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Sample records for academic progress map

  1. The Impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Program on Student Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordray, David S.; Pion, Georgine M.; Brandt, Chris; Molefe, Ayrin

    2013-01-01

    One of the most widely used commercially available systems incorporating benchmark assessment and training in differentiated instruction is the Northwest Evaluation Association's (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) program. The MAP program involves two components: (1) computer-adaptive assessments administered to students three to four…

  2. Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of Computerized Adaptive Testing: Application to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; McCall, Marty; Jiao, Hong; Harris, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are twofold. First, to investigate the construct or factorial structure of a set of Reading and Mathematics computerized adaptive tests (CAT), "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP), given in different states at different grades and academic terms. The second purpose is to investigate the invariance of test…

  3. An Analysis of the Concurrent and Predictive Validity of Curriculum Based Measures CBM), the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP), and the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) for Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andren, Kristina J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concurrent validity of four different reading assessments that are commonly used to screen students at risk for reading difficulties by measuring the correlation of the third grade Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) in Reading with three specific versions of curriculum based measurement: DIBELS oral reading fluency (ORF),…

  4. Mapping Affinities in Academic Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Rodighiero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly affinities are one of the most fundamental hidden dynamics that drive scientific development. Some affinities are actual, and consequently can be measured through classical academic metrics such as co-authoring. Other affinities are potential, and therefore do not leave visible traces in information systems; for instance, some peers may share interests without actually knowing it. This article illustrates the development of a map of affinities for academic collectives, designed to be relevant to three audiences: the management, the scholars themselves, and the external public. Our case study involves the School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering of EPFL, hereinafter ENAC. The school consists of around 1,000 scholars, 70 laboratories, and 3 institutes. The actual affinities are modeled using the data available from the information systems reporting publications, teaching, and advising scholars, whereas the potential affinities are addressed through text mining of the publications. The major challenge for designing such a map is to represent the multi-dimensionality and multi-scale nature of the information. The affinities are not limited to the computation of heterogeneous sources of information; they also apply at different scales. The map, thus, shows local affinities inside a given laboratory, as well as global affinities among laboratories. This article presents a graphical grammar to represent affinities. Its effectiveness is illustrated by two actualizations of the design proposal: an interactive online system in which the map can be parameterized, and a large-scale carpet of 250 square meters. In both cases, we discuss how the materiality influences the representation of data, in particular the way key questions could be appropriately addressed considering the three target audiences: the insights gained by the management and their consequences in terms of governance, the understanding of the scholars’ own

  5. Designation differences and academic career progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris W. Callaghan

    2015-05-01

    Contribution/Value add: This study provides new insights into certain ‘crisis milestones’, or role conflicts or issues, that may need to be resolved or balanced before the career progression of academics can typically occur.

  6. West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Academic Journal of Social and Human Sciences: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic Journal of Social and Human Sciences: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Academic Journal of Social and Human Sciences: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Content Layer progressive Coding of Digital Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Jensen, Ole Riis

    2002-01-01

    A new lossless context based method is presented for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images, such as maps, company logos, etc., common on the World Wide Web. Progressive encoding is achieved by encoding the image in content layers based on color level or other predefined...... for calculating the resulting number of contexts are given. The new methods outperform existing schemes coding digital maps and in addition provide progressive coding. Compared to the state-of-the-art PWC coder, the compressed size is reduced to 50-70% on our layered map test images....

  9. Mapping Knowledge and Intellectual Capital in Academic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Tomas; Husted, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    This paper argues that knowledge mapping may provide a fruitful avenue for intellectual capitalmanagement in academic environments such as university departments. However, while some researchhas been conducted on knowledge mapping and intellectual capital management in the public sector...... reflect of the uses of knowledge mapping at their departments and institutes. Finally a number ofsuggestions are made as to the rationale and conduct of knowledge mapping in academe.Keywords: Knowledge mapping, academic, intellectual capital management, focus group, researchmanagement...

  10. Content layer progressive coding of digital maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Jensen, Ole Riis

    2000-01-01

    A new lossless context based method is presented for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images, such as maps, company logos, etc., common on the WWW. Progressive encoding is achieved by separating the image into content layers based on other predefined information. Information from....... The new methods outperform existing coding schemes coding digital maps and in addition provide progressive coding. Compared to the state-of-the-art PWC coder, the compressed size is reduced to 60-70% on our layered test images....

  11. The Effect of Weekly Progress Reports on Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Katherine S.

    This study investigated the effect of weekly progress reports on the academic achievement of seventh grade language arts students. It also investigated the effects of weekly progress reports on locus of control attribution and the relationship between academic achievement and locus of control attribution. The study took place in a suburban school…

  12. [Burnout effect on academic progress of Oncology medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ávila, Gabriel; Bello-Villalobos, Herlinda

    2014-01-01

    In the formative period of the courses taken in medical specializations, new and greater responsibilities are accepted by physicians in personal and academic spheres. The interaction of several factors that encompass the practice of these physicians could surpass their capacity to cope, causing on these professionals a high level of stress and professional exhaustion, which will affect their academic development. The objective of this research was to establish if the occupational stress of these medical residents affects their academic progress. We administered the Spanish version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to 52 residents of three specializations in Oncology (Medical Oncology, Surgical Oncology, and Radio-Oncology). These residents accepted voluntarily at the same time of their third cognitive exam. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 13.5 %, with a high frequency among medical residents of first degree. Medical Oncology residents showed a higher emotional exhaustion and lower personal fulfillment. Considering the three specializations, the academic progress was higher in the third year, with a significant difference to Surgical Oncology and Medical Oncology (p = 0.026 and 0.015, respectively). No significant difference was found between burnout syndrome, academic progress and sociodemographic characteristics. The presence of burnout syndrome does not affect the academic progress of Oncology medical residents.

  13. Mapping Knowledge and Intellectual Capital in Academic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Tomas; Husted, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    This paper argues that knowledge mapping may provide a fruitful avenue for intellectual capitalmanagement in academic environments such as university departments. However, while some researchhas been conducted on knowledge mapping and intellectual capital management in the public sector,the unive......This paper argues that knowledge mapping may provide a fruitful avenue for intellectual capitalmanagement in academic environments such as university departments. However, while some researchhas been conducted on knowledge mapping and intellectual capital management in the public sector......,the university has so far not been directly considered for this type of management. The paper initiallyreviews the functions and techniques of knowledge mapping and assesses these in the light of academicdemands. Secondly, the result of a focus group study is presented, where academic leaders were askedto...

  14. Academic Progress Scores to Predict Performance on a State Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study examined seventh-grade reading scores to determine the extent to which certain demographic variables (race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status) explain and MAP reading scores predict reading scores on the State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) in a selected northeast Texas public school. Standardized…

  15. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  16. PREDICTORS OF WOMEN ACADEMICS' CAREER PROGRESSION: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadrian G. Djajadikerta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of glass ceiling, invisible barriers that limit the access of women to higher level occupations and positions, continues to be of concern. Prior studies in this topic have been mostly conducted based on two perspectives: systemic and personal. However, neither of these two perspectives have managed to completely explain the glass ceiling phenomena in organizations. This paper focuses on higher education institutions in Australia. Incorporating both of these perspectives, this paper investigates the factors that influence career progression of women academics in Australian universities.

  17. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Martin; Víta, Martin; Vaitsis, Christos; Schwarz, Daniel; Pokorná, Andrea; Zary, Nabil; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution's curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations. We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets. We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent global in-depth medical curriculum

  18. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Komenda

    Full Text Available No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution's curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets.We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations.We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets.We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent global in-depth medical

  19. Evolving from academic to academic entrepreneur: overcoming barriers to scientific progress and finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    The overall goal of my career as an academic chemist has always been the design and creation of advanced therapeutics and diagnostics that address unmet medical need in the management of chronic diseases. Realising this goal has been an immensely difficult process involving multidisciplinary problem-driven research at the chemistry-biology-medicine interfaces. With success in the laboratory, I started seriously to question the value of remaining an academic whose career is spent in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding alone without making any significant effort to translate knowledge and understanding gained into products of genuine utility for public benefit. Therefore, I elected by choice to become an academic entrepreneur, seeking opportunities wherever possible for the translation of the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work into potentially valuable and useful products. This choice has brought with it many unexpected difficulties and challenges. Nevertheless, progress bas been made and sufficient learnt to suggest that this would be an appropriate moment to take stock and provide some personal reflections on what it takes to design and create advanced therapeutics and diagnostics in the laboratory then seek to develop, innovate and translate the best towards market.

  20. ReNEW: Wyoming's Answer to Academic Progression in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jennifer; Wells, Kathy; Mather, Charlotte; Burman, Mary E

    The aim of the study was to describe Wyoming's approach to academic progression and its projected impact. The collaborative process used to develop the shared statewide BSN curriculum is described along with recommendations. Successful educational models that address the Institute of Medicine's recommendation that 80 percent of RNs have a baccalaureate degree by 2020 face numerous challenges, especially in rural states. ReNEW (Revolutionizing Nursing Education in Wyoming) is a creative solution designed to decrease barriers to BSN education and increase motivation through a streamlined shared curriculum building on a strong community college system and the state's one BSN program. Guiding principles, especially addressing the value of both ADN and BSN education, broad-based coalition development and maintenance, statewide structure, and ongoing funding, were keys to success.

  1. A Road Map for Learning Progressions Research in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Niem Tu; Solem, Michael; Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of learning progressions (LP) and assesses the potential of this line of research to improve geography education. It presents the merits and limitations of three of the most common approaches used to conduct LP research and draws on one approach to propose a first draft of a LP on map reading and interpretation.…

  2. Longitudinal tracking of academic progress during teacher preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Roisin P; O'Flaherty, Joanne

    2017-12-01

    Given that the ultimate academic goal of many education systems in the developed world is for students to graduate from college, grades have a considerable bearing on how effective colleges are in meeting their primary objective. Prior academic performance informs predominantly the selection and retention of teacher candidates. However, there remains a dearth of evidence linking academic performance with outcomes in teacher preparation or the workplace. This study examined pre-service teachers' trajectories of academic growth during teacher preparation. The sample comprised 398 pre-service teachers - 282 (70.8%) males and 116 (29.1%) females. Academic growth was measured across eight time points over the course of 4 years. Pre-service teachers' academic growth was analysed using linear and nonlinear latent growth models. Results indicate that academic growth was quadratic and, over time, decelerated, with no evidence of the Matthew effect or the compensatory effect. There was evidence of a connection between prior academic attainment and current grades. Greater attention to academic growth during the college years, and particularly among pre-service teachers, may enable greater achievement support for students. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Education Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  3. Making Progress: A Case Study of Academic Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    The processes by which unprepared freshmen are able to develop their academic literacy are overlooked by those in the academy. The author will describe a case study of the development of a student's academic literacy in the 1st 3 semesters of college. The information for this project was obtained through interviews with the student and her…

  4. Academic Uses of Google Earth and Google Maps in a Library Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Dodsworth

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, Google Earth and Google Maps have been adopted by many academic institutions as an academic research and mapping tool. The authors were interested in discovering how popular the Google mapping products are in the academic library setting. A survey was conducted to establish the mapping products’ popularity, and type of use in an academic library setting. Results show that over 90% of the respondents use Google Earth and Google Maps either to help answer research questions, to create and access finding aids, for instructional purposes or for promotion and marketing. The authors recommend expanding the mapping product’s user base to include all reference and liaison librarians.

  5. Evansville Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (EAEHMP) - Progress Report, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Oliver S.; Haase, Jennifer L.; Moore, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Maps of surficial geology, deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard, and liquefaction potential index have been prepared by various members of the Evansville Area Earthquake Hazard Mapping Project for seven quadrangles in the Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson, Kentucky, metropolitan areas. The surficial geologic maps feature 23 types of surficial geologic deposits, artificial fill, and undifferentiated bedrock outcrop and include alluvial and lake deposits of the Ohio River valley. Probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard and liquefaction hazard mapping is made possible by drawing on a wealth of information including surficial geologic maps, water well logs, and in-situ testing profiles using the cone penetration test, standard penetration test, down-hole shear wave velocity tests, and seismic refraction tests. These data were compiled and collected with contributions from the Indiana Geological Survey, Kentucky Geological Survey, Illinois State Geological Survey, United States Geological Survey, and Purdue University. Hazard map products are in progress and are expected to be completed by the end of 2009, with a public roll out in early 2010. Preliminary results suggest that there is a 2 percent probability that peak ground accelerations of about 0.3 g will be exceeded in much of the study area within 50 years, which is similar to the 2002 USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps for a firm rock site value. Accelerations as high as 0.4-0.5 g may be exceeded along the edge of the Ohio River basin. Most of the region outside of the river basin has a low liquefaction potential index (LPI), where the probability that LPI is greater than 5 (that is, there is a high potential for liquefaction) for a M7.7 New Madrid type event is only 20-30 percent. Within the river basin, most of the region has high LPI, where the probability that LPI is greater than 5 for a New Madrid type event is 80-100 percent.

  6. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  7. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-12-31

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  8. Women of Color in Academic Administration: Trends, Progress, and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Reginald

    1989-01-01

    Presents historical events, legal restrictions, and traditional customs as barriers that women of color have faced in pursuit of academic administrative positions. Discusses degree attainment and fields of study for different ethnic groups. Recent changes in affirmative action policy are discussed. (JS)

  9. The status of women in academic anesthesiology: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cynthia A; Stock, Marie Christine

    2008-07-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased steadily in the last half century. In this study, we reassessed the status of women in academic anesthesiology departments in the United States in 2006. Medical student, resident, and faculty rank gender data were obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Data regarding the make-up and gender of anesthesia subspecialty society leadership, the editorial boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia and Anesthesiology, the awardees of anesthesia research grants, American Board of Anesthesiology examiners, and department chairs were obtained from websites, organization management personnel, and the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Anesthesiology data were compared with composite data from medical school departments in other clinical specialties and to data from previous years, beginning in 1985. The percentage of medical school graduates, anesthesiology residents, and anesthesiology faculty members who are women has increased since 1985; however, the rate of increase in the percentage of women is significantly faster for medical school graduates compared with anesthesiology residents (P research grants awarded to women has not changed over several decades. The status of women in academic anesthesiology in the first decade of the millennium has, by some measures, advanced compared with 20 yr ago. However, by other measures, there has been no change. The task ahead is to identify factors that discourage qualified women medical students, residents, and junior faculty members from pursuing careers in academic anesthesiology and advancing in academic rank.

  10. A Progressive Buffering Method for Road Map Update Using OpenStreetMap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 enables a two-way interaction between servers and clients. GPS receivers become available to more citizens and are commonly found in vehicles and smart phones, enabling individuals to record and share their trajectory data on the Internet and edit them online. OpenStreetMap (OSM makes it possible for citizens to contribute to the acquisition of geographic information. This paper studies the use of OSM data to find newly mapped or built roads that do not exist in a reference road map and create its updated version. For this purpose, we propose a progressive buffering method for determining an optimal buffer radius to detect the new roads in the OSM data. In the next step, the detected new roads are merged into the reference road maps geometrically, topologically, and semantically. Experiments with OSM data and reference road maps over an area of 8494 km2 in the city of Wuhan, China and five of its 5 km × 5 km areas are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the method. It is shown that the OSM data can add 11.96% or a total of 2008.6 km of new roads to the reference road maps with an average precision of 96.49% and an average recall of 97.63%.

  11. Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement. Report 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, Christine; Gray, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement was to examine the characteristics of schools with a low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) from all jurisdictions that were identified to be making a difference to student academic and to identify the key drivers and characteristics of…

  12. Mapping Women's and Gender Studies in the Academic Field in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Milica Antic

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to map the development of women's and gender studies (WGS) in the academic field in Slovenia. Slovenia is the first of the former Yugoslav state republics in which WGS have succeeded in entering the academic field and becoming part of institutionalised university study. In this paper we will ask the following…

  13. The Early Academic Progress of Children with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Samantha; Platt, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    Children with special educational needs (SEN) are known to experience lower average educational attainment than other children during their school years. But we have less insight into how far their poorer educational outcomes stem from their original starting points or from failure to progress during school. The extent to which early…

  14. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Concept Mapping on Turkish Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the experimental studies which test the effectiveness of the concept mapping instructional strategy compared to the traditional teaching method. Meta-analysis was used to calculate the effect size of the concept mapping strategy on academic success. Therefore, the analysis includes experimental studies conducted in Turkey…

  15. Policy Route Map for Academic Libraries' Digital Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouris, Alexandros; Kapidakis, Sarantos

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a policy decision tree for digital information management in academic libraries. The decision tree is a policy guide, which offers alternative access and reproduction policy solutions according to the prevailing circumstances (for example acquisition method, copyright ownership). It refers to the digital information life cycle,…

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    27, 28, 29, 30, 31 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders by P. Zerwas / Desy, D and R. Siemann / Slac, USA Physics issues (P. Zerwas - 27, 28 May)The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Sta...

  17. Relationship between Admission Selection Criteria and Academic Progression for Student Nurse Anesthetists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Today's admission selection criteria require refinement with the intention of fostering academic progression for students entering nurse anesthesia programs (Reese, 2002).With the escalating cost of graduate education coupled with the current economic crisis, efforts by educational leaders to minimize attrition remains pivotal (Andrews, Johansson,…

  18. The impact of peer relations on academic progress in junior high

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Miranda J.; Van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.; Snijders, Tom A. B.; Creemers, Bert P. M.; Kuyper, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether peer relations within classrooms were related to students' academic progress, and if so, whether this can be explained by students' relatedness and engagement, in line with Connell and Wellborn's self-system model. We analyzed data of 18,735 students

  19. Frank and Fearless: Supporting Academic Career Progression for Women in an Australian Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly Parker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in senior positions continues to be a major challenge in higher education and most other industries. In Australia, the career trajectory for academic women stalls at a lower level than that of their male counterparts. Concern about this situation in one Australian university led to the design and delivery of a career progression program to support women’s advancement from senior lecturer to associate professor. This study details the main features of the program, designed to facilitate women’s transition from being leading academics to academic leaders through a focus on leadership and career progression. We report the participants’ perceptions of its value based on survey data. We conclude that leadership development is difficult work and requires a supportive environment where risk-taking is encouraged, where frank and fearless feedback is provided, and where the individual is required to examine assumptions and biases and to assume a leadership identity.

  20. Cognitions of Expert Supervisors in Academe: A Concept Mapping Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemer, Gülsah; Borders, L. DiAnne; Willse, John

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen expert supervisors reported their thoughts while preparing for, conducting, and evaluating their supervision sessions. Concept mapping (Kane & Trochim, [Kane, M., 2007]) yielded 195 cognitions classified into 25 cognitive categories organized into 5 supervision areas: conceptualization of supervision, supervisee assessment,…

  1. Digital Map Soup: what's Cooking in British Academic Libraries and are we helping our Users?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Moore

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available My original intention had been to consider the roles being developed in British academic libraries to assist users in making full use of cartographic material that is available for their requirements - an almost predictable report on the blending of the old with the new and, again hopefully, coming to a slightly more positive vision of the future for the academic map library in the United Kingdom. That was before I received an e-mail from David Medyckyj-Scott, Research and Geo-Data Services Manager at the EDINA National Data Centre in Edinburgh and one of the key figures behind the implementation and development of the Digimap service to the UK Higher and Further Education sectors. Launched in 2000, Digimap delivers Ordnance Survey map data to subscribing institutions and allows staff and students to produce map extracts at set scales, to generate their own maps online or download map data to use with appropriate application software such as CAD or GIS. I do not think it is an overstatement to suggest that the advent of the Digimap service has been the most important and influential event in British academic map libraries in, at least, the last thirty years - and I say this as someone who was critically cautious of the service at the outset.

  2. Concept Mapping Strategy: An Effective Tool for Improving Students' Academic Achievement in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyo, John; Waziri, Kawu

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the use of concept mapping teaching method on secondary school students' academic achievement in biology. Two hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance guided the study. The design of the study was quasi-experimental design with 122 Senior Secondary students selected purposively from two senior secondary schools in…

  3. A population-based study of stimulant drug treatment of ADHD and academic progress in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoëga, Helga; Rothman, Kenneth J; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2012-01-01

    between their fourth- and seventh-grade tests were more likely to decline in test performance. The crude probability of academic decline was 72.9% in mathematics and 42.9% in language arts for children with a treatment start 25 to 36 months after the fourth-grade test. Compared with those starting......OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the hypothesis that later start of stimulant treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder adversely affects academic progress in mathematics and language arts among 9- to 12-year-old children. METHODS: We linked nationwide data from the Icelandic Medicines Registry...... and the Database of National Scholastic Examinations. The study population comprised 11,872 children born in 1994-1996 who took standardized tests in both fourth and seventh grade. We estimated the probability of academic decline (drop of ≥ 5.0 percentile points) according to drug exposure and timing of treatment...

  4. Progressive Coding of Palette Images and Digital Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Salinas, J. Martin

    2002-01-01

    A 2D version of PPM (Prediction by Partial Matching) coding is introduced simply by combining a 2D template with the standard PPM coding scheme. A simple scheme for resolution reduction is given and the 2D PPM scheme extended to resolution progressive coding by placing pixels in a lower resolutio...... of combined content-layer/spatial progressive coding is also given....

  5. Academic status and progress of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in general education classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, Shirin D; Jones, Patricia B; Reed, Susanne; Kreimeyer, Kathryn H

    2009-01-01

    The study participants were 197 deaf or hard-of-hearing students with mild to profound hearing loss who attended general education classes for 2 or more hours per day. We obtained scores on standardized achievement tests of math, reading, and language/writing, and standardized teacher's ratings of academic competence annually, for 5 years, together with other demographic and communication data. Results on standardized achievement tests indicated that, over the 5-year period, 63%-79% of students scored in the average or above-average range in math, 48%-68% in reading, and 55%-76% in language/writing. The standardized test scores for the group were, on average, half an SD below hearing norms. Average student progress in each subject area was consistent with or better than that made by the norm group of hearing students, and 79%-81% of students made one or more year's progress annually. Teachers rated 69%-81% of students as average or above average in academic competence over the 5 years. The teacher's ratings also indicated that 89% of students made average or above-average progress. Students' expressive and receptive communication, classroom participation, communication mode, and parental participation in school were significantly, but moderately, related to academic outcomes.

  6. Toward digital geologic map standards: a progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrech, George E.; Reynolds, Mitchell W.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    Establishing modern scientific and technical standards for geologic maps and their derivative map products is vital to both producers and users of such maps as we move into an age of digital cartography. Application of earth-science data in complex geographic information systems, acceleration of geologic map production, and reduction of population costs require that national standards be developed for digital geologic cartography and computer analysis. Since December 1988, under commission of the Chief Geologic of the U.S. Geological Survey and the mandate of the National Geologic Mapping Program (with added representation from the Association of American State Geologists), a committee has been designing a comprehensive set of scientific map standards. Three primary issues were: (1) selecting scientific symbology and its digital representation; (2) creating an appropriate digital coding system that characterizes geologic features with respect to their physical properties, stratigraphic and structural relations, spatial orientation, and interpreted mode of origin; and (3) developing mechanisms for reporting levels of certainty for descriptive as well as measured properties. Approximately 650 symbols for geoscience maps, including present usage of the U.S Geological Survey, state geological surveys, industry, and academia have been identified and tentatively adopted. A proposed coding system comprises four-character groupings of major and minor codes that can identify all attributes of a geologic feature. Such a coding system allows unique identification of as many as 105 geologic names and values on a given map. The new standard will track closely the latest developments of the Proposed Standard for Digital Cartographic Data soon to be submitted to the National Institute of Standards and Technology by the Federal Interagency Coordinating Committee on Digital Cartography. This standard will adhere generally to the accepted definitions and specifications for spatial

  7. Progress in Geo-Electrical Methods for Hydrogeological Mapping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In most of the 20th century the geo-electrical methods were primarily used for groundwater exploration and the application of the methods were normally followed by a borehole, and a moment of truth. In this process the use of DC (direct current) soundings have been developed to a high grade of ex....... The test area was earlier mapped by DC-soundings, so it is possible to test the methods against each other. It is concluded that well performed DC-soundings with a Schlumberger configuration still provide the best base for hydrogeological mapping...

  8. T2 map signal variation predicts symptomatic osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Haoti; Miller, David J. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA (United States); Urish, Kenneth L. [Magee Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, The Bone and Joint Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this work is to use quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify patients at risk for symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) progression. We hypothesized that classification of signal variation on T2 maps might predict symptomatic OA progression. Patients were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a prospective cohort. Two groups were identified: a symptomatic OA progression group and a control group. At baseline, both groups were asymptomatic (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis [WOMAC] pain score total <10) with no radiographic evidence of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] score ≤ 1). The OA progression group (n = 103) had a change in total WOMAC score greater than 10 by the 3-year follow-up. The control group (n = 79) remained asymptomatic, with a change in total WOMAC score less than 10 at the 3-year follow-up. A classifier was designed to predict OA progression in an independent population based on T2 map cartilage signal variation. The classifier was designed using a nearest neighbor classification based on a Gaussian Mixture Model log-likelihood fit of T2 map cartilage voxel intensities. The use of T2 map signal variation to predict symptomatic OA progression in asymptomatic individuals achieved a specificity of 89.3 %, a sensitivity of 77.2 %, and an overall accuracy rate of 84.2 %. T2 map signal variation can predict symptomatic knee OA progression in asymptomatic individuals, serving as a possible early OA imaging biomarker. (orig.)

  9. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  10. Self-Efficacy, Achievement Motivation, and Academic Progress of Students with Learning Disabilities: A Comparison with Typical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Seyed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Many factors including self-efficacy and achievement motivation can affect children’s academic progress. Studies have shown that socioeconomic status can affect people’s life, education, and vocation. However, not many studies looked at the relations between the intrinsic factors and socioeconomic status, and between these 2 categories and students’ academic progress in children with learning disabilities. Thus, the present study aimed at examining self-efficacy, achievement motivation, and academic progress of students with learning disabilities compared with typical students and looking for any possible relation between these variables and socioeconomic status (parental education and occupation. Methods This was a cross sectional study, which included 34 students with learning disabilities and 32 typical students matched on age, gender, and school grade. The participants answered Sherer et al.’s self-efficacy scale (1982 and Herman’s achievement motivation questionnaire (2000. Students’ academic progress was evaluated based on the descriptive scores in the first semester. Findings Scores of children with learning disabilities in self-efficacy, achievement motivation, and academic progress were significantly lower than those of matched controls (P<0.0001. Results revealed moderate positive correlations between academic progress and different levels of self-efficacy (rs = 0.441, P<0.0001, N = 66; and between academic progress and achievement motivation (rs = 0.645, P<0.0001, N = 66. The results of the correlation analysis demonstrated weak to moderate positive correlations between academic progress and parental education (rs = 0.39, P = 0.001, academic progress and father’s occupation (rs = 0.323, P = 0.008, achievement motivation and parental education (rs = .34, p = 0.009, N = 66, and finally achievement motivation and father’s occupation (rs = 0.285, P = 0.02, N = 66. Conclusions Lower levels of self-efficacy and

  11. An Examination of the Influence of Institutional Context on Academic Progress Rates at Division I Institutions: A Multilevel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The growing attention given to intercollegiate athletics in recent years amid ongoing controversies highlights the importance of closely examining the implementation and impact of sports policy on college campuses. In an attempt to improve the academic performance and retention of student-athletes, the Academic Progress Rate (APR) was implemented…

  12. Progressive significance map and its application to error-resilient image transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Pearlman, William A; Li, Xin

    2012-07-01

    Set partition coding (SPC) has shown tremendous success in image compression. Despite its popularity, the lack of error resilience remains a significant challenge to the transmission of images in error-prone environments. In this paper, we propose a novel data representation called the progressive significance map (prog-sig-map) for error-resilient SPC. It structures the significance map (sig-map) into two parts: a high-level summation sig-map and a low-level complementary sig-map (comp-sig-map). Such a structured representation of the sig-map allows us to improve its error-resilient property at the price of only a slight sacrifice in compression efficiency. For example, we have found that a fixed-length coding of the comp-sig-map in the prog-sig-map renders 64% of the coded bitstream insensitive to bit errors, compared with 40% with that of the conventional sig-map. Simulation results have shown that the prog-sig-map can achieve highly competitive rate-distortion performance for binary symmetric channels while maintaining low computational complexity. Moreover, we note that prog-sig-map is complementary to existing independent packetization and channel-coding-based error-resilient approaches and readily lends itself to other source coding applications such as distributed video coding.

  13. Improving Academic Performance and Working Memory in Health Science Graduate Students Using Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kurt K; Blyler, Diane

    Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, we randomly assigned participants to a PMR group or a control group. Results indicated that PMR reduced state anxiety, F(1, 126) = 15.58, p academic performance in the treatment group. The results of this study contribute to the literature on Attentional Control Theory by clarifying the process through which working memory and anxiety affect cognitive performance. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. Progress Towards a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard map for New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, W. L.; Downes, G. L.; Stirling, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    New Zealand sits on the Pacific `ring-of-fire' and has a long shoreline exposed to the open ocean. As such it is at a moderate to high risk from tsunami, a conclusion which is confirmed by records of historical tsunami and geological evidence of paleo-tsunami. In recent years there has been a considerable impetus for development of coastal areas. For these reasons maps of tsunami inundation hazard, akin to maps of seismic hazard, would be very useful for planning purposes. However the task of producing such maps is made difficult by the diversity of potential tsunami sources and the short span of historical records in New Zealand. As a first step we have decided to concentrate on the most frequently recurring source of hazardous tsunami for New Zealand, namely large subduction-zone earthquakes along the South-American coast. In this presentation we demonstrate our initial attempts to model the spatial and seismic properties of the South-American subduction zone, and our method for relating simulated earthquake events to tsunami hazard at the New Zealand coastline using the MOST tsunami propagation model [1]. Results from this initial modelling will be described and compared against qualitative expectations of hazard based on historical events and the morphology of the seabed. The techniques for producing tsunami hazard maps are at an early stage of development and we will discuss the limitations of our work so far and our plans for future improvements. [1] Titov, V. V. and Gonzalez, F. L. (1997). Implementation and testing of Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-112.

  15. Factors that influence career progression among postdoctoral clinical academics: a scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi; Rees, Geraint

    2016-10-21

    The future of academic medicine is uncertain. Concerns regarding the future availability of qualified and willing trainee clinical academics have been raised worldwide. Of significant concern is our failure to retain postdoctoral trainee clinical academics, who are likely to be our next generation of leaders in scientific discovery. To review the literature about factors that may influence postdoctoral career progression in early career clinical academics. This study employed a scoping review method. Three reviewers separately assessed whether the articles found fit the inclusion criteria. PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (1991-2015). The review encompassed a broad search of English language studies published anytime up to November 2015. All articles were eligible for inclusion, including research papers employing either quantitative or qualitative methods, as well as editorials and other summary articles. Data extracted from included publications were charted according to author(s), sample population, study design, key findings, country of origin and year of publication. Our review identified 6 key influences: intrinsic motivation, work-life balance, inclusiveness, work environment, mentorship and availability of funding. It also detected significant gaps within the literature about these influences. Three key steps are proposed to help support postdoctoral trainee clinical academics. These focus on ensuring that researchers feel encouraged in their workplace, involved in collaborative dialogue with key stakeholders and able to access reliable information regarding their chosen career pathway. Finally, we highlight recommendations for future research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Behavioral and Academic Progress of Children Displaying Substantive ADHD Behaviors in Special Education: A 1-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutjesdijk, Regina; Scholte, Evert M; Swaab, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Exploring differences in behavioral and academic progress between children displaying substantive ADHD behaviors (M age of 9.4 years) in special schools (n = 38) and in inclusive education (n = 26). The contribution of pedagogical strategies to positive outcomes was also examined. Measurements used were the Teachers' Report Form, the Social Emotional Questionnaire, assessments of academic achievement, and the Pedagogical Methods Questionnaire. Mixed-model ANOVAs and Pearson's correlations were used to analyze the data. Significant progress was found regarding disorder-specific problem behavior and in all academic areas, but no interaction effect was found between time and setting. Correlations indicated that positive behavior reinforcement and emotional support are the pedagogical strategies that contributed most to behavioral adaptation. Children displaying substantive ADHD behaviors in both groups develop equally well in the areas of behavioral and academic functioning where significant progress was found. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Mapping project on energy and the social sciences. Progress report for period October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.A.; Gould, L.C.

    1977-06-01

    The purpose of this Energy Research and Development Administration supported project is to improve the effectiveness and accessibility of policy-oriented, academic social science research relevant to energy problems. Progress has been made toward identifying the useful existing research and specifying needed new research in several areas, including energy and social organization, energy boomtowns, the diffusion of innovations, public participation, regulatory systems, and energy-survey data. A national clearinghouse for research information on selected energy topics is being established. Workshops are being conducted and other interactions established with ERDA and other policy-making organizations. The process of mapping, the systematic identification of a research agenda, is being studied with the objective of developing guidelines for future efforts.

  18. Dynamic CRM occupancy reflects a temporal map of developmental progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Bartek; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2010-06-22

    Development is driven by tightly coordinated spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression, which are initiated through the action of transcription factors (TFs) binding to cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Although many studies have investigated how spatial patterns arise, precise temporal control of gene expression is less well understood. Here, we show that dynamic changes in the timing of CRM occupancy is a prevalent feature common to all TFs examined in a developmental ChIP time course to date. CRMs exhibit complex binding patterns that cannot be explained by the sequence motifs or expression of the TFs themselves. The temporal changes in TF binding are highly correlated with dynamic patterns of target gene expression, which in turn reflect transitions in cellular function during different stages of development. Thus, it is not only the timing of a TF's expression, but also its temporal occupancy in refined time windows, which determines temporal gene expression. Systematic measurement of dynamic CRM occupancy may therefore serve as a powerful method to decode dynamic changes in gene expression driving developmental progression.

  19. Seventh Graders' Academic Achievement, Creativity, and Ability to Construct a Cross-Domain Concept Map--A Brain Function Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Chu

    2004-01-01

    This study proposes an interactive model of "cross-domain" concept mapping with an emphasis on brain functions, and it further investigates the relationships between academic achievement, creative thinking, and cross-domain concept mapping. Sixty-nine seventh graders participated in this study which employed two 50-minute instructional…

  20. The Effects of Concept Mapping and Academic Self-Efficacy on Mastery Goals and Reading Comprehension Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Kim, Wonsun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of concept mapping on mastery goal orientation and academic self-efficacy in a collaborative learning environment. The current study employed a randomized controlled pretest-posttest group design to examine if learning strategies such as concept mapping can help students with both reading…

  1. Linking Government to Academic Research: Lessons from the American Progressive Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Filip

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to explore why and how the U.S. government involved academic scholars in the policy-making process during the Progressive Era, with a focus on President Woodrow Wilson‘s formation and use of the Inquiry. It further attempts to draw upon the lessons learned from this case study in history in order to stimulate new thinking with regard to the interest of the governmental decision-makers in exploiting academic potential. The paper rests mainly on the research dedicated to Progressivism and Wilsonianism and it consists of an analysis based on the literature review and the case study of The Inquiry. The conclusions highlight the impact that the intellectual potential from within universities and research centres might have in informing policies, revealing alternative tracks and finally supporting the process as a whole. Thus, the paper aims to offer ―food for thought‖ for further debates, raise the awareness on the issue of benefiting from a stronger and deeper government-academia relationship and nurture the mutual interest for partnership and even possible integration.

  2. Analysis of the BEV Technology Progress of America, Europe, Japan and Korea Based on Patent Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurong, Huang; Yuanyuan, Hou; Jingyan, Zhou; Ru, Liu

    2018-02-01

    The paper analyzed the Battery Electric Vehicle patent application trend, major country distribution, main technology layout and patentee of America, Europe, Japan and Korea based on patent information from 2006 to 2016 by using patent map method, and visualized the Battery Electric Vehicle technology progress conditions of the four countries and regions in the last decade.

  3. How Much Progress Do Children in Shanghai Make Over One Academic Year? Evidence From PISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Anders

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since its entry into the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA in 2009, the Chinese province of Shanghai has been the top-performing economy within these international rankings. Many have interpreted this as demonstrating how Shanghai has a “world class” education system, the most effective teaching methods, and the best schools. This article questions such interpretations of the PISA results. Specifically, we argue that statements about school and school system quality require information on the progress that children make during their time at school, which the PISA rankings do not provide (at least not directly. Our empirical analysis then uses a “fuzzy” regression discontinuity design approach to demonstrate how a rather different perspective of Shanghai’s performance in PISA emerges once pupils’ academic progress over one particular school year is considered. Our key finding is that the first year of upper secondary school in Shanghai adds essentially no value (on average to children’s PISA reading, science, and mathematics test scores.

  4. Use of Social Emotional Learning Skills to Predict Future Academic Success and Progress toward Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan; Solberg, V. Scott; de Baca, Christine; Gore, Taryn Hargrove

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which a range of social emotional learning skills--academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, social connections, importance of school, and managing psychological and emotional distress and academic stress--could be used as an indicator of future academic outcomes. Using a sample of 4,797 from a large urban…

  5. Preclinical medical students’ understandings of academic and medical professionalism: visual analysis of mind maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have begun to explore medical students’ understandings of professionalism generally and medical professionalism specifically. Despite espoused relationships between academic (AP) and medical professionalism (MP), previous research has not yet investigated students’ conceptualisations of AP and MP and the relationships between the two. Objectives The current study, based on innovative visual analysis of mind maps, therefore aims to contribute to the developing literature on how professionalism is understood. Methods We performed a multilayered analysis of 98 mind maps from 262 first-year medical students, including analysing textual and graphical elements of AP, MP and the relationships between AP and MP. Results The most common textual attributes of AP were learning, lifestyle and personality, while attributes of MP were knowledge, ethics and patient-doctor relations. Images of books, academic caps and teachers were used most often to represent AP, while images of the stethoscope, doctor and red cross were used to symbolise MP. While AP-MP relations were sometimes indicated through co-occurring text, visual connections and higher-order visual metaphors, many students struggled to articulate the relationships between AP and MP. Conclusions While the mind maps’ textual attributes shared similarities with those found in previous research, suggesting the universality of some professionalism attributes, our study provides new insights into students’ conceptualisations of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships. We encourage medical educators to help students develop their understandings of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships, plus consider the feasibility and value of mind maps as a source of visual data for medical education research. PMID:28821520

  6. Screen Media Usage, Sleep Time and Academic Performance in Adolescents: Clustering a Self-Organizing Maps Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peiró-Velert, Carmen; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; González, Luis M.; García-Massó, Xavier; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Devís-Devís, José

    2014-01-01

    Screen media usage, sleep time and socio-demographic features are related to adolescents' academic performance, but interrelations are little explored. This paper describes these interrelations and behavioral profiles clustered in low and high academic performance. A nationally representative sample of 3,095 Spanish adolescents, aged 12 to 18, was surveyed on 15 variables linked to the purpose of the study. A Self-Organizing Maps analysis established non-linear interrelationships among these ...

  7. The Effect of Instructing Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies on the Academic Progress of Ilam Medical University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Amir; Keikhavani, Sattar; Hasel, Kourosh Mohammadi

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the effect of instructing cognitive and metacognitive strategies on the academic progress of Medical Sciences of Ilam University students. The research is quasi-experimental including a pre-test and a post-test. The population of the research includes the students of Medical Sciences of Ilam University. The sample includes 120…

  8. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  9. Promoting the Social Inclusion and Academic Progress of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Children: A Secondary School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Siobhan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify support strategies used to promote "social inclusion" and "academic progress" of Key Stage 3 and 4 Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) pupils. The study used an interpretivist approach, incorporating an embedded single case study with several participant groups, namely GRT pupils, GRT parents,…

  10. Botanical inventory of the Rocky Flats AEC site: mapping methods and preliminary maps. Technical progress report, July 31, 1975--April 28, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, P.J.; Clark, S.V.

    1976-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report represents a small but important part of the overall progress and research effort of this contract. It outlines the methods used to produce one 1:12,000 colored vegetation map of the Rocky Flats site and its surrounding area and six black and white 1:500 vegetation maps of intensively studied experimental plots. These maps are already being used by various researchers and it is appropriate that the mapping methods be detailed prior to the final contract report so that their use may be optimised. (auth)

  11. Using progressive concept maps as a strategy for teaching and learning in teacher education in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Aparecida Soares Mendonça

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study carried out with Biology teachers under training, and aimed at investigating how concept maps enabled meaningful learning. The work was motivated by the fact that future teachers presented difficulties learning various concepts. In this light, maps can be a valuable instrument for the diagnosis and assessment of learning, enabling better concept learning. Thus, during our pedagogical intervention, we have strived to identify the conceptual evolution of students, through the construction of concept maps before, during and after the study of a proposed theme. The qualitative analysis of the produced maps focused on the processes of teaching, learning and assessment. At this point, the goal was to investigate whether or not students were able to relate the concepts under study, according to the principles of progressive differentiation and integrative reconcilitation. This was done while searching for evidences of meaningful learning.The pedagogical intervention lasted for 45 hours (8 meetings, during which a Zoology topic, concept Elephants was studied at a State university of Brazil. The qualitative analysis of the maps created by the learners has shown, in 58% of the cases, that there was an evolution of the learnersʼ knowledge of the theme. Obtained results suggest that maps have an efficient functional action and help improve the professional profile under formation.

  12. Personality traits and educational identity formation in late adolescents: longitudinal associations and academic progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimstra, Theo A; Luyckx, Koen; Germeijs, Veerle; Meeus, Wim H J; Goossens, Luc

    2012-03-01

    Changes in personality traits in late adolescence and young adulthood are believed to co-occur with changes in identity, but little research is available that supports this hypothesis. The present study addressed this relatively understudied area of research by examining longitudinal associations of Big Five personality traits (i.e., Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness) with dimensions of identity formation (i.e., identification with commitment and exploration in depth) in the domain of education. For this purpose, we used four annual waves of longitudinal data on 485 Belgian late adolescents (87.4% female; mean age at T1 = 18.6 years) covering a 3-year period. Multivariate growth models revealed that changes in Big Five personality traits were related to changes in identification with commitment and exploration in depth. Cross-lagged panel models uncovered that, except for Openness, all Big Five traits predicted educational identity dimensions. Educational identity dimensions only predicted Neuroticism. In addition, adolescents with higher levels on the personality trait of Conscientiousness faced fewer study delays. In sum, the present study adds to the growing literature that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of personality trait development by uncovering the interplay of personality traits, educational identity dimensions, and academic progress in late adolescents.

  13. Student nurse non-attendance in relation to academic performance and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshankova, Catriona; Hirons, Debra; Kirton, Jennifer A; Knighting, Katherine; Jinks, Annette M

    2018-01-01

    High levels of non-attendance are reported in nurse education programmes even though literal interpretation of UK national guidelines implies mandatory student attendance is a requirement for all elements of pre-registration undergraduate programmes. To examine relationships between undergraduate student nurse non-attendance, academic performance and progression. A quantitative study using audit approaches was undertaken. The records of 1347 undergraduate student nurses who had studied at a university in the north west of England were analysed. Following data coding and input into an SPSS database descriptive and chi-square analyses were conducted to explore the associations between non-attendance rates and age, sex, entry qualifications, year of study and degree classification. The characteristics of the sample were that the majority were female, aged under 21years and had 'A' level entry qualifications. Significant chi-square associations were found in regard of age at entry and entry qualifications with degree classification. Significant chi-square associations were also identified between degree classification and non-attendance across all three years of the programme. The findings that non-attendance is positively associated with degree outcome across all the three years of study are in keeping with the findings of several studies. Many of these findings will help inform future student attendance policies where the study was conducted and are insightful for other national and international institutions that offer nurse education programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Parent's Guide to MAP. NWEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This guide was created as a resource to help families better understand "Measures of Academic Progress"® (MAP®), and their child's results. The guide provides answers to a variety of questions such as: "What is MAP?"; "What does MAP measure?"; "How do schools and teachers use MAP scores?"; "Can MAP tell…

  15. Screen media usage, sleep time and academic performance in adolescents: clustering a self-organizing maps analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró-Velert, Carmen; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; González, Luis M; García-Massó, Xavier; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Devís-Devís, José

    2014-01-01

    Screen media usage, sleep time and socio-demographic features are related to adolescents' academic performance, but interrelations are little explored. This paper describes these interrelations and behavioral profiles clustered in low and high academic performance. A nationally representative sample of 3,095 Spanish adolescents, aged 12 to 18, was surveyed on 15 variables linked to the purpose of the study. A Self-Organizing Maps analysis established non-linear interrelationships among these variables and identified behavior patterns in subsequent cluster analyses. Topological interrelationships established from the 15 emerging maps indicated that boys used more passive videogames and computers for playing than girls, who tended to use mobile phones to communicate with others. Adolescents with the highest academic performance were the youngest. They slept more and spent less time using sedentary screen media when compared to those with the lowest performance, and they also showed topological relationships with higher socioeconomic status adolescents. Cluster 1 grouped boys who spent more than 5.5 hours daily using sedentary screen media. Their academic performance was low and they slept an average of 8 hours daily. Cluster 2 gathered girls with an excellent academic performance, who slept nearly 9 hours per day, and devoted less time daily to sedentary screen media. Academic performance was directly related to sleep time and socioeconomic status, but inversely related to overall sedentary screen media usage. Profiles from the two clusters were strongly differentiated by gender, age, sedentary screen media usage, sleep time and academic achievement. Girls with the highest academic results had a medium socioeconomic status in Cluster 2. Findings may contribute to establishing recommendations about the timing and duration of screen media usage in adolescents and appropriate sleep time needed to successfully meet the demands of school academics and to improve

  16. Screen media usage, sleep time and academic performance in adolescents: clustering a self-organizing maps analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Peiró-Velert

    Full Text Available Screen media usage, sleep time and socio-demographic features are related to adolescents' academic performance, but interrelations are little explored. This paper describes these interrelations and behavioral profiles clustered in low and high academic performance. A nationally representative sample of 3,095 Spanish adolescents, aged 12 to 18, was surveyed on 15 variables linked to the purpose of the study. A Self-Organizing Maps analysis established non-linear interrelationships among these variables and identified behavior patterns in subsequent cluster analyses. Topological interrelationships established from the 15 emerging maps indicated that boys used more passive videogames and computers for playing than girls, who tended to use mobile phones to communicate with others. Adolescents with the highest academic performance were the youngest. They slept more and spent less time using sedentary screen media when compared to those with the lowest performance, and they also showed topological relationships with higher socioeconomic status adolescents. Cluster 1 grouped boys who spent more than 5.5 hours daily using sedentary screen media. Their academic performance was low and they slept an average of 8 hours daily. Cluster 2 gathered girls with an excellent academic performance, who slept nearly 9 hours per day, and devoted less time daily to sedentary screen media. Academic performance was directly related to sleep time and socioeconomic status, but inversely related to overall sedentary screen media usage. Profiles from the two clusters were strongly differentiated by gender, age, sedentary screen media usage, sleep time and academic achievement. Girls with the highest academic results had a medium socioeconomic status in Cluster 2. Findings may contribute to establishing recommendations about the timing and duration of screen media usage in adolescents and appropriate sleep time needed to successfully meet the demands of school academics and

  17. The Effectiveness of Electronic Mind Maps in Developing Academic Achievement and the Attitude towards Learning English among Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaser, Afaf M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the effect of using electronic Mind Maps on the academic achievement of the fifth-grade primary female students in the English language curriculum compared to the traditional teaching method adopted in the teacher's guide. It also aimed to indicate the attitudes of the fifth-grade female students towards the use…

  18. A Mapping Review of Poster Presentation Publications Across Time and Academic Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Muriel Lavallee Warren

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Rowe, N. (2017. Tracing the 'grey literature' of poster presentations: A mapping review. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 34(2, 106-124. Abstract Objective – To map the development and use of poster presentations in order to determine disciplines in which they are particularly prolific and how their popularity or presence may have changed over time. This will potentially assist health and interdisciplinary librarians asked to search for poster presentations in systematic reviews. Design – Informetric mapping review. Setting – An unnamed UK University Library search facility which processes 249 international databases and research publications. Databases and publications range across 37 research disciplines, including literature, medicine, and engineering. Subjects – Published literature connected to poster presentations – the authors state that this could be poster presentations themselves, abstracts, title listings in conference proceedings, or any variety of materials. They also state that over 99% of the results of this review were title citations or abstracts of conference poster presentations. Methods – An informetric mapping review was conducted via a UK University Library search facility by searching for the term “poster presentation” in 249 databases spanning 37 research areas. An index of databases used is provided as an appendix to the article. Results were not connected by the search facility to an individual database. Search results were categorized by discipline and decade of publication. Scholarly and peer-reviewed search limiters were used to obtain an idea of the themes and contributions to what could be considered core literature, and the search was also run in Google Scholar to provide a comparator. Duplications across databases were removed by the search service, although several results appeared both in aggregate (for example, conference proceedings encompassing all poster presentations and

  19. Assessing Mild Cognitive Impairment Progression using a Spherical Brain Mapping of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Murcia, Francisco Jesus; Górriz, Juan Manuel; Ramírez, Javier; Segovia, Fermín; Salas-Gonzalez, Diego; Castillo-Barnes, Diego; Ortiz, Andrés

    2018-04-04

    The early diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), particularly in its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), still remains a challenge. Many computational tools have been developed to successfully explore and predict the disease progression. In this context, the Spherical Brain Mapping (SBM) proved its ability in detecting differences between AD and aged subjects without symptoms of dementia. Being a very visual tool, its application in predicting MCI conversion to AD could be of great help to understand neurodegeneration and the disease progression. In this work, we aim at predicting the conversion of MCI affected subjects to AD more than 6 months in advance of their conversion session and understanding the progression of the disease by predicting neuropsychological test outcomes from MRI data. In order to do so, SBM is applied to a series of MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The resulting spherical brain maps show statistical and morphological information of the brain in a bidimensional plane, performing at the same time a significant feature reduction that provides a feature vector used in classification analysis. The study achieves up to 92.3% accuracy in the AD versus normal controls (CTL) detection, and up to a 77.6% in detection a of MCI conversions when trained with AD and CTL subjects. The prediction of neuropsychological test outcomes achieved R2 rates up to more than 0.5. Significant regions according to t-test and correlation analysis match reported brain areas in the literature. The results prove that Spherical Brain Mapping offers good ability to predict conversion patterns and cognitive state, at the same time that provides an additional aid for visualizing a two-dimensional abstraction map of the brain.

  20. Brain metabolic maps in Mild Cognitive Impairment predict heterogeneity of progression to dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cerami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [18F]FDG-PET imaging has been recognized as a crucial diagnostic marker in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, supporting the presence or the exclusion of Alzheimer's Disease (AD pathology. A clinical heterogeneity, however, underlies MCI definition. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the predictive role of single-subject voxel-based maps of [18F]FDG distribution generated through statistical parametric mapping (SPM in the progression to different dementia subtypes in a sample of 45 MCI. Their scans were compared to a large normal reference dataset developed and validated for comparison at single-subject level. Additionally, Aβ42 and Tau CSF values were available in 34 MCI subjects. Clinical follow-up (mean 28.5 ± 7.8 months assessed subsequent progression to AD or non-AD dementias. The SPM analysis showed: 1 normal brain metabolism in 14 MCI cases, none of them progressing to dementia; 2 the typical temporo-parietal pattern suggestive for prodromal AD in 15 cases, 11 of them progressing to AD; 3 brain hypometabolism suggestive of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD subtypes in 7 and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB in 2 subjects (all fulfilled FTLD or DLB clinical criteria at follow-up; and 4 7 MCI cases showed a selective unilateral or bilateral temporo-medial hypometabolism without the typical AD pattern, and they all remained stable. In our sample, objective voxel-based analysis of [18F]FDG-PET scans showed high predictive prognostic value, by identifying either normal brain metabolism or hypometabolic patterns suggestive of different underlying pathologies, as confirmed by progression at follow-up. These data support the potential usefulness of this SPM [18F]FDG PET analysis in the early dementia diagnosis and for improving subject selection in clinical trials based on MCI definition.

  1. St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project - A Progress Report-November 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, D.; Rogers, J.D.; Williams, R.A.; Cramer, C.H.; Bauer, R.A.; Hoffman, D.; Chung, J.; Hempen, G.L.; Steckel, P.H.; Boyd, O.L.; Watkins, C.M.; McCallister, N.S.; Schweig, E.

    2009-01-01

    St. Louis has experienced minor earthquake damage at least 12 times in the past 200 years. Because of this history and its proximity to known active earthquake zones, the St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (SLAEHMP) is producing digital maps that show variability of earthquake hazards, including liquefaction and ground shaking, in the St. Louis area. The maps will be available free via the internet. Although not site specific enough to indicate the hazard at a house-by-house resolution, they can be customized by the user to show specific areas of interest, such as neighborhoods or transportation routes. Earthquakes currently cannot be predicted, but scientists can estimate how strongly the ground is likely to shake as the result of an earthquake. Earthquake hazard maps provide one way of conveying such estimates. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which produces earthquake hazard maps for the Nation, is working with local partners to develop detailed maps for urban areas vulnerable to strong ground shaking. These partners, which along with the USGS comprise the SLAEHMP, include the Missouri University of Science and Technology-Rolla (Missouri S&T), Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Saint Louis University, Missouri State Emergency Management Agency, and URS Corporation. Preliminary hazard maps covering a test portion of the 29-quadrangle St. Louis study area have been produced and are currently being evaluated by the SLAEHMP. A USGS Fact Sheet summarizing this project was produced and almost 1000 copies have been distributed at several public outreach meetings and field trips that have featured the SLAEHMP (Williams and others, 2007). In addition, a USGS website focusing on the SLAEHMP, which provides links to project results and relevant earthquake hazard information, can be found at: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/ceus/urban_map/st_louis/index.php. This progress report summarizes the

  2. Progressive Amalgamation of Building Clusters for Map Generalization Based on Scaling Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjin He

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Map generalization utilizes transformation operations to derive smaller-scale maps from larger-scale maps, and is a key procedure for the modelling and understanding of geographic space. Studies to date have largely applied a fixed tolerance to aggregate clustered buildings into a single object, resulting in the loss of details that meet cartographic constraints and may be of importance for users. This study aims to develop a method that amalgamates clustered buildings gradually without significant modification of geometry, while preserving the map details as much as possible under cartographic constraints. The amalgamation process consists of three key steps. First, individual buildings are grouped into distinct clusters by using the graph-based spatial clustering application with random forest (GSCARF method. Second, building clusters are decomposed into scaling subgroups according to homogeneity with regard to the mean distance of subgroups. Thus, hierarchies of building clusters can be derived based on scaling subgroups. Finally, an amalgamation operation is progressively performed from the bottom-level subgroups to the top-level subgroups using the maximum distance of each subgroup as the amalgamating tolerance instead of using a fixed tolerance. As a consequence of this step, generalized intermediate scaling results are available, which can form the multi-scale representation of buildings. The experimental results show that the proposed method can generate amalgams with correct details, statistical area balance and orthogonal shape while satisfying cartographic constraints (e.g., minimum distance and minimum area.

  3. Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. Progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.A.; Doob, L.W.; Gould, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This is a progress report of activities in the fourth year of the Yale Institution for Social and Policy Studies Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. The Mapping Project evaluates past and present social and behavioral science energy studies, assesses the potential for social and behavioral science contributions to a resolution of the energy problems in the future, and diffuses social and behavioral science information and perspectives to policymakers and others concerned with US or world energy developments. Activities in FY 1979 included meetings, workshops, collecting bibliographic material, publications, evaluating DOE programs in buildings and transportation, performing a special study of potential social impacts of 4 coal technologies, and developing plans for 10 specific research studies on energy.

  4. Process mapping evaluation of medication reconciliation in academic teaching hospitals: a critical step in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anne; Bowen, James M; Patel, Harsit; O'Brien, Chris; You, John J; Tahavori, Roshan; Doleweerd, Jeff; Berezny, Tim; Perri, Dan; Nieuwstraten, Carmine; Troyan, Sue; Patel, Ameen

    2016-12-30

    Medication reconciliation (MedRec) has been a mandated or recommended activity in Canada, the USA and the UK for nearly 10 years. Accreditation bodies in North America will soon require MedRec for every admission, transfer and discharge of every patient. Studies of MedRec have revealed unintentional discrepancies in prescriptions but no clear evidence that clinically important outcomes are improved, leading to widely variable practices. Our objective was to apply process mapping methodology to MedRec to clarify current processes and resource usage, identify potential efficiencies and gaps in care, and make recommendations for improvement in the light of current literature evidence of effectiveness. Process engineers observed and recorded all MedRec activities at 3 academic teaching hospitals, from initial emergency department triage to patient discharge, for general internal medicine patients. Process maps were validated with frontline staff, then with the study team, managers and patient safety leads to summarise current problems and discuss solutions. Across all of the 3 hospitals, 5 general problem themes were identified: lack of use of all available medication sources, duplication of effort creating inefficiency, lack of timeliness of completion of the Best Possible Medication History, lack of standardisation of the MedRec process, and suboptimal communication of MedRec issues between physicians, pharmacists and nurses. MedRec as practised in this environment requires improvements in quality, timeliness, consistency and dissemination. Further research exploring efficient use of resources, in terms of personnel and costs, is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Screening for intrinsic water use efficiency in a potato dihaploid mapping population under progressive drought conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topbjerg, Henrik Bak; Kaminski, Kacper Piotr; Sørensen, Kirsten Kørup

    2015-01-01

    A drought screening experiment focusing on intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) was carried out among 132 clones belonging to a dihaploid potato mapping population. The clones were exposed to progressive soil drying during a five-day period in a greenhouse pot experiment. Analysis...... between leaf ABA concentration and soil water potential was found. The latter findings suggest that the investigated population did not harbour significant genetic variation as to ABA production as function of soil desiccation level or with respect to the sensitivity of stomatal aperture vis-à-vis leaf...... ABA concentration and soil water potential....

  6. Evaluating Longitudinal Mathematics Achievement Growth: Modeling and Measurement Considerations for Assessing Academic Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring and modeling academic achievement growth is critical to support educational policy and practice. Using a nationally representative longitudinal data set, this study compared various models of mathematics achievement growth on the basis of both practical utility and optimal statistical fit and explored relationships within and…

  7. Progress for Women in Academe, Yet Inequities Persist: Evidence from NSOPF:99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutkoushian, Robert K.; Conley, Valerie Martin

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we use data from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99) to measure the unexplained wage gap between men and women in academe. We pay particular attention to how these unexplained wage gaps have changed over time by comparing the results from the 1999 survey to published results from previous national surveys and…

  8. Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

  9. Participant Leadership in Adult Basic Education: Negotiating Academic Progress and Leadership Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Brendaly; Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the conflicts and challenges that student leaders in adult basic education and literacy programs experience in balancing their leadership responsibilities with academic endeavours. Based upon a case study of an adult basic education student leadership council in New York City, the article shows that leadership activities can…

  10. A Pedagogy of Conceptual Progression and the Case for Academic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The potential for academic knowledge to "interrupt" inter-generational reproduction in education is located in the structural contradictions that shape knowledge and democracy. Since the late 1990s research in the sociology of education, which theorises curriculum knowledge using the ideas of Durkheim, Vygotsky and Bernstein, suggests…

  11. Considerations for creating and annotating the budding yeast Genome Map at SGD: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Esther T; Cherry, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) is compiling and annotating a comprehensive catalogue of functional sequence elements identified in the budding yeast genome. Recent advances in deep sequencing technologies have enabled for example, global analyses of transcription profiling and assembly of maps of transcription factor occupancy and higher order chromatin organization, at nucleotide level resolution. With this growing influx of published genome-scale data, come new challenges for their storage, display, analysis and integration. Here, we describe SGD's progress in the creation of a consolidated resource for genome sequence elements in the budding yeast, the considerations taken in its design and the lessons learned thus far. The data within this collection can be accessed at http://browse.yeastgenome.org and downloaded from http://downloads.yeastgenome.org. DATABASE URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org.

  12. Mapping Research in Landscape Architecture: Balancing Supply of Academic Knowledge and Demand of Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; Miller, Patrick A.; Clements, Terry L.; Kim, Mintai

    2017-01-01

    With increasing academic research in the past few decades, the knowledge scope of landscape architecture has expanded from traditional focus on aesthetics to a broad range of ecological, cultural and psychological issues. In order to understand how academic research and knowledge expansion may have redefined the practice, two surveys were…

  13. Relationship of work hours with selected health behaviors and academic progress among a college student cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. The authors randomly selected a sample of 1,700 undergraduates from a southeastern US university and mailed to them a survey requesting a variety of self-reported health behaviors and hours worked. A total of 903 completed questionnaires were received, indicating a response rate of 57.3%. Binge drinking, less sleep, and lower academic performance were significantly associated with working 20 or more hours per week. Those variables were not associated with working fewer than 20 hours per week. Although administrators and others in higher education are aware of the impact of economics on a school's ability to operate, they may not be aware of the impact on students' health.

  14. Sleep Quality and Academic Progression among Students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horyeh Sarbazvatan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep deprivation and drowsiness are very common among university students. The aim of this study was to examine the sleep quality and academic achievement among university students across all medical disciplines in Northwest of Iran. Methods: This study was based on data from a longitudinal study, the "Health and Lifestyle of University Students" (HeLiS. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, a self-administered questionnaire consisting of general information about sleep quality, was completed by students during the first eight weeks of the first semester and academic achievement was assessed via Grade Point Average (GPA in the two semesters following the administration of the PSQI. Results: The mean age of students was 19.16±1.04 and the majority were female (64%. The mean overall score on the PSQI was 6.87±2.25; the majority of students (70% had a global PSQI score greater than 5, indicating they were poor sleepers. Only 28% reported getting over 7 hours of sleep. Female students had higher scores than male students in subjective sleep quality, which was statistically significant (2.15 vs. 1.95 respectively, P = 0.01; however, there was no difference between males and females on other component scores or on the global score. Results of a multiple regression model showed that PSQI score was a predictor of academic achievement (β=-.07, P=0.035, which implies that GPA will be lower among students whose quality of sleep is lower. Conclusion: Based on our sleep quality should be considered and assessed, and sleep hygiene should be promoted among medical university students in order to improve academic achievement.

  15. Conceptualizing trust in community-academic research partnerships using concept mapping approach: A multi-CTSA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Gaurav; Frerichs, Leah; Jones, Jennifer; Kim, Mimi; Schaal, Jennifer; Vassar, Stefanie; Varma, Deepthi; Striley, Catherine; Ruktanonchai, Corrine; Black, Adina; Hankins, Jennifer; Lovelady, Nakita; Cene, Crystal; Green, Melissa; Young, Tiffany; Tiwari, Shristi; Cheney, Ann; Cottler, Linda; Sullivan, Greer; Brown, Arleen; Burke, Jessica; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2018-02-01

    Collaborations between communities, healthcare practices and academic institutions are a strategy to address health disparities. Trust is critical in the development and maintaining of effective collaborations. The aim of this pilot study was to engage stakeholders in defining determinants of trust in community academic research partnerships and to develop a framework for measuring trust. The study was conducted by five collaborating National Institute of Health' Clinical and Translational Sciences Awardees. We used concept mapping to engage three stakeholders: community members, healthcare providers and academicians. We conducted hierarchical cluster analysis to assess the determinants of trust in community-academic research partnerships. A total of 186 participants provided input generating 2,172 items that were consolidated into 125 unique items. A five cluster solution was defined: authentic, effective and transparent communication; mutually respectful and reciprocal relationships; sustainability; committed partnerships; and, communication, credibility and methodology to anticipate and resolve problems. Results from this study contribute to an increasing empirical body of work to better understand and improve the underlying factors that contribute to building and sustaining trust in community academic research partnerships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping and analysis of the assignment concepts process at academic secretaries of Colegio Pedro II: reflections and proposals for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Bitencourt de Carvalho Athaydes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Colegio Pedro II was equated to Federal Institutes of Education, Science and Technology by Law 12677 Publication of June 25, 2012. If, on the one hand, this equalization resulted in an expressive organizational restructuring, with growth of the number of educational units, in addition to the incorporation of new educational levels, on the other, this institutional growth was dissociated from efforts of standardization of administrative processes, notably, under the academic departments of different units – where it shows a variation of the process of launching notes/concepts. In order to contribute with improvements to the operation of the institution, the present article aims to map and analyse comparatively the launch process of notes/concepts in three campus of the Colegio Pedro II. Methodologically, are held in-person interviews with professionals responsible for the academic departments of the following units, Engenho Novo I, Humaita I and Realengo I, in order to obtain the necessary subsidies to support the design of the processes performed by these academic departments units. As a result, it can be verified that the processes of the academic departments are not aligned to any system of performance indicators, which motivated the proposal of a standard process for the launching of notes/concepts, as well as a performance indicators panel (KPIs.

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. Academic Persistence of Online Students in Higher Education Impacted by Student Progress Factors and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lint, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study evaluated and investigated the theoretical underpinnings of the Kember's (1995) student progress model that examines the direct or indirect effects of student persistence in online education by identifying the relationships between variables. The primary method of data collection in this study was a survey by exploring the…

  19. Expression profiling of MAP kinase-mediated meiotic progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie W Leacock

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The LET-60 (Ras/LIN-45 (Raf/MPK-1 (MAP kinase signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111 animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo.

  20. Cognition, academic progress, behavior and self-concept at 14 years of very low birth weight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, A L; Kelly, E A; Doyle, L W; Callanan, C

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare cognition, academic progress, behavior, and self-concept children of very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight 2,499 g). At 14 years of age, 130 (84.4%) of 154 VLBW and 42 (70.0%) of 60 NBW children were assessed. Ten VLBW children and one NBW child who had cerebral palsy were excluded. VLBW children scored at a significantly lower level on all three composite scales of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd Edition. VLBW children were also significantly disadvantaged on more specific cognitive processes, including tests of visual processing and visual memory and on subtests reflecting learning and problem solving. Only in arithmetic was a difference between the groups discerned on tests of achievement. Significantly more VLBW children were rated by teachers as socially rejected and by their parents as having learning problems at school. VLBW children had significantly reduced self-esteem. VLBW children had more cognitive, academic, and behavioral problems and lower self-esteem at 14 years of age than NBW control subjects.

  1. Mapping Disciplinary Differences and Equity of Academic Control to Create a Space for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Lynne; Liu, Yin; Smith, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    Academics are collaborating more as their research questions are becoming more complex, often reaching beyond the capacity of any one person. However, in many parts of the campus, teamwork is not a traditional work pattern, and team members may not understand the best ways to work together to the benefit of the project. Challenges are particularly…

  2. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness and Academic Achievement in Adolescents: A Self-Organizing Maps Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; Garcia-Massó, Xavier; Morales, Jose; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; González, Luis-Millán; Toca-Herrera, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The relationship among physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents has been widely studied; however, controversy concerning this topic persists. The methods used thus far to analyse the relationship between these variables have included mostly traditional lineal analysis according to the available literature. The…

  3. The Academic Support Process (ASP) website: helping preceptors develop resident learning plans and track progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodel, Emma J; Montpetit, Madeleine; Eyre, Alison; Prentice, Michelle; Johnston, Mary

    2012-01-01

    At times, preceptors struggle with aspects of resident education. Many are looking for more support and faculty development in this area. To address preceptors' needs for resources and provide a proactive framework for their teaching, the Academic Support Process (ASP) website was developed and evaluated. Preceptors' (N = 35) experiences using the ASP website, as well as their perceptions of its usefulness in supporting resident education, were identified. The research comprised two phases: a self-directed workshop involving the creation of a web-based learning plan for a standardised scenario of a resident in difficulty followed by 3 months use of the ASP website with residents in their practice. Information on their experiences was solicited via surveys and focus group interviews. Findings revealed the ASP website enabled preceptors to find words for their concerns around resident competency, gave them a proactive teaching framework, expanded their arsenal of teaching strategies, and supported a customised approach for all learners along the performance spectrum. However, there were a number of challenges encountered by the preceptors that affected site use and buy in. Results are promising. Next steps involve developing a clear strategy for adoption.

  4. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.7--pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear electronics, nuclear detecting technology, pulse power technology, nuclear fusion and plasma

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fifth one, the content is about radiation protection and nuclear chemical industry.

  6. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.4--nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally.This is the fourth one, the content is about nuclear materials, isotope separation, nuclear chemistry and radiological chemistry.

  7. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  8. Restructuring Student Experiences Using Tech Prep Mapping To Integrate Vocational and Academic Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzoli, Don

    The growing emphasis on accountability and the demand for better prepared students is pressing institutions of higher education to examine restructuring. Student experiences represent an important arena for school restructuring, and a useful approach to changing student experiences is the Tech Prep Mapping (TPM) process. The TPM process requires…

  9. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  10. Progress on mobility and instability of research personnel in Japan: scientometrics on a job-posting database for monitoring the academic job market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-07-01

    This study has two purposes. The first purpose is to extract statistics from a database of jobposting cards, previously little-used as a data source, to assess the academic job market. The second purpose is to connect statistics on the academic job market with monitoring of indicators of policy progress related to the mobility and instability of research personnel. The data source used in this study is a job-posting database named JREC-IN Portal, which is the de facto standard for academic job seeking in Japan. The present results show a growing proportion of fixed-term researchers in the Japanese academic job market and that job information is increasingly diverse. (Author)

  11. Multistate atmospheric power production pollution study - MAP3S. Progress report for FY 1977 and FY 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCracken, Michael C.; Ballantine, David S.

    1979-07-01

    Research progress on the transport, transformation, and fate of pollutants released by energy-related activities is summarized. Information is reported under the following section headings: power production emissions; non-power production emissions; measuring pollutants and their properties; regional pollutant distribution; transport; pollutant transformation; surface removal processes; wet removal processes; weather and climate modification; numerical modeling and analysis; special activities; and, MAP3S research directions. (JGB)

  12. APPLICATION OF FUZZY COGNITIVE MAPS ON POLICY ANALYSIS: DETERMINING THE POLICY OF SUPPORTING THE ACADEMIC SPIN OFFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny P. Soetanto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM is a type of artificial neural network. It can be viewed as a weighted directed graph in which vertices represent concepts and edges represent causal links between them. An FCM can be used as an intelligent decision support system (DSS tool. It works by representing important issues in a given situation and their causal relationships. The evolution of a dynamic system with time can be simulated and the behavior of the systems can be predicted and explained using an FCM. In this case FCM is used to ditermine the policy to support the academic spin off. Simulation brings forth some conclusions and the best policy can be chosen.

  13. Mapping a Teacher Boycott in Seattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Noah

    2013-01-01

    The author, a teacher in the Seattle public schools, tells the story of a movement begun by teachers at Garfield High School who in January 2013 voted unanimously to refuse to administer the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test. The MAP boycott spread to seven more Seattle schools, and teachers at 10 more schools signed statements of support.…

  14. The Effect of Computer Assisted Mind Mapping on Students’ Academic Achievement, Attitudes and Retention in Science and Technology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri GÖMLEKSİZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at determining the effects of computer assisted mind mapping (CAMM technique on students’ academic achievement, attitudes and retention in Science and Technology course. Mixed-method research design which included both quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the study. Pretest-posttest control group experimental design, interview and observation techniques were used. The study included one experimental (N:36 one control group (N:32. The study was conducted on seventh grade students at an elementary school in 2011-2012 academic year. While experimental group used CAMM technique, control group used traditional method. The achievement test, administered as a pre-, post- and delayed post-test, included 34 questions. The mean difficulty of the test was calculated to be .54 and KR-20 reliability coefficient was measured to be .73. To determine students' attitudes towards Science and Technology course, a 20-item five-point Likert-style attitude scale (α: .89 developed by Akınoğlu (2001 was used. The results revealed that CAMM technique had a positive effect on students’ achievement and attitudes towards learning science and technology

  15. Developing leadership within an academic medical department in Canada: a road map for increasing leadership span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Peter S; Anderson, Ronald; Sargent, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Medicine is dependent on strong leaders to advance innovation in the clinical care of patients. In most academic medical streams, there is no explicit system-wide approach for succession planning and leadership development. In late 2009, it was clear to the authors' department that they were at risk of losing high-potential individuals and division heads. Succession Planning and Needs Assessment (SPAN) was introduced to the department executive in late 2009 and endorsed in mid-2010. An executive coach was hired to assist in identifying emerging leaders and the skills needing to be developed within a mentorship cycle for leaders to be successful. A group of emerging leaders plus observer senior leaders worked between June and October 2010 to develop a manual that would provide guidance to the department executive. Since June 2010 a succession plan has been in place, allowing allocation of leadership roles. A group of 18 individuals has met four times to establish the elements of leadership development. A manual has been endorsed that includes elements such as the traits needed to be considered an emerging leader; the skills agreed on as important to develop; and the mentorship cycle needed. The group has also proposed a coordinator role and a budget for resource material. Departmental leadership development initiatives are important for succession planning and engagement of high-potential academics, who eventually will become our future leaders. In this article, the authors propose a cohort approach to piloting department initiatives that make a difference to developing leaders.

  16. [Recent progress in gene mapping through high-throughput sequencing technology and forward genetic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cai-rui; Zou, Chang-song; Song, Guo-li

    2015-08-01

    Traditional gene mapping using forward genetic approaches is conducted primarily through construction of a genetic linkage map, the process of which is tedious and time-consuming, and often results in low accuracy of mapping and large mapping intervals. With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technology and decreasing cost of sequencing, a variety of simple and quick methods of gene mapping through sequencing have been developed, including direct sequencing of the mutant genome, sequencing of selective mutant DNA pooling, genetic map construction through sequencing of individuals in population, as well as sequencing of transcriptome and partial genome. These methods can be used to identify mutations at the nucleotide level and has been applied in complex genetic background. Recent reports have shown that sequencing mapping could be even done without the reference of genome sequence, hybridization, and genetic linkage information, which made it possible to perform forward genetic study in many non-model species. In this review, we summarized these new technologies and their application in gene mapping.

  17. "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities": Re-Visiting a Theoretical Lens Five Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Published in a 2008 issue of "Journal of Basic Writing" ("JBW"), "Journalism, Poetry, Stand-Up Comedy, and Academic Writing: Mapping the Interplay of Curricular and Extracurricular Literate Activities" was Kevin Roozen's first single-authored publication. Drawn from data collected for the first case study from…

  18. Recent progress in the development of 3D deep n-well CMOS MAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Traversi, Gianluca; Manazza, Alessia; Manghisoni, Massimo; Ratti, Lodovico; Re, Valerio; Zucca, Stefano; 10.1088/1748-0221/7/02/C02007

    2012-01-01

    In the deep n-well (DNW) monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) a full in-pixel signal processing chain is integrated by exploiting the triple well option of a deep submicron CMOS process. This work is concerned with the design and characterization of DNW MAPS fabricated in a vertical integration (3D) CMOS technology. 3D processes can be very effective in overcoming typical limitations of monolithic active pixel sensors. This paper discusses the main features of a new analog processor for DNW MAPS (ApselVI) in view of applications to the SVT Layer0 of the SuperB Factory. It also presents the first experimental results from the test of a DNW MAPS prototype in the GlobalFoundries 130 nm CMOS technology.

  19. The 1:3M geologic map of Mercury: progress and updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Valentina; Guzzetta, Laura; Mancinelli, Paolo; Giacomini, Lorenza; Malliband, Christopher C.; Mosca, Alessandro; Wright, Jack; Ferranti, Luigi; Massironi, Matteo; Pauselli, Cristina; Rothery, David A.; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2017-04-01

    After the end of Mariner 10 mission a 1:5M geologic map of seven of the fifteen quadrangles of Mercury [Spudis and Guest, 1988] was produced. The NASA MESSENGER mission filled the gap by imaging 100% of the planet with a global average resolution of 200 m/pixel and this led to the production of a global 1:15M geologic map of the planet [Prockter et al., 2016]. Despite the quality gap between Mariner 10 and MESSENGER images, no global geological mapping project with a scale larger than 1:5M has been proposed so far. Here we present the status of an ongoing project for the geologic mapping of Mercury at an average output scale of 1:3M based on the available MESSENGER data. This project will lead to a fuller grasp of the planet's stratigraphy and surface history. Completing such a product for Mercury is an important goal in preparation for the forthcoming ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to aid selection of scientific targets and to provide context for interpretation of new data. At the time of this writing, H02 Victoria [Galluzzi et al., 2016], H03 Shakespeare [Guzzetta et al., 2016] and H04 Raditladi [Mancinelli et al., 2016] have been completed and H05 Hokusai [Rothery et al., 2017], H06 Kuiper [Giacomini et al., 2017], H07 Beethoven and H10 Derain [Malliband et al., 2017] are being mapped. The produced geologic maps were merged using the ESRI ArcGIS software adjusting discontinuous contacts along the quadrangle boundaries. Contact discrepancies were reviewed and discussed among the mappers of adjoining quadrangles in order to match the geological interpretation and provide a unique consistent stratigraphy. At the current stage, more than 20% of Mercury has now a complete 1:3M map and more than 40% of the planet will be covered soon by the maps that are being prepared. This research was supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) within the SIMBIOSYS project (ASI-INAF agreement no. I/022/10/0). References Galluzzi V. et al. (2016). Geology of the Victoria Quadrangle (H

  20. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  1. MAP3S/RAINE biennial progress report for the period FY 1980-FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Research accomplished under the MAP3S/RAINE program during the two-year period ending on October 1, 1981 is reported. Load shifting to meet unanticipated demands occurred frequently throughout this two-year period, with the result that new activities were introduced to the program and some scheduled activities deferred or deleted. Therefore the report is organized in a format to present both the scheduled and unscheduled activities. The first section provides a broad overview of the total program from a management perspective, indicating major decision points, accomplishments, and the rationale for the decision-paths chosen. The next section is a summary of unscheduled activities in MAP3S/RAINE that pertain to the first two categories noted above. The next section describes the major element of the third class of deviation, namely the OSCAR experiment. The following section presents the activity summaries, which constitute a major portion of the report. As noted above, these pertain to originally scheduled research components, and thus are a direct measure of scientific productivity. The next and final section provides an indexed listing of MAP3S/RAINE publications, and describes the future MAP3S/RAINE-dedicated issue of Atmospheric Environment, which is a major final product of the 1980-81 MAP3S/RAINE phase.

  2. Quantitative T1 and T2 mapping in recurrent glioblastomas under bevacizumab: earlier detection of tumor progression compared to conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescher, Stephanie; Jurcoane, Alina; Veit, Andreas [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Baehr, Oliver [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Dr. Senckenberg Institute of Neurooncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Deichmann, Ralf [Brain Imaging Center, Center for Imaging in Neuroscience, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hattingen, Elke [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hospital of University Bonn, Instiute of Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Treatment with the humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab in glioblastoma patients suppresses contrast enhancement via the reduction of vascular permeability, which does not necessarily indicate real reduction of tumor cell mass. Therefore, other imaging criteria are needed to recognize tumor growth under bevacizumab more reliably. It is still unknown, whether quantitative T1 mapping is useful to monitor the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy or to indicate a tumor progression earlier and more reliable compared to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. This raised the question whether quantitative T1 mapping is more suitable to monitor treatment effects of bevacizumab. Conventional and quantitative MRI was performed on six consecutive patients with recurrent glioblastoma before treatment with bevacizumab and every 8 weeks thereafter until further tumor progression. Quantitative T1 maps before and after intravenous application of contrast agent and quantitative T2 maps were performed to calculate serial differential maps and subtraction maps from one time point, subtracting contrast-enhanced T1 maps from non-contrast T1 maps. In five illustrative cases, tumor progression was documented earlier in differential T1 relaxation time (DiffT1) and T2 relaxation time (DiffT2) maps before changes in the conventional MRI studies were obvious. Four patients showed previous prolongation of T1 relaxation time in the DiffT1 maps, suggesting tumor progression, and subtraction maps revealed faint contrast enhancement matching with the areas of T1 prolongation. Our results emphasize that quantitative relaxation time mapping could be a promising method for tumor monitoring in glioblastoma patients under anti-angiogenic therapy. Quantitative T1 mapping seems to detect enhancing tumor earlier than conventional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. (orig.)

  3. Mapping of Students’ Learning Progression Based on Mental Model in Magnetic Induction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, R.; Pabunga, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    The progress of student learning in a learning process has not been fully optimally observed by the teacher. The concept being taught is judged only at the end of learning as a product of thinking, and does not assess the mental processes that occur in students’ thinking. Facilitating students’ thinking through new phenomena can reveal students’ variation in thinking as a mental model of a concept, so that students who are assimilative and or accommodative can be identified in achieving their equilibrium of thought as well as an indicator of progressiveness in the students’ thinking stages. This research data is obtained from the written documents and interviews of students who were learned about the concept of magnetic induction through Constructivist Teaching Sequences (CTS) models. The results of this study indicate that facilitating the students’ thinking processes on the concept of magnetic induction contributes to increasing the number of students thinking within the "progressive change" category, and it can be said that the progress of student learning is more progressive after their mental models were facilitated through a new phenomena by teacher.

  4. A computer system for access to distributed genome mapping data. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marr, T.G.

    1992-02-05

    Development of a computer system for access to distributed genome mapping data is continuing. This effort is to develop software which accesses multiple databases and retrieves data which contain information useful for accelerating mapping human chromosomes. For example, the molecular sequence databases (GenBank, EMBL Data Library, PIR, SwissProt) which contain data required for the development of oligonucleotides for probing DNA as well as for extracting data for primer pair development for PCR-based methods. It is also to develop software which qualitatively integrates the following mapping data: (1) markers regionally localized using cytogenetic methods, (2) polymorphic markers ordered by genetic linkage analysis, (3) clones ordered by various ``finger-printing`` methods, (4) fragments ordered by long-range restriction mapping, (5) single genomic fragments or clones that have STSs assigned to them, (6) nucleotide sequences, (7) the associated metadata such as the submitting investigator`s name, location, etc; the source organism; the chromosome the element is from; the chromosomal location is whatever detail is available.

  5. Progress towards construction of a total restriction fragment map of a human chromosome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vissing; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon; G. Moore; N. Lench; N. Shennan; R. Williamson

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe present an approach to the construction of an overlapping restriction fragment map of a single human chromosome. A genomic cosmid library genome was constructed from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing chromosome 17 as its only human genetic component. Cosmids containing human

  6. Effectiveness of MAP Goal Setting on Reading for Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical Education Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Student goal setting and academic planning has been a major focus for PUSD, with the aim of increasing the level of student engagement and student ownership over their learning. Goal setting has been implemented in conjunction with the Northwest Evaluation Association's Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) tests, which provide educators with a tool…

  7. Mapping of the Academic Production at Science and Mathematics Education Postgraduate about the Theory of Social Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, José Isnaldo de Lima; Curi, Edda; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2016-12-01

    The theory of social representations, appeared in 1961, arrived in Brazil in 1982, and since then has advanced significantly, been used in various areas of knowledge, assumed a significant role also in education. Thus, the aim of this article is to make a mapping of theses and dissertations in post-graduation programs, whose basic area is the Teaching of Science and Mathematics, and used as the theoretical foundation the theory of social representations, highlighted the social groups that are subject of this research. This is a documentary research, and lifting to the "state of knowledge" of two theses and 36 dissertations, defended in ten of the 37 existing programs in the basic area of Science and Mathematics Teaching, with the delimitation of academic masters and doctorates. The data collection was executed on December 2014 and was placed in the virtual libraries of these masters and doctoral programs, these elements were analysed according to some categories established after reading the summaries of the work, and the results showed that the theory of social representations has been used as a theoretical framework in various research groups, established in postgraduate programs in this area, for almost the entire Brazil. As for the subjects involved in this research, three groups were detected, which are: Middle school and high school students, teachers who are in full swing, spread from the early years to higher education, and undergraduates in Science and Mathematics.

  8. Mapping the Daily Progression of Large Wildland Fires Using MODIS Active Fire Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraverbeke, Sander; Sedano, Fernando; Hook, Simon J.; Randerson, James T.; Jin, Yufang; Rogers, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    High temporal resolution information on burned area is a prerequisite for incorporating bottom-up estimates of wildland fire emissions in regional air transport models and for improving models of fire behavior. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire product (MO(Y)D14) as input to a kriging interpolation to derive continuous maps of the evolution of nine large wildland fires. For each fire, local input parameters for the kriging model were defined using variogram analysis. The accuracy of the kriging model was assessed using high resolution daily fire perimeter data available from the U.S. Forest Service. We also assessed the temporal reporting accuracy of the MODIS burned area products (MCD45A1 and MCD64A1). Averaged over the nine fires, the kriging method correctly mapped 73% of the pixels within the accuracy of a single day, compared to 33% for MCD45A1 and 53% for MCD64A1.

  9. Beyond Academic Tracking: Using Cluster Analysis and Self-Organizing Maps to Investigate Secondary Students' Chemistry Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Sara E.; Yezierski, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Academic tracking, placing students in different classes based on past performance, is a common feature of the American secondary school system. A longitudinal study of secondary students' chemistry self-concept scores was conducted, and one feature of the study was the presence of academic tracking. Though academic tracking is one way to group…

  10. Mapping sequences in loops of nuclear DNA by their progressive detachment from the nuclear cage.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, P R; Brazell, I A

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is organised into loops, probably by attachment to a supramolecular structure. We describe a method which enables us to map the position of sequences within a loop relative to the point of attachment. Nuclear DNA is isolated unbroken by lysing HeLa cells in 2M NaCl to release structures which retain many of the morphological features of nuclei. Their DNA is supercoiled and so must remain unbroken and looped during lysis. Nucleoids are digested to various degrees with a restriction...

  11. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  12. Mapping longitudinal scientific progress, collaboration and impact of the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Yao

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI is a landmark imaging and omics study in AD. ADNI research literature has increased substantially over the past decade, which poses challenges for effectively communicating information about the results and impact of ADNI-related studies. In this work, we employed advanced information visualization techniques to perform a comprehensive and systematic mapping of the ADNI scientific growth and impact over a period of 12 years.Citation information of ADNI-related publications from 01/01/2003 to 05/12/2015 were downloaded from the Scopus database. Five fields, including authors, years, affiliations, sources (journals, and keywords, were extracted and preprocessed. Statistical analyses were performed on basic publication data as well as journal and citations information. Science mapping workflows were conducted using the Science of Science (Sci2 Tool to generate geospatial, topical, and collaboration visualizations at the micro (individual to macro (global levels such as geospatial layouts of institutional collaboration networks, keyword co-occurrence networks, and author collaboration networks evolving over time.During the studied period, 996 ADNI manuscripts were published across 233 journals and conference proceedings. The number of publications grew linearly from 2008 to 2015, so did the number of involved institutions. ADNI publications received much more citations than typical papers from the same set of journals. Collaborations were visualized at multiple levels, including authors, institutions, and research areas. The evolution of key ADNI research topics was also plotted over the studied period.Both statistical and visualization results demonstrate the increasing attention of ADNI research, strong citation impact of ADNI publications, the expanding collaboration networks among researchers, institutions and ADNI core areas, and the dynamic evolution of ADNI research topics. The visualizations

  13. Mapping the landscape of urology: A new media-based cross-sectional analysis of public versus academic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Salem, Johannes; Baunacke, Martin; Boehm, Katharina; Groeben, Christer; Schmid, Marianne; Siegel, Fabian P; Huber, Johannes

    2018-03-08

    To quantify public and academic interest in the urological field using a novel new media-based methodology. We systematically measured public and academic interest in 56 urological keywords and combined in nine subspecialties. Public interest was quantified as video views on YouTube. Academic interest was quantified as article citations using Microsoft Academic Search. The public-to-academic interest ratio was calculated for a comparison of subspecialties as well as for diseases and treatments. For the selected 56 urological keywords, we found 226 617 591 video views on YouTube and 2 146 287 citations in the academic literature. The public-to-academic interest ratio was highest for the subspecialties robotic urology (ratio 6.3) and andrological urology (ratio 4.6). Prostate cancer was the central urological disease combining both a high public (20% of all video views) and academic interest (26% of all citations, ratio 0.8). Further diseases/treatments of high public interest were premature ejaculation (ratio 54.4), testicular cancer (ratio 11.4), erectile dysfunction (ratio 5.5) and kidney transplant (ratio 3.7). Urological treatments had a higher public-to-academic interest ratio (median ratio 0.25) than diseases (median ratio 0.05; P = 0.029). A quantification of academic and public interest in the urological field is feasible using a novel new media-based methodology. We found several mismatches in public versus academic interest in urological diseases and treatments, which has implications for research strategies, conference planning and patient information projects. Regular re-assessments of the public and academic interest landscape can contribute to detecting and proving trends in the field of urology. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. The position of Ghana on the progressive map of positive mental health: A critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Angelina; Somhlaba, Nceba Z

    2017-05-01

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), mental health is a state of well-being and not just the absence of diseases. With this definition, there has been a surge of mental health research, albeit still predominantly in Western countries, which is reflected in contemporary theories on positive mental health that include 'flourishing mental health', 'salutogenesis', and 'fortigenesis'. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), mental health research is slowly receiving scholarly attention. The aim of this paper was twofold: Firstly, to highlight progress that had been made in some LMICs, giving consideration to research across different settings and populations as a basis to argue for more research on positive mental health in the Ghanaian context. Secondly, to present a critical perspective on the current mental health research trends in Ghana, thus discussing important recommendations for future research.

  15. Efforts to Address the Aging Academic Workforce: Assessing Progress through a Three-Stage Model of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian; Walker, Mark; Andersson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The aging of the academic workforce is becoming more relevant to policy discussions in higher education. Yet there has been no formal, large-scale analysis of institutional efforts to develop policies and programs for aging employees. We fielded a representative survey of human resource specialists at 187 colleges and universities across the…

  16. Insecticide-treated net coverage in Africa: mapping progress in 2000-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Abdisalan M; Mutheu, Juliette J; Tatem, Andrew J; Hay, Simon I; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-03

    Insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) provide a means to improve child survival across Africa. Sales figures of these nets and survey coverage data presented nationally mask inequities in populations at biological and economic risk, and do not allow for precision in the estimation of unmet commodity needs. We gathered subnational ITN coverage sample survey data from 40 malaria-endemic countries in Africa between 2000 and 2007. We computed the projected ITN coverage among children aged less than 5 years for age-adjusted population data that were stratified according to malaria transmission risks, proximate determinants of poverty, and methods of ITN delivery. In 2000, only 1.7 million (1.8%) African children living in stable malaria-endemic conditions were protected by an ITN and the number increased to 20.3 million (18.5%) by 2007 leaving 89.6 million children unprotected. Of these, 30 million were living in some of the poorest areas of Africa: 54% were living in only seven countries and 25% in Nigeria alone. Overall, 33 (83%) countries were estimated to have ITN coverage of less than 40% in 2007. On average, we noted a greater increase in ITN coverage in areas where free distribution had operated between survey periods. By mapping the distribution of populations in relation to malaria risk and intervention coverage, we provide a means to track the future requirements for scaling up essential disease-prevention strategies. The present coverage of ITN in Africa remains inadequate and a focused effort to improve distribution in selected areas would have a substantial effect on the continent's malaria burden.

  17. Self-Portrait with Mortar Board: A Study of Academic Identity Using the Map, the Novel and the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the "map", the "novel" and the "grid", three strategies inspired by the creative arts that potentially enrich higher education research by revealing layers of truth otherwise difficult to discern. The "map" was inspired by the "Map of an Englishman," an etching by Grayson…

  18. The Impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Program on Student Reading Achievement. Final Report. NCEE 2013-4000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordray, David; Pion, Georgine; Brandt, Chris; Molefe, Ayrin; Toby, Megan

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, the use of standardized benchmark measures to differentiate and individualize instruction for students received renewed attention from educators. Although teachers may use their own assessments (tests, quizzes, homework, problem sets) for monitoring learning, it is challenging for them to equate performance on classroom…

  19. Analysis of the human brain in primary progressive multiple sclerosis with mapping of the spatial distributions using H-1 MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, PE; Irwan, R; Potze, JH; Mostert, JP; De Keyser, J; Oudkerk, M

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (ppMS; n=4) patients and controls (n=4) were examined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to map choline (Cho), creatine and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion

  20. Behavioural problems in Sri Lankan schoolchildren: associations with socio-economic status, age, gender, academic progress, ethnicity and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Margot; Virasinghe, Shanya; Smart, Diana

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about behavioural and emotional adjustment in children in Sri Lanka, and this study is the first attempt to assess mental health problems in this population. Using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman R (1994) A modified version of the Rutter parent questionnaire including items on children's strengths: a research note. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 35:1483-1494) with parent, teacher and child informants, in a large sample of 10- to 13-year-old school children from Colombo, we found rates and types of problems consistent with other international studies of child mental health. Problem rates were higher in boys and were associated with lower SES and poorer academic performance. Relationships between behavioural adjustment and Tamil ethnicity and Hindu religion emerged in this sample and could possibly be associated with the experience of longstanding ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka. The study confirms the need for development of child and adolescent health services in Sri Lanka.

  1. Qualitative Assessment of Academic Radiation Oncology Department Chairs' Insights on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Progress, Challenges, and Future Aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rochelle D; Chapman, Christina H; Holliday, Emma B; Lalani, Nafisha; Wilson, Emily; Bonner, James A; Movsas, Benjamin; Kalnicki, Shalom; Formenti, Silvia C; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Liu, Fei-Fei; Jagsi, Reshma

    2018-01-09

    A lack of diversity has been observed in radiation oncology (RO), with women and certain racial/ethnic groups underrepresented as trainees, faculty, and practicing physicians. We sought to gain a nuanced understanding of how to best promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) based on the insights of RO department chairs, with particular attention given to the experiences of the few women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) in these influential positions. From March to June 2016, we conducted telephone interviews with 24 RO department chairs (of 27 invited). Purposive sampling was used to invite all chairs who were women (n = 13) or URMs (n = 3) and 11 male chairs who were not URMs. Multiple analysts coded the verbatim transcripts. Five themes were identified: (1) commitment to DEI promotes quality health care and innovation; (2) gaps remain despite some progress with promoting diversity in RO; (3) women and URM faculty continue to experience challenges in various career domains; (4) solutions to DEI issues would be facilitated by acknowledging realities of gender and race; and (5) expansion of the career pipeline is needed. The chairs' insights had policy-relevant implications. Bias training should broach tokenism, blindness, and intersectionality. Efforts to recruit and support diverse talent should be deliberate and proactive. Bridge programs could engage students before their application to medical school. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear Information sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear Information and computer applications

  3. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.6--computational physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 13 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about computational physics sub-volume

  4. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--nuclear agriculture sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 10 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about nuclear agriculture sub-volume

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.2--uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 48 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

  6. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.3--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 86 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the third one, the content is about nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.2)

  7. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--isotope separation sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 37 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about isotope separation sub-volume

  8. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--radiation research and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 12 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation research and its application sub-volume

  9. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.2--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining, uranium metallurgy and nuclear power.

  10. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.2--uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining, uranium metallurgy and nuclear power.

  11. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--pulse power technology and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 18 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about pulse power technology and its application sub-volume

  12. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.6--particle accelerator sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 10 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about particle accelerator sub-volume

  13. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 22 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

  14. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 18 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

  15. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.7--Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology

  16. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.8--radiation research and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation research and its application

  17. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--radiation research and radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  18. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  19. Developing a Scorecard to Assess Global Progress in Scaling Up Diarrhea Control Tools: A Qualitative Study of Academic Leaders and Implementers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Alexander Anthony; Narine, Steven; Yamey, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, diarrhea caused 0.75 million child deaths, accounting for nearly 12% of all under-five mortality worldwide. Many evidence-based interventions can reduce diarrhea mortality, including oral rehydration solution (ORS), zinc, and improved sanitation. Yet global coverage levels of such interventions remain low. A new scorecard of diarrhea control, showing how different countries are performing in their control efforts, could draw greater attention to the low coverage levels of proven interventions. Methods We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 21 experts, purposively sampled for their relevant academic or implementation expertise, to explore their views on (a) the value of a scorecard of global diarrhea control and (b) which indicators should be included in such a scorecard. We then conducted a ranking exercise in which we compiled a list of all 49 indicators suggested by the experts, sent the list to the 21 experts, and asked them to choose 10 indicators that they would include and 10 that they would exclude from such a scorecard. Finally, we created a “prototype” scorecard based on the 9 highest-ranked indicators. Results Key themes that emerged from coding the interview transcripts were: a scorecard could facilitate country comparisons; it could help to identify best practices, set priorities, and spur donor action; and it could help with goal-setting and accountability in diarrhea control. The nine highest ranking indicators, in descending order, were ORS coverage, rotavirus vaccine coverage, zinc coverage, diarrhea-specific mortality rate, diarrhea prevalence, proportion of population with access to improved sanitation, proportion with access to improved drinking water, exclusive breastfeeding coverage, and measles vaccine coverage. Conclusion A new scorecard of global diarrhea control could help track progress, focus prevention and treatment efforts on the most effective interventions, establish transparency and accountability

  20. Developing a scorecard to assess global progress in scaling up diarrhea control tools: a qualitative study of academic leaders and implementers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anthony Rosinski

    Full Text Available In 2010, diarrhea caused 0.75 million child deaths, accounting for nearly 12% of all under-five mortality worldwide. Many evidence-based interventions can reduce diarrhea mortality, including oral rehydration solution (ORS, zinc, and improved sanitation. Yet global coverage levels of such interventions remain low. A new scorecard of diarrhea control, showing how different countries are performing in their control efforts, could draw greater attention to the low coverage levels of proven interventions.We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 21 experts, purposively sampled for their relevant academic or implementation expertise, to explore their views on (a the value of a scorecard of global diarrhea control and (b which indicators should be included in such a scorecard. We then conducted a ranking exercise in which we compiled a list of all 49 indicators suggested by the experts, sent the list to the 21 experts, and asked them to choose 10 indicators that they would include and 10 that they would exclude from such a scorecard. Finally, we created a "prototype" scorecard based on the 9 highest-ranked indicators.Key themes that emerged from coding the interview transcripts were: a scorecard could facilitate country comparisons; it could help to identify best practices, set priorities, and spur donor action; and it could help with goal-setting and accountability in diarrhea control. The nine highest ranking indicators, in descending order, were ORS coverage, rotavirus vaccine coverage, zinc coverage, diarrhea-specific mortality rate, diarrhea prevalence, proportion of population with access to improved sanitation, proportion with access to improved drinking water, exclusive breastfeeding coverage, and measles vaccine coverage.A new scorecard of global diarrhea control could help track progress, focus prevention and treatment efforts on the most effective interventions, establish transparency and accountability, and alert donors and

  1. The Use of Goal Setting and Progress Self-Monitoring with Formative Assessment in Community College to Increase Academic Achievement and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Tiffany L.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of formative assessment on community college students' content-specific vocabulary skills, academic achievement and academic self-efficacy. Sixty-one community college students who were enrolled in Developmental Psychology took part in formative assessment only (N = 24), formative assessment in conjunction with goal…

  2. The adaptor-like protein ROG-1 is required for activation of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway and meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Urushiyama, Seiichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Shirakata, Masaki; Iino, Yuichi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    The Ras-MAP kinase pathway regulates varieties of fundamental cellular events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this pathway is required for oocyte development; however, the nature of its up-stream regulators has remained elusive. Here, we identified a C. elegans gene, rog-1, which encodes the only protein having the IRS-type phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain in the worms. ROG-1 has no obvious domain structure aside from the PTB domain, suggesting that it could serve as an adaptor down-stream of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of rog-1 mRNA significantly decreased brood size. rog-1(tm1031) truncation mutants showed a severe disruption in progression of developing oocytes from pachytene to diakinesis, as was seen in worms carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras or mpk-1 MAP kinase gene. Furthermore, let-60 Ras-regulated activation of MPK-1 in the gonad is undetectable in rog-1(tm1031) mutants. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras gene rescues the brood size reduction and germ cell abnormality in rog-1(tm1031) worms. Consistently, rog-1 is preferentially expressed in the germ cells and its expression in the gonad is essential for oocyte development. Thus, ROG-1 is a key positive regulator of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway that permits germ cells to exit from pachytene.

  3. Mapping progress in chronic hepatitis B: geographic variation in prevalence, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment, 2013-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Jennifer; Allard, Nicole; Carville, Kylie; Haynes, Katelin; Cowie, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    To measure progress towards Australia's National Hepatitis B Strategy 2014-17 targets, and assess geographic variation in disease burden and access to care for those living with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Data were generated from routinely collected sources, including risk-group prevalence and population data, infectious diseases notifications, Medicare records, and immunisation registry data, and assessed nationally and according to geographic area for 2013-15. CHB prevalence in 2015 was 239,167 (1.0%), with 62% of those affected having been diagnosed (target 80%). Treatment uptake was 6.1% (target 15%), and only 15.3% of people with CHB received guideline-based care. CHB prevalence ranged within Australia's 31 Primary Health Networks (PHNs) from 1.77% (NT) to 0.56% (Grampians & Barwon South West VIC). No PHN reached the 15% treatment target, with uptake highest in South Western Sydney (13.7%). Immunisation coverage reached the 95% target in three PHNs. The CHB burden in Australia is significant and highly geographically focused, with notable disparities in access to care across Australia. Implications for public health: Efforts to improve progress toward National Strategy targets should focus on priority areas where the prevalence of CHB is substantial but access to treatment and care remains low. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Linkage analysis and comparative mapping of canine progressive rod–cone degeneration (prcd) establishes potential locus homology with retinitis pigmentosa (RP17) in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Gregory M.; Ray, Kunal; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Gu, Weikuan; Langston, Amelia A.; Rine, Jasper; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    1998-01-01

    Progressive rod–cone degeneration (prcd) is the most widespread hereditary retinal disease leading to blindness in dogs and phenotypically is the canine counterpart of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans. In previous efforts to identify the genetic locus for prcd, the canine homologs for many of the genes causally associated with RP in humans, such as RHO, PDE6B, and RDS/peripherin, have been excluded. In parallel with a recent undertaking to establish a framework map of the canine genome, multiple prcd-informative pedigrees have been typed with a panel of more than 100 anchor loci and microsatellite-based markers. Identification of a linkage group flanking prcd ([TK1, GALK1, prcd]–[MYL4, C09.173, C09.2263]–RARA–C09.250–C09.474–NF1) localizes prcd close to the centromeric end of canine chromosome 9 (CFA9), and excludes RARA as a candidate gene. The conserved synteny of this region of CFA9 and distal human chromosome 17q establishes the potential locus homology of prcd in the dog with RP17, a human retinitis pigmentosa locus for which no gene has yet been identified. Assignment of the prcd disease locus to an identified canine autosome represents a powerful application of the developing canine linkage map in medical genetics. The usefulness of this approach is further demonstrated by identification of the correspondence of the prcd interval to homologous human and mouse chromosomal regions. The rapid progress that is now occurring in the field of canine genetics will expedite the identification of the genes underlying many of the inherited traits and diseases that make the dog a unique asset for the study of mammalian traits. PMID:9501213

  5. Brain Susceptibility Changes in a Patient with Natalizumab-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: A Longitudinal Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Relaxometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pontillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrain MRI plays an essential role in both diagnosis and follow-up of the JC virus infection of the brain. Recently, MR studies with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI sequences have shown hypointensities in U-fibers adjacent to white matter (WM lesions of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. This finding has been confirmed with the use of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM, allowing to hypothesize a paramagnetic effect in these regions. Here, we report the first longitudinal assessment of QSM and R2* maps in natalizumab-associated PML to evaluate serial changes in susceptibility contrast images and their role in PML diagnosis and follow-up.Case presentationWe report the case of a 42-year-old woman with multiple sclerosis (MS who eventually developed, after the 28th natalizumab infusion, subacute cognitive decline and received a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of PML, leading to immediate drug discontinuation. Three months later, she suffered a new clinical exacerbation, with a brain scan revealing significant inflammatory activity compatible with the radiological diagnosis of an Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS. She was then treated with corticosteroids until the clinico-radiological spectrum became stable, with the final outcome of a severe functional impairment. Quantitative maps obtained in the early symptomatic stage clearly showed increased QSM and R2* values in the juxtacortical WM adjacent to PML lesions, which persisted during the subsequent disease course.Discussion and conclusionHigh QSM and R2* values in U-fibers adjacent to WM lesions were early and seemingly time-independent radiological findings in the presented PML case. This, coupled to the known absence of significant paramagnetic effect of new active MS lesions, could support the use of quantitative MRI as an additional tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of natalizumab-related PML in MS.

  6. Academic Task Demand in the 21st-Century, High-Stakes-Accountability School: Mapping the Journey from Poor [To Fair to Good to Great] to Excellent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesiul, Stacy Agee; Nehring, James; Carey, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on theoretical and empirical research concerning the relationship between academic work and student learning, this article explores the following questions: What skills are required to execute the academic tasks teachers assign on a daily basis? How do teachers and administrators interpret the task demands represented in instructional…

  7. Mapping human resources for eye health in 21 countries of sub-Saharan Africa: current progress towards VISION 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of human resources for eye health (HReH) is a major focus of the Global Action Plan 2014 to 2019 to reduce the prevalence of avoidable visual impairment by 25% by the year 2019. The eye health workforce is thought to be much smaller in sub-Saharan Africa than in other regions of the world but data to support this for policy-making is scarce. We collected HReH and cataract surgeries data from 21 countries in sub-Sahara to estimate progress towards key suggested population-based VISION 2020 HReH indicators and cataract surgery rates (CSR) in 2011. Methods Routinely collected data on practitioner and surgery numbers in 2011 was requested from national eye care coordinators via electronic questionnaires. Telephone and e-mail discussions were used to determine data collection strategies that fit the national context and to verify reported data quality. Information was collected on six practitioner cadres: ophthalmologists, cataract surgeons, ophthalmic clinical officers, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists and ‘mid-level refractionists’ and combined with publicly available population data to calculate practitioner to population ratios and CSRs. Associations with development characteristics were conducted using Wilcoxon rank sum tests and Spearman rank correlations. Results HReH data was not easily available. A minority of countries had achieved the suggested VISION 2020 targets in 2011; five countries for ophthalmologists/cataract surgeons, four for ophthalmic nurses/clinical officers and two for CSR. All countries were below target for optometrists, even when other cadres who perform refractions as a primary duty were considered. The regional (sample) ratio for surgeons (ophthalmologists and cataract surgeons) was 2.9 per million population, 5.5 for ophthalmic clinical officers and nurses, 3.7 for optometrists and other refractionists, and 515 for CSR. A positive correlation between GDP and CSR as well as many practitioner ratios was observed

  8. MAP Science for Use with Next Generation Science Standards. NWEA External FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) Science for use with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) assessments are available for the 2016-17 school year. These new assessments measure student growth toward understanding of the multidimensional NGSS performance expectations. This report presents MAP Science for use with NGSS by presenting and…

  9. Disrupted Brain Network in Progressive Mild Cognitive Impairment Measured by Eigenvector Centrality Mapping is Linked to Cognition and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tiantian; Luo, Xiao; Shen, Zhujing; Huang, Peiyu; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jiong; Zhang, Minming

    2016-10-18

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous condition associated with a high risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although functional brain network alterations have been observed in progressive MCI (pMCI), the underlying pathological mechanisms of network alterations remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated neuropsychological, imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data at baseline across a cohort of: 21 pMCI patients, 33 stable MCI (sMCI) patients, and 29 normal controls. Fast eigenvector centrality mapping (fECM) based on resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) was used to investigate brain network organization differences among these groups, and we further assessed its relation to cognition and AD-related pathology. Our results demonstrated that pMCI had decreased eigenvector centrality (EC) in left temporal pole and parahippocampal gyrus, and increased EC in left middle frontal gyrus compared to sMCI. In addition, compared to normal controls, patients with pMCI showed decreased EC in right hippocampus and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and sMCI had decreased EC in right middle frontal gyrus and superior parietal lobule. Correlation analysis showed that EC in the left temporal pole was related to Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Logical Memory (WMS-LM) delay score (r = 0.467, p = 0.044) and total tau (t-tau) level in CSF (r = -0.509, p = 0.026) in pMCI. Our findings implicate EC changes of different brain network nodes in the prognosis of pMCI and sMCI. Importantly, the association between decreased EC of brain network node and pathological changes may provide a deeper understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of pMCI.

  10. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge produced by academic scientists has been identified as a potential key driver of technological progress. Recent policies in Europe aim at increasing commercially orientated activities in academe. Based on a sample of German scientists across all fields of science, we investigate the......, a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the abolishment of the “professor privilege” (the German counterpart of the US Bayh-Dole Act) reveals that this legal disposition led to an acceleration of this apparent decline....

  11. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  12. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  13. THEMATIC PROGRESSION PATTERNS OF THE DISCUSSION TEXTS WRITTEN BY THE FOURTH SEMESTER STUDENTS OF TIDAR UNIVERSITY (UNTIDAR IN 2013/2014 ACADEMIC YEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farikah Farikah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A good writing is one that is cohesive and coherent. Cohesion and coherence are essential textual components to create organized and comprehensiveness of the texts. To create cohesive and coherent texts, theme and rheme play an important role. This research focuses on analyzing types of thematic Progression Patterns applied by the students of English Department of Tidar University and the tendency of the students in applying thematic progression patterns. The unit analyses of this research are clauses of discussion texts written by the fourth semester students of English Department, Tidar University. Based on Martin‘s theory in Paltridge (2000, there are 32.48% of the clauses applied reiteration/constant theme patterns, 22.63% applied zig-zag, 3.65% multiple theme patterns and 41.24 % applied other patterns. It means, the paragraphs were developed without repeating the preceding theme or rheme of the previous clauses. It is because each clause has a separate idea. It seems that the students did not know how to develop the paragraph coherently.

  14. The climb to break the glass ceiling in surgery: trends in women progressing from medical school to surgical training and academic leadership from 1994 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Jonathan S; Chartrand, Genevieve; Moo, Tracy-Ann; Moore, Maureen; Yeo, Heather

    2016-10-01

    There have been many efforts to increase the number of women surgeons. We provide an update of women surgeon representation along the pathway to surgical academia. Data was extracted from Association of American Medical Colleges FACTS and Faculty Administrative Management Online User System as well as GME annual reports starting in 1994 until the last year available for each. The proportion of graduating women medical students has increased on average .5% per year from 1994 to 2014. Women general surgery trainees have more than doubled in number over the same period but represented 38.3% of all general surgery trainees in 2014. Women Full Professors increased on average .3% from 1994 to 2015 but still make up less than 10% of all Full Professors. Despite improvements over the past 20 years, there are still large gender gaps in surgery for trainees and academic leadership. At the current rate of increase, women Full Professors will not achieve gender parity until in 2136. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    avoidance and mastery orientation, Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), awareness of academic rules and regulations, assessment practices, faculty, and university attended predicted the different types of academic dishonesty with varying levels of significance. INTRODUCTION. Today's undergraduate students are ...

  16. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  17. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression in Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, R; Kurland, B F; Abberbock, S R; Ellingson, B M; Okada, H; Jakacki, R I; Pollack, I F; Panigrahy, A

    2015-11-01

    Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. From 2009 to 2012, 21 children, 4-18 years of age, with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiation therapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at 6-week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from the first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) with prevaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC, fractional decreased ADC, and parametric response mapping ratio (fractional increased ADC/fractional decreased ADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, by using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range, 6.4-24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (P = .01) and fractional decreased ADCs (P = .0004), compared with patients without pseudoprogression. Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination.

  18. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Enhancing research visibility of academics: the role of academic libraries. Information Impact: Journal of Information and. Knowledge Management. 2017, Vol. .... Social media platforms allow users to connect, create, promote, share and follow interest groups. With these capabilities, academic libraries can make use of ...

  19. Mapping the Journal of Homosexuality: A Preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Lance

    2016-01-01

    This article serves as a Preface to the supplementary section of this special issue on "Mapping Queer Bioethics," in which we take a solipsistic turn to "map" the Journal of Homosexuality itself. Born contemporaneously with the depathologization of "homosexuality" in the early 1970s, how does the Journal of Homosexuality's commitment to LGBT health issues the past four decades reveal longstanding tensions between medical pathology, cultural appropriation, and political progress? Introducing the articles that follow (each of which examines a seminal medical-themed subject from the journal's history), this article asks how LGBT-sensitive academic texts play complicit roles in both the reinforcement and the liberation of queer subjects in biomedical discourse.

  20. The Effect of Systematic Academic Instruction on Behavioural and Academic Outcomes of Students with EBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Post, Wendy J.; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of systematic academic instruction on academic progress and behavioural problems of students with emotional and/or behavioural disorders (EBD) in special education. Earlier studies have noted the importance of a systematic approach as well as the significance of focusing on academic instruction instead of on…

  1. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fil...

  2. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so...

  3. Evaluación de las condiciones iniciales de alumnos de la Diplomatura en Fisioterapia y su relación con el rendimiento académico Evaluation of prior factors potentially related to academic progress in Physiotherapy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Larrán López

    2004-06-01

    , identifying factors related to academic progress is key to improving the quality of university teaching. We present data resulting from an initial evaluation of first year physiotherapy students enrolled on the course "Human Cell and Tissue Biology". The questionnaire consisted of several items requiring free choice answers and provided information on variables such as sex, route of access to University, motivation, post-degree expectations, prior knowledge of the subject, etc. The final grades obtained by students (accumulative evaluation were also recorded. We performed a descriptive analysis of initial variables, and evaluated the possible correlation between these variables and the final grades obtained in order to identify factors related to academic performance. We observed that prior knowledge of the subject is generally insufficient or confused. The students coming from Secondary school (COU / Bachillerato had higher instruction levels than those from vocational education centres (Formación profesional. Among the variables assessed, the relation between prior instruction and final grades was statistically significant .

  4. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  5. Learning By leaving: Identifying the impact of intercultural mobility as a pedagogic tool in the learning environment. A return on investment analysis measuring the impact of intercultural mobility and work based learning on: absenteeism; academic performance; access, transfer & progression and employability.

    OpenAIRE

    Croke, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the impact of intercultural Mobility (learning by leaving) as a pedogogic tool in the learning environment and to undertake a return on investment analysis to measure the impact intercultural Mobility and work based learning has on absenteeism; academic performance; access, transfer & progression and employability. In my opinion, the value that an intercultural mobility work placement brings to the learning environment has not been researched in a sign...

  6. Inhibition of plaque progression and promotion of plaque stability by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist: Serial in vivo findings from iMap-IVUS in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mitsumasa; Li, Yuxin; Hiro, Takafumi; Takayama, Tadateru; Mitsumata, Masako; Shiomi, Masashi; Sugitani, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Hao, Hiroyuki; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2017-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is thought to inhibit development of aortic atherosclerosis and plaque formation. However, whether GLP-1 stabilizes fully developed atherosclerotic plaque or alters the complicated plaque composition remains unclarified. Ten Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits were divided into GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment group and control group. After confirmation of atherosclerotic plaques in brachiocephalic arteries by iMap intravascular ultrasound (iMAP-IVUS), GLP-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide was administered to WHHL rabbits at 30 nmoL/kg/day for 12 weeks by osmotic pump. An equal volume of normal saline was administered in a control group. After evaluation by iMAP-IVUS at 12 weeks, brachiocephalic arteries were harvested for pathological histological analysis. iMAP-IVUS analysis revealed larger fibrotic plaque components and smaller necrotic and calcified plaque components in the GLP-1 group than in the control group; %fibrotic area: 66.30 ± 2.06% vs. 75.14 ± 2.62%, p GLP-1 receptor agonist might modify plaque composition and increase plaque stability. Histological analysis confirmed that GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment improved smooth muscle cell (SMC)-rich plaque with increased fibrotic content. Furthermore, plaque macrophage infiltration and calcification were significantly reduced by GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment; %SMC area: 6.93 ± 0.31% vs. 8.14 ± 0.48%, p = 0.02; %macrophage area: 9.11 ± 0.80% vs. 6.19 ± 0.85%, p GLP-1 receptor agonist inhibited plaque progression and promoted plaque stabilization by inhibiting plaque growth and modifying plaque composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. CISN Display Progress to Date - Reliable Delivery of Real-Time Earthquake Information, and ShakeMap to Critical End Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, H.; Hauksson, E.; Thomas, E.; Friberg, P.; Frechette, K.; Given, D.

    2003-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) has collaborated to develop a next-generation earthquake notification system that is nearing its first operations-ready release. The CISN Display actively alerts users of seismic data, and vital earthquake hazards information following a significant event. It will primarily replace the Caltech/USGS Broadcast of Earthquakes (CUBE) and Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) Display as the principal means of delivering geographical seismic data to emergency operations centers, utility companies and media outlets. A subsequent goal is to provide automated access to the many Web products produced by regional seismic networks after an earthquake. Another aim is to create a highly configurable client, allowing user organizations to overlay infrastructure data critical to their roles as first-responders, or lifeline operators. And the final goal is to integrate these requirements, into a package offering several layers of reliability to ensure delivery of services. Central to the CISN Display's role as a gateway to Web-based earthquake products is its comprehensive XML-messaging schema. The message model uses many of the same attributes in the CUBE format, but extends the old standard by provisioning additional elements for products currently available, and others yet to be considered. The client consumes these XML-messages, sorts them through a resident Quake Data Merge filter, and posts updates that also include hyperlinks associated to specific event IDs on the display map. Earthquake products available for delivery to the CISN Display are ShakeMap, focal mechanisms, waveform data, felt reports, aftershock forecasts and earthquake commentaries. By design the XML-message schema can evolve as products and information needs change, without breaking existing applications that rely on it. The latest version of the CISN Display can also automatically download ShakeMaps and display shaking intensity within the GIS system. This

  8. Padrão de motivação e desfechos de progresso acadêmico: estudo longitudinal com estudantes de medicina/Motivation patterns and outcomes of academic progress: a longitudinal study with medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejano Tavares Sobral

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O propósito do estudo foi analisar a motivação educacional de estudantes de medicina em relação com indicadores de progresso acadêmico durante a graduação na Universidade de Brasília. A Escala de Motivação Acadêmica foi aplicada em turmas consecutivas ao total de 285 participantes no início do segundo ano. Foram analisados estatisticamente indicadores da Escala e suas correlações prospectivas com índices de rendimento acadêmico e realização de monitoria, e também diferenças nesses índices entre quatro grupos de configuração motivacional identificados em análise classificatória. Os resultados mostraram correlações positivas e significantes entre motivação intrínseca e rendimento acadêmico, bem como entre realização de monitoria e combinação de motivação intrínseca e regulação externa. Grupos com orientação motivacional expressamente autônoma ou mista (autônoma e controlada realizaram número significantemente maior de monitorias do que grupos com menor autodeterminação motivacional. Os achados são discutidos - a luz da teoria da autodeterminação - quanto aos aspectos de adaptação motivacional e de influências de transição da ambiência educacional. Concluindo, os resultados sugerem que indicadores de motivação caracterizados no início da graduação têm efeito preditivo pequeno, mas significante no desempenho acadêmico continuado e no exercício eletivo de monitoria. Esse desfecho eletivo diferiu significantemente entre estudantes com distintos perfis motivacionais. The purpose of this work was to analyze medical students` motivation features in relation to outcomes of academic progress during undergraduate studies. The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS was administered in consecutive classes to a total of 285 2nd year students who graduated at the University of Brasilia. Statistical analyses were undertaken on AMS indicators and their correlations with cumulative GPA and peer

  9. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  10. Academic Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  11. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Billig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artículo sugiere que esta época es la mejor y peor para la labor académica. La mejor en cuanto hay más publicaciones académicas que nunca. Y la peor porque sobra mucho de estas publicaciones. Trabajando en las condiciones competitivas del capitalismo académico, los académicos se sienten en la necesidad de continuar publicando, independientemente de que tengan algo que decir. Las presiones de publicar continuamente y promover la propia perspectiva se reflejan en la manera en la que los científicos sociales están escribiendo. Y es que los académicos utilizan un lenguaje técnico basado en sustantivos, con una precisión menor a la del lenguaje ordinario. Los estudiantes de postgrado han sido educados en esta manera de escribir como una condición previa a iniciarse en las ciencias sociales. Así, la naturaleza misma del capitalismo académico no sólo determina las condiciones en las que los académicos trabajan, sino que también afecta su manera de escribir.


    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scientists are writing. Academics use a noun-based technical language, which is less precise than ordinary language. Postgraduates are taught this way of writing as a precondition for entering the social sciences. In this way, the nature of academic capitalism not only determines the conditions under which academics are working but it affects the way that they are writing.

  12. A Comparison of Academic and Athletic Performance in the NCAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah; Bhattacharyya, Mouchumi

    2017-01-01

    The Academic Progress Rate (APR) of 34 sports was investigated to determine whether the top athletic teams performed significantly better "academically" compared to their bottom counterparts. A "p" value of 0.0029 revealed that top athletic teams academically outperformed bottom athletic teams. Further analysis showed the…

  13. Spread of academic success in a high school social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students' academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends' average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network.

  14. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  15. Spread of Academic Success in a High School Social Network

    OpenAIRE

    Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students' academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends' average ...

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  17. Mapping the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goerres, Achim; Vanhuysse, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post-Industri......Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post...

  18. A User-Friendly Method for Teaching Restriction Enzyme Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrman, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a teaching progression that enhances learning through low-cost, manipulative transparencies. Discussed is instruction about restriction enzymes, plasmids, cutting plasmids, plasmid maps, recording data, and mapping restriction sites. Mapping wheels for student use is included. (CW)

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  20. Mapping the Progression of Phytophthora Ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, T.; Li, J.; El-Askary, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    There has been a plant pathogen, Phytophthora Ramorum that has been causing trouble for the plant species in the forests of California and Oregon. Phytophthora is essentially a water mold that infects oak species like California black oak, coast live oak as well as California bay laurel (Lamsal). What this project aims to accomplish is to observe any changes in NDVI values between the years of 2002 and 1994. What the project hopes to observe is a decline of NDVI values between the two years because the infection of Phytophtora Ramorum will cause stress to the plant or kill the plant, which will lower the values of NDVI. The project will utilizes satellite data to create NDVI images over the study area and two types of change detection methods to observe the differences between the NDVI values of the two years. Preliminary results for the project, data obtained from Landsat 7 ETM+ with a resolution of 240 meters, was not able to observe any significant changes. A finer resolution to differentiate the NDVI values would be needed. In addition the best way to keep the pathogen from getting out of control is with ground level management, or complete eradication of the pathogen. These eradication methods include burning the infected host plants and spreading herbicide (Alexander). With that in mind it would be ideal to have an early detection of the pathogen infestation. Therefore another goal of the project is to continue to research if remote sensing could play a role in an early detection method for the presence of Phytophtora Ramorum.

  1. ADHD symptoms, academic achievement, self-perception of academic competence and future orientation: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Sara; Rydell, Ann-Margret; Yang-Wallentin, Fan

    2013-06-01

    In the investigation of the effect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms on school careers there is a need to study the role of adolescent and childhood ADHD symptoms and academic achievement, and to incorporate measures that include the individual's perspective. Our aim was to gain an overview of the long-term development of school careers in relation to ADHD symptoms. We studied associations between ADHD symptoms and academic achievement at different time-points and future orientation at the end of high school, and assessed the role of self-perceptions of academic competence in these associations. Participants were 192 children (47% girls) with a range of ADHD symptoms taken from a community sample. Collecting data at three time points, in 6th, 11th and 12th grade we tested a structural equation model. Results showed that ADHD symptoms in 6th grade negatively affected academic achievement concurrently and longitudinally. ADHD symptoms in 11th grade negatively affected concurrent academic achievement and academic self-perception and future orientation in 12th grade. Academic achievement had a positive influence on academic self-perception and future orientation. Given the other factors, self-perception of academic competence did not contribute to outcomes. We concluded that early ADHD symptoms may cast long shadows on young people's academic progress. This happens mainly by way of stability in symptoms and relations to early low academic achievement. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2013 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  2. Association of Academic Physiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Podcasts AAP Podcasts Leadership & Academic Development Program for Academic Leadership (PAL) Volunteer Opportunities Mentorship Programs Publications & News American Journal of PM&R AAP Newsletter RFC Newsletter - Physiatry ...

  3. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic achievement is the main measure of the level of education attained, which is meant to achieve the curriculum objective of success and priority. The study investigated effect of emotional intelligence and academic procrastination on academic achievement of students in two Nigerian Universities. The study adopted ...

  4. Visualizing Keyword Distribution across Multidisciplinary C-Space; Google Meets eBay: What Academic Librarians Can Learn from Alternative Information Providers; Trends in Use of Electronic Journals in Higher Education in the UK-Views of Academic Staff and Students; DOI: A 2003 Progress Report; Understanding the International Audiences for Digital Cultural Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagle, Donald; Kenney, Anne R.; McGovern, Nancy Y.; Martinez, Ida T.; Heidig, Lance J.; Bonthron, Karen; Urquhart, Christine; Thomas, Rhian; Ellis, David; Everitt, Jean; Lonsdale, Ray; McDermott, Elizabeth; Morris, Helen; Phillips, Rebecca; Spink, Sian; Yeoman, Alison; Armstrong, Chris; Fenton, Roger; Paskin, Norman; Miller, Paul; Dawson, David; Perkins, John

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discusses c-space as a visualization schema related to keyword distribution in information retrieval; academic librarians and alternative information providers, such as Google and eBay; electronic journal use in higher education in the United Kingdom; digital object identifiers; and international audiences for digital…

  5. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  6. ABoVE: Burn Severity, Fire Progression, Landcover and Field Data, NWT, Canada, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides peatland landcover classification maps, fire progression maps, and vegetation community biophysical data collected from areas that were burned...

  7. Fourth international circumpolar arctic vegetation mapping workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynolds, Martha K.; Markon, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    During the week of April 10, 2001, the Fourth International Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Mapping Workshop was held in Moscow, Russia. The purpose of this meeting was to bring together the vegetation scientists working on the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) to (1) review the progress of current mapping activities, (2) discuss and agree upon a standard set of arctic tundra subzones, (3) plan for the production and dissemination of a draft map, and (4) begin work on a legend for the final map.

  8. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  9. Onomastic Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yu. Gordova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mapping the onomastic material and creating linguistic atlases of each region remains a significant and urgent problem of Russian onomastics. The paper summarizes the experience of onomastic cartography, and explains the concept of onomastic map as well as linguistic and technical principles of mapping. The author considers traditional objects of mapping and main map topics and describes new opportunities which become possible due to the creation of modern means and techniques of mapping. The paper is illustrated with toponymic maps, compiled by different researchers between 1970 and 2000.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Escaping in Extra Dimensions by J. D. March-Russell/ CERN-TH Recent progress in the formulation of fundamental theories for a Universe with more than 4 dimensions will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be given to theories predicting the existence of extra dimensions at distance scales within the reach of current or forthcoming experiments. The phenomenological implications of these theories, ranging from detectable deviations from Newton's law at sub-millimeter scales, to phenomena of cosmological and astrophysical interest, as well as to high-energy laboratory experiments, will be discussed.

  11. THE IMPORTANCE OF CONCEPTUAL MAPS IN ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a model for using conceptual maps in accounting courses. While this notion is commonly used in natural science education, it is less known inaccounting education. Conceptual maps are tools that raise significant learning in the classroom. As teachers, we are challenged to change our curriculum and teaching methods. We are going to present a literature review of this concept, identifying its basic principles and strategies of development. Reading them in accounting education academic perspective will allow us to evaluate to what extent is a method that is suitable for teaching and learning in this field. Following Trébucq and Noel (2006, the set of selected information will be the basis of a study applied on some students in Romanian space in order to observe the extent to which the use of conceptual maps to help structuring and strengthening specialized concepts. This work seen as a qualitative research shows that by using conceptual maps we both improve what students learn and develop higher-order skill competencies demanded by the accounting profession. This paper brings the following contributions to knowledge. First it adds to a limited number of education papers that puts conceptual maps in an accounting context. Second, it is the first paper in Romanian context that show how concept maps can be used for both the students and the teachers in accounting education field by promoting self-learning and life-long learning skills. The main conclusion of the study conducted consists in the fact that this concept should be integrated into the Romanian accounting curriculum. Hence we outlined a three-dimensional approach on using conceptual maps advantage for students: first is the fact that reflects their own knowledge at the beginning of an accounting course, second show the progress made during the course and finally helps students to synthesize information gained.

  12. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work

  13. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  14. Docear : An Academic Literature Suite for Searching, Organizing and Creating Academic Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Beel, Joeran; Gipp, Bela; Langer, Stefan; Genzmehr, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In this demonstration-paper we introduce Docear, an 'academic literature suite'. Docear offers to scientists what an office suite like Microsoft Office offers to office workers. While an office suite bundles various applications for office workers (word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, etc.), Docear bundles several applications for scientists: academic search engine, PDF reader, reference manager, word processor, mind mapping module, and recommender system. Besides Docear's ge...

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    15, 16, 17 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Council room, bldg. 503 on 15 May, Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 16 and 17 May Introduction to free electron lasers by R.P. Walker / Rutherford Laboratory, UK The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise the...

  16. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  17. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  18. Do Men and Women Perform Academic Work Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ramos, Ana M.; Fernández Palacín, Fernando; Muñoz Márquez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Why is the gender gap so large in researchers' career progression? Do men and women have different priorities in their academic careers? This study explores men's and women's academic work to shed light on the strategies of male and female researchers. The online survey collected data on Andalusian researchers to determine possible differences in…

  19. Effect on Academic Procrastination after Introducing Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendicho, Peña Fabiani; Mora, Carlos Efren; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; Rivero-Rodríguez, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Students suffer academic procrastination while dealing with frequent deadlines and working under pressure. This causes to delay their coursework and may affect their academic progress, despite feeling worse. Triggering students' motivation, like introducing technologies, helps to reduce procrastination. In this context, Augmented Reality has been…

  20. Community College Academic Integrity Lessons That Put Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bealle, Penny

    2017-01-01

    Academic integrity is an educational issue requiring an educational response from all stakeholders, including faculty, students, librarians, learning support staff, and administrators. This article posits that an educational response at Suffolk County Community College (SCCC) advances progress toward an integrated academic integrity strategy at…

  1. Investigating Arabic Academic Vocabulary Knowledge among Middle School Pupils: Receptive versus Productive Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Baha

    2017-01-01

    The current study attempted to investigate the development of Arabic academic vocabulary knowledge among middle-school Arabic native speakers, taking into account the socioeconomic status of the Arab population in Israel. For this purpose, Arabic academic word list was developed, mapping the required academic words that are needed for adequate…

  2. Academic Standards and Regulatory Frameworks: Necessary Compromises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Marie; Falahee, Marie; Woolf, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Assessment regulations in higher education, which are important for assuring threshold academic standards, reflect institutional cultures and histories, and are shaped by pragmatic concerns about quality indicators such as retention and progression rates, as well as principles of equity. This paper articulates some of the tensions that confront…

  3. Academic and Public Library Buildings, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bette-Lee; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Three articles on library buildings present Library Journal's annual architectural survey of completed public and academic library buildings and library projects in progress; guidelines for leasing a shared library facility, and a description of a successful public library building project in Michigan are also discussed. (EM)

  4. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused

  5. Social cognitive predictors of Mexican American college students' academic and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y; Navarro, Rachel L

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used Lent's (2004) social cognitive model of well being to examine the academic and life satisfaction of 457 Mexican American college students attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Using structural equation modeling, results indicated that the model provided a good fit to the data. Specifically, we found positive relations from positive affect to enculturation, acculturation, college self-efficacy, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction; from enculturation to college self-efficacy; from acculturation to college self-efficacy and college outcome expectations; from college self-efficacy to college outcome expectations, academic goal progress, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction; from college outcome expectations to academic satisfaction; from academic goal progress to academic and life satisfaction; and from academic satisfaction to life satisfaction. Findings indicated the model was invariant across gender groups, and overall, 38% and 14% of the variance in academic satisfaction and life satisfaction, respectively, were explained by the predictor variables. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  6. Coastal mapping handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,; Ellis, Melvin Y.

    1978-01-01

    Passage of the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 focused attention on the Nation's coastal land and water areas. As plans for more effective management of the coastal zone evolved, it soon became apparent that improved maps and charts of these areas were needed. This handbook was prepared with the requirements of the entire coastal community in mind, giving greatest attention to the needs of coastal zone managers and planners at the State and local levels. Its principal objective is to provide general information and guidance; it is neither a textbook nor a technical manual, but rather a primer on coastal mapping. This handbook should help planners and managers of coastal programs to determine their mapping requirements, select the best maps and charts for their particular needs, and to deal effectively with personnel who gather data and prepare maps. The sections on "Sources of Assistance and Advice" and "Product and Data Sources" should be especially useful to all involved in mapping the coastal zone. Brief summaries of the mapping efforts of several State coastal zone management programs are included. "Future outlook" discusses anticipated progress and changes in mapping procedures and techniques. Illustrations are inserted, where appropriate, to illustrate the products and equipment discussed. Because of printing restrictions, the colors in map illustrations may vary from those in the original publication. The appendixes include substantial material which also should be of interest. In addition a glossary and an index are included to provide easy and quick access to the terms and concepts used in the text. For those interested in more technical detail than is provided in this handbook, the "Selected references" will be useful. Also, the publications of the professional societies listed in appendix 4 will provide technical information in detail.

  7. Content Progressive Coding of Limited Bits/pixel Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Riis; Forchhammer, Søren

    1999-01-01

    A new lossless context based method for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images is proposed. Progressive coding is achieved by separating the image into contelnt layers. Digital maps are compressed up to 3 times better than GIF.......A new lossless context based method for content progressive coding of limited bits/pixel images is proposed. Progressive coding is achieved by separating the image into contelnt layers. Digital maps are compressed up to 3 times better than GIF....

  8. Somatosensory maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding-Forrester, Samuel; Feldman, Daniel E

    2018-01-01

    Somatosensory areas containing topographic maps of the body surface are a major feature of parietal cortex. In primates, parietal cortex contains four somatosensory areas, each with its own map, with the primary cutaneous map in area 3b. Rodents have at least three parietal somatosensory areas. Maps are not isomorphic to the body surface, but magnify behaviorally important skin regions, which include the hands and face in primates, and the whiskers in rodents. Within each map, intracortical circuits process tactile information, mediate spatial integration, and support active sensation. Maps may also contain fine-scale representations of touch submodalities, or direction of tactile motion. Functional representations are more overlapping than suggested by textbook depictions of map topography. The whisker map in rodent somatosensory cortex is a canonic system for studying cortical microcircuits, sensory coding, and map plasticity. Somatosensory maps are plastic throughout life in response to altered use or injury. This chapter reviews basic principles and recent findings in primate, human, and rodent somatosensory maps. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  10. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffres, Meghan N.; Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled.

  11. Progression og underviserkompetencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2014-03-01

    entrepreneurship. The study uses categories such as didactics, working processes in academic courses or courses at university as key themes. Participating teachers’ descriptions of their concepts of entrepreneurship in their teaching practices are used to chart their progress. This material provides an insight into the teachers’ reflections on their development processes, challenges and different modes of teacher authority related to entrepreneurship teaching in universities. Together, the gathered data contribute to discussions on student teacher development by identifying the importance of the teachers’ motivation as a precondition for professional and educational development. 

  12. Progression og underviserkompetencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2014-03-01

    entrepreneurship. The study uses categories such as didactics, working processes in academic courses or courses at university as key themes. Participating teachers’ descriptions of their concepts of entrepreneurship in their teaching practices are used to chart their progress. This material provides an insight into the teachers’ reflections on their development processes, challenges and different modes of teacher authority related to entrepreneurship teaching in universities. Together, the gathered data contribute to discussions on student teacher development by identifying the importance of the teachers’ motivation as a precondition for professional and educational development.

  13. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  14. Relationship of nutrition and physical activity behaviors and fitness measures to academic performance for sixth graders in a midwest city school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jane U; Mauch, Lois; Winkelman, Mark R

    2011-02-01

    To support curriculum and policy, a midwest city school district assessed the association of selected categories of nutrition and physical activity (NUTR/PA) behaviors, fitness measures, and body mass index (BMI) with academic performance (AP) for 800 sixth graders. Students completed an adapted Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (NUTR/PA behaviors), fitness assessments (mile run, curl-ups, push-ups, height, and weight) with results matched to standardized scores (Measures of Academic Progress [MAP]), meal price status, and gender. Differences in mean MAP scores (math and reading) were compared by selected categories of each variable utilizing 1-way analysis of variance. Associations were determined by stepwise multiple regression utilizing mean MAP scores (for math and for reading) as the dependent variable and NUTR/PA behaviors, fitness, and BMI categories as independent variables. Significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher MAP math scores were associated with NUTR (more milk and breakfast; less 100% fruit juice and sweetened beverages [SB]) and PA (increased vigorous PA and sports teams; reduced television), and fitness (higher mile run performance). Higher MAP reading scores were associated with NUTR (fewer SB) and PA (increased vigorous PA, reduced television). Regression analysis indicated about 11.1% of the variation in the mean MAP math scores and 6.7% of the mean MAP reading scores could be accounted for by selected NUTR/PA behaviors, fitness, meal price status, and gender. Many positive NUTR/PA behaviors and fitness measures were associated with higher MAP scores supporting the school district focus on healthy lifestyles. Additional factors, including meal price status and gender, contribute to AP. © 2011, Fargo Public School.

  15. Work-Based Learning and Academic Skills. IEE Working Paper No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Katherine L.; Moore, David Thornton; Bailey, Thomas R.

    The claim that work-based experience improves students' academic performance was examined through a study of the academic progress of 25 high school and community college student interns employed in various health care workplaces. Data were collected from the following activities: (1) review of the literature on academic reinforcement and academic…

  16. Class, Ability, Mobility: Economic and Academic Paths from Middle School to Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joe G.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines academic and economic progression of 8th graders using the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS 88). In terms of educational mobility, this analysis indicates it is clearly better to possess academic ability--middle-school students who have high-academic ability but low family socioeconomic status (SES)…

  17. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  18. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  19. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  20. Collection Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  1. CALS Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Ib; Nielsen, Povl Holm; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1998-01-01

    To enhance the industrial applications of CALS, CALS Center Danmark has developed a cost efficient and transparent assessment, CALS Mapping, to uncover the potential of CALS - primarily dedicated to small and medium sized enterprises. The idea behind CALS Mapping is that the CALS State of the ent...

  2. Academic Self-Concept, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and Academic Achievement: Mediating and Additive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.; Roy, Amelie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between…

  3. MAP17, a ROS-dependent oncogene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnero, Amancio

    2012-01-01

    MAP17 is a small 17 kDa non-glycosylated membrane protein previously identified as being overexpressed in carcinomas. Breast tumor cells that overexpress MAP17 show an increased tumoral phenotype with enhanced proliferative capabilities both in the presence or the absence of contact inhibition, decreased apoptotic sensitivity, and increased migration. MAP17-expressing clones also grow better in nude mice. The increased malignant cell behavior induced by MAP17 is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the treatment of MAP17-expressing cells with antioxidants results in a reduction in the tumorigenic properties of these cells. The MAP17-dependent increase in ROS and tumorigenesis relies on its PDZ-binding domain because disruption of this sequence by point mutations abolishes the ability of MAP17 to enhance ROS production and tumorigenesis. MAP17 is overexpressed in a great variety of human carcinomas, including breast tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of MAP17 during cancer progression demonstrates that overexpression of the protein strongly correlates with tumoral progression. Generalized MAP17 overexpression in human carcinomas indicates that MAP17 can be a good marker for tumorigenesis and, especially, for malignant progression.

  4. Student perceptions of stress, coping, relationships, and academic civility: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Nguyen, Danh T; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina

    2014-01-01

    Academic incivility can increase student stress, jeopardize learning, damage relationships, and negatively impact the academic environment. This 3-year longitudinal study measured a cohort of prelicensure nursing students' progressive perceptions of stress, coping, student-student and faculty-student relationships, and levels of academic civility. While civility scores remained mild to moderately high overall, there was a slightly declining trend over the 3-year period. Perceived stressors and coping strategies and ways to improve academic civility are identified and discussed.

  5. Progressivity Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rather than a scientific text, the author contributes a concise memorandum from the originator of the idea who has managed the campaign for the conversion of the military barracks into a creative cluster between 1988 and 2002, when he parted ways with Metelkova due to conflicting views on the center’s future. His views shed light on a distant period of time from a perspective of a participant–observer. The information is abundantly supported by primary sources, also available online. However, some of the presented hypotheses are heavily influenced by his personal experiences of xenophobia, elitism, and predatorial behavior, which were already then discernible on the so-called alternative scene as well – so much so that they obstructed the implementation of progressive programs. The author claims that, in spite of the substantially different reality today, the myths and prejudices concerning Metelkova must be done away with in order to enhance its progressive nature. Above all, the paper calls for an objective view on internal antagonisms, mainly originating in deep class divisions between the users. These make a clear distinction between truly marginal ndividuals and the overambitious beau-bourgeois, as the author labels the large part of users of Metelkova of »his« time. On these grounds, he argues for a robust approach to ban all forms of xenophobia and self-ghettoization.

  6. Social cognitive predictors of first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriott, Patton O; Hudyma, Aaron; Keene, Chesleigh; Santiago, Dana

    2015-04-01

    The present study tested Lent's (2004) social-cognitive model of normative well-being in a sample (N = 414) of first- and non-first-generation college students. A model depicting relationships between: positive affect, environmental supports, college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, academic progress, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction was examined using structural equation modeling. The moderating roles of perceived importance of attending college and intrinsic goal motivation were also explored. Results suggested the hypothesized model provided an adequate fit to the data while hypothesized relationships in the model were partially supported. Environmental supports predicted college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, and academic satisfaction. Furthermore, college self-efficacy predicted academic progress while college outcome expectations predicted academic satisfaction. Academic satisfaction, but not academic progress predicted life satisfaction. The structural model explained 44% of the variance in academic progress, 56% of the variance in academic satisfaction, and 28% of the variance in life satisfaction. Mediation analyses indicated several significant indirect effects between variables in the model while moderation analyses revealed a 3-way interaction between academic satisfaction, intrinsic motivation for attending college, and first-generation college student status on life satisfaction. Results are discussed in terms of applying the normative model of well-being to promote first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. RS-land cover based environmental monitoring in Europe progress report on the applicability of NOAA-AVHRR 1-km data for small scale land cover mapping; final report part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mücher, C.A.; Veldkamp, J.G.; Katwijk, van V.F.; Nieuwenhuis, G.J.A.; Velde, van de R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The multispectral and multitemporal classification approach of AVHRR data on specific dates was studied for land cover mapping on a continental scale. Major conclusions are: decision keys must be developed that exploit both the use of multitemporal composites and multispectral data; the current

  8. The other way around: probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restrict progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice via activiation of CD8 alpha+ immune cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine the immune-modulating effects of feeding a novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD) in rumi...

  9. The other way around: Probiotic lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restricts progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice through activation of CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine immune effects of feeding novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD). We hypothesized that fe...

  10. Cortical Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, James A; Wilson, Stuart P

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review functional organization in sensory cortical regions-how the cortex represents the world. We consider four interrelated aspects of cortical organization: (1) the set of receptive fields of individual cortical sensory neurons, (2) how lateral interaction between cortical neurons reflects the similarity of their receptive fields, (3) the spatial distribution of receptive-field properties across the horizontal extent of the cortical tissue, and (4) how the spatial distributions of different receptive-field properties interact with one another. We show how these data are generally well explained by the theory of input-driven self-organization, with a family of computational models of cortical maps offering a parsimonious account for a wide range of map-related phenomena. We then discuss important challenges to this explanation, with respect to the maps present at birth, maps present under activity blockade, the limits of adult plasticity, and the lack of some maps in rodents. Because there is not at present another credible general theory for cortical map development, we conclude by proposing key experiments to help uncover other mechanisms that might also be operating during map development. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Factors of academic procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Kranjec, Eva; Košir, Katja; Komidar, Luka

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed ...

  12. Geologic mapping of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

  13. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

  14. Academic musculoskeletal radiology: influences for gender disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Sadia R; Khurshid, Kiran; Jalal, Sabeena; Bancroft, Laura; Munk, Peter L; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2018-03-01

    Research productivity is one of the few quintessential gauges that North American academic radiology departments implement to determine career progression. The rationale of this study is to quantify the relationship of gender, research productivity, and academic advancements in the musculoskeletal (MSK) radiology to account for emerging trends in workforce diversity. Radiology residency programs enlisted in the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) and International Skeletal Society (ISS) were searched for academic faculty to generate the database for gender and academic profiles of MSK radiologists. Bibliometric data was collected using Elsevier's SCOPUS archives, and analyzed using Stata version 14.2. Among 274 MSK radiologists in North America, 190 (69.34%) were men and 84 (30.66%) were women, indicating a statistically significant difference (χ2 = 6.34; p value = 0.042). The available number of female assistant professors (n = 50) was more than half of the male assistant professors (n = 88), this ratio however, plummeted at higher academic ranks, with only one-fourth of women (n = 11) professors compared to men (n = 45). The male MSK radiologist had 1.31 times the odds of having a higher h-index, keeping all other variables constant. The trend of gender disparity exists in MSK radiology with significant underrepresentation of women in top tiers of academic hierarchy. Even with comparable h-indices, at the lower academic ranks, a lesser number of women are promoted relative to their male colleagues. Further studies are needed to investigate the degree of influence research productivity has, in determining academic advancement of MSK radiologists.

  15. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Progress Report, covering the period up to the end of 1979 year, was sent to the IAEA according to the research agreement No. 1971 /CF. This work covered the following fields: preparation and dummy irradiation experiments with a new experimental capsule of ''CHOUCA-M'' type; measurement of temperature fields and design of specimen holders; measurement of neutron energy spectrum in the irradiation place in our experimental reactor of VVR-S type (Nuclear Research Institute) using a set of activation detectors; unification and calibration of the measurement of neutron fluence with the use of Fe, Cu, Mn-Mg and Co-Al monitors; development and improvement of the measuring apparatus and technique for the dynamic testing of pre-cracked specimens with determination of dynamic parameters of fracture mechanics; preparation and manufacture of testing specimens from the Japanese steels - forging, plate and weld metal; preparation of the irradiation capsule for assembling

  16. From Academic to Post-Academic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Ghaneirad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the cultural change in science from academic science to post-academic science by the use of documentary studying and analytical reasoning. The aim of this study is determining the direction of cultural change in science and comparing it with cultural change in society.The knowledge production which surrounds academy has little relationship with the values of society and epistemological norms regulate scientists' behavior from within the scientific system. But in post-academic science the relationship between science and society operates in the same line with market and government and science produce within the social context and scientists' behavior controlled by the norms out of the scientific system. So the culture of science has changed because science applied to meet the requirements of market and industry. The result is that contrary to cultural change in society that goes from materialism to post-materialism, cultural change in science moves from post-materialism to materialism.

  17. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic ... genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome Project (HGP) was to develop new, better and cheaper ...

  18. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    . In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology. This type...... of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...... of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  19. Global Trends: Paradox of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    human history . Human and Animal Health Under Pressure. Changing environmental conditions and increasing global connectivity will affect...PARADOX OF PROGRESS A pub l ica t ion o f the Nat ional In te l l i gence Counci l GLOBAL TRENDS JANUARY 2017 NIC 2017-001 ISBN 978-0-16-093614...1 The Map of the Future 5 Trends Transforming the Global Landscape 29 Near Future: Tensions Are Rising 45 Three Scenarios for the Distant Future

  20. Sleep difficulties and academic performance in Norwegian higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Amie C; Sivertsen, Børge; Hysing, Mari; Vedaa, Øystein; Øverland, Simon

    2017-12-01

    Sleep difficulties are common among university students and may detrimentally affect academic outcomes. Despite this, remarkably little information is currently available during this critical developmental period of early adulthood, and thus, the direct effect on measurable domains of academic ability and proficiency is equivocal. To evaluate the associations between difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) and subjective and objective academic performance in a large sample of university students. A total of 12,915 students who participated in large student survey in Norway from 24 February 2014 to 27 March 2014. DIMS was assessed by the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25), and academic outcomes included failed examinations, delayed study progress, and school-related self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale). Difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep was independently associated with increased odds for poor school performance for all academic outcomes. Reporting 'extreme' DIMS was associated with increased odds of reporting delayed study progress (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.57, p academic outcomes as well as poorer self-rated academic proficiency among higher education students. Amelioration of sleep difficulties may improve overall academic performance and health outcomes in affected students. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  1. A reference linkage map for Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Corey J; Freeman, Jules S; Kullan, Anand R K; Petroli, César D; Sansaloni, Carolina P; Kilian, Andrzej; Detering, Frank; Grattapaglia, Dario; Potts, Brad M; Myburg, Alexander A; Vaillancourt, René E

    2012-06-15

    Genetic linkage maps are invaluable resources in plant research. They provide a key tool for many genetic applications including: mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL); comparative mapping; identifying unlinked (i.e. independent) DNA markers for fingerprinting, population genetics and phylogenetics; assisting genome sequence assembly; relating physical and recombination distances along the genome and map-based cloning of genes. Eucalypts are the dominant tree species in most Australian ecosystems and of economic importance globally as plantation trees. The genome sequence of E. grandis has recently been released providing unprecedented opportunities for genetic and genomic research in the genus. A robust reference linkage map containing sequence-based molecular markers is needed to capitalise on this resource. Several high density linkage maps have recently been constructed for the main commercial forestry species in the genus (E. grandis, E. urophylla and E. globulus) using sequenced Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. To provide a single reference linkage map for eucalypts a composite map was produced through the integration of data from seven independent mapping experiments (1950 individuals) using a marker-merging method. The composite map totalled 1107 cM and contained 4101 markers; comprising 3880 DArT, 213 microsatellite and eight candidate genes. Eighty-one DArT markers were mapped to two or more linkage groups, resulting in the 4101 markers being mapped to 4191 map positions. Approximately 13% of DArT markers mapped to identical map positions, thus the composite map contained 3634 unique loci at an average interval of 0.31 cM. The composite map represents the most saturated linkage map yet produced in Eucalyptus. As the majority of DArT markers contained on the map have been sequenced, the map provides a direct link to the E. grandis genome sequence and will serve as an important reference for progressing eucalypt research.

  2. The Academic Publishing Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher; Wenzel, Tim Ole; Schmidt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The case starts with introducing the outstanding profitability of academic journal publishers such as Elsevier and then dives into describing the research process from an idea to conducting research and to publishing the results in academic journals. Subsequently, demand and supply for scientific...

  3. Marketing Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  4. Academic Work and Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, John

    2017-01-01

    Neoliberal reforms in higher education have resulted in corporate managerial practices in universities and a drive for efficiency and productivity in teaching and research. As a result, there has been an intensification of academic work, increased stress for academics and an emphasis on accountability and performativity in universities. This paper…

  5. Academic Identities under Threat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the lived experience of practising academics as part of an inquiry into the vexed question of "academic identities". Identity is understood not as a fixed property, but as part of the lived complexity of a person's project. The article reports on data from a small study in one university. The data suggest that…

  6. Patterns of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Victor; Mensink, David; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Uses the Academic Procrastination Questionnaire to measure procrastination and six possible patterns underlying it among undergraduate students. Finds that the most common patterns for clients involved Evaluation Anxiety or being Discouraged/Depressed, or Dependent. Supports individualized assessment and solutions for academic procrastination. (SC)

  7. Arbitration in Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Joel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Questions and issues critical to an understanding of arbitration in higher education are discussed. Aspects of the academic arbitration model are defined. The following four topics are examined: (1) the procedural similarities and differences between academic arbitration and the industrial model; (2) the possible inherent conflict between academic…

  8. Gender and Academic Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershott, Anne; Drinan, Patrick F.; Cross, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the academic integrity climate of a mid-sized, comprehensive, private university. Seeks to assess gender differences in motivations surrounding cheating behaviors among 532 undergraduate students. Findings indicate that while both males and females are reluctant to report instances of academic dishonesty that they witness, there…

  9. Thinking Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  10. Diligence and Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Novarese, Marco; Di Giovinazzo, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    This article uses university administration data to investigate the relation between student behavior (rapid response in finalizing enrolment procedures) and academic performance. It shows how student solicitude in enrolment, or a lack of it, can be a useful forecast of academic success. Several explanations can be given, including the greater or lesser tendency to procrastinate.

  11. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negot......This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  12. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  13. Towards a global land subsidence map

    OpenAIRE

    G. Erkens; G. Erkens; E. H. Sutanudjaja; E. H. Sutanudjaja

    2015-01-01

    Land subsidence is a global problem, but a global land subsidence map is not available yet. Such map is crucial to raise global awareness of land subsidence, as land subsidence causes extensive damage (probably in the order of billions of dollars annually). With the global land subsidence map relative sea level rise predictions may be improved, contributing to global flood risk calculations. In this paper, we discuss the approach and progress we have made so far in ma...

  14. ARM-Cortex M3-Based Two-Wheel Robot for Assessing Grid Cell Model of Medial Entorhinal Cortex: Progress towards Building Robots with Biologically Inspired Navigation-Cognitive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cuneo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the implementation and use of a two-wheel autonomous robot and its effectiveness as a tool for studying the recently discovered use of grid cells as part of mammalian’s brains space-mapping circuitry (specifically the medial entorhinal cortex. A proposed discrete-time algorithm that emulates the medial entorhinal cortex is programed into the robot. The robot freely explores a limited laboratory area in the manner of a rat or mouse and reports information to a PC, thus enabling research without the use of live individuals. Position coordinate neural maps are achieved as mathematically predicted although for a reduced number of implemented neurons (i.e., 200 neurons. However, this type of computational embedded system (robot’s microcontroller is found to be insufficient for simulating huge numbers of neurons in real time (as in the medial entorhinal cortex. It is considered that the results of this work provide an insight into achieving an enhanced embedded systems design for emulating and understanding mathematical neural network models to be used as biologically inspired navigation system for robots.

  15. Homeschool Progress Report 2009: Academic Achievement and Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the Home School Legal Defense Association commissioned Dr. Brian D. Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute to conduct a nationwide study of homeschooling in America. The study's purpose was to develop a current picture of homeschool students and their families--capturing their demographics and educational background--and…

  16. Setbacks to academic progression of distance learners wisdom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major problems that prevented majority of them from entering the university before the introduction of the distance learning programme are financial problem, family problems, failed attempts and lack of the required grades, etc. Some of the challenges or problems the distance education students face are difficulty in ...

  17. Radioelement mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A high quality geochemical database is pertinent to a wide range of investigations in the earth and life sciences, and should be considered as an essential component of environmental knowledge. Natural radioactive elements associated with radioactive raw materials, the radiation environment and their health impact, form part of such a comprehensive geochemical database. Databases on radioelement mapping have been increasingly used and updated in several countries for the exploration of uranium and thorium raw materials for nuclear fuels, environmental geochemical studies and the assessment of the radiation environment. The demand for radioelement databases is expected to grow over the next decade as new applications for them are foreseen. To this end, the IAEA invited a group of experts to investigate the issues and draft a report on the current state of radioelement mapping and the development of a global radioelement baseline. In the past, based on gamma surveys for uranium exploration and field gamma spectrometry, the IAEA took a leading role in facilitating the development of methodologies and standards for the quantitative estimation of radioelement concentrations and for the geochemical mapping of radioelements.. The need for approved methodologies and standards for radioelement mapping was identified at an IAEA panel meeting in 1972. This led to IAEA technical meetings in 1973 and 1974 and the publication of the proceedings of an IAEA symposium entitled Exploration for Uranium Ore Deposits. In subsequent years, calibration standards and procedures were developed for radiometric field equipment. The standards were based on geological reference materials for laboratory gamma ray spectrometers issued by the IAEA. The information on the standards and the equipment has been documented in detail in IAEA technical reports: Preparation and Certification of IAEA Gamma ray Spectrometry Reference Materials RGU-1, RGTh-1 and RGK-1, report IAEA/RL/148 (1987); and

  18. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    . In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology. This type...... of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...

  19. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    , performative, and participatory practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-human- geographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement...... towards a new political ecology. This type of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper...

  20. Invariant metric for nonlinear symplectic maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a function of system parameters, we demonstrate that the performance of a nonlinear Hamiltonian system is enhanced. Keywords. Invariant metric; symplectic maps; performance optimization. PACS Nos 05.45. ...... [7] A Nijenhuis and H S Wilf, Computational algorithms for computers and calculators (Academic. Press, New ...

  1. Mellon Conference: Panel on "Licensing, Copyright and Fair Use." The HYPATIA Project (toward an ASCAP for Academics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Jane C.; Janklow, Morton L.

    The HYPATIA Project envisions the creation of a digital depository and licensing and tracking service for unpublished "academic" works, including working papers, other works-in-progress, lectures, and other writings that are not normally published in formal academic journals. Any academic who wishes to deposit a work will be welcome to…

  2. Academic streaming in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falaschi, Alessandro; Mønster, Dan; Doležal, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...... in Europe. We report on a survey of the use of streaming media in the academic community in Europe, an open source content delivery network, and a portal for announcing live streaming events to the global academic community....

  3. Student academic performance analysis using fuzzy C-means clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosadi, R.; Akamal; Sudrajat, R.; Kharismawan, B.; Hambali, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    Grade Point Average (GPA) is commonly used as an indicator of academic performance. Academic performance evaluations is a basic way to evaluate the progression of student performance, when evaluating student’s academic performance, there are occasion where the student data is grouped especially when the amounts of data is large. Thus, the pattern of data relationship within and among groups can be revealed. Grouping data can be done by using clustering method, where one of the methods is the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm. Furthermore, this algorithm is then applied to a set of student data form the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padjadjaran University.

  4. Concept Mapping Strategies: Content, Tools and Assessment for Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, Stephanie; Monroe-Ossi, Heather; Cobb, Sharon; Fountain, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the use of concept mapping for formative and summative assessment of northeast Florida middle school students' knowledge of human geography. The students were participants in an afterschool, academic, college reach-out program that provided opportunities to test concept mapping strategies that support spatial thinking and…

  5. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  6. Energetic map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report explains the energetic map of Uruguay as well as the different systems that delimits political frontiers in the region. The electrical system importance is due to the electricity, oil and derived , natural gas, potential study, biofuels, wind and solar energy

  7. Meal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Kügler, Jens; Olsen, Nina Veflen

    2013-01-01

    probabilities are subjected to multiple correspondence analysis and mapped into low-dimensional space. In a third step, the principal coordinates representing meal centres and side components in the correspondence analysis solution are subjected to cluster analysis to identify distinct groups of compatible...

  8. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus ...

  9. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    , it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This article looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the data-journalism platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example...

  10. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  11. Guide to research in academic global surgery: A statement of the Society of University Surgeons Global Academic Surgery Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Saurabh; Nwomeh, Benedict; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Holterman, AiXuan L; Jawa, Randeep S; Jayaraman, Sudha; Juillard, Catherine; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Rickard, Jennifer; Weiser, Thomas G; Yang, George P; Shrime, Mark G

    2018-02-01

    Global surgery is an emerging academic discipline that is developing in tandem with numerous policy and advocacy initiatives. In this regard, academic global surgery will be crucial for measuring the progress toward improving surgical care worldwide. However, as a nascent academic discipline, there must be rigorous standards for the quality of work that emerges from this field. In this white paper, which reflects the opinion of the Global Academic Surgery Committee of the Society for University Surgeons, we discuss the importance of research in global surgery, the methodologies that can be used in such research, and the challenges and benefits associated with carrying out this research. In each of these topics, we draw on existing examples from the literature to demonstrate our points. We conclude with a call for continued, high-quality research that will strengthen the discipline's academic standing and help us move toward improved access to and quality of surgical care worldwide. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Academic librarianship today

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Intended for use by both librarians and students in LIS programs, Academic Librarianship Today is the most current, comprehensive overview of the field available today. Key features include: Each chapter was commissioned specifically for this new book, and the authors are highly regarded academic librarians or library school faculty— or both Cutting-edge topics such as open access, copyright, digital curation and preservation, emerging technologies, new roles for academic librarians, cooperative collection development and resource sharing, and patron-driven acquisitions are explored in depth Each chapter ends with thought-provoking questions for discussion and carefully constructed assignments that faculty can assign or adapt for their courses The book begins with Gilman’s introduction, an overview that briefly synthesizes the contents of the contributors’ chapters by highlighting major themes. The main part of the book is organized into three parts: The Academic Library Landscape Today, ...

  13. Googilum academic gaveshana librarikalum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayakumar, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    Describes about two projects of Google such as "Google Scholar" and "Google Print".It also describes how the traditional library based academic research information search can be affected by these two projects.

  14. The Academic Quilting Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Julia A.; Ko, Marcia G.; Blair, Janis E.

    2009-01-01

    In medicine, the challenges faced by female faculty members who are attempting to achieve academic advancement have been well described. Various strategies have been proposed to increase academic productivity to aid the promotion of women in medicine. We propose an innovative collaboration strategy that encourages completion of an academic writing project. This strategy acknowledges the challenges inherent in achieving work–life balance and utilizes a collaborative work style with a group of peer physicians. The model is designed to encourage the completion and collation of independently prepared sections of an academic paper within a setting that emphasizes social networking and collaboration. This approach has many similarities to the construction of a quilt during a “quilting bee.” PMID:19172365

  15. Declaration of Academic Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan ÇETİNSAYA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Universities are the institutions where all the opinions, various truth claims as well as social and political problems are discussed in a liberal and civilized way and the complicated problems are expressed clearly without any oppression and prevention. 2. Academic freedom includes first and foremost the right of freedom of research and thus freedom of using the essential knowledge methods, the right of possessing the necessary tools and conditions required for the research and the rights of scientific production, informing, learning and dissemination. 3. Academics possess the rights to benefit from the academic freedom without any limitation, to research and investigate according to their own preferences and interests, and to teach these without being exposed to any oppression and prevention. 4. This freedom of teaching that the academics have should not be used in a manner restricting students' freedom of learning; academics should avoid from being dogmatic in the research and education processes and respect students' rights of thinking differently and expressing themselves. 5. Academics accordingly should lead the students to evaluate and understand the new thoughts as a whole and to be tolerant to the thoughts they do not agree and to think in various ways. Also, academics should encourage the students to create their own opinions based on evidences and enable them to express these opinions freely and respect their freedom of expression. 6. Campuses should be safe environments where the students can express their own opinions freely. Suppressing the intellectual diversity and the plurality of viewpoints will decrease the productivity of teaching and learning process, restrict students' freedom of learning, and constrain the chance of formation of critical and in-depth thinking. 7. Critical thinking develops only in the campuses where various thoughts are expressed in a liberal way. Students should feel that they would not be prevented

  16. Mapping the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goerres, Achim; Vanhuysse, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post-Industri......Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post...... boxes by asking a number of central questions. How does population aging change political support for redistribution towards different age groups in society, including not just elderly people but also families with children? How, and when, do established parties in aging democracies implement policies......? The answers provided in this volume promise to be of major interest to scholars in fields such as political economy, political sociology, social policy, comparative politics, demography, and gerontology....

  17. Perspectives on academic dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, M J; Lowenstein, A J

    1990-01-01

    Academic dishonest behaviors, such as lying, cheating, and plagiarism, are destructive and must be recognized and addressed early in the development of professional nurses. Faculty must be concerned with the relationship between student integrity in the classroom and clinical or professional behaviors. The authors discuss student motivation and attitudes toward unethical practices, faculty responses, and responsibilities when these incidents arise, and strategies for preventing academic dishonesty.

  18. Whistleblowing in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J J

    2004-02-01

    Although medical centres have established boards, special committees, and offices for the review and redress of breaches in ethical behaviour, these mechanisms repeatedly prove themselves ineffective in addressing research misconduct within the institutions of academic medicine. As the authors see it, institutional design: (1) systematically ignores serious ethical problems, (2) makes whistleblowers into institutional enemies and punishes them, and (3) thereby fails to provide an ethical environment. The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine.

  19. Academic Motivations and Academic Self-Efficacy of Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gamze Sarikoc

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Academic motivation and academic self-efficacy play important roles in the learning process. They increase academic achievement and the attainment of educational goals, thus providing opportunities in the training of qualified nurses. This study was conducted to determine nursing students%u2019 academic motivation and academic self-efficacy levels. Material and Method: This is a descriptive study. A total of 346 students who are attending a nursing school as either a first, second, third...

  20. Academic Writing and Tacit Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    The genre of academic writing is discipline dependent, so that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can, independently of each other, provide students with the necessary help to develop the ability to write in their academic disciplines. Furthermore, the rules are largely tacit, i.e. they are not…

  1. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  2. Academic Procrastination on Worker Students

    OpenAIRE

    Muzaqi, Sugito; Arumsari, Andini Dwi

    2017-01-01

    Academic procrastination is to delay the work in the academic field. Academic procrastination occurs because students who work less able to divide his time well, between work and college. Students who work doing academic procrastination because it is less able to regulate themselves. Self-regulation is the ability to control their own behavior and one of the prime movers of the human personality. In the process of self-regulation, academic procrastination students who need to understand the i...

  3. Whistleblowing in academic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J

    2004-01-01

    The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine. PMID:14872069

  4. Natural and man-made hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California—study progress as of May 2017, and a summative-scale approach to estimate background Cr(VI) concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Groover, Krishangi D.

    2018-03-22

    This report describes (1) work done between January 2015 and May 2017 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), background study and (2) the summative-scale approach to be used to estimate the extent of anthropogenic (man-made) Cr(VI) and background Cr(VI) concentrations near the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) natural gas compressor station in Hinkley, California. Most of the field work for the study was completed by May 2017. The summative-scale approach and calculation of Cr(VI) background were not well-defined at the time the USGS proposal for the background Cr(VI) study was prepared but have since been refined as a result of data collected as part of this study. The proposed summative scale consists of multiple items, formulated as questions to be answered at each sampled well. Questions that compose the summative scale were developed to address geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical constraints on Cr(VI) within the study area. Each question requires a binary (yes or no) answer. A score of 1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data consistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI); a score of –1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data inconsistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI). The areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated from the summative-scale analyses will be compared with the areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated on the basis of numerical groundwater flow model results, along with particle-tracking analyses. On the basis of these combined results, background Cr(VI) values will be estimated for “Mojave-type” deposits, and other deposits, in different parts of the study area outside the summative-scale mapped extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI).

  5. Arithmetic Progressions on Conics

    OpenAIRE

    Ciss, Abdoul Aziz; Moody, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we look at long arithmetic progressions on conics. By an arithmetic progression on a curve, we mean the existence of rational points on the curve whose x-coordinates are in arithmetic progression. We revisit arithmetic progressions on the unit circle, constructing 3-term progressions of points in the first quadrant containing an arbitrary rational point on the unit circle. We also provide infinite families of three term progressions on the unit hyperbola, as well as conics ax2 ...

  6. Experimental studies on the Auburn Torsatron: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandy, R.F.; Swanson, D.G.

    1987-10-01

    Progress on the Auburn Torsatron is discussed in this report. In particular, experiments are described dealing with methods of surface mapping the magnetic configuration, plasma confinement studies, ion cyclotron heating and modification to the device

  7. Theoretical research in nuclear collective motion. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Progress is summarized on the following research projects: generalized density matrix method, large amplitude collective motion, boson mappings for the Interacting Boson Model, and semi-classical method for testing IBM hypothesis

  8. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  9. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  10. Construction of Cognitive Maps to Improve E-Book Reading and Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang-Yi; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Yang, Sheng-Jie

    2013-01-01

    People have greater difficulty reading academic textbooks on screen than on paper. One notable problem is that they cannot construct an effective cognitive map because of the lack of contextual information cues and ineffective navigational mechanisms in e-books. To support the construction of cognitive maps, this paper proposes the visual cue map,…

  11. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    process. This article fills these gaps by discussing potentials and challenges in “Collective Academic Supervision”, a model for supervision at the Master of Education in Guidance at Aarhus University in Denmark. The pedagogical rationale behind the model is that students’ participation and learning...... are interconnected. Collective Academic Supervision provides possibilities for systematic interaction between individual master students in their writing process. In this process they learn core academic competencies, such as the ability to assess theoretical and practical problems in their practice and present them...... to peers. In sum CAS provides a practice in which a group of students and their supervisor learn by working together. Potentials for future research is to investigate the ways in which participants – both students and teachers - can be prepared for different modes of participation and, finally, how...

  12. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire.

  13. Bioethics and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the events surrounding his attempts to lecture on the subject of euthanasia in West Germany in June 1989. Singer, who defends the view that active euthanasia for some newborns with handicaps may be ethically permissible, had been invited to speak to professional and academic groups. Strong public protests against Singer and his topic led to the cancellation of some of his engagements, disruptions during others, and harrassment of the German academics who had invited him to speak. These incidents and the subject of euthanasia became matters of intense national debate in West Germany, but there was little public or academic support for Singer's right to be heard. Singer argues that bioethics and bioethicists must have the freedom to challenge conventional moral beliefs, and that the events in West Germany illustrate the grave danger to that freedom from religious and political intolerance.

  14. Reasoning Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Falcão, Renato Pinto de Queiroz

    2003-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia de Produção. Esta dissertação apresenta uma ferramenta de apoio à decisão, baseada na Metodologia Multicritérios de Apoio à Decisão - MCDA, através do desenvolvimento de um software denominado Reasoning Maps. O software permite, de maneira integrada, a construção de mapas cognitivos, suas diversas análises topológicas e o cadastramento e análise de alternativas. Abor...

  15. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    the applied framework, semantic restrictions, the choice of type of assessors and the validation of product separations. The applied framework concerns the response surface as presented to the assessor in different shapes, e.g. rectangular, square or round. Semantic restrictions are a part of the assessor...... instructions and influence heavily the product placements and the descriptive vocabulary (Dehlholm et.al., 2012b). The type of assessors performing the method influences results with an extra aspect in Projective Mapping compared to more analytical tests, as the given spontaneous perceptions are much dependent...

  16. A Study on Academic Achievement and Personality of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, V. D.; Ganesha Bhata, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study is concerned with the Academic Achievement and Personality of 300 students of secondary schools of Mandya city. The Raven's Standard Progress Matrices was used to obtain the Academic Scores and Eysenk Personality Inventory was used to collect data regarding their Personality. Result reflects that there is negligible positive…

  17. Implications of Academic Literacies Research for Knowledge Making and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Moragh; Frith, Vera

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the issue of what academic literacies research can bring to the study of knowledge and curriculum in higher education from a theoretical perspective and by means of illustrations from a work in progress academic literacies research project in the natural sciences. It argues that reading and writing are central to the process…

  18. The Role of Parents in College Students' Sociopolitical Awareness, Academic, and Social Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Casandra E.; Sax, Linda J.; Wolf, De'Sha S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental contact (frequency of student-parent communication) and involvement (parents' interest and/or involvement in students' academic progress and decision-making) with college students' personal, social, and academic development. Parental involvement accounted for over two-thirds of the significant…

  19. Effects of Cooperative Learning on the Social Acceptance of Mainstreamed Academically Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Nancy A.; Slavin, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Six classes enrolling academically handicapped and normal-progress elementary students were randomly assigned to study mathematics cooperatively or under a traditional classroom structure. Results indicated that cooperative techniques improved social acceptance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (Author/CL)

  20. Longitudinal Test of a Social Cognitive Model of Academic and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singley, Daniel B.; Lent, Robert W.; Sheu, Hung-Bin

    2010-01-01

    The authors tested a social cognitive model of academic and overall life satisfaction in a sample of 769 university students. The predictors, drawn from Lent's unifying perspective on well-being and psychosocial adjustment, included social cognitive (academic self-efficacy, goal progress, social support) and personality (trait positive affect)…

  1. The Relationship between Participation in Campus Recreation Programs and College Student Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Jessica E.

    2017-01-01

    The academic success of undergraduate students is necessary for degree attainment and fulfilling career goals. Universities recognize factors that affect academic achievement and promote strategies that support satisfactory grades, progression through degree programs, and graduation for students. It is essential to determine predictors of success…

  2. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organi......Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...... their performance....

  3. #IWD2016 Academic Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2016-01-01

    What academics or books have inspired you in your writing and research, or helped to make sense of the world around you? In this feature essay, Ninna Meier returns to her experience of reading Hannah Arendt as she sought to understand work and how it relates to value production in capitalist...... economies. Meier recounts how Arendt’s book On Revolution (1963) forged connective threads between the ‘smallest parts’ and the ‘largest wholes’ and showed how academic work is never fully relegated to the past, but can return in new iterations across time....

  4. The Future of Dental Schools in Research Universities and Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Laurie K

    2017-09-01

    As a profession, dentistry is at a point of discernible challenge as well as incredible opportunity in a landscape of evolving changes to health care, higher education, and evidence-based decision making. Respecting the past yet driving forward, a well-mapped future course is critical. Orchestrating this course in a collaborative manner is essential for the visibility, well-being, and potentially the existence of the dental profession. The research performed in dental institutions needs to be contemporary, aligned with biomedical science in general, and united with other disciplines. Dentistry is at risk of attrition in the quality of its research and discovery mission if participation with bioscience colleagues in the collaborative generation of new knowledge is underoptimized. A fundamental opportunity dentistry has is to contribute via its position in academic health centers. Rigorous research as to the impact of interprofessional education and collaborative care on population health outcomes provides significant potential for the dental profession to participate and/or lead such evidence-centered efforts. It is imperative that academic dental institutions are part of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary organizations that move health care into its new day. Strategizing diversity by bringing together people who have different ways of seeing problems to share perspectives, heuristics, interpretations, technologies, and predictive models across disciplines will lead to impactful progress. Academic dental institutions are a natural part of an emphasis on translational research and acceleration of implementing new scientific discoveries. Dentistry needs to remain an essential and integrated component of higher education in the health professions; doing so necessitates deliberate, respectful, and committed change. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  5. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  6. Smart Tools for Academic Information Seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva Koponen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systematic information seeking is an essential part of academic work. Research and information seeking go hand in hand, and both need planning. In the academic world you can hardly avoid the research plan, but you probably won’t hear that much about the information seeking plan. The information seeking plan guides you through the research process from the first sparks of an idea to the last dot in the bibliography from the point of view of the often invisible process of systematic information seeking. Systematic Information Seeking Framework designed in the Jyväskylä University Library has its roots in Carol Kuhlthau's Guided Inquiry Design Process. Our model, designed for more contextual adjustability, is presented in our Library Tutorial (https://koppa.jyu.fi/avoimet/kirjasto/en/library-tutorial, an open self-study material. The process starts with “Defining the topic and finding search terms”. This stage requires extensive reading about the subject matter, understanding the basic differences between everyday knowledge and scientific knowledge and distinguishing information resources for different kinds of needs. Analysis of concepts and understanding of their contextuality are at the core of scientific knowledge. With the information seeking plan and a mind map one can work on the search terms, discover connections and construct search statements for different resources and the search strategies they require. The second section is about “Finding sources”, which students often understand as the starting point for systematic information seeking. Knowledge of the publication cultures in different disciplines guide the information seeker to the different types of sources needed. Finally, “Citing and managing references”. One of the most essential skills in all academic work is the appropriate use of scientific sources, citing and managing references correctly. As academic dishonesty hurts the whole community, academic fraud, e

  7. Impact of CNG Crisis on Student's Academic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Kiran; Nadeem, Wajiha; Zia, Afsa; Shehzad, Shiza; Anwar, Zara

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the impact of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) crisis on Student's Academic Life of Karachi Pakistan. This research helps in observing the behavior of students and their educational progress includes depression and anxiety, rate of absenteeism and undesirable results in exams threatens due to CNG crisis and…

  8. Creation and use of knowledge management in academic libraries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It concluded and recommended that existing information technological infrastructure should be upgraded, including organization‟s intranet and extranet to facilitate the capturing, organizing, storage and sharing of both explicit and tacit knowledge for the overall progress and development of academic libraries as well as its ...

  9. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  10. Consumption in Action. Mapping Consumerism in International Academic Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pattaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumer-citizen and more generally, the emergence of active forms of citizenship mediated by consumption point to a change in the relations of production, consumption and distribution. These forms of citizenship come to encompass opposite poles of consumption such as hedonism and social responsibility. When consumption choices are associated with the social and environmental issues connected to manufacturing and distribution processes, the space claimed by the active consumer comes to represents a form of social identity recognition. This ‘political’ sphere, made up of individual and/or collective claims mediated by consumer society comes in the wake of a long period of market de-politicization. On the basis of these assumptions, this article surveys and evaluates the topics related to critical consumption that are most discussed in the social sciences. Such forms of socially oriented consumption – enacted in the form of individual or collective consumer choices – represent a new form of political participation and are understood as practices of active-citizenship promotion. The findings of this article are based on data gathered from 478 peer-reviewed articles published between 2004 and 2013. The articles were selected from Scopus on the basis of their broad connection to critical consumerism and forms of socially oriented consumerism. A software-based content analysis run through T-Lab software was used to generate an analytical model of the main research axis of the most recent international literature on these arguments. The heterogeneous body of scholarly literature on socially oriented consumption reflects the rich diversity of perspectives adopted to understand the political and ethical role of consumers in contemporary societies

  11. Mapping Frontier Research in the Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whereas the classical sciences were organized around academic disciplines, knowledge production today is increasingly interdisciplinary and distributed across a variety of societal sectors. Classical disciplines have not only specialized and multiplied; they are increasingly interacting with extra-academic...... diversity, the volume outlines reasons for optimism on the potentials of the current hybrid university system. Drawing on a number of case studies and conceptual-empirical mappings of the humanities in Denmark and beyond, and avoiding simple metrics, the volume opens for an appreciation of different types...

  12. The gastrointestinal electrical mapping suite (GEMS): software for analyzing and visualizing high-resolution (multi-electrode) recordings in spatiotemporal detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Rita; O'Grady, Gregory; Paskaranandavadivel, Nira; Du, Peng; Angeli, Timothy R; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K; Erickson, Jonathan C

    2012-06-06

    Gastrointestinal contractions are controlled by an underlying bioelectrical activity. High-resolution spatiotemporal electrical mapping has become an important advance for investigating gastrointestinal electrical behaviors in health and motility disorders. However, research progress has been constrained by the low efficiency of the data analysis tasks. This work introduces a new efficient software package: GEMS (Gastrointestinal Electrical Mapping Suite), for analyzing and visualizing high-resolution multi-electrode gastrointestinal mapping data in spatiotemporal detail. GEMS incorporates a number of new and previously validated automated analytical and visualization methods into a coherent framework coupled to an intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. GEMS is implemented using MATLAB®, which combines sophisticated mathematical operations and GUI compatibility. Recorded slow wave data can be filtered via a range of inbuilt techniques, efficiently analyzed via automated event-detection and cycle clustering algorithms, and high quality isochronal activation maps, velocity field maps, amplitude maps, frequency (time interval) maps and data animations can be rapidly generated. Normal and dysrhythmic activities can be analyzed, including initiation and conduction abnormalities. The software is distributed free to academics via a community user website and forum (http://sites.google.com/site/gimappingsuite). This software allows for the rapid analysis and generation of critical results from gastrointestinal high-resolution electrical mapping data, including quantitative analysis and graphical outputs for qualitative analysis. The software is designed to be used by non-experts in data and signal processing, and is intended to be used by clinical researchers as well as physiologists and bioengineers. The use and distribution of this software package will greatly accelerate efforts to improve the understanding of the causes and clinical consequences of

  13. The gastrointestinal electrical mapping suite (GEMS: software for analyzing and visualizing high-resolution (multi-electrode recordings in spatiotemporal detail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassi Rita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal contractions are controlled by an underlying bioelectrical activity. High-resolution spatiotemporal electrical mapping has become an important advance for investigating gastrointestinal electrical behaviors in health and motility disorders. However, research progress has been constrained by the low efficiency of the data analysis tasks. This work introduces a new efficient software package: GEMS (Gastrointestinal Electrical Mapping Suite, for analyzing and visualizing high-resolution multi-electrode gastrointestinal mapping data in spatiotemporal detail. Results GEMS incorporates a number of new and previously validated automated analytical and visualization methods into a coherent framework coupled to an intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. GEMS is implemented using MATLAB®, which combines sophisticated mathematical operations and GUI compatibility. Recorded slow wave data can be filtered via a range of inbuilt techniques, efficiently analyzed via automated event-detection and cycle clustering algorithms, and high quality isochronal activation maps, velocity field maps, amplitude maps, frequency (time interval maps and data animations can be rapidly generated. Normal and dysrhythmic activities can be analyzed, including initiation and conduction abnormalities. The software is distributed free to academics via a community user website and forum (http://sites.google.com/site/gimappingsuite. Conclusions This software allows for the rapid analysis and generation of critical results from gastrointestinal high-resolution electrical mapping data, including quantitative analysis and graphical outputs for qualitative analysis. The software is designed to be used by non-experts in data and signal processing, and is intended to be used by clinical researchers as well as physiologists and bioengineers. The use and distribution of this software package will greatly accelerate efforts to improve the

  14. Productive procrastination: academic procrastination style predicts academic and alcohol outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Erin C.; Wormington, Stephanie V.; Oleson, Kathryn C.; Lindgren, Kristen P.

    2017-01-01

    Productive procrastination replaces one adaptive behavior with another adaptive—albeit less important—behavior (e.g., organizing notes instead of studying for an exam). We identified adaptive and maladaptive procrastination styles associated with academic and alcohol outcomes in 1106 college undergraduates. Cluster analysis identified five academic procrastination styles—non-procrastinators, academic productive procrastinators, non-academic productive procrastinators, non-academic procrastinators, and classic procrastinators. Procrastination style differentially predicted alcohol-related problems, cravings, risk of alcohol use disorders, and GPA (all ps procrastination and academic productive procrastination were most adaptive overall; non-academic productive procrastination, non-academic procrastination, and classic procrastination were least adaptive. Productive procrastination differed from other procrastination strategies, and maladaptive procrastination styles may be a useful risk indicator for preventative and intervention efforts. PMID:28804158

  15. Productive procrastination: academic procrastination style predicts academic and alcohol outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Erin C; Wormington, Stephanie V; Oleson, Kathryn C; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2017-03-01

    Productive procrastination replaces one adaptive behavior with another adaptive-albeit less important-behavior (e.g., organizing notes instead of studying for an exam). We identified adaptive and maladaptive procrastination styles associated with academic and alcohol outcomes in 1106 college undergraduates. Cluster analysis identified five academic procrastination styles- non-procrastinators , academic productive procrastinators , non-academic productive procrastinators, non-academic procrastinators , and classic procrastinators . Procrastination style differentially predicted alcohol-related problems, cravings, risk of alcohol use disorders, and GPA (all ps procrastination and academic productive procrastination were most adaptive overall; non-academic productive procrastination, non-academic procrastination, and classic procrastination were least adaptive. Productive procrastination differed from other procrastination strategies, and maladaptive procrastination styles may be a useful risk indicator for preventative and intervention efforts.

  16. Academic interventions for academic procrastination: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacks, Shlomo; Hen, Meirav

    2018-01-01

    Procrastination is a widespread phenomenon in academic settings. It has been studied from many different theoretical angles, and a variety of causes and consequences have been suggested. Recent studies support the notion that academic procrastination can be seen from a situational perspective and as a failure in learning self-regulation. It suggests that interventions should address situational as well as deficits in self-regulation to help students overcome their procrastinating tendencies. The present review examined the recent literature on causes and consequences of academic procrastination and the limited number of studies of academic interventions for academic procrastination. Findings of this review strengthen the need to further study the topic of academic interventions for academic procrastination and to develop effective interventions. At the end of this review, several suggestions for the development of academic interventions are outlined.

  17. Summary of Research 1997, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boger, Dan

    1999-01-01

    This report contains information of research projects in the interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group, Information Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic...

  18. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  19. The Academic Chairperson's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    This book champions the importance of chairing an academic department (or division) and focuses attention on the strategies "excellent" chairs use in building a positive work environment for faculty and releasing individual faculty potential. The framework is based on human, organizational, and career development; systems theory; and interpersonal…

  20. Kompetenceprofil for academic developers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Rie; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    gerne vil udføre? Vi vil også diskutere hvilke positive og negative konsekvenser en (mulig fælles nordisk) kompetenceprofil kunne få.Referencer:Ansela, M. & Maikkola, M. (2007). ACADEMIC DEVELOPER’S COMPETENCE-BASED DESCRIPTION:Core and basic competences. Retrieved 22/01/15 at http://www.peda-forum.fi/index.php...

  1. Reframing Academic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, Lee G.; Gallos, Joan V.

    2011-01-01

    In "Reframing Academic Leadership," the authors offer higher education leaders a provocative and pragmatic guide for: (1) Crafting dynamic institutions where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts; (2) Creating campus environments that facilitate creativity and commitment; (3) Forging alliances and partnerships in service of the mission;…

  2. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  3. The academic rat race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour...

  4. Academic Nightmares: Predatory Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E.; Rogers, Kem A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic researchers who seek to publish their work are confronted daily with a barrage of e-mails from aggressive marketing campaigns that solicit them to publish their research with a specialized, often newly launched, journal. Known as predatory journals, they often promise high editorial and publishing standards, yet their exploitive business…

  5. Towards Transnational Academic Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to current debates on the relationship between globalisation and higher education. The main argument of the paper is that we are currently witnessing transnationalisation of academic capitalism. This argument is illustrated by examining the collaboration between transnational corporations and research universities, and how…

  6. Participatory academic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Janus Holst; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    2015-01-01

    understanding of participation in edu-cation can move educatees’ learning beyond institutions through focusing on educatees as researchers, participat-ing in society, building a research community and obtaining academic citizenship. Further, the article discusses how a value-based, vision-driven approach...

  7. Academic Engagement and Commercialisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkmann, Markus; Tartari, Valentina; McKelvey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    A considerable body of work highlights the relevance of collaborative research, contract research, consulting and informal relationships for university–industry knowledge transfer. We present a systematic review of research on academic scientists’ involvement in these activities to which we refer...

  8. Why Do Academics Use Academic Social Networking Sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Pieterse, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Academic social-networking sites (ASNS) such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate are becoming very popular among academics. These sites allow uploading academic articles, abstracts, and links to published articles; track demand for published articles, and engage in professional interaction. This study investigates the nature of the use and the…

  9. The Effect of Academic Advising on Academic Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although academic advising in Kenyan universities exists, no research has been done to find out how it impacts on students' educational and career goals. This research aimed at establishing the effect of academic advising on academic performance and the influence of year of study and gender on students' tendency to ...

  10. Is Your Academic Library Pinning? Academic Libraries and Pinterest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Academic libraries are flocking to online social networking sites in an effort to meet users where they are. Pinterest is the latest of these rapidly growing online social networking tools. The author of this article reports results from a survey on academic libraries' presence on Pinterest. The survey found most academic library pinboards are in…

  11. Arithmetic Progressions on Conics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciss, Abdoul Aziz; Moody, Dustin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we look at long arithmetic progressions on conics. By an arithmetic progression on a curve, we mean the existence of rational points on the curve whose x -coordinates are in arithmetic progression. We revisit arithmetic progressions on the unit circle, constructing 3-term progressions of points in the first quadrant containing an arbitrary rational point on the unit circle. We also provide infinite families of three term progressions on the unit hyperbola, as well as conics ax 2 + cy 2 = 1 containing arithmetic progressions as long as 8 terms.

  12. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  13. Effect of Software Designed by Computer Conceptual Map Method in Mobile Environment on Learning Level of Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmani N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In order to preserve its own progress, nursing training has to be utilized new training methods, in such a case that the teaching methods used by the nursing instructors enhance significant learning via preventing superficial learning in the students. Conceptual Map Method is one of the new training strategies playing important roles in the field. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the designed software based on the mobile phone computer conceptual map on the learning level of the nursing students. Materials & Methods: In the semi-experimental study with pretest-posttest plan, 60 students, who were studying at the 5th semester, were studied at the 1st semester of 2015-16. Experimental group (n=30 from Meibod Nursing Faculty and control group (n=30 from Yazd Shahid Sadoughi Nursing Faculty were trained during the first 4 weeks of the semester, using computer conceptual map method and computer conceptual map method in mobile phone environment. Data was collected, using a researcher-made academic progress test including “knowledge” and “significant learning”. Data was analyzed in SPSS 21 software using Independent T, Paired T, and Fisher tests. Findings: There were significant increases in the mean scores of knowledge and significant learning in both groups before and after the intervention (p0.05. Nevertheless, the process of change of the scores of significant learning level between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05.   Conclusion: Presenting the course content as conceptual map in mobile phone environment positively affects the significant learning of the nursing students.

  14. Incremental validity of emotional intelligence ability in predicting academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    We tested the incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence (El) in predicting academic achievement in undergraduate students, controlling for cognitive abilities and personality traits. Academic achievement has been conceptualized in terms of the number of exams, grade point average, and study time taken to prepare for each exam. Additionally, gender differences were taken into account in these relationships. Participants filled in the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, the reduced version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and academic achievement measures. Results showed that El abilities were positively related to academic achievement indices, such as the number of exams and grade point average; total El ability and the Perceiving branch were negatively associated with the study time spent preparing for exams. Furthermore, El ability adds a percentage of incremental variance with respect to cognitive ability and personality variables in explaining scholastic success. The magnitude of the associations between El abilities and academic achievement measures was generally higher for men than for women. Jointly considered, the present findings support the incremental validity of the MSCEIT and provide positive indications of the importance of El in students' academic development. The helpfulness of El training in the context of academic institutions is discussed.

  15. Hardiness commitment, gender, and age differentiate university academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The increasing diversity of students, particularly in age, attending university has seen a concomitant interest in factors predicting academic success. This 2-year correlational study examined whether age, gender (demographic variables), and hardiness (cognitive/emotional variable) differentiate and predict university final degree grade point average (GPA) and final-year dissertation mark. Data are reported from a total of 134 university undergraduate students. Participants provided baseline data in questionnaires administered during the first week of their second year of undergraduate study and gave consent for their academic progress to be tracked. Final degree GPA and dissertation mark were the academic performance criteria. Mature-age students achieved higher final degree GPA compared to young undergraduates. Female students significantly outperformed their male counterparts in each measured academic assessment criteria. Female students also reported a significantly higher mean score on hardiness commitment compared to male students. commitment was the most significant positive correlate of academic achievement. Final degree GPA and dissertation mark were significantly predicted by commitment, and commitment and gender, respectively. The findings have implications for universities targeting academic support services to maximize student scholastic potential. Future research should incorporate hardiness, gender, and age with other variables known to predict academic success.

  16. Climate economics in progress 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Perthuis, Christian; Jouvet, Pierre-Andre; Trotignon, Raphael; Simonet, Gabriela; Boutueil, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    Climate Economics in Progress offers a global overview of the present status of action on climate change. Drawing on the most recent data, it analyzes the development of carbon markets in Europe and other parts of the world. It also examines the conditions for including major players such as China and new sectors such as agriculture, forestry and transport in the fight against global warming. The book is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand current advances in climate control, which could pave the way for a new form of economic growth. The book brings together a group of researchers whose goal is to make the link between academic research on the economics of climate change and the implementation of operational tools, thereby allowing the climate issue to be integrated into the functioning of the real economy

  17. Curriculum Mapping of the Master’s Program in Pharmacy in Slovenia with the PHAR-QA Competency Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmeiner, Tanja; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja; Obreza, Aleš; Vovk, Tomaž; Grabnar, Iztok; Božič, Borut

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of mapping the Slovenian pharmacy curriculum to evaluate the adequacy of the recently developed and validated European Pharmacy Competences Framework (EPCF). The mapping was carried out and evaluated progressively by seven members of the teaching staff at the University of Ljubljana’s Faculty of Pharmacy. Consensus was achieved by using a two-round modified Delphi technique to evaluate the coverage of competences in the current curriculum. The preliminary results of the curriculum mapping showed that all of the competences as defined by the EPCF are covered in Ljubljana’s academic program. However, because most EPCF competences cover healthcare-oriented pharmacy practice, a lack of competences was observed for the drug development and production perspectives. Both of these perspectives are important because a pharmacist is (or should be) responsible for the entire process, from the development and production of medicines to pharmaceutical care in contact with patients. Nevertheless, Ljubljana’s graduates are employed in both of these pharmaceutical professions in comparable proportions. The Delphi study revealed that the majority of differences in scoring arise from different perspectives on the pharmacy profession (e.g., community, hospital, industrial, etc.). Nevertheless, it can be concluded that curriculum mapping using the EPCF is very useful for evaluating and recognizing weak and strong points of the curriculum. However, the competences of the framework should address various fields of the pharmacist’s profession in a more balanced way. PMID:28970436

  18. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    OpenAIRE

    N. Jayakumar; M. Surudhi

    2016-01-01

    In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried o...

  19. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their scientific interests. This study provides valuable insights to federal and institutional policiescreated to foster industry-academia partnerships and commercialization of academic research.

  20. The Mismeasure of Academic Labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    In quantifying and qualifying the scope of academic labour, workload models serve multiple ends. They are intended to facilitate equitable and transparent divisions of academic work, to provide academics with a sense of whether their workload is reasonable relative to their colleagues, and universities with a mechanism for rationalising the…

  1. Economic Status of Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Robert; Young, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines some of the factors affecting the current economic status of academic librarians, as well as the history of changes in that economic picture. Issues discussed include the ranking of beginning academic librarian salaries in comparison to others in the profession, historical differences between academic librarian salaries and…

  2. Predicting Academic Entitlement in Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara; Boswell, Stefanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Academic entitlement (AE) is a common source of frustration for college personnel. This investigation examined predictors (self-concept, academic dishonesty, locus of control, and family functioning) of AE in male and female college students. Academic dishonesty and the interaction between locus of control and family functioning significantly…

  3. Understanding Academic Identity through Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Jennie; King, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Metaphors used by higher education teachers in their narratives of academic life provide insight into aspects of academic identity. Drawing on an international study of leader/follower dynamics, the teachers' narratives reveal how academics interpret their interactions with leaders; the perceived distance between expectations and experience, and…

  4. Life Stress and Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Huang, Yun-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been shown to negatively affect learning. Academic burnout is a significant problem associated with poor academic performance. Although there has been increased attention on these two issues, literature on the relationship between students' life stress and burnout is relatively limited. This study surveys academic burnout and life…

  5. Another Discussion about Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changgeng, Li

    2007-01-01

    Academic corruption is a commonplace matter about which all people are clearly aware. However, people often overlook many hidden or latent manifestations of academic corruption. This article discusses eight of these manifestations: indiscriminate use of the academic team spirit, the proliferation of "word games," deliberate attacks on…

  6. Academic Dishonesty in Medical Schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drive academic dishonesty among aspiring doctors. Objective: To establish the factors driving academic dishonesty ... academic dishonesty in the Medical School made it. 86.3% likely that a student would participate. Having .... on Plagiarism and Cheating, in Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in the.

  7. Usability Evaluation of Public Web Mapping Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.

    2014-04-01

    Web mapping sites are interactive maps that are accessed via Webpages. With the rapid development of Internet and Geographic Information System (GIS) field, public web mapping sites are not foreign to people. Nowadays, people use these web mapping sites for various reasons, in that increasing maps and related map services of web mapping sites are freely available for end users. Thus, increased users of web mapping sites led to more usability studies. Usability Engineering (UE), for instance, is an approach for analyzing and improving the usability of websites through examining and evaluating an interface. In this research, UE method was employed to explore usability problems of four public web mapping sites, analyze the problems quantitatively and provide guidelines for future design based on the test results. Firstly, the development progress for usability studies were described, and simultaneously several usability evaluation methods such as Usability Engineering (UE), User-Centered Design (UCD) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) were generally introduced. Then the method and procedure of experiments for the usability test were presented in detail. In this usability evaluation experiment, four public web mapping sites (Google Maps, Bing maps, Mapquest, Yahoo Maps) were chosen as the testing websites. And 42 people, who having different GIS skills (test users or experts), gender (male or female), age and nationality, participated in this test to complete the several test tasks in different teams. The test comprised three parts: a pretest background information questionnaire, several test tasks for quantitative statistics and progress analysis, and a posttest questionnaire. The pretest and posttest questionnaires focused on gaining the verbal explanation of their actions qualitatively. And the design for test tasks targeted at gathering quantitative data for the errors and problems of the websites. Then, the results mainly from the test part were analyzed. The

  8. Computer Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Academic Procrastination on College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Rahardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination is fairly and commonly found among college students. The lack of understanding in making the best use of computer technology may lead to anxiety in terms of operating computer hence cause postponement in completing course assignments related to computer operation. On the other hand, failure in achieving certain academic targets as expected by parents and/or the students themselves also makes students less focused and leads to tendency of postponing many completions of course assignments. The aim of this research is to investigate contribution of anxiety in operating computer and academic stress toward procrastination on students. As much as 65 students majoring in psychology became participants in this study. The results showed that anxiety in operating computer and academic stress play significant role in influencing academic procrastination among social sciences students. In terms of academic procrastination tendencies, anxiety in operating computer and academic stress, male students have higher percentage than female students.

  9. SOA and Web Technology for Building BSE Market Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu VINTE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation as a map of the stock market data can offer access, in a quick and rele-vant manner for human participants, to the overall state of the market at a given point in time. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of our academic research upon building the market map for Bucharest Stock Exchange (BSE. We will focus on the algorithm for generat-ing the market map, the system architecture, and web technology employed for capturing the required data and making the map publicly available through the portal www.bursa.ase.ro. Mathematics Subject Classification: 68M14 (Distributed Systems

  10. From ERPs to academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Charles H; Pontifex, Matthew B; Motl, Robert W; O'Leary, Kevin C; Johnson, Christopher R; Scudder, Mark R; Raine, Lauren B; Castelli, Darla M

    2012-02-15

    Standardized tests have been used to forecast scholastic success of school-age children, and have been related to intelligence, working memory, and inhibition using neuropsychological tests. However, ERP correlates of standardized achievement have not been reported. Thus, the relationship between academic achievement and the P3 component was assessed in a sample of 105 children during performance on a Go/NoGo task. The Wide Range Achievement Test - 3rd edition was administered to assess aptitude in reading, spelling, and arithmetic. Regression analyses indicated an independent contribution of P3 amplitude to reading and arithmetic achievement beyond the variance accounted for by IQ and school grade. No such relationship was observed for spelling. These data suggest that the P3, which reflects attentional processes involved in stimulus evaluation and inhibitory control may be a biomarker for academic achievement during childhood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Academic dishonesty among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Linda

    2014-02-01

    This quantitative study identified sociodemographic and situational conditions that affected 336 nursing students' engagement in academic dishonesty, their attitudes regarding various forms of academic dishonesty, and the prevalence of academic dishonesty in which they engaged and witnessed. More than half of the participants reported cheating in the classroom and in the clinical settings. A positive relationship was found between the frequency of cheating in classroom and clinical settings. Results revealed differences in frequency of engagement in and attitudes toward academic dishonesty by gender, semester in the program, and ethnicity. Relationships were also found among peer behavior, personal beliefs and values, and frequency of engaging in academic dishonesty. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Academic Manager or Managed Academic? Academic Identity Schisms in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between values and academic identity has received scant attention in the higher education literature with some notable exceptions (Churchman, 2006; Harley, 2002; Henkel, 2005). This paper contends that the perceived need to align all academics around corporate values and goals has given rise to academic identity schisms in higher…

  13. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Academic Procrastination, Satisfaction with Academic Life and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Procrastination has become one of the most researched topics due its adverse effects on the both general and student population in social sciences. The general tendency toward delaying academic tasks has been conceptualized as academic procrastination in academic setting. It is a prevalent issue among students and a numerous students…

  14. Plagiarism in Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eugenia Rojas-Porras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social responsibility of citing the sources in a scientific or artistic work is undeniable. This paper explores, in a preliminary way, academic plagiarism in its various forms. It includes findings based on a forensic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness on the importance of considering these details when writing and publishing a text. Hopefully, this analysis may put the issue under discussion.

  15. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  16. Monuments to Academic Carelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 1942, Katherine Frost Bruner published an article titled “Of psychological writing: Being some valedictory remarks on style.” It was published in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, the journal for which she served as editorial assistant between 1937 and 1941. Her collection of advice to writing scholars has been widely quoted, including by several editions of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The most frequently quoted message in Bruner’s article deals with the importance of making sure that references in academic texts are complete and accurate. Exploring the citation history of this particular message reveals an ironic point: the great majority of those who have quoted Bruner’s words on reference accuracy have not done so accurately. The case may serve as a reminder of the importance of the basic academic principle of striving to use primary sources. The most startling finding in this study is how frequently this principle is violated, even by authors who advise and educate academic writers. PMID:28479644

  17. Towards a Common Map of Academia

    OpenAIRE

    Bolikowski, Łukasz; Nowiński, Aleksander; Sylwestrzak, Wojtek; Wendykier, Piotr; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    At Centre for Open Science, ICM UW, we are constructing a comprehensive map of academic community: a large-scale graph of semantic relations between people, documents, institutions, venues (journals, conferences, blogs), topics, funding sources, and more. The graph is being built using publicly available resources: web pages from Common Crawl, OAI-PMH compliant repositories, OA subset of PubMed Central, open databases such as DBLP and DOAJ, or metadata from the NPG Linked Data Platform. Our a...

  18. [Primary progressive apraxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Masaki

    2011-10-01

    Similar to primary progressive aphasia, primary progressive apraxia has been considered to cause slowly progressive apraxia without dementia and to be a dependent disease. Of the 3 cases reported by De Renzi in 1986, 1 case showed slowly progressive apraxia without dementia. Since then, cases of primary progressive apraxia have been reported occasionally. Studies on primary progressive apraxia indicate that not only focal lesions caused by vascular disease or brain trauma but also lesions caused by neurodegenerative disease can cause apraxia alone, thereby supporting the hypothesis that apraxia-associated neurodegeneration may develop in cases of primary progressive apraxia. The pathogenesis of primary progressive apraxia is yet to be elucidated. Clinical features of primary progressive apraxia are not precisely distinguishable from those of corticobasal degeneration (CBD); further, previous studies have indicated that the brain pathology observed in primary progressive apraxia is consistent with that in Alzheimer disease (AD) or Pick disease. "Primary" progressive apraxia may be intrinsically different from slowly progressive apraxia that is associated with CBD, AD, or Pick disease and may show specific pathological findings. On the other hand, primary progressive apraxia may not be a dependent disease but a syndrome characterized by prolonged neurodegeneration that is observed in various degenetive dementias such as CBD, AD, or Pick disease.

  19. Longitudinal Relationship between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Luís B; Marques, Adilson; Minderico, Claudia; Palmeira, António; Martins, Sandra; Santos, Diana A; Ekelund, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prospective associations between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and academic achievement in the youth. The sample included 1286 fifth-, sixth-, and seventh-grade students, age 11 to 14 yr (Mage = 11.3 ± 1.1), from 14 schools followed for 3 yr. Academic achievement was assessed using the students' marks at baseline and at follow-up 3 yr apart, in Portuguese, mathematics, foreign language (English), and science. CRF was assessed by the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run test from the Fitnessgram battery. Students were classified as fit-fit, unfit-fit, fit-unfit, and unfit-unfit according to the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run test results at baseline and follow-up. Ordinal regression analyses were performed to examine associations between CRF and academic achievement. Being persistently fit (fit-fit), compared with those classified unfit-unfit, increased the odds of having high levels of academic achievement in Portuguese (odds ratio (OR) = 3.49; 95% CI, 1.97-6.20; P achieving better marks than those persistently unfit-unfit in Portuguese (OR = 2.52; 95% CI, 1.42-4.45; P academic achievement especially in mother tongue and foreign language.

  20. Defining and Measuring Academic Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis T. York

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite, and perhaps because of its amorphous nature, the term - academic success' is one of the most widely used constructs in educational research and assessment within higher education. This paper conducts an analytic literature review to examine the use and operationalization of the term in multiple academic fields. Dominant definitions of the term are conceptually evaluated using Astin's I-E-O model resulting in the proposition of a revised definition and new conceptual model of academic success. Measurements of academic success found throughout the literature are presented in accordance with the presented model of academic success. These measurements are provided with details in a user-friendly table (Appendix B. Results also indicate that grades and GPA are the most commonly used measure of academic success. Finally, recommendations are given for future research and practice to increase effective assessment of academic success.

  1. The Role of Neighborhood Context and School Climate in School-Level Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Linda D; McMahon, Susan D; Jason, Leonard A

    2018-03-30

    In recent years, the quality of education available to children has become increasingly dependent on the social and economic demographics of neighborhoods in which the children live. This study assesses the role of community violence in explaining the relation between socio-economic status (SES) and academic outcomes and the potential of positive school climate to promote academic achievement. With a sample of 297 Chicago public elementary schools, we examine community-level and school-level data and use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to illustrate how school academic achievement coincides with neighborhood economics and crime statistics. Results support the hypothesized mediation, such that lower SES was associated with lower academic achievement, and violent crime partially mediated this relation. School climate was positively associated with academic achievement, and student safety significantly moderated the relation between SES and academic achievement. Implications for theory, research, and intervention are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2018.

  2. 78 FR 6770 - Notice of Intent To Establish an Adequate Yearly Progress Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Yearly Progress (AYP). As required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, the Secretary will select... INFORMATION: I. Background The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Act) required States to use certain academic..., referred to as an ``accountability system'') to measure academic achievement. See 20 U.S.C. 6311. The Act's...

  3. Utilisation of academic nursing competence in Europe - A survey among members of the European Academy of Nursing Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen, Tove Aminda; Olsen, Pia Riis

    2018-01-01

    academic nurses' competencies are used and in what positions. AIM: To understand the progression of nurses' academic careers following completion of the EANS Summer School and to picture how research and academic skills of the nurses are being used for research and/or other fields in nursing. METHODS: We......: The EANS Summer School is an example of an effort to improve nurses' academic competencies. The survey indicates that the competencies of academically trained nurses in Europe primarily are used in universities and educational institutions. However, a large proportion is working close...

  4. Alternative energies. Updates on progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, German

    2013-01-01

    Presents fundamental and applied research of alternative energies. Address key pillars in the alternative energy field, such as: biomass energy, hydrogen energy, solar energy, wind energy, hydroelectric power, geothermal energy and their environmental implications, with the most updated progress. Includes the life cycle assessment and thermoeconomic analysis as tools for evaluating and optimising environmental and cost subjects. This book presents nine chapters based on fundamental and applied research of alternative energies. At the present time, the challenge is that technology has to come up with solutions that can provide environmentally friendly energy supply options that are able to cover the current world energy demand. Experts around the world are working on these issues for providing new solutions that will break the existing technological barriers. This book aims to address key pillars in the alternative energy field, such as: biomass energy, hydrogen energy, solar energy, wind energy, hydroelectric power, geothermal energy and their environmental implications, with the most updated progress for each pillar. It also includes the life cycle assessment (LCA) and thermoeconomic analysis (TA) as tools for evaluating and optimising environmental and cost subjects. Chapters are organized into fundamental research, applied research and future trends; and written for engineers, academic researches and scientists.

  5. Alternative energies. Updates on progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, German (ed.) [CIRCE - Centre of Research for Energy Resources and Consumption, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    Presents fundamental and applied research of alternative energies. Address key pillars in the alternative energy field, such as: biomass energy, hydrogen energy, solar energy, wind energy, hydroelectric power, geothermal energy and their environmental implications, with the most updated progress. Includes the life cycle assessment and thermoeconomic analysis as tools for evaluating and optimising environmental and cost subjects. This book presents nine chapters based on fundamental and applied research of alternative energies. At the present time, the challenge is that technology has to come up with solutions that can provide environmentally friendly energy supply options that are able to cover the current world energy demand. Experts around the world are working on these issues for providing new solutions that will break the existing technological barriers. This book aims to address key pillars in the alternative energy field, such as: biomass energy, hydrogen energy, solar energy, wind energy, hydroelectric power, geothermal energy and their environmental implications, with the most updated progress for each pillar. It also includes the life cycle assessment (LCA) and thermoeconomic analysis (TA) as tools for evaluating and optimising environmental and cost subjects. Chapters are organized into fundamental research, applied research and future trends; and written for engineers, academic researches and scientists.

  6. Portraits of breast cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Shridar

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering analysis of microarray data is often criticized for giving ambiguous results because of sensitivity to data perturbation or clustering techniques used. In this paper, we describe a new method based on principal component analysis and ensemble consensus clustering that avoids these problems. Results We illustrate the method on a public microarray dataset from 36 breast cancer patients of whom 31 were diagnosed with at least two of three pathological stages of disease (atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC. Our method identifies an optimum set of genes and divides the samples into stable clusters which correlate with clinical classification into Luminal, Basal-like and Her2+ subtypes. Our analysis reveals a hierarchical portrait of breast cancer progression and identifies genes and pathways for each stage, grade and subtype. An intriguing observation is that the disease phenotype is distinguishable in ADH and progresses along distinct pathways for each subtype. The genetic signature for disease heterogeneity across subtypes is greater than the heterogeneity of progression from DCIS to IDC within a subtype, suggesting that the disease subtypes have distinct progression pathways. Our method identifies six disease subtype and one normal clusters. The first split separates the normal samples from the cancer samples. Next, the cancer cluster splits into low grade (pathological grades 1 and 2 and high grade (pathological grades 2 and 3 while the normal cluster is unchanged. Further, the low grade cluster splits into two subclusters and the high grade cluster into four. The final six disease clusters are mapped into one Luminal A, three Luminal B, one Basal-like and one Her2+. Conclusion We confirm that the cancer phenotype can be identified in early stage because the genes altered in this stage progressively alter further as the disease progresses through DCIS

  7. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cause different symptoms. Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include these difficulties: Comprehending spoken or written ... word meanings Naming objects Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include: Having difficulty retrieving words Frequently pausing ...

  8. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  9. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy as well as progressive mild dementia. The disorder's ... alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy as well as progressive mild dementia. The disorder's ...

  10. Progress in K spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1977-07-01

    The progress in the field of K* spectroscopy is reviewed within the framework of the simple harmonic oscillator quark model, and contrasted with the recent progress made in the charmonium spectroscopy

  11. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most prominent symptoms are clumsiness; progressive weakness; and visual, speech, and sometimes personality changes. The progression of deficits leads to life-threatening disability and (frequently) death. A diagnosis of PML can ...

  12. Guide to Academic Research Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail Neely, J; Smith, Richard J; Graboyes, Evan M; Paniello, Randal C; Paul Gubbels, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Development of an academic career easily follows a clinical course for which there are multiple role models; however, development of an academic research career involves few role models, and rarely do instructional guides reach out to the new faculty. The purpose of this article is to present the cumulative experiences of previously and currently funded authors to serve as a guide to young as well as older faculty for developing their research careers. Cumulative experiences of research-dedicated faculty. This article is the result of lessons learned from developing a Triological Society National Physician-Scientist Program and Network, as well as the cumulative experiences of the authors. Table I illustrates key elements in developing a serious research career. Table II records the career courses of five surgeon-scientists, highlighting the continued theme focus with theme-specific publications and progressive grants. These cumulative experiences have face validity but have not been objectively tested. The value added is a composite of 50 years of experiences from authors committed to research career development for themselves and others. Crucial elements in developing a research career are a desire for and commitment to high-quality research, a focus on an overall theme of progressive hypothesis-driven investigations, research guidance, a willingness to spend the time required, and an ability to learn from and withstand failure. 5.

  13. Maps & minds : mapping through the ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1984-01-01

    Throughout time, maps have expressed our understanding of our world. Human affairs have been influenced strongly by the quality of maps available to us at the major turning points in our history. "Maps & Minds" traces the ebb and flow of a few central ideas in the mainstream of mapping. Our expanding knowledge of our cosmic neighborhood stems largely from a small number of simple but grand ideas, vigorously pursued.

  14. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... and previous association studies. RESULTS: A total of 1085 subjects showed WML progression. The heritability estimate for WML progression was low at 6.5%, and no single-nucleotide polymorphisms achieved genome-wide significance (PFour loci were suggestive (P

  15. Lunar Map Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Map Catalog includes various maps of the moon's surface, including Apollo landing sites; earthside, farside, and polar charts; photography index maps; zone...

  16. STOOKE SMALL BODIES MAPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stooke Small Bodies Map collection contains maps of small solar system bodies in various projections, with and without latitude/longiude grids. The maps are...

  17. Z factor: a new index for measuring academic research output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With rapid progress in scientific research activities and growing competition for funding resources, it becomes critical to effectively evaluate an individual researcher's annual academic performance, or their cumulative performance within the last 3–5 years. It is particularly important for young independent investigators, and is also useful for funding agencies when determining the productivity and quality of grant awardees. As the funding becomes increasingly limited, having an unbiased method of measuring recent performance of an individual scientist is clearly needed. Here I propose the Z factor, a new and useful way to measure recent academic performance.

  18. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  19. The Imperative for Diversity: ARL's Progress and Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Barbara I.

    2009-01-01

    The Association of Research Libraries' diversity initiatives, under the leadership of Duane Webster and member libraries, have had a visible and long-lasting influence on the makeup of academic librarianship. ARL's accomplishments and progress in advancing diversity comprise important milestones for librarianship and did not come without…

  20. Mapping Progress : Human Rights and International Students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in international student numbers in Australia in the first decade of the  2000s was accompanied by a series of public crises. The most important of these was the outbreak in Melbourne Victoria and elsewhere of physical attacks on the students. Investigations at the time also pointed to cases of gross exploitation, an array of threats that severely compromised their human rights. This paper reviews and pursues the outcomes of a report prepared by the authors in 2010 for Universities Australia and the Human Rights Commission. The report reviewed social science research and proposed a series of priorities for human rights interventions that were part of the Human Rights Commission’s considerations.  New activity, following the innovation of having international students specifically considered by the Human Rights Commission, points to initiatives that have not fully addressed the wide range of questions at state.

  1. Entering and navigating academic medicine: academic clinician-educators' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Koshila; Roberts, Chris; Thistlethwaite, Jill

    2011-05-01

    Despite a recognised need for richer narratives about academic medicine, much of the literature is limited to an analysis of the enablers and barriers associated with recruitment and retention, and focuses on analysing the development of research career pathways. We explored academic clinician-educators' experiences of entering into and navigating academic medicine, with a particular focus on those who privilege teaching above research. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups conducted across a medical school at one Australian university. We used socio-cognitive career theory to provide theoretical insight into the factors that influence academic clinician-educators' interests, choice and motivations regarding entering and pursuing a teaching pathway within academic medicine. Framework analysis was used to illustrate key themes in the data. We identified a number of themes related to academic clinician-educators' engagement and performance within an academic medicine career focused on teaching. These include contextual factors associated with how academic medicine is structured as a discipline, cultural perceptions regarding what constitutes legitimate practice in academia, experiential factors associated with the opportunity to develop a professional identity commensurate with being an educator, and socialisation practices. The emphasis on research in academia can engender feelings of marginalisation and lack of credibility for those clinicians who favour teaching over research. The prevailing focus on supporting and socialising clinicians in research will need to change substantially to facilitate the rise of the academic clinician-educator. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  2. Academic procrastination and academic performance: An initial basis for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroshit, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Academic procrastination is a prevalent phenomenon with a range of negative outcomes. Many studies focused on causes and correlates of academic procrastination; however, the study of interventions for academic procrastination is scarce. The present study is an initial effort to study the relationship between academic procrastination, online course participation, and achievement, as a basis for developing an intervention for academic procrastination. Findings indicated that studying procrastination was negatively associated with final exam grade as well as with the three online course participation measures. Final exam grade was positively associated with two of the online course participation measures, and they positively correlated with each other. In addition, results indicated that studying procrastination, in combination with online course participation measures, explained about 50% of variance in final exam's grade. Frequency of activities in course Web site had the strongest positive effect on final exam's grade. These findings strengthen the notion that studying procrastination is an impediment to students' academic performance and outcomes and clarifies the need to develop and study academic interventions for academic procrastination as a means to decrease its prevalence in academic settings.

  3. Academic Motivations and Academic Self-Efficacy of Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Sarikoc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Academic motivation and academic self-efficacy play important roles in the learning process. They increase academic achievement and the attainment of educational goals, thus providing opportunities in the training of qualified nurses. This study was conducted to determine nursing students%u2019 academic motivation and academic self-efficacy levels. Material and Method: This is a descriptive study. A total of 346 students who are attending a nursing school as either a first, second, third, or fourth year student have been accepted in the study. The Academic Motivation Scale and Academic Self-Efficacy Scale were used to collect data. Results: The total score of the participants for extrinsic motivation was 66.52 ± 10.29, and for intrinsic motivation 64.60 ± 10.75. It was observed that freshmen have a higher level of intrinsic motivation than the sophomores and the seniors; and the extrinsic motivation of the juniors is less than all the other classes. It was determined that there is a positive self-efficacy relationship between the intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation levels of the students. Discussion: In the study we determined that there is a difference between the classes in terms of academic motivation. For this reason psychoeducational interventions may be helpful in improving the academic motivation of the students, thus producing nurses who are confident and willing to learn.

  4. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jayakumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried out to find out the possible relationship between schooling background and academic achievement of agriculture students. The students admitted in Adhiparasakthi Agricultural College, Kalavai, Vellore between 1999 and 2009 formed the subjects of the study. Findings of the study revealed that determinants like gender, type of school and stream of education had a significant role in the academic achievement of the students. Medium of instruction in HSC did influence the academic achievement but not significantly. It was also found that students who performed well in their HSC did perform well in their undergraduate programme also. This confirms that previous educational outcomes are the most important indicators of student’s future achievement and schooling background has a significant role in academic achievement of students.

  5. Mapping for Depth and Variety: Using a "Six W's" Scaffold to Facilitate Concept Mapping for Different History Concepts with Different Degrees of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jeng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how 98 students in Taiwan taking a typical high-school history class composed concept maps related to both an everyday concept and an academic-oriented unique concept with various degrees of freedom in concept mapping. In order to reveal the multidimensionality of history concepts, this study provided participants a 6W scaffold…

  6. The relationship between school absence, academic performance, and asthma status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonie, Sheniz; Sterling, David A; Figgs, Larry W; Castro, Mario

    2008-03-01

    Children with asthma experience more absenteeism from school compared with their nonasthma peers. Excessive absenteeism is related to lower student grades, psychological, social, and educational adjustment. Less is known about the relationship between the presence of asthma and the academic achievement in school-aged children. Since students with asthma miss more days from school, this may negatively impact their academic achievement. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between absenteeism, presence of asthma, and asthma severity level with standardized test level performance in a predominantly African American urban school district. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 3812 students (aged 8-17 years) who took the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) standardized test during the 2002-2003 academic year. After adjustment for covariates, a significant inverse relationship was found between absenteeism and test level performance on the MAP standardized test in all children (F = 203.9, p achievement between those with and without asthma (p = .12). Though not statistically different, those with persistent asthma showed a modestly increased likelihood of scoring below Nearing Proficient compared with those with mild intermittent asthma (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence intervals = 0.93-4.01, p = .08). A negative impact of absenteeism on standardized test level achievement was demonstrated in children from an urban African American school district. Children with asthma perform the same academically as their nonasthma peers. However, those with persistent asthma show a trend of performing worse on MAP standardized test scores and have more absence days compared with other students. More research is warranted on the effects of persistent asthma on academic achievement.

  7. The academic rat race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour......, and entailing a self-defeating and hence counter-productive pattern, where more publications is always better and where it becomes increasingly difficult for researchers to keep up with the new research in their field. The article identifies the pressure to publish as a problem of collective action. It ends up...

  8. A monotonicity conjecture for real cubic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Galeeva, R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Milnor, J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tresser, C. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This will be an outline of work in progress. We study the conjecture that the topological entropy of a real cubic map depends ``monotonely`` on its parameters, in the sense that each locus of constant entropy in parameter space is a connected set. This material will be presented in more detail in a later paper.

  9. Summary of Research 1995, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups (Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group)

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Academic Groups

    1995-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. This report contains information of research projects in the four interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group, which were carried out under funding of the Naval Postgraduate School Research...

  10. Academic Freedom in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokay GEDİKOĞLU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the concept ‘academic freedom’ is discussed, its implications and value for the academics, institutions of higher education, and the society are focused, and a few suggestions for the Turkish higher education are made. Academic freedom is defined as the freedom of the academic staff to look for and to find the truth in their scientific field, to publish the findings, and to teach these findings to their students without any external intervention. The concept has gained a further definition with inclusion of research activities into academic freedom as part of the reform attempts started in the German higher education in the 19th century. Therefore, academic freedom is at the very core of the missions of the institutions of higher education; that is, teaching-learning and research. On the point of academic staff and their academic activities of the academic freedom, the subjects such as the aim of the course, choosing the teaching materials and textbooks, the lecturer, and the criteria for the measurement and evaluation of the course take place. And he point of research covers the aim of the study, academicians can’t be imposed the involve in an academic and artistic studies that conflict their values and beliefs; researchers should comply with codes of ethical principles and practices during the process of researching; and research outputs should be reported accurately and honestly without any misleading manipulation. Academic freedom does not provide any exemption from accountability in academic activities of the faculty, nor does it provide any right to act against the well-being of the society, current laws and regulations, and codes of ethical principles and practices.

  11. Peer effects in academic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the data of dormitory students in National Institute of Technology, Kagoshima College to demonstrate the existence of peer effects in academic performance. The data have unique advantages to avoid the difficulties of the self-selection problem and reflection problem. The data shows freshmen's academic performance and previous year's junior high school records, and roommate's previous year's academic performance for using an instrumental variable method. The results of my...

  12. Project MAP: Model Accounting Plan for Special Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Robert J.

    The Model Accounting Plan (MAP) is a demographic accounting system designed to meet three major goals related to improving planning, evaluation, and monitoring of special education programs. First, MAP provides local-level data for administrators and parents to monitor the progress, transition patterns, expected attainments, and associated costs…

  13. Analysis of the chicken genome : mapping of monogenic traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter-Spira, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    The development of genetic linkage maps in farm animals is progressing rapidly. Linkage maps can be used to identify genetic loci responsible for genetic variation in traits of economic importance. The ultimate goal is to find the underlying genes involved in these traits. To achieve this,

  14. Concept Mapping for Critical Thinking: Efficacy, Timing, & Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles M.; Zha, Shenghua

    2017-01-01

    Many college students are not progressing in the development of their critical thinking skills. Concept mapping is a technique for facilitating validation of one's critical thinking by graphically depicting the structure of complex concepts. Each of our three studies of concept mapping involved approximately 240 students enrolled in four sections…

  15. How are number words mapped to approximate magnitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jessica; Barner, David

    2013-01-01

    How do we map number words to the magnitudes they represent? While much is known about the developmental trajectory of number word learning, the acquisition of the counting routine, and the academic correlates of estimation ability, previous studies have yet to describe the mechanisms that link number words to nonverbal representations of number. We investigated two mechanisms: associative mapping and structure mapping. Four dot array estimation tasks found that adults' ability to match a number word to one of two discriminably different sets declined as a function of set size and that participants' estimates of relatively large, but not small, set sizes were influenced by misleading feedback during an estimation task. We propose that subjects employ structure mappings for linking relatively large number words to set sizes, but rely chiefly on item-by-item associative mappings for smaller sets. These results indicate that both inference and association play important roles in mapping number words to approximate magnitudes.

  16. Academic achievement one year after resective epilepsy surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puka, Klajdi; Khattab, Maryam; Kerr, Elizabeth N; Smith, Mary Lou

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have examined the academic functioning of children following pediatric epilepsy surgery. Although intellectual functioning has been more thoroughly investigated, children with epilepsy may experience additional difficulties with academic skills. This study examined the academic outcomes of a cohort of children who underwent pediatric epilepsy surgery on an average 1.2 (standard deviation [SD]: 0.3) years prior. Participants were 136 children (mean age: 14.3 years, [SD]: 3.7 years) who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery. Academic functioning was assessed presurgery and postsurgery using standardized tests of reading, reading comprehension, arithmetic, and spelling. At baseline, 65% of the children displayed low achievement (1 SD below test mean), and 28% had underachievement (1 SD below baseline IQ) in at least one academic domain. Examining change over time revealed that reading, numeral operations, and spelling significantly declined among all patients; seizure freedom at follow-up (attained in 64% of the patients) did not influence this relationship. Reading comprehension and IQ remained unchanged. Similar findings were found when examining patients with a baseline IQ of ≥ 70 and when controlling for IQ. Regression analyses revealed that after controlling for IQ, demographic and seizure-related variables were not significantly associated with academic achievement at follow-up. Results show baseline academic difficulties and deteriorations following surgery that go beyond IQ. Further investigations are required to determine whether the observed deteriorations result from the development of the child, the course of the disorder, or the epilepsy surgery itself. Long-term studies are warranted to identify the progression of academic achievement and whether the observed deteriorations represent a temporal disruption in function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-directional influence between peer relationships and academic achievement. In other words, the quality of peer relationships affects academic achievement, and conversely, academic achievement affects the quality of peer relationships. For example, socially accepted children exhibiting prosocial, cooperative and responsible forms of behavior in school most frequently have high academic achievement. On the other hand, children rejected by their peers often have lower academic achievement and are a risk group tending to delinquency, absenteeism and drop out of school. Those behavioral and interpersonal forms of competence are frequently more reliable predictors of academic achievement than intellectual abilities are. Considering the fact that various patterns of peer interaction differently exert influence on students' academic behavior, the paper analyzed effects of (a social competence, (b social acceptance/rejection, (c child's friendships and (d prosocial behavior on academic achievement.

  18. Detection of progression of glaucomatous retinal nerve fibre layer defects using optical coherence tomography-guided progression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Hoon; Kim, Min Kyung; Wi, Jae Min; Chung, Jae Keun; Lee, Kwan Bok

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the agreement for detection of progression of glaucomatous retinal nerve fibre layer defects (RNFLD) between optical coherence tomography-guided progression analysis (OCT GPA) and conventional red-free fundus photography. Four hundred and fifteen glaucomatous eyes that underwent at least four serial red-free photographic and OCT examinations were included in the study. Based on the inspection of the red-free fundus photographs and GPA maps, RNFLD progression was defined as the development of a new defect, widening or deepening of a pre-existing RNFLD in red-free fundus photography (photographic progression) or 'Likely Loss' on a GPA map (GPA progression). The agreement of photographic and OCT GPA progression and the factors influencing it, including refractive error, severity of glaucoma (mean deviation of the visual field), type of RNFLD (localised versus diffuse), width of the baseline RNFLD, type of RNFLD progression (new defect, widening, deepening) and location of RNFLD progression (clock-hour sector) were assessed. Among the 415 eyes, 82 (19.8 per cent) showed photographic or GPA progression. Among the 82 eyes with progression, progression was detected only in red-free fundus photography in nine (11.0 per cent) eyes and only in GPA in 32 (39.0 per cent) eyes. In 41 eyes (50.0 per cent), progression was detected with both methods. Detection of RNFLD progression only in GPA was associated with a higher myopia, diffuse RNFLD, deepening of the RNFLD and RNFLD progression at the 6, 9 and 12 o'clock positions (p < 0.05). OCT GPA may be a useful supplement to conventional red-free fundus photography for detecting RNFLD progression. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  19. Mapping Me: Mapping Identity among Academically High-Performing Black Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flennaugh, Terry K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scholars have argued that far too little research has examined the complex processes that many Black males undertake in constructing identities that function in schools (Howard & Flennaugh, 2011; Howard, Flennaugh, & Terry, 2012; Terry, Flennaugh, Blackmon, & Howard, 2014). Some have highlighted the perpetuation of a false…

  20. Crime Mapping and Geographical Information Systems in Crime Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dağlar, Murat; Argun, Uğur

    2016-01-01

    As essential apparatus in crime analysis, crime mapping and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are being progressively more accepted by police agencies. Development in technology and the accessibility of geographic data sources make it feasible for police departments to use GIS and crime mapping. GIS and crime mapping can be utilized as devices to discover reasons contributing to crime, and hence let law enforcement agencies proactively take action against the crime problems before they b...

  1. Spatial mathematics theory and practice through mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Arlinghaus, Sandra Lach

    2013-01-01

    In terms of statistics, GIS offers many connections. With GIS, data are gathered, displayed, summarized, examined, and interpreted to discover patterns. Spatial Mathematics: Theory and Practice through Mapping uses GIS as a platform to teach mathematical concepts and skills through visualization of numbers. It examines theory and practice from disparate academic disciplines such as geography, mathematics, physics, and general social science. This approach allows students to grapple with biodiversity, crime, natural hazards, climate, energy, water, and other relevant real-world issues of the twenty-first century. Includes QR Codes Linked to Animated Maps, a Mapping Activity Site, or to an Interactive Webpage, Creating an Interactive Resource That Stays Relevant The book integrates competing philosophical views of the world: synthesis and analysis. These two approaches yield different results and employ different tools. This book considers both approaches to looking at real-world issues that have mathematics as...

  2. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  3. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  4. ASSESSING STUDENTS’ COMPETENCE IN DEVELOPING CHOROPLETH MAPS COMBINED WITH DIAGRAM MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA OSACI-COSTACHE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choropleth maps combined with diagram maps are frequently used in geography. For this reason, based on the maps developed by students, the study aims at the following: identifying and analyzing the errors made by the students; establishing and analyzing the competence level of the students; identifying the causes that led to these errors; and finding the best solutions to improve both the educational process aiming at the formation of this kind of competences and the students’ results. The map assessment was accomplished during two academic years (2013-2014 and 2014-2015, in the aftermath of the activities meant to train the competence. We assessed 105 maps prepared by the students in Cartography (Faculty of Geography, University of Bucharest based on an analytical evaluation grid, with dichotomous scale, comprising 15 criteria. This tool helped us identify the errors made by the students, as well as their competence level. By applying a questionnaire, we identified the source of the errors from the students’ perspective, while by comparing the errors and the competence levels at the end of the two academic years we were able to come up with potential solutions for the improvement of the teaching and learning process.

  5. Ensuring Academic Freedom in Politically Controversial Academic Personnel Decisions. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report seeks to confront the contemporary political challenge to the academic community by exploring how free universities contribute to the common good even as they create political tensions between themselves and society that require the protection of academic freedom. At the same time, the report suggests ways that protection may be…

  6. Performance samples on academic tasks : improving prediction of academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanilon, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development and validation of a performance-based test, labeled as Performance Samples on academic tasks in Education and Child Studies (PSEd). PSEd is designed to identify students who are most able to perform the academic tasks involved in an Education and Child Studies

  7. Academic Entrepreneurship and Traditional Academic Duties: Synergy or Rivalry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Muthu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of academic entrepreneurship on traditional academic duties carried out in a resource-constrained environment, particularly focusing on whether there is synergy or rivalry between these two activities. Using qualitative evidence, we discover that there are funding, resource, knowledge and skill and networking…

  8. 7. Annex II: Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Aeberli, Annina

    2012-01-01

    Map 1: States of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – States, as of 15 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-states-15-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 2: Counties of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – Counties, as of 16 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-counties-16-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 3: Eastern Equato...

  9. Differential maps, difference maps, interpolated maps, and long term prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talman, R.

    1988-06-01

    Mapping techniques may be thought to be attractive for the long term prediction of motion in accelerators, especially because a simple map can approximately represent an arbitrarily complicated lattice. The intention of this paper is to develop prejudices as to the validity of such methods by applying them to a simple, exactly solveable, example. It is shown that a numerical interpolation map, such as can be generated in the accelerator tracking program TEAPOT, predicts the evolution more accurately than an analytically derived differential map of the same order. Even so, in the presence of ''appreciable'' nonlinearity, it is shown to be impractical to achieve ''accurate'' prediction beyond some hundreds of cycles of oscillation. This suggests that the value of nonlinear maps is restricted to the parameterization of only the ''leading'' deviation from linearity. 41 refs., 6 figs

  10. Mapping "Social Responsibility" in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Maja; Glerup, Cecilie

    The paper investigates the discourse on social responsibility in science as it appears in academic journals. Through database searches a collection of more than 300 papers have been analysed in order to map their answers to the following three questions: - What is the central problem that threatens...... of social responsibility of science imply different forms of governance of and within science. The paper employs a Foucaldian discourse analysis to understand how a particular conceptualisation of responsibility implies a political rationality, i.e. a particular form of governance of science. The analysis...... responsibility in science? - What are the central aspects of science or its relation to society that need to be regulated or changed? - What kinds of solutions are imagined and how are these solutions supposed to be put into place? On this basis the paper explores how different interpretations of the notion...

  11. European Extremely Large Telescope: progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2014-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope is a project of the European Southern Observatory to build and operate a 40-m class optical near-infrared telescope. The telescope design effort is largely concluded and construction contracts are being placed with industry and academic/research institutes for the various components. The siting of the telescope in Northern Chile close to the Paranal site allows for an integrated operation of the facility providing significant economies. The progress of the project in various areas is presented in this paper and references to other papers at this SPIE meeting are made.

  12. Academic dishonesty and attitudes towards academic dishonest acts: support for cognitive dissonance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A; Storch, Jason B

    2003-02-01

    The present study examined the relation between self-reported academic dishonesty and attitudes towards dishonest academic behaviors in 244 college students. Analysis suggested that self-reported academic dishonesty and approval of academic dishonest behaviors were positively correlated.

  13. Predicting Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Gallacher

    2005-01-01

    This paper discussed advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of "admission tests" as predictors of performance in undergraduate studies programs. The paper analyzes performance of economics and business administration students. This performance is linked to admission tests results. The paper also analyzes aspects of performance related to (i) differential progress through time, and (ii) differences in the extent to which students have "areas of interest/ability". The paper conclu...

  14. Innovation and Academic Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2006-01-01

    Literature on skill-biased technological and organisational change has established that these kinds of changes are positively related with demand for highly skilled (and highly educated) labour. Most of the literature is based on the hypothesis that technological and organisational change cause...... a larger demand for highly skilled labour (see e.g. Abramovitz and David 1996; Bresnahan 1999), but it has also been argued that ample supply of highly skilled labour may affect technological change (Acemoglu 2002), and that the relationship is likely to be complementary and interdependent (Caroli and Van...... will be written on an assumption of a positive relationship between innovation and use of academic skills subject to a continuing importance of practical know-how and non-formal learning processes. Confronting this assumption with Danish empirics, interesting research questions arise. Danish empirics thus show...

  15. Music and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud Cabanac; Perlovsky, Leonid; Bonniot-Cabanac, Marie-Claude; Cabanac, Michel

    2013-11-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that listening to a pleasant music while performing an academic test helped students to overcome stress, to devote more time to more stressful and more complicated task and the grades were higher. Yet, there remained ambiguities as for the causes of the higher test performance of these students: do they perform better because they hear music during their examinations, or would they perform better anyway because they are more gifted/motivated? This motivated the current study as a preliminary step toward that general question: Do students who like/perform music have better grades than the others? Our results confirmed this hypothesis: students studying music have better grades in all subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Collection Mapping as an Evaluation Technique for Determining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of curriculum and collection evaluation, and the use of the conspectus approach in the development of collection mapping in academic libraries and how it is practised at the University of Botswana Library are discussed. The conspectus approach allows for systematic collection development. The approach ...

  17. Mapping of health facilities in Jimeta Metropolis: a digital approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two sets of data were acquired and used, cartographic data and attribute data. Scanning was carried out using CorelDraw!2 while Georeferencing and Digitizing was done using ILWIS3.1 academic Software packages. A digital map, showing the spatial distribution of health facilities in Jimeta metropolis was produced; this ...

  18. Relative Effects of Problem-Solving and Concept Mapping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discussed various types of teaching strategies and they can aid the academic achievement of students in Economics. Also problem-solving and concept mapping strategies are also discussed and their significance and importance to students. The research design employed a 3x2 pre test, post test, control group, ...

  19. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  20. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.casey@physics.gla.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  1. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M. M.; McVitie, S.

    2009-09-01

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  2. Condescension and Critical Sympathy: Historians of Education on Progressive Education in the United States and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraga, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Although progressive education was an international phenomenon, historical interpretations of it may be affected on the national level by academic and institutional contingencies. An analysis of how US and English historians of education interpret progressive education reforms in their respective countries identified a strain of condescension…

  3. The Progress of Pupils in Their First School Year across Classes and Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymms, Peter; Merrell, Christine; Wildy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research has identified school membership as being and important factor in relation to academic progress but it has also pointed to the importance of teachers. Additionally, districts have been shown to be of minor importance for progress once key variables are taken into account while data from international studies…

  4. Academic Writing: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Brian V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I attempt to locate the study of academic writing in the broader field of Literacies as Social Practice. I begin with a brief summary of recent theories of Literacies as Social Practice and then recount some of the ethnographic methods for studying these. I then discuss the application of these concepts to academic writing in Higher…

  5. Academic Education Chain Operation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ruskov, Petko; Ruskov, Andrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for modelling the educational processes as a value added chain. It is an attempt to use a business approach to interpret and compile existing business and educational processes towards reference models and suggest an Academic Education Chain Operation Model. The model can be used to develop an Academic Chain Operation Reference Model.

  6. Healthy Eating and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between healthy eating and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a healthy school nutrition environment to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  7. Machine Translation for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace Hui-chin; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Due to the globalization trend and knowledge boost in the second millennium, multi-lingual translation has become a noteworthy issue. For the purposes of learning knowledge in academic fields, Machine Translation (MT) should be noticed not only academically but also practically. MT should be informed to the translating learners because it is a…

  8. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  9. 'Military Thinkers and Academic Thinkers'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugegaard, Rikke

    Culture analysis seems to create friction when we try to introduce academic concepts relating to culture to military planners. This friction might be related to the fact that officers and academics do their thinking in different 'spaces'. This paper argues the interface or overlapping space between...

  10. Entrepreneurship Education and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Vegard

    2014-01-01

    The significant increase of entrepreneurship education (EE) is a trend in Europe. Entrepreneurship education is supposed to promote general and specific entrepreneurial abilities and improve academic performance. This paper evaluates whether EE influences academic performance, measured by Grade Point Average. The main indicator used for EE is the…

  11. Comics, Copyright and Academic Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Deazley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the extent to which UK-based academics can rely upon the copyright regime to reproduce extracts and excerpts from published comics and graphic novels without having to ask the copyright owner of those works for permission. In doing so, it invites readers to engage with a broader debate about the nature, demands and process of academic publishing.

  12. Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The consistent poor academic performance of students in public secondary schools can be regarded as a serious social problem because a number of scholars, stakeholders in education, school administrator, and public commentators have concluded that students' academic performance in public secondary schools falls ...

  13. Academic Freedom: The Ethical Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author takes his cue for discussions of academic freedom from Simone de Beauvoir as found in her classic text, "The Ethics of Ambiguity." Like other existentialists, de Beauvoir emphasizes that freedom and responsibility are intimately linked. Academic freedom is an ethical responsibility that compels the author to teach and…

  14. Gendered Games in Academic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at women's efforts to construct an academic leadership career. It is not a study of women's leadership in general but one that takes place in what Bourdieu calls the academic field. Drawing from an in-depth interview study of 31 women from faculties of education who occupy managerial positions in universities in Canada,…

  15. Ten Rules of Academic Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Creative writers are well served with 'how to' guides, but just how much do they help? And how might they be relevant to academic authors? A recent survey of writing tips by twenty-eight creative authors has been condensed to the ten most relevant to the academic, supported by some comments on

  16. Academic Language in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  17. Undergraduate students' perceived academic environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the relationship between undergraduates' perception of the academic environment, their attitude to academic work and achievement. A total of 348 undergraduates who formed the sample were drawn from five departments in three universities in Nigeria. The study revealed that four dimensions of the ...

  18. Cognitive Factors in Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuasay, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This review explores the factors of cognitive processing, style, and metacognitive organization as they contribute to academic success. Specific discussions consider aspects of short- and long-term memory, including how these affect learning and academic performance, and the keys to attaining long-term memory capability by involving redundancy,…

  19. Constructivism, Dewey, and Academic Advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xyst, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Many published scholars argue for constructivism as a basis for academic advising theory. However, few have discussed the commensurate ontological assumptions of constructivist thinking. Potential problems with the metaphysical view of the student in contemporary academic advising may be attributable to constructivism. John Dewey's critique of…

  20. Transforming Academic Practice through Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Angela

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the fast changing university, how are academics to grow the capacity to cope with continual change and what can academic/faculty developers do to assist them? The paper first establishes the context of higher education as a challenging environment. It then reviews ideas about scholarship and explores the application of these…

  1. Diet Quality and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Michelle D.; Asbridge, Mark; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the effects of nutrition on health and school performance are often cited, few research studies have examined the effect of diet quality on the academic performance of children. This study examines the association between overall diet quality and academic performance. Methods: In 2003, 5200 grade 5 students in Nova Scotia,…

  2. Academic underachievement: A neurodevelopmental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shapiro Bruce, MD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic underachievement is a common presenting symptom and has many different causes. The disorders that describe academic underachievement are based on the child’s function in cognitive, academic, or behavioral domains. The disorders that are associated with academic underachievement are final common pathways that have different etiologies and mechanisms. Multiple disorders are the rule because brain dysfunction in childhood usually affects multiple functions. Consequently, management programs must be individualized, comprehensive and address issues related to the child, school, and family. Treatment plans include parent training, academic accommodations, techniques to maintain self-esteem, and psychopharmacologic approaches. Ongoing monitoring of the management programs is necessary to detect important comorbidities that may emerge, to modify the program to meet the changing academic and social demands that occur as the child ages, and to provide current information. The outcome for children with academic underachievement is most dependent on the underlying disorder. Health providers have multiple roles to play in the prevention, detection, diagnosis and management of children with academic underachievement.

  3. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  4. The Erosion of Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Michael W.; Marshall, Thomas; McHenry, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    This article originated from a single question: do the restrictions that various accrediting agencies place on teacher educators limit, or entirely eliminate, academic freedom? Considering that question makes it apparent the problem is much broader than academic freedom. The issue has two foci: personal identity and the impact of market…

  5. Modelling and Motivating Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Geoffrey; Pettit, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Three possible motivators for college teachers (individual economic interest, academic virtue, and academic honor) suggest mechanisms that can be used to improve performance. Policies need to address all three motivators; economic levers alone may undermine alternative ways of supporting good work. (MSE)

  6. Mapping Nursing Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Birks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Articulated education pathways between the vocational education training sector and universities provide opportunities for students wishing to progress to higher qualifications. Enrolled nurses seeking to advance their career in nursing can choose to enter baccalaureate degree programs through such alternative entry routes. Awarding of credit for prior studies is dependent on accurate assessment of the existing qualification against that which is sought. This study employed a modified Delphi method to inform the development of an evidence-based, structured approach to mapping the pathway from the nationally consistent training package of the Diploma of Nursing to the diversity of baccalaureate nursing programs across Australia. The findings of this study reflect the practical nature of the role of the enrolled nurse, particularly the greater emphasis placed on direct care activities as opposed to those related to professional development and the generation and use of evidence. These findings provide a valuable summative overview of the relationship between the Diploma of Nursing and the expectations of the registered nurse role.

  7. Academic entitlement in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Romanelli, Frank; Smith, Kelly M

    2012-12-12

    The constructs of academic entitlement and student consumerism refer to students' attitudes toward education as a commodity and the underlying belief that as consumers, they should be catered to and given the opportunity to participate in the education process according to their preferences. Most discussions regarding these attitudes are anecdotal, but the pervasiveness of these accounts and the troubling effects that ensue warrant attention. Grade inflation, student incivility, altered classroom practices, and decreased faculty morale are all potential aftereffects of teaching students who hold academic entitlement beliefs. Numerous factors are posited as attributing to academic entitlement including personal issues, societal pressures, and broad academic practices. This paper discusses these factors and offers faculty members and administrators recommendations regarding practices that may curb or alleviate issues associated with academically entitled students.

  8. Academic Entitlement in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Frank; Smith, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    The constructs of academic entitlement and student consumerism refer to students’ attitudes toward education as a commodity and the underlying belief that as consumers, they should be catered to and given the opportunity to participate in the education process according to their preferences. Most discussions regarding these attitudes are anecdotal, but the pervasiveness of these accounts and the troubling effects that ensue warrant attention. Grade inflation, student incivility, altered classroom practices, and decreased faculty morale are all potential aftereffects of teaching students who hold academic entitlement beliefs. Numerous factors are posited as attributing to academic entitlement including personal issues, societal pressures, and broad academic practices. This paper discusses these factors and offers faculty members and administrators recommendations regarding practices that may curb or alleviate issues associated with academically entitled students. PMID:23275654

  9. Geologic map of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kenzie J.; Berry, Margaret E.; Page, William R.; Lehman, Thomas M.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Scott, Robert B.; Miggins, Daniel P.; Budahn, James R.; Cooper, Roger W.; Drenth, Benjamin J.; Anderson, Eric D.; Williams, Van S.

    2011-01-01

    interpretation, was from the USGS Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center. Mapping contributed from university professors and students was mostly funded by independent sources, including academic institutions, private industry, and other agencies.

  10. The Impact of Electronic Mind Maps on Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaidat, Mohammad Mahmoud Talal

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of the electronic mind map (IMindMap) on the development of reading comprehension among the ninth grade students in Jordan. The sample of the study consisted of two ninth grade sections from two public schools in Irbid First Directorate during the academic 2016-2017. Each section consisted of (30)…

  11. Quality and Rigor of the Concept Mapping Methodology: A Pooled Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Scott R.; Kane, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The use of concept mapping in research and evaluation has expanded dramatically over the past 20 years. Researchers in academic, organizational, and community-based settings have applied concept mapping successfully without the benefit of systematic analyses across studies to identify the features of a methodologically sound study. Quantitative…

  12. A comparison of student academic achievement using decision trees techniques: Reflection from University Malaysia Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fatihah; Jusoh, Abd Wahab; Abu, Mohd Syafarudy

    2015-05-01

    A decision tree is one of the techniques in data mining for prediction. Using this method, hidden information from abundant of data can be taken out and interpret the information into useful knowledge. In this paper the academic performance of the student will be examined from 2002 to 2012 from two faculties; Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering and Faculty of Microelectronic Engineering in University Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP). The objectives of this study are to determine and compare the factors that affect the students' academic achievement between the two faculties. The prediction results show there are five attributes that have been considered as factors that influence the students' academic performance.

  13. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  14. The Intertwined Nature of Adolescents' Social and Academic Lives: Social and Academic Goal Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Eliyahu, Adar; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa; Putallaz, Martha

    2017-01-01

    The relations of academic and social goal orientations to academic and social behaviors and self-concept were investigated among academically talented adolescents (N = 1,218) attending a mastery-oriented academic residential summer program. Results supported context effects in that academic mastery goal orientations predicted academic (in-class…

  15. The Causal Ordering of Self-Concept and Academic Motivation and Its Effect on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jasmine; Nelson, Genevieve; Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herb

    2006-01-01

    Critical questions in educational psychology research to be addressed in this paper concern the casual relationship between academic self-concept, academic motivation and its effect on academic achievement. Do changes in academic self-concept and academic motivation lead to changes in subsequent academic achievement? Various studies have attempted…

  16. On How Editors of Academic Journals at Institutions of Higher Learning Should Resist Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Academic corruption is a hot issue in today's society. "Academic corruption" means that certain individuals in academic circles, driven by the desire for personal gain, resort to various kinds of nonnormative and unethical behavior in academic research activities. These include: academic self-piracy, academic piracy, copying and…

  17. Progressive osseous heteroplasia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia is a rare genetic disorder characterized by cu- taneous ossification during infancy and progressive ossification of subcutane- ous and deep connective tissue including muscle and fascia during childhood. It is at the severe end of a spectrum of Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein,.

  18. Real-time Global Illumination by Simulating Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard

    2004-01-01

    for reflection and refraction and hard shadows. Furthermore, the scenes include our methods for progressively updated caustics and progressively updated indirect illumination. We have compared the image quality of our method to the standard photon mapping method and the results are very similar.......This thesis introduces a new method for simulating photon mapping in realtime. The method uses a variety of both CPU and GPU based algorithms for speeding up the different elements in global illumination. The idea behind the method is to calculate each illumination element individually...... in a progressive and efficient manner. This has been done by analyzing the photon mapping method and by selecting efficient methods, either CPU based or GPU based, which replaces the original photon mapping algorithms. We have chosen to focus on the indirect illumination and the caustics. In our method we first...

  19. Is lexicography making progress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    tions as learning tools, but the user's performance is also under investigation in empirical research, with the aim of optimising .... those of some lexicographers and academic researchers whose knowledge of dictionary use and ..... and video clips which, on account of their game-like approach, favour vocabulary acquisition.

  20. Does academic achievement during childhood and adolescence benefit later health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê-Scherban, Félice; Diez Roux, Ana V; Li, Yun; Morgenstern, Hal

    2014-05-01

    Educational disparities in health persist after adjustment for income and occupation, suggesting that other purely cognitive and psychosocial mechanisms may be involved. Unlike occupation- or income-mediated effects, effects of cognitive and psychosocial gains-as reflected in academic achievement-may be apparent even before schooling is completed. We used data spanning 10 years on a national U.S. cohort of 2546 children aged 3-14 years at baseline to estimate the effects of academic achievement, measured by standardized tests of cognitive achievement, on future health. We used marginal structural models to address potential mutual influence of achievement and health on each other over time. One SD higher academic achievement 1997-2002 was associated with a lower prevalence of poorer health status in 2007 in girls (prevalence ratio = 0.87 [(95% confidence interval) 0.78-0.97]) but not in boys (prevalence ratio = 0.96 [0.86-1.08]). Higher achievement was also weakly associated with lower body mass index and less psychological distress among girls only. Academic achievement may benefit future health but a number of questions remain unanswered, including reasons for the gender differences and how academic achievement-related health disparities may progress over the life course and interact with other social determinants of health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Changing Academic Identities in Changing Academic Workplaces: Learning from Academics' Everyday Professional Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Mary R.; Stierer, Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article we examine issues of academic identity through the lens of academics' everyday workplace writing, offering a complementary perspective to those already evident in the higher education research literature. Motivated by an interest in the relationship between routine writing and aspects of professional practice, we draw on data from…

  2. OpenStreetMap, the Wikipedia Map

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    "This paper presents OpenStreetMap and closely related software as a resource for spatial economic research. The paper demonstrates how information can be extracted from OpenStreetMap, how it can be used as a geographical interface in web-based communication, and illustrates the value of the tools by use of a specific application, the WU campus GIS." (author's abstract)

  3. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  4. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  5. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  6. Academic achievement of children and adolescents with oral clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Collet, Brent; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A; Ansley, Timothy N; Speltz, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies of academic achievement of children with oral clefts have mostly relied on small, clinic-based samples prone to ascertainment bias. In the first study in the United States to use a population-based sample with direct assessment, we evaluated the academic achievement of children with oral clefts relative to their classmates. Children born with isolated oral clefts in Iowa from 1983 to 2003 were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders and matched to unaffected classmates by gender, school/school district, and month and year of birth. Academic achievement was assessed by using standardized tests of academic progress developed by the Iowa Testing Programs. Iowa Testing Programs data were linked to birth certificates for all children. Regression models controlled for household demographic and socioeconomic factors. The analytical sample included 588 children with clefts contributing 3735 child-grade observations and 1874 classmates contributing 13 159 child-grade observations. Children with oral clefts had lower scores than their classmates across all domains and school levels, with a 5-percentile difference in the overall composite score. Children with clefts were approximately one-half grade level behind their classmates and had higher rates of academic underachievement and use of special education services by 8 percentage points. Group differences were slightly lower but remained large and significant after adjusting for many background characteristics. Children with oral clefts underperformed across all academic areas and grade levels compared with their classmates. The results support a model of early testing and intervention among affected children to identify and reduce academic deficits. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Meso(topoclimatic maps and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Plánka

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric characteristics can be studied from many points of view, most often we talk about time and spatial standpoint. Application of time standpoint leads either to different kinds of the synoptic and prognostic maps production, which presents actual state of atmosphere in short time section in the past or in the near future or to the climatic maps production which presents longterm weather regime. Spatial standpoint then differs map works according to natural phenomenon proportions, whereas the scale of their graphic presentation can be different. It depends on production purpose of each work.In the paper there are analysed methods of mapping and climatic maps production, which display longterm regime of chosen atmospheric features. These athmosphere features are formed in interaction with land surface and also have direct influence on people and their activities throughout the country. At the same time they’re influenced by anthropogenic intervention to the landscape.

  8. An investigation into African-Caribbean academic success in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Rhamie, Jasmine; Hallam, Susan

    2002-01-01

    While, there is a history of academic under-achievement among African-Caribbeans in the United Kingdom, some African-Caribbeans progress successfully through under-graduate and on to postgraduate studies. This research investigates the factors contributing to such academic success. Fourteen African-Caribbean professionals, male and female, aged between 23 and 40 years old, who had undertaken most of their compulsory education in United Kingdom schools, were interviewed. The findings suggest t...

  9. Study of academic achievements using spatial analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C.; Velilla, C.; Sánchez-Girón, V.

    2012-04-01

    In the 2010/12 academic year the College of Agricultural Engineering of the Technical University of Madrid implemented three new degrees all of them adapted to the European Space for Higher Education. These degrees are namely: Graduate in Agricultural Engineering and Science, Graduate in Food Engineering and Graduate in Agro-Environmental Engineering. A total of 382 new incoming students were finally registered and a survey study was carried out with these students about their academic achievement with the aim of finding the level of dependence among the following variables: the final mark in their secondary studies, the option followed in the secondary studies (Art, Science and Technology, and Humanities and Social Sciences), the mark obtained in the entering examination to the university and in which of the two opportunities per year this examination takes place the latter mark was obtained. Similarly, another group of 77 students were evaluated independently to the former group. These students were those entering the College in the previous academic year (2009/10) and decided to change their curricula to the new ones. Subsequently, using the tools of spatial analysis of geographic information systems, we analyzed the possible relationship between the success or failure at school and the socioeconomic profile of new students in a grade. For this purpose every student was referenced assigning UTM coordinates to their postal addresses. Furthermore, all students' secondary schools were geographically coded considering their typology (public, private, and private subsidized) and fares. Each student was represented by its average geometric point in order to be correlated to their respective record. Following this procedure a map of the performance of each student could be drawn. This map can be used as a reference system, as it includes variables as the distance from the student home to the College, that can be used as a tool to calculate the probability of success or

  10. Academic mobbing: hidden health hazard at workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Sb

    2010-01-01

    Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, 'ganging up' behaviour adopted by academicians to "wear and tear" a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are "hidden" to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high achievers, with good integrity and principles. Mobbing activities appear trivial and innocuous on its own but the frequency and pattern of their occurrence over long period of time indicates an aggressive manipulation to "eliminate" the target. Mobbing activities typically progress through five stereotypical phases that begins with an unsolved minor conflict between two workers and ultimately escalates into a senseless mobbing whereby the target is stigmatized and victimized to justify the behaviours of the bullies. The result is always physical, mental, social distress or illness and, most often, expulsion of target from the workplace. Organizations are subjected to great financial loss, loss of key workers and a tarnished public image and reputation. Public awareness, education, effective counselling, establishment of anti-bullying policies and legislations at all levels are necessary to curb academic mobbing. General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in supporting patients subjected to mental and physical health injury caused by workplace bullying and mobbing.

  11. ACADEMIC MOBBING: HIDDEN HEALTH HAZARD AT WORKPLACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHOO SB

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, ‘ganging up’ behaviour adopted by academicians to “wear and tear” a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are “hidden” to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high achievers, with good integrity and principles. Mobbing activities appear trivial and innocuous on its own but the frequency and pattern of their occurrence over long period of time indicates an aggressive manipulation to “eliminate” the target. Mobbing activities typically progress through five stereotypical phases that begins with an unsolved minor conflict between two workers and ultimately escalates into a senseless mobbing whereby the target is stigmatized and victimized to justify the behaviours of the bullies. The result is always physical, mental, social distress or illness and, most often, expulsion of target from the workplace. Organizations are subjected to great financial loss, loss of key workers and a tarnished public image and reputation. Public awareness, education, effective counselling, establishment of anti-bullying policies and legislations at all levels are necessary to curb academic mobbing. General practitioners (GPs play an important role in supporting patients subjected to mental and physical health injury caused by workplace bullying and mobbing.

  12. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    academic years were compared, the progress test mapped out over the course of study not only by the overall test but also in terms of the subject groups and competency areas.Outlook: Further development in cooperation with students will be continued. Focus will be on compiling additional questions and test formats that can represent competency at a higher skill level, such as key feature questions, situational judgement test questions and OSCE. In addition, the feedback formats will be successively expanded. The intention is also to offer the formative competency-based progress test online.

  13. MapBook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Beginning with the systematic mapping of the lunar surface more than three decades ago, this database contains over 1600 maps of the planets and satellites of the...

  14. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  15. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  16. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  17. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  18. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  19. The survey of academic libraries

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Survey of Academic Libraries, 2014-15 Edition looks closely at key benchmarks for academic libraries in areas such as spending for books and e-books, deployment and pay rates for student workers, use of tablet computers, cloud computing and other new technologies, database licensing practices, and much more. The study includes detailed data on overall budgets, capital budgets, salaries and materials spending, and much more of interest to academic librarians and their suppliers. Data in this 200+ page report is broken out by size and type of library for easy benchmarking.

  20. Academic procrastination: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Karina Nobre Sampaio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination has been understood as a dynamic phenomenon, which involves personal, behavioral and environmental issues and is characterized by the postponement of non-strategic actions. This behavior may affect the academic performance of the students. The present study aimed to describe the procrastination among university students, and identify activities that are more or less delayed and feelings reported to be procrastinating.The results indicate the frequency of procrastination among university students, as well as a list of academic tasks and unpleasant feelings postponed to procrastinate.