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Sample records for academic staff advancement

  1. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educator's Self Efficacy and Collective Educators' Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff: An Ethical Issue. ... staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was discussed in line with ethical principles and code of conduct of psychologists.

  2. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  3. Academic Staff Development and Output in State Universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected from a sample of 402 academic staff. ... staff development and the productivity of academic staff in terms of research, teaching and community service. ... Keywords: Academic staff development; Performance management; Nigeria ... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  4. Vice-Chancellors Influence on Academic Staff Intentions to Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kmacharia

    adoption and diffusion of Learning Management System (LMS) by academic staff for ... of TAM, as a supportive framework for investigating the academic staff ... This definition includes university-wide information systems that embrace blended.

  5. Understanding Relationships between Academic Staff and Administrators: An Organisational Culture Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to advance the understanding of relationships between university academic staff and administrators through information in interviews with 18 academic staff members and 18 administrators at a large public research university in the United States. Through exploring the first-hand insights and perceptions of interviewees from an…

  6. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  7. Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University of Botswana medical school. ... To document the medical school's staff recruitment and retention trends and challenges, and to propose ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  8. Academic Staff's Views About International Scholarships and Support Programs

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    M. Ertaç ATİLA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine views of academic staff who have been to the United States in order to do a research study by means of scholarships and support programs provided by the Higher Education Council or Scientific or Technological Research Council of Turkey about the scholarship programs. The qualitative study is carried out as a holistic multiple case study research design. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews from 10 academic staff who participated the scholarship program. Data were analyzed with content analysis technique. The results indicated that application process, time and financial resources were important for the preferences of academic staff in scholarship and support programs. The main reasons for applying the scholar program to undertake an international research study are grouped under three headings as academic, socio-cultural and foreign language improvements. The main influencing factors behind the researchers' preferences to go the United States are its' level of advancements in scientific research and peer influence. Concerning the duration of a research study in abroad the participants thought that 6 months to one year is adequate time and this time depends on the foreign language skills of the researchers, the field of study, subject and project. The main drawbacks of an international research study visit are the long waiting times for having the United States visa with no adequate support, the cost of health insurance and visa, lack of speaking foreign language skills, and adaptation time in the first arrival. As a result, the experienced participants suggested that the future scholarships have to cover health insurance; the researchers have to be supported for developing their foreign language skills and develop a clear research agenda and project prior to going abroad.

  9. Utilization of electronic information resources by academic staff at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the utilization of Electronic Information resources by the academic staff of Makerere University in Uganda. It examined the academic staff awareness of the resources available, the types of resources provided by the Makerere University Library, the factors affecting resource utilization. The study was ...

  10. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  11. Role of Academic Managers in Workload and Performance Management of Academic Staff: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    This small-scale case study focused on academic managers to explore the ways in which they control the workload of academic staff and the extent to which they use the workload model in performance management of academic staff. The links that exist between the workload and performance management were explored to confirm or refute the conceptual…

  12. Staff development and library services in academic libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. ... Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, data was ...

  13. EVALUATION OF CAREER PATTERNS OF ACADEMIC STAFF IN A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-31

    Jan 31, 2013 ... Keywords Absorbing Markov Chain; Academic Staff; Career Pattern; Grade; Faculty. INTRODUCTION ... faculty is created from the then Faculty of Science ..... who already have PhD with cognate teaching and research ...

  14. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  15. Utilization of digitized information resources by academic staff of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reported on the utilization of the digitized information resources amongst the academic staff of Waziri Umaru federal polytechnic Birnin Kebbi and Federal College of Education Technical Gusau. The paper gave an overview of digitization and its initiatives in academic libraries in Nigeria. The paper tried to ...

  16. Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff in Private Universities in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Santhapparaj; Syed S. Alam

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between pay, promotion, fringe benefits, working condition, support of research, support of teaching, gender and job satisfaction of academic staff in private universities in Malaysia. The required information was collected from 173 teaching staff who were randomly selected from three universities. The regression results indicate that pay, promotion, working condition and support of research have positive and significant effect on job ...

  17. Computer Literacy among University Academic Staff: The Case of IIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Majid

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of computing skills of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM faculty members. A questionnaire was used to elicit information regarding computer literacy from a sample of 114 faculty members. The study shows that the level of computer literacy among IIUM faculty members is quite low: most of them have been using computers for word processing only. Other computer applications are being used by a limited number of academic staff. Irrespective of the existing level of computer literacy, almost all academic staff showed interest in attending computer courses.

  18. Impact of Management Style on Performance Indicators of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the impact of management style on academic staff performance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study. The management style of the vice chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the periods, September 3, 1996 to September 3, 2001 was determined using the Ohio State…

  19. Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical College in South West, Nigeria. OA Lesi, OO Orenuga, A Roberts, OO Abudu. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  20. Educating Academic Staff to Reorient Curricula in ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Makrakis, Vassilios; Concina, Eleonora; Frate, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a professional development experience for higher education academic staff within the framework of an international Tempus project focused on reorienting university curricula to address sustainability. The project included revising curricula to phase sustainable development principles into university…

  1. Day jobs/nightwork: Academic staff studying towards higher degrees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They need teaching relief, research assistance and financial support for their research activities as well as access to resources and equipment and the support of experienced and knowledgeable supervisors and mentors. Academic staff members' perceptions and reflections on the experience of studying towards Masters ...

  2. Academic staff competence development as a gap in quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, despite commonplace understanding that quality in university education depends on the quality of the academic staff, universities are paying little attention to the professional competence of the latter. This paper discusses this anomaly with the conclusion that it threatens quality, especially in today's digital era.

  3. Equity development programmes for academic staff at South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current academic staff profile in South African Higher Education reflects much of the skewdness of the past. The central dilemma faced by these institutions is how to achieve an equitable ratio in the short and medium terms. In response to government concerns expressed through the National Plan on Higher Education, ...

  4. Use of university libraries by academic staff of Nigerian universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study employed descriptive survey research method to sample 318 respondents from a population of 326 academic staff. Questionnaire was used for data collections and descriptive statistics using IBM SPSS Statistics 2.0 in computing the statistical table to determine its frequencies and percentages. The findings of this ...

  5. Recruitment and quality academic staff selection: the case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sources from which organizations decide to select personnel from are central to its ability to survive, adapt, and grow (Noe et al, 2004:171). The paper examines a case study of recruitment and selection of quality academic staff into Covenant University. The paper addresses the factors that could affect recruitment ...

  6. Use of search engines for academic activities by the academic staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was designed to investigate the Internet Search Engine use behaviour and experiences of lecturers at the University of Jos, using the academics of the Faculty of Natural Sciences in the University as a focal population. The entire population of 148 academic staff members in the Faculty was adopted for the ...

  7. The BDA Dental Academic Staff Group Student Elective Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A D; White, D A; Hobson, R; Ensor, S

    2007-08-25

    In the current climate in dental education, many schools are re-evaluating the role of the student elective in the curriculum, with two schools no longer running elective programmes. In order to discuss the future of student electives in the dental curriculum, the Dental Academic Staff Group (DASG) of the British Dental Association organised a Student Elective Workshop, which attracted 42 delegates including nine student representatives. The following article is an account of the Workshop and its conclusions.

  8. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  9. Cultural Awareness Among Nursing Staff at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Jennifer; Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Madigan, Catherine K; Li, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to identify areas for targeted improvement in regard to cultural awareness and competence among nursing staff and in the work environment. Many facilities have initiated programs to facilitate cultural competence development among nursing staff; however, there has been little examination of the effect of these initiatives, assessment of experienced nurses' cultural awareness, or investigation of nurse leader's role in promoting cultural competence in the literature. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a cultural awareness survey was modified and electronically distributed to all registered nurses and assistive personnel at an academic medical center. The modified survey instrument showed good reliability and validity among the study population. Most nursing staff exhibited a moderate to high level of cultural awareness and held positive opinions about nursing leadership and the work environment with regard to cultural issues. In increasingly diverse work environments, assessing the cultural awareness of nursing staff enables nurse leaders to evaluate efforts in promoting cultural competence and to identify specific areas in which to target staff development efforts and leadership training.

  10. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  11. Opportunities and Challenges of Academic Staff in Higher Education in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushemeza, Elijah Dickens

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the opportunities and challenges of academic staff in higher education in Africa. The paper argues that recruitment, appointment and promotion of academic staff should depend highly on their productivity (positive production per individual human resource). The staff profile and qualifications should be posted on the University…

  12. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  13. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  14. Research Staff | Advanced Manufacturing Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    manages wind turbine rotor blade composite manufacturing projects at the National Wind Technology Center postdoctoral researcher working to develop and validate advanced composite manufacturing processes using novel materials for wind and marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This includes hands-on composite

  15. The Economics of Academic Advancement Within Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Fleischer, Brian; Korndorffer, James R; Slakey, Douglas; DuCoin, Christopher

    The success of an academic surgeon's career is often viewed as directly related to academic appointment; therefore, the sequence of promotion is a demanding, rigorous process. This paper seeks to define the financial implication of academic advancement across different surgical subspecialties. Data was collected from the Association of American Medical College's 2015 report of average annual salaries. Assumptions included 30 years of practice, 5 years as assistant professor, and 10 years as associate professor before advancement. The base formula used was: (average annual salary) × (years of practice [30 years - fellowship/research years]) + ($50,000 × years of fellowship/research) = total adjusted lifetime salary income. There was a significant increase in lifetime salary income with advancement from assistant to associate professor in all subspecialties when compared to an increase from associate to full professor. The greatest increase in income from assistant to associate professor was seen in transplant and cardiothoracic surgery (35% and 27%, respectively). Trauma surgery and surgical oncology had the smallest increases of 8% and 9%, respectively. With advancement to full professor, the increase in lifetime salary income was significantly less across all subspecialties, ranging from 1% in plastic surgery to 8% in pediatric surgery. When analyzing the economics of career advancement in academic surgery, there is a substantial financial benefit in lifetime income to becoming an associate professor in all fields; whereas, advancement to full professor is associated with a drastically reduced economic benefit. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. . CONDITIONS AND DETERMINANTS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE MODERN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Fomenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the research findings concerning a complicated process of academic staff formation in the secondary school. The main determinants of the process include the discrepancy between the actual development level of academic staff and the existing requirements of pedagogic society. The author denotes the main motives for academic staff development: moral and financial incentives for professional growth, new educational tasks, unsatisfactory social status of educational institution, etc; and identifies the complex of objective and subjective conditions positively affecting the given process. According to the author, the main priority should be given to the methodological provision of academic staff, integration of their activity, and stimulation of informational, methodical, and organizational channels of school activity. In conclusion, the paper considers the principles of life-long teacher training, corporate cooperation, partnership and solidarity, and discusses the technological structure of academic staff development, based on the competence model of education. 

  17. Mobility of academic staff from Faculty of Social Sciences at Charles University in years 2011- 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Gregáňová, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is analysing of the mobility of academic staff from the Faculty of Social Sciences in period 2011- 2015. The main aim of thesis will be exploration of the mobility of academic staff of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Charles University, focuses on the individual academic degrees and different institutions inside of faculty. The first sub-objective will analyse the usability offered by the mobility of academic staff and their interest. As another sub-goal I chos...

  18. Culture Clash or Ties That Bind? What Australian Academics Think of Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a framework analysis to explore the opinions a cohort of Australian academic staff hold towards professional staff. Five indicative themes were identified from the extant literature on university professional staff: the professional other; managerialism; an expensive bureaucracy; complementary agendas; and the third space and…

  19. Academic staff involvement and openness to diversity in international educational organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob; Jonasson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Joint work among academic staff is important for solving the ever-increasing number of complex tasks that are becoming part of everyday activities in higher education. At the same time, diversification and internationalisation may challenge collaboration processes and communication demands. Speak...... level types of diversity (linguistic and visible) but no effect on openness to deep-level types of diversity (informational and value).......Joint work among academic staff is important for solving the ever-increasing number of complex tasks that are becoming part of everyday activities in higher education. At the same time, diversification and internationalisation may challenge collaboration processes and communication demands....... Speaking a shared language consistently could be a way of overcoming problems. Hence, this study focuses on the effect of shared language among academic staff on the relation between academic staff involvement in work processes and openness to diversity. This study draws on data from 489 Danish academic...

  20. Perception of performance management system by academic staff in an open distance learning higher education environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M. Maimela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Institutions of higher learning in South Africa are fast embracing performance management system (PMS as a mechanism for the achievement of teaching excellence and enhancement of research productivity. However, literature provided evidence to show that application of PMS in the private sector had failed to drive competition, efficiency and productivity. Research purpose: The main purpose of this article was to evaluate the perception of academic staff members of an open distance learning institution regarding the implementation of a PMS. Motivation for the study: PMS as a mechanism through which performance of academics is measured has been described as inconsistent with the long tradition of academic freedom, scholarship and collegiality in the academy. Moreso, previous research on the implementation of PMS was limited to private sector organisations, thus resulting in the dearth of empirical literature relating to its practice in service-driven public sector institutions. Research design, approach and method: The article adopted a quantitative research approach using census survey methodology. Data were collected from 492 academic staff from the surveyed institution using a self-developed questionnaire that was tested for high content validity with a consolidated Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.83. Data were analysed using a onesample t-test because of the one-measurement nature of the variable under investigation. Main findings: Major findings of the study indicated that respondents were satisfied with the implementation of the PMS by management. However, the payment of performance bonuses was not considered as sufficiently motivating, thus necessitating a pragmatic review by management. Practical/managerial implications: The findings of this article provided a practical guide to managers on the implementation and management of PMS as an employee performance reward mechanism in non-profit and service-oriented organisations

  1. [Job satisfaction in an Italian university: difference between academic and technical-administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Molino, Monica; Zito, Margherita; Curzi, Ylenia; Fabbri, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the academic world led to an increase in job demands and a decrease in the available job resources. In recent years, the positive image of work in academia has gradually blurred. The present study, within the theoretical framework of the job demands-resources model, aimed to analyse the relationship between some job demands (workload, work-family conflict and emotional dissonance) and some job resources (autonomy, supervisors' support and co-workers' support) and job satisfaction in a medium-sized Italian University, by observing the differences between the academic staff (professors and researchers) and the technical-administrative staff The research was conducted by administering a self-report questionnaire which allowed to detect job satisfaction and the mentioned variables. Respondents were 477 (177 from academic staff and 300 from technical-administrative staff). The analysis of variance (independent samples t-test) showed significant differences in variables of interest between academic staff and technical-administrative staff. Multiple regression pointed out that job autonomy is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the academic staff sample, whereas supervisor support is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the technical-administrative staff sample. This research represents one of the first Italian studies on these topics in the academic context and highlights the importance of further in-depth examinations of specific job dynamics for both teaching and technical-administrative staff. Among practical implications, the importance of keeping high levels of job autonomy for academic staff and of fostering an effective leadership development for technical-administrative staff emerged.

  2. Worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic and administrative staff at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuli Ngonyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly it investigated the relationship between worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic staff and administrative staff at a South African university. Secondly it investigated if there is a statistically significant difference between worker participation levels of academic and non-academic staff. Most empirical work on worker participation has focused on workers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors of the economy, with limited focus on worker participation in the services sector. This study aims to address this gap through this exploratory study of the impact of worker participation on job satisfaction at a South African University.

  3. Job satisfaction among the academic staff of a saudi university: an evaluative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M; Rahim, Sheikh Idris A; Abumadini, Mahdi S; Wosornu, Lade

    2009-09-01

    Job satisfaction is a major determinant of job performance, manpower retention and employee well-being. To explore the state of job satisfaction among the academic staff of King Faisal University - Dammam (KFU-D), and detect the areas and groups at a higher risk of being dissatisfied. A fully-structured 5-option Likert-type Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (JSQ) composed of an evaluative item and eleven domains making a total of 46 items was used. It was distributed by internal mail to all the 340 academic staff, 248 of whom returned completed questionnaires (response rate = 72.9 %). The overall mean Job Satisfaction Rate (JSR) was 73.6 %. The highest JSR's were found in three domains ("Supervision", "Responsibility", and "Interpersonal Relationships"), and the lowest in four others ("Salary", "My Work Itself", "Working Conditions", and "Advancement"). The JSR was significantly lower among Saudi nationals, females, those below age 40, those from clinical medical and Dentistry departments. Multiple Regression identified six independent variables which conjointly explained 25 % of the variance in job satisfaction (p jobs, but there was significant dissatisfaction with several job-related aspects and demographic features. Appropriate interventions are indicated. Further studies are needed to confirm the present findings and to monitor future trends.

  4. The Impact of Income on academic staff Job Satisfaction at Public research Universities, Malaysia

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    Aida Mehrad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of job satisfaction as a vital factor amongst academic staff in university is too considerable. Furthermore, recognizing principal factors that influence on job satisfaction assumed much significant, because of these factors appear various normal and abnormal behavior at workplace. In this case, the present study focused on income as external factor that impacts on job satisfaction and examines the association between these two factors among academic staffs at public universities in Malaysia. The sample of the study was 440 academic staff that worked in public universities and completed the job descriptive index inventory. Additionally, the result showed there is significant relationship between income and the amount of job satisfaction that analyzed by ANOVA test. As well, the existing paper supports the effect of income on job satisfaction among academic staff.

  5. Job satisfaction among the academic staff of a Saudi University: An evaluative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Rubaish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction is a major determinant of job performance, manpower retention and employee well-being. Objectives: To explore the state of job satisfaction among the academic staff of King Faisal University - Dammam (KFU-D, and detect the areas and groups at a higher risk of being dissatisfied. Method: A fully-structured 5-option Likert-type Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (JSQ composed of an evaluative item and eleven domains making a total of 46 items was used. It was distributed by internal mail to all the 340 academic staff, 248 of whom returned completed questionnaires (response rate = 72.9 %. Findings: The overall mean Job Satisfaction Rate (JSR was 73.6 %. The highest JSR′s were found in three domains ("Supervision", "Responsibility", and "Interpersonal Relationships", and the lowest in four others ("Salary", "My Work Itself", "Working Conditions", and "Advancement". The JSR was significantly lower among Saudi nationals, females, those below age 40, those from clinical medical and Dentistry departments. Multiple Regression identified six independent variables which conjointly explained 25 % of the variance in job satisfaction (p < 0.0001. These were: being an expatriate, above the age of 50, serving the university for less than one or more than ten years, and, not from a clinical department of Medicine or Dentistry. Conclusions : Most staff were satisfied with many aspects of their jobs, but there was significant dissatisfaction with several job-related aspects and demographic features. Appropriate interventions are indicated. Further studies are needed to confirm the present findings and to monitor future trends.

  6. The Impact of Income on Academic Staff Job Satisfaction at Public Research Universities, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrad, Aida

    2014-01-01

    The presence of job satisfaction as a vital factor amongst academic staff in university is too considerable. Furthermore, recognizing principal factors that influence on job satisfaction assumed much significant, because of these factors appear various normal and abnormal behavior at workplace. In this case, the present study focused on income as external factor that impacts on job satisfaction and examines the association between these two factors among academic staffs at public universities...

  7. PUBLICATION ACTIVITY AND ITS ROLE IN ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT OF HEI ACADEMIC STAFF (RUSSIAN PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Ardashkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyze and summarize the Russian best practices of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the professional activity of the academic staff; to identify the role of motivational factors as a method to manage and control the publication activity of the academic staff.Methods. The authors address the methodology of comprehensive research based on the method of document analysis, comparative analysis, and method of secondary use of sociological and psychological data.Results and scientific novelty concludes in presenting Russian and international best practices generalized on using the publication activity to assess the engagement of HEI (Higher Educational Institution academic staff; the most appropriate formats of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the research component of the academic staff engagement are defined. Degree of reliability of this criterion is shown – its strengths and shortcomings. The conclusion is drawn on need of the essential changes in management of publication activity affecting both professional and motivational spheres of scientific and pedagogical staff. The most acceptable options of measurement of staff work efficiency of this category are formulated.Practical significance. The research outcomes can be the corpus for designing the assessment method for the professional engagement of the academic staff.

  8. Motivations, Expectations, and Experiences of Expatriate Academic Staff on an International Branch Campus in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Hall, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of non-Chinese academic staff working on an international branch campus in China. The article presents findings from an interview study that explored the expectations of expatriate staff and what motivated them to want to work abroad. The second part of the article reports on whether and how these expectations…

  9. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  10. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  11. Exploring the contribution of formal and informal learning to academic staff member employability: A Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Marcel; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Boon, Jo; van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Little attention has been paid to the employability of academic staff and the extent to which continuous learning contributes to academic career success. The purpose of this paper is to explore the contribution of formal and informal learning to employability. Design/methodology/approach –

  12. Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, we relied on first-hand knowledge about the school events and ... As there was a multilevel change in university management in 2011, the periods and events before and after April 2011 .... not ascertain academics' motivation for.

  13. Academic Practice:Guidelines for Staff and Students - English

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system. Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt...

  14. Engaging Academic Staff in Transnational Teaching: The Job Satisfaction Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Danny; McGill, Tanya; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Transnational education (TNE) is an important facet of the international education learning and teaching landscape. Ensuring academics are positively engaged in TNE is a challenging but necessary issue for this form of educational provision if the risks inherent in TNE are to be successfully mitigated. This article explores job satisfaction for…

  15. Typical career dilemmas of academic staff during the early career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Higher education institutions need to identify, and fami- .... ment to the organisation, declining psychological and physical health, problematic inter- ... More research focusing on the quality of worklife of academics within the South African .... panel concerned to determine whether they understood the question, before being ...

  16. Supervisory Rotation: Impact on an Academic Library Reference Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Bob; Piotrowski, Chris

    The results of a managerial rotation program in a medium-sized academic library reference department are presented. After meeting certain minimal eligibility requirements, librarians in this department take turns on a 2-year cycle serving as head of the department. This case study is used as a model to assess both the advantages and disadvantages…

  17. Academic Self-Perceptions of Ability and Course Planning among Academically Advanced Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of gender to the academic self-perceptions of ability and related coursework plans for high school and college across academically advanced students. Participants were academically advanced students (N = 447) from grades 5 to 12. Findings revealed that (a) girls' self-perceptions of ability…

  18. Academic Practice. Guidelines for Staff and Students - English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive...... kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system....

  19. Enhancing Human Capital Development and Service Delivery in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions through Effective Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyeaka Igbokwe-Ibeto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of bureaucratic and human capital theories, an eclectic approach, the study examines the nexus between academic staff recruitment in Nigerian tertiary institutions and human capital development as well as service delivery with specific reference to universities. It is generally agreed that higher education is a sine-qua-non for human capital development and efficient service delivery. Higher education is a prerequisite for the production of highly competent experts, which in turn, contributes to the development of organizations and the economy at large. For these to be achieved, the right content and academic staff  must be in place to perform this varied function.  However, over the years the quality of human capital coming out of Nigerian universities and its impact on service delivery has become a source of concern to employers of labour and all stakeholders. Inferential opinions have traced the problem to the recruitment of incompetent academic staff. To investigate the issues raised, the study relied heavily on primary and secondary data and multi stage sampling was used to select the sample population. The data collected was presented in pie chart and simple percentage. Similarly, in order to test the hypotheses and establish the degree of dependence or independence of the variables under investigation, the chi-square statistical technique was used. The findings of the study revealed among others, that Nigerian universities do not employ merit, qualification and competency in the academic staff recruitment. It also established that there is a significant relationship between merit, qualification and competency based academic staff recruitment and human capital development and service delivery. To enhance human capital development and service delivery in Nigerian universities, the study recommends among others, that an independent body like the National University Commission (NUC should be given the responsibility of

  20. The Effect of Gender on Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Public Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ma’rof Bin Redzuan, Haslinda Abdullah, Aida Mehrad, Hanina Halimatussadiah

    2015-01-01

    Based on last due decades, job satisfaction assumed as one of the imperative organizational factors that has great role among staff at workplace; furthermore,focusing on this important factor and finding effective items that impact on the level of job satisfaction is very essential. The main purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between gender and job satisfaction of academic staff at public universities in Malaysia. The Job Descriptive Index inventory (JDI) was used to mea...

  1. Using Texting for Clinical Communication in Surgery: A Survey of Academic Staff Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdouse, Mohammed; Devon, Karen; Kayssi, Ahmed; Goldfarb, Jeremy; Rossos, Peter; Cil, Tulin D

    2018-03-01

    Text messaging has become ubiquitous and is being increasingly used within the health care system. The purpose of this study was to understand texting practices for clinical communication among staff surgeons at a large academic institution. Staff surgeons in 4 subspecialties (vascular, plastics, urology, and general surgery) were surveyed electronically. A total of 62 surgeons from general surgery (n = 33), vascular surgery (n = 6), plastic surgery (n = 13), and urology (n = 10) completed the study (response rate 30%). When conveying urgent patient-related information, staff surgeons preferred directly calling other staff surgeons (61.5%) and trainees (58.8%). When discussing routine patient information, staff surgeons used email to reach other staff surgeons (54.9%) but preferred texting (62.7%) for trainees. The majority of participants used texting because it is fast (65.4%), convenient (69.2%) and allows transmitting information to multiple recipients simultaneously (63.5%). Most felt that texting enhances patient care (71.5%); however, only half believed that it enhanced trainees' educational experiences. The majority believed that texting identifiable patient information breaches patient confidentiality. Our data showed high adoption of text messaging for clinical communication among surgeons, particularly with trainees. The majority of surgeons acknowledge security concerns inherent in texting for patient care. Existing mobile communication platforms fail to meet the needs of academic surgeons. Further research should include guidelines related to texting in clinical practice, educational implications of texting, and technologies to better meet the needs of clinicians working in an academic surgical settings.

  2. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  3. OCCUPATIONAL BURNOUT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC STAFF: TURKEY-MALTA STUDY GROUP SAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Demirtas, Cagri; Kapusuzoglu, Saduman

    2016-01-01

    The study group of this survey comprises of 185academic staff working in the University, Faculty of Education and Faculty ofEconomics and Administrative Sciences, in Turkey, and Malta University, Facultyof Education and Faculty of Economy, Management and Accounting. This study is adescriptive survey model, in which the assessment tool of Maslach BurnoutInventory is used. The burnout levels of academic personnel are investigated interm of gender, age and Faculty variables. As a result, it was ...

  4. Readiness for Training Disabled Students in Academic Staff of Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin N.Y.,

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The readiness of the teaching staff of higher educational institutions for teaching and psychological and pedagogical support of students with disabilities is being considered. We emphasize that the personnel of the educational organization need special competence to work with persons with disabilities of various nosological groups. The issues of creating an accessible environment in the university were studied, the readiness of teachers to apply special educational technologies in the training of students with disabilities, to develop teaching and methodological materials; the ability to establish pedagogically appropriate relationships with students, and provide psychological and pedagogical support in matters of personal and professional self-determination. The results show a high degree of importance of special professional competencies for inclusive education. But, at the same time, teachers assess their own level of preparedness with students with disabilities as insufficient, which allowed to determine the main areas of work.

  5. Job Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Academic Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovska, Gordana; Angelkoska, Slagana; Osmani, Fadbi; Grncarovska, Svetlana Pandiloska

    2017-01-01

    Education is the most important organization of a nation; it plays a significant role in the development of any country. Universities create and cultivate knowledge for the sake of building a modern world. The academic staff is the key resource within higher education institutions. A positive and healthy university structure results in increased…

  6. The Impact of the Bologna Process on Academic Staff in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marta A.; Chapman, David W.; Rumyantseva, Nataliya L.

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff in Ukraine face a convergence of institutional and professional pressures precipitated by a national economic crisis, projected declines in enrolment and dramatic changes to institutional procedures as institutions implement the Bologna Process. This article examines the extent to which these pressures are reshaping the way academic…

  7. Management perceptions of a higher educational brand for the attraction of talented academic staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Saurombe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Academic staff members have a crucial role in the success of higher education institutions (HEIs. Therefore, it is imperative to cultivate an appealing organisational brand that will attract them to HEIs as an employer of choice. Research purpose: The main objective of this study was to explore management perceptions on a higher educational institution as a brand for the attraction of talented academic staff. Motivation for the study: Although a substantial amount of research has been conducted on organisational branding, not much has emphasised the higher educational sector. Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research approach was adopted, using semi-structured interviews to collect data from management (N = 12 of a merged South African HEI. Main findings: The findings revealed six themes that should form the core of a higher educational brand for academic staff: reputation and image, organisational culture and identity, strategic vision, corporate social responsibility and work and surrounding environment. Practical/managerial implications: The findings of the study will assist higher education management to create a compelling organisational brand and work environment to attract and retain talented academic staff members. Contribution/value-add: This research makes a valuable contribution towards creating new knowledge in the key that should form part of an appealing higher education brand that will attract and retain current and future talent.

  8. The E-Balanced Scorecard (e-BSC) for Measuring Academic Staff Performance Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, May Leen; Hamid, Suraya; Ijab, Mohamad Taha; Soo, Hsaio Pei

    2009-01-01

    This research paper is a pilot study that investigated the suitability of adopting an automated balanced scorecard for managing and measuring the performance excellence of academic staffs in the higher education setting. A comprehensive study of related literature with requirements elicited from the target population in a selected premier…

  9. For Better or Worse: Using Wikis and Blogs for Staff Communication in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Kristen; Del Bosque, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    This case study from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, University Libraries, which has one main library, three branches, and more than 110 staff, illustrates one approach to using new technologies as additional methods for internal communication. At large academic libraries, communication within the organization can be challenging. The…

  10. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  11. Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos. ... Abstract. Work-life balance is associated with the maintenance of stability in both one's professional and personal life. It is key to the welfare and, subsequently, job satisfaction and productivity of employees. It is against this understanding that this study ...

  12. Perspectives on Academic Staff Involvement in the Acquisition and Implementation of Educational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study using both quantitative and qualitative data to uncover the extent and nature of the involvement of academic staff in the processes of acquisition and implementation of educational technologies. Actor-network theory (ANT) is used to inform the design of the study and the analysis of the data. Three main…

  13. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  14. Gender Issues in the Recruitment and Selection of Academic Staff in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines gender issues in the recruitment and selection of academic staff in a Nigerian university. The recruitment and selection practices of the university are examined with a view to ascertaining whether such practices encourage male dominance. Primary data were obtained through the administration of ...

  15. Innovative and Traditional Elements in the Work of Academic Staff: The Views of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgena, Inese; Cedere, Dagnija; Keviša, Ingrida

    2015-01-01

    The academic staff of the institutions of higher education plays a key role in the implementation of innovations in the study process. This article aims to analyze the views of students, pre-service teachers, on the role of innovations and traditions in the work of the academic staff at their institution of higher education. The survey data from…

  16. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic faculty members: do instructional and clinical staff differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Song, Jae W; Kim, H Myra; Woolliscroft, James O; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Gyetko, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between instructional and clinical faculty members. A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1898 academic faculty members at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organisation, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between faculty members on the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Response rates for the instructional and clinical faculty groups were 43.1% and 46.7%, respectively. Clinical faculty members reported being less satisfied with how they were mentored and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between the two faculty groups. Surprisingly, clinical faculty members with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were mentored and with career advancement, and were significantly less likely to choose an academic career if they had to do it all over again compared with instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty members were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty members compared with senior-level instructional faculty staff. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both groups included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. In the clinical track only, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Greater emphasis must be placed on faculty members' well-being at both the institutional level and the level of departmental leadership. Efforts to enhance job satisfaction and improve retention are more likely to succeed if they are directed by locally designed

  17. Job Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Academic Staff in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Stankovska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Education is the most important organization of a nation; it plays a significant role in the development of any country. Universities create and cultivate knowledge for the sake of building a modern world. The academic staff is the key resource within higher education institutions. A positive and healthy university structure results in increased academic staff’s job satisfaction and better job motivation. According to this, the main purpose of this research was to investigate the possible relationship between job motivation and job satisfaction among academic staff. The Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS and Job Motivation Questionnaire (JMQ were administered to a sample of 100 (50 males and 50 females university employees. The results indicated that the academic staff was highly motivated with their job. At the same time the results showed that academicians were more satisfied with their salary, co-workers, promotion, operating procedures and supervision, but dissatisfied with fringe benefits, contingent rewards, nature of work and communication. This research offers practical suggestions to the educational institutions and human resource managers on how to pay, promote, retain and maintain equity in the universities.

  18. The incidence of secual harassment at higher education institutions in South Africa: perceptions of academic staff

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Joubert; Christo van Wyk; Sebastiaan Rothmann

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the perceptions of academic staff relating to the incidence of sexual harassment at higher education institutions in South Africa. The results show a relatively low incidence level of sexual harassment, with gender harassment being more prevalent than unwanted sexual attention and quid pro quo harassment. No statistically significant effect of gender, age, population group or years of service was found on the perceptions of the incidence of sexual harassment. ...

  19. Bibliometrics and academic staff assessment in Polish university libraries - current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Ryś

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic staff assessment in Poland is, to a large extent, based on bibliographic indicators, such as the number of scientific publications produced, the Ministry of Science and Higher Education score pertaining to the journal rank and the publication type, as well as the number of citations and derivatives. Relevant data is retrieved from bibliographic databases developed by libraries, international citation indexes available for Polish scientific institutions under a national licence, and from open-access international and Polish sources, which are briefly presented in the article. The workload entailed, and in consequence, the results of this citation search vary depending on the search method applied. For this reason university staff members and university authorities often seek assistance for this from the university library staff. This in return provides an opportunity for libraries to increase their role within the academic community.In order to investigate the matter further, the authors conducted a survey among the largest academic libraries in Poland. The findings confirm that bibliometric processes (namely, the registration and the formal acceptance of university staff scientific publications, and compilation of citation reports have become a vital part of modern library work. Bibliographies of university staff publications developed by libraries include various bibliometric indicators (those most frequently used being identified in the article, and have become an important source of statistical and bibliometric information. The survey results highlight the most frequently used bibliometric sources and methods. Examples of bibliographic databases created by the libraries and bibliometric indicators used within these databases are also presented.

  20. A COMPARISON ON THE TIME MANAGEMENT UNDERSTANDINGS OF UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Çimen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate time management understandings of university academic staff with their participation or not participation in the sports activities, gender and their work year. The sample of the study consisted of 93 university academic staff who Works at Dumlupinar University (37 women and 56 men. As data collection tool in addition to a questionary, which consists 10 items developed by the researchers, “Time Management Scale”, which was developed by Britton and Tesser (1991 and Turkish adaptation was done by Koçak and Alay (2002 was used. The obtained data were analyzed by using SPSS for windows. In addition to descriptive statistics, Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis test were done in order to determine significant differences between time management understandings of the academic staff. As a result, although, there was no significant difference between participants’ time management understanding according to gender (p>.05 there were significant differences between participants’ time management understandings in the “time attitudes” subscale according to their work year and in “time management” and “time attitudes” subscales according to participation /or not participation in sport activities (p<.05.

  1. Publication among academic staff and students: an analysis from the ethical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Urrutia Soto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes, from the ethical perspective, the authorship of particles carried out among students and professors and their potential conflicts. After the literature review, it has been found that the Vancouver criteria that should be fulfilled for the attribution of authorship of an article are not popularly known by students and academic staff. Many problems are posed in this area, among which the following are highlighted: ghost writer, honorary author, and incorrect assignment in the order authors should appear. The professor-student relationship brings with it implicit risks that could lead to conflict, against which it is the academician who should be cautious to curtail any ethical fault when assigning the authors. The measures recommended to avoid conflicts of authorship among students and academic staff are: early assignment of the authors, reflection among academicians, education to students/academic staff, and external control conducted by journal editors. Conclusion is that lack of awareness of the criteria of authorship by academicians and students is the principal problem in the attribution of authorships. It is indispensable to improve this knowledge and look after the application of said criteria in practice.

  2. Pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement of Academic and non-Academic staff in tertiary Institutions in Ondo State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ajibua M.A.; Alla J.B

    2012-01-01

    Leisure signifies individual’s choice to spend his/her discretionary time fulfilling certain interest or needs or performing a gratifying experience for the sake of wellness or personal development. The aim of this study was to look into the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institution in Ondo State. For the purpose of the study, 40 academic and 40 non-academic staff were selected from the five Government-owned tertiary in...

  3. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  4. Advancement Staff and Alumni Advocates: Cultivating LGBTQ Alumni by Promoting Individual and Community Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Drezner, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a constructivist case-study analysis, we explore philanthropy toward higher education among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) alumni, examining the role of advancement staff and alumni advocates in engaging LGBTQ alumni to promote individual and community uplift. Data come from focus groups with 37 advancement staff and…

  5. Call for papers: SAJHE special issue 'Re-imagining writing retreats for academic staff in higher education'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest Editors

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Call for papers for an upcoming special issue of the South African Journal of Higher Education (SAJHE in 2016: ‘Re-imagining writing retreats for academic staff in higher education’.

  6. The Globalisation of Higher Education and the Sojourner Academic: Insights into Challenges Experienced by Newly Appointed International Academic Staff in a UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly diverse nature of the higher education academic community in the United Kingdom is under-researched and under-theorised. This article presents an exploratory study of the lived experiences of newly appointed international academic staff as expressed in their written reflections on their professional practice and interpreted by the…

  7. The Mediating Role of Conflict Management Styles Between Organizational Justice and Affective Commitment Among Academic Staffs in Malaysian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Kassim Muhammad Asyraf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes in deep the effects of two major dimensions in organizational justice such as procedural and distributive justice on affective commitment through three conflict management styles such as integrating, compromising, and avoiding styles. These relationships are analyzed in advance on the extent of academic staff in Malaysian Public Universities. Partial Least Squares of Structural equation modelling (SEM and Statistical Package Social Science (SPSS are utilized to determine the effect of the two variables and the mediating effect of the conflict management styles. The results exhibit that procedural and distributive justice is significantly related with integrating, and compromising styles while not significantly related to avoiding style. It also revealed that integrating and compromising styles were significant with affective commitment while avoiding style does not relate with affective commitment. In conclusion, the results also showed only integrating and compromising styles mediate the relationship between procedural and distributive justice and affective commitment.

  8. The Relationship Between Psychological Resilience and Life Satisfaction of University Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze ÜLKER TÜMLÜ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between academic staff psychological resilience and life satisfaction. The research is a descriptive study in relational survey model. The study group includes 94 faculty members chosen randomly in 2011-2012 academic years in Kastamonu University. As a data collection instruments, life satisfaction scale developed by Diener et al in 1985, adapted to Turkish by Köker in 1991 and Connor and Davidson Resilience Scale/CD-RISC developed by Connor and Davidson in 2003, adapted to Turkish by Karaırmak in 2010, were used. In the study correlation method was used in order to determine the relationship between resilience and life satisfaction, regression analysis was used in order to determine whether the resilience predict life satisfaction. In addition, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used in the analysis of resilience in terms of age, gender, marital status, degree, years of service and years of service at the university in the study. When the outcomes were evaluated, a significant, positive relationship was found between life satisfaction and resilience. The psychological resilience predicts life satisfaction in a meaningful way and resilience explains 7% of the total variance about life satisfaction. In addition, resilience levels of the university academic staff does not differ meaningfully from the gender, age, marital status, degree, years of service and years of service at university.

  9. Perceptions of Undergraduate University Students about Working Conditions of Women Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice YALÇIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Women constitute nearly 41%of academic staff in our country. Among all academic staff, the ratio of female academicians is increasing as it is approached to rural areas from suburbs. This study aims to reveal the perceptions of undergraduate education students about female academicians’ working life conditions. Considering available time and facilities, the universe of research was limited within a university; as it was primarily intended to reveal students’ individual perceptions on the conditions of women academics, the students’ being at the undergraduate level was at the fore front of study rather than the academic departments of the university. The survey data form were applied to 157 female and 104 male undergraduate students (N = 261 studying at faculties and schools of the university where the survey was applied excluding freshmen classes.. Descriptive tests were used to evaluate the data. The findings were evaluated by x ² test, which were formerly tested according to the desires of students on what to get on their education and whether they were willing to be academicians. 54%of female students involved in the research stated that they were “partially” satisfied with the female academics. While 74,3%of the students agreed on the question “Should women work as academicians?”, only 2.2%percent stated that women should not work as academicians. 47,8%consider that there is a partial discrimination between the male and female members of academic life. 47,1%mentioned that working as an academician was a barrier to being a good mother or a good wife and 69,7%stated that working as a female academician was a tough work. 23,7%of the students think that being an academician is mostly beneficial in terms of personal development for a woman. 79,6%stated that the biggest challenge for female academics is to sustain the academic studies as well as being a mother and a wife. The best advantage of being female academician was revealed

  10. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  11. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  12. Technology Infusion Within Part-Time Professional Development Programmes for Academic Staff and Industry Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McAvinia, Dr. Claire; McDonnell, Dr. Claire; Donnelly, Dr. Roisin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the experiences of programme co-ordinators and includes findings from a two year (2013-15) evaluation pilot study on a key communication technology – audio feedback – conducted across three accredited part-time programmes for a blend of academic staff (faculty) in higher education and eLearning industry practitioners. Key to our decision making with regards to which tools to infuse in our programmes is our aim to help the educators who participate on our programmes to ma...

  13. Views on authorship: survey among academic staffs of the Korean radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seong Su

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of my survey is to assess the knowledge and views of the academic staff on authorship criteria. 363 academic staff were invited to fill out the survey via e-mail and the responses were collected for two weeks. A one-page questionnaire was prepared and it included 19 questions with three major groups. The first group of questions was demographic information including the responder's age, sex and academic position. The second group of questions was focused on the individual perception and personal experience for authorship on their publications. The last group of questions included awareness and views of authorship criteria established by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The responders were grouped according to age, sex and grade. To examine the difference of responses among each group, a Chi square test for categorical variables was performed. The overall response rate to the survey was 39.2% (113/288) and 20.7% (75/363) of e-mail address were undeliverable. The grade of respondents is relatively evenly distributed from fellowship (20%) to professor (22%). Most of the respondents (90.6%) had experienced difficulties with authorship. Although 72.2% of respondents had no awareness of ICMJE's criteria, they agreed with criteria fully (56.1%) and partially (42.4%). 42% of respondents expected that more than 50% of the authors per paper didn't fulfill the authorship criteria. Less than 5 authors per paper were adequate (96%). Most of respondents thought that the introduction of a contribution listing to the Journal of the Korean radiological society is necessary (93.5%) but it is not urgently needed (59.0%). I can see that there are authorship problems among the academic members of Korean radiological society. It is necessary to educate the members and to have them justify the validity of their authorship claims

  14. An Academic-Practice Partnership Model to Grow and Sustain Advanced Practice Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracy E; Howard, Patricia B

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this article were to describe the implementation of an academic-practice partnership for healthcare system workforce development and provide preliminary outcomes of the associated pilot study. The demand for cross-continuum healthcare delivery models necessitates creation of workforce development structures for advanced practice nursing. An academic-practice partnership specified enrollment of 5 cohorts of BSN staff nurses in a 3-year DNP program. Qualitative methods were used to explore pilot data at midpoint of cohort 1 student progression to determine learning outcomes and DNP projects with potential for impact on organization goals. Partnership implementation experiences indicate that contractual agreements and an established evaluation plan are keys to academic-practice partnership success. Pilot study findings suggest that curriculum core courses provide a foundation for designing DNP projects congruent with acute and primary care health system goals. Implementing an academic-practice partnership is a strategy for workforce development to increase retention of advanced practice nurses. Academic-practice partnerships can serve as a catalyst for a paradigm shift for changing models of care, thus enhancing workforce development succession planning for sustainable growth in healthcare systems.

  15. Hypertension and anthropometry measurement on academic staff at public universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Ilya Zulaikha; Abdullah, Mohammad Nasir; Baharuddin, Mohd Sapuan; Arul, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension or most commonly known as high blood pressure is a non-communicable disease affecting to health of people with non-detectible cause (primary) and some with determined causes (secondary). The prevalence of hypertension morbidity was very high globally, the consequences of the disease if not been treated is death. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hypertension and anthropometry measurements such as weight, height and body mass index among academic staff in public universities in Malaysia. The design for this study was cross-sectional and the method for data collection was mailed questionnaire. The initial sample size for this study was 189, therefore, 500 questionnaires were distributed to randomly selected academicians in public universities, colleges and polytechnics in Malaysia. However, only 101 questionnaires were returned and were analysed in this study. The target population were academicians which includes lecturers and senior lecturers in public universities in Malaysia. The methods of analysis employed was logistic regression and frequency analysis. It was found that weight, height and body mass index (BMI) have no significant relationship with hypertension but based on the Crude Odd Ratio, all these three anthropometry measures showed that there were protective risk of hypertension among lecturers and senior lecturers in public university, Malaysia. In a nutshell, there were no evidence to conclude that anthropometry measurements can affect hypertension status among academic staff at public university.

  16. Relationships between Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the wellbeing of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. This study examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate in order to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. METHODS The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014–2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and five outcomes of student wellbeing: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. RESULTS Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. CONCLUSIONS As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multi-dimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. PMID:28382671

  17. Relationships Among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Gomez, Louis M; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A

    2017-05-01

    School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014-2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and 5 outcomes of student well-being: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multidimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  18. Modelling job support, job fit, job role and job satisfaction for school of nursing sessional academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Leanne S; Moroney, Robyn

    2018-01-01

    Sessional academic staff are an important part of nursing education. Increases in casualisation of the academic workforce continue and satisfaction with the job role is an important bench mark for quality curricula delivery and influences recruitment and retention. This study examined relations between four job constructs - organisation fit, organisation support, staff role and job satisfaction for Sessional Academic Staff at a School of Nursing by creating two path analysis models. A cross-sectional correlational survey design was utilised. Participants who were currently working as sessional or casual teaching staff members were invited to complete an online anonymous survey. The data represents a convenience sample of Sessional Academic Staff in 2016 at a large school of Nursing and Midwifery in Australia. After psychometric evaluation of each of the job construct measures in this study we utilised Structural Equation Modelling to better understand the relations of the variables. The measures used in this study were found to be both valid and reliable for this sample. Job support and job fit are positively linked to job satisfaction. Although the hypothesised model did not meet model fit standards, a new 'nested' model made substantive sense. This small study explored a new scale for measuring academic job role, and demonstrated how it promotes the constructs of job fit and job supports. All four job constructs are important in providing job satisfaction - an outcome that in turn supports staffing stability, retention, and motivation.

  19. Women in academic medicine: perceived obstacles to advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, N M; Nickerson, K G

    1992-01-01

    To investigate perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine, we sent a questionnaire assessing perceptions of the fairness and supportiveness of the academic environment to the 229 female teaching and research faculty of the School of Physicians & Surgeons at Columbia University. The overall response rate was 85%. Forty-six percent believed that they had not had the same professional opportunities as their male colleagues, 52% believed that salaries were not equivalent for men and women in similar positions, and 50% believed that promotions were awarded in a biased manner. Thirty percent reported that sexist behavior was common and that sexual harassment occurred in the workplace. Eighty-one percent experienced conflicts between their professional and personal lives and most believed that the institution failed to adequately address the needs of women with children. This survey indicates that there are significant perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine that must be addressed.

  20. Predictors of Academics' Career Advancement at Malaysian Private Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiasamy, Lawrence; Ismail, Maimunah; Ahmad, Aminah; Othman, Jamilah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the influence of individual and organizational variables on the career advancement of academics in Malaysian private universities. Design/methodology/approach: A correlation study was conducted in six private universities. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. The dependent…

  1. The determinants of academic career advancement: Evidence from Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of professors’ career advancement in Italian universities. From the analyses, it emerges that the fundamental determinant of an academic candidate’s success is not scientific merit, but rather the number of years that the candidate has belonged to the same...

  2. An Academic-Practice Partnership to Advance DNP Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Patricia B; Williams, Tracy E

    During the past decade, the growth of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in the United States has been phenomenal, with most focusing on the preparation of advanced practice registered nurses. Simultaneously, academic-practice partnerships have been a frequent subject of discussion for nursing's leading academic, administrative, and practice organizations. Numerous reports about academic-practice partnerships concerning aspects of baccalaureate nursing education exist, but partnership accounts for DNP programs are essentially nonexistent. The purpose of this article is to describe the initial phase of an academic-practice partnership between a multisystem health care organization and a college of nursing in a public land-grant university in the southeastern United States. The 7-year partnership agreement between Norton Healthcare and the University of Kentucky College of Nursing was designed to prepare 5 cohorts of 20 to 30 baccalaureate-prepared staff nurses as DNP graduates for advanced practice registered nurse eligibility. The description of partnering institution characteristics frames an emphasis on elements of the partnership proposal, contractual agreement, and partner responsibilities along with the logic model evaluation plan. Lessons learned include the importance of proposals and contracts to sustain the partnership, frequent communication to build trust, and strategic analysis for rapid response to challenging situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies' usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs members in using databases and would also be capable of

  4. Collaboration in academic medicine: reflections on gender and advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis L; Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon; Conrad, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Collaboration in academic medicine is encouraged, yet no one has studied the environment in which faculty collaborate. The authors investigated how faculty experienced collaboration and the institutional atmosphere for collaboration. In 2007, as part of a qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, the authors interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, with an oversampling of women, minorities, and generalists, regarding their perceptions and experiences of collaboration in academic medicine. Data analysis was inductive and driven by the grounded theory tradition. Female faculty expressed enthusiasm about the potential and process of collaboration; male faculty were more likely to focus on outcomes. Senior faculty experienced a more collaborative environment than early career faculty, who faced numerous barriers to collaboration: the hierarchy of medical academe, advancement criteria, and the lack of infrastructure supportive of collaboration. Research faculty appreciated shared ideas, knowledge, resources, and the increased productivity that could result from collaboration, but they were acutely aware that advancement requires an independent body of work, which was a major deterrent to collaboration among early career faculty. Academic medicine faculty have differing views on the impact and benefits of collaboration. Early career faculty face concerning obstacles to collaboration. Female faculty seemed more appreciative of the process of collaboration, which may be of importance for transitioning to a more collaborative academic environment. A reevaluation of effective benchmarks for promotion of faculty is warranted to address the often exclusive reliance on individualistic achievement.

  5. Research on the Academic Benefits of the Advanced Placement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Warne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With more than 3 million participants per year, the Advanced Placement (AP program is one of the most popular programs in the United States for exposing high-achieving high school students to advanced academic content. Sponsored by the College Board, the AP program provides a framework in which high school teachers can teach introductory college-level courses to high school students. These students then take one of 34 standardized tests at the end of the year, and students who score well on their course’s AP test can receive college credit from their university in which they later enroll. Despite the popularity of the AP program, remarkably little independent research has been conducted on the academic benefits of AP. In this article, I summarize the state of knowledge about the academic benefits of AP. Previous research and descriptive data indicate that AP students outperform non-AP students on a variety of academic measures, but many other aspects of the program are poorly understood, partially due to variability across AP subjects. These aspects include the causal impact of AP, which components of the program are most effective in boosting academic achievement, and how students engage with the AP program. I also conclude by making suggestions for researchers to use new methodologies to investigate new scientific and policy questions and new student populations to improve the educational scholars’ and practitioners’ understanding of the AP program.

  6. Knowledge sharing behaviour among non-academic staff in higher learning institutes: The role of trust and perceived risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sabbir Rahman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyse knowledge sharing behaviour among non-academic staff of higher learning institutions. This research focuses on the mediation impact of perceived risk on trust and knowledge sharing behaviour. The research also proposes actions that can be taken by higher learning institutions to enhance trust among the staff in order to create a knowledge sharing environment at the workplace. This research applied confirmatory factor analysis and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM to evaluate the proposed measurement model and proved the research hypotheses. The findings from the research show that perceived risk plays a strong mediating role between trust and knowledge sharing behaviour among the non-academic staff of higher learning institutions. The SEM analysis also confirmed that the research model shows a good fit. This research highlights issues concerning knowledge sharing practices among non-academic staff and provides some recommendations to the managers to address these issues. The researchers agreed that more research needs to be done in this area as there are aspects that are yet to be explored. The findings of this research serve to add to the literature on knowledge sharing focussing on non-academic staff of higher learning institutions.

  7. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  8. Pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement of Academic and non-Academic staff in tertiary Institutions in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajibua M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure signifies individual’s choice to spend his/her discretionary time fulfilling certain interest or needs or performing a gratifying experience for the sake of wellness or personal development. The aim of this study was to look into the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institution in Ondo State. For the purpose of the study, 40 academic and 40 non-academic staff were selected from the five Government-owned tertiary institutions in the state using convenience sampling techniques. Thus, total respondents were 400. The instrument employed in the study was a structured and validated questionnaire, Pattern of Leisure Involvement Questionnaire (PLIQ to collect information on the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among staff. The reliability test of the instrument was carried out by obtaining Cronbach’s Alpha statistic which is a measure of how reliable and consistent the instrument was. The result showed that Cronbach’s Alpha was 0.896. Since the value was above 0.5 which was the average, it showed that the research instrument was reliable and consistent. The information gathered from the subjects through the questionnaire was analyzedusing descriptive (mean, standard deviation and standard error and inferential statistics (t-test. The findings showed that academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institutions in Ondo State participate in leisure-time physical activity differently. It thus suggested that variety of leisure-time physical activities must be provided for members of tertiary institutions so that some groups will not be taken care of, while others will be isolated.

  9. Structural Equation Models of Management and Decision-Making Styles with Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzat, Ismail Hussein; Idris, Datuk Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision-making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of 218 respondents. The instruments used in the study were the Teacher Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Decision…

  10. Trust and Work Place Spirituality on Knowledge Sharing Behaviour: Perspective from Non-Academic Staff of Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M; Daud, Nuraihan Mat; Chowdhury, Abdul Hannan; Hassan, Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical research aims to add value in the existing research on knowledge sharing, investigate the antecedents of knowledge-sharing behaviour by embedding trust and workplace spirituality variable on non-academic staff from higher learning institution in Malaysia. The role of trust, perceived risk and workplace spirituality towards…

  11. Academic Benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education: A Literary Review, Staff Development, and Guidebook for Elementary Administrators and Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jean Ann; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides a literature review, staff development information, and a guidebook for elementary administrators and educators that explains the academic benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) for prekindergarten through fifth grade students. TBE allows limited English speaking students to learn a second language while being…

  12. New Work Demands in Higher Education. A Study of the Relationship between Excessive Workload, Coping Strategies and Subsequent Health among Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Marika; Astvik, Wanja; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff's strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with…

  13. Perceptions of Academic Staff towards Accommodating Students with Disabilities in a Civil Engineering Undergraduate Program in a University in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayat, Nafisa; Amosun, Seyi Ladele

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of academic staff towards admission of students with disabilities, and their accommodation once accepted into an undergraduate Civil Engineering program in a South African university. Qualitative responses relating to the perceptions of five academic staff were obtained through semi-structured interviews. The…

  14. THE RESULTS OF ENGLISH TEACHING AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF IN THE ARTIFICIAL BILINGUALISM ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Rasskazova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the conditions of the modern globalization, one of the most significant indicators of competitiveness of the universities is the academic mobility of students, graduate students, teachers and research associates that implies their free and competent enough foreign language skills, first of all English. Yet, until recently, comparatively little attention has been paid to foreign language skills of the Russian academic teaching staff. However, in recent years, with regard to the process acceleration of internationalization of the higher education to provide own effective functioning and remain a demanded one in education and training market, domestic higher education institutions are forced to quickly fill in the gaps of foreign language knowledge among academic teaching staff. The aim of this article is to analyse and describe the tuition outcomes for academic teaching staff based on the official exam results from Cambridge English Language Assessment for three years (2015–2017. Methodology and research methods. The research, which is grounded in interdisciplinary approach and lies at the intersection of psychology, linguistics and pedagogics, was conducted on the basis of the statistical analysis and generalization of mean scores of English language testing results, taking into account qualitative and quantitative standards of speech skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking and use of English (for levels B2, C1. Results and scientific novelty. The essential strengthening and development of the Cambridge English system for level increase of proficiency in English among the Russian academic teaching staff is proved. The data of external peer evaluation provided by exam centre Cambridge English Language Assessment including the foreign language training results of academic teaching staff are analysed. The results obtained show that contrary to the wide-spread opinion that productive skills (speaking and writing take longer

  15. Male Student-Athlete Perceptions of University Academic Staff Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of Perceptions, Value and Academic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeck, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 male collegiate student-athletes in a revenue-generating sport in an effort to better inform current academic support practitioners how to best serve this population. The inquiry focused on student-athlete perceptions of two areas: (1) perceptions regarding the expectations academic personnel have…

  16. The impact of ED nurse manager leadership style on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction in academic health center hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, Glenn H

    2008-10-01

    Nurse managers with effective leadership skills are an essential component to the solution for ending the nursing shortage. Empirical studies of existing ED nurse manager leadership styles and their impact on key nurse management outcomes such as staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction have not been performed. The specific aims of this study were to determine what types of leadership styles were used by ED nurse managers in academic health center hospitals and examine their influence on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction. ED nurse managers were asked to complete the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and a 10-item researcher defined nurse manager role and practice demographics survey. Completed surveys (15 managers and 30 staff nurses) representing 15 out of 98 possible U.S. academic health centers were obtained. Fisher's exact test with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the data. The sample percentage of managers who exhibited Transformational leadership styles and demographic findings of nurse manager age, total years experience and length of time in current position matched current reports in the literature. A trend of lower staff nurse turnover with Transformational leadership style compared to non-Trasformational leadership styles was identified. However, the type of leadership style did not appear to have an effect on patient satisfaction. The ED is an ever-changing, highly regulated, critical-care environment. Effective ED nurse manager leadership strategies are vital to maintaining the standards of professional emergency nursing practice to create an environment that can produce management outcomes of decreased staff nurse turnover, thereby enhancing staff nurse retention and potentially impacting patient satisfaction.

  17. The Use of Electronic Resources by Academic Staff at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Adeyinka; Orim, Faith; Ibrahim, Dauda Morenikeji; Memudu, Suleiman Ajala

    2018-01-01

    The use of e-resources is now commonplace among academics in tertiary educational institutions the world over. Many academics including those in the universities are exploring the opportunities of e-resources to facilitate teaching and research. As the use of e-resources is increasing particularly among academics at the University of Ilorin,…

  18. Managing Online Presence in the E-Learning Environment: Technological Support for Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nurul; Beer, Martin; Slack, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades the use of E-learning technology increased to such an extent that the role of the traditional academic has been forced to change. Focusing on academics' views, this study examines their interactions in the E-learning environment and whether online learning applications have increased academic workload (Eynon, 2005;…

  19. Relationship Between Reward and Emotional Intelligence of Academic Staff at Malaysian Public Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ma’rof Bin Redzuan Haslinda Abdullah, Aida Mehrad Hanina Halimatussadiah

    2015-01-01

    One of the great positive behavioral factors among staff at university is emotional intelligence. In reality, emotional intelligence is cause of different reaction at workplace that was appeared by staff and also controlled most of moods in various situations. Moreover, knowing factors that impact on emotional intelligence is very vital and lead to different positive and negative behavior among staff. Reward is one of these external effective factors that influence on emotional intelligence. ...

  20. NRC staff preliminary analysis of public comments on advance notice of proposed rulemaking on emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peabody, C.A.; Hickey, J.W.N.

    1980-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking on emergency planning on July 17, 1979 (44 FR 41483). In October and November 1979, the NRC staff submitted several papers to the Commission related to the emergency planning rulemaking. One of these papers was a preliminary analysis of public comments received on the advance notice (SECY-79-591B, November 13, 1979). This document consists of the preliminary analysis as it was submitted to the Commission, with minor editorial changes

  1. Work wellness of academic staff in South African higher education institutions / Emmerentia Nicolene Barkhuizen

    OpenAIRE

    Barkhuizen, Emmerentia Nicolene

    2005-01-01

    Academia is a demanding profession, as evidenced by a body of research that documents the debilitating impact of occupational stress and burnout on the personal and professional welfare of academics. In particular, high levels of these pathological phenomena, left unchecked, undermine the quality, productivity and creativity of the academics' work in addition to their health, well-being and morale. Despite these indicators of "weaknesses" and "malfunctioning", academics know th...

  2. Advancing the recovery orientation of hospital care through staff engagement with former clients of inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame; Collins, April; Clark, Carrie; Costa, Lucy; Mihalakakos, George; Paterson, Jane

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of consumer narratives on the recovery orientation and job satisfaction of service providers on inpatient wards that focus on the treatment of schizophrenia. It was developed to address the paucity of literature and service development tools that address advancing the recovery model of care in inpatient contexts. A mixed-methods design was used. Six inpatient units in a large urban psychiatric facility were paired on the basis of characteristic length of stay, and one unit from each pair was assigned to the intervention. The intervention was a series of talks (N=58) to inpatient staff by 12 former patients; the talks were provided approximately biweekly between May 2011 and May 2012. Self-report measures completed by staff before and after the intervention assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the recovery model, the delivery of recovery-oriented care at a unit level, and job satisfaction. In addition, focus groups for unit staff and individual interviews with the speakers were conducted after the speaker series had ended. The hypothesis that the speaker series would have an impact on the attitudes and knowledge of staff with respect to the recovery model was supported. This finding was evident from both quantitative and qualitative data. No impact was observed for recovery orientation of care at the unit level or for job satisfaction. Although this engagement strategy demonstrated an impact, more substantial change in inpatient practices likely requires a broader set of strategies that address skill levels and accountability.

  3. Academic integrity and plagiarism: perceptions and experience of staff and students in a school of dentistry: a situational analysis of staff and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, P J; Hughes, C

    2012-02-01

    This project has investigated student and staff perceptions and experience of plagiarism in a large Australian dental school to develop a response to an external audit report. Workshops designed to enhance participants' understanding of plagiarism and to assist with practical ways to promote academic integrity within the school were provided to all students and staff. Anonymous surveys were used to investigate perceptions and experience of plagiarism and to assess the usefulness of the workshops. Most participants felt that plagiarism was not a problem in the school, but a significant number were undecided. The majority of participants reported that the guidelines for dealing with plagiarism were inadequate and most supported the mandatory use of text-matching software in all courses. High proportions of participants indicated that the workshops were useful and that they would consider improving their practice as a result. The study provided data that enhanced understanding of aspects of plagiarism highlighted in the report at the school level and identified areas in need of attention, such as refining and raising awareness of the guidelines and incorporation of text-matching software into courses, as well as cautions to be considered (how text-matching software is used) in planning responsive action. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  5. Lessons from Star Trek: Engaging Academic Staff in the Internationalisation of the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsed, Craig; Green, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    One consequence of globalisation is the demand on academics to better prepare students for work and life in an interconnected world through curriculum internationalisation. Many academics are hesitant, resistant, or ill-prepared to engage with curriculum internationalisation. This paper explores how this can be addressed by reconfiguring the way…

  6. Modern Challenges and Perspectives in Development of Academic Staff in Higher Schools and Peculiarities of Military Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neno Hristov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Current paper presents a book review made by Colonel Assoc. Prof. Neno Hristov, D.Sc. on the monograph “Modern challenges and perspectives in development of academic staff in higher schools and peculiarities of military education system” – an edition of Innovations and Sustainability Academy – Bulgaria authored by Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Natural History Prof. Dr. Eng. Venelin Terziev and Colonel Assoc. Prof. Dr. Eng. Georgi Georgiev from Vasil Levski National Military University – Veliko Tarnovo.

  7. User experience of academic staff in the use of a learning management system tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Kock, E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In Open Distance Learning (ODL) institutions the teaching model is moving towards fully integrated information and communication technology applications. To successfully teach or facilitate the use of technology, academics need to have a strong...

  8. Relationships among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N.; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they…

  9. Academic Practice, APA Referencing Style:guidelines for staff and students

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system.Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og...

  10. The "Decolonial Turn": What Does It Mean for Academic Staff Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne Vorster

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly evident that the discourse of transformation that has shaped the democratising of higher education institutions over the first two decades of the democratic dispensation in South Africa has now run its course. Over the past few years, and particularly during the tumultuous student protests of 2015 and 2016, students and some academics have been calling for the decolonisation of university structures and cultures, including curricula. Using concepts from Margaret Archer’s social realism we consider the failure of the discourse of transformation  to lead to real change and examine a constellation of new discourses related to the decolonisation of universities that have emerged in South Africa recently. Furthermore, we critique the discourses that have underpinned our own practices as academic developers over the past two decades and then explore the implications of what could be termed a “decolonial turn” for academic developers and by implication for the academics with whom they work.

  11. Plagiarism, Cultural Diversity and Metaphor--Implications for Academic Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex, culturally loaded concept which causes much anxiety for both academics and students. Exactly what constitutes plagiarism is dependent on a number of contextual factors. Despite the difficulties associated with defining and detecting plagiarism, it is said to be on the increase, and students from "other cultures"…

  12. Paying the Piper: The Costs and Consequences of Academic Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ashley; Fletcher, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In many professions there are qualifications to gain and professional standards to achieve. Lawyers pass the bar and doctors pass their boards. In academic life the equivalent is a doctorate, closely followed by a profile of peer-reviewed publication. To hold a doctoral degree is the common requirement to become "academic" but does it…

  13. Hierarchy as a barrier to advancement for women in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Peter; Carr, Phyllis; Knight, Sharon; Renfrew, Megan R; Dunn, Mary B; Pololi, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Research on barriers to professional advancement for women in academic medicine has not adequately considered the role of environmental factors and how the structure of organizations affects professional advancement and work experiences. This article examines the impact of the hierarchy, including both the organization's hierarchical structure and professionals' perceptions of this structure, in medical school organization on faculty members' experience and advancement in academic medicine. As part of an inductive qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, we interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, using in-depth semistructured interviews, about their perceptions about and experiences in academic medicine. Data were coded and analysis was conducted in the grounded theory tradition. Our respondents saw the hierarchy of chairs, based on the indeterminate tenure of department chairs, as a central characteristic of the structure of academic medicine. Many faculty saw this hierarchy as affecting inclusion, reducing transparency in decision making, and impeding advancement. Indeterminate chair terms lessen turnover and may create a bottleneck for advancement. Both men and women faculty perceived this hierarchy, but women saw it as more consequential. The hierarchical structure of academic medicine has a significant impact on faculty work experiences, including advancement, especially for women. We suggest that medical schools consider alternative models of leadership and managerial styles, including fixed terms for chairs with a greater emphasis on inclusion. This is a structural reform that could increase opportunities for advancement especially for women in academic medicine.

  14. Recruiting and Retaining LGBTQ-Identified Staff in Academic Libraries Through Ordinary Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Kuecker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brief While the American academic library field works hard to include all patrons and materials that represent less dominant populations, it should be more mindful of inclusivity in its own workforce. Particularly, the field does nothing to explicitly recruit or retain LGBTQ-identified librarians. The author proposes practical remedies to these problems that directly respond to workplace studies on interpersonal difficulties LGBTQ-identified librarians and others have cited as barriers to happiness in the workplace, and argues toward more inclusive LIS education and financial support.

  15. Challenges of scientific knowledge visualization in publication productivity of the university academic staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabanova Natalia N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that a person, an author particularly, faces the challenges of visualization in the cognitive process. The aim of this study is to consider the forms of thinking process and the changes happened in education process and in scientific activity. It was noted that the challenges connected with information perceiving during the work with the text occur in the process of creating academic papers as well. We conclude that the topical field of visualization covers not only the educative process assuming information transfer from person to person (model “teacher-student”, but the process of scientific activity. Applying the methods of visualization in publication activity is the factor for effective communication in social and cultural space that provides the opportunity for academic society to recognize results. We offer possible ways to promote scientific papers via online resources such as scientific social networks and tools of media corporations. The scientific social network ResearchGate and Thomson Reuters media corporation product as an online tool “Researcher ID” placed at the bibliographic database Web of Science TM Core Collection are used as the examples. We state that information technology allows authors to promote the results of their studies around the world.

  16. 'Luck, chance, and happenstance? Perceptions of success and failure amongst fixed-term academic staff in UK higher education'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Vik

    2017-09-07

    What does it mean to attribute success to 'luck', but failure to personal deficiency? In 2015/16, more than 34 per cent of academic employees in UK higher education institutions were employed on temporary contracts, and the sector itself has undergone a substantial transformation in recent years in terms of expansion, measurement, and marketization. Based on two waves of interviews conducted with fixed-term academic employees at different career stages, the article explores the narrativization of success and failure amongst staff working at the 'sharp end' of the so-called neoliberal academy. Arguing that precarious employment situations precipitate the feeling of being 'out of control', the majority of the participants' narratives were characterized by a distinct lack of agency. The paper explores the recourse to notions of chance and the consolidation of 'luck' as an explanatory factor in accounting for why good things happen; however, in tandem with this inclination is the tendency to individualize failure when expectations have been thwarted. While accounts of fixed-term work are suffused with notions of chance and fortune, 'luck' remains an under-researched concept within sociology. The article thus concludes by considering what the analysis of 'luck' might offer for a fuller, politicized understanding of processes at work in the contemporary academy. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  17. Restorative Justice as the Rx for Mistreatment in Academic Medicine: Applications to Consider for Learners, Faculty, and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, David; Karp, David R

    2018-03-01

    The mistreatment of learners is an ongoing issue at U.S. medical schools. According to responses to the 2017 Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire, 39.3% of medical students nationally reported being mistreated. Many articles have been published on the topic of mistreatment at medical schools over the last 20 years. These articles have focused primarily on the definition of mistreatment, the impact of mistreatment, and initiatives put into place to help mitigate the problem. To date, very little attention has been paid to repairing the harm caused by mistreatment and rebuilding community trust. Academic medicine is in need of new forums of interaction to achieve more positive learning and workplace environments.The authors discuss restorative justice practices and the potential applications that they may have in academic medicine learning and workplace environments to serve vulnerable students, faculty, and staff who are targets of mistreatment. Restorative justice practices are used to convene groups of people to engage in substantive dialogue about consequential issues that impede community functioning. This process can help a group identify and gain mutual understanding of the personal and collective harm that has occurred, create the conditions that incentivize offenders to admit responsibility rather than deny or minimize the harm, and explore and define a set of problem-solving steps to address the harm and rebuild community trust.

  18. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  19. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  20. Peers for Promotion: Achieving Academic Advancement through Facilitated Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockene, Judith K.; Milner, Robert J.; Thorndyke, Luanne E.; Congdon, John; Cain, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    The promotion process is challenging, particularly for non-tenure track faculty in academic medicine. To address this challenge, we implemented a facilitated peer mentoring program that included a structured curriculum with regular meetings, guided by two senior faculty mentors. Participants expressed satisfaction with the program, showed…

  1. Mediation Effect of Self-Efficacy on the Relationship between Mentoring Function and Career Advancement among Academics in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Bita; Parsa, Parisa; Parsa, Nakisa

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of social organizational factors in career advancement and promotion among academic employees, still some academic employees suffer from low career advancement and consequently low academic performance. Aim of this study was to examine the mediation effect of self-efficacy on relationship between mentoring and career advancement among academic employees in the two public universities in Iran. This survey research was done among 307 randomly selected academic employees to determine predictors of their career advancement. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. The Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) methodology was applied to determine the best fitted model to predict career advancement. Analysis of data was performed using the Pearson's correlation analysis and SEM. The results show that self-efficacy was related to mentoring and career advancement (pcareer advancement was significant (pcareer advancement (pcareer advancement.

  2. Women in global science advancing academic careers through international collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Zippel, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Scientific and engineering research is increasingly global, and international collaboration can be essential to academic success. Yet even as administrators and policymakers extol the benefits of global science, few recognize the diversity of international research collaborations and their participants, or take gendered inequalities into account. Women in Global Science is the first book to consider systematically the challenges and opportunities that the globalization of scientific work brings to U.S. academics, especially for women faculty. Kathrin Zippel looks to the STEM fields as a case study, where gendered cultures and structures in academia have contributed to an underrepresentation of women. While some have approached underrepresentation as a national concern with a national solution, Zippel highlights how gender relations are reconfigured in global academia. For U.S. women in particular, international collaboration offers opportunities to step outside of exclusionary networks at home. International ...

  3. The quest for academic excellence: aspects relating to the assessment of the performance of University teaching staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Mauer

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to assess the views of academics about issues relating to performance appraisal/ and to test the views expressed by several authors, a questionnaire consisting of 23 items was developed and distributed to a random sample of senior lecturers, associate professors and professors from all South African universities. The research participants were requested to evaluate the importance of each of the items, as well as the extent to which these activities in fact existed in their departments. The resulting data were subjected to a principal factor analysis and an oblique rotation procedure, and five readily interpretable dimensions were identified for both sets of ratings. In the main, these dealt with Feedback and advice, Regular and formal appraisals, staff development, the Role of external examiners, and Consumer evaluation. While no differences were found between faculties, different degrees of experience, different qualification levels, and ranks, it was apparent that there were sizable differences between the importance that academics ascribe to the different aspects of appraisal and development and current practices in their departments. The findings have important implications for the management of academics. Opsomming In 'n poging om akademici se beskouings van aspekte rakende hulle eie prestasies, en outeurs se menings oor die onderwerp te ondersoek, is 'n vraelys met 23 items saamgestel. Die vraelys is onder 'n ewekansige steekproef van senior lektore/ mede-professore en professore versprei. Die navorsingsdeelnemers is versoek om die items te beoordeel aan die hand van die belangrikheid van die aktiwiteite wat deur die items verteenwoordig word, en die mate waarin die onderhawige aktiwiteite in hulle tuisdepartemente toegepas word. Die twee datastelle is aan 'n hooffaktorontleding en skuinsrotasie onderwerp en vyf komponente is gei'dentifiseer/ naamlik Terugvoer en advies, Gereelde en formele evaluerings, Personeelontwikkeling

  4. Use of multivariate analysis to research career advancement of academic librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto Felipe Martínez Arellano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse variables dealing with credential factors, bureaucratiuc factors, organizational and disciplinary achievements, academic culture factors, social ascribed factors, and institutional factors were stated as explanatory elements of promotion, tenure status, and earnings. A survey was the research instrument for collecting data to test diverse variables dealing with academic librarians rewards and earnings. Since the study attempted to analyze variables in a multivariate context, variable interactions were tested using multiple regression analysis. Findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of those factors influencing career advancement of academic librarians. Likewise, research methodology of this study could be used in Library and Information Science(LIS research.

  5. Developing an Education Intervention for Staff Supporting Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; McCarron, Mary; Connaire, Kevin; McCallion, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Generally, staff working in settings that provide care for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not received specific education with respect to extended care for terminal illnesses or late-stage dementia. Equally, staff working in specialist palliative care often are not familiar with the unique issues of supporting persons with…

  6. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement outcomes at early career stages. Female academic scientists have disadvantages in the career progress in the academic STEM. They tend to fall behind throughout their career paths and to leave the field compared to their male colleagues. Researchers have found that gender differences in the career advancement are shaped by gender-biased evaluations derived from gender stereotypes. Other studies demonstrate the positive impacts of mentoring and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads. To add greater insights to the current findings of female academic scientists' career disadvantages, this dissertation investigates comprehensive effects of gender, mentoring, and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on female scientists' career advancement outcomes in academic science. Based on the Status Characteristics Theory, the concept of mentoring, Social Capital Theory, and Ingroup Bias Theory, causal path models are developed to test direct and indirect effects of gender, mentoring resources, and gender homophily on STEM faculty's career advancement. The research models were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) with data collected from a national survey, funded by the National Science Foundation, completed in 2011 by tenured and tenure-track academic STEM faculty from higher education institutions in the United States. Findings suggest that there is no gender difference in career advancement controlling for mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads and other factors including research productivity and domestic caregiving responsibilities. Findings also show that the positive relationship between

  7. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    competitive for qualified employees), higher learning institutions are transforming their structures and ... Assistant Professor, College of Business and Economics Jimma University, Jimma,. Ethiopia ... Such a profile may have a significant.

  8. The Views Of Academic Staffs on The Principle of “Leadership of Top Management” of Total Quality In Higer Education

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Alkış

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the application of quality concept is increasing in education sector like other competitive sectors. Because of universities are the central of science and development. The importance of the application of the quality concept is increasing much more than other sectors. The aim of this study is to search opinions of academic staffs about application of leadership of top management which is one of the four basic rules of the total quality management. In this scope, this study ...

  9. Academic career in medicine: requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-04-29

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. The conditions for an academic career in

  10. Academic career in medicine – requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Martina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Methods Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Results Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1 focus on basic sciences, (2 strong focus on research (PhD programs followed by clinical training, (3 one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4 clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role

  11. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, Maximus Gorky

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual) dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was…

  12. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement…

  13. Integration of Vocational and Academic Curricula through the NSF Advanced Technological Education Program (ATE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Thomas R.; Matsuzuka, Yukari

    A study examined the impact of the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program on efforts in academic and vocational integration. A case study of 10 community colleges housing ATE-funded projects collected data through interviews with administrators, faculty, ATE program practitioners, and faculty and administrators at collaborating high…

  14. Rank Advancement in Academic Careers: Sex Differences and the Effects of Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents evidence on sex differences in rank advancement in academic careers, and considers the relative importance of quality and quantity of publications. Results for 556 male and 450 female biochemists show the importance of time in rank and number of publications and that rates of promotion are lower for women. (SLD)

  15. Research Strategies for Academic Medical Centers: A Framework for Advancements toward Translational Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Rand; Champagne, Thomas J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    This review article presents a simplified framework for thinking about research strategy priorities for academic medical centers (AMCs). The framework can serve as a precursor to future advancements in translational medicine and as a set of planning guideposts toward ultimate translational excellence. While market pressures, reform uncertainties,…

  16. A Critical Perspective on Relations between Staff Nurses and their Nurse Manager: Advancing Nurse Empowerment Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udod, Sonia; Racine, Louise

    2014-12-01

    This study considers empowerment in nurse-manager relations by examining how conflict is handled on both sides and how the critical social perspective has influenced these relations. The authors use inductive analysis of empirical data to explain how (1) nursing work is organized, structured, and circumscribed by centrally determined policies and practices that downplay nurses' professional judgement about patient care; (2) power is held over nurses in their relationship with their manager; and (3) nurses' response to power is to engage in strategies of resistance. The authors illustrate how power influences relations between staff nurses and managers and provide a critical analysis of the strategies of resistance that result in personal, relational, and critical empowerment among staff nurses. Through resistance, staff nurses engage in alternative discourses to counteract the prevailing neoliberal organizational and managerial discourses of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  17. Gender Disparities in Faculty Rank: Factors that Affect Advancement of Women Scientists at Academic Medical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. López

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While a significant portion of women within academic science are employed within medical schools, women faculty in these academic medical centers are disproportionately represented in lower faculty ranks. The medical school setting is a critical case for both understanding and advancing women in basic sciences. This study highlights the findings from focus groups conducted with women faculty across Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor ranks (n = 35 in which they discussed barriers and facilitators for advancement of women basic scientists at an academic medical center. Qualitative analysis demonstrated several emergent themes that affect women’s advancement, including gendered expectation norms (e.g., good citizenship, volunteerism, work-life balance, mentorship/sponsorship, adoption of a team science approach, tenure process milestones, soft money research infrastructure, institution specific policies (or lack thereof, and operating within an MD-biased culture. These findings are compared with the extant literature of women scientists in STEM institutions. Factors that emerged from these focus groups highlight the need for evidence-based interventions in the often overlooked STEM arena of academic medical centers.

  18. Hurdles in clinical implementation of academic advanced therapy medicinal products: A national evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Sofieke; Veltrop-Duits, Louise; Hoozemans-Strik, Merel; Ras, Thirza; Blom-Veenman, Janine; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Zandvliet, Maarten; Meij, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    Since the implementation of the European Union (EU) regulation for advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in 2009, only six ATMPs achieved marketing authorization approval in the EU. Recognizing the major developments in the ATMP field, starting mostly in academic institutions, we investigated which hurdles were experienced in the whole pathway of ATMP development towards clinical care. Quality interviews were executed with different stakeholders in The Netherlands involved in the ATMP development field, e.g. academic research groups, national authorities and patient organizations. Based on the hurdles mentioned in the interviews, questionnaires were subsequently sent to the academic principal investigators (PIs) and ATMP good manufacturing practice (GMP) facility managers to quantify these hurdles. Besides the familiar regulatory routes of marketing authorization (MA) and hospital exemption (HE), a part of the academic PIs perceived that ATMPs should become available by the Tissues and Cells Directive or did not anticipate on the next development steps towards implementation of their ATMP towards regular clinical care. The main hurdles identified were: inadequate financial support, rapidly evolving field, study-related problems, lacking regulatory knowledge, lack of collaborations and responsibility issues. Creating an academic environment stimulating and planning ATMP development and licensing as well as investing in expanding the relevant regulatory knowledge in academic institutions seems a prerequisite to develop ATMPs from bench to patient. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  20. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  1. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximus Gorky Sembiring

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was collected proportionally and purposively followed by congregating them through unified interviews. Population was 1,814 Universitas Terbuka students domiciled overseas; 350 questionnaires were dispersed, 169 completed. Satisfaction was assessed by examining Servqual dimensions. Importance-performance analysis (IPA and customer-satisfaction index (CSI were applied to measure satisfaction and the level of its importance. Structural equation model (SEM was then employed to examine influencing variables. Nine hypotheses developed were all validated by the analysis. Responsiveness, assurance, tangible, reliability, and empathy were in harmony to satisfaction. Career advancement, retention, academic performance, and persistence were influenced by satisfaction. Qualitative inquiry implemented afterwards was basically coherent with the quantitative findings.

  2. Advancing women and closing the leadership gap: the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, R C; Morahan, P S; Cohen, D W; McDade, S A

    2001-04-01

    Women are persistently underrepresented in the higher levels of academic administration despite the fact that they have been entering the medical profession in increasing numbers for at least 20 years and now make up a large proportion of the medical student body and fill a similar proportion of entry level positions in medical schools. Although there are no easy remedies for gender inequities in medical schools, strategies have been proposed and implemented both within academic institutions and more broadly to achieve and sustain the advancement of women faculty to senior level positions. Substantial, sustained efforts to increase programs and activities addressing the major obstacles to advancement of women must be put in place so that the contributions of women can be fully realized and their skills fittingly applied in meeting the medical education and healthcare needs of all people in the 21st century.

  3. Barriers to advancement in academic surgery: views of senior residents and early career faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B; Crandall, Marie; Brasel, Karen; Hauschild, Tricia; Neumayer, Leigh

    2013-11-01

    A significant faculty attrition rate exists in academic surgery. The authors hypothesized that senior residents and early-career faculty members have different perceptions of advancement barriers in academic surgery. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered electronically to surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers. Residents identified a lack of mentorship as a career barrier about half as often as faculty members. Residents were twice as likely as faculty members to view childbearing as a career barrier. Many early-career faculty members cite a lack of mentors as a limitation to their career development in academic surgery. Childbearing remains a complex perceived influence for female faculty members in particular. Female faculty members commonly perceive differential treatment and barriers on the basis of their sex. Faculty development programs should address both systemic and sex-specific obstacles if academic surgery is to remain a vibrant field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Share and share alike: encouraging the reuse of academic resources through the Scottish electronic Staff Development Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna M. Campbell

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Scottish electronic Staff Development Library (http://www.sesdl.scotcit.acuk is an ongoing collaborative project involving the Universities of Edinburgh, Paisley and Strathclyde which has been funded by SHEFC as part of their current ScotCIT Programme (http:llwww.scotcit.ac.uk. This project is being developed in response to the increasing demand for flexible, high-quality staff development materials.

  5. Advance Care Planning in palliative care: a qualitative investigation into the perspective of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah; Dale, Jeremy

    2015-04-01

    The majority of children and young people who die in the United Kingdom have pre-existing life-limiting illness. Currently, most such deaths occur in hospital, most frequently within the intensive care environment. To explore the experiences of senior medical and nursing staff regarding the challenges associated with Advance Care Planning in relation to children and young people with life-limiting illnesses in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit environment and opportunities for improvement. Qualitative one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and senior nurses, to gain rich, contextual data. Thematic content analysis was carried out. UK tertiary referral centre Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Eight Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and six senior nurses participated. Four main themes emerged: recognition of an illness as 'life-limiting'; Advance Care Planning as a multi-disciplinary, structured process; the value of Advance Care Planning and adverse consequences of inadequate Advance Care Planning. Potential benefits of Advance Care Planning include providing the opportunity to make decisions regarding end-of-life care in a timely fashion and in partnership with patients, where possible, and their families. Barriers to the process include the recognition of the life-limiting nature of an illness and gaining consensus of medical opinion. Organisational improvements towards earlier recognition of life-limiting illness and subsequent Advance Care Planning were recommended, including education and training, as well as the need for wider societal debate. Advance Care Planning for children and young people with life-limiting conditions has the potential to improve care for patients and their families, providing the opportunity to make decisions based on clear information at an appropriate time, and avoid potentially harmful intensive clinical interventions at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. The ADVANCE Program: Targeting the Increase in the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperanca, S.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of NSF's ADVANCE Program is to help increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers. The Program tries to address this under representation by focusing on support for men and women with three approaches: institutional (Institutional Transformation), grass-root (Leadership), and individual (Fellows) support. The ADVANCE Program alternates with a round of Institutional and Leadership awards in one year and a Fellows competition the next. Since its inception in 2001, NSF has had two competitive rounds for each of the three award types and will have spent approximately 75 M\\ by the end of the next fiscal year (2004). The first and second ADVANCE Institutional Transformation competitions (FY 2001 and 2003) received over 70 proposals each. These awards are for multi-year support in the amount of 3-4M\\ each. Details and access to the websites for the ADVANCE programs of each institution can be found in NSF's ADVANCE webpage at http://nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/advance/itwebsites.htm. The number of proposals submitted for the Leadership awards competition dropped from 35 in 2001 to 26 in 2003, despite an increase in the allowed award size for the second round. In terms of projected goals, this part of ADVANCE is perhaps the most eclectic. Some Leadership awards were made to professional societies to work specifically with their respective scientific communities in identifying needs that might be peculiar to a field of science. In the first round of the Leadership awards, PI Mary-Anne Holmes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators received a grant to work with the Association of Women Geoscientists to determine the current status of women geoscientists in the US. These grantees hope to disseminate the information gathered under this award broadly in order to educate women students and faculty on strategies to

  7. The Medical Academic Advancement Program at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W L; Woode, M K; Carey, R M; Apprey, M; Schuyler, J M; Atkins-Brady, T L

    1999-04-01

    Since 1984 the University of Virginia School of Medicine has conducted the Medical Academic Advancement Program for minority and disadvantaged students interested in careers in medicine. The program is a six-week residential program for approximately 130 undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students per year. It emphasizes academic course work--biology, chemistry, physics, and essay writing--to prepare the participants for the Medical College Admission Test. Non-graded activities, such as a clinical medicine lecture series, clinical experiences, and a special lecture series, and special workshops are also offered. The participants take two simulated MCAT exams. Between 1984 and 1998, 1,497 students have participated in the program, with complete follow-up information available for 690 (46%). Of the 1,487 participants, 80 (5%) have graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 174 (12%) from other medical schools; 44 (3%) are attending the medical school now, and 237 (16%) are at other medical schools; 44 (3%) have graduated from other health professions schools, and 54 (3%) are attending such schools. The retention rate for participants at the University of Virginia School of Medicine is 91% (that is, all but seven of the 80 who matriculated have been retained past the first year). The Medical Academic Advancement Program has been successful in increasing the number of underrepresented minority students matriculating into and continuing in medical education. Such programs warrant continued support and encouragement.

  8. Interest in and willingness to use complementary, alternative and traditional medicine among academic and administrative university staff in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staden, Anna Maria; Joubert, Georgina B A

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare systems worldwide are changing and the use of complementary, alternative and traditional medicine (CAM) form part of this transformation. South Africa has a large number of CAM practitioners, but they are not included in the official healthcare system. The aim of this study was to determine the perception and usage of CAM among the academic and administrative staff of the University of the Free State (UFS) in Bloemfontein, South Africa. A questionnaire was compiled and sent electronically to all the academic and administrative staff of the UFS who had a university email address, to be completed online. The response rate was 5.5%, with most of the respondents from the Faculty of Health Sciences. The respondents (n=165) were mainly women of 41-60 years of age with more than one tertiary qualification. Most of the respondents were in good health and considered CAM as moderately helpful and mostly safe. Most of the CAM recommendations were not from a medical physician. The respondents wanted alternatives to certain medications, such as antibiotics. They also had good previous experience with CAM and felt that conventional treatment was not always effective to treat their problems. They identified a need for CAM in the health system. The study has limitations due to the data collection method and the low response rate. The results showed that the respondents favored a more integrated healthcare system including different CAM therapies, and that conventional doctors should be better informed about these therapies and its uses.

  9. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  10. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there…

  11. Partnering through Staff Rotation in a Multi-Branch Academic Library: One Example at the UCSD Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Kymberly Anne

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a partnership between two of the libraries at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) through which two staff in one library worked part-time at the other during the summer of 2006 in order to maximize staffing efficiency among the units, as well as to realize professional development-related goals for the staff…

  12. Effective Quality Management Requires a Systematic Approach and a Flexible Organisational Culture: A Qualitative Study among Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jan; Dolmans, Diana; Willems, Jos; van Hout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research examines the similarities and differences between three teaching departments within Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) in the Netherlands that provide effective and three that provide less effective quality management. What are staff members' conceptions and perceptions of quality, quality management and…

  13. Sexual harassment of academic staff at higher education institutions in South Africa / Pierre André Joubert.

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Pierre André

    2009-01-01

    The efforts to create an equal non-discriminatory South African society should also manifest in the workplace and, more specifically, in the academic arena. Academics are regarded as the leaders of society and the shapers of the future of a country. Their conduct should be of the highest ethical and moral standards, and no form of discrimination should be allowed by or against them. In terms of the Employment Equity Act, sexual harassment is a form of unfair discrimination and carries a subst...

  14. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond

  15. Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction as a Predictor of Work Engagement among Academic Staff in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were…

  16. Geographic mobility advances careers: study of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marsha R; Morahan, Page S; Dannels, Sharon A; McDade, Sharon A

    2013-11-01

    To explore whether geographic mobility is associated with career advancement of women in U.S. medical schools who are entering mid- to executive-level positions. Using an existing dataset of 351 participants in academic medicine who attended the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women (1996-2005) (adjusted to 345 participants in some analyses because data on initial faculty rank were missing), the authors conducted a quantitative study in 2009 to determine whether geographic mobility was associated with administrative promotion for those who relocated geographically (from employer while attending ELAM to employer at last job of record). Twenty-four percent of women (83/345) relocated geographically (movers) after attending ELAM. Moving had a positive association with career advancement (P = .001); odds for promotion were 168% higher for movers than for stayers [odds ratio Exp(β) = 2.684]. Movers attained higher administrative positions (P = .003), and more movers (60%) were promoted at the most recent job compared with stayers (40%) (P = .0001). Few movers changed city size; 70% already resided in large or urban cities where most medical schools are located. Age was not a barrier to mobility. Career advancement was not related to research reputation (National Institutes of Health grant award ranking) of participants' schools (either at time of attending ELAM or post-ELAM). Similar to findings outside academic medicine, 24% of women classified as geographic "movers" among midcareer faculty in medical schools attained career advantages. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors underlying women's relocation decisions require additional study.

  17. TOURISM IN HEALTH PROMOTION – A STRATEGY IN STRESS MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT OF UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC STAFF

    OpenAIRE

    Lawal Yazid Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growth of leisure travel and stress coping research based analysis of leisure and tourism, stress coping have been performed rarely. The purpose of the present study is to examine how University staffs cope with stress through participation in leisure and tourism activities, and how work related stress affect their organizational commitment using data collected from a focus group interview approach and a self-developed questionnaire consisting of 25 items design to elicit informat...

  18. Innovative Practice in Advancement of Academic Nurse Educator Careers: Developing Scholarship From Program Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Linda L; Hoeksel, Renee; Fitzgerald, Cindy; Doutrich, Dawn

    We describe an innovative practice in advancing careers of academic nurse educators: demonstrating scholarly productivity from program grants. Scholarly productivity is often narrowly defined, especially in research-intensive institutions. The expectation may be a career trajectory based on the traditional scholarship of discovery. However, nurse educators, especially at the associate and full professor ranks, are often involved in leadership activities that include writing and managing program grants. We encourage the academy to value and support the development of program grants that include significant scholarly components, and we offer exemplars of associate and full professor scholarship derived from these projects.

  19. Advance organizers in a gross anatomy dissection course and their effects on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun-Kyung; Nam, Kwang-Il; Oh, Sun-A; Han, Eui-Ryoung; Woo, Young-Jong; Hitchcock, Maurice A

    2013-04-01

    We presented two kinds of advance organizers (AOs), video clips and prosection, for a gross anatomy dissection course and compared their effects on academic achievement and student perception of the learning experience. In total, 141 students at Chonnam National University Medical School were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (n = 70) was provided with video clips AO, whereas Group 2 (n = 71) was provided with prosection AO, the use of cadaveric specimens dissected by the course instructor. Student self-assessment scores regarding the learning objectives of upper limb anatomy improved significantly in both groups. Academic achievement scores in Group 2 were significantly higher than those in Group 1, although the self-assessment scores were not significantly different between the groups. Additionally, students in Group 2 responded significantly more positively to the statements about perception of the learning experience such as helping them understand the course content and concepts, decreasing anxiety about the dissection course, and participating actively in the dissection. It would seem that the application of prosection as an AO improved academic achievement and increased student engagement and satisfaction. This study will contribute to designing effective AOs and developing a teaching and learning strategy for a gross anatomy dissection course. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being.

  1. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the fieldPart 1: Understanding feedback, evaluation, and advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Allison B; Thompson, Angela M; Jeffres, Meghan N; Glode, Ashley E; Mahyari, Nila; Thompson, Megan

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. This is a three-part commentary series that explores select challenges: 1) feedback, evaluation and advancement; 2) understanding and balancing of distribution of effort; 3) learning how and when to say yes. Faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to this commentary series as a reference. Schools of pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation in order to ensure smooth integration into the academic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced engineering design program at the University of Illinois for the 1987-1988 academic year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivier, Kenneth R.; Lembeck, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The participation of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the NASA/USRA Universities Advanced Engineering Design Program (Space) is reviewed for the 1987 to 88 academic year. The University's design project was the Manned Marsplane and Delivery System. In the spring of 1988 semester, 107 students were enrolled in the Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering Departments' undergraduate Aerospace Vehicle Design course. These students were divided into an aircraft section (responsible for the Marsplane design), and a spacecraft section (responsible for the Delivery System Design). The design results are presented in Final Design Reports, copies of which are attached. In addition, five students presented a summary of the design results at the Program's Summer Conference.

  3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELEMENTS OF JOB ENRICHMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE AMONG THE NON ACADEMIC STAFF IN NIGERIAN PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odunayo SALAU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Job enrichment has become an essential aspect in motivating employees for better and greater performance through a mutual sense for skill variety, task identity, task significance and autonomy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the elements of job enrichment and organization performance among the non-teaching staff in Nigerian public universities. Descriptive research method was adopted for this study using one hundred and ninety seven (197 valid questionnaires which were completed by selected public universities in Ogun State, South-West Nigeria. A stratified and simple random sampling techniques were adopted for the study. The data collected were statistically analyzed in a significant manner. The result of the findings revealed that there are positive correlation between job depth, on the job training and core job dimension elements of the job enrichment and workers/organizational performance while there was no correlation between motivators’ elements and performance. Hence, increased recognition of task significance will stimulate the employees to further raise their commitment towards the attainment and realization of the goal and objectives of the institutions/organizations.

  4. Academe's Glass Ceiling: Societal, Professional-Organizational, and Institutional Barriers to the Career Advancement of Academic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Olga; Cummings, William

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 10 national systems of higher education found that less than 10 percent of professors were women, and the proportion of female professors was negatively related to institutional prestige. This academic "glass ceiling" was related to women's shorter careers, tenure issues during hard times, and women's lower level of academic…

  5. Bridging the Gap 10 Years Later: A Tool and Technique to Analyze and Evaluate Advanced Academic Curricular Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jennifer G.; Briggs, Christine; Pennington, Leighann

    2017-01-01

    The need for a shared vision concerning exemplary curricula for academically advanced learners must be a priority in the field of education. With the advent of the Common Core State Standards adoption in many states, a new conversation has been ignited over meeting the needs of students with gifts and talents for whom the "standard"…

  6. Advancing the IS Curricula: The Identification of Important Communication Skills Needed by IS Staff during Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth A.; Luse, Donna W.

    2004-01-01

    Although research indicates communication is important among information systems (IS) staff, users, and managers to ensure successful development projects, the ineffective communication skills of IS staff are often cited as a possible cause of failed IS projects. To develop effective systems, communication between IS users and systems developers…

  7. The role of advanced practice providers in pediatric otolaryngology academic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Brian K; Brandon, Gretchen; Shah, Rahul; Preciado, Diego; Zalzal, George

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the roles of Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) in pediatric academic otolaryngology programs to provide a better understanding of their scope of practice, levels of autonomy, clinical duties, teaching opportunities and research participation. An anonymous web-based electronic survey tool was sent to all pediatric otolaryngology fellowship program directors in the United States. Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants are utilized in approximately 3 out of every 4 pediatric otolaryngology practices. The top three job activities of both the PA and NP were: (1) seeing patients independently, (2) working alongside doctors in clinic, and (3) answering phone lines/parental calls. A higher percentage of PAs (83%), worked alongside doctors in clinic, as compared to NPs, where only 55% work alongside MDs. Over half of PAs round with the in-patient team and see consults as compared to just over one third of NPs who participate in such activities. Twenty-five percent of practices reported that PAs cover call and assist in the OR. Most PAs/NPs saw between 11 and 15 patients per clinic which provides a clear productivity advantage when looking to screen patients, provide medical care, generate surgical cases, and maximize billings. NPs and PAs have complimentary skill sets ideal for the pediatric otolaryngology workplace, although job activities and "best fit" are hospital and practice dependent. Our study suggests that the use of PAs and NPs will continue to grow to meet increased demand for services in the field of pediatric otolaryngology. Employing advanced practice providers enables academic centers to improve access, provide additional financial remuneration, reduce wait times for new patients, and allow attending physicians to meet increased practice demands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Current Situation of Knowledge Economy at Yemeni Universities from Academic Staff Perspectives: A field Study at Sana'a University and University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood A. H. M. Al-Azizi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to assess the current situation of the knowledge economy in the Yemeni universities (Public and private from the point of view of their faculty members. A further investigation into the possible significant differences between faculty members’ views regarding the knowledge economy in both Yemeni public and private universities was also attempted. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, the researchers used the descriptive approach, and designed a questionnaire as the research tool which consisted of four main dimensions: research, development, innovation, education and training, ICT infrastructure, and governance. The validity and reliability of the tool were statistically checked, and data was analyzed using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: -        The current knowledge economy at Sana’a University was rated as very low by the faculty members.-        The current knowledge economy at the University of Science and Technology was rated by the academic staff as medium.-        There were statistically significant differences between the opinions of the members of the research sample in favor of the University of Science and Technology. A number of recommendations and suggested areas for further research were proposed. Keywords: Knowledge economy, Research, Development, Innovation, Education and training, ICT infrastructure, Governance.

  9. Implementing the Namaste Care Program for residents with advanced dementia: exploring the perceptions of families and staff in UK care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacpoole, Min; Hockley, Jo; Thompsell, Amanda; Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2017-10-01

    Increasing numbers of older people with advanced dementia are cared for in care homes. No cure is available, so research focused on improving quality of life and quality of care for people with dementia is needed to support them to live and die well. The Namaste Care programme is a multi-dimensional care program with sensory, psycho-social and spiritual components intended to enhance quality of life and quality of care for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the study was to establish whether the Namaste Care program can be implemented in UK care homes; and what effect Namaste Care has on the quality of life of residents with advanced dementia, their families and staff. This article explores the qualitative findings of the study, reporting the effect of the programme on the families of people with advanced dementia and care home staff, and presenting their perceptions of change in care. An organisational action research methodology was used. Focus groups and interviews were undertaken pre/post implementation of the Namaste Care program. The researcher kept a reflective diary recording data on the process of change. A comments book was available to staff and relatives in each care home. Data was analysed thematically within each care home and then across all care homes. Six care homes were recruited in south London: one withdrew before the study was underway. Of the five remaining care homes, four achieved a full Namaste Care program. One care home did not achieve the full program during the study, and another discontinued Namaste Care when the study ended. Every home experienced management disruption during the study. Namaste Care challenged normal routinised care for older people with advanced dementia. The characteristics of care uncovered before Namaste was implemented were: chaos and confusion, rushing around, lack of trust, and rewarding care. After the programme was implemented these perceptions were transformed, and themes of calmness, reaching out to

  10. The effectiveness of advance organiser model on students' academic achievement in learning work and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidena, Asay; Gebeyehu, Desta

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the advance organiser model (AOM) on students' academic achievement in learning work and energy. The design of the study was quasi-experimental pretest-posttest nonequivalent control groups. The total population of the study was 139 students of three sections in Endabaguna preparatory school in Tigray Region, Ethiopia. Two sections with equivalent means on the pretest were taken to participate in the study purposely and one section assigned as the experimental group and the other section assigned as the control group randomly. The experimental group was taught using the lesson plan based on the AOM, and the control group was taught using the lesson plan based on the conventional teaching method. Pretest and posttest were administered before and after the treatment, respectively. Independent sample t-test was used to analyse the data at the probability level of 0.05. The findings of the study showed that the AOM was more effective than the conventional teaching method with effect size of 0.49. This model was also effective to teach male and female students and objectives namely understanding and application. However, both methods were equally important to teach work and energy under the objective knowledge level.

  11. Gender and academic medicine: a good pipeline of women graduates is not advancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljak, Livia; Kojundzic, Sanja Lovric; Sapunar, Damir

    2008-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in the higher levels of appointment in academic medicine, despite the so-called feminization of medicine. A 27-year (1979-2006) retrospective study was conducted regarding the success and advancement of women and men at the University of Split School of Medicine in Croatia. Data were collected from the school's archive, including number of women and men among applicants, enrollees, graduates, teachers, department chairs and the school management: high school grade averages and admission tests scores by applicant gender and gender-based graduation grade averages. The number and gender patterns of all employed and unemployed physicians in the Split-Dalmatia county were also collected. Men represent the minority among applicants, enrollees, and graduates, whereas women were in the minority among faculty, department chairs, and the school management across all 27 years. Graduation grades from high school and medical school showed that women were statistically better students, although the difference was slight. In the same geographic area, women are more often unemployed and less likely to specialize. More women are applying, enrolling and graduating from the University of Split School of Medicine. Women also perform statistically better on entrance exam and have better graduation grades, yet they remain a minority in faculty and leadership positions. A review of county-wise employment statistics revealed that women were more frequently unemployed and less likely to specialize in this study.

  12. Sex differences in academic advancement. Results of a national study of pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, S H; Sullivan, L M; Dukes, K A; Phillips, C F; Kelch, R P; Schaller, J G

    1996-10-24

    Although the numbers of women in training and in entry-level academic positions in medicine have increased substantially in recent years, the proportion of women in senior faculty positions has not changed. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of background and training, academic productivity, distribution of work time, institutional support, career attitudes, and family responsibilities to sex differences in academic rank and salary among faculty members of academic pediatric departments. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all salaried physicians in 126 academic departments of pediatrics in the United States in January 1992. Of the 6441 questionnaires distributed, 4285 (67 percent) were returned. The sample was representative of U.S. pediatric faculty members. Multivariate models were used to relate academic rank and salary to 16 independent variables. Significantly fewer women than men achieved the rank of associate professor or higher. For both men and women, higher salaries and ranks were related to greater academic productivity (more publications and grants), more hours worked, more institutional support of research, greater overall career satisfaction, and fewer career problems. Less time spent in teaching and patient care was related to greater academic productivity for both sexes. Women in the low ranks were less academically productive and spent significantly more time in teaching and patient care than men in those ranks. Adjustment for all independent variables eliminated sex differences in academic rank but not in salary. Lower rates of academic productivity, more time spent in teaching and patient care and less time spent in research, less institutional support for research, and lower rates of specialization in highly paid subspecialties contributed to the lower ranks and salaries of female faculty members.

  13. Gender Inequality and Research Performance: Moving beyond Individual-Meritocratic Explanations of Academic Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2016-01-01

    Academic debates addressing the persistent gender gap in science reveal considerable contestation of the relevance and extent of the problem. Particular attention has been given to the question of whether women's high attrition rates should be ascribed to the structural and cultural barriers inherent to the academic system or instead…

  14. Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in advanced science classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascoe, Barbara; Monroe Atwater, Mary

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this research effort was to examine Black male students' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in science. The purposeful sample consisted of nine Black males between the ages of 14 and 18 years. Four categories of self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential emerged from the data. These included: (a) gifted high achievers; (b) gifted could do better high achievers; (c) gifted could do better situational nonachievers; and (d) gifted could do better underachievers. Science teachers' influences that referenced participants' academic achievement pointed to validation. Participants' perceptions regarding how science teachers' influenced their academic performance focused on science teachers' content knowledge. Power dynamics germane to Black male participants' value or worth that directed their efforts in science learning environments are discussed. Implications are posited for science teaching, science education programs, and future research. This research endeavor was based on two premises. The first premise is that Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability affect their science academic achievement. The second premise is that, given parental, peer, and community influences, science teachers have considerable influence on students' self-perceptions of academic ability. However, the focus of this research was not on parental influences, peer influences, or any potential influences that participants' communities may have on their academic achievement.

  15. Putting Descartes before the Horse: Opportunities for Advancing the Student Affairs Link with Academic Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarid, Lucas

    1999-01-01

    Article challenges the division between student and academic affairs and encourages a view of learning and reason in a more holistic and integrated fashion. Outlines the historical factors for the separation of student and academic affairs and offers the programs instituted at Bellarmine College as examples of effective collaboration between…

  16. A Staff Development Program Designed To Reach the Partnership School's Goals: Cooperative Learning Strategies, Coaching Sessions and a Narrowed Academic Performance Gap among Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kathy; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a staff-development program at Vivian Field Junior High School in Carrollton, Texas. The school is a member of the Texas Partnership School Initiative, which was created to give schools latitude in raising student achievement. The goal of the staff-development program was to identify gains in…

  17. Introducing online teaching in Humanities: A case study about the acceptance of online activities by the academic staff of classical languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Vlachopoulos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available L'objectiu d'aquest article és mostrar les percepcions del professorat de llengües clàssiques (grec antic i llatí amb relació a les activitats en línia fetes durant els cursos. L'estudi es va fer a tres països: Grècia (a tres universitats importants, Espanya (a la Universitat de Barcelona i els Estats Units (a la Universitat de Califòrnia a Berkeley amb la participació de trenta-tres professors. Segons el nivell d'ús i d'acceptació de les TIC i a partir de la classificació de G. Moore, vam separar els docents participants en tres grups: els conservadors, el corrent principal i els adoptadors primerencs. El fet que el grup més petit sigui el tercer mostra clarament que hi ha una necessitat de preparació i formació dels professors abans d'introduir projectes innovadors a l'aula. Com que el punt d'inici de l'aplicació d'innovació a l'aula és el professorat, els responsables dels projectes d'innovació s'haurien de centrar a ajudar-los a conscienciar-se dels canvis en els mètodes d'ensenyament i a incloure la seva opinió durant el disseny dels esmentats projectes. The purpose of this paper is to show the perceptions of the academic staff of classical languages (ancient Greek and Latin concerning use of online activities during their courses. The study was carried out in three countries: Greece (three major Universities, Spain (University of Barcelona and the United States (University of California, Berkeley with the participation of thirty-three academic instructors. Depending on the level of use and acceptance of the ICT and following G. Moore's classification, we separated the participating academics in three groups: the conservatives, the mainstream and the early adopters. The fact that the smallest group is the third clearly shows the necessity for teachers' preparation and training before introducing innovative projects in the classroom. Since the starting point for the application of innovation in the classroom is the

  18. Gender inequality in career advancement for females in Japanese academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Kae; Nomura, Kyoko; Fukami, Kayo; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2014-11-01

    During the past three decades, the participation of women in medicine has increased from 10.6% (1986) to 19.7% (2012) in Japan. However, women continue to be underrepresented in the top tiers of academic medicine. We highlight gender inequality and discuss the difficulties faced by female surgeons in Japanese academic surgery. Using anonymous and aggregate employment data of medical doctors at Kyoto University Hospital from 2009 and 2013, and a commercially-published faculty roster in 2012-2013, we compared gender balance stratified by a professional and an academic rank. The numbers of total and female doctors who worked at Kyoto University Hospital were 656 and 132 (20.1%) in 2009 and 655 and 132 (20.2%) in 2013, respectively. Approximately half the men (n = 281) were in temporary track and the rest (n = 242) were in tenure track, but only one fifth of women (n = 24) were in tenure track compared to 108 women in temporary track (p < 0.0001) in 2013. There were three female associate professors in basic medicine (8.1%), two female professors in clinical non-surgical medicine (3.9%) and one female lecturer in clinical surgical medicine (2.3%) in 2012. Fewer female doctors were at senior positions and at tenure positions than male doctors at Kyoto University Hospital. There were no female associate and full professors in surgery. The status of faculty members indicates the gender differences in leadership opportunities in Japanese academic surgery.

  19. Career Advancement of Women Senior Academic Administrators in Indonesia: Supports and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murniati, Cecilia Titiek

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women have gained access to college and the college teaching profession worldwide. However, women continue to be underrepresented in academic, research, and leadership positions. Women who have aspirations for top leadership positions still encounter numerous internal and external challenges. Existent literature on women…

  20. Linguistic Markers of Stance in Early and Advanced Academic Writing: A Corpus-Based Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aull, Laura L.; Lancaster, Zak

    2014-01-01

    This article uses corpus methods to examine linguistic expressions of stance in over 4,000 argumentative essays written by incoming first-year university students in comparison with the writing of upper-level undergraduate students and published academics. The findings reveal linguistic stance markers shared across the first-year essays despite…

  1. A qualitative study of the impact of the implementation of advanced access in primary healthcare on the working lives of general practice staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offredy Maxine

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The North American model of 'advanced access' has been emulated by the National Primary Care Collaborative in the UK as a way of improving patients' access in primary care. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the implementation of advanced access on the working lives of general practice staff. Methods A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interviews, was conducted with 18 general practice staff: 6 GPs, 6 practice managers and 6 receptionists. Two neighbouring boroughs in southeast England were used as the study sites. NUD*IST computer software assisted in data management to identify concepts, categories and themes of the data. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Results Whilst practice managers and receptionists saw advanced access as having a positive effect on their working lives, the responses of general practitioners (GPs were more ambivalent. Receptionists reported improvements in their working lives with a change in their role from gatekeepers for appointments to providing access to appointments, fewer confrontations with patients, and greater job satisfaction. Practice managers perceived reductions in work stress from fewer patient complaints, better use of time, and greater flexibility for contingency planning. GPs recognised benefits in terms of improved consultations, but had concerns about the impact on workload and continuity of care. Conclusion AA has improved working conditions for receptionists, converting their perceived role from gatekeeper to access facilitator, and for practice managers as patients were more satisfied. GP responses were more ambivalent, as they experienced both positive and negative effects.

  2. THE IMPROVEMENT OF STAFF PERFORMANCE THROUGH VARIATION OF LEADERSHIP APPROACH AT STATE VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL (SMKN 2 METRO ACADEMIC YEAR 2015/2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutarman - -

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : SMKN 2 Metro, as one of vocational high schools potentially becomes a reference school, need to deal that possibility with high performace both teachers and staff. Reference school requires all staffs to manage and organize the school establishment in accordance with quality management procedure and do their best to improve their competency and qualification. The improvement of their competency and qualification is a supporting factor of the service provided by the school to all stake holders at SMKN 2 Metro. The aim of the research is to improve the performance of the staff at SMKN 2 Metro.It was school action research applied. This research was conducted to improve working situation and process to overcome problems of the school. SMKN 2 Metro is located at Street Yos Sudars, West Metro of Metro Municipal City. The subjcts of the research were staff consist of 13 civil servants (PNS and 20 volunteer (PTT. It was done for three months from February to April 2015.The researcher was able to conclude that staff performance at SMKN 2 Metro improved when variation of leadership approach applied. This conclusion was supported by some findings. There was linear improvement of staff performance both PNS and PTT. The improvement of PTT performance was better than PNS in the beggining of the treatment, bu then they reached the same quality of improvement. Coersive power needed to be apllied more intensive in the beggining although applied with very careful manner. Flexible leadership approach must equip authoritative approach. Reward, even in smallest amount of recognition, must be applied more intensive.   Key Words: Approach, Performance, Staff

  3. The Impact of Attaining the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma on Academic Performance in Bioscience Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhnell, Emma; Wood, Heather; Baker, Mathew; Amici-Dargan, Sheila; Taylor, Chris; Randerson, Peter; Shore, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma Qualification (WBQ) in 2003, an increasing number of students are applying to higher education institutions (HEIs) with this qualification. The advanced-level WBQ is regarded as equivalent to one General Certificate of Education A-Level (GCE A-Level). This study assesses the impact…

  4. Meeting the challenge of providing flexible learning opportunities: Considerations for technology adoption amongst academic staff | Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d’apprentissage flexibles : considérations pour l’adoption de la technologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis’ Technology Acceptance Model’s tenets of perceived usefulness and ease of use. Further, this study supports Lai and Savage’s (2013 assertion of a lack of attention to the pedagogical affordances of technology when adoption decisions are made by instructors, thus we highlight the need for higher education leaders to determine strategies promoting awareness of the benefits technology-enabled teaching and learning can bring to advance educationally-rich flexible learning opportunities. Cet article traite d’un sous-ensemble de résultats provenant d’une étude plus vaste ayant enquêté sur la résistance des universitaires envers l’intégration de la technologie à l’enseignement en langue étrangère sur le campus dans un établissement nord-américain d’études supérieures. L’étude a révélé que les facteurs ayant une influence sur l’adoption de la technologie coïncident avec les principes du modèle d’acceptation de la technologie de Davis sur l’utilité perçue et la facilité d’utilisation. De plus, cette étude appuie l’assertion de Lai et Savage (2013 d’un manque d’attention envers les affordances pédagogiques de la technologie lorsque les décisions d’adoption sont prises par les formateurs. Nous soulignons donc le besoin, pour les meneurs de l’éducation supérieure, de déterminer les stratégies qui favorisent la connaissance des avantages de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage que permet la technologie pour faire progresser les occasions d’apprentissage flexibles et riches sur le plan éducatif.

  5. Career advancement of men and women in academic radiology: is the playing field level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vydareny, K H; Waldrop, S M; Jackson, V P; Manaster, B J; Nazarian, G K; Reich, C A; Ruzal-Shapiro, C B

    2000-07-01

    The authors' purposes were to determine if there are gender differences in the speed of promotion and/or academic productivity in academic radiology and if this situation had changed since a previous study was performed in 1987. Surveys were distributed to faculty members of academic radiology departments in May 1997. A total of 707 surveys were analyzed according to gender for time at rank for assistant and associate professor levels, in relation to publication rate, grant funding rate, and distribution of professional time. There was no difference between genders in the time at assistant professor rank. Among all current professors, women had been associate professors longer than men, but there was no difference between genders for those who had been in academic radiology for less than 15 years. There was no gender difference at any rank in the rate of publishing original articles. There was no difference in funding rates, although men had more total grant support. Male associate professors reported spending more time in administration and slightly more time in total hours at work than did their female colleagues, and male professors spent slightly more time teaching residents. Otherwise, there is no difference in how men and women at any rank spend their professional time. There are, however, lower percentages of women in tenured positions and in the uppermost levels of departmental administration. The time at rank for men and women and their rate of publication appear to have equalized. Women still are underrepresented at the uppermost levels of departmental administration, however, and are less likely than men to hold tenured positions.

  6. Pathways to Advancing Aging Policy-Relevant Research in Academic Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzman, Kathryn G; Troy, Lisa M; Green, Carmen R; Wallace, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Policy-level changes have a significant influence on the health and well-being of aging populations. Yet there is often a gap between scientific knowledge and policy action. Although previous research has identified barriers and facilitators to effective knowledge translation, little attention has been given to the role of academic institutions in knowledge generation. This exploratory focus group study examines barriers and pathways to developing and maintaining an aging policy-relevant research agenda in academic settings, and additional challenges associated with minority group membership in this pursuit. Participants were personally committed to conducting policy-relevant research despite institutional barriers such as fewer funding opportunities and less value attributed to their research, particularly in the context of tenure and promotion. Although many viewed their research as an opportunity to make a difference, especially for underserved older adult populations, a number of minority group participants expressed that their policy research interests were marginalized. Participants offer individual and institutional-level strategies for addressing barriers, including collaborating with community members and colleagues and engaging mentors within and outside of their academic institutions. Reframing the valuation of policy research through the diversification of funding and publishing opportunities can better support scholars engaged in aging policy-relevant research.

  7. Integrating movement in academic classrooms: understanding, applying and advancing the knowledge base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C A; Russ, L; Vazou, S; Goh, T L; Erwin, H

    2015-08-01

    In the context of comprehensive and coordinated approaches to school health, academic classrooms have gained attention as a promising setting for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time among children. The aims of this paper are to review the rationale and knowledge base related to movement integration in academic classrooms, consider the practical applications of current knowledge to interventions and teacher education, and suggest directions for future research. Specifically, this paper (i) situates movement integration amid policy and research related to children's health and the school as a health-promoting environment; (ii) highlights the benefits of movement integration; (iii) summarizes movement integration programs and interventions; (iv) examines factors associated with classroom teachers' movement integration; (v) offers strategies for translating research to practice and (vi) forwards recommendations for future inquiry related to the effectiveness and sustainability of efforts to integrate movement into classroom routines. This paper provides a comprehensive resource for developing state-of-the-art initiatives to maximize children's movement in academic classrooms as a key strategy for important goals in both education and public health. © 2015 World Obesity.

  8. Academic and Career Advancement for Black Male Athletes at NCAA Division I Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ashley R.; Hawkins, Billy J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the structural arrangements and challenges many Black male athletes encounter as a result of their use of sport for upward social mobility. Recommendations to enhance their preparation and advancement are provided.

  9. The impact of attaining the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma on academic performance in bioscience higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Yhnell, E; Wood, H; Baker, M.D; Amici-Dargan, S; Taylor, C; Randerson, P; Shore, A

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma Qualification (WBQ) in 2003, an increasing number of students are applying to higher education institutions (HEIs) with this qualification. The advanced-level WBQ is regarded as equivalent to one General Certificate of Education A-Level (GCE A-Level). This study assesses the impact of attaining the WBQ in addition to three GCE A-Levels on overall university degree performance in comparison to attaining four GCE A-Levels, in th...

  10. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  11. A Comparative Study of Academic Staff Teaching Activities between Japan and China: Based on National Surveys in 2011-2012. RIHE International Seminar Reports. No. 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2015-01-01

    A review of recent literature suggests that, although academics in several countries (such as Japan, Korea and Germany) now allocate more of their time to research, service activities and administration than they had in the early 1990s (Teichler, Arimoto, and Cummings, 2013), the majority of university professors still spend the largest proportion…

  12. TEACHERS' GUIDES. WORLD HISTORY FOR THE ACADEMICALLY TALENTED. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUGSPURGER, EVERETT F.; AND OTHERS

    PREPARED BY TEACHERS AND SUPERVISORS WORKING WITH A 2-YEAR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS GUIDES FOR A WORLD HISTORY COURSE (PREHISTORY TO EARLY 20TH CENTURY) FOR THE GIFTED AND AN ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (ANCIENT CIVILIZATION TO EARLY 20TH CENTURY). STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO STUDY HISTORICAL ISSUES AND DEVELOP…

  13. Part-time physician faculty in a pediatrics department: a study of equity in compensation and academic advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Mumtaz; Emans, S Jean; Harris, Z Leah; Brown, Nancy J; Scott, Theresa A; Cooper, William O

    2011-08-01

    To assess equity in compensation and academic advancement in an academic pediatrics department in which a large proportion of the physician faculty hold part-time appointments. The authors analyzed anonymized data from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics databases for physician faculty (faculty with MD or MD/PhD degrees) employed during July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. The primary outcomes were total compensation and years at assistant professor rank. They compared compensation and years at junior rank by part-time versus full-time status, controlling for gender, rank, track, years since first appointment as an assistant professor, and clinical productivity. Of the 119 physician faculty in the department, 112 met inclusion criteria. Among those 112 faculty, 23 (21%) were part-time and 89 (79%) were full-time faculty. Part-time faculty were more likely than full-time faculty to be women (74% versus 28%, P part-time versus full-time status. In other adjusted analyses, faculty with part-time appointments spent an average of 2.48 more years as an assistant professor than did faculty with full-time appointments. Overall group differences in total compensation were not apparent in this department, but physician faculty with part-time appointments spent more time at the rank of assistant professor. This study provides a model for determining and analyzing compensation and effort to ensure equity and transparency across faculty.

  14. Prefrontal cognitive ability, intelligence, Big Five personality, and the prediction of advanced academic and workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Daniel M; Peterson, Jordan B; Pihl, Robert O; Lee, Alice G M

    2007-08-01

    Studies 1 and 2 assessed performance on a battery of dorsolateral prefrontal cognitive ability (D-PFCA) tests, personality, psychometric intelligence, and academic performance (AP) in 2 undergraduate samples. In Studies 1 and 2, AP was correlated with D-PFCA (r=.37, ppersonality. Studies 3 and 4 assessed D-PFCA, personality, and workplace performance among (a) managerial-administrative workers and (b) factory floor workers at a manufacturing company. Prefrontal cognitive ability correlated with supervisor ratings of manager performance at values of r ranging from .42 to .57 (ps<.001), depending on experience, and with factory floor performance at pr=.21 (p=.02), after controlling for experience, age, and education. Conscientiousness correlated with factory floor performance at r=.23.

  15. University Students Are Unaware of the Role of Academic Librarians. A Review of: Bickley, R. & Corral, S. (2011. Student perceptions of staff in the information commons: A survey at the University of Sheffield. Reference Services Review, 39(2, 223-243. doi:10.1108/00907321111135466

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Thomson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To discover students’ perceptionsof information commons staff, and todetermine how these perceptions influence theuse of library resources.Design – Post-experience survey with onefollow-up interview.Setting – The University of Sheffield, a postsecondaryinstitution in England.Subjects – All undergraduate andpostgraduate students were invited to takepart. Just over 1% of the student population, or250 students, completed the survey.Methods – Information about the survey wassent to students’ institutional email addresses.One follow up interview was carried out viaemail using the critical incident technique.Main Results – Students do not understandthe academic roles of librarians. They areunlikely to approach library staff for academicsupport, preferring to turn to instructors, otherstudents, friends, and family. Most studentshad positive opinions about assistancereceived in the Information Commons, but asmall number reflected on previous badexperiences with staff, or on a fear of beingmade to feel foolish. The vast majority ofstudents who did not seek help in theInformation Commons stated that this wasbecause they did not require assistance. Most students do not perceive a difference between Information Commons staff and library staff.Conclusion – Students have positive views of Information Commons staff at the University of Sheffield, but have low awareness of the roles of professional librarians. Librarians need to develop partnerships with academic staff and strengthen their presence in both physical and online learning environments to promote their academic roles.

  16. RASC-AL (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage): 2002 Advanced Concept Design Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) is a program of the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in collaboration with the Universities Space Research Association's (USRA) ICASE institute through the NASA Langley Research Center. The RASC-AL key objectives are to develop relationships between universities and NASA that lead to opportunities for future NASA research and programs, and to develop aerospace systems concepts and technology requirements to enable future NASA missions. The program seeks to look decades into the future to explore new mission capabilities and discover what's possible. NASA seeks concepts and technologies that can make it possible to go anywhere, at anytime, safely, reliably, and affordably to accomplish strategic goals for science, exploration, and commercialization. University teams were invited to submit research topics from the following themes: Human and Robotic Space Exploration, Orbital Aggregation & Space Infrastructure Systems (OASIS), Zero-Emissions Aircraft, and Remote Sensing. RASC-AL is an outgrowth of the HEDS-UP (University Partners) Program sponsored by the LPI. HEDS-UP was a program of the Lunar and Planetary Institute designed to link universities with NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. The first RASC-AL Forum was held November 5-8, 2002, at the Hilton Cocoa Beach Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Representatives from 10 university teams presented student research design projects at this year's Forum. Each team contributed a written report and these reports are presented.

  17. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Clinic. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  19. Changing the academic culture: valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanberg, Paul R; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T; Kaler, Eric W; Marchase, Richard B; Sands, Timothy D; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-05-06

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future.

  20. Establishing a 'track record': research productivity and nursing academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emden, C

    1998-01-01

    Many nursing academics in Australia are finding to their dismay that an outstanding teaching career and exemplary professional contribution to their field--and a PhD--are not enough to achieve promotion within their university, or secure a new academic post. One must also possess a proven or established 'track record' in research and publication. The operational funding arrangements for Australian universities rely in part on the research productivity of their academic staff members. This places special expectation upon the way academics conduct their scholarly work. Nursing academics are under particular pressure: as relative newcomers to the university scene, most find themselves considered as early career researchers with weak track records. This paper reviews relevant research and draws upon personal experience in the area of research development, to highlight how nursing academics may most strategically establish a research and publication record with a view to career advancement.

  1. Innovative partnerships to advance public health training in community-based academic residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo JC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joan C Lo,1–3 Thomas E Baudendistel,2,3 Abhay Dandekar,3,4 Phuoc V Le,5 Stanton Siu,2,3 Bruce Blumberg6 1Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente East Bay, Oakland, CA, USA; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 5School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative partnerships between community-based academic residency ­training programs and schools of public health, represent an innovative approach to training future physician leaders in population management and public health. In Kaiser Permanente Northern California, development of residency-Masters in Public Health (MPH tracks in the Internal Medicine Residency and the Pediatrics Residency programs, with MPH graduate studies completed at the University of California Berkeley School of Public Health, enables physicians to integrate clinical training with formal education in epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, and disease prevention. These residency-MPH programs draw on more than 50 years of clinical education, public health training, and health services research – creating an environment that sparks inquiry and added value by developing skills in patient-centered care through the lens of population-based outcomes. Keywords: graduate medical education, public health, master’s degree, internal medicine, pediatrics, residency training

  2. The Effects of Advance Graphic Organizers Strategy Intervention on Academic Achievement, Self Efficacy, and Motivation to Learn Social Studies in Learning Disabled Second Year Prep Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using advance graphic organizers on academic achievement, self efficacy, and motivation to learn social studies in learning disabled second year prep students. A total of 60 students identified with LD were invited to participate. The sample was randomly divided into two groups; experimental (n = 30, 23 boys,…

  3. Development of Technology Competencies for Public Services’ Staff Has Limited External Validity. A Review of: Wong, G. K. W. (2010. Information commons help desk transactions study. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36(3, 235-241.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To develop an understanding of the types of technology questions asked at an information commons help desk for the purposes of staffing the desk and training. Specifically, the study looked to answer the following questions:1. What kind of assistance do users seek from the help desk?2. How complex is it to handle the technology questions?3. What are the key competencies desirable of the help desk staff?Design - Qualitative analysis of transactions completed at an information commons help desk.Setting - A medium sized academic library located in Hong Kong.Data - 1,636 transactions completed at an information commons help desk between January 2007 and May 2009.Methods - From the opening in 2006, the staff of the information commons help desk recorded all transactions electronically using a modified version of the open source software LibStats. The author examined the transactions for roughly the second and third weeks of each month from January 2007 to May 2009 in an effort to determine the types of questions asked and their complexity.Main Results - In response to question one, 86.3% of questions asked at the help desk concerned technology; the majority of those questions (76.5% were about printing, wireless connection, and various software operation. For question two, 82% of technology questions were determined to be of the lowest tier (Tier 1 of complexity, one-third of the questions required only “direct answers,” and 80% of questions could be answered consistently via the creation of a “knowledge base of answers for these foreseeable questions.” For question three, a list of fourteen competencies for help desk staff were created.Conclusion - With the low complexity of the technology questions asked, the creation of a knowledge base of common questions and answers, and proper training of staff based on the competencies identified in the study, an information commons could be effective with one integrated desk staffed by a

  4. Academic Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  5. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  6. Analyzing the Relationship of Geographic Mobility and Institutional Prestige to Career Advancement of Women in Academic Medicine Pursuing Midcareer-, Senior-, or Executive-Level Administrative Positions: Implications for Career Advancement Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marsha Renee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of geographic mobility and institutional prestige to career advancement defined as administrative promotions of women seeking midcareer-, senior-, or executive-level positions at academic health centers (AHCs) and their medical schools or in non-AHC related medical schools in the United…

  7. Women's Advancement in Political Science. A Report on the APSA Workshop on the Advancement of Women in Academic Political Science in the United States (Washington, DC, March 4-5, 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Political Science Association (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    In March 2004, the National Science Foundation funded a two-day workshop by the American Political Science Association (APSA) on the advancement of women in academic political science in the United States. The workshop was prompted by an alarming stall in the number of women entering the discipline and persisting through early years of faculty…

  8. A Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, Melinda [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab; Benjamin, Stan [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab; James, Eric [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab; Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lantz, kathy [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab; Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Molling, Christine [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Executive Summary NOAA is making major contributions to the solar forecasting project in three areas. First, it is improving its forecasts of solar irradiance, clouds, and aerosols in its numerical weather prediction models. Second, it is providing advanced satellite products for DOE's FOA awardees to use in their forecast systems. Third, it is using high-quality ground-based measurements from SURFRAD and ISIS stations to verify and validate forecast model output. This reports covers results from all three areas for the period May 1, 2014 - April 30, 2015. Modeling In its modeling effort, NOAA continues work to improve the skill of solar forecasts from the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) research versions of the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) and the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) models, which are in turn transitioned into operations at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). A major milestone was achieved in September 2014 with the initial operational implementation of the HRRR at NCEP. In the ESRL research versions of the models, testing and development, in both real-time runs and retrospective experiments, is guided by an extensive in-house verification system. Early in the SFIP project, we developed the capability to verify our model forecasts against the high-quality surface radiation measurements from the SURFRAD and ISIS networks. This highlighted some shortcomings with the RAP and HRRR forecasts of incoming shortwave radiation. Most of our effort during Phase 1 of SFIP was focused on addressing these problems with a variety of model system improvements. The RAP and HRRR models during the warm season of 2014 had a noticeable warm and dry bias in near-surface conditions over most of the central and eastern United States, and our new SURFRAD/ISIS verification revealed that there was also a large excess of incoming global horizontal irradiance in the models. We hypothesized that a lack of cloud cover (particularly low-level cloud

  9. STAFF TRAINING FOR MILITARY AND CIVIL SERVICE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE 19TH CENTURY: ACADEMIC YEARS OF HISTORIAN, GENERAL-LIEUTENANT N.K. SCHILDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т В Слепцова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to replenish the information fi eld of Russian historians by introducing data about a little-known element in the historiography in the system of staff trai-ning in elite educational institutions of Russia in the middle of the 19th century. The object of the study is the young age of Nikolai Karlovich Schilder (1842-1902, who by honourable service in the military fi eld rose to the rank of Lieutenant General (1893 after completing two educational institutions. As a result of his historical studies, he became the corresponding mem-ber of the Petersburg Academy of Sciences (1900. Based on the information found in archival and published historical sources, as well as in the an-nexes to the published historical works, there is considered the process of N.K. Schilder’s acquiring not only a large body of knowledge, but also the process of his personality formation as a patriot of Russia.Five years (1857-1862 were a special period of his life as a future military engineer and historian - the time when he obtained secondary and special higher military education. The years of studies in the Pages Corps and the Nikolaev Engineering Academy were of great use for him. He showed good results in studies and extraordinary creative abilities. The article shows the scope of knowledge and quality of skills obtained by N.K. Shilder while studying, the degree of his preparedness to work both as a military engineer and historian-researcher. The article proves that he obtained professional knowledge necessary for a military engineer; he was accustomed to thinking big, to working systematically, independently and creatively. Self-discipline and acquired skills of research work were the key to his future success in the fi eld of military and military-political history and in the biographical genre.

  10. Women in academic surgery: why is the playing field still not level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Natashia M; Webster, Fiona; Holden, Helen Alyx; Moulton, Carol-Anne E; Baxter, Nancy; Desjardins, Christine; Cil, Tulin

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore career satisfaction and advancement for women in academic surgery. A 48-item web-based survey was emailed to women surgeons in academic centers across Canada, exploring career advancement, family planning, mentorship, discrimination, and career satisfaction. The survey response rate was 38% (81 of 212); 18% of participants felt they experienced gender discrimination in medical school, 36% in residency, 12% in fellowship, and 41% as staff surgeons. More than half felt that their gender had played a role in the career challenges they faced. Responses to open-ended questions suggested that many surgeons struggled to balance their academic careers with family life. Despite this, participants rated their career satisfaction very highly. There remain ongoing challenges for women in academic surgery including lack of gender equality, appropriate mentorship, and accommodations for surgeons with families. Continued advancement of women in academic surgery is dependent on addressing these concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology research grant program: factors associated with publication and advancement in academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D; Dellon, Evan S; Bright, Stephanie D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2009-05-01

    The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Demographic data, the year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient's institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. A similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred with 255 of the 368 awards (69%) for 1983-2006 [corrected]. Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of the 313 awardees over the same period, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions [corrected]. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (P academics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publication, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology.

  12. Career Self-Management and Career Capital of Mid-Level Administrators in Higher Education Who Previously Served as Professional Academic Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elecia Cole

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the prerequisites for career advancement helps to keep employees motivated and engaged. However, in the higher education (H.E.) workplace, where formalized career ladders are sparse and ambiguous for staff personnel--especially those in professional academic advising--employees who are interested in career advancement into mid-level…

  13. How do I manage and staff for intelligent transportation systems? : thinking outside the box : a cross-cutting study : maximizing project resources and advancing coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) projects often need staff with skills that are not resident in traditional transportation organizations. Therefore, project administrators must sometimes look beyond the usual staffing methods to fill these po...

  14. "Blogfolios" and Their Role in the Development of Research Projects in an Advanced Academic Literacy Class for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on "blogfolios", online interactive blog-based portfolios, developed by students for class projects in Electronic Literacy. Blogfolios may contain interactive images, podcasts, and web-log discussions on a variety of researched academic topics. The impact of academic blogfolios on the second language learner's…

  15. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1 how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of the implementation of PBL curriculum? 2 What kinds of support do university academic staff need in order to maintain PBL implementation? Through a combination of a literature review, interviews with 6 PBL experts which emphasize the importance of PBL facilitators, and document analysis of reflection notes from 18 trainees of a PBL workshop, this study will produce a guideline in developing a PBL Academic Staff Development Program for an institute wishes to implement and retain PBL as the education strategy.

  16. Academic Staff in the UAE: Unsettled Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David; Austin, Ann; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how instructors in United Arab Emirates higher education institutions view their professional employment, the extent of their identification and engagement with their institution, and how their views are shaped by the national and institutional contexts in which they work. Many interviewees felt their professional…

  17. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  18. A Case Study of Gender Bias at the Postdoctoral Level in Physics, and its Resulting Impact on the Academic Career Advancement of Females

    OpenAIRE

    Towers, S.

    2008-01-01

    This case study of a typical U.S. particle physics experiment explores the issues of gender bias and how it affects the academic career advancement prospects of women in the field of physics beyond the postdoctoral level; we use public databases to study the career paths of the full cohort of 57 former postdoctoral researchers on the Run II Dzero experiment to examine if males and females were treated in a gender-blind fashion on the experiment. The study finds that the female researchers wer...

  19. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  20. I Get to Use an iPod in School? Using Technology-Based Advance Organizers to Support the Academic Success of English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Elsa S.; Mathison, Carla

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of technology-based advance organizers (TBAOs) on the academic performance of 240 4th grade English learners (ELs) participating in a science class in School in the Park (SITP), a museum-school collaboration. While SITP provides a rich, hands-on learning environment, ELs face significant linguistic challenges in their ability to access the dense academic language and concepts provided in SITP's English only curriculum, thus negatively impacting ELs' engagement and learning. The TBAOs were designed in response to this issue. The study investigated two forms of treatment: TBAOs viewed on individual handheld mobile devices (HMDs), specifically iPods; and, TBAOs viewed as a whole class on DVD. The study utilized both qualitative and quantitative data sources, including a pre- and posttest, hands-on and performance-based assessments, as well as focus interviews. Results showed a significant interaction effect between group assignment, language status and application assessments, indicating ELs performed significantly better in the treatment groups. Students who used the HMD instead of the DVD or no treatment improved their total scores significantly on hands-on, performance-based measurements. Differences between treatment and control groups' performance on pre-/posttests approached significance. Furthermore, students reported TBAOs supported learning by introducing new material, introducing and reviewing daily academic vocabulary, and helping them anticipate behavioral and procedural expectations of hands-on activities. Classroom and museum educators reported an increase in the treatment groups' motivation and engagement. The study provided important implications in the use and power of learner-controlled technology in supporting ELs' linguistic and academic success.

  1. Perspective: Adopting an Asset Bundle Model to Support and Advance Minority Students’ Careers in Academic Medicine and the Scientific Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in the scientific pipeline (e.g., academic medicine, science, technology, engineering and mathematics) requires a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity continge...

  2. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  3. The Symbolic Role of Academic Boards in University Academic Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Julie

    2013-01-01

    While much research on quality assurance in higher education has centred on issues related to the impact on teaching and learning and academic staff, there is a significant gap in the area of quality assurance and academic governance. Within Australia the roles of university academic boards (also known as academic senates or faculty senates) have…

  4. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  5. From networking to next-working: how an academic department "retreated" and advanced at the same time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Kenna, Heather; Hantke, Mindy

    2015-04-01

    Department-wide retreats conducted at periods of transition can enrich and benefit academic departments in several ways. Here, the authors describe the organization, conduct, and immediate outcomes of a department-wide retreat in a university department of psychiatry intended to (1) foster networking and communication among faculty who often work in "silos" and (2) invite the faculty to provide "internal consultations" regarding aspirational strategic goals and recommendations for short-term actionable tactics to address these goals. The retreat featured an evening networking and socializing poster session followed by a day-long event consisting of small group and large group interactive sessions. Participants were 120 faculty members including 44 new and younger faculty members who prepared and presented posters about themselves and their work. A variety of aspirational goals and specific recommendations for follow-up emerged from small groups were discussed in plenary sessions and were subsequently summarized and distributed to the faculty to be addressed by ongoing workgroups. Immediate informal feedback suggests that conducting and acting on recommendations ensuing from academic department retreats can foster at least a short-term sense of shared community and purpose, network faculty, identify commonly held values and aspirational goals, and potentially stimulate formation of innovative affinity groups and collaborations. Longer-term workgroup efforts and outcome assessments are required to assess the enduring results and value of such undertakings.

  6. Considering context in academic medicine: differences in demographic and professional characteristics and in research productivity and advancement metrics across seven clinical departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Erica T; Carapinha, René; Weber, Griffin M; Hill, Emorcia V; Reede, Joan Y

    2015-08-01

    To understand the disciplinary contexts in which faculty work, the authors examined demographics, professional characteristics, research productivity, and advancement across seven clinical departments at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and nationally. HMS analyses included faculty from seven clinical departments-anesthesiology, medicine, neurology, pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology, and surgery-in May 2011 (N = 7,304). National analyses included faculty at 141 U.S. medical schools in the same seven departments as of December 31, 2011 (N = 91,414). The authors used chi-square and Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests to compare departmental characteristics. Heterogeneity in demographics, professional characteristics, and advancement across departments was observed in HMS and national data. At HMS, psychiatry had the highest percentage of underrepresented minority faculty at 6.6% (75/1,139). In anesthesiology, 24.2% (128/530) of faculty were Asian, whereas in psychiatry only 7.9% (90/1,139) were (P advancement across clinical departments at HMS and nationally. The context in which faculty work, of which department is a proxy, should be accounted for in research on faculty career outcomes and diversity inclusion in academic medicine.

  7. Burnout in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: A Single Academic Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelan-Hansen, Katie; Anne, Samantha; Benninger, Michael S

    2018-05-01

    Burnout in modern medicine is becoming more recognized and researched. The objective in this study is to evaluate burnout in a tertiary care academic institution and compare results among faculty, trainees, and advanced practice practitioners (APPs) in a cross-sectional survey using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Fifty-two surveys were distributed; 44 participants completed the survey (85%): 25 staff physicians (57%), 14 resident physicians (32%), and 5 nurse practitioners (11%). Staff physicians had low emotional exhaustion, moderate depersonalization, and low result for reduced personal accomplishments; trainees reported low emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and moderate reduced personal accomplishment; and nurse practitioners reported moderate on all 3 dimensions. There is overall low burnout in this tertiary care academic center of otolaryngologist providers and no difference in rates among the different groups (trainees, APPs, staff). Measures addressing specific deficiencies among dimensions of burnout would be helpful to prevent disintegration of physician satisfaction into burnout.

  8. Making High Schools Work through Blended Instruction. A Vision and Plan for the Integration of Academic and Career and Technology Education in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    A team consisting of Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) staff, local educators, and other representatives developed an action plan to assist in advancing the blending of academic, career, and technology education. The team prepared a vision statement, set strategic directions, analyzed barriers, and developed recommendations and actions…

  9. Shattering the glass ceiling in academia : a comparative study of the differences in how women advance and reach leadership positions in the academic world in Sweden versus women in the US.

    OpenAIRE

    Kadhem, Meis; Khalili, Mahzad

    2013-01-01

    This study tried to emphasize the differences between Sweden and the US when it comes to women’s career advancement to leading positions within the academic world. The differences between the countries were examined by studying women in leadership positions in universities in both countries. The three main research questions that this study was supposed to answer were: -          What are the different barriers women in leadership positions in the academic world encounter when advancing in Sw...

  10. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment. Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method. Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations. Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research. Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope. Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  11. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment.Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method.Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations.Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research.Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope.Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  12. Motivation of Academics: An Empirical Assessment of Herzberg's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Aycan Cicek

    2007-01-01

    This study examined academics' viewpoints according to sex, academic title, and professional seniority to establish how much the university presented to its staff hygiene and motivation factors and to find out the effect of these factors in motivating the staff. The findings show that there is not a statistical difference among the academics'…

  13. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach.

  14. Perspective: Adopting an Asset Bundle Model to Support and Advance Minority Students’ Careers in Academic Medicine and the Scientific Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in the scientific pipeline (e.g., academic medicine, science, technology, engineering and mathematics) requires a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support in order to continue toward a career in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, or socioeconomic status). The authors define “asset bundles” as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach. PMID:23018329

  15. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  16. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  17. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  18. Electronic Reserve--A Staff Development Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn

    1997-01-01

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Library's experience in developing an electronic reserve service is offered as a case study. Discussion includes the limited access service, technical components, academic community support, lending staff training, usage, copyright, and future scenarios and solutions. (AEF)

  19. Leadership Styles of Principals and Job Performance of Staff in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leadership Styles of Principals and Job Performance of Staff in Secondary Schools in Delta State of Nigeria. ... recommended that principals should adopt the democratic leadership style to boost better job performance among staff and in essence enhance administrative effectiveness and students‟ academic performance.

  20. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  1. Principals' Leadership Style and Staff Job Performance in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    data. The study findings identified 10 different leadership styles adopted by different ... or non-academic staff, and staff job performance is assessed based on the .... perspectives, firstly as a “process”, which implies that leadership requires ... changes, focusing on the long-term and the big picture, not always doing to save.

  2. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  3. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  4. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  5. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  6. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS): 10. Variability among academic glaucoma subspecialists in assessing optic disc notching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaasterland, D E; Blackwell, B; Dally, L G; Caprioli, J; Katz, L J; Ederer, F

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of data from the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS) has found eyes reported to have partial optic disc rim notching (not to the edge) at baseline to have less risk of subsequent visual field loss than eyes with no notching. Because this is counterintuitive and because classification of notching had not been defined in the AGIS protocol, we have assessed AGIS ophthalmologists interobserver and intraobserver agreement on notching. Fourteen glaucoma subspecialists classified notching in 26 pairs of stereoscopic disc photographs of eyes with mild to severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. They classified images as showing either no notching, notching not to the edge, or notching to the edge. Several hours later, 10 of them classified the same images a second time. In an analysis of interobserver agreement, of 26 stereoscopic images, a plurality of ophthalmologists classified notching as absent in 9 (35%), as present but not to the edge in 7 (27%), and as present and not to the edge in 10 (38%). All 14 ophthalmologists (100%) agreed on the classification of 7 (27%) of the images, and 13 of the 14 ophthalmologists (93%) agreed on the classification of 4 additional images (15%). Of these 11 images with at least 93% agreement, notching was reported as absent in 3 (27%) and to the edge in 8 (73%). In the remaining 15 images, there was substantial disagreement about whether notching was present and, if so, whether it was to the edge. In an analysis of intraobserver agreement, none of the 10 ophthalmologists who completed the viewing a second time classified all eyes exactly the same as the first time, though 5 ophthalmologists made 4 or fewer reclassifications. Overall, 80% of the original classifications were reproduced on second reading. Of the initial classifications that were not reproduced, slightly more than half were first classified as having notching not to the edge. Without definitions or examples of optic disc rim notching, the glaucoma

  8. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  9. What Is Required to Develop Career Pathways for Teaching Academics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dawn; Roberts, Lynne; Ananthram, Subramaniam; Broughton, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Despite the rise of teaching academic (teaching only) roles in Australia, the UK, the USA, and Canada, the experiences of teaching academics are not well documented in the literature. This article reports from a university-wide study that responded to the introduction of teaching academic roles during a major restructure of academic staff.…

  10. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  11. Using the Tuning Methodology to design the founding benchmark competences for a new academic professional field: the case of Advanced Rehabilitation Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Hughes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available    Designing innovative high quality educational programmes to meet the workforce needs in emerging interdisciplinary areas of practice can present challenges to academics, students, employers and industrial partners. This paper demonstrates how the Tuning Process successfully helped to construct benchmark learning outcomes and competences in the area of healthcare practice where advanced technologies are used to improve movement namely Rehabilitation Technologies (RTs. The paper also discusses the engagement of patients, carers and carer organisations within the development of competences.    Due to changing demographics, limited resources and the availability of technology, rehabilitation technologies are starting to be used for the assessment and treatment of patients. However there are currently no European transnational Bachelor or Master programmes targeted at educating people for the design, development, use and evaluation of these technologies. The contemporary field is predominantly staffed and resourced by engineering scientists and clinicians who were primarily educated in their primary discipline. The first generations of rehabilitation technologists have established this specialist field through invention, perseverance, and collaborative working. However, there is now a recognition that new and complementary skill sets are required by future graduates, whether engineering scientists or clinicians, so as to better meet the needs of clients and the employment market whether in the domains of industry, research, academia or clinical practice.   This project demonstrates how a group of European specialist rehabilitation technologists, supported by educationalists, collaborated to identify and develop the core competences and learning outcomes required by future Master’s (second cycle graduates in this new discipline. Building on the work of the Tuning Process and applying the principles embedded in the Bologna Process, future

  12. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  13. Academic Freedom in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokay GEDİKOĞLU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the concept ‘academic freedom’ is discussed, its implications and value for the academics, institutions of higher education, and the society are focused, and a few suggestions for the Turkish higher education are made. Academic freedom is defined as the freedom of the academic staff to look for and to find the truth in their scientific field, to publish the findings, and to teach these findings to their students without any external intervention. The concept has gained a further definition with inclusion of research activities into academic freedom as part of the reform attempts started in the German higher education in the 19th century. Therefore, academic freedom is at the very core of the missions of the institutions of higher education; that is, teaching-learning and research. On the point of academic staff and their academic activities of the academic freedom, the subjects such as the aim of the course, choosing the teaching materials and textbooks, the lecturer, and the criteria for the measurement and evaluation of the course take place. And he point of research covers the aim of the study, academicians can’t be imposed the involve in an academic and artistic studies that conflict their values and beliefs; researchers should comply with codes of ethical principles and practices during the process of researching; and research outputs should be reported accurately and honestly without any misleading manipulation. Academic freedom does not provide any exemption from accountability in academic activities of the faculty, nor does it provide any right to act against the well-being of the society, current laws and regulations, and codes of ethical principles and practices.

  14. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  15. Perceived sources of conflict among academic and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived sources of conflict among academic and management staff in colleges of education in Borno state, Nigeria. ... To what extent do male and female academic staff differ on the perceived sources of conflict? The study adopted an exploratory ... Chi-Square was computed to test for sex differences. The study found ...

  16. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director-Bio research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This

  17. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  18. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  19. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  20. Twitter accounts followed by Congressional health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Meisel, Zachary F; Merchant, Raina M; Seymour, Jane; Gollust, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    Although health policy research should inform policy making, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers limits successful translation. Social media represents a new opportunity to connect researchers and policy makers. Our objective was to assess who Congressional health policy staff follow on a major social media platform. Cross-sectional study. Our study measured Congressional health policy staff's use of Twitter and the types of individuals and organizations they follow. To focus on more influential Twitter accounts, we restricted our sample to those followed by at least 3 individual Congressional staff members. Of the 30,843 accounts followed by the 115 Congressional health policy staff, 1273 were potentially policy-related and followed by 3 or more staff. Of these, few were academically affiliated (2.4%) or explicitly health-related (5.6%) sites; many were general news media sources (50.9%) and political and governmental sources (36.4%). Health-focused accounts were frequently connected to the news media or government rather than academia. Top accounts followed (ie, highest quintile) were most likely to be national news organizations (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-19.7) and elected officials (OR, 8.22; 95% CI, 1.75-38.6) compared with advocacy and interest groups. Health-related and academic sources are largely absent from the Twitter conversations with US Congressional health policy staff. Even within social media, traditional and political news media are important information intermediaries that researchers and journals should target to disseminate health policy evidence.

  1. Development of a medical academic degree system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of 'credits' that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International - a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord, setting up a system of easily comparable and

  2. Job Satisfaction of Academics: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Taylor, Maria de Lourdes; White, Kate; Gouveia, Odilia

    2014-01-01

    Academic work in higher education has been influenced by global trends such as accountability, massification and deteriorating financial support. Within this broader context, the performance of academic staff as teachers and researchers has an impact on student learning and implications for the quality of higher education institutions (HEIs).…

  3. Managing "Academic Value": The 360-Degree Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret R.; Corr, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    The "raison d'etre" of all universities is to create and deliver "academic value", which we define as the sum total of the contributions from the 360-degree "angles" of the academic community, including all categories of staff, as well as external stakeholders (e.g. regulatory, commercial, professional and community…

  4. Performance management and academic workload in higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Higher Education system is in a state of rapid flux. Various factors are rendering education vulnerable to destructive influences. It has become imperative for academic managers to ensure that academic staff function productively. Management information systems which will generate correct information as ...

  5. Academic Integrity: Information Systems Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaney, Roger; Cronan, Timothy Paul; Douglas, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic integrity receives a great deal of attention in institutions of higher education. Universities and colleges provide specific honor codes or have administrative units to promote good behaviors and resolve dishonesty allegations. Students, faculty, and staff have stakes in maintaining high levels of academic integrity to ensure their…

  6. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Marshall, N.W.; Rawlings, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  8. Factors relating to the attraction of talented early career academics in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcas L. Lesenyeho

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: South African higher education institutions (HEIs are facing significant challenges in attracting talents to academic positions. Research purpose: The main objective of this research was to determine factors that will attract early career academics to South African HEIs. Motivation for the study: Currently there exists limited research on factors that attract early career academics to HEIs as preferred employers. Research approach, design and method: A qualitative approach was adopted for this study; semi-structured interviews were conducted to gain data. The study participants comprised of 23 academic staff members from various merged South African HEIs. Main findings: The findings show that nine themes are related to the attraction of early career academics to HEIs: career development and advancement, opportunities to make a contribution, employer branding and prestige, job security, flexible working hours (work–life balance, intellectual stimulation, innovation, opportunity to apply skills and autonomy. Practical/managerial implications: The results also challenge HEIs to develop a superior employer brand with a strong employee value proposition (EVP that would attract, develop and reward early career academics for their work efforts. Contribution/value-add: The study provides important practical guidelines that could assist HEIs to attract talented early career academics and become an employer of choice.

  9. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  10. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  11. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  12. Staff Performance Analysis: A Method for Identifying Brigade Staff Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ... members of conventional mounted brigade staff. Initial analysis of performance requirements in existing documentation revealed that the performance specifications were not sufficiently detailed for brigade battle staffs...

  13. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  14. Academics in Academia: the Forgotten Resource in the Rush to New Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim S Roberts

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Suffice to say that I'm leaving in large part because it's not much fun any more, and the directions of the university are not mine. I'm not the first, and I won't be the last.(Farewell Email from N.M., April 2000 The rush to the use of advanced learning technologies has left many academics dazed and confused. The above excerpt, a direct quotation from a well-respected and admired academic, in many ways prompted the writing of this paper. Why isn’t it much fun any more? What are these new directions currently being explored by many universities, and why are they not viewed favorably by many staff? And how is it possible for universities to explore these new directions, and yet still retain an environment that the majority of academics find professionally rewarding and enjoyable?

  15. The academic quilting bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Anita P; Files, Julia A; Ko, Marcia G; Blair, Janis E

    2009-03-01

    In medicine, the challenges faced by female faculty members who are attempting to achieve academic advancement have been well described. Various strategies have been proposed to increase academic productivity to aid the promotion of women in medicine. We propose an innovative collaboration strategy that encourages completion of an academic writing project. This strategy acknowledges the challenges inherent in achieving work-life balance and utilizes a collaborative work style with a group of peer physicians. The model is designed to encourage the completion and collation of independently prepared sections of an academic paper within a setting that emphasizes social networking and collaboration. This approach has many similarities to the construction of a quilt during a "quilting bee."

  16. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Fen; Jin, Jing-Fen; Feng, Xiu-Qin; Huang, Xin; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    .001). A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements.

  17. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang HF

    2015-03-01

    top type of error regarding administration route, but it continuously decreased from 64 (first half-year of 2012 to 27 (first half-year of 2014. More experienced registered nurses made fewer medication errors. The number of MAEs in surgical wards was twice that in medicinal wards. Compared with non-intensive care units, the intensive care units exhibited higher occurrence rates of MAEs (1.81% versus 0.24%, P<0.001. Conclusion: A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements. Keywords: medication administration, medication errors, nurse, quality improvements

  18. An Examination of How Academic Advancement of U.S. Journalism Students Relates to Their Degree Motivations, Values, and Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Serena; Hoag, Anne; Grant, August E.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The newsroom is a powerful influence in a journalist's identity formation. Research has yet to verify the socializing impact of academia. This research utilized the quantitative survey method applying it to undergraduate journalism students (n = 798) to assess how academic status relates to students' degree motivations, life values, and technology…

  19. Research Staff | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff desc Greg Wilson Center Director Dr. Greg Wilson is the Director of @nrel.gov 303-384-6649 Bosco, Nicholas Staff Scientist Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov 303-384-6337 Braunecker, Wade IV-Physics Michael.Deceglie@nrel.gov 303-384-6104 Deline, Chris Staff Engineer Chris.Deline@nrel.gov

  20. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows : as from 1 July 2002 Article R IV 1.41 - Method of adjustment of the amount of subsistence indemnity (page 53) as from 1 January 2003 Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2002/2003, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2002 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2003, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  2. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  3. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2002: Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73). Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74). Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81). Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2001/2002, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2001 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2002, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web HERE Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  4. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  5. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  6. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fifth Chief of Staff Division, namely Finance, is the end result of ... 1946 was able to report in 1948 that there had ... the same time however, the Secretary referred ... mended that because 'the existing dual arrange- ... tigate the division of functions in the Department. ... randum discussing the different arguments sur-.

  7. Staff Development Redesigned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Contends that staff development, supposedly designed to assist teachers, has instead colluded with forces to continue their colonization. Since teachers are not taking charge of their profession and participating actively in educational change, certain actions must be taken to lighten their nonprofessional workload and to build a professional…

  8. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), France. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  9. Institutionalizing Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, William F.

    Three years ago, Golden West College (GWC) decided to make a major commitment to staff development as a means of revitalizing the college. This commitment was evidenced through the creation of the position of Dean of Educational Development, who is responsible solely for serving faculty needs; the Educational Development Center, which houses the…

  10. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  11. Bibliotherapy and aging phobia among Covenant University staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading is one of life's greatest pleasures and opens the door to culture, knowledge and independence. It can be very therapeutic. This study examines the effect of bibliotherapy on aging phobia among Covenant University academic and senior staff. The result shows that reading of books has influenced positively their ...

  12. A Safe and Welcoming Place?: Workplace Progression for Women Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Jean; O'Rourke, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with seven women lecturers and five administrative/library staff at Leeds University uncovered the following: differential career paths for women and men; a link between the extent of career progression and working full or part time; and few opportunities for gender issues to be openly discussed in the academic workplace. (SK)

  13. 1978-79 Directory of Physics & Astronomy Staff Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Inst. of Physics, New York, NY.

    This directory gives names, addresses, and telephone numbers of staff members of astronomy and physics departments. The listings are made under the following headings: (1) American Institute of Physics and its member societies; (2) geographic listing of academic institutions and faculty - U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Central America; (3) U.S.…

  14. Full Spectrum Operations: An Analysis of Course Content at the Command and General Staff College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, II, Frank L

    2008-01-01

    .... This monograph examined the Intermediate Level Education, the Advanced Military Studies Program, and the Tactical Commanders Development Program curricula at the Command and General Staff College...

  15. Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Melanie E.

    1999-01-01

    The academic profession is an occupation in which pay has fallen dramatically, resulting in the setting up of a Committee of Inquiry to examine both pay relativities and mechanisms for pay determination. This paper considers salary determination and the gender salary gap in the academic labour market drawing upon a particularly detailed data set of 900 academics from five traditional Scottish Universities. Results reveal an aggregate gender salary differential for academic staff of 15%. Most ...

  16. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study attempted to investigate students' self reported academic dishonesty in Ethiopian ... university programs can play a key role in ... serious problem in establishing academic ... and Rocha 2006); Asian-Pacific, ... and self-adjustment mediates the ..... In my suggestion, it is better that ..... Comparative and International.

  17. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  18. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  19. Staff nurse clinical leadership: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Eduardo C; Yoder, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a concept analysis of staff nurse clinical leadership (SNCL). A clear delineation of SNCL will promote understanding and encourage communication of the phenomenon. Clarification of the concept will establish a common understanding of the concept, and advance the practice, education, and research of this phenomenon. A review of the literature was conducted using several databases. The databases were searched using the following keywords: clinical leadership, nursing, bedside, staff nurse, front-line, front line, and leadership. The search yielded several sources; however, only those that focused on clinical leadership demonstrated by staff nurses in acute care hospital settings were selected for review. SNCL is defined as staff nurses who exert significant influence over other individuals in the healthcare team, and although no formal authority has been vested in them facilitates individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared clinical objectives. The theoretical definition for SNCL within the team context will provide a common understanding of this concept and differentiate it from other types of leadership in the nursing profession. This clarification and conceptualization of the concept will assist further research of the concept and advance its practical application in acute care hospital settings. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  1. Characterizing the adequacy, effectiveness, and barriers related to research mentorship among junior pediatric hospitalists and general pediatricians at a large academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Vaughn, Lisa M; Klein, Melissa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to characterize the adequacy, effectiveness, and barriers related to research mentorship among junior pediatric hospitalists and general pediatricians at a large academic institution. Junior faculty and staff physicians in hospital medicine and general pediatrics at a large academic institution were invited to participate in this qualitative study. In-depth interviews were conducted. Experienced mentors were invited to be interviewed for theoretical sampling. Interviews were conducted and analyzed by using grounded theory methodology. Twenty-six (75%) of the eligible physicians, pediatric hospitalists representing 65% of this sample, agreed to be interviewed about their mentoring experiences. Satisfied and dissatisfied participants expressed similar mentoring themes: acquisition of research skills, academic productivity, and career development. Four experienced mentors were interviewed and provided rationale for mentoring clinicians in research. Both groups of participants agreed that institutional support is vital for promoting mentorship. Junior pediatric hospitalists and general pediatricians indicated considerable interest in being mentored to learn to do clinical research. Developing faculty and staff physicians to their utmost potential is critical for advancement in academic medicine. Mentoring clinical physicians seeking to add research skills and academic productivity to their practice merits study as an innovative path to develop clinical investigators. Hospital medicine, as a rapidly developing pediatric specialty, is well-positioned to implement the necessary infrastructure to mentor junior faculty in their academic pursuits, thereby optimizing the potential impact for individuals, families, learners, and institutions.

  2. Directorate of Management - Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGB Official March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J-7 J-8 Personal Staff Inspector General Judge Advocate General Officer Management Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  3. Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  4. Perceptions of staff at Eastern Cape Technikon on the value and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to determine the perceptions of staff at Eastern Cape Technikon on the value and effectiveness of linkage partnerships. Academic staff indicated that the main reason for their involvement in these projects is capacity building. Apart from the development of skills and competencies they also rate ...

  5. Quality and Qualms in the Marking of University Assignments by Sessional Staff: An Exploratory Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Coombe, Kennece

    2006-01-01

    The higher education sector is increasingly reliant upon casual ("sessional") staff for teaching and marking purposes. While this practice has been little examined in the past, over the last few years increasing attention has been paid to the quality of marking, mainly because students and academic staff alike are becoming increasingly…

  6. Imagined and Emerging Career Patterns: Perceptions of Doctoral Students and Research Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; Turner, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, research staff positions rather than lectureships are the reality for social sciences PhD graduates wishing academic work. Within this context, our longitudinal study examined how social science doctoral students and research staff in two UK universities imagined their futures in and out of academia. The variation over time in how…

  7. Exploiting the Potential of CD-ROM Databases: Staff Induction at the University of East Anglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Marie-Noelle; Kenning, Marie-Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Overviews a project exploring the possibility of using CD-ROM applications and the design of exploratory didactic materials to introduce academic staff to the field of computer-assisted instruction. The project heightened the staff's awareness of electronic resources and their potential as research, teaching, and learning aids, with particular…

  8. Maori in Partnership: A Peer Mentoring Model for Tertiary Indigenous Staff in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Ratima, Matiu

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a professional development programme which brought an indigenous minority group of tertiary staff together. We describe a peer-mentoring model, piloted in 2009 at The University of Auckland, New Zealand with university staff in order to promote staff advancement. The participants were all Maori, the indigenous people of New…

  9. Personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries: a case study of ... the level of staff development, identify the motivational factors of the library personnel, ... Questionnaire was used for this research as the main data collection ...

  10. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Key words: academic libraries, open access, research, researchers, technology ... European commission (2012) reports that affordable and easy access to the results ...

  11. Academic Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H C Felix

    2017-01-01

    Alternative modes of academic publication. What it is: Page for the dissemination of academic papers in alternative formats. Aimed at the diffusion of the idea of open publication, or open access publication, a branch of open science, a multidisciplinary movement that seeks to modify the paradigm of knowledge production that centralizes it and prevents its spreading. Historically, Western tradition has become firmly rooted in the free dissemination of knowledge among peers. However, the c...

  12. Building Social Justice among Academic Staffs of Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    Institutions, the Influence of Acculturation, Networking and. School Management .... research on predictors of social justice building among teachers, and how it is related ... Acculturation theory has historically focused on individual and group ... behaviors are used to build and maintain informal contacts that enhance career.

  13. Academic Staff Perception on Effective Planning of Information and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survey design was adopted and a researcher - developed questionnaire ... Government/institutions should provide among other things, a website or be connected to internet and procure up to date computers with genuine spare parts and ...

  14. Income Generation Activities among Academic Staffs at Malaysian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abd Rahman; Soon, Ng Kim; Ting, Ngeoh Pei

    2015-01-01

    Income generation activities have been acquainted among public higher education institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia. Various factors that brought to insufficient of funding caused Higher Education Institutions(HEIs) to seek for additional income as to support the operation expenses. Financial sustainability issues made up the significant impact…

  15. Research Staff | Water Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the water power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer /Editor/Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  16. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  17. Professor in Residence: An Innovative Academic-Practice Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinic, Katherine; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Silverstein, Wendy

    2017-12-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership between an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet ® -designated hospital and an academic nurse educator that has increased the hospital's capacity for research, evidence-based practice, and support for nurses continuing their education. Through close collaboration with the full-time nurse researcher and members of the nursing education department, the professor in residence consults with clinical staff to support completion of research and evidence-based practice projects. The collaboration also has resulted in the development of a formal year-long mentoring program for clinical nurses in the area of evidence-based practice. Individual support and academic consults are offered to nurses enrolled in school to promote advancement of nurses' educational level. This collaboration has been beneficial for both the hospital and the university, increasing the capacity for scholarly activities for nurses in the hospital and serving as a forum for ongoing faculty practice and scholarship. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):552-556. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Analysis of the Motivation and Work Climate of University Teaching Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    The scientific, social, economic and technological progress taking place in present-day advanced societies needs to be closely linked to the work of the university and to effectiveness, productivity and efficiency. Moreover, teaching staff play a predominant role and are the best point of reference for any changes to be introduced in teaching, in the way to manage classes, in the use of tools, changes in methodology or teaching strategies, and also in the ways students learn, etc. The teacher ceases to be a figure who only transmits knowledge and becomes a guide or facilitator of learning. The teacher, therefore, takes on a different commitment with the ways of learning, of approaching students, guiding tutorials, assessing student learning, etc. For these reasons staff motivationisone of the basic concerns. It would be expected that a demotivated staff with few incentives and a low opinion of their worth as teachers would be less committed to their teaching, research and management work, and as a result would achieve less success in their work with students. To put it another way, they would perform worse in all they do. But could it be that their vocation as teachers and the professionalism of university staff are sufficient motivating factors in themselves? The concepts of work climate, motivation and demotivation of teaching staff, feeling uneasy with teaching or academic work, conflicts of communication, a deterioration in relationships with colleagues, etc., are phrases that are heard more and more in the work environment. Most of these phrases would seem to be related to academic performance or the way of becoming involved in the centre's activities or to other variables which until proved are only supposition. It is for these reasons that we have wished to analyse the situation of teaching staff in universities in Madrid. In university organisations the teaching staff is one of the key elements that leads to work being done more or less effectively. Human

  19. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  20. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2005 Internal taxation of remuneration, payments and other financial benefits (New articles IV 2.01, R IV 2.01 to 2.04 pages 56 bis & 56 ter; Annex R A 1 bis page 73 bis) 1 September 2005 Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01 page 81) for the academic year 2005/2006 1 November 2005 Age limit (Article R II 6.04 page 37) 1 January 2006 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 page 73 & Annex R A 2 page 74 respectively). Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4 page 76) New contract policy for staff members (Articles R II 1.19 & 1.20 page 15, R II 1.23 page 16, II 6.01 page 36, R II 6.02 & R II 6.06 page 37, VIII 1.03 page 68, R A 9.01 page 83). Copies of this update (modification # 15) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following addr...

  2. Teaching matters-academic professional development in the early 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnert, Beatrix

    2015-10-01

    Academic work at different career stages has changed and a broadened portfolio of expertise enables academics to adapt, maintain and advance their career. Development related to research activity is naturally driven by methodology and technology. Institutions and peers largely support development in the contexts of dissemination, measuring impact and obtaining funding. A European Commission High Level Group recommended pedagogic training for everyone teaching in Higher Education by 2020 with mandatory continuing professional development and with academic staff recruitment and promotion being linked to teaching performance. Early career teaching experience is already an expectation, and advantage is gained by developing recognized teaching expertise. More senior academics gain an advantage through recognition of higher levels of expertise, also covering elements of leadership and innovation in teaching. This review aims to raise awareness particularly of teaching-related skills within the dimensions of academic professional development in Higher Education, outlining some general directions for development and recognition in context of current challenges to support planning and identifying training needs and opportunities at different career stages. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved.

  3. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  4. Challenging Perspectives on Learning and Teaching in the Disciplines: The Academic Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kerri-Lee D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of academic staff perspectives on disciplinary communities and skill development in disciplinary contexts. Fifty-five academic staff were interviewed across eight disciplines in four Australian universities. Responses of historians and mathematicians are the focus of this article. A socio-constructivist framework…

  5. Academic Workload and Working Time: Retrospective Perceptions versus Time-Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the validity of perceptions by academic staff about their past and present workload and working hours. Retrospective assessments are compared with time-series data. The data are drawn from four mail surveys among academic staff in Norwegian universities undertaken in the period 1982-2008. The findings show…

  6. The Difficult Patron in the Academic Library: Problem Issues or Problem Patrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds Patience L.; Ingold, Jane L.

    2002-01-01

    Identifies difficult patron issues in academic libraries from the librarians' perspectives and offers solutions to try and prevent them from becoming problems. Topics include labeling academic library users; eliminating sources of conflict between faculty and library staff; and conflicts between students and library staff. (Author/LRW)

  7. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  8. PEL Staff Together for the First Time | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer John-Paul Denson and Troy Taylor of the Protein Expression Laboratory (PEL) used to pack liters of Escherichia coli lysates on ice, put them in the back of a microvan, and drive across campus to deliver the samples for protein purification. Now that all PEL staff members are working under the same roof at the Advanced Technology Research Facility

  9. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fill...... some of the gaps. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was directed electronically towards expatriate academics occupying regular positions in science faculty departments in universities in northern Europe. Findings – Results showed that job clarity was the dominating job factor with strong...... relationships with all of the five investigated work outcome variables, work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and time to proficiency. Job conflict and job freedom had an association with some of the work outcome variables but not with all of them. Neither workload nor job...

  10. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so......This doctoral thesis explores the key transnational institutions of European law academia and their role in the creation of a constitutional legal practice in the European Community from 1961 to 1993. Consisting of three case studies, it investigates the transnational federation gathering...

  11. New directions for academic liaison librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Aimed at practitioners and students of librarianship, this book is about interesting and unusual practical projects currently being run by academic liaison librarians. It shows how liaison librarians can extend their roles beyond the established one of information literacy teaching and showcases areas in which they can engage in collaborative ventures with academic and administrative staff. Designed to excite and inspire, New Directions for Academic Liaison Librarians demonstrates the potential of the liaison role and emphasises the need for flexibility, imagination and initiative in those who

  12. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  13. Efforts Towards Gender Equity in Academic and Employment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Job-opportunities specify educational levels, types and quality, which an applicant must have to secure the job opportunity. As such ... in narrowing down the gap between female and male university students' enrolment in academic programmes and academics, technical and administrative staff in employment opportunities.

  14. Monitoring International Interest in Transnational Academic Mobility to Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This research examines the issue of transnational academic mobility of academic staff looking at potential moves to higher education institutions in Australia. By establishing a web-based portal, attracting interested parties from around the world with information about Australian universities and subsequent career opportunities, web analytics are…

  15. Contingent and Marginalised? Academic Development and Part-Time Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Academics employed on non-standard contracts are a numerically significant part of the labour market in higher education. Concerns about access to formal academic development for this staff group have been articulated in many countries in the context of increasing emphasis on teaching quality assessment and employment regulation of…

  16. University Academics' Experiences of Learning through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Trudy; Harvey, Marina; Cahir, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The use of mentoring for staff development is well established within schools and the business sector, yet it has received limited consideration in the higher education literature as an approach to supporting learning for academics. In this study located at one metropolitan university in Australia, an online questionnaire and one-on-one…

  17. Social Networking Tools for Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Samuel Kai-Wah; Du, Helen S.

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory study investigating the use of social networking tools in academic libraries, examining the extent of their use, library staff's perceptions of their usefulness and challenges, and factors influencing decisions to use or not to use such tools. Invitations to participate in a web-based survey were sent to 140 university…

  18. Women and the Decision to Leave, Linger, or Lean In: Predictors of Intent to Leave and Aspirations to Leadership and Advancement in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinas, Elizabeth H; Fouad, Nadya; Byars-Winston, Angela

    2018-03-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges reports continued low rates of female faculty as professors and in leadership positions. While attrition and discrimination have both been proposed as explanations, recent literature has suggested that women's professional motivations, ingrained behavior, and perceptions of organizational support may also play a role. The authors employed a series of scales informed by the turnover theory (which predicts intent to leave an organization), previously validated and used in business and engineering studies, but rarely used in academic medicine. The authors proposed and tested a multiple regression model to assess predictors (role strain, work-life balance, and organizational climate) for three outcome variables: seeking promotion, seeking leadership, and intent to leave. Survey results from 614 faculty members indicated that gender significantly influenced both promotion and leadership seeking, but not intent to leave. Perceived work-family conflict was negatively correlated with leadership seeking for women, but not for men. Positive views of organizational support and commitment were associated with promotion seeking and persistence for all participants. Role strain was positively correlated with desire for promotion and leadership, as well as with intent to leave. Female faculty may not be leaning in to promotion and leadership roles because of increased role conflict, work-life concerns, and organizational factors; this seems to be more of a factor for female clinical rather than research faculty. Work-family conflict affects male and female faculty differently and should be addressed in efforts to retain faculty and to remove barriers for female faculty seeking leadership opportunities.

  19. Academic dishonesty in dental education (A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Ardinansyah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic dishonesty which the most common are cheating or plagiarism. Several studies have shown that behavior of cheating and plagiarism as a major serious problem in academic institution worldwide especially in dentistry. Enforcement of academic ethic and integrity  in dentistry should involve institution and supported by the entire academic community of students, faculty, stakeholders and staff. Furthermore, dentistry education should create ethics curricula, which uphold academic integrity and ethical codes, starting with giving attitude of respect and humanism through the method that is known as pedagogy.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  1. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  2. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Billig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artículo sugiere que esta época es la mejor y peor para la labor académica. La mejor en cuanto hay más publicaciones académicas que nunca. Y la peor porque sobra mucho de estas publicaciones. Trabajando en las condiciones competitivas del capitalismo académico, los académicos se sienten en la necesidad de continuar publicando, independientemente de que tengan algo que decir. Las presiones de publicar continuamente y promover la propia perspectiva se reflejan en la manera en la que los científicos sociales están escribiendo. Y es que los académicos utilizan un lenguaje técnico basado en sustantivos, con una precisión menor a la del lenguaje ordinario. Los estudiantes de postgrado han sido educados en esta manera de escribir como una condición previa a iniciarse en las ciencias sociales. Así, la naturaleza misma del capitalismo académico no sólo determina las condiciones en las que los académicos trabajan, sino que también afecta su manera de escribir.


    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scientists are writing. Academics use a noun-based technical language, which is less precise than ordinary language. Postgraduates are taught this way of writing as a precondition for entering the social sciences. In this way, the nature of academic capitalism not only determines the conditions under which academics are working but it affects the way that they are writing.

  3. Sharing of information and knowledge among staff in King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) library

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes strategies and initiatives undertaken by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) library in sharing information and knowledge among its staff. KAUST Library adopted several IT platforms to enable staff to contribute, share, collaborate, extract and act upon knowledge in order to serve our users better. They include: Sharepoint and Google Docs. As Duffy (2000) stated, that “success depends on capitalizing on every available resource including what a company knows and how it uses what it knows”. Therefore, to provide value-added services to our community of researchers and academicians, library staff needs to be equipped with the right skills and tools to be able to act upon users’ inquiries and information needs. KAUST library which was opened in Aug 2009 aims to support education and advanced scientific research. With its state of the art learning and information resource center, the library provides instructional assistance and reference services to its research and academic community. With the influx of information coupled the pervasive use of information technology and Web2.0, the library has to grapple with the issue of information overload. It is important to be able to sieve through the rubbles of information to apply the relevant ones during the point of transaction. Based on our experience in using various IT platforms, this paper will share the impacts of such tools. Lessons learnt and future directions in this area will also be discussed.

  4. Youth and Academic and Educational Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Zokaei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The empirical studies undertaken on academic culture in Iran suggest an inefficient academic acculturation and students alienation from the structure and process of a desired academic culture. A sense of powerlessness, normlessness, anomie, social isolation and in general strangement from the self, educational processes, unverrsity camp, academic staff members and also from other students is increasingly growing in the minds and feelings of a considerable number of higher education students in humanities and social sciences. Drawing on a mixed methodology, the following paper aims to reconstruct the phenomenology of academic and educational alienation based on students personal lived experience and narrativity. Apart from accounting for internal and external social factors affecting this experience, we have proposed a typology of the types of alienation experienced by different groups of students and the strategies they have adopted to counter it. Results suggest that alienation is directly affected by culture politics and involves different social, psychological, and economic consequences in their lives.

  5. Is past academic productivity predictive of radiology resident academic productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Stephanie K; Fitzgerald, James T; Boyse, Tedric D; Cohan, Richard H

    2002-02-01

    The authors performed this study to determine whether academic productivity in college and medical school is predictive of the number of publications produced during radiology residency. The authors reviewed the records of 73 radiology residents who completed their residency from 1990 to 2000. Academic productivity during college, medical school, and radiology residency, other postgraduate degrees, and past careers other than radiology were tabulated. The personal essay attached to the residency application was reviewed for any stated academic interest. Residents were classified as being either previously productive or previously unproductive. Publication rates during residency and immediately after residency were compared for the two groups. For the productive residents, a correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between past frequency of publication and type of previous activity. Least-squares regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between preresidency academic productivity, advanced degrees, stated interest in academics, and other careers and radiology residency publications. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of articles published by those residents who were active and those who were not active before residency (P = .21). Only authorship of papers as an undergraduate was weakly predictive of residency publication. These selected measures of academic productivity as an undergraduate and during medical school are not helpful for predicting publication during residency. There was no difference in publication potential between those residents who were academically productive in the past and those who were not.

  6. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2001 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 and Annex R A 2 respectively). These scales include the correction approved in June 2001 of the discrepancy of 0.3% in the net salary adjustment on 1 January 2001. Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4). Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01) for the academic year 2000/2001, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2000. Periodic reviews of the financial conditions of members of the personel (Annex A1). 1 July 2001 Various drafting amendments adopted in order to ensure greater coherence between the texts, the procedures and actual practice. 1 September 2001 Implementation of the new career structure. Copies of these updates are available in the divisional secretariats.

  7. Women in academic general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Brownstein, Michelle R; Sheldon, George F

    2004-04-01

    To portray the professional experiences of men and women in academic general surgery with specific attention to factors associated with differing academic productivity and with leaving academia. A 131-question survey was mailed to all female (1,076) and a random 2:1 sample of male (2,152) members of the American College of Surgeons in three mailings between September 1998 and March 1999. Detailed questions regarding academic rank, career aspirations, publication rate, grant funding, workload, harassment, income, marriage and parenthood were asked. A five-point Likert scale measured influences on career satisfaction. Responses from strictly academic and tenure-track surgeons were analyzed and interpreted by gender, age, and rank. Overall, 317 surgeons in academic practice (168 men, 149 women) responded, of which 150 were in tenure-track positions (86 men, 64 women). Men and women differed in academic rank, tenure status, career aspirations, and income. Women surgeons had published a median of ten articles compared with 25 articles for men (p career satisfaction was high, but women reported feeling career advancement opportunities were not equally available to them as to their male colleagues and feeling isolation from surgical peers. Ten percent to 20% of surgeons considered leaving academia, with women assistant professors (29%) contemplating this most commonly. Addressing the differences between men and women academic general surgeons is critical in fostering career development and in recruiting competitive candidates of both sexes to general surgery.

  8. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  9. Managing the academic talent void: Investigating factors in academic turnover and retention in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Theron

    2014-04-01

    Research purpose: This study aimed to investigate the factors that influence turnover and retention of academic and to validate the developed talent retention diagnostic tool for use in South African higher education institutions. Motivation for the study: Limited research currently exists on the retention factors of academic staff in the South African context. Research approach, design and method: Using an investigative quantitative research approach, the tool was administered to a convenience sample of academics (n = 153 in 13 higher education institutions. Main findings: The results showed an array of distinguishing turnover and retention factors and proved the tool to be a valid and reliable measure. Over half the respondents indicated slight to strong dissatisfaction with compensation and performance management practices. Significantly, 34% indicated that they considered exiting their academic institution, citing unhappiness about compensation, as the most likely reason, whilst 74.5% have previously looked for another job. Practical/managerial implications: The research highlights key areas (i.e. compensation, emotional recognition, a bonus structure that reflects employee contribution, performance management systems, mentorship and career development opportunities that higher education should attend to if they want to retain their key and talented academic staff. Contribution/value-add: The results contribute to new knowledge on the factors that contribute to turnover and retention of academic staff and present a valid and reliable measure to assess these retention factors.

  10. A Comparative Study Examining Academic Cohorts with Transnational Migratory Intentions towards Canada and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, John

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the issue of transnational academic mobility of academic staff, those choosing to migrate to higher education institutions in different countries as part of their career development, and performs a comparative study between the characteristics of academics examining Australia as a possible migratory destination with those…

  11. Monitoring International Interest in Transnational Academic Mobility to Australia: A Mixed-Method Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, John L.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, the issue of transnational academic mobility of academic staff, considering moves to higher education institutions in Australia, was examined using a web-based portal that attracted interested parties from around the world with information about Australian academic career opportunities. Web analytics were used as the research…

  12. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  13. Psychological impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on university staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline; Carter, Frances; Boden, Joseph; Wilkinson, Tim; McKenzie, Jan; Ali, Anthony

    2016-02-19

    To assess the impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on the psychological functioning of university staff, to identify predictors of adverse psychological functioning and to survey how different aspects of work roles (academic, teaching, clinical, administrative) were affected. Eighteen months following the most severe earthquake, 119 staff from the University of Otago based in Christchurch completed a retrospective survey. This included demographic information, a measure of earthquake exposure, standardised and self-rated measures to identify psychological distress and measures of how people perceived different aspects of their work roles were impacted. A substantial minority of staff reported moderate-extreme difficulties on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) subscales 18 months following the most severe earthquake (Depression=9%; Anxiety=3%; Stress =13%). Predictors of distress were higher levels of exposure to earthquake-related stressors, neuroticism and prior mental health disorders. There was an association between impact and work roles that was hierarchical; academic and administrative roles were most affected, followed by teaching with the least impact on clinical roles. This study shows that psychological symptoms following a disaster are common, but in a retrospective survey most people report that these improve with time. A minority however, continue to report difficulties which persist even 18 months post disaster. It also gives insights into how different work roles were impacted and from this makes suggestions for how organisations can support staff over difficult times.

  14. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  15. Transforming rural health systems through clinical academic leadership: lessons from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, J E; Couper, I D; Campbell, D; Walker, J

    2013-01-01

    Under-resourced and poorly managed rural health systems challenge the achievement of universal health coverage, and require innovative strategies worldwide to attract healthcare staff to rural areas. One such strategy is rural health training programs for health professionals. In addition, clinical leadership (for all categories of health professional) is a recognised prerequisite for substantial improvements in the quality of care in rural settings. Rural health training programs have been slow to develop in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); and the impact of clinical leadership is under-researched in such settings. A 2012 conference in South Africa, with expert input from South Africa, Canada and Australia, discussed these issues and produced recommendations for change that will also be relevant in other LMICs. The two underpinning principles were that: rural clinical leadership (both academic and non-academic) is essential to developing and expanding rural training programs and improving care in LMICs; and leadership can be learned and should be taught. The three main sets of recommendations focused on supporting local rural clinical academic leaders; training health professionals for leadership roles in rural settings; and advancing the clinical academic leadership agenda through advocacy and research. By adopting the detailed recommendations, South Africa and other LMICs could energise management strategies, improve quality of care in rural settings and impact positively on rural health outcomes.

  16. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the "knowledge nexus" for their academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or "nexus" for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process.

  17. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  19. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  20. Retention of Mohs surgeons in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Mina, Mary Alice; Brown, Marc D; Zwald, Fiona O

    2015-08-01

    Retention of academic Mohs surgeons is important for the growth of this specialty and teaching of residents and students. To examine factors that influence retention of Mohs surgeons in academics and to better understand reasons for their departure. A survey was electronically distributed to academic Mohs surgeons in the American College of Mohs Surgery, asking them to rate the importance of several variables on their decision to remain in academia. Private practice Mohs surgeons who had left academics were also surveyed. Two hundred thirty-six dermatologic surgeons completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent work full time in academics, and approximately 7% work part time. The top reasons for practicing in the academic setting are intellectual stimulation, teaching opportunities, and collaboration with other university physicians and researchers. Seventy-one percent of respondents reported they would stay in academics, 7% indicated they would not, and 22% were unsure. Unfair compensation, inadequate support staff, poor leadership, increased bureaucracy, and decreased autonomy were top reasons that may compel a Mohs surgeon to leave. Opportunities for intellectual stimulation, collaboration, and teaching remain the main draw for academic Mohs surgeons. A supportive environment, strong leadership, and establishing fair compensation are imperative in ensuring their stay.

  1. Chief of staff finance | Lillie | Scientia Militaria: South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (1982) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Chief of staff finance. Ashley C ...

  2. Establishing a method to support academic and professional competence throughout an undergraduate radiography programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Curtise K.C.; White, Peter; McKay, Janice C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Radiography degree programmes are coming under increasing pressure from the community to ensure that graduates have not only the necessary academic development but also the practice-based skills. This study aims to establish a method of monitoring students' progress towards, and ability to meet, academic and professional competences throughout a radiography programme. Methods: Questionnaires were designed for students and academic staff to determine the stages and standards of progress of competence development, and to inform the review process of the current assessment tools throughout the programme. A literature search identified the appropriate pedagogy as a basis for devising the method. Another questionnaire was distributed to overseas radiography institutions to gain insights into other assessment practices to validate the framework. Results and discussion: It was established that years of study rather than semester periods were appropriate to allow students to meet the standards. Discrepancies were noted in the expectations between academic staff (higher expectations) and students (more realistic) in terms of the pace of development expected. As students progress at different rates, and do not experience the same clinical exposure, their ability to meet expectations may differ and so both sets of expectations were combined as a range of criteria. A multi-dimensional assessment approach should be adequate to gauge students' progress but time and resource effectiveness has not yet been addressed. The portfolio was identified as the pedagogy capable of integrating all the competence assessment tools, linked by reflective writing, to gather individual outcomes into a whole, and form a holistic framework. Outcome: The portfolio framework will initially run as a voluntary activity and standards of progress corresponding to the students' stages will be delivered to participants in advance. Participants will be required to select materials and reflect on

  3. Establishing a method to support academic and professional competence throughout an undergraduate radiography programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Curtise K.C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: or.curtis@polyu.edu.hk; White, Peter [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htpwhite@polyu.edu.hk; McKay, Janice C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htjanmck@polyu.edu.hk

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: Radiography degree programmes are coming under increasing pressure from the community to ensure that graduates have not only the necessary academic development but also the practice-based skills. This study aims to establish a method of monitoring students' progress towards, and ability to meet, academic and professional competences throughout a radiography programme. Methods: Questionnaires were designed for students and academic staff to determine the stages and standards of progress of competence development, and to inform the review process of the current assessment tools throughout the programme. A literature search identified the appropriate pedagogy as a basis for devising the method. Another questionnaire was distributed to overseas radiography institutions to gain insights into other assessment practices to validate the framework. Results and discussion: It was established that years of study rather than semester periods were appropriate to allow students to meet the standards. Discrepancies were noted in the expectations between academic staff (higher expectations) and students (more realistic) in terms of the pace of development expected. As students progress at different rates, and do not experience the same clinical exposure, their ability to meet expectations may differ and so both sets of expectations were combined as a range of criteria. A multi-dimensional assessment approach should be adequate to gauge students' progress but time and resource effectiveness has not yet been addressed. The portfolio was identified as the pedagogy capable of integrating all the competence assessment tools, linked by reflective writing, to gather individual outcomes into a whole, and form a holistic framework. Outcome: The portfolio framework will initially run as a voluntary activity and standards of progress corresponding to the students' stages will be delivered to participants in advance. Participants will be required to select materials

  4. Checklist for Staff Technology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Presents a planning checklist for staff technology training. Includes forming a committee and developing proposals, contacting pertinent people, handling publicity, sending invitations, distributing schedules/registration information, arranging for equipment, purchasing prizes, conducting preliminary checks on equipment and software, ordering…

  5. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  6. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  7. New Roles, New Responsibilities: Examining Training Needs of Repository Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Simons

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Institutional repositories play a critical role in the research lifecycle. Funding agencies are increasingly seeking an improved return on their investment in research. Repositories facilitate this process by providing storage of, and access to, institutional research outputs and, more recently, research data. While repositories are generally managed within the academic library, repository staff require different skills and knowledge compared with traditional library roles. This study reports on a survey of Australasian institutional repository staff to identify skills and knowledge sets. METHODS Institutional repository staff working at universities in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate in an online survey which incorporated both open and closed-ended question types. RESULTS The survey found significant gaps in the current provision of formal training and coursework related to institutional repositories, which echoed findings in the United Kingdom, Italy, and the United States. DISCUSSION There is clearly a need for more and varied training opportunities for repository professionals. Repository work requires a specific set of skills that can be difficult to find and institutions will benefit from investing in training and ongoing development opportunities for repository staff. CONCLUSION The data from this study could be used to facilitate staff recruitment, development, training, and retention strategies.

  8. Theorising and Analysing Academic Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Allmer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to contextualise universities historically within capitalism and to analyse academic labour and the deployment of digital media theoretically and critically. It argues that the post-war expansion of the university can be considered as medium and outcome of informational capitalism and as a dialectical development of social achievement and advanced commodification. The article strives to identify the class position of academic workers, introduces the distinction between academic work and labour, discusses the connection between academic, information and cultural work, and suggests a broad definition of university labour. It presents a theoretical model of working conditions that helps to systematically analyse the academic labour process and to provide an overview of working conditions at universities. The paper furthermore argues for the need to consider the development of education technologies as a dialectics of continuity and discontinuity, discusses the changing nature of the forces and relations of production, and the impact on the working conditions of academics in the digital university. Based on Erik Olin Wright’s inclusive approach of social transformation, the article concludes with the need to bring together anarchist, social democratic and revolutionary strategies for establishing a socialist university in a commons-based information society.

  9. Employee Assistance Programs in Higher Education. Alcohol, Mental Health and Professional Development Programming for Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Richard W., Ed.; Hosokawa, Elizabeth P., Ed.

    The promotion of employee assistance programs (EAP) in higher education is considered in 24 chapters, with an emphasis on enhancing resources and the academic environment for faculty and staff. Seven topical areas are addressed: history of EAP; characteristics of higher education; alcoholism and other risks in the academic life-style; EAP models…

  10. A staff shortage in Canada?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, P.

    1995-01-01

    Attrition of experienced staff, falling student enrolments and closure of university courses are symptoms of the contraction of the Canadian nuclear industry over the last two decades. It is not alone. A study carried out by Human Resources Development Canada, a government department, to forecast the demand for qualified nuclear staff in Canada over the next 15 years has reached similar conclusions to an OECD/NEA study of its members' future personnel requirements. (author)

  11. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  12. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... individual staff sections in the brigade command post. The program was designed to deliver training to newly formed, inexperienced staffs conducting the staff functions that support the military decision-making process within the execution phase...

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  14. Contextualising change through a common strategy: Lecturers' perceptions and key role in supporting academic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindelan, Paz; Martin, Ana

    2014-05-01

    European universities are currently going through a process of change in order to meet the common goals set for higher education by the European Commission. They are revising their educational models to adjust them to the guidelines of the "Bologna Process" and are devising an institutional strategy for its implementation. In practical terms, this means aligning former national degrees and diplomas to standard European Bachelor and Masters degrees and PhD doctorates, by creating acknowledged professional qualification benchmarks that also include adjusted course lengths and contents. This process, in the end, mostly affects academic staff members who have a fundamental role to play in carrying out the pedagogical reforms on the teaching front. Besides presenting a commentary on the institutional approach of one particular technical university in Spain, the purpose of this paper is to propose, from the authors' point of view as lecturers, a strategy which has the potential to create a favourable atmosphere for carrying out such a reform. The article's main objective is to highlight a series of action points which may serve to reinforce and advance the main institutional strategy by relying on the powerful influence of its academic staff members.

  15. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    organizations.Today, the full range of human activities entrusted to the personnel service of organizations. Educational institutions are involved only in the process of learning and, as a rule, stand apart from the rest of the personnel requirements of organizations (according to the principle: “We gave you the knowledge, and then you are by yourself…”. It is practically impossible to create a large-scale system of continuous development of managerial staff in the organizations without continuous interaction of personnel services in organizations, and educational institutions that have, both human and educational technologies.It is proposed to extend the learning process of the educational institutions in the state bodies and organizations through a system of cascading mentoring based on telecommunication technologies. The structure of the e-learning system provides means of creation, management and delivery of the content, means of organizing the learning process and interaction support of the participants. E-learning system provides system view of the educational process, when the main unit is not the academic discipline, and the formed administrative competence, around which the complex process of interaction between students, lecturers, learners and educational institutions exists. In the Academy of Management this interaction is carried out using the remote control SharePoint LMS learning system, which provides the high-quality implementation of the educational process. In the cascade mentoring system the distance learning is based on the modern telecommunication technologies and means of remote access to the distributed databases and knowledge of scientific, technical and educational information. The most promising model in this area is the open education, the dominant trend in the development of which becomes the student-centered learning model, taking into account the individual, personal qualities of each student and is based on the advanced pedagogical and

  16. Are all pharmacy staff interested in potential future roles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Rhiannon; Chesney, Kate Marie; Keast, Emilia Paulina; Ng, Lye Jinn; Qi, Sarah; Samaranayaka, Sashika; Wang, Eddie

    2012-12-01

    To determine the current perceived roles and responsibilities of pharmacy staff in community pharmacies in New Zealand, and attitudes to proposed new advanced roles for pharmacy staff. Structured interviews were conducted within five community pharmacies, including at least two pharmacists, two dispensary staff and two pharmacy assistants. The interviews were structured to determine previous experience, current roles and responsibilities and the perceived future roles of pharmacy staff within a community pharmacy setting. Thematic analysis from 27 interviews identified key findings. Current roles appeared to be fairly well defined. Pharmacy assistants listed key roles as customer interactions and sales focus, noting that the dispensary was outside their area of responsibility. Technicians identified their role as being dispensary focused while pharmacists saw their role as the 'final check' to ensure accuracy as well as providing dispensing, counselling and managerial roles. With potential future roles, the assistants were less interested than the other groups, citing contentment with current situation and training as a barrier. Some technicians indicated an interest in furthering their roles, but many were reluctant and saw that additional training was too time consuming. Whilst pharmacists appeared to be interested in further scopes of practice, they appeared more reluctant to do this at the expense of handing dispensing responsibility to a non-pharmacist. Whilst there is a push for pharmacists to provide advanced clinical services, it is important to acknowledge that many staff working within community pharmacies are satisfied with their current role. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Are Australasian academic physicians an endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A

    2007-11-01

    It has been stated that academic medicine is in a worldwide crisis. Is this decline in hospital academic practice a predictable consequence of modern clinical practice with its emphasis on community and outpatient-based services as well as a corporate health-care ethos or does it relate to innate problems in the training process and career structure for academic clinicians? A better understanding of the barriers to involvement in academic practice, including the effect of gender, the role and effect of overseas training, expectation of further research degrees and issues pertaining to the Australian academic workplace will facilitate recruitment and retention of the next generation of academic clinicians. Physician-scientists remain highly relevant as medical practice and education evolves in the 21st century. Hospital-based academics carry out a critical role in the ongoing mentoring of trainees and junior colleagues, whose training is still largely hospital based in most specialty programmes. Academic clinicians are uniquely placed to translate the rapid advances in medical biology into the clinical sphere, by guiding and carrying out translational research as well as leading clinical studies. Academic physicians also play key leadership in relations with government and industry, in professional groups and medical colleges. Thus, there is a strong case to assess the problems facing recruitment and retention of physician-scientists in academic practice and to develop workable solutions.

  18. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  19. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  20. Plagiarism and ghostwriting: The rise in academic misconduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawren Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the current situation regarding plagiarism and ghostwriting, and to stimulate debate about how universities should respond to the rise in these forms of academic misconduct. The apparent upsurge in academic misconduct means that universities today face one of the greatest challenges to academic integrity they have had to deal with ever since the university system came into existence some 800 years ago. Plagiarism and ghostwriting are undermining the integrity of university degrees to an extent not seen before. Academia and fraud are not strangers. Universities have a long history of cheating of one sort or another, often associated with examinations, but also with research. In the past this cheating involved activities such as smuggling notes (commonly called "crib sheets" into examinations, and consulting them even under the watchful eyes of invigilators. It also involved students obtaining sight of an examination paper in advance. The fraudulent creation of research results has also been an issue. However, in the 21st century, the opportunities for cheating have exploded. This has resulted in universities becoming more concerned about ensuring the integrity of their examination processes and the degrees they award. Our paper focuses on cheating in the writing of dissertations or theses required at undergraduate or postgraduate level, with an emphasis on plagiarism and ghostwriting. We do not propose a simple solution to these problems, as preventing or stopping cheating is not just a matter of catching the wrongdoers. Cheating is endogenous to the current university education system, and needs to be addressed in terms of not only prevention and detection but also how people who are found to engage in such misconduct are treated. We suggest that creative ways of promoting learning would help to minimise cheating at universities. It is also important to ensure that the issue is discussed openly among students

  1. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  2. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  3. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  4. Fostering Professional Nursing Careers in Hospitals: The Role of Staff Development, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovie, Margaret D.

    1983-01-01

    Building on the model of professional nursing careers presented in Part 1, the author discusses the aspects of professional maturation and professional mastery, focusing on the vital role of staff development for career advancement. (SK)

  5. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Itwas therefore recommended that efforts should be made to look into other pressing factors like self-esteem, teacher's attitude, student's attitude, parental background among others which may be influencing student's poor academic achievement. Key words: Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination, Academic ...

  6. Training of power station staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusserre, J.

    1993-01-01

    ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE currently operates 51 generating stations with 900 and 1300 MW Pressurized Water Reactors while, only 15 years ago, France possessed only a very small number of such stations. It was therefore vital to set up a major training organization to produce staff capable of starting, controlling and maintaining these facilities with a constant eye to improving quality and safety. Operator and maintenance staff training is based on highly-structured training plans designed to match both the post to be filled and the qualifications possessed by the person who is to fill it. It was essential to set up suitable high-performance training resources to handle this fast growth in staff. These resources are constantly being developed and allow EDF to make steady progress in a large number of areas, varying from the effects of human factors to the procedures to be followed during an accident

  7. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  8. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  9. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  10. Barriers to leadership positions for Indian women in academic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Shobha; Kohli, Anil; Bhalla, Sumati

    2007-10-01

    Indian women, have come up a long way during the past 50 years. Gone are the days when the leadership positions in dentistry and health care professions were occupied solely by males and the women in-charge were looked down upon as anomalies. The staff rooms in dental and medical schools, the research laboratories in India today are employing women, who have quietly begun challenging the conventional male ideas that had shaped the policies earlier on. Women have advanced considerably in academic dentistry but like every coin, this story too, has two sides. In spite of the considerable gain in equity of status, women in research and academic careers related to health care professions still face innumerable barriers to their careers. This study was conducted with an aim to highlight the various barriers being faced by women in leadership positions in academic dentistry in India and this paper also suggests issues which require global concern for unbiased advancement of women. This was a questionnaire-based study in which the subjects were women in leadership positions in the various dental colleges in India. The questions are related to the various barriers like family commitments, attitude of the society, sexual harassment, gender bias and lack of cooperation from spouse which hinders the development of the careers of such women with tremendous potential. The results show that 67% of the subjects feel there are more barriers to their careers as women than men and health care professions definitely need more women leaders for improvement in women's health status globally. 63.5% of women in dentistry feel their family commitments are barriers to rising in their careers and 64.7% report that a marriage is happier if the husband's career graph is better than wife's. The survey results indicate that the same salary is paid to 93.5% women as their male colleagues. The results of the study show that there certainly has been a change in outlook of Indian women as they have

  11. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  12. Community Relations - Public Affairs - Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Public Affairs : Community Relations Community Relations The National Guard Bureau Civic Engagement Report National Commission of the Future of the Army White Papers I am the Guard ARNG Media ARNG Public Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  13. Noninstructional Staff Perceptions of the College Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Molly H.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored staff perception of organizational climate, including the impact of gender on staff interactions with faculty and students and staff perceptions of workplace satisfaction within the community college. The overarching research question guiding this study was, What are noninstructional staff perceptions of the community college…

  14. About the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  15. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  16. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  17. Practical solutions for staff recruitment & retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hoek, N

    2001-01-01

    There are three essential topics for radiology managers to consider in light of persistent staffing shortages: support of the profession and educational programs, perks as recruitment tools and incentives as retention tools. Some activities that can help support departments and educational programs for radiologic technologists are job shadowing, training for volunteer services, advanced placement for school applicants, sponsoring an educational program or clinical training site, creating a positive work environment and supporting outreach projects geared to local high schools. Traditional perks used in recruitment efforts have included relocation assistance, travel and lodging expenses during the interview process, loan repayment, scholarships and sign-on bonuses. Some common incentives for retaining employees are tuition reimbursement, cross training, availability of educational resources, continuing education opportunities, professional development and incremental increases in salary. There are many other tools that can be used, such as career ladders, creating an environment conducive to teamwork or a more personal atmosphere and showcasing talents of various staff members. There is much overlap among these suggestions in support of the profession and educational programs, recruitment and retention of qualified staff radiologic technologists. Radiology managers can and should be creative in developing different programs to build loyalty and commitment to a radiology department.

  18. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Seamus Hegarty / HR; Tel. 74128

    2001-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David O. Williams/it (Convener) Cristoforo Benvenuti/est David Plane/ep Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Sverre Jarp/it (Chairman) Flemming Pedersen/ps Robin Lauckner/sl Christian Roche/ett Lars Leistam/est Dietrich Schinzel/ep Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/ep [Convener] - Florence Ranjard/ep [Alternate] Jacques Gruber/ps - Peter Sievers/lhc [Alternate] Thomas Pettersson/est - Michel Mayoud/est [Alternate] Sue Foffano/as - Thierry Lagrange/spl [Alternate] Werner Zapf/hr (Secretary) LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/sl [Convener] - Fabien Perriollat/ps [Alternate] Mats Wilhelmsson/st - Véronique Fassnacht/tis [Alternate] Lucie Linssen/ep - Alfredo Placci/ep [Alternate] Patrick Geeraert/fi - John Cuthb...

  19. Composition of Staff Review Advisory Bodies - 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David Plane/EP [Convener] Enrico Chiaveri/AB Peter Schmid/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin Lauckner/AB [Chairman]Marcel Mottier/EST Michael Letheren/EP Louis Walckiers/AT Lucie Linssen/EP Mats Wilhelmsson/ST Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard/EP [Alternate] Roger Bailey/ABPeter Sievers/AT " " Doris Forkel-Wirth/TISPierre Ninin/ST " " Rob Rayson/HRMaarten Wilbers/DSU " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/AB [Convener]Fabien Perriollat/AB [Alternate] Christian Lasseur/ESTRamon Folch/EST " " Lucie Linssen/EP Alfredo Placci/EP " " Mats Møller/ASLaszlo Abel/SPL " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  20. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows: Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) Cristoforo BENVENUTI/EST [Convener] David PLANE/EP Peter SCHMID/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin LAUCKNER/SL [Chairman] Flemming PEDERSEN/PS Lucie LINSSEN/EP Dietrich SCHINZEL/EP Marcel MOTTIER/EST Louis WALCKIERS/LHC Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano CAMPORESI/EP [Convener] Florence RANJARD/EP [Alternate] Jacques GRUBER/PS [until 30.6.2002] Roger BAILEY/SL [from 1.7. 2002] Peter SIEVERS/LHC [Alternate] Doris FORKEL-WIRTH/TIS Pierre NININ/ST [Alternate] Sue FOFFANO/AS Maarten WILBERS/DSU [Alternate] Werner ZAPF/HR[Secretary] LTCB 2 Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique PARIS/SL [Convener] Fabien PERRIOLLAT/PS [Alternate] Mats WILHELMSSON/ST Charles NUTTALL/TIS [Alternate] Lucie LINSSEN/EP Alfredo PLACCI/EP [Alternate] Patrick GEERAER...

  1. Academic Motivation of Students - The German Case

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Heike; Virgillito, Alfredo; Wilkesmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The concept of motivation is used in many different disciplines to analyze the ‘what and why’ (Deci & Ryan, 2000) of human action. A vast body of literature exists on the relationship of motivation and performance in professional work and organization settings (e.g. Osterloh, Frey & Homberger, 2011; Gagné & Deci, 2005). Motivation is widely acknowledged to enhance performance and efficiency of staff (Ryan & Deci, 2000). Beyond work settings motivation may influence performance in academic set...

  2. Leadership behaviors of frontline staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardellone, Christine; Musil, Carol M; Smith, Elaine; Click, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    A recommendation in the Institute of Medicine's report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, challenges the nursing profession to enhance nursing's leadership role in health care redesign. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study examined the self-perceived leadership behaviors of RNs enrolled in a clinical ladder career pathway. A self-report survey was conducted using the Leadership Practice Inventory and a demographic questionnaire. Significant associations between continuous and categorical demographic factors and ladder levels were reported. Nurses with more experience showed fewer leadership behaviors. Leadership development is necessary for nurses in all areas of practice. The findings from this study provide evidence of the strengths and weaknesses in leadership behaviors of staff clinical RNs who often make frontline decisions for patients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, John A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Nappi, Jean; Gubbins, Paul O; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-11

    Benchmarking in academic pharmacy, and recommendations for the potential uses of benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments are discussed in this paper. Benchmarking is the process by which practices, procedures, and performance metrics are compared to an established standard or best practice. Many businesses and industries use benchmarking to compare processes and outcomes, and ultimately plan for improvement. Institutions of higher learning have embraced benchmarking practices to facilitate measuring the quality of their educational and research programs. Benchmarking is used internally as well to justify the allocation of institutional resources or to mediate among competing demands for additional program staff or space. Surveying all chairs of academic pharmacy departments to explore benchmarking issues such as department size and composition, as well as faculty teaching, scholarly, and service productivity, could provide valuable information. To date, attempts to gather this data have had limited success. We believe this information is potentially important, urge that efforts to gather it should be continued, and offer suggestions to achieve full participation.

  4. Motivating Staff, Parents, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cynthia Cavenaugh

    Two motivational theories considered particularly useful in administering early childhood programs are discussed, and guidelines for motivating staff, parents, and children are provided. First, the two-factor theory of motivation within organizations, as outlined by Herzberg (1959), is described. Offered in this section are a list of motivators…

  5. Training Staff for Multicultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennison, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses guidelines for training staff in multicultural camp communities. Includes developing an awareness and acceptance of cultural differences, self-awareness, an understanding of the "dynamics of differences," knowledge of the camper's culture, and adaptation of skills. Addresses the importance of integrating multicultural education goals…

  6. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...

  7. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major source of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings. The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. The issue is no longer whether hand hygiene is effective, but how to produce a sustained improvement in health workers' compliance.

  8. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    contrast, diffusion-weighted techniques, and MR spectroscopy (single voxel, multivoxel, PEPSI ). Mechanisms of recovery include application of the...key methods to build academic portfolios, understand the APT process and market their academic advancement Faculty Development: 103...APT process and market their academic advancement Faculty Development: 104 Leadership Faculty Development: Enhancing Team Effectiveness

  9. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  10. English Language Screening for Scientific Staff at Delft University of Technology,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.G.; Bos, M.H.P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Delft University of Technology (DUT) screened her (non-native English) scientific staff on their level of English proficiency in the academic year of 2006/2007. In this paper this large scale operation, involving planning, policy decisions, assessment means, advice and training are discussed. Since

  11. English Language Test for Scientific Staff at D.U.T.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.G.; Bos, M.H.P.C.; Roubos, Tim; Veronesi, Daniela; Nickenig, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Delft University of Technology (DUT) screened her (non-native English) scientific staff on their level of language proficiency over the year academic 2006/2007. In this paper the large scale operation, involving planning, policy decisions, assessment means, advise and training are discussed. Results

  12. What Is the Use of Fieldwork? Conceptions of Students and Staff in Geography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alison; Magnier, Kirsty; Weaver, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores conceptions of the purpose of fieldwork held by undergraduates and academic staff in the disciplines of geography and geology. Phenomenographic analysis of written data reveals six qualitatively distinct conceptions broadly classified as "fragmented" and "cohesive". While considerable commonality in…

  13. IUPUI's Leadership in Dynamic Organizations Program: Translating Leadership into Application for Staff and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Daniel; Bedford, Marilyn; Hundley, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Traditional leadership development programs for higher education staff are challenged to blend theory with a real-world context that is meaningful to participants' work. Standard student leadership curriculum is strong on theory, but often thin on providing this real-world context. Both HR training departments and academic units charged with…

  14. The Challenges of Listening to Academic Lectures for EAP Learners and the Impact of Metacognition on Academic Lecture Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimirad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic listening skill is an indispensable necessity for English for academic purposes (EAP students in English-medium universities and also critical for their future success in comprehending conference lectures. But due to the specific nature of such academic lectures, nonnative students all too often face challenges in getting a full command of this task. This study investigates the challenges of listening to academic lectures and the impact of related metacognitive strategies on academic lecture listening comprehension on a group of Iranian learners in an EAP workshop. Fifteen academic staff who took part in two intact classes at the University of Qom, Iran, were randomly assigned to treatment (N = 8 and control (N = 7 groups. The treatment group received 16 hr of metacognitive strategy instruction based on the models proposed by Vandergrift during academic listening instruction, while the control group was just exposed to academic lectures with no explicit strategy instruction. The academic listening sections of the British International English Language Testing System (IELTS were utilized to measure the listening comprehension of both groups before and after the treatment. The results of the data analysis determined that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in the listening posttest. The interviews before and after the treatment revealed details of challenges in academic lecture comprehension and also shed light on the perception of the learners regarding metacognitive strategy instruction and the frequency of main metacognitive strategies used in comprehending academic lectures.

  15. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  16. Advancement & Promotion Review: 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the end of June, following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 13/2003. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2003. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions are now published on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist_2003.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2003. Final decisions will be applied retroactively to 1 July 2003. Human Resources Division Tel:...

  17. ADVANCEMENT & PROMOTION REVIEW: 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the beginning of July, under the new career structure scheme and following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 11/2002. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2002. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions will be published this year on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2002. Final decisions will be applied retroactivel...

  18. Job Satisfaction Among Academic Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agana, Denny Fe; Porter, Maribeth; Hatch, Robert; Rubin, Daniel; Carek, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Family physicians report some of the highest rates of burnout among their physician peers. Over the past few years, this rate has increased and work-life balance has decreased. In academic medicine, many report lack of career satisfaction and have considered leaving academia. Our aim was to explore the factors that contribute to job satisfaction and burnout in faculty members in a family medicine department. Six academic family medicine clinics were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Focus groups were conducted to allow for free-flowing, rich dialogue between the moderator and the physician participants. Transcripts were analyzed in a systematic manner by independent investigators trained in grounded theory. The constant comparison method was used to code and synthesize the qualitative data. Six main themes emerged: time (62%), benefits (9%), resources (8%), undervalue (8%), physician well-being (7%), and practice demand (6%). Within the main theme of time, four subthemes emerged: administrative tasks/emails (61%), teaching (17%), electronic medical records (EMR) requirements (13%), and patient care (9%). Academic family physicians believe that a main contributor to job satisfaction is time. They desire more resources, like staff, to assist with increasing work demands. Overall, they enjoy the academic primary care environment. Future directions would include identifying the specific time restraints that prevent them from completing tasks, the type of staff that would assist with the work demands, and the life stressors the physicians are experiencing.

  19. Principles of modern radar advanced techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Melvin, William

    2012-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Advanced Techniques is a professional reference for practicing engineers that provides a stepping stone to advanced practice with in-depth discussions of the most commonly used advanced techniques for radar design. It will also serve advanced radar academic and training courses with a complete set of problems for students as well as solutions for instructors.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14, 15 February LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 11, 12, 14, 15 February, Council room on 13 February Cosmology and the Origin of Structure by E. W. Kolb / CERN-TH There is now strong evidence that the rich and varied structure we see in the universe today in the form of stars, galaxies, galaxy clusters, and even larger structures, grew from small primordial 'seeds' that were planted in the first second in the history of the universe. The last decade has seen remarkable advances in observational cosmology, highlighted by the observations of galaxies in the deep universe and the observation of primordial fluctuations in the microwave background. With the increasing accuracy and sophistication of astronomical observations, the details of our theory for the growth of structure will be tested. These lectures will serve as an introduction to the generation and growth of structure in the universe. The series of four lectures will follow the program: Lecture 1: The o...

  1. Implications for Academic Workload of the Changing Role of Distance Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Adéle

    2015-01-01

    The changing work roles and resulting workloads of distance educators hold significant implications for the wellbeing and mental health of academics. New work roles include redesigning curricula for online delivery, increasing staff-student ratios and demands for student-support, management of part-time staff, and 24-h availability. This research…

  2. 'Flying below the radar': a qualitative study of minority experience and management of discrimination in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis L; Palepu, Anita; Szalacha, Laura; Caswell, Cheryl; Inui, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    This paper aims to give voice to the lived experience of faculty members who have encountered racial or ethnic discrimination in the course of their academic careers. It looks at how they describe the environment for minorities, how they manage discrimination and what institutions and majority-member faculty can do to improve medical academe for minority members. Qualitative techniques were used for semi-structured, in-depth individual telephone interviews, which were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed by reviewers. Themes expressed by multiple faculty members were studied for patterns of connection and grouped into broader categories. A description of the faculty sample is provided, in which respondents ranked the importance of discrimination in hindering academic advancement and used Likert scales to evaluate effects of discrimination. The sample was drawn from 12 of 24 academic medical centres in the National Faculty Survey and included 18 minority-member faculty staff stratified by gender, rank and degree who had experienced, or possibly experienced, work-related discrimination. Minority faculty described the need to be strongly self-reliant, repeatedly prove themselves, develop strong supports and acquire a wide range of academic skills to succeed. Suggested responses to discrimination were to be cautious, level-headed and informed. Confronting discriminatory actions by sitting down with colleagues and raising the level of awareness were important methods of dealing with such situations. Academic medical centres may need to make greater efforts to support minority faculty and improve understanding of the challenges confronting such faculty in order to prevent the loss and/or under-utilisation of important talent.

  3. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  4. Managing Expectations: A Case Study of Sessional Staff in Languages and Cultures Education in Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Brown

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In light of the increasing casualisation of the academic workforce in recent years, expectations of sessional staff in Australian universities from their academic employment are becoming more poignant. Following on from a previous report by Ferrari & Hajek (2012, this paper further highlights how these workers are affected by short-term, often only semester-long, contracts. We focus on how the brevity of employment affects sessional teachers’ perceptions of their role and perceived obligations to the university, and consequently the health of languages education. We present the results of an online survey conducted at the vast majority of Australian universities, which investigated sessional staff’s expectations. This study reveals that language sessional staff have expectations of their employment which are often at odds with their role as academics in the university environment.

  5. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  6. International Symposium on Recent Advances in Aerodynamics and Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Charles

    1986-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics at Stanford University was established in October 1973 to provide an academic environment for long-term cooperative research between Stanford and NASA Ames Research Center. Since its establishment, the Institute has conducted theoretical and experimental work in the areas of aerodynamics, acoustics, fluid mechanics, flight dynamics, guidance and control, and human factors. This research has involved Stanford faculty, research associates, graduate students, and many distinguished visitors in collaborative efforts with the research staff of NASA Ames Research Center. The occasion of the Institute's tenth anniversary was used to reflect back on where that research has brought us, and to consider where our endeavors should be directed next. Thus, an International Symposium was held to review recent advances in the fields relevant to the activities of the Institute and to discuss the areas of research to be undertaken in the future. This anniversary was also chosen...

  7. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  8. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  9. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  10. Will Academics Drive or Obstruct the Slovenian Government's Internationalisation Agenda for Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flander, Alenka; Klemencic, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The present article is concerned with the question of how conducive the academic culture and climate in Slovenian higher education institutions are to internationalisation. Our underlying assumption is that academic staff represent either an important driving force or an obstacle to the implementation of internationalisation policies formulated at…

  11. Female Administrative Managers in Australian Universities: Not Male and Not Academic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michelle; Marchant, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Women make up 65 per cent of the staff in Australian universities who do not perform academic work. While there is a growing body of research on women in senior management and the experiences of female academics in Australian universities, there is less literature on women working in the administrative stream, especially those in middle…

  12. The challenges of attracting an retaining academic talent. Central and Eastern European perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Rose, Anna-Lena

    2016-01-01

    Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries are currently facing strong imperatives to increase incoming academic staff mobility. In this article, we focus on barriers and facilitators of academic mobility. We provide examples of Lithuanian and Czech higher education systems that are based on

  13. Role of Department Heads in Academic Development: A Leader-Member Exchange and Organizational Resource Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Andre Leonard; du Plessis, Yvonne; Nkomo, Stella

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of leadership in the development of academic talent in higher education from a social exchange and organizational support perspective. Drawing from a sample of academic staff at a large South African university, the study investigates the extent to which a quality leader-member exchange relationship versus a formal…

  14. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  15. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  16. The internet and academic manuscript processing in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internet is growing at a rapid rate and has broken the territorial and geographical barriers that characterized traditional practices of editorial review process. Thus, a study on online manuscript review process and its utilization by academic staff became a necessity. This study examines the effect of the Internet on traditional ...

  17. Project Portfolio Management for Academic Libraries: A Gentle Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinopal, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In highly dynamic, service-oriented environments like academic libraries, much staff time is spent on initiatives to implement new products and services to meet users' evolving needs. Yet even in an environment where a sound project management process is applied, if we're not properly planning, managing, and controlling the organization's work in…

  18. The Evolution of Academic Library Architecture: A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, Kenneth E.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the history of architectural developments in academic libraries. Highlights include natural lighting and the invention of the incandescent bulb; compact shelving; open versus closed stacks; modular construction methods; central air conditioning and controlled environments; interior arrangements; access to handicapped users and staff; and…

  19. Analysis of the effects of frequent strikes on academic performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU)'s strike can be traced back to 1978, the period of the beginning of the decline in the oil boom, when the country faced the consequences of the failure by its rulers to use the oil wealth to generate production and a social welfare system. Military dictatorship had ...

  20. Management of CD-ROM Resources in Nigeria Academic Libraries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is on management of CD-ROM resources in Nigerian academic libraries with reference to Federal Polytechnic Nekede Library, Owerri. A descriptive survey method was adopted random sampling technique was used in selecting twenty five (25) staff from the library under study. The questionnaire was the major ...

  1. Factors Underlying Technology Adoption in Academic Libraries in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fadhli, Meshal; Corrall, Sheila; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzed factors shaping adoption of technology in academic libraries in Kuwait. The research was based on interviews conducted with library directors, staff, and users, combined with observation and document analysis. A major aspect of the Kuwaiti context was a relative lack of financial restraints and an enthusiasm for technology…

  2. Models of Reference Services in Australian Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Liz

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a project which was undertaken in 2006 to investigate the current modes and methods for delivering reference services in Australian academic libraries. The project included a literature review to assist in providing a definition of reference services as well as a snapshot of statistics showing staff and patron numbers from…

  3. People, Policy and Process in College-Level Academic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang N.

    2016-01-01

    Academic institution structure is both hierarchical and committee-based. It is hierarchical in the Administration including staff, similar to business corporations. It is committee-based for the Faculty body in a fashion similar to US Congress. It can exploit the best of both models for better governance and rightfully democratic decisions. The…

  4. Universities' expectations of pastoral care: trends, stressors, resource gaps and support needs for teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas A; Fiedler, Brenton A

    2012-10-01

    Since the mid-90s, the university environment has challenged the motivation of academic staff to engage in pastoral care. A literature review revealed five themes that aligned with analysis of interview data from a previous study (Laws and Fiedler, 2010). The key themes were i) staff were often disturbed by unplanned intrusions of students who exhibited behavioural problems or sought emotional support, ii) the management of emotions in face-to-face encounters was stressful, iii) staff felt under-equipped for dealing with Mental Health (MH) issues, iv) standards and control needed updating and v) counselling and disability services did not meet academics' need to know about 'at risk' students. Having identified the incidence of mental health issues among Australian University students, this study aims to locate literature that describes how well current university policies/protocols are supported by Evidence Based Practice in the management of MH problems in the student population. Findings from a content analysis of the literature were triangulated with verbatim comments recorded during a previous study that utilised semi structured interviews with 34 academics at the School of Nursing and Midwifery and the School of Commerce at the University of South Australia (Laws and Fiedler, 2010). Lack of clarity on role boundaries around promotion of students' well-being was not clearly defined. The Higher Education (HE) institutions' slowness in responding to mental health needs of students combined with the increasing expectations of academics' performance monitoring has lead staff to avoid deep investment in their students' well-being. The literature indicates that students are in need of psychological support, but pastoral care remains ill-defined despite enduring expectations held by university administrators. Teacher motivation is diminished by time spent with students in need of emotional support which is not acknowledged in workloads. Staff stress is increased by

  5. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  6. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  7. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  8. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  9. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  10. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  11. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the institution's Inmate Organization Manager (IO...

  12. Research Staff | Chemistry and Nanoscience Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Research staff members in NREL's Chemistry and Nanoscience Center are Electrochemical Engineering and Materials Chemistry. For lead researcher contacts, see our research areas. For our : Chemistry and Nanoscience In addition to his position at NREL, Dr. van de Lagemaat is also a fellow of the

  13. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffres, Meghan N.; Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled.

  14. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-01-01

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information

  16. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    the importance of academic patenting. Our findings suggest that academic involvement in patenting results in a citation premium, as academic patents appear to generate more forward citations. We also find that in the European context of changing research objectives and funding sources since the mid-1990s...

  17. The Academic Adviser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  18. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Joint Chiefs of Staff > About > The Joint Staff > Senior Enlisted Advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  20. 2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1ST TERM 1ST OCTOBER - 23 NOVEMBER 2001 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS The Autumn term of the Academic Training Programme is about to start. As usual, the first term includes lectures primarily dedicated to Post-graduate students. These are meant to help students complement the courses available from their home Universities with lectures on topics close to CERN activities. The lectures are nevertheless open to all CERN staff, and in particular to young Fellows. This year's series include courses on Accelerator Physics, on Field Theory, and on Symmetry Breaking Phenomena in Physics. The course on Accelerators by Dr. Wilson has been a regular feature on the Academic Training programme for many previous editions. This year, the course will be updated to include new sections on Colliders and on future facilities such as the Neutrino Factory. A good introduction to this very successful course can be found in the previous version of these lectures, available from the Web Lecture Archive Project: http://w...

  1. Collaborative Writing to Enhance Academic Writing Development through Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robayo Lun, Alma Milena; Hernandez Ortiz, Luz Stella

    2013-01-01

    Advanced students at university level struggle with many aspects of academic writing in English as a foreign language. The purpose of this article is to report on an investigation aimed at analyzing what collaborative writing through project work tells us about students' academic writing development at the tertiary level. The compositions written…

  2. Academic Libraries in Greece: The Present Situation and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Dean H., Ed.

    The purpose of this collection of essays is to examine academic libraries in Greece at a time when the potential for changes and advance in librarianship is great. The 15 papers are as follows: "International Interlibrary Cooperation: Exchanging Goals, Values and Culture" (Don L. Tolliver); "Academic Libraries in Greece" (James…

  3. Managing ebook metadata in academic libraries taming the tiger

    CERN Document Server

    Frederick, Donna E

    2016-01-01

    Managing ebook Metadata in Academic Libraries: Taming the Tiger tackles the topic of ebooks in academic libraries, a trend that has been welcomed by students, faculty, researchers, and library staff. However, at the same time, the reality of acquiring ebooks, making them discoverable, and managing them presents library staff with many new challenges. Traditional methods of cataloging and managing library resources are no longer relevant where the purchasing of ebooks in packages and demand driven acquisitions are the predominant models for acquiring new content. Most academic libraries have a complex metadata environment wherein multiple systems draw upon the same metadata for different purposes. This complexity makes the need for standards-based interoperable metadata more important than ever. In addition to complexity, the nature of the metadata environment itself typically varies slightly from library to library making it difficult to recommend a single set of practices and procedures which would be releva...

  4. Minority faculty members' resilience and academic productivity: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cora-Bramble, Denice; Zhang, Kehua; Castillo-Page, Laura

    2010-09-01

    To explore whether there is a relationship between resilience and academic productivity of minority faculty members in U.S. academic health centers. For the purposes of the study, the authors defined academic productivity as peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed publications, grants, and academic promotion. In 2007, the authors simultaneously collected quantitative and qualitative data by using a triangulation (mixed-method) design. Past participants in the Association of American Medical Colleges' Minority Faculty Career Development Seminar completed the Web-based 70-item Personal Resilience Questionnaire (PRQ). In addition, two focus groups were conducted with past seminar participants. Seventy-four minority faculty members completed the PRQ, and 15 participated in the two focus groups. The quantitative data showed a positive correlation between demographic, educational, and academic productivity variables and certain resilience subscale scores. Common themes that emerged from the qualitative data were categorized under four major domains: existing barriers to academic advancement, internal protective factors or cultural buffers, external institutional or environmental facilitators, and necessary attributes for ensuring academic productivity and advancement. Certain resilience subscales showed correlation with academic productivity of minority faculty members, and specific personal and/or cultural characteristics were identified as enablers. Minority faculty members may benefit from skill development and coaching that extends beyond the traditional scope of faculty development programs and that specifically targets modifiable resilience characteristics. Additional research is needed, but such nontraditional, resilience-centered intervention strategies may positively affect the advancement of minority faculty in academic medicine.

  5. Japanese Management Styles: Can Academic Libraries Learn from Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes the three main characteristics of Japanese management style and discusses its applicability to academic library management in the United States. Responses from 10 readers of advance copies of the article are included. (6 references) (MES)

  6. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  7. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  8. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  9. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  10. Contending with contest in academic literacy. | Murray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29 (1996) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Contending with contest in academic literacy. H Murray ...

  11. Correlation Between Entry Requirements and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the investigator examines the correlation between entry requirements and academic performance of undergraduate students at the University of Buea. The quality of performance on the Cameroon General Certificate Examination at the Advanced Level is the predictor while the criterion is the cumulative grade ...

  12. Academic Departments: Problems, Variations, and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Dean E.; And Others

    Do academic departments promote scholarship, protect higher learning from stagnation and interference, and provide a sound basis for hiring and advancing faculty? Or do they stifle teaching and research, foster parochialism, and limit the development of professors and students? There exist operating alternatives to conventional departments. Those…

  13. Academic Specialization and Contemporary University Humanities Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, Martine W.

    2012-01-01

    Given the academic specialization endemic today in humanities disciplines, some of the most important work of humanities centers has become promoting education about the humanities in general. After charting the rise of humanities centers in the US, three characteristics of centers that enable their advancement of larger concerns of the humanities…

  14. Academic musculoskeletal radiology: influences for gender disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Sadia R; Khurshid, Kiran; Jalal, Sabeena; Bancroft, Laura; Munk, Peter L; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2018-03-01

    Research productivity is one of the few quintessential gauges that North American academic radiology departments implement to determine career progression. The rationale of this study is to quantify the relationship of gender, research productivity, and academic advancements in the musculoskeletal (MSK) radiology to account for emerging trends in workforce diversity. Radiology residency programs enlisted in the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) and International Skeletal Society (ISS) were searched for academic faculty to generate the database for gender and academic profiles of MSK radiologists. Bibliometric data was collected using Elsevier's SCOPUS archives, and analyzed using Stata version 14.2. Among 274 MSK radiologists in North America, 190 (69.34%) were men and 84 (30.66%) were women, indicating a statistically significant difference (χ2 = 6.34; p value = 0.042). The available number of female assistant professors (n = 50) was more than half of the male assistant professors (n = 88), this ratio however, plummeted at higher academic ranks, with only one-fourth of women (n = 11) professors compared to men (n = 45). The male MSK radiologist had 1.31 times the odds of having a higher h-index, keeping all other variables constant. The trend of gender disparity exists in MSK radiology with significant underrepresentation of women in top tiers of academic hierarchy. Even with comparable h-indices, at the lower academic ranks, a lesser number of women are promoted relative to their male colleagues. Further studies are needed to investigate the degree of influence research productivity has, in determining academic advancement of MSK radiologists.

  15. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  16. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  17. Bringing poetry into staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie

    2002-01-01

    "Quello che mai fue detto d'alfcuna," words from Dante, "strive to say which was never said by anyone." This is the art of true verbal expression, the essence of poetry. Poet W. H. Auden once wrote that "poetry can open spaces of meaning for the human spirit that is more intimate to other human beings than it is to ourselves" (Auden, 1968). Poetry has many definitions. To some, it is the rhythmic verse they remember from grade school or from Mother Goose. To others, poetry is a verse of meter and measure, of balance and harmony. However, to most individuals, poetry is the ultimate expression of human emotion. Roy (1999) believed that nursing is in need of poetry, in order to evoke the deepest of images, fears, questions, and quests of the human spirit and the nursing profession. This article examines the use of poetry and how it might be incorporated into staff education.

  18. AdvanceVT Newsletter: February 2004

    OpenAIRE

    AdvanceVT

    2004-01-01

    Inside this issue: Today's Leadership Seminar; Women's Month Reception; Child Care Survey National Science Foundation The AdvanceVT Team Elizabeth Creamer, Assessment Director Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Catherine Eckel, ADVANCE Professor Professor of Economics Patricia Hyer, Principle Investigator Associate Provost for Academic Administration Barbara Johnson, Administrative Assistant Peggy Layne, Project Coordinator Nancy Love, Co-PI and ADVANCE Pro...

  19. Using HL7 in hospital staff assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2014-02-01

    Hospital staff assignments are the instructions that allocate the hospital staff members to the hospital beds. Currently, hospital administrators make the assignments without accessing the information regarding the occupancy of the hospital beds and the acuity of the patient. As a result, administrators cannot distinguish between occupied and unoccupied beds, and may therefore assign staff to unoccupied beds. This gives rise to uneven and inefficient staff assignments. In this paper, the hospital admission-discharge-transfer (ADT) system is employed both as a data source and an assignment device to create staff assignments. When the patient data is newly added or modified, the ADT system updates the assignment software client with the relevant data. Based on the relevant data, the assignment software client is able to construct staff assignments in a more efficient way. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580