-generation SUs. These were used orally for Type 2 diabetes. Biguanide (BG) group, phenformin HC1 (1959), metformin HC1 (1961) and buformin HC1 (1961) had also been in use by oral treatment of Type 2 diabetes. SU appears to act by increasing the sensitivity of b-cells, which secrete insulin. BG probably exerts by increasing glucose transport across the membranes of target organs. 3) New types of antidiabetic drugs: a-Glucosidase inhibitors (i.e., acarbose: Bayer, 1993; and voglibose: Takeda, 1994) act on hyperglycemia after meals by decreasing glucose absorption. Thiazolidinedione compounds, such as troglitazone (Sankyo, 1995) and pioglitazone HC1 (Takeda, 1994) act by increasing the insulin sensitivity of the target tissues. These are useful for Type 2 DM patients when SUs are ineffective. Nevertheless, troglitazone was discontinued in 2000 due to severe liver damage. Nateglinide (Ajinomoto Co., 1999), which is a D-phenylalanine derivative acting similar to SUs, is useful orally for after