WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic award winners

  1. National Academic Award Winners over Time: Their Family Situation, Education and Interpersonal Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekowski, Andrzej; Siekanska, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study focusing on the family situation, education and interpersonal relations of adults (26-35 years old) who in their adolescence (16-19 years old) displayed exceptional giftedness. One group of those surveyed were national academic award winners (90). The control group consisted of 90 people of no…

  2. And the winners were... Innovation Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The winners of the 2003 Economist innovation awards included Tim Berners-Lee for the WWW and Dr. Damadian for his suggestion that NMR could be used as a medical detection device for cancer (1/2 page).

  3. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  4. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  5. 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award Winners in the Southeast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016 FGC award winners in the Southeast are: the Department of Human Services’ U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Southeast Regional Office and Department of Energy’s East Tennessee Technology Park.

  6. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  7. CMA Announces the 1996 Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Eighteen exceptional teachers of science, chemical technology, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been selected to receive a Responsible Care Chemical Manufacturers Association's 1996 Catalyst Award. The Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Program honors individuals who have the ability to inspire students toward careers in chemistry and science-related fields through their excellent teaching ability in and out of the classroom. The program also seeks to draw public attention to the importance of quality chemistry and science teaching at the undergraduate level. Since the award was established in 1957, 502 teachers of science, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been honored. Winners are selected from a wide range of nominations submitted by colleagues, friends, and administrators. All pre-high school, high school, two and four-year college, or university teachers in the United States and Canada are eligible. Each award winner will be presented with a medal and citation. National award winners receive 5,000; regional award winners receive 2,500. National Winners. Martin N. Ackermann, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH Kenneth R. Jolls, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Suzanne Zobrist Kelly, Warren H. Meeker Elementary School, Ames, IA John V. Kenkel, Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE George C. Lisensky, Beloit College, Beloit, WI James M. McBride, Yale University, New Haven, CT Marie C. Sherman, Ursuline Academy, St. Louis, MO Dwight D. Sieggreen, Cooke Middle School, Northville, MI Regional Winners Two-Year College. East-Georgianna Whipple-VanPatter, Central Community College, Hastings, NE West-David N. Barkan, Northwest College, Powell, WY High School. East-John Hnatow, Jr., Emmaus High School, Northampton, PA South-Carole Bennett, Gaither High School, Tampa, FL Midwest-Kenneth J. Spengler, Palatine High School, Palatine, IL West-Ruth Rand, Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM Middle School. East-Thomas P. Kelly, Grandville Public Schools, Grandville, NH West

  8. Climate Wise Achievement Awards: A profile of the award winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, K.; Milmoe, P.H.; Haydel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Climate Wise is a partnership initiative sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency designed to stimulate the voluntary reduction of greenhouse gas emissions among participating manufacturing companies. Because energy use in the manufacturing sectors accounts for nearly 30% of total US anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, industrial energy-efficiency actions can have a significant effect on reducing these emissions. Climate Wise works with US manufacturers to help them take advantage of the environmental and economic benefits of energy-efficiency improvements. The Climate Wise Partnership, Representing 13% of total US industrial energy use, currently has more than 500 partners that are saving money and energy by implementing a wide range of efficiency and waste reduction projects. In November of 1998, Climate Wise held its first annual partner Achievement Awards, recognizing its leading partners for their exceptional achievements in the areas of Leadership, Innovation, Action Planning, and Results. Fourteen companies were recognized for overall environmental performance, and three others were acknowledged for special achievement in specific areas. This paper summarizes the achievements of the Climate Wise partners recognized for their outstanding accomplishments. These case studies highlight their corporate climate goals and strategies, specific energy-efficiency actions implemented, and the anticipated financial benefits, fuel savings, and environmental impacts of these actions

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  10. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, Professor Schelter, developed a new, targeted approach for separating mixtures of rare earth metals obtained from consumer waste streams comprising mixtures of Nd/Dy and Eu/Y

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  5. Coretta Scott King Award Winner Javaka Steptoe Stands Tall "In Daddy's Arms."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Jackie; Hendershot, Judy

    1999-01-01

    Offers an interview with artist and author Javaka Steptoe, winner of the Coretta Scott King award for his book "In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall: African Americans Celebrating Fathers." Discusses his background in the arts, the variety of media he uses, how he begins thinking about his illustrations, his work with children's art, and aspects of his work.…

  6. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  7. The Stock Performance of C. Everett Koop Award Winners Compared With the Standard & Poor's 500 Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z; Fabius, Raymond; Fabius, Dan; Roemer, Enid C; Thornton, Nicole; Kelly, Rebecca K; Pelletier, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    To explore the link between companies investing in the health and well-being programs of their employees and stock market performance. Stock performance of C. Everett Koop National Health Award winners (n = 26) was measured over time and compared with the average performance of companies comprising the Standard and Poor's (S&P) 500 Index. The Koop Award portfolio outperformed the S&P 500 Index. In the 14-year period tracked (2000-2014), Koop Award winners' stock values appreciated by 325% compared with the market average appreciation of 105%. This study supports prior and ongoing research demonstrating a higher market valuation--an affirmation of business success by Wall Street investors--of socially responsible companies that invest in the health and well-being of their workers when compared with other publicly traded firms.

  8. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  9. Join the CERN ISEF special award winners | 16 June - 3 p.m.

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Come and join the CERN ISEF special award winners at their lightning talks session on 16 June at 3.00 p.m. in the main auditorium.   The 2016 Intel ISEF CERN special award winners on stage with the selection committee on 17 May 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. (Picture: Society for Science and the Public) Between 11 and 17 June 2016, the ten finalists of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) who won the CERN Special Award, will visit CERN to partake in various educational lectures. ISEF is the world's largest international pre-college science competition, with approximately 1,700 high school students from more than 75 countries taking part. They will present their projects in short 5 minutes lightning talks' sessions at the main auditorium on Thursday 16 June at 3 p.m. The award winners would be also very happy to have a chance to interact and discuss with you af...

  10. Shepard Award Winners, Part 1: Dr. Stephen Thacker

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Stephen Thacker, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/22/2009.

  11. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  12. Shepard Award Winners, Part 3: Dr. Larissa Roux

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Larissa Roux, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 9/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/22/2009.

  13. Measuring Excellence: A Closer Look at Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winners in the Manufacturing Category

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cazzell

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is the nation’s highest quality award. The application and review process is outlined in this work. The objective of this study was to examine the five previous winners in the Manufacturing category and to establish a firm conclusion about the award’s impact. The impact of the award was examined in several categories including financial performance, market share, and employee productivity. This study explored the accomplishments of each company and compared the common factors they shared with one another. It was found that all five companies experienced tremendous financial growth on average of 100% in either sales or revenue as a result of their dedication to quality which ultimately led to winning the MBNQA.

  14. The Stock Performance of C. Everett Koop Award Winners Compared With the Standard & Poor's 500 Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z.; Fabius, Raymond; Fabius, Dan; Roemer, Enid C.; Thornton, Nicole; Kelly, Rebecca K.; Pelletier, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the link between companies investing in the health and well-being programs of their employees and stock market performance. Methods: Stock performance of C. Everett Koop National Health Award winners (n = 26) was measured over time and compared with the average performance of companies comprising the Standard and Poor's (S&P) 500 Index. Results: The Koop Award portfolio outperformed the S&P 500 Index. In the 14-year period tracked (2000–2014), Koop Award winners’ stock values appreciated by 325% compared with the market average appreciation of 105%. Conclusions: This study supports prior and ongoing research demonstrating a higher market valuation—an affirmation of business success by Wall Street investors—of socially responsible companies that invest in the health and well-being of their workers when compared with other publicly traded firms. PMID:26716843

  15. Recognizing 21. century citizenship: 1997 federal energy and water management award winners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Energy is a luxury that no one can afford to waste, and many Federal government agencies are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of using energy wisely. Thoughtful use of energy resources is important, not only to meet agency goals, but because energy efficiency helps improve air quality. Sound facility management offers huge savings that affect the agency`s bottom line, the environment, and workplace quality. Hard work, innovation, and vision are characteristic of those who pursue energy efficiency. That is why the Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is proud to salute the winners of the 1997 Federal Energy and Water Management Award. The 1997 winners represent the kind of 21st century thinking that will help achieve widespread Federal energy efficiency. In one year, the winners, through a combination of public and private partnerships, saved more than $100 million and 9.8 trillion Btu by actively identifying and implementing energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. The contributions of these individuals, small groups, and organizations are presented in this report.

  16. An Organizational Model for Excellence in Healthcare Delivery: Evidence From Winners of the Baldrige Quality Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R

    Winners of the Baldrige National Quality Award in healthcare have documented top quartile clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction across a variety of American communities and a full spectrum of care. Their results also show high levels of satisfaction among physicians, nurses, and other workers, as well as effective financial performance. The managerial methods they use-collectively, the Baldrige model-are consistent with organizational theory literature and are found across all winners. The winners have sustained excellence after winning and expanded it by acquisition of other healthcare organizations.The model differs substantially from traditional management approaches in healthcare delivery. It is a comprehensive program that emphasizes a shared focus on excellence, systematically responsive management, evidence-based medicine, multidimensional measures and negotiated goals, improvement of work processes, thorough training, and extensive rewards. The model could be expanded on a much larger scale. Doing so successfully would substantially improve the quality and cost of healthcare, as well as the satisfaction and commitment of care providers and other staff. The opportunity deserves further study and trial by large healthcare delivery systems, insurers, and consulting companies.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Trost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner Professor Barry M. Trost, developed the concept of atom economy: chemical reactions that do not waste atoms. This is a fundamental cornerstone of green chemistry.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Academic Award (Waymouth and Hedrick)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winners, Professor Robert M. Waymouth and Dr. James L. Hedrick, developed a broad class of highly active, environmentally benign, metal-free catalysts for synthesizing plastics.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Draths and Frost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winners, Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, used benign, genetically engineered microbes and sugars (instead of benzene) to synthesize adipic acid and catechol.

  20. ACC International Academic Collaborative receives special award

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast Conference's new International Academic Collaborative (ACC/IAC) has been singled out by the New York-based Institute of International Education (IIE) for a special award for innovation in international education.

  1. Leadership profile: HealthAchieve 2013 Nursing Leadership Award Winner, Tiziana Rivera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Tiziana

    2014-03-01

    Tiziana Rivera, the winner of the 2013 Nursing Leadership Award at the November HealthAchieve conference, is chief nursing executive and chief practice officer at Mackenzie Health. As such, she provides strategic leadership for the development and implementation of a shared vision for professional practice, nursing and all disciplines to promote innovative care and the development of care delivery models that will improve quality of care and population health.Prior to assuming her position at Mackenzie Health, Rivera provided strategic leadership for the Seniors' Health Program at Trillium Health Centre, where her role focused on the development of seniors' health services across the continuum of care. She has published numerous articles in refereed journals, conducted several research studies and presented her papers provincially, nationally and internationally. Rivera has a clinical appointment at the University of Toronto Faculty of Nursing, a faculty adviser position at Ryerson and an adjunct faculty position at the School of Health Sciences, York University and at the School of Health Sciences, Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning.In the following Q and A, Rivera shares her thoughts on leadership in nursing and perspectives on several critical issues.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Academic Award - James C. Liao and Easel Biotechnologies, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Dr. James C. Liao, genetically engineered microorganisms to make higher alcohols (with 3 to 8 carbon atoms) from glucose or directly from carbon dioxide (CO2).

  3. 1997 Hardwood Research Award Winner: "Automatic Color Sorting of Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Qiang Lu; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    The National Hardwood Lumber Association's 1997 Hardwood Research Award was presented to D. Earl Kline, Richard Conners, Qiang Lu and Philip Araman at the 25th Annual Hardwood Symposium for developing an automatic system for color sorting hardwood edge-glued panel parts. The researchers comprise a team from Virginia Tech University and the USDA Forest Service in...

  4. US Baltic Foundation award winners from Estonia are Arvo Pärt and Enn Kunila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Washingtonis toimunud tänavusel U.S Baltic Foundationi auhinnagalal tunnustati kahte eestlast: helilooja Arvo Pärti auhinnaga Baltimaade kuvandi rikastamise eest (Baltic Image Enhancement Award) ja ettevõtjast kunstikollektsionääri Enn Kunilat Baltimaade filantroopiaauhinnaga

  5. Gifted students' academic performance in medical school: a study of Olympiad winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the performance of academically talented students (i.e., those who received awards in Olympiads, the international competitions for gifted students in science or mathematics) in medical school. The goal is to investigate whether students exceptionally talented in science and mathematics excel in medical school. A retrospective analysis of 13 cohorts of medical students (N = 475) was conducted to compare learning outcomes of academically talented students (ATS) with their peers in terms of their grade point averages (GPAs) and national licensing exam (KMLE) scores. ATS outperformed their peers in total GPAs (p success in medical school, even among those with exceptional talent. Better understanding of nonacademic factors associated with medical school performance is warranted to improve our selection processes and to better help academically talented students succeed in medical school.

  6. Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) Poster Award winners 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Neil; Lowe, John; Coddens, Annelies

    2017-07-01

    The 11th WRIB held in Los Angeles, CA, USA in April 2017. It drew over 750 professionals representing large Pharmas, Biotechs, CROs and multiple regulatory agencies from around the world, from the global bioanalytical community. Bioanalysis and Bioanalysis Zone are very proud to be supporting the WRIB Poster Awards again this year, and we feature the profiles of the authors of the winning posters. Visit www.bioanalysis-zone.com to see the winning posters in full.

  7. Total quality approach at ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel - winner of the Swedish quality award 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorlin, K.; Olsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Division received the Swedish Quality Award 1994. The company has since many years a reputation for high product quality and a well implemented quality assurance system. Since some years a total quality approach is applied. For ABB Atom, total quality means continuous improvement of all business processes keeping the customer in focus. This paper elaborates on the improvement tools used at the ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Division and gives some detailed information of the experience. (author) 6 figs

  8. Interview with Xiaoli Wang PhD winner of CACA 2016 Young Investigator Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Wang is currently an R&D Senior Scientist in Agilent’s HPLC instrument R&D group at Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany. Prior to this, he was an R&D manager in Agilent’s CrossLab Group in the US focusing on development of novel chromatographic columns. He has a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Peking University, Beijing China and a PhD. degree in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Minnesota in 2006. He started his industrial career in the pharmaceutical industry at AstraZeneca for four years before joining Agilent Technologies in 2010. Recently, he won the prestigious 2016 Young Investigator Award from Chinese American Chromatography Association (CACA. This interview was conducted by Roland J.W. Meesters PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Applied Bioanalysis.

  9. SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH QUALITY TRANSFORMATION: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS OF QUALITY AWARD WINNERS AND A PROPOSED FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ashari Idris

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality management is a dynamic philosophy that underlines the organisational adaptation and proactive transformation that enables firms to reap real benefits from market opportunities. The faster the market changes, the quicker the transformation that is required for sustaining the firm's internal capabilities and its external competitiveness. Under a competitive pressure, a firm will need to learn faster and lead in best practice for operational excellence and continuously finding ways to shield its advantage from imitation.In the search for determinants for sustainability, this article analyses best practices adopted by quality award-winning organisations and synthesises a collection of critical factors that could assist organisations in improving their performance. From a longitudinal learning on how these leading organisations led themselves into a new sustaining paradigm, the article makes explicit the factors that were considered of paramount importance to sustainability. These success factors become a basis for others to leapfrog ahead into a new performance orbit. A proposed model for sustaining competitiveness has been developed from the creative learning of best practices of leading organisations. This proposed framework presents companies with an opportunity to emulate successful implementation of TQ-based initiatives, and to embed these pioneering concepts, particularly in the context of emerging countries.

  10. Performance management excellence among the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winners in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Neville T; Goodson, Jane R; Arnold, Edwin W

    2013-01-01

    When carefully constructed, performance management systems can help health care organizations direct their efforts toward strategic goals, high performance, and continuous improvement needed to ensure high-quality patient care and cost control. The effective management of performance is an integral component in hospital and health care systems that are recognized for excellence by the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in Health Care. Using the framework in the 2011-2012 Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence, this article identifies the best practices in performance management demonstrated by 15 Baldrige recipients. The results show that all of the recipients base their performance management systems on strategic goals, outcomes, or competencies that cascade from the organizational to the individual level. At the individual level, each hospital or health system reinforces the strategic direction with performance evaluations of leaders and employees, including the governing board, based on key outcomes and competencies. Leader evaluations consistently include feedback from internal and external stakeholders, creating a culture of information sharing and performance improvement. The hospitals or health care systems also align their reward systems to promote high performance by emphasizing merit and recognition for contributions. Best practices can provide a guide for leaders in other health systems in developing high-performance work systems.

  11. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R and D resulted in 7 R and D 100 Awards including the 2010 R and D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  12. 9th Annual Webby Awards(R) Unveil Best Sites Of The Year; Former Vice President Al Gore, Webby Winners to be Honored at June 6th Ceremony in New York

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Winners of the Webby Awards, selected by the Academy, were revealed today in over 60 countries - from popular favorites like Community, Fashion, Film, and Politics to new categories making their debut this year, such as Blog, Beauty, Real Estate, Retail, and Social Networking (1/2 page)

  13. Photowalk contest winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    The local winners of the global particle physics Photowalk have been announced by the five participating laboratories. At CERN, Diego Giol and Christian Stephani were the jury’s favourites, and their photos will now go forward to the global vote, competing against the local winners from DESY in Germany, Fermilab in the US, KEK in Japan and TRIUMF in Canada. Two prizes are to be awarded, one selected by a global jury, the other by popular vote – it’s time to get voting!   Diego Giol #1 The global winners of the Photowalk contest will be revealed by the second week of October, but the local CERN winners were announced last week. After three weeks of work, two meetings of the jury and three successive selections, 20 photos were chosen from the 792 entries. The three highest-ranked will participate in the final competition. The public can vote for their favourite photos on the interactions.org website until 8 October. Only two photographers took the three winning photo...

  14. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  15. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  16. Dreaming with a sense of reality. Winner of the 2004 Royal Shell Award for biofuels research professor Wim van Swaaij; Dromen met realiteitszin. Prof. Wim van Swaaij wint Koninklijke/Shell prijs voor biobrandstoffen-research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wit, P. (ed.)

    2004-12-01

    According to the winner of the 2004 Royal Shell Award for Sustainable Development biofuels will play a very important role in the world energy supply. However, the cultivation of energy crops may not be at the expense of the cultivation of crops for food. [Dutch] Biobrandstoffen gaan een zeer belangrijke rol spelen in de wereldenergievoorziening, stelt prof. Wim van Swaaij. Deze winnaar van de Koninklijke/Shell Prijs voor duurzame ontwikkeling 2004 vindt wel dat de teelt van energiegewassen niet ten nadele mag gaan van de teelt van voedingsgewassen.

  17. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  18. Society News: Fellow sets new world record; RAS thesis prize winners; Galileo in the courtyard; Need a room? Society announces new award for early-career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Generous sponsorship from Winton Capital Management has made possible two new RAS Awards, to be given annually to postdoctoral researchers who have made outstanding progress in the years immediately after their PhD.

  19. CERN welcomes Intel Science Fair winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This June, CERN welcomed twelve gifted young scientists aged 15-18 for a week-long visit of the Laboratory. These talented students were the winners of a special award co-funded by CERN and Intel, given yearly at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF).   The CERN award winners at the Intel ISEF 2012 Special Awards Ceremony. © Society for Science & the Public (SSP). The CERN award was set up back in 2009 as an opportunity to bring some of the best and brightest young minds to the Laboratory. The award winners are selected from among 1,500 talented students participating in ISEF – the world's largest pre-university science competition, in which students compete for more than €3 million in awards. “CERN gave an award – which was obviously this trip – to students studying physics, maths, electrical engineering and computer science,” says Benjamin Craig Bartlett, 17, from South Carolina, USA, wh...

  20. The academic impact of the Triological Society theses--Mosher and Fowler awards: citations, impact factor, and h-index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Karam W; Lahham, Sari; Mahboubi, Hossein; Crumley, Roger L; Wong, Brian J F

    2013-11-01

    The Triological Society requires thesis submission for full membership. Accepted theses (AT) may be recognized with designations of: Mosher Awards (MA), Fowler Awards (FA), Honorable Mention for Basic Science (HMBS), and Honorable Mention for Clinical Science (HMCS). We sought to determine and compare the scholarly impact of Triological Society theses, their authors, and whether differences exist between AT and those that receive special recognition. Retrospective analysis of awards and theses compiled by The Triological Society home office from 1998 to 2011. Thomson Reuters' Integrated Search Interface (ISI) Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar and were used to determine citations and the author's h-index. Trend and statistical analysis was performed. Of the 307 Triological Society theses examined, 275 were published and had record of citation. H-indices and number of citations were found to be nonparametric; thus, median and quartile (1(st) -3(rd) quartiles) values were found to be the following: AT 11 (4-26), MA 18 (9-25), FA 6 (1-28), HMBS 11 (4-26), and HMCS 16 (1-28) for number of citations per published thesis. H-indices of authors with accepted theses were AT 15 (10-19), MA 16 (15-23), FA 18 (10-23), HMBS 16 (11-19), and HMCS 15 (11-21). When comparing all groupings of theses and award winners with bibliometric indices, no statistical significance was found (P >0.5). The Triological Society cultivates a competitive pool of applicants as membership is highly regarded. Negligible difference in citations and author h-index were observed between AT, MA, and FA theses indicated that the level of excellence is uniform, and thesis submission remains influential and prestigious. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Metabolix, used biotechnology to develop microorganisms that produce polyhydroxyalkanoates: natural, biodegradable plastics with a range of environmental benefits.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Buckman Laboratories International, developed Optimyze technology, which uses an esterase enzyme to remove sticky contaminants from paper products prior to recycling.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, EDEN Bioscience, discovered and commercialized harpins: nontoxic, naturally occurring, biodegradable proteins that activate a plant's defense and growth mechanisms.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Headwaters Technology Innovation, developed a metal nanocatalyst to synthesize hydrogen peroxide directly from hydrogen and oxygen, eliminating hazardous chemicals.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, The Solberg Company, replaced fluorinated surfactants in its firefighting foam concentrates with a blend of non-fluorinated surfactants and sugars.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Archer Daniels Midland, developed Archer RC, a nonvolatile, biobased, reactive coalescent that replaces volatile organic coalescents in architectural latex paints.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Clarke, developed Natular, a plaster matrix that encapsulates the pesticide spinosad, slowly releasing it into water and effectively controlling mosquito larvae.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Solazyme, engineered microalgae to produce oils tailored to customers’ needs that can mimic or enhance properties of traditional vegetable oils.

  9. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  10. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  11. Everyone is a winner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuben, Ernesto; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2010-01-01

    We test if cooperation is promoted by rank-order competition between groups in which all groups can be ranked first, i.e. when everyone can be a winner. This type of rank-order competition has the advantage that it can eliminate the negative externality a group's performance imposes on other groups...

  12. Excellence in the stacks strategies, practices and reflections of award-winning libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Excellence in the Stacks details the philosophies, practices and innovations of award-winning libraries over the last ten years. It will inform the profession and highlight the themes and strategies these liberal-arts colleges share, and where they differ. Using the Association of Research and College Libraries Excellence in Academic Libraries Award standards as guidelines for exploring librarianship, this book gathers the perspectives of all types of librarians at all levels of employment. By highlighting winners' holistic approaches it helps define and focus the energies of college libraries

  13. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  14. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, UniEnergy,improved a vanadium redox flow battery to double the energy density, have a broader operating temperature range, a smaller footprint, reduced chemical usage, and very little capacity degradation.

  15. Awards to academic institutions by the Department of Transportation in FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megerian, G.K.; Whitfield, H.L.

    1976-02-20

    A comprehensive listing is given of contracts and grants awarded by the Department of Transportation to colleges and universities during fiscal year 1975. The awards are categorized into seven different schemes. Subject areas include (1) carpooling; (2) problems of the elderly and the handicapped; (3) energy; (4) environment; (5) facilities and services; (6) Federal Government role; (7) freight movement; (8) human factors; (9) land use planning; (10) management; (11) materials; (12) motorcycles; (13) noise; (14) personal rapid transit; (15) rural planning; (16) safety; (17) systems development; (18) taxicabs; (19) technology; (20) traffic control; (21) training; (22) tunneling; and (23) urban planning. (PMA)

  16. CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition winners tour CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Last week, the Laboratory rolled out the red carpet for the six young winners of the CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition. From a visit of the CMS detector to dessert with the Director-General, these young talents were given the full VIP treatment. Nothing less would do for our winners!   The competition's youngest winners study the CMS detector. For the CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition winners, Easter 2014 would be unforgettable. Besides visits to all the main CERN landmarks, they attended an award ceremony in the Main Building in their honour. Among the audience were CERN Director-General, Rolf Heuer, the Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Ana Maria Menendez Perez, and the Director of the Prince of Asturias Foundation, Teresa Sanjurjo González. The ceremony was also an opportunity for the CERN community to interact with the young winners. “They brought with them such heartfelt enthusiasm,” says CERN&am...

  17. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  18. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  19. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  20. Nobel prize winners from Siemens company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the history of discoveries and scientists which worked in the Siemens company. First Nobel prize winners from Siemens company was Gustav Ludwig Hertz from Hamburg. In his doctoral dissertation he deals with the study of collisions of electrons with molecules of gases. In the physics this experiment is known as 'Franc and Hertz experiment', which confirmed state of energy in Bohr theory and in 1925 he obtained Nobel prize. In 1945, as a director of the Department of physics in the research laboratories of Siemens, he constructed cyclotron kernel - magnet with mass of 80 tonnes. The second Nobel prize winner was Dennis Gabor worked in the Laboratory for measurement and medicinal technology in Siemensstadt (Berlin). When he tried to increase the resolution of electron microscopy he discovered the holography (method of 3-dimensional imaging). In 1971 he obtained the Nobel prize. The third scientist - Ernst Ruska discovered electron microscope. At Siemens, he was involved in developing the first commercially-produced electron microscope in 1939. In 1986, Ernst Ruska was awarded half of the Nobel Prize in Physics for his many achievements in electron optics.

  1. The Perceptions of Administrators from Quality Award-Winning School Districts and a Comparison of Student Academic Achievement in Quality Award-Winning Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    This research project served two main purposes. The first was to uncover the perceptions of district administrators from Quality award-winning school districts in regard to the use of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award program as a management framework. This was accomplished by using the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium's…

  2. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  3. Three scientists to receive presidential Enrico Fermi award

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today named John Bahcall, Raymond Davis, Jr. and Seymour Sack as winners of the Enrico Fermi Award. ... Drs. Bahcall and Davis will receive the award for their research in neutrino physics. Dr. Sack will receive the award for his contributions to national security" (1 page).

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Faraday Technology, Inc., process high-performance chrome coatings to be made from the less toxic, trivalent chromium. Reduce millions of pounds hexavalent chromium without comprising performance.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winners, Arkon Consultants and NuPro Technologies, developed a safer processing system for flexographic printing that includes washout solvents and reclamation/recycling.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Shaw Industries, developed EcoWorx carpet tiles with a backing that uses less toxic materials. The carpet tile fiber and backing are readily separated for recycling.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Sherwin-Williams, developed water-based acrylic alkyd paints with VOCs that can be made from recycled soda bottle (PET), acrylics, and soybean oil.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Battelle, developed a biobased soy toner for laser printers and copiers. The technology saves energy and improves de-inking, allowing more paper fiber to be recycled.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, BASF, invented a one-component, urethane acrylate oligomer primer system for automobile refinishing that is UV-curable, has VOCs, and is free of diisocyanates.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Nalco Chemical Co., developed homogeneous dispersion polymerization with water as the solvent to make polymers to treat water in industrial and municipal operations.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Argonne National Laboratory, developed an efficient, membrane-based process to synthesize lactate esters from sugars. These esters can replace toxic solvents.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winners, Bayer and Bayer AG, Covestro, developed high-performance, water-based, two-component polyurethane (PU) coatings that eliminate most or all VOCs and HAPs in other PU coatings.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Dow Chemical Company, developed a process to manufacture polystyrene foam sheet packaging that uses carbon dioxide (CO2) as a blowing agent, eliminating CFC-12 and HCFC-22.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, S.C. Johnson & Son, developed Greenlist, a rating system for environmental and health effects of ingredients. SC Johnson uses it to reformulate many of its products.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Merck & Co. and Codexis, developed an enzymatic synthesis for sitagliptin (Januvia) that reduces waste, improves yield and safety, and eliminates a metal catalyst.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Flexsys America, developed nucleophilic aromatic substitution for hydrogen to eliminate waste from a common reaction and to produce 4-ADPA, a high-volume chemical.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, used an artificial neural network to discover spinetoram, an improved spinosad biopesticide to replace organophosphates for key pests of fruit trees.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winners, Bayer Corporation and Bayer AG, developed a waste-free manufacturing process for sodium iminodisuccinate (Baypure CX), a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Dow and BASF, jointly developed a route to make propylene oxide from hydrogen peroxide that eliminates almost all waste and greatly reduces water and energy use.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Legacy Systems, developed the Coldstrip process, which uses only water and oxygen to remove photoresist from silicon semiconductors. It replaces corrosive acids.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, BHC Company, developed a highly atom-efficient method to make ibuprofen, a common painkiller, using three catalytic steps instead of six stoichiometric ones.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, SC Fluids, with Los Alamos National Laboratory, developed supercritical CO2 resist remover technology to clean residues from semiconductor wafers during manufacture.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Elevance Renewable Sciences, used Nobel-prize-winning metathesis catalysis to produce high-value difunctional chemicals from renewable feedstocks including natural oils.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winners, Professor Kaichang Li, Columbia Forest Products, and Hercules, developed an adhesive for wood composites based on soy flour instead of resins with formaldehyde.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Lilly Research Laboratories, developed a low-waste drug synthesis using yeast for a stereospecific reduction, reducing solvent amounts, and replacing chromium oxide.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Verdezyne, developed a yeast to produce USDA Certified Biobased dodecanedioic acid (DDDA) used to make high performance nylon 6,12. Lower greenhouse gas emissions, no high temperature or nitric acid

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, BioAmber, developed an integrated technology to produce large, commercial quantities of succinic acid by bacterial fermentation, replacing petroleum-based feedstocks.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Eastman Chemical Co., makes esters for emollients and emulsifiers in cosmetics with immobilized enzymes, saving energy and avoiding strong acids and organic solvents.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, SiGNa Chemistry, stabilized highly reactive sodium and lithium by encapsulating them in porous, sand-like powder, maintaining their usefulness in synthetic reactions.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Life Technologies, developed a one-pot synthesis for polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a much more efficient process that prevents about 1.5 million pounds of hazardous waste a year.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Pfizer, improved its synthesis of sertraline, the active ingredient in its drug, Zoloft, to double the yield and reduce the use of raw materials, energy, and water.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Donlar, developed thermal polyaspartate, a nontoxic, biodegradable, biobased polymer made in a highly efficient process for use in agriculture, water treatment, etc.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Monsanto Company, developed a safer synthesis for DSIDA, a key building block for the herbicide RoundUp. The synthesis uses no ammonia, cyanide, or formaldehyde.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, NovaSterilis, invented a way to sterilize delicate biological materials such as graft tissue without harming them, using supercritical carbon dioxide and a peroxide.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Bristol-Myers Squibb, manufactures paclitaxel, the active ingredient in the anticancer drug, Taxol, using plant cell fermentation and extraction to replace synthesis.

  16. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winners, Merck, developed a novel asymmetric aza-Michael cyclization, employing a chemically stable and fully recyclable organocatalyst to make Letermovir, an antiviral drug

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Kraton Performance Polymers, developed halogen-free, high-flow NEXAR polymer membranes using less solvent that save energy during reverse osmosis to desalinate water.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, RevTech, developed a process to print top-quality labels directly on glass. Their Envirogluv inks have no heavy metals, have little to no VOCs, and are biodegradable.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Roche Colorado, developed a greener synthesis for gancyclovir (Cytovene, a potent antiviral drug) that uses a second-generation Guanine Triester (GTE) process.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Codexis, directed the evolution of three designer enzymes to produce the key chiral building block for atorvastatin, the active ingredient in the drug Lipitor.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Dow Agrosciences LLC, developed Instinct®, a technology that reduces fertilizer nitrate leaching to ground and surface waters and atmospheric nitrous oxide emissions. More corn and reduces CO2.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Cargill, Inc., developed a vegetable-oil-based transformer fluid that is much less flammable, provides superior performance, is less toxic, and has a substantially lower carbon footprint.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winners, Albemarle and CB&I, developed a safer technology to produce alkylate, a clean gasoline component by replacing liquid acid catalysts with a lower environmental impact catalyst

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, LanzaTech Inc. developed a method to utilize gas streams with a range of CO and H2 compositions to produce fuels such as ethanol and chemicals at high selectivities and yields

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Albright & Wilson Americas, discovered that tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate, THPS, is an effective, safer biocide for use in industrial water systems.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, developed spinosad, a highly selective, low-toxicity, nonpersistant insecticide made by a soil microorganism. It controls many chewing insect pests.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Novozymes North America, developed BioPreparation, an enzyme technology to separate natural waxes, oils, and contaminants from cotton before it is made into fabric.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Chemical Specialties, developed an alkaline copper quaternary wood preservative to replace chromated copper arsenate preservative phased out due to risk to children.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, CEM Corporation, developed a fast, automated analytical process using less toxic reagents and less energy to distinguish protein from the food adulterant, melamine.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Rohm and Haas, developed Sea-Nine, a marine antifoulant to control plants and animals on ship hulls. Sea-Nine replaces persistent, toxic organotin antifoulants.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Nalco Company, developed 3D TRASAR technology to monitor the condition of cooling water continuously and add chemicals only when needed, saving water and energy.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Cargill Dow, developed the NatureWorks process to make biobased, compostable, and recyclable polylactic acid polymers for fibers and plastic packaging.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Imation, developed DryView Imaging Systems, which use a special photographic film for medical imaging that replaces hazardous developer chemicals and water with heat.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Cytec Industries, developed the MAX HT sodalite scale inhibitor for heat exchangers and pipes in the Bayer process, which converts bauxite into alumina.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Amyris, engineered yeast to make a chemical called farnesene, which is a building block hydrocarbon that can be converted into a renewable, drop-in replacement for petroleum diesel.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, DuPont, developed a genetically engineered microorganism jointly with Genencor International to manufacture 1,3-propanediol, a building block for Sorona polyester.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Codexis and Professor Yi Tang, developed a synthesis for the high cholesterol drug, simvastatin, using an engineered acyltransferase enzyme and a low-cost acyl donor as a feedstock.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, LS9, engineered microorganisms to convert fermentable sugars selectively to alkanes, olefins, fatty alcohols, or fatty esters, each in a single-unit biorefinery.

  19. And the winners are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-09-01

    For 63-year-old Sergio Ferrara, winning a multi-million-Euro grant from the European Research Council (ERC) will mean something special: being able to return to Italy to continue his research into high-energy physics. Without his European windfall, Ferrara, who currently works in the theory section at the CERN particle-physics lab near Geneva, would either have had to retire in a few years' time due to strict employment laws or emigrate to the US where there is no compulsory retirement age. So the news that he was among the first people to be awarded one of the ERC's generous new advanced grants came as a huge relief.

  20. Michael Tomasello: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Michael Tomasello, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to understanding what makes the human mind unique. Michael Tomasello's pioneering research on the origins of social cognition has led to revolutionary insights in both developmental psychology and primate cognition." Tomasello's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year Winners: AEC Congratulates These Outstanding Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Educational Computing, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year winners. Anne Mirtschin is the recipient of the ACCE/ACS 2012 Educator of the Year Award. Mirtschin is an innovative teacher at Hawkesdale P-12 College a small rural school that is isolated culturally and geographically. She uses online tools and technology to create…

  2. Record productions establish RF-driven sources as the standard for generating high-duty-factor, high-current H- beams for accelerators (Winner of the ICIS 2017 Brightness Award)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, Robert F.; Han, Baoxi

    2018-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source operates reliably at 1.2 MW and will gradually ramp to 1.4 MW. This paper briefly recalls some of the struggles when the unprecedented project was started and ramped to 1 MW over a 3½ year period. This was challenging, especially for the H- ion source and the low-energy beam transport system, which make up the H- injector. It took several more years to push the H- injector to the 1.4 MW requirements, and even longer to reach close to 100% injector availability. An additional breakthrough was the carefully staged, successful extension of the H- source service cycle so that disruptive source changes became rare events. More than 7 A.h of extracted H- ions have been demonstrated with a single source without maintenance, more than twice the single-source quantity of ions produced by any other high-current H- accelerator facility. Achieving the 1.4 MW requirements with close to 100% availability and record-breaking source service cycles were the basis for the 2017 Brightness Award.

  3. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  4. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  5. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  6. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  7. Daniel Landis: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Daniel Landis for his unparalleled contribution to the field of intercultural research in a distinguished academic career spanning almost half a century. Landis has shaped the field of intercultural research through scholarship of the highest order, reflected in his publications on cross-cultural training and research, the measurement of equal opportunity climate, individual-differences research and methodology, evaluation of social programs, development of theory in social psychology, and cross-cultural aspects of human sexuality. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Intercultural Relations and has edited three editions of the Handbook of Intercultural Training (1983, 1996, 2004). Landis' Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. ALICE gives its first thesis awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    For the first time the ALICE collaboration has given two of its doctoral students awards for their outstanding theses. Winners Christian Holm Christensen and Zaida Conesa del Valle holding their awards.On 29 October the ALICE collaboration honoured two students for their outstanding theses at a ceremony held at CERN. The two awards, one of which was given for a physics thesis and the other for a technical thesis, went to Zaida Conesa Del Valle (Laboratoire de physique subatomique et des technologies associées) and Christian Holm Christensen (Niels Bohr Institute) respectively. "It is very gratifying to see that the collaboration appreciates our work," said Zaida Conesa del Valle, winner of the physics award for her thesis: Performance of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Weak Boson Production and Measurement in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC. "I also feel specially thankful to all the people who worked with me," she added. "It was pl...

  9. Kelly D. Brownell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of Kelly D. Brownwell, winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology (2012). He won the award for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the etiology and management of obesity and the crisis it poses for the modern world. A seminal thinker in…

  10. Communicators take nine Virginia Press Women awards

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Three Virginia Tech communicators have won Virginia Press Women awards. The winners - Susan Trulove, research division communications manager; Clara Cox, university publications director; and Heather Riley Chadwick, College of Architecture and Urban Studies communication manager - were announced at the Virginia Press Women Annual Spring Conference in Staunton, Va.

  11. Excellent Educators: ISTE's Award Winners Inspire, Captivate, and Motivate!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingal, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In the impassioned debate about school reform, there is one point that all sides agree on: Classroom teachers have a huge impact on student success. Great teachers don't just teach. They inspire, they captivate, and they motivate their students to create, investigate, solve, and continue learning long after their school years are over. This…

  12. Winners of the 2017 IDRC Doctoral Research Awards | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-11-30

    Nov 30, 2017 ... ... an entrepreneurial training program that she arranged for war-affected single mothers ... countries to improve the lives of people in the developing world. ... cities were discussed at ADAPTO's second international workshop.

  13. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  14. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through…

  15. Bernice Lott: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. The 2012 winner is Bernice Lott. Lott's commitment to the public interest has always guided her career, as her groundbreaking research on gender, ethnicity, and race…

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, Algenol, blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels, uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters, reduces the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, no reliance on food crops

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Designing Greener Chemicals and Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Newlight Technologies, developed a net carbon negative plastic made from methane-based GHG. It is cheaper than petroleum-based plastic; used to make cell phone cases, furniture, and other products.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award (Merck & Co., Inc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Merck, designed an atom-economical, energy- and water-saving, convergent synthesis for aprepitant, the active ingredient in Emend, a drug for nausea and vomiting.

  19. The effects of national cash awards for science teaching on recipients and their peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weld, Jeffrey Donn

    Cash teaching awards available to science teachers in the U.S. have goals to improve science teaching. This study assessed the effectiveness of five national cash award programs at identifying exemplars and inspiring better science teaching. Award winning secondary science teachers provided their perceptions of the effects of an award on their own teaching and on the profession as a whole. Randomly selected secondary science teachers across the U.S. reported their perceptions of the effects of the existence of awards on their own teaching and on the profession. Program directors for the five national cash awards were interviewed to determine the intentions and strategies of their award programs. The criteria that guide the selection of award winners were found to align with research-supported exemplar characteristics, but the methods used for identifying outstanding teachers were found to be inadequate for that purpose. Award winning science teachers perceive awards to result from, rather than to inspire, good teaching. Their motivation derives from student achievement and a job well done. The valued effects of winning an award are the recognition and increased respect that follow. Award winners perceive awards as difficult to win, minimally motivating, and frequently causing of dissension among peers. In most respects award winners perceive increased intrinsic rewards to accompany recognition through cash awards. Randomly selected U.S. science teachers who have not won cash awards perceive them as poor motivational incentives because too few awards exist, the basis for recognition is unclear, and the award itself is not a valued outcome. Most science teachers consider themselves good teachers and would apply for an award despite doubts that they would win. Direct comparisons reveal that winners and nonwinners have widely divergent opinions of awards. Winners of lesser cash amounts have the same perceptions of awards as winners of greater cash amounts. Effective

  20. The Transitional Legend of Winners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 a number of stories that featured the motive of great gain under dramatic circumstances were repeatedly told in betting-houses in Kragujevac, a town in Serbia. The main character of these legends is an empoverished victim of transition who, thanks to luck and help of friends, wins a great sum of money betting. Besides describing the preceding transitional "fall" of the winner (getting fired, failing in private enterprise, the legends describe his economical and social prosperity initiated by capital gained through betting (starting succesfull enterprises, buying good shares. Diachronically following other "sudden wealth" legends this transitional legend speaks about the establishing of a new system of values that, in the categories of social promotion, makes up for the old principles that marked the period of socialism.

  1. And now, for the winners.

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    The Computer Security Day held on 10 June was a success. There were eight presentations, with some forty people attending each session.     The presentation videos can be viewed on Indico. The computer security team’s new website is now up and running, with a wealth of useful information and advice. Go to http://cern.ch/Computer.Security.     The quiz attracted 130 participants, and the answers have now been posted on line! The quiz winners are: Lars Aprin, Richard Baud, Thibaut Bernard, Brice Copy, Daniele de Ruschi, Sébastien Gadrat, Amanda Garcia Munoz, Stephen Gowdy, Joni Hahkala, Joseph Izen, Ryszard Erazm Jurga, Jukka Klem, Danila Oleynik, Ian Pong, Pascal Serge Roguet, Jani Tapani Taskinen, Jan Therhaag, Yves Thurel, Adrian Vogel, Thomas White. Well done to all! If you haven’t done so already, you should soon be getting your prize (i.e. a book, a T-shirt or a bag, etc.).  

  2. Thirty Years After: The Lives of Former Winners of Mathematical Olympiads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    This follow-up study surveyed earlier winners of the St. Petersburg (Russia) mathematical Olympiad in 1991 (n=58) and 2001 (n=30). Findings are detailed concerning respondents' academic degrees, employment, publications, schools attended, and perceived quality of mathematical education. Respondents' views about education were conservative and…

  3. Special awards lighten up SPR banquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Ron; Baker, Dan; Reiff, Pat

    On December 8, 1982, Marcia Neugebauer, then president of the Solar and Planetary Relationships section, held the “First Occasional Awards Ceremony” in conjunction with the annual dinner banquet at the Fall AGU meeting. These awards were an attempt to add a little humor to our usually somber gatherings. This year we reincarnated Neugebauer's successful concept and presented a number of new and novel awards to our fellow scientists at the Fall AGU SPR dinner. Summarized for your enjoyment are the categories and the official winners, as announced at the December 6 banquet.

  4. The Google Science Fair winner comes to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Shree Bose, the Google Science Fair Grand Prize winner, will come to CERN for a three-day internship. She is looking forward to it and hopes to sit in the CERN Control Room, and to learn more about ALICE and in general the work going on here right now.   Google Science Fair winners Lauren Hodge (left) Shree Bose (middle) and Naomi Shah (right). (Image Copyright Google) Despite her young age, Shree Bose is already an experienced researcher. Indeed, she has already been awarded prestigious prizes in various science fairs and competitions. Aged 17, she found a way to improve ovarian cancer treatment for patients when they have built up a resistance to certain chemotherapy drugs. The project won the Grand Prize at the Google Science Fair, and together with an amazing 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands with National Geographic Expeditions, she also won a trip to CERN. “Shree will visit several experimental sites here and will sit next to our physicists and engineers, in the CCC an...

  5. Closing Remarks and Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Van der Meer, K.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-01-01

    M. Whitaker: On behalf of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, we are grateful for the opportunity to support this symposium. The number of symposium events-presentations, posters, technical demonstrations, panel discussions, and receptions - has been completely overwhelming and truly impressive. My compliments to the IAEA organization staff for a spectacular event. I have gained a much better appreciation for why these are only once every four years. This symposium has provided an important opportunity to reengage with friends and colleagues from around the globe to discuss international safeguards topics. The theme this year is very appropriate. So much of our work relies upon people. Together we work to develop the strategies that ensure that international safeguards are effectively implemented to provide the world the assurances that they expect from us. Thank you for this opportunity to share in the organization and execution of this symposium. K. Van der Meer: It is my pleasure to give the last poster awards. We have had two award ceremonies already this week on Wednesday and Thursday to recognize the best posters in those sessions. Today it will be two parts. First we will give the award for the best posters for this morning's sessions, and then we have four special awards: Gold, Silver, Bronze and the New Generation Symposium Award. These are the awards for the best posters for the whole week. The New Generation Symposium Award is for recognition of a younger participant and the prize is also for a younger participant. The full list of award winners is available under the symposium website. The IAEA recognizes the generous donations by INMM and ESARDA of the following prizes given as awards for the best posters: · Best e-poster advertisement per session: free subscription to the ESARDA Bulletin; · Best e-poster per session: free membership in INMM; · Best poster of the week ''Bronze'': free registration for the 8th INMM

  6. Why do winners keep winning? Androgen mediation of winner but not loser effects in cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui F.; Silva, Ana; Canário, Adelino V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal conflicts are influenced by social experience such that a previous winning experience increases the probability of winning the next agonistic interaction, whereas a previous losing experience has the opposite effect. Since androgens respond to social interactions, increasing in winners and decreasing in losers, we hypothesized that socially induced transient changes in androgen levels could be a causal mediator of winner/loser effects. To test this hypothesis, we staged fights between dyads of size-matched males of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). After the first contest, winners were treated with the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate and losers were supplemented with 11-ketotestosterone. Two hours after the end of the first fight, two contests were staged simultaneously between the winner of the first fight and a naive male and between the loser of first fight and another naive male. The majority (88%) of control winners also won the second interaction, whereas the majority of control losers (87%) lost their second fight, thus confirming the presence of winner/loser effects in this species. As predicted, the success of anti-androgen-treated winners in the second fight decreased significantly to chance levels (44%), but the success of androgenized losers (19%) did not show a significant increase. In summary, the treatment with anti-androgen blocks the winner effect, whereas androgen administration fails to reverse the loser effect, suggesting an involvement of androgens on the winner but not on the loser effect. PMID:19324741

  7. A community translational research pilot grants program to facilitate community--academic partnerships: lessons from Colorado's clinical translational science awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Deborah S; Felzien, Maret C; Magid, David J; Calonge, B Ned; O'Brien, Ruth A; Kempe, Allison; Nearing, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    National growth in translational research has increased the need for practical tools to improve how academic institutions engage communities in research. One used by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) to target investments in community-based translational research on health disparities is a Community Engagement (CE) Pilot Grants program. Innovative in design, the program accepts proposals from either community or academic applicants, requires that at least half of requested grant funds go to the community partner, and offers two funding tracks: One to develop new community-academic partnerships (up to $10,000), the other to strengthen existing partnerships through community translational research projects (up to $30,000). We have seen early success in both traditional and capacity building metrics: the initial investment of $272,742 in our first cycle led to over $2.8 million dollars in additional grant funding, with grantees reporting strengthening capacity of their community- academic partnerships and the rigor and relevance of their research.

  8. Policies, activities, and structures supporting research mentoring: a national survey of academic health centers with clinical and translational science awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Robert E; Jang, Susan; Abedin, Zainab; Richards, Boyd F; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    To document the frequency of policies and activities in support of mentoring practices at institutions receiving a U.S. National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The study consisted of a 69-item survey with questions about the inclusion (formal or informal) of policies, activities, and structures supporting mentoring within CTSA-sponsored research (i.e., KL2 programs) and, more broadly, in the CTSA's home institution. The survey, conducted from November 2010 through January 2011, was sent to the 55 institutions awarded CTSAs at the time of the survey. Follow-up phone interviews were conducted to clarify responses as needed. Fifty-one of 55 (92%) institutions completed the survey for institutional programs and 53 of 55 (96%) for KL2 programs. Responses regarding policies and activities involving mentor criteria, mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluative mechanisms revealed considerable variability between KL2 and institutional programs in some areas, such as having mentor qualification criteria and processes to evaluate mentors. The survey also identified areas, such as training and women and minority mentoring programs, where there was frequent sharing of activities between the institutional and KL2 programs. KL2 programs and institutional programs tend to have different preferences for policies versus activities to optimize qualification of mentors, the mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluation mechanisms. Frequently, these elements are informal. Individuals in charge of implementing and maintaining mentoring initiatives can use the results of the study to consider their current mentoring policies, structures, and activities by comparing them with national patterns within CTSA institutions.

  9. I Love My Librarian Award: An Award That Recognizes Great Librarians Also Highlights the Central Role of Libraries in Communities across America. Carnegie Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    The Carnegie Corporation of New York/"New York Times" I Love My Librar­ian Award publicizes librarians' abilities to improve their communities, and by highlighting the achievements of the winners, inspire other librarians to boost their own performance. Since the award's creation in 2008, it has helped the public to better understand…

  10. Robert A. Millikan Award Lecture (August 2002): Global Study of the Role of the Laboratory in Physics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Presents the lecture given by the Millikan Award winner on a global study of the role of the laboratory in physics education. Discusses physics education in India, Malaysia, Great Britain, and the United States. (NB)

  11. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  12. Thomas L. Griffiths: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (2012). Thomas L. Griffiths won the award for bringing mathematical precision to the deepest questions in human learning, reasoning, and concept formation. In his pioneering work,…

  13. Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology: Nancy E. Adler

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Nancy E. Adler, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology, is cited for her research on reproductive health examining adolescent decision making with regard to contraception, conscious and preconscious motivations for pregnancy, and perception of risk for sexually transmitted diseases, and for her groundbreaking…

  14. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  15. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Steven F. Maier

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Steven F. Maier, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for his work in the fields of learned helplessness; cytokines, depressed mood, and cognitive interference; and the brain structures that produce and counteract learned helplessness. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected bibliography of Maier's…

  16. Interior design students win two IDEC Student Design Competition awards

    OpenAIRE

    Watson-Bloch, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Interior Design students in the School of Architecture + Design at Virginia Tech won two of the four awards presented in the 2004-2005 Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) Student Design Competition. Winners were selected at the International IDEC Conference in Savannah, Ga. with Virginia Tech Interior Design students winning second place and honorable mention.

  17. Daniel L. Schacter: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Daniel L. Schacter as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Daniel L. Schacter's major theoretical and empirical contributions include groundbreaking research on the psychological and neural foundations of implicit and explicit memory, memory distortions and…

  18. A Kiss Lajos-díj 2014. évi nyertese: dr. Slíz Mariann [The 2014 winner of Lajos Kiss Prize: Dr Mariann Slíz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, István

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lajos Kiss Prize, awarded every two or three years since 2006, is considered to be a highly prestigious award for young onomasticians. The 2014 winner of the prize is Dr Mariann Slíz, senior lecturer at the Department of Hungarian Linguistics and Finno-Ugric Studies of Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. She earned this award for her contribution to Hungarian Onomastics, especially in research on personal names.

  19. A Kiss Lajos-díj 2016. évi nyertese: dr. Póczos Rita [Winner of the 2016 Lajos Kiss Prize: Dr Rita Póczos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, István

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lajos Kiss Prize, awarded every two or three years since 2006, is considered to be a highly prestigious award for young onomasticians. The 2016 winner of the prize is Dr Rita Póczos, senior lecturer at the Department of Hungarian Linguistics of the University of Debrecen. She was given this award for her contribution to Hungarian Historical Onomastics, especially for her research on place names.

  20. Winners and Losers in Danish Soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    2011-01-01

    of main performance outputs in relation to the key factors of this function. The approach represents a sociological supplement to the ordinary performance benchmarks often used in sports economics, revealing FC Copenhagen and Brøndby IF as the main winners and AGF and Akademisk Boldklub (AB) as the main...

  1. J. David Creswell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize excellent young psychologists who have not held a doctoral degree for more than nine years. One of the 2014 award winners is J. David Creswell, for "outstanding and innovative research on mechanisms linking stress management strategies to disease." Creswell's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    It is with great pleasure and pride that we share the news of the award of the 2014 “City of Philadelphia John Scott Award”, to Dr. Leonard Hayflick and Dr. Paul Moorhead, for their research on ageing. The press release announcing the award states that: “from the first awarded in 1822, the Award is the oldest scientific award in the United States and, as a legacy to Benjamin Franklin, they are in the historic company of past winners who include Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Jonas Salk, Irving L...

  3. Adam M. Reid: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Adam M. Reid, who received this award "for his community service, in which he has integrated the highest standards of professional psychological clinical practice and science." Adam's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Gold awards for CERN's top suppliers!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's awards to the LHC project's best suppliers are now into their second year. Three companies received 'Golden Hadrons' for 2003. The Golden Hadron awards were presented to the delighted representatives of the winning firms by LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans on Friday 16 May. Only three out of the LHC's four hundred suppliers were lucky enough to receive a gold award. The consortium IHI (Japan)-Linde Kryotechnik (Switzerland), the Belgian company JDL Technologies and the Japanese firm Furukawa Electric Company were rewarded not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. The 2003 Golden Hadron winners with Lyn Evans. From left to right: Armin Senn, Thomas Voigt, Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of LINDE KRYOTECHNIK ; Tadaaki Honda, Project Leader and Motoki Yoshinaga, Associate Director of IHI Corporation ; Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader; Shinichiro Meguro, Managing Director of FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY ; Nobuyoshi Saji, Consulting Engineer of IHI Corporatio...

  5. FIRST LEGO League announces State Championship winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    PEAK Home School Network Team 1832 'Techno Warriors' of Brandon sport the Champions Award they won during the Dec. 8 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League 2007 Mississippi Championship Tournament.

  6. Chico Pereira, Ganador del Premio Cinematográfico de la Agencia Europea para la Seguridad y la Salud en el Trabajo con el largometraje "El Invierno de Pablo" The Film "Pablo's Winter" of Chico Pereira, Winner of the film award fron the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Limón Tamés

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La Agencia Europea para la Seguridad y la Salud en el Trabajo (EU-OSHA organiza cada año el Festival de Cine Documental de Leipzig (DOK, Leipzig en el que se otorga el Premio Cinematográfico "Lugares de Trabajo Saludables" al documental que destaque como promotor del debate y la reflexión entre los ciudadanos europeos sobre la importancia de la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo. Este año 2012, el Premio ha sido otorgado al largometraje "El invierno de Pablo" del director español Chico Pereira, que narra la cruda historia de Pablo, un minero jubilado que trabajó extrayendo cinabrio durante 30 años y que actualmente presenta unos pulmones y un corazón seriamente dañados como consecuencia de la continua exposición al sulfuro de mercurio. En España, la Red Española de Seguridad y Salud en el Trabajo, coordinada por el Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, organizará durante 2013 sesiones de cine forum en la que se podrán visionar las películas ganadoras del Certamen Cinematográfico "Lugares de Trabajo Saludables", como actividad divulgativa para el debate y la promoción de la cultura preventiva.The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA is supporting every year the Healthy Workplaces Film Award for the best documentary on work-related topics. The award is presented at the International Leipzig Festival for Documentary and Animated Film (DOK Leipzig. The award honours a documentary film that promotes the importance of workplace health and safety across Europe. The film "Pablo's Winter" won this year the edition, telling the story of a retired miner who had been working during 30 years in an old mercury mine in Spain and currently has his heart and lungs severely damaged as a result of continued exposure to mercury sulfide. In Spain, the Spanish Network of Safety and Health at Work, coordinated by the National Institute of Safety and Health at Work, is organizing during 2013 video screenings of

  7. CIP's Eighth Annual Educational Software Contest: The Winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Denis

    1997-01-01

    Announces the winners of an annual software contest for innovative software in physics education. Winning entries include an application to help students visualize the origin of energy bands in a solid, a package on the radioastronomy of pulsars, and a school-level science simulation program. Also includes student winners, honorable mentions,…

  8. Research award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... In the remaining 50% of the time, the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, general public); ...

  9. Research Award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, general ...

  10. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2017 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At this time, however, we do not offer awards for research that involves the following ... Overall appropriateness, completeness, quality, and clarity of the research ... the proposed research, including academic training, local language capacity, ...

  11. APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology: Luz Maria Garcini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. The 2016 award winners is Luz Maria Garcini, whose commitment to the health and mental health of those recently immigrated has led to research and service that "have greatly benefited the lives of undocumented individuals in the border area of southern California." Garcini's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology: Octavio Andres Santos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded annually by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. The 2017 award winner is Octavio Andres Santos, who has demonstrated through several initiatives "effective engagement with advocacy, professional organizations, and research in the area of health disparities and multicultural/multilingual assessment." Santos's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. 2011 EnergyValue Housing Award Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, D.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    This report details the simulation tool(s) and energy modeling methodology followed in making the energy efficiency estimates and documents the estimated performance of the EVHA award winning houses in comparison with the Building America Benchmark and the associated House Simulation Protocols. A summary of each building and its features is included with a brief description of the project and the judges' comments. The purpose of this report is to assess the energy performance of the 2011 EVHA winners as well as align the EVHA Program with the Building America Program.

  14. PERBANDINGAN KAPITALISASI PASAR PORTOFOLIO SAHAM WINNER DAN LOSER SAAT TERJADI ANOMALI WINNER-LOSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadioetomo Hadioetomo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Capital market anomaly showed that there was an anomaly in efficient capitalmarket hypothesis. One of its types was price reversal phenomenon, which showed that previouswinner portfolio became loser portfolio and vice versa. Price reversal phenomenon was alsoknown as overreaction market hypothesis (OMH. The hypothesis stated that if stock priceswere systematically valued overly as a consequence of investors’ over pessimism or optimism,price reversal certainly came from previous stock price performance. In this research, theresearcher analyzed price reversal phenomenon on Indonesia Stock Exchange (ISX by consideringabnormal return. The result of this research indicated that overreaction occur separate in itsmove. Winners and losers were not constant overtime. Analysis independent sample t test didnot show the different average abnormal return significantly so there was anomaly incapitalization market winner and loser.

  15. Google Science Fair winner visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Google Science Fair Grand Prize winner Brittany Michelle Wenger today wrapped up a day-and-a-half's visit of the CERN site. Her winning project uses an artificial neural network to diagnose breast cancer – a non-invasive technique with significant potential for use in hospitals.   Brittany Michelle Wenger at CERN's SM18 Hall. Besides winning a $50,000 scholarship from Google and work experience opportunities with some of the contest hosts, Brittany was offered a personal tour of CERN. “This visit has just been incredible,” she says. “I got to speak with [CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology] Steve Myers about some of the medical applications and technologies coming out of the LHC experiments and how they can be used to treat cancer. We talked about proton therapy and hadron therapy, which could really change the way patients are treated, improving success rates and making treatment not such an excruciating process. That ...

  16. The Third Edition of the Inka Brodzka-Wald Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Sujecka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Third Edition of the Inka Brodzka-Wald Award On 16 June 2015, the Academy for the Development of Philanthropy in Poland and the Adam Mickiewicz Literary Society announced the winners of the third edition of the Inka Brodzka-Wald Award for doctoral dissertations in the humanities. The competition was open for theses which concerned present issues and were defended in 2014.   Komunikat o rozstrzygnięciu trzeciej edycji Nagrody im. Inki Brodzkiej-Wald za rok 2014.

  17. 2017 Outstanding Contributions to ISCB Award: Fran Lewitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E; Berger, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    The Outstanding Contributions to the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Award was launched in 2015 to recognize individuals who have made lasting and valuable contributions to the Society through their leadership, service, and educational work, or a combination of these areas. Fran Lewitter is the 2017 winner of the Outstanding Contributions to ISCB Award and will be recognized at the 2017 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB)/European Conference on Computational Biology, meeting in Prague, Czech Republic being held from July 21-25, 2017.

  18. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  19. Fanny M. Cheung: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Fanny M. Cheung for her outstanding contributions to the assessment of cross-cultural psychopathology, personality psychology, and gender…

  20. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal…

  1. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Christian N. L. Olivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Christian N. L. Olivers, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for outstanding research on visual attention and working memory. Olivers uses classic experimental designs in an innovative and sophisticated way to determine underlying mechanisms. He has formulated important theoretical…

  2. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Charlotte J. Patterson

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Charlotte J. Patterson, winner of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited as the world's expert on psychological research on children and youths raised by lesbian and gay parents. Her early analytic syntheses of the literature on the subject greatly influenced other researchers in child and family…

  3. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    is the oldest scientific award in the United States and, as a legacy to Benjamin Franklin, they are in the historic company of past winners who include Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Jonas Salk, Irving Langmuir, Nicola Tesla, Guglielmo Marconi, R. Buckminister Fuller, Sir Alexander Fleming, Sir Howard Florey...

  4. Thou shall not steal: Nanyang Technological University Library’s drive to help students avoid plagiarism and achieve academic integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lee Yen

    2017-01-01

    Poster presented at the 5th International Plagiarism Conference, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Winner of Outstanding Academic Integrity Poster Case Study presented by International Association of Academic Integrity Conferences (IAAIC) alliance.

  5. Meet the winner artists of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan | 3 February

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su (left) and Pei-Ying Lin (right). Accelerate@CERN is the country-specific, one-month research award for artists who have never been in a science laboratory before. Accelerate@CERN Taiwan, is funded by the Ministry of Culture for Taiwan. From within thirty outstanding applicants, the winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su - dancer and choreographer - and Pei-Ying Lin - digital artist. This is the first opportunity for two talented artists to work and research together on the joint creation of a new dance project which engages with the digital realm and is inspired by the world of particle physics. In the past month they have been exploring CERN together, and now they are working on their project. Meet the artists on Wednesday 3 February at 4:30 p.m. in Restaurant 1. For more information on Accelerate@CERN, see here. Follow the artists blog to know what they have been doing for the past month at CERN.

  6. Luciano Maiani and Jean Iliopoulos awarded the Dirac Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Luciano Maiani, when he was Director-General of CERN. Jean Iliopoulos in 1999. (©CNRS Photothèque - Julien Quideau)On 8 August, the 2007 Dirac Medal, one of the most prestigious prizes in the fields of theoretical physics and mathematics, was awarded to Luciano Maiani, professor at Rome’s La Sapienza University and former Director-General of CERN, and to Jean Iliopoulos, emeritus Director of Research at the CNRS Laboratory of Theoretical Physics. The medal was awarded to both physicists for their joint "work on the physics of the charm quark, a major contribution to the birth of the Standard Model, the modern theory of Elementary Particles." Founded by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in 1985, the Dirac Medal is awarded annually on 8 August, the birthday of the famous physicist Paul Dirac, winner of the 1933 Nobel Prize for Physics. It is awarded to ...

  7. Quality in the 21st century perspectives from ASQ Feigenbaum medal winners

    CERN Document Server

    Saraiva, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This book is a compilation of perspectives provided by several winners of the ASQ Feigenbaum Medal, which is awarded each year to an individual under the age of 35 who has made a significant contribution to the field of Quality. As such, it serves as a valuable reference book in this area. It is primarily based on the medalists’ vision to "refresh" and "re-think" the quality concepts that have been used over the past century and the future development of the topic. Maximizing readers’ understanding of the ways in which Quality is created, it provides insights from pioneers in this field from around the globe and anticipates how and what Quality will be in the future, as well as how people and organizations can benefit from it today.

  8. Representatives of the companies receiving CMS Gold Awards on 15 March, pictured in front of the first superconducting coil module at the experiment construction site.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The fifth annual CMS awards ceremony was held at CERN on 15 March. This year, six of the approximately 1000 companies who work for CMS were honoured with the Gold Award for demonstrating excellence by providing parts on schedule, within budget and within specification. Two of the prize-winners also received the Crystal Award, which is given to a company that has taken further efforts to develop new designs, explore novel technologies and collaborate in research and development program

  9. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  10. Winners and losers of IWRM in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara van Koppen,

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the application of the concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM in Tanzania. It asks: how did IWRM affect the rural and fast-growing majority of smallholder farmersʼ access to water which contributes directly to poverty alleviation and employment creation in a country where poverty and joblessness are high? Around 1990, there were both a strong government-led infrastructure development agenda and IWRM ingredients in place, including cost-recovery of state services aligning with the Structural Adjustment Programmes, water management according to basin boundaries and the dormant colonial water rights (permits system. After the 1990s, the World Bank and other donors promoted IWRM with a strong focus on hydroelectric power development, River Basin Water Boards, transformation of the water right system into a taxation tool, and assessment of environmental flows. These practices became formalised in the National Water Policy (2002 and in the Water Resources Management Act (2009. Activities in the name of IWRM came to be closely associated with the post-2008 surge in large-scale land and water deals. Analysing 25 years of IWRM, the paper identifies the processes and identities of the losers (smallholders and – at least partially – the government and the winners (large-scale water users, including recent investors. We conclude that, overall, IWRM harmed smallholdersʼ access to water and rendered them more vulnerable to poverty and unemployment.

  11. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    of Dr Todd Evans, another significant mentor of mine, as winner of this prestigious award? Then, it happened. The paper covers several key topics related to high beta tokamak physics. For me, the greatest satisfaction in receiving this award is because it was the first Nuclear Fusion Award to recognize research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The achievement of record stability parameters in a mega-Ampere class spherical torus (ST) device reported in the paper represents a multi-year effort, contributed to by the entire research team. Research to maintain such plasmas for an indefinite period continues today. Understanding RWM stabilization physics is crucial for this goal, and leveraging the high beta ST operating space uniquely tests theory for application to future STs and to tokamaks in general, including advanced operational scenarios of ITER. For instance, the RWM was found to have significant amplitude in components with the toroidal mode number greater than unity. This has important implications for general active RWM control. Evidence that the RWM passive stabilization physics and marginal stability criterion are indeed more complex than originally thought was shown in this paper. Present work shows the greater complexity has a direct impact on how we should extrapolate RWM stabilization to future devices. The paper also reported the qualitative observation of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), followed by a companion paper by our group in 2006 reporting the quantitative observation of this effect and comparison to theory. The physics of this interesting and important phenomenon was introduced to me by Professor J. Callen (who has given an overview talk at this conference including this subject) and Professor Kerchung Shaing of the University of Wisconsin, to whom I am quite indebted. The paper also reported the first measurement of resonant field amplification at high beta in the NSTX

  12. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  13. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Christa; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2014-05-20

    This report assesses the use of institutional change principles and the institutional impact of award-winning projects through interviews with 22 Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (DOE FEMP) award winners. Award winners identified institutional facilitators and barriers in their projects and programs as well as factors in their implementation processes, thus providing information that can guide other efforts. We found that award winners do use strategies based on eight principles of institutional change, most frequently in terms of making changes to infrastructure, engaging leadership, and capitalizing on multiple motivations for making an energy efficiency improvement. The principles drawn on the least often were commitment and social empowerment. Award winners also faced five major types of obstacles that were institutional in nature: lack of resources, constraints of rules, psychological barriers, lack of information, and communication problems. We also used the seven categories of Energy Management Excellence (EME) as a lens to interpret the interview data and assess whether these categories relate to established institutional change principles. We found that the eight principles reflect strategies that have been found to be useful in improving energy efficiency in organizations, whereas the EME categories capture more of a blend of social contextual factors and strategies. The EME categories fill in some of the social context gaps that facilitate institutional change and energy management excellence, for example, personal persistence, a culture that supports creativity and innovation, regular engagement with tenants, contractors, and staff at all levels. Taking together the use of principles, EME criteria, and obstacles faced by interviewees, we make recommendations for how FEMP can better foster institutional change in federal agencies.

  14. Joint hypermobility in children with idiopathic scoliosis: SOSORT award 2011 winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Generalized joint hypermobility (JHM) refers to increased joint mobility with simultaneous absence of any other systemic disease. JHM involves proprioception impairment, increased frequency of pain within joints and tendency to injure soft tissues while performing physical activities. Children with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) often undergo intensive physiotherapy requiring good physical capacities. Further, some physiotherapy methods apply techniques that increase joint mobility and thus may be contraindicated. The aim of this paper was to assess JHM prevalence in children with idiopathic scoliosis and to analyze the relationship between JHM prevalence and the clinical and radiological parameters of scoliosis. The methods of assessment of generalized joint hypermobility were also described. Materials and methods This case-control study included 70 subjects with IS, aged 9-18 years (mean 13.2 ± 2.2), Cobb angle range 10°-53° (mean 24.3 ± 11.7), 34 presenting single curve thoracic scoliosis and 36 double curve thoracic and lumbar scoliosis. The control group included 58 children and adolescents aged 9-18 years (mean 12.6 ± 2.1) selected at random. The presence of JHM was determined using Beighton scale complemented with the questionnaire by Hakim and Grahame. The relationship between JHM and the following variables was evaluated: curve severity, axial rotation of the apical vertebra, number of curvatures (single versus double), number of vertebrae within the curvature (long versus short curves), treatment type (physiotherapy versus bracing) and age. Statistical analysis was performed with Statistica 8.1 (StatSoft, USA). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, U Mann-Whitney test, Chi2 test, Pearson and Spermann correlation rank were conducted. The value p = 0.05 was adopted as the level of significance. Results JHM was diagnosed in more than half of the subjects with idiopathic scoliosis (51.4%), whilst in the control group it was diagnosed in only 19% of cases (p = 0.00015). A significantly higher JHM prevalence was observed in both girls (p = 0.0054) and boys (p = 0.017) with IS in comparison with the corresponding controls. No significant relation was found between JHM prevalence and scoliosis angular value (p = 0.35), apical vertebra rotation (p = 0.86), the number of vertebrae within curvature (p = 0.8), the type of applied treatment (p = 0.55) and the age of subjects (p = 0.79). JHM prevalence was found to be higher in children with single curve scoliosis than in children with double curve scoliosis (p = 0.03). Conclusions JHM occurs more frequently in children with IS than in healthy sex and age matched controls. No relation of JHM with radiological parameters, treatment type and age was found. Systematically searched in IS children, JHM should be taken into account when physiotherapy is planned. PMID:21981906

  15. Joint hypermobility in children with idiopathic scoliosis: SOSORT award 2011 winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawłowska Paulina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized joint hypermobility (JHM refers to increased joint mobility with simultaneous absence of any other systemic disease. JHM involves proprioception impairment, increased frequency of pain within joints and tendency to injure soft tissues while performing physical activities. Children with idiopathic scoliosis (IS often undergo intensive physiotherapy requiring good physical capacities. Further, some physiotherapy methods apply techniques that increase joint mobility and thus may be contraindicated. The aim of this paper was to assess JHM prevalence in children with idiopathic scoliosis and to analyze the relationship between JHM prevalence and the clinical and radiological parameters of scoliosis. The methods of assessment of generalized joint hypermobility were also described. Materials and methods This case-control study included 70 subjects with IS, aged 9-18 years (mean 13.2 ± 2.2, Cobb angle range 10°-53° (mean 24.3 ± 11.7, 34 presenting single curve thoracic scoliosis and 36 double curve thoracic and lumbar scoliosis. The control group included 58 children and adolescents aged 9-18 years (mean 12.6 ± 2.1 selected at random. The presence of JHM was determined using Beighton scale complemented with the questionnaire by Hakim and Grahame. The relationship between JHM and the following variables was evaluated: curve severity, axial rotation of the apical vertebra, number of curvatures (single versus double, number of vertebrae within the curvature (long versus short curves, treatment type (physiotherapy versus bracing and age. Statistical analysis was performed with Statistica 8.1 (StatSoft, USA. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, U Mann-Whitney test, Chi2 test, Pearson and Spermann correlation rank were conducted. The value p = 0.05 was adopted as the level of significance. Results JHM was diagnosed in more than half of the subjects with idiopathic scoliosis (51.4%, whilst in the control group it was diagnosed in only 19% of cases (p = 0.00015. A significantly higher JHM prevalence was observed in both girls (p = 0.0054 and boys (p = 0.017 with IS in comparison with the corresponding controls. No significant relation was found between JHM prevalence and scoliosis angular value (p = 0.35, apical vertebra rotation (p = 0.86, the number of vertebrae within curvature (p = 0.8, the type of applied treatment (p = 0.55 and the age of subjects (p = 0.79. JHM prevalence was found to be higher in children with single curve scoliosis than in children with double curve scoliosis (p = 0.03. Conclusions JHM occurs more frequently in children with IS than in healthy sex and age matched controls. No relation of JHM with radiological parameters, treatment type and age was found. Systematically searched in IS children, JHM should be taken into account when physiotherapy is planned.

  16. Frank Beach Award Winner: Steroids as Neuromodulators of Brain Circuits and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remage-Healey, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily via action potentials that transmit information on the timescale of milliseconds. Neurons also integrate information via alterations in gene transcription and protein translation that are sustained for hours to days after initiation. Positioned between these two signaling timescales are the minute-by-minute actions of neuromodulators. Over the course of minutes, the classical neuromodulators (such as serotonin, dopamine, octopamine, and norepinephrine) can alter and/or stabilize neural circuit patterning as well as behavioral states. Neuromodulators allow many flexible outputs from neural circuits and can encode information content into the firing state of neural networks. The idea that steroid molecules can operate as genuine behavioral neuromodulators - synthesized by and acting within brain circuits on a minute-by-minute timescale - has gained traction in recent years. Evidence for brain steroid synthesis at synaptic terminals has converged with evidence for the rapid actions of brain-derived steroids on neural circuits and behavior. The general principle emerging from this work is that the production of steroid hormones within brain circuits can alter their functional connectivity and shift sensory representations by enhancing their information coding. Steroids produced in the brain can therefore change the information content of neuronal networks to rapidly modulate sensory experience and sensorimotor functions. PMID:25110187

  17. Wheatley Award 2017 Winner: How Physics Can Help Africa Transform, from a Problem to an Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Africa represents the world's greatest untapped pool of scientific and technical talent. The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) is providing outstanding postgraduate training and research opportunities to gifted students across the continent. Its alumni proceed to employment in fields ranging from epidemiology to natural resource management, information technology and mathematical finance, to engineering and pure research in physics and mathematics. Many have already had a major impact in revitalising Africa's universities, in tackling major epidemics, and in raising skills levels in industry and government. AIMS has opened six centres of excellence so far, in South Africa, Senegal, Ghana, Cameroon, Tanzania, and, most recently, Rwanda, and plans to grow to a network of fifteen centres over the next decade. Its 1200 alumni are at the leading edge of Africa's transformation into a knowledge-based society.

  18. In the Hunger Games, the Winner Takes Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel, Franziska; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Entosis is an atypical form of cell death that occurs when a cell engulfs and kills another cell. A recent article by Overholtzer and colleagues indicates that glucose deprivation promotes entosis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in the loser cells triggers their engulfment and elimination by winner cells, which endure starvation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria

  20. Global Power Play--Competition Winners Light Up the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This year's "Tech Directions" Inventors Competition asked students to come up with ways to provide electricity to remote villages that traditional electrical utilities have not yet reached. This article presents the results of the judging by inventor/electrical engineer Harry T. Roman. The winners are: (1) First Place--Scott Hulver,…

  1. Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-28

    Jan 28, 2011 ... Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with Senegalese colleagues ... South or the developed world are tackling the challenges of urban living. ... Upon his return to Canada, the 26-year-old wrote to IDRC the ...

  2. Winners & Sinners: What's Hot and What's Not in Alumni Merchandising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Wendy Ann

    1990-01-01

    A large part of any merchandising program is picking products that will sell. Sixty alumni professionals were asked about their ideas. Some of the winners included a watch with the institution's seal, a windsock, and athletic shoes. Some of the losers included a sweater and a commemorative plate. (MLW)

  3. Recipients of major scientific awards: A descriptive and predictive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Andrew Calvin

    Recent trends demonstrate an increase of women in leadership roles, STEM fields, and participating in higher education including graduate and doctoral programs, which is a result of Title IX. This quantitative study considered major scientific awards awarded to females and examines demographic characteristics of awardees from the Nobel, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and National Science Foundation (NSF). More specifically, the following awards were examined the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the NAS Public Welfare Medal, and the NSF National Medal of Science within the discipline of Physical Science. Also, this study focused on equality to determine if a fair playing field and equal opportunity for women in academics has improved since Title IX. A limited amount of research has explored female award recipients. Specifically, existing research, has not examined the pinnacle of academic performance in the form of national and international awards. In the present study, I posed research questions relating to demographic characteristics of award recipients from the Nobel, NAS, and NSF between 1975 and 2015. Additionally, I examined if sex and age of the awardees could predict early career award obtainment. Through the frame of Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997, and 2005) I considered how perceptions of gender roles are a product of influence by society and the possible connection to performance. Results indicated a limited number of females have received these scientific awards and the awardees age could predict receiving an award early in their career. Additionally, the study provided insight into the progression of Title IX within the context of athletics and academics. It addressed the incremental and systematic increase in academics for women at high school, college, career, and scientific awards. Perhaps most importantly, it identified an observed pattern for female science award recipients reaching a critical mass and a tipping point.

  4. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-30

    May 30, 2018 ... You must be enrolled at a Canadian university at the doctoral level ... IDRC Doctoral Research Awards are intended to promote the capacity and growth of ... including academic training, local language capacity, professional ... funding opportunity to support Canadian-African research teams studying Ebola.

  5. NWWA Science Award given

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Bill

    John G. Ferris, a U.S. Geological Survey retiree, received the National Water Well Association (NWWA) Science Award for 1985 on September 10, 1985, in Baltimore, Md. The award recognizes Ferris's renowned contributions to the science of groundwater.

  6. The "Karma Level Sexy Bottom" awards are back at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The highly coveted "Karma Level Sexy Bottom" awards are given to the winners of the “Bike to CERN” competition. There is only one way to secure your place in history: commute to work on your bike, no matter what the weather conditions are and how busy you may feel.   The president of the CERN cycling club, Henrik Nissen (left), with Tim Smith, one of the three winners of the “Bike to CERN” Challenge. At CERN, bikers have a dedicated club and can take part in two popular events designed to challenge them: Bike2Work, which has been going for 10 years and which, every June, mobilises some 50,000 employees from more than 1100 companies and organisations across Switzerland, and the “unofficial Bike to CERN” challenge, which runs throughout the year. In 2013, 125 people took part in this local competition, but many CERN personnel ride to work every day without registering their kilometres. The three winners, all correspond...

  7. Thomson Reuters innovation award research brief: the use of patent analytics in measuring innovation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stembridge, Bob

    2009-09-01

    There are six different factors that can be used to assess the inventiveness of an organization and to determine how efficiently they apply invention resources to innovate effectively. This research briefing describes the techniques used to measure certain aspects of patenting activity by Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) headquartered in India. The techniques are used to identify the most innovative SMEs in India in order to determine the winners of the Innovation Award 2009 from Thomson Reuters, awarded at InfoVision 2009 in Bangalore. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  8. Hybrid All-Pay and Winner-Pay Contests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlöf, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In many contests in economic and political life, both all-pay and winner-pay expenditures matter for winning. This paper studies such hybrid contests under symmetry and asymmetry. The symmetric model is very general but still yields a simple closed-form solution. More contestants tend to lead to ...... expenditures. An endogenous bias that maximizes total expenditures disfavors the high-valuation contestant but still makes her the more likely one to win....

  9. Alert with destruction of stratospheric ozone: 95 Nobel Prize Winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Zurita, E.

    1995-01-01

    After briefly summarizing the discoveries of the 95 Nobel Prize Winners in Chemistry related to the threats to the ozone layer by chemical pollutants, we make a soft presentation of the overall problem of stratospheric ozone, starting with the destructive catalytic cycles of the pollutant-based free radicals, following with the diffusion mathematical models in Atmospheric Chemistry, and ending with the increasing annual drama of the ozone hole in the Antarctica. (Author)

  10. Investigating Shifts in Diverse Family Structures in Newbery Award and Honor Books Utilizing U.S. Census Data, 1930-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despain, Shannon M.; Tunnell, Michael O.; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Newbery Award and Honor books are a representation of children's literature, but family structures portrayed in them have not previously been studied. This prescriptive content analysis considered 87 contemporary realistic fiction Newbery winners and runners-up since the 1930s that portray families in English-speaking, Western settings. The family…

  11. 34 CFR 425.2 - Who is eligible for an award?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.2 Who is eligible for an award? (a) The following entities are eligible for an award under the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  12. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Alex Ince-Cushman, John deGrassie, Lars-Goran Eriksson, Yoshiteru Sakamoto, Andrea Scarabosio and Yuri Podpaly, as well as the other coauthors. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to Earl Marmar, Martin Greenwald and Miklos Porkolab at MIT for continued support of this work, as well as to the entire C-Mod team. This award was made possible due to the insight of Mitsuru Kikuchi and the support of the IAEA through Werner Burkhart, and I am truly grateful to both of them. Many thanks as well to the outstanding staff at Nuclear Fusion. It is a distinct honor to be included in the group of previous winners: Tim Luce, Clemente Angioni, Todd Evans and Steve Sabbagh. It is also a great honor to be considered alongside the 2010 nominees: Phil Snyder, Sibylle Guenter, Maiko Yoshida, Hajime Urano, Fulvio Zonca, Erik Garcia, Costanza Maggi, Hartmut Zohm, Thierry Loarer and Bruce Lipschultz. Finally, I would like to thank the readers of Nuclear Fusion for the many citations. John Rice 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award winner Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA

  13. A Game Theoretical Approach for Solving Winner Determination Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kun Tsung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the winners in combinatorial auctions to maximize the auctioneer's revenue is an NP-complete problem. Computing an optimal solution requires huge computation time in some instances. In this paper, we apply three concepts of the game theory to design an approximation algorithm: the stability of the Nash equilibrium, the self-learning of the evolutionary game, and the mistake making of the trembling hand assumption. According to our simulation results, the proposed algorithm produces near-optimal solutions in terms of the auctioneer's revenue. Moreover, reasonable computation time is another advantage of applying the proposed algorithm to the real-world services.

  14. Into the black. 1993 Hospital Turnaround Contest winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerne, F; Bergman, R

    1993-07-20

    Turning a hospital around takes a lot more than adjusting the financials, as the winners and finalists in the Great Comebacks 1993: The Hospital Turnaround Contest demonstrate. In every case we report on, the hospital being recognized has worked intensively with its community to reassess the services needed by its patients, build support for major management and delivery changes, and articulate the reasons for the strategies being used. Each of the eight hospital organizations we profile, which are spread across the country from Texas to Wisconsin to Maine to North Carolina--has put together its own version of success--in other words, eight lessons in innovation and progress.

  15. Google Science Fair 2012 : Grand Prize Winner Brittany Wenger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    17-18 age category AND Grand Prize Winner: Brittany Wenger (USA)—“Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.” Brittany’s project harnesses the power of the cloud to help doctors accurately diagnose breast cancer. Brittany built an application that compares individual test results to an extensive dataset stored in the cloud, allowing doctors to assess tumors using a minimally-invasive procedure. Brittany Michelle Wenger, and her mother, passed through the CERN Control Centre accompanied by Mike Lamont, CERN Beams Department, Operation Group Leader.

  16. Is the Chinese Army the Real Winner in PLA Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    44 Commentary / The Chinese Army and PLA Reforms JFQ 83, 4th Quarter 2016 Is the Chinese Army the Real Winner in PLA Reforms? By Phillip C. Saunders...and John Chen G round force officers run China’s military, the People’s Liberation Army ( PLA ). About 70 percent of PLA soldiers serve in the PLA ...Saunders and Chen 45 services and arms of the PLA ” has meant reductions in “technologically backward” PLAA units and personnel increases for the other

  17. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-01-01

    Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (T...

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  19. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  20. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  1. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  2. Golden Hadrons 2004: and the winners are …

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    For the third year running, CERN has awarded a prize to its best LHC suppliers. Three companies were presented with the Golden Hadron 2004. On Friday 30 July, three of the two hundred suppliers for the LHC were presented with Golden Hadron awards by Lyn Evans. This is the third year that the awards have been presented. This year it was the turn of Alstom-MSA (France), Ernesto Malvestiti S.p.A. (Italy) and Simic S.p.A. (Italy) to receive awards, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. From left to right: Sandro Ferraris (SIMIC), Guiseppi Ginola (SIMIC), Gérard Grunblatt (ALSTOM), Phillippe Mocaer (ALSTOM), Gianfranco Malvestiti (ERNESTO MALVESTITI), Ernesto Malvestiti (ERNESTO MALVESTITI) Alstom-MSA was awarded the prize for manufacturing superconducting cable for the LHC's main magnets, the dipoles designed to steer the particles round the accelerator and the quadrupoles designed to focus the particle beams. Seven thousand kilometres ...

  3. Another Record Year for Academic Pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how, fueled by the war on terrorism, Congress has awarded a record $1.8 billion in academic earmarks in the 2002 fiscal year. Profiles several recipient programs and includes a campus-by-campus list of projects. (EV)

  4. Modelling Dominance Hierarchies Under Winner and Loser Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Klodeta; Broom, Mark; Kandler, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Animals that live in groups commonly form themselves into dominance hierarchies which are used to allocate important resources such as access to mating opportunities and food. In this paper, we develop a model of dominance hierarchy formation based upon the concept of winner and loser effects using a simulation-based model and consider the linearity of our hierarchy using existing and new statistical measures. Two models are analysed: when each individual in a group does not know the real ability of their opponents to win a fight and when they can estimate their opponents' ability every time they fight. This estimation may be accurate or fall within an error bound. For both models, we investigate if we can achieve hierarchy linearity, and if so, when it is established. We are particularly interested in the question of how many fights are necessary to establish a dominance hierarchy.

  5. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    year, paid, ... the areas of democracy, human rights and economic growth. ... Networked Economies is seeking a Research Award Recipient to explore research questions ... such as engineering or computer/information science;.

  6. CASE Recognition Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  7. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  8. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  9. Research Award: Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division ... successful candidate's time will include contributions to program operations, which may include ... Civil engineering. • Water resource ...

  10. 2015 Gulf Guardian Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  11. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  12. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  13. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through the use of a mock trial experiment, the research revealed that jurors discounted a juvenile's coerced confession and sometimes used intellectual disability as a mitigating factor. Attribution theory and the discounting principle were used to identify the psychological mechanisms underlying this effect. The paper, titled 'Understanding Jurors' Judgments in Cases Involving Juvenile Defendants,' was published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law in October 2011 and was the basis for Najdowski's selection as the recipient of the 2012 Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. Bette L. Bottoms, PhD, served as faculty supervisor. Najdowski's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (TQM and reached their goal of winning the prestigious Deming Prize. The common working principles of these companies and the various tools and techniques used by them are described in a concise manner in this paper. Further, the paper highlights the lessons from these companies to inspire others. The data taken from the respective websites of the companies has been used to list out the objectives, methodologies, and the benefits accrued by the companies.

  15. Interview with 2018 Hooke medal winner Andrew McAinsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-14

    Andrew McAinsh received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK, working in the laboratory of Steve Jackson on DNA damage and repair mechanisms in yeast. He then joined the laboratory of Peter Sorger as a Jane Coffin Childs Fellow to work as a post-doc on kinetochore biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, USA. In 2005, he returned to the UK to establish his independent laboratory at the Marie Curie Research Institute, Surrey, before moving to the University of Warwick in 2009 to co-found the Centre for Mechanochemical Cell Biology (CMCB). Subsequently, Andrew was appointed Professor of Cell Biology and became a Wellcome Senior Investigator, and was awarded a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award. He co-directs the MRC Doctoral Training Partnership in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research, and in 2017 became Head of Division of Biomedical Sciences at Warwick Medical School. Andrew is interested in understanding how the chromosomal multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, ensures error-free chromosome segregation. He is the recipient of the 2018 Hooke medal, established to recognize an emerging leader in cell biology. The Hooke medal is awarded at the annual spring meeting of the British Society for Cell Biology (BSCB). © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Route de Meyrin-CERN: and the winner is...

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Last night, CERN’s engagement with society took an important step forward with the unveiling of the winner of the architectural competition for the Route de Meyrin between CERN’s entrances A and B. The winning entry is a project entitled “Metaphoros”, entered by Studio Bürgi of Ticino.   Metaphoros was selected by a jury, of which I was a member, from an impressive range of proposals from around the world. It will be some time before construction gets underway, but anyone who’d like a forward look at how the gateway to CERN will look from 2014 can visit an exhibition in the Globe opening today and running until 28 January. The exhibition focuses on the winning entry, but also has a place for the runners-up, and for the Cosmic Rings of CERN proposal for buildings and landscaping around the Globe, which, subject to external funding, will merge seamlessly with Metaphoros as the next phase in the redevelopment of CERN’s public sp...

  17. Amateur boxing: activity profile of winners and losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip; Wittekind, Anna; Beneke, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    An activity profile of competitive 3 × 2-min novice-level amateur boxing was created based on video footage and postbout blood [La] in 32 male boxers (mean ± SD) age 19.3 ± 1.4 y, body mass 62.6 ± 4.1 kg. Winners landed 18 ± 11 more punches than losers by applying more lead-hand punches in round 1 (34.2 ± 10.9 vs 26.5 ± 9.4), total punches to the head (121.3 ± 10.2 vs 96.0 ± 9.8), and block and counterpunch combinations (2.8 ± 1.1 vs. 0.1 ± 0.2) over all 3 rounds and punching combinations (44.3 ± 6.4 vs 28.8 ± 6.7) in rounds 1 and 3 (all P < .05). In 16 boxers, peak postbout blood [La] was 11.8 ± 1.6 mmol/L irrespective of winning or losing. The results suggest that landing punches requires the ability to maintain a high frequency of attacking movements, in particular the lead-hand straight punch to the head together with punching combinations. Defensive movements must initiate a counterattack. Postbout blood [La] suggests that boxers must be able to tolerate a lactate production rate of 1.8 mmol · L-1 · min-1 and maintain skillful techniques at a sufficient activity rate.

  18. Academic Inbreeding in the Portuguese Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Orlanda; Cardoso, Sónia; Carvalho, Teresa; Sousa, Sofia Branco; Santiago, Rui

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the inbreeding phenomena in Portuguese public universities. Inbreeding is defined as the recruitment of academics by the same institution that awarded their PhDs. Focusing on 1,217 PhD-holding Portuguese academics, belonging to four public universities and to six disciplinary areas, inbreeding is analysed in order to understand…

  19. Message from the ISCB: 2015 ISCB Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award: Cyrus Chothia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2015-07-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org) honors a senior scientist annually for his or her outstanding achievements with the ISCB Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award. This award recognizes a leader in the field of computational biology for his or her significant contributions to the community through research, service and education. Cyrus Chothia, an emeritus scientist at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology and emeritus fellow of Wolfson College at Cambridge University, England, is the 2015 ISCB Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award winner.Chothia was selected by the Awards Committee, which is chaired by Dr Bonnie Berger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He will receive his award and deliver a keynote presentation at 2015 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology/European Conference on Computational Biology in Dublin, Ireland, in July 2015. dkovats@iscb.org. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Research Award: Canadian Partnerships

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  1. FAQs for Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    I am a student enrolled in a master's program. ... I am required to complete an internship in an organization selected by my university. Can ... Yes, you are responsible for obtaining a valid work permit and proper visa prior to starting your award.

  2. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  3. ISIAQ Academy Awards 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaroff, William W.; Clausen, Geo; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate (Indoor Air 2014) was convened in Hong Kong during the week of 7–12 July 2014. Professor Yuguo Li served as the Conference President. One of many highlights was the presentation of awards from the ISIAQ Academy of Fellows, which...

  4. Awards and honours

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  5. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Salivary hormones and anxiety in winners and losers of an international judo competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacosta, Elena; Nassis, George P; Gleeson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses of salivary hormones and salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and anxiety in winners and losers during an international judo competition. Twenty-three trained, male, national-level judo athletes provided three saliva samples during a competition day: morning, in anticipation of competition after an overnight fast, mid-competition, and post-competition within 15 min post-fight for determination of salivary cortisol, salivary testosterone, salivary testosterone/cortisol ratio, SIgA absolute concentrations, SIgA secretion rate and saliva flow rate. The competitive state anxiety inventory questionnaire was completed by the athletes (n = 12) after the first saliva collection for determination of somatic anxiety, cognitive anxiety and self-confidence. Winners were considered 1-3 ranking place (n = 12) and losers (n = 11) below third place in each weight category. Winners presented higher anticipatory salivary cortisol concentrations (p = 0.03) and a lower mid-competition salivary testosterone/cortisol ratio (p = 0.003) compared with losers with no differences for salivary testosterone. Winners tended to have higher SIgA secretion rates (p = 0.07) and higher saliva flow rates (p = 0.009) at mid-competition. Higher levels of cognitive anxiety (p = 0.02) were observed in the winners, without differences according to the outcome in somatic anxiety and self-confidence. The results suggest that winners experienced higher levels of physiological arousal and better psychological preparedness in the morning, and as the competition progressed, the winners were able to control their stress response better.

  7. Simulated ocean acidification reveals winners and losers in coastal phytoplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart T Bach

    Full Text Available The oceans absorb ~25% of the annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This causes a shift in the marine carbonate chemistry termed ocean acidification (OA. OA is expected to influence metabolic processes in phytoplankton species but it is unclear how the combination of individual physiological changes alters the structure of entire phytoplankton communities. To investigate this, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms (volume ~50 m3 for 113 days at the west coast of Sweden and simulated OA (pCO2 = 760 μatm in five of them while the other five served as controls (380 μatm. We found: (1 Bulk chlorophyll a concentration and 10 out of 16 investigated phytoplankton groups were significantly and mostly positively affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. However, CO2 effects on abundance or biomass were generally subtle and present only during certain succession stages. (2 Some of the CO2-affected phytoplankton groups seemed to respond directly to altered carbonate chemistry (e.g. diatoms while others (e.g. Synechococcus were more likely to be indirectly affected through CO2 sensitive competitors or grazers. (3 Picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (0.2-2 μm showed the clearest and relatively strong positive CO2 responses during several succession stages. We attribute this not only to a CO2 fertilization of their photosynthetic apparatus but also to an increased nutrient competitiveness under acidified (i.e. low pH conditions. The stimulating influence of high CO2/low pH on picoeukaryote abundance observed in this experiment is strikingly consistent with results from previous studies, suggesting that picoeukaryotes are among the winners in a future ocean.

  8. Simulated ocean acidification reveals winners and losers in coastal phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Lennart T; Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago; Hornick, Thomas; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    The oceans absorb ~25% of the annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This causes a shift in the marine carbonate chemistry termed ocean acidification (OA). OA is expected to influence metabolic processes in phytoplankton species but it is unclear how the combination of individual physiological changes alters the structure of entire phytoplankton communities. To investigate this, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms (volume ~50 m3) for 113 days at the west coast of Sweden and simulated OA (pCO2 = 760 μatm) in five of them while the other five served as controls (380 μatm). We found: (1) Bulk chlorophyll a concentration and 10 out of 16 investigated phytoplankton groups were significantly and mostly positively affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. However, CO2 effects on abundance or biomass were generally subtle and present only during certain succession stages. (2) Some of the CO2-affected phytoplankton groups seemed to respond directly to altered carbonate chemistry (e.g. diatoms) while others (e.g. Synechococcus) were more likely to be indirectly affected through CO2 sensitive competitors or grazers. (3) Picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) showed the clearest and relatively strong positive CO2 responses during several succession stages. We attribute this not only to a CO2 fertilization of their photosynthetic apparatus but also to an increased nutrient competitiveness under acidified (i.e. low pH) conditions. The stimulating influence of high CO2/low pH on picoeukaryote abundance observed in this experiment is strikingly consistent with results from previous studies, suggesting that picoeukaryotes are among the winners in a future ocean.

  9. Simulated ocean acidification reveals winners and losers in coastal phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago; Hornick, Thomas; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    The oceans absorb ~25% of the annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This causes a shift in the marine carbonate chemistry termed ocean acidification (OA). OA is expected to influence metabolic processes in phytoplankton species but it is unclear how the combination of individual physiological changes alters the structure of entire phytoplankton communities. To investigate this, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms (volume ~50 m3) for 113 days at the west coast of Sweden and simulated OA (pCO2 = 760 μatm) in five of them while the other five served as controls (380 μatm). We found: (1) Bulk chlorophyll a concentration and 10 out of 16 investigated phytoplankton groups were significantly and mostly positively affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. However, CO2 effects on abundance or biomass were generally subtle and present only during certain succession stages. (2) Some of the CO2-affected phytoplankton groups seemed to respond directly to altered carbonate chemistry (e.g. diatoms) while others (e.g. Synechococcus) were more likely to be indirectly affected through CO2 sensitive competitors or grazers. (3) Picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (0.2–2 μm) showed the clearest and relatively strong positive CO2 responses during several succession stages. We attribute this not only to a CO2 fertilization of their photosynthetic apparatus but also to an increased nutrient competitiveness under acidified (i.e. low pH) conditions. The stimulating influence of high CO2/low pH on picoeukaryote abundance observed in this experiment is strikingly consistent with results from previous studies, suggesting that picoeukaryotes are among the winners in a future ocean. PMID:29190760

  10. McJimsey Award Winner: Ideologies of the Shri Meenakshi Goushala: Hindu and Jain Motivations for a Madurai Cow Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay describes and analyzes the motivations underlying the creation and current organization of a recently constructed 'goshala '(cow home in the south Indian city of Madurai.  Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in 2012, I highlight the divergent visions of the 'goshala'’s purpose and future that were articulated by the institution’s Hindu and Jain members.  Interviews and informal conversations with participants indicate that many individuals conceptualize only one “authentic” tradition of animal homes.  However, within Madurai’s 'goshala 'and likely many others like it, these stakeholders referred to distinctly different traditions.  I argue that Hindu and Jain understandings of 'ahimsa '(nonviolence and the cow vary significantly, and this strongly affects individual expectations of the mission of animal homes.  Utilizing Hobsbawm and Ranger’s framework (1983, I note that the many “invented traditions” of animal homes may be difficult to accommodate within one institution, especially one with a religiously diverse membership.  I further suggest that transparent discussions which clearly indicate an animal home’s goals and mission are necessary and that the outcomes of these discussions should be effectively communicated to the wider community supporting the institution.

  11. 2007 Preserve America Presidential Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    aviation history museum that emphasizes people and culture as well as technology and events. With a the Private Preservation category, the two winners are: The History Channel, Save Our History Save Our History were Abbe Raven, president and CEO, A&E Television Networks; and Nancy Dubuc

  12. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.

    2014-07-01

    The Greeley Early Career Award is named for pioneering planetary scientist Ronald Greeley. Ron was involved in nearly every major planetary mission from the 1970s until his death and was extraordinarily active in service to the planetary science community. Ron's greatest legacies, however, are those he mentored through the decades, and it is young scientists whose work and promise we seek to recognize. This year's Greeley award winner is Jonathan L. Mitchell, an assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Jonathan received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and after a postdoc at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, he joined the UCLA faculty, where he holds a joint appointment in Earth and space sciences and in atmospheric sciences.

  13. Michael K. Scullin: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Michael K. Scullin as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. "For an outstanding research paper that examines the relationship between prospective memory in executing a goal and various lapses of time from 20 minutes up to a 12- hour wake delay and a 12-hour sleep delay. The results suggest that consolidation processes active during sleep increase the probability of goal execution. The paper, titled 'Remembering to Execute a Goal: Sleep On It!' was published in Psychological Science in 2010 and was the basis for Michael K. Scullin's selection as the recipient of the 2011 Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. Mark A. McDaniel, PhD, served as faculty research advisor." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Exploring Academic Misconduct: Some Insights into Student Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Academic research and newspaper stories suggest that academic misconduct, including plagiarism, is on the increase. This apparent increase coupled with new internet enterprises selling "pass" papers and customized research are worrying trends. Academic misconduct is deeply harmful in a number of ways by devaluing awards, frustrating…

  15. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  16. On the need for nuclear waste management. Keynote address by the award winner on the occasion of the Otto Hahn Prize awarding ceremony 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgaertner, F.

    1988-06-01

    One may find reasons justifying one's hopes in the sun or wind or other sources of energy to replace nuclear energy, or even reasons justifying the selfish attitude of those who believe that, for our lifetime, money will buy us enough fossil fuels to continue, but all this may not and must not let us close our eyes to the main problem that must be solved in the next few decades: disposal of the nuclear wastes. Shutting down all nuclear power plants would not free us from the problem at all. In 1986, medical and research establishments and industry have produced more than twice the amount of medium level and low level radioactive waste than have the nuclear power plants. However, even if we would place our hopes in the solar power plant and decide to abandon nuclear power, and even if society would also be prepared to close down the nuclear medical departments of the hospitals, to prohibit the use of radioactive substances by research and industry, we still would have to cope for a certain transitional period with the spent fuel accumulated so far, so that safe reprocessing and disposal of radioactive wastes is a problem remaining in any case.

  17. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  18. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  19. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  20. A New Hybrid Algorithm to Solve Winner Determination Problem in Multiunit Double Internet Auction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Ykhlef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solving winner determination problem in multiunit double auction has become an important E-business task. The main issue in double auction is to improve the reward in order to match the ideal prices and quantity and make the best profit for sellers and buyers according to their bids and predefined quantities. There are many algorithms introduced for solving winner in multiunit double auction. Conventional algorithms can find the optimal solution but they take a long time, particularly when they are applied to large dataset. Nowadays, some evolutionary algorithms, such as particle swarm optimization and genetic algorithm, were proposed and have been applied. In order to improve the speed of evolutionary algorithms convergence, we will propose a new kind of hybrid evolutionary algorithm that combines genetic algorithm (GA with particle swarm optimization (PSO to solve winner determination problem in multiunit double auction; we will refer to this algorithm as AUC-GAPSO.

  1. Can We Predict the Winner in a Market with Network Effects? Competition in Cryptocurrency Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Gandal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how network effects affect competition in the nascent cryptocurrency market. We do so by examining early dynamics of exchange rates among different cryptocurrencies. While Bitcoin essentially dominates this market, our data suggest no evidence of a winner-take-all effect early in the market. Indeed, for a relatively long period, a few other cryptocurrencies competing with Bitcoin (the early industry leader appreciated much more quickly than Bitcoin. The data in this period are consistent with the use of cryptocurrencies as financial assets (popularized by Bitcoin, and not consistent with winner-take-all dynamics. Toward the end of our sample, however, things change dramatically. Bitcoin appreciates against the USD, while other currencies depreciate against the USD. The data in this period are consistent with strong network effects and winner-take-all dynamics. This trend continues at the time of writing.

  2. NAVIGATING A QUALITY ROUTE TO A NATIONAL SAFETY AWARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PREVETTE SS

    2009-05-26

    Center. On October 1,2008, a transition occurred that changed Fluor's role at Hanford. Fluor's work at Hanford was split in two with the technical scope being assumed by the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) CHPRC is now spearheading much of the cleanup work associated with former nuclear-processing facilities, contaminated groundwater, and transuranic waste. Fluor is an integrated subcontractor to CH PRC in this effort. In addition, at the time of this writing, while the final outcome is being determined for the new Mission Support Contract, Fluor Hanford has had its contract extended to provide site-wide services that include security, fire protection, infrastructure, and operating the HAMMER facility. The emphasis has to be on doing work safely, delivering quality work, controlling costs, and meeting deadlines. Statistical support is provided by Fluor to the PRC, within Fluor Hanford, and to a third contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, which is tasked with cleaning up approximately 210 square miles designated as the Columbia River corridor along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The closing months of Fluor Hanford's 12 year contract were busy, characterized by special events that capped its work as a prime cleanup contractor, transitions of work scope and personnel, and the completion numerous activities. At this time, Fluor's work and approach to safety were featured in state and national forums. A 'Blockbuster' presentation at the Washington State Governor's Industrial Safety Conference in September 2008 featured Fluor Hanford's Chief Operating Officer, a company Safety Representative, and me. Simultaneously, an award ceremony in Anaheim, Calif. recognized Fluor Hanford as the winner of the 2008 Robert W. Campbell Award. The Robert W. Campbell Award is co-sponsored by Exxon Mobil Corporation and the National Safety Council. Named after a pioneer of industrial safety, the Campbell Award recognizes organizations

  3. Assessing and identifying transitional losers and winners in the Serbian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ways to assess and evaluate losers and winners in the Serbian transitional society, through several concrete examples. Therefore, the paper is a follow-up of the manuscript published in the previous Bulletin of Institute of ethnography, and fits into the theoretical framework already stated. The main indicator of a variety of assessment regarding losers and winners is found among comments made by visitors of relevant Internet web sites, referring to news about societal problems and issues during the process of post-socialist transformation. These are directly linked with a phenomenon of losing or winning in transition, such as unemployment, poverty, criminal, success, failure, wealth, and power. Hence, news from two internet sites "Blic" i "B92" served as a source, while their visitors ‘commentaries to the particular news served in the analysis. Specific news was used to define a particular problem or issue, and the commentaries were seen as reactions to the news. The commentaries contain readers’ attitudes, assessment of particular issues and discourses overview. These comments were chosen based on whether they refer directly to the problem of losing/winning in transition, and on their diversity regarding assessment of the problem itself. At the same time, posted texts on the mentioned sites were not unbiased, and they can also serve to identify losers and winners of transition. Defining a category of losers or winners in transition is a complex issue of various interpretations and constructions, making thus a discrepancy in attributed meanings among the members of Serbian society. Controversy and contradictions in expressed attitudes about losers and winners, as well as understanding of these categories, could be explained by various aspects and outlooks held. In brief, an existing particular social heteroglossia, assumes many different readings and attitudes regarding the categories, caused by various factors. The

  4. R&D 100 Awards | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    R&D 100 Awards R&D 100 Awards NREL has won 61 R&D 100 Awards. Widely recognized as the Oscars of Invention, the R&D 100 Awards are presented by R&D Magazine to identify and celebrate the top technological advances of the year. Recent R&D 100 Awards 2016 NREL engineers Chuck Booten

  5. SPIE Smart Structures Product Implementation Award: a review of the first ten years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Sater, Janet M.

    2007-04-01

    The research field of smart materials and structures has been a distinct entity for two decades. Over the past ten years, the SPIE Industrial and Commercial Applications Conference has presented a Smart Structures Product Implementation Award at its annual symposium. This paper revisits the nine winning entries to date (1998-2007) and updates their status. The paper begins with a brief description of the original and current intent of the award and follows with a short overview of the evolution of smart structures, from research to products. The winning teams and their respective products are then described. The current status of the products is discussed based on publicly available information and input from the respective companies. Note however that it is not the purpose of the paper to rank the product winners in terms of success or sales. The paper concludes with an assessment of the larger trends in productization of smart structures technologies. The application "form" for the award as well as the evaluation criteria and suggestions for improving award application packages can be found in the appendix.

  6. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  7. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  8. Atoms for peace awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    In making their annual selection for 1968 the Atoms for Peace Award Trust has paid signal tribute to the Agency. Each of the three recipients has for many years contributed to its work. Sigvard Eklund, Abdus Salam and Henry DeWolf Smyth received their gold medallion and $30 000 honorarium at a ceremony in New York on 14 October this year. All of them have achieved high distinction in science, but their greatest efforts have been to make the world aware of the benefits to be gained from using nuclear knowledge for peace, health and prosperity. (author)

  9. "the winners" and "the losers" in a globalized world: the case of Amazon rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Majewska, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper by using the approach of "the winners" and "the losers" both in economy and environment emphasizes the multiple outcomes that can emerge as a result of interaction between the eager will of profit over the need to protect the environment. The case of the "Amazonian rainforest from Brazil" was taken as an illustrative example

  10. DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics October 3, 2006 WASHINGTON, DC Space Flight Center for co-winning the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. "I offer my congratulations to with the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics," Secretary Bodman said. "The groundbreaking work of

  11. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  12. The last SPR dinner awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce

    1992-03-01

    Because the Solar-Planetary Relationships section of AGU has officially changed its name to Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), the December 10, 1991, section dinner award ceremony at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was the last of the series. Presumably an SPA dinner award series will be started under President-elect Andy Nagy.We have followed our tradition of recognizing the special talents of section members at the annual dinner. This year we had eight awardees. These awards are given in fun and are intended to be humorous. The selection committee defining the awards (the awards are changed regularly to keep people from trying to win one) and selecting the awardees will have to remain anonymous. (The committee is similar to Skull and Bones, but we are politically correct in that we allow women as members.)

  13. Environmental Protection Agency Award Recipient Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itemized Award Phase information. Information about the Recipient's Responsibilities Upon Notification of the Award, The EPA Project Officer Responsibilities, and EPA Grant Specialists Responsibilities.

  14. Who are the winners? E-book consortial purchasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Woodward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The e-book consortia pilot project was funded by Jisc Collections during 2012/2013 and managed by Information Power Ltd. The aim of the project was to see if there is an effective way to purchase e-books on a title-by-title basis with a collaborative group of academic libraries. The project explored a range of questions including: did all books receive sufficient use to provide value for money for libraries; how such an initiative could be equitably funded by libraries; how much would publishers charge; what benefits there would be for participating publishers; and how it would be managed. The project focused on engineering e-books, and usage data and cost data was collected and analysed in depth.

  15. Award for Lise Meitner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    It is a matter of history that the work in the 1930's of Lise Meitner, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann played a great part in pointing the way to exploiting the possibilities of fission. One of the most interesting occasions the Agency has known came in 1963 when Lise Meitner paid a visit to talk about her life as a scientist, thus returning to the city where she had started her university career in 1901. Her account of a career which had brought her into contact with scientists such as Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Bohr and many others took her listeners back to the birth of the atomic age. A photograph is shown taken at Dr. Meitner's home in Cambridge, UK, when she received the Enrico Fermi award for 1966, shared with Hahn and Strassmann

  16. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  17. Prestigious award for SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    SOHO spacecraft artist's impression hi-res Size hi-res: 451 Kb Credits: ESA SOHO spacecraft SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. SOHO's science ranges from the Sun's hot interior, through its visible surface and stormy atmosphere, and out to distant regions where the wind from the Sun battles with a breeze of atoms coming from among the stars. The award recognises both the outstanding achievements in designing, building and operating the mission, as well as the science it has performed. It is a tribute to a team that has contributed to one of the most successful space missions in history. The International Academy of Astronautics presents this award in recognition of extraordinary performance and achievement by teams of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of astronautics. This honour has been awarded only twice before - to the Russian Mir Space Station Team and the US Space Shuttle Team. Now the SOHO team joins this select group. The citation of the award for the SOHO team reads: "To the team of scientists, engineers and managers for the development and operation of a world-class mission leading to substantial advancements in understanding the Sun and the solar-terrestrial relationship." SOHO has an impressive and unique list of achievements. For instance, it produced the first ever images of the turbulent outer shell of the Sun and of the structure below sunspots. It gave the most precise measurements of the solar temperature structure, the interior rotation and the gas flows inside the Sun. It measured the acceleration of the fast and slow solar winds and discovered new solar phenomena, such as solar tornadoes. It revolutionised our ability to forecast space weather, and helped our understanding of the impact of solar variability on Earth's climate. During eight years of operation, the team has had to face several heart-stopping moments, but with extraordinary team spirit, skill and competence, they turned these

  18. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  19. 34 CFR 84.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award. 84.605 Section 84.605 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the Department of Education or...

  20. Hierarchical Winner-Take-All Particle Swarm Optimization Social Network for Neural Model Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Brandon S.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Sommer, Alexandra L.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) has gained widespread use as a general mathematical programming paradigm and seen use in a wide variety of optimization and machine learning problems. In this work, we introduce a new variant on the PSO social network and apply this method to the inverse problem of input parameter selection from recorded auditory neuron tuning curves. The topology of a PSO social network is a major contributor to optimization success. Here we propose a new social network which draws influence from winner-take-all coding found in visual cortical neurons. We show that the winner-take-all network performs exceptionally well on optimization problems with greater than 5 dimensions and runs at a lower iteration count as compared to other PSO topologies. Finally we show that this variant of PSO is able to recreate auditory frequency tuning curves and modulation transfer functions, making it a potentially useful tool for computational neuroscience models. PMID:27726048

  1. Forecasting a winner for Malaysian Cup 2013 using soccer simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Muhammad Mat; Fauzee, Mohd Soffian Omar; Latif, Rozita Abdul

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates through soccer simulation the calculation of the probability for each team winning Malaysia Cup 2013. Our methodology used here is we predict the outcomes of individual matches and then we simulate the Malaysia Cup 2013 tournament 5000 times. As match outcomes are always a matter of uncertainty, statistical model, in particular a double Poisson model is used to predict the number of goals scored and conceded for each team. Maximum likelihood estimation is use to measure the attacking strength and defensive weakness for each team. Based on our simulation result, LionXII has a higher probability in becoming the winner, followed by Selangor, ATM, JDT and Kelantan. Meanwhile, T-Team, Negeri Sembilan and Felda United have lower probabilities to win Malaysia Cup 2013. In summary, we find that the probability for each team becominga winner is small, indicating that the level of competitive balance in Malaysia Cup 2013 is quite high.

  2. Hierarchical winner-take-all particle swarm optimization social network for neural model fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Brandon S; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Sommer, Alexandra L; Bartlett, Edward L

    2017-02-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) has gained widespread use as a general mathematical programming paradigm and seen use in a wide variety of optimization and machine learning problems. In this work, we introduce a new variant on the PSO social network and apply this method to the inverse problem of input parameter selection from recorded auditory neuron tuning curves. The topology of a PSO social network is a major contributor to optimization success. Here we propose a new social network which draws influence from winner-take-all coding found in visual cortical neurons. We show that the winner-take-all network performs exceptionally well on optimization problems with greater than 5 dimensions and runs at a lower iteration count as compared to other PSO topologies. Finally we show that this variant of PSO is able to recreate auditory frequency tuning curves and modulation transfer functions, making it a potentially useful tool for computational neuroscience models.

  3. 23 CFR 635.114 - Award of contract and concurrence in award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRAFFIC OPERATIONS CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.114 Award of contract and concurrence in award. (a) Federal-aid contracts shall be awarded only on the basis of the lowest responsive... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Award of contract and concurrence in award. 635.114...

  4. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  5. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  6. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  8. Research Award: Employment and Growth

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... The successful candidate will allocate 50% of their time to their own research ... Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a.

  9. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2005-01-01

    This annual report details the number of nuclear engineering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2004. It also looks at nuclear engineering degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in nuclear engineering degree programs at 31 U.S. universities in 2004

  10. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  11. The international "Balint" Award--a rising opportunity for Romanian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lală, Adrian; Bobîrnac, Geo; Tipa, Raluca

    2010-01-01

    The International "Balint" Award for students, instituted by the Foundation for Psychosomatic and Social Medicine in honor of Michael and Enid Balint, has been a rising opportunity for Romanian medical and psychology students to achieve international fame. Romanian students have been among the winners of this award for the last 10 years, in competition with students from Ivy League and other illustrious universities. The "Ascona model" case presentation debates the psychological side of a medical case, while keeping in focus the diagnostic, pathology and treatment issues. This article focuses on explaining this type of case presentation in correlation with one of the papers submitted in the contest that has received this award in the 15th International Balint Congress. The exposed case is that of a 17-year-old boy presenting with apparent stupor encountered by an emergency mobile unit. The patient was suspected of substance abuse and overdose but these suspicions were denied by the clinical exam. Further encounters led to the conclusion that both the boy and his whole family needed psychotherapy counseling and were referred there with great success.

  12. 12 Years of the National Quality Award of the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jurkovičová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the article is to present twelve years of the National Quality Award of the Slovak Republic, survey results of the awarded organisations and their benefits for the success of the organisation. The basis is previous knowledge of recognition based on the EFQM Excellence Model and CAF Model in the Slovak Republic. The questionnaire survey has been used completed with respondent’s allegation. The aim of the survey was to gain proposals for improvements for the following annual sets of the National Quality Awards of the Slovak Republic to raise quality awareness and competitiveness of Slovak private and public organisations. The following findings were main conclusions. The most effective way of how to approach potential competition participants it to approach them with a direct email information. Expectations of most organisations entering the competition have been met. The quality model implementation and site visit based recommendations were main benefits of participating in the competition that resulted in success and added value in different areas of the organisation and its performance. Organisations that have an experience of at least one year participation in the competition claim its importance. It is also confirmed by the fact that organisations that became winners of its category in the past, backtrack to the competition after three and more years to benchmark their improvements and advancement. The competition is a strong tool that is able to assist an organisation on its journey to success and excellence.

  13. Imitating winner or sympathizing loser? Quadratic effects on cooperative behavior in prisoners' dilemma games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cooperation is vital in human societies and therefore is widely investigated in the evolutionary game theory. Varieties of mechanisms have been proposed to overcome temptation and promote cooperation. Existing studies usually believe that agents are rational, but irrationalism such as emotions and feelings matters as well. Winner and loser are defined by their payoffs. In addition to admiring and imitating winners, the mechanism of sympathizing and imitating losers is introduced into the model as an alternative action rule, and each one plays the prisoners' dilemma game with eight neighbors under the influence of both irrationalism and rationalism. Rationalism refers to imitating winner to get highest payoff, and irrationalism means that people sympathize and adopt the actions of losers. As it is widely recognized that temptation reduces cooperation, this study focuses on the effect of sympathy on cooperation within a certain group or society. If it overcomes temptation that leads to defection, sympathy will be a powerful mechanism to promote cooperative behavior. Simulation results indicate that sympathy and temptation shares similar quadratic relationships with cooperation. Both sympathy and temptation undermine cooperation below their thresholds, and they both promote cooperation above their thresholds. Temptation not only reduces cooperation but also promote it as temptation goes beyond the threshold. Although sympathy is a good merit or human nature that is beneficial to society, a crisis or collapse of cooperation is inevitable when the sympathy propensity is relatively smaller. After cooperation reaches a minimal bottom, it then rises increasingly and dramatically, which brings a much brighter future of the society.

  14. The conceptualization of winners and losers of transition in popular culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Trifunović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the reconstruction of social presentations (picture, vision of losers and winners of transition based on the products of the popular culture such as the domestic TV series. The given picture was considered in the context of the 1990s, when those TV series were filmed and aired (broadcast, which means that they are typical, primarily, for the period of the so-called first transition. The analysis meant the abstracting one of the dominant themes in both TV series which refers to a certain family of ordinary people, faced with the everyday problems of the time their time, and those problems being mainly existential ones. The identification of the messages about losers and winners of transition, which was being sent through these TV series, was later continued by establishing a formula based on which the mentioned theme (subject was structured, and in the end completed by putting in connection the perceived oppostitions via semiotic square. The conceptualization of losers and winners of transition, which is the result of this paper, in no way implies that this vision of theirs is the only and the dominant one in this society. On the other hand, it certainly exists (existed in the given moment and context and as such it came to surface through domestic TV series as the product of popular culture, through which often widespread and popular attitudes of a society are expressed.

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  16. Ronald F. Levant: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Ronald F. Levant as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. "Ronald F. Levant is one of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of men and masculinity. Through his pioneering research, he helped define gender role strain theory, fostered a multicultural understanding of fathering and masculinity issues, and developed and evaluated the Male Role Norms Inventory and the Normative Male Alexithymia Scale. He also established the empirical foundation for the normative male alexithymia hypothesis, which proposes that male socialization inhibits emotional expression in males, and he developed alexithymia reduction treatment, which is designed to prepare men to engage more fully in psychotherapy and to experience greater benefit from it." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Awarded a prize for original use of natural gas. Praemieres for original brug af naturgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Every year the Danish Natural gas companies award the natural gas prize of the year to a company, an instituion or a housing association that are using natural gas in a particularly good way. This year the judges have selected John Englyst, Market Gardener, Grundfoer at Hinnerup, as winner of the natural gas prize of the year. In connection with the introduction of natural gas John Englyst has been able to utilize the possibilities offered by the new energy source. Not only has he established a highly efficient boiler plant, but also, and that is what is now being rewarded, one of the very first combined heat and power plants for industrial application. (author).

  18. Adam M. Grant: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Adam M. Grant, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. "For extensive, elegant, and programmatic research on the power of relational job design in enhancing employee motivation, productivity, and satisfaction; for creative and rigorous studies documenting the profound and surprising effects of connecting employees to their impact on others; for highlighting prosocial motivation, not only extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, as a key force behind employee behavior; and for demonstrating by example the feasibility and benefits of conducting field experiments, yielding studies rich in internal validity, external validity, and practical impact. In addition to his accomplishments, Adam M. Grant is known for his generosity as a scholar, teacher, and colleague." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Jordan M. Braciszewski: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Jordan M. Braciszewski as the 2011 winner of the American psychological Association APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. "For his concerted efforts to identify the needs of homeless and other at-risk populations and to design and provide necessary services for them. Jordan M. Braciszewski is committed to using applied psychological science and evidence-based intervention methods to assist the most disadvantaged in our society. He has already provided additions to the relevant research literature and has volunteered countless hours of his time to implement community-based interventions and provide direct services himself. He has sought out the training experiences necessary to assist him in doing an even better job in the future in these public service activities." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Award ceremony for the "Crèche and School" competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Whenever there is a competition, there are obviously participants – and especially winners! The awards ceremony for the competition to find a new name for the CERN Staff Association's Crèche and School took place on 15 May. During the ceremony, jointly led by Céline Grobon (President of the Crèche and School Steering Committee), Carole Dargagnon (Headmistress of the Crèche and School) and Jean-Baptiste Zenner (Staff Association delegate), the proposals selected by the jury were rewarded. The first place went to Marie-Luz Cavagna for her proposal "Le jardin des petits chercheurs", and the second place to Sarah Palluel for her proposal "Le Jardin des Zélectrons". Finally, Aude Mourey and Sandra Fleury tied for third place with their respective proposals "Les petits atomes" and "La crèche des particules". Can we find the winning name of the competition among...

  2. Academic Excellence: A Commentary and Reflections on the Inherent Value of Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J.; Shambrook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Academic peer review is widely viewed as fair, equitable, and essential to academic quality. Successfully completing the process through publication or award is widely deemed as one of the most rigorous and prestigious forms of scholarly accomplishment. Despite this sentiment the academic peer review process is not without fault. It is criticized…

  3. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  4. Relationship between National Institutes of Health research awards to US medical schools and managed care market penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, E; Mazzaschi, A J; Levin, R J; Blake, D A; Griner, P F

    1997-07-16

    Medical research conducted in academic medical centers is often dependent on support from clinical revenues generated in these institutions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that managed care has the potential to affect research conducted in academic medical centers by challenging these clinical revenues. To examine whether empirical evidence supports a relationship between managed care and the ability of US medical schools to sustain biomedical research. Data on annual extramural research grants awarded to US medical schools by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from fiscal years 1986 to 1995 were obtained, and each medical school was matched to a market for which information about health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration in 1995 was available. Growth in total NIH awards, traditional research project (R01) awards, R01 awards to clinical and basic science departments, and changes in institutional ranking by NIH awards were compared among schools located in markets with low, medium, and high managed care penetration. Medical schools in all markets had comparable rates of growth in NIH awards from 1986 to 1990. Thereafter, medical schools in markets with high managed care penetration had slower growth in the dollar amounts and numbers of NIH awards compared with schools in markets with low or medium managed care penetration. This slower growth for schools in high managed care markets was associated with loss of share of NIH awards, equal to $98 million in 1995, and lower institutional ranking by NIH awards. Much of this revenue loss can be explained by the slower growth of R01 awards to clinical departments in medical schools in high managed care markets. These findings provide evidence of an inverse relationship between growth in NIH awards during the past decade and managed care penetration among US medical schools. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined.

  5. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  6. 77 FR 13304 - Application for New Awards; Charter Schools Program (CSP); Grants for Replication and Expansion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... Replication and Expansion of High-Quality Charter Schools AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement... Replication and Expansion of High-Quality Charter Schools Notice inviting applications for new awards for... effects on students, student academic achievement, staff, and parents. The purpose of the Replication and...

  7. Virginia Tech announces AdvanceVT awards seed grants; names leadership fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Clara B.

    2004-01-01

    AdvanceVT, a comprehensive program that promotes and enhances the careers of women in science and engineering at Virginia Tech, has awarded its first seed grants and named its first leadership fellows as part of an ongoing effort to increase the number of women electing to pursue or remain in academic careers.

  8. A Longitudinal Study of Illinois State Scholarship Commission Monetary Award Recipients, 1967-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph D.; Fenske, Robert H.

    The present effectiveness and future direction of monetary award programs administered by the Illinois State Scholarship Commission is examined in three surveys. A random sample of 1,000 was drawn from the total number of scholarship recipients during the 1967-68 and 1970-71 academic years; 2,000 from the 1973-74 survey. It is shown that: (1)…

  9. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  10. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  11. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  12. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  13. Improved Monkey-King Genetic Algorithm for Solving Large Winner Determination in Combinatorial Auction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhong

    Using GA solve the winner determination problem (WDP) with large bids and items, run under different distribution, because the search space is large, constraint complex and it may easy to produce infeasible solution, would affect the efficiency and quality of algorithm. This paper present improved MKGA, including three operator: preprocessing, insert bid and exchange recombination, and use Monkey-king elite preservation strategy. Experimental results show that improved MKGA is better than SGA in population size and computation. The problem that traditional branch and bound algorithm hard to solve, improved MKGA can solve and achieve better effect.

  14. DIFERENCE EFFICACY BETWEEN WINNER AND DEFEAT TIM ON WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP IN SOCCER GAME 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Kapidžić

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyse thirty games of world championship in soccer 2006 with am to determine variables which contribute signifi cant distinction and differences between winner and defeat tim. Fortifi cation differences in aplayed variables we will apply multivariant analisis of variance. For this examination we will use variable of tehnich elements, and some of tactics calculation and estimate quality of tehnics elements according to the judges. This problem is very interesting for exploration, and it’s leading to modern tendency’s so these are the elementary reasons why we chose this kind of exploration.

  15. A Comparison of Three Major Academic Rankings for World Universities: From a Research Evaluation Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces three current major university ranking systems. The Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities by Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan (HEEACT Ranking) emphasizes both the quality and quantity of research and current research performance. The Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tung University (ARWU) focuses on outstanding performance of universities with indicators such as Nobel Prize winners. The QS Wo...

  16. Research Award: Donor Partnerships Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  17. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  18. Fermilab Education Office - Director's Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Director's Award Exceptional Service To Fermilab's K-12 Education Programs The many successes of Fermilab's K-12 education programs depend on the talents of the over 200 employees, users, and $1,000, made possible by an anonymous donor to Fermilab Friends for Science Education, recognizes one

  19. Carter G. Woodson Book Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents the recipients of the 1999 Carter G. Woodson book awards that honor books focusing on ethnic minorities and race relations in a manner appropriate for young readers; the books cover topics that include the lives of Langston Hughes, Rosa Parks, and Ida B. Wells and the history of the Crow people. (CMK)

  20. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  1. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7. a) Were you in contact with other IDRC staff (aside from Centre Awards staff) during the. course of your research? Please indicate who you were in contact with and if this contact assisted you in any way. b) Please indicate the names and contact information of individuals from other organizations (departments, institutes, ...

  2. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  3. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Development announces the award of a cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the... Children and Families (ACF) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger...

  4. 7 CFR 3021.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the Department of Agriculture or other Federal...

  5. 41 CFR 105-74.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award. 105-74.605 Section 105-74.605 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.605 Award. Award...

  6. Age and sex differences in game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in elite basketball games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Madarame

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS To advance knowledge of long-term development of basketball players, this study investigated age and sex differences in game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in World Basketball Championships held after the 2010 rule change. METHODS A total of 935 games from six categories (under-17, under-19 and open age for both men and women were analyzed. All games were classified into three types (balanced, unbalanced and very unbalanced according to point differential by a k-means cluster analysis. A discriminant analysis was performed to identify game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in each game type. An absolute value of a structural coefficient (SC equal to or above 0.30 was considered relevant for the discrimination. RESULTS In balanced games, assists discriminated winners from losers in open games (men, |SC| = 0.32; women, |SC| = 0.34, whereas successful free throws did so in under-17 games (men, |SC| = 0.30; women, |SC| = 0.31. Successful 2-point field goals discriminated winners from losers only in women’s games (under-19, |SC| = 0.38; open, |SC| = 0.36. CONCLUSION There were three novel findings in balanced games: 1 successful free throws but not assists discriminated winners from losers in under-17 games; 2 successful 2-point field goals discriminated winners from losers in women’s games but not in men’s games; and 3 discriminating power of successful 3-point field goals was extremely small in women’s games. These results may be related to the new rules for the shot clock and the 3-point distance.

  7. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  8. Mechanisms of Winner-Take-All and Group Selection in Neuronal Spiking Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    A major function of central nervous systems is to discriminate different categories or types of sensory input. Neuronal networks accomplish such tasks by learning different sensory maps at several stages of neural hierarchy, such that different neurons fire selectively to reflect different internal or external patterns and states. The exact mechanisms of such map formation processes in the brain are not completely understood. Here we study the mechanism by which a simple recurrent/reentrant neuronal network accomplish group selection and discrimination to different inputs in order to generate sensory maps. We describe the conditions and mechanism of transition from a rhythmic epileptic state (in which all neurons fire synchronized and indiscriminately to any input) to a winner-take-all state in which only a subset of neurons fire for a specific input. We prove an analytic condition under which a stable bump solution and a winner-take-all state can emerge from the local recurrent excitation-inhibition interactions in a three-layer spiking network with distinct excitatory and inhibitory populations, and demonstrate the importance of surround inhibitory connection topology on the stability of dynamic patterns in spiking neural network.

  9. Technical and physical analysis of the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil: winners vs. losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Michael C; Silva, Joao R; Hertzog, Maxime; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Nassis, George

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the technical and physical performance parameters that distinguish between teams winning and losing matches in the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil. Data were derived from the FIFA website and from live-statistics provided during each game of the world cup. Twelve physical (such as total distance covered in meters (TD), TD in distinct locomotor categories: low-intensity running (LIR; 14 km/h)) and 21 technical parameters (total passes, short-, medium- and long-distance passes, total pass completion rate, dangerous attacks, attacking attempts, delivery in penalty area, ball possession, goals, goals from set-pieces, goals per shot on goal, defending saves, shots, shots on goal, shot accuracy, set-pieces, crosses, corners, clearances, yellow cards) were analyzed. Forty-two games in which a winner and consequently a loser were presented after 90 minutes of game time were investigated with independent t-tests. A binary-logistic regression was utilized to investigate whether the significant variables predicted success of the winning teams. The winning teams scored significantly (PTechnical performance related to goal scoring parameters play a decisive role in World Cup games. Furthermore, scoring efficacy from open-play as well as from set-pieces are crucial to win matches in a World Cup tournament. At this level, physical performance was not the factor to discriminate between winners and losers.

  10. A Game-Theoretical Winner and Loser Model of Dominance Hierarchy Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Klodeta; Broom, Mark; Kandler, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Many animals spend large parts of their lives in groups. Within such groups, they need to find efficient ways of dividing available resources between them. This is often achieved by means of a dominance hierarchy, which in its most extreme linear form allocates a strict priority order to the individuals. Once a hierarchy is formed, it is often stable over long periods, but the formation of hierarchies among individuals with little or no knowledge of each other can involve aggressive contests. The outcome of such contests can have significant effects on later contests, with previous winners more likely to win (winner effects) and previous losers more likely to lose (loser effects). This scenario has been modelled by a number of authors, in particular by Dugatkin. In his model, individuals engage in aggressive contests if the assessment of their fighting ability relative to their opponent is above a threshold [Formula: see text]. Here we present a model where each individual can choose its own value [Formula: see text]. This enables us to address questions such as how aggressive should individuals be in order to take up one of the first places in the hierarchy? We find that a unique strategy evolves, as opposed to a mixture of strategies. Thus, in any scenario there exists a unique best level of aggression, and individuals should not switch between strategies. We find that for optimal strategy choice, the hierarchy forms quickly, after which there are no mutually aggressive contests.

  11. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners; Marie en IreneCurie. De eerste vrouwelijke Nobelprijswinnaars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordenbos, G. [Joke Smit Instituut voor Vrouwenstudies, Universiteit Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences. [Dutch] In 1903, precies honderd jaar geleden, ontving Marie Curie als eerste vrouw de Nobelprijs voor de Wetenschap, gevolgd door een tweede Nobelprijs in 1911. Ook haar dochter Irene Joliot-Curie kreeg de Nobelprijs voor de wetenschap in 1935. Marie and Irene Curie schetst een breed beeld van de academische wereld waarin beide vrouwen zich bewogen: de beperkte toegang van vrouwen tot de universiteit, hun carrisres in de natuurkunde en baanbrekende ontdekkingen, de afwijzing van Marie door de Franse Academie des Sciences, de toekenning van de Nobelprijs en de benoeming van Irene als eerste vrouwelijke minister in Frankrijk, de invloed van de twee Wereldoorlogen, hun huwelijks- en priveleven en de niet aflatende hetze van de pers tegen beiden. In de door mannen gedomineerde wereld van de natuurwetenschappen liep de uitzonderingspositie van beide vrouwen als rode draad door hun curieuze levens. Het leven en werk van de Curies wordt geactualiseerd door deze tegen het licht te houden van de huidige positie van vrouwen in de natuurwetenschappen. Het bereiken van de top van de wetenschap door vrouwen blijkt nog steeds uitzonderlijk.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: R&D 100 Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    earlier polymeric membrane technology by capturing more carbon dioxide, faster, from a gas mixture while scenarios. 2015 winners CO2 Memzyme CO2 Memzyme The CO2 Memzyme is an ultra-thin membrane that is the first winners Membrane Projection Lithography publication snapshot Portable Diagnostic Device for Bacillus

  13. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study attempted to investigate students' self reported academic dishonesty in Ethiopian ... university programs can play a key role in ... serious problem in establishing academic ... and Rocha 2006); Asian-Pacific, ... and self-adjustment mediates the ..... In my suggestion, it is better that ..... Comparative and International.

  14. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  15. New awards for CERN science

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this week, the European Physical Society (EPS) announced its High Energy and Particle Physics prizes for 2013, and I’m pleased to say that the LHC featured highly. With all that has been happening in the last few years, that’s perhaps not too surprising, but these awards nevertheless constitute a great honour for our community.   The High Energy and Particle Physics Prize went to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni and Tejinder Virdee “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”. Among the other awards, the Young Experimental Physicist Prize went to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ ...

  16. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50 th anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  17. Radiation protection training award - an innovative approach of testing radiation protection skills in catastrophe management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.

    2003-01-01

    own emergency planning. ARCS Bronze award consists of 4 practical exercises followed by a theoretical test. The praxis requirements include the detection and identification of a radioactive source, application of a low level gamma monitor, principles of personnel monitoring, control of external hazard as well as taking environmental samples. Theoretical testing ranges from the nature of radioactivity and radiation units to the legislation related to radiological protection. Evaluation is given in an objective numeric grading. The Silver award includes the treatment of nuclear emergencies such as the detonation of a nuclear weapon, an accident in a radionuclid/ isotop lab or an accident in a nuclear plant. The candidates have also to present their skills in handling an transportation accident, arranging immediate catastrophe management. The candidates' background ranged from security force members to academics. The problem of harmonized training standards is, especially since the September 11 th attacks, a worldwide need. Security forces have to show their practical knowledge and secure their theoretical background to eventually update their skills. The protection of the general population can only be ensured by a homogenous training as well as perfect collaboration of the security units. Therefore an intensive training of the security guards performed by specialists must be guaranteed. ARCS radiation protection awards can be seen as the motivational background to this approach. Also the social component must not be neglected since the period of training at ARCS offers a perfect environment for interdisciplinary discussion. Safety culture and training experiences in the field of radiation protection in Austria depend an such an information system and ARCS has shown experience in that field for decades. Innovative approaches in training and sharing information as well as experience are seen as important tools to maintain safety culture. Harmonization and national

  18. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  19. Markov chains of nonlinear Markov processes and an application to a winner-takes-all model for social conformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, T D [Center for the Ecological Study of Perception and Action, Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2008-07-18

    We discuss nonlinear Markov processes defined on discrete time points and discrete state spaces using Markov chains. In this context, special attention is paid to the distinction between linear and nonlinear Markov processes. We illustrate that the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation holds for nonlinear Markov processes by a winner-takes-all model for social conformity. (fast track communication)

  20. Markov chains of nonlinear Markov processes and an application to a winner-takes-all model for social conformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T D

    2008-01-01

    We discuss nonlinear Markov processes defined on discrete time points and discrete state spaces using Markov chains. In this context, special attention is paid to the distinction between linear and nonlinear Markov processes. We illustrate that the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation holds for nonlinear Markov processes by a winner-takes-all model for social conformity. (fast track communication)

  1. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Key words: academic libraries, open access, research, researchers, technology ... European commission (2012) reports that affordable and easy access to the results ...

  2. The cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species winners into losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Schoepf, Verena; McGinley, Michael; Baumann, Justin; Matsui, Yohei

    2014-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures result in extensive coral loss throughout the tropics, and are projected to increase in frequency and severity. If bleaching becomes an annual event later in this century, more than 90% of coral reefs worldwide may be at risk of long-term degradation. While corals can recover from single isolated bleaching and can acclimate to recurring bleaching events that are separated by multiple years, it is currently unknown if and how they will survive and possibly acclimatize to annual coral bleaching. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that annual coral bleaching can dramatically alter thermal tolerance in Caribbean corals. We found that high coral energy reserves and changes in the dominant algal endosymbiont type (Symbiodinium spp.) facilitated rapid acclimation in Porites divaricata, whereas low energy reserves and a lack of algal phenotypic plasticity significantly increased susceptibility in Porites astreoides to bleaching the following year. Phenotypic plasticity in the dominant endosymbiont type of Orbicella faveolata did not prevent repeat bleaching, but may have facilitated rapid recovery. Thus, coral holobiont response to an isolated single bleaching event is not an accurate predictor of its response to bleaching the following year. Rather, the cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species 'winners' into 'losers', and can also facilitate acclimation and turn some coral species 'losers' into 'winners'. Overall, these findings indicate that cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching could result in some species becoming increasingly susceptible to bleaching and face a long-term decline, while phenotypically plastic coral species will acclimatize and persist. Thus, annual coral bleaching and recovery could contribute to the selective loss of coral diversity as well as the overall decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Edward A. Delgado-Romero: Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Edward A. Delgado-Romero, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. "Societies, professions, and individual citizens are enriched by the contributions of those who care. Edward A. Delgado-Romero has demonstrated through his scholarship, leadership in psychological associations such as the National Latina/Latino Psychological Association, and collaborations with universities and school districts in Georgia that he cares and is committed to addressing challenges in the provision of culturally sensitive psychological services to benefit the public interest. His example of servant leadership leaves a legacy to other early career professionals and graduate students alike. Es un hijo honorado." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  4. Academic Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H C Felix

    2017-01-01

    Alternative modes of academic publication. What it is: Page for the dissemination of academic papers in alternative formats. Aimed at the diffusion of the idea of open publication, or open access publication, a branch of open science, a multidisciplinary movement that seeks to modify the paradigm of knowledge production that centralizes it and prevents its spreading. Historically, Western tradition has become firmly rooted in the free dissemination of knowledge among peers. However, the c...

  5. Research Award: Supporting Inclusive Growth

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    The successful candidate will allocate about 50% of the time to his/her own research ... The Research Awardee will also contribute to the management of the ... analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, general public);.

  6. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  7. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology research grant program: factors associated with publication and advancement in academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D; Dellon, Evan S; Bright, Stephanie D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2009-05-01

    The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Demographic data, the year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient's institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. A similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred with 255 of the 368 awards (69%) for 1983-2006 [corrected]. Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of the 313 awardees over the same period, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions [corrected]. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (P academics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publication, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology.

  8. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  9. Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award), which publicly recognizes organizations that achieve publicly-set aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

  10. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and Use of Data from the Award Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0003, January 9, 2018. The OIG plans to begin preliminary research to evaluate the agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and how the agency uses the data from the award nominations.

  11. Daily Public Assistance Grants Award Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Daily activity of Public Assistance Grant Awards, including FEMA Region, State, Disaster Declaration Number, Event description, Mission Assigned agency, Assistance...

  12. Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations for their comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals.

  13. Parimad suhtekorraldusteod konkursil Baltic PR Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Balti riikide suhtekorraldusliidud koostöös Rahvusvahelise Avalike Suhete Assotsiatsiooniga (IPRA) korraldavad 2001. aastast iga aasta kommunikatsioonijuhtimisalast auhinnakonkurssi Baltic PR Awards

  14. Are PhDs Winners or Losers? Wage Premiums for Doctoral Degrees in Private Sector Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers expect that increasing shares of PhDs will find employment within the private sector. However, the incentive structure for undertaking PhD education and subsequently seeking private sector employment has not been adequately assessed in the literature. This paper investigates...... to choose private sector employment immediately after award of the PhD degree....

  15. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  16. Financial Aid Tipping Points: An Analysis of Aid and Academic Achievement at a California Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Elizabeth; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between financial aid awards and measures of student academic achievement. Financial aid and academic records for 11,956 students attending an urban California community college were examined and analyzed using simultaneous linear regression and two-way factorial ANOVAs. Findings revealed a…

  17. Visceral perfusion abnormalities following complement activation. Clues to the mediators of organ ischemia in trauma and sepsis. First place winner: Conrad Jobst Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, W J; Schirmer, J M; Naff, G B; Fry, D E

    1988-12-01

    Complement, activated during infection and injury, has been implicated as a mediator of microvascular injury and obstruction. This study examines how two potent activators of complement, zymosan, and cobra venom factor (CVF), affect systemic and visceral perfusion. Rats were injected with either saline (1 ml/kg), zymosan (5 mg/kg) or CVF (5 units/kg) at t = 0 and 30 minutes. Thermodilution cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, systemic vascular resistance, and hematocrit were determined at t = 2 hours. Effective hepatic and renal blood flows, by clearance of galactose and p-aminohippurate respectively, were determined over the next hour. The per cent change in total hemolytic complement from t = 0 to t = 3 hours was determined by immune hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes. There was no difference in systemic hemodynamic parameters between the three groups. Hepatic blood flow was depressed in both the zymosan (3.83 +/- 0.23 ml/min/100 g) and CVF (3.72 +/- 0.20 ml/min/100 g) groups compared with controls (4.62 +/- 0.19 ml/min/100 g, P less than 0.05). Renal blood flow in the zymosan-treated group (6.40 +/- 0.24 ml/min/100 g) increased over control (4.80 +/- 0.40 ml/min/100 g, P less than 0.05) but was unchanged in the CVF group (5.06 +/- 0.23 ml/min/100 g). The amount of complement activated correlated with the change in hepatic (r = -0.419, P less than 0.05) but not renal (r = -0.008, P = 0.917) flow. Complement activation may occupy a proximal position in the pathogenesis of hepatic ischemia associated with trauma and sepsis.

  18. Effects of cortisol on cognition in major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline personality disorder - 2014 Curt Richter Award Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2015-01-01

    Stress hormones influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory performance and executive function. It is well established that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation but impair memory retrieval. While most of the effects have been attributed to glucocorticoid receptors (GR), the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) has been also emphasized. Dysfunctions in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been reported for several mental disorders. While major depressive disorder (MDD) as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) seem to be characterized by enhanced cortisol release in concert with a reduced feedback sensitivity of the HPA axis, in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) a contrary picture has been reported. Despite the fact that altered GR function has been discussed for these disorders only very few studies have investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognitive performance in these patients so far. In a series of studies, we investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognition (i.e. declarative memory, working memory and response inhibition) in different mental disorders such as MDD, PTSD and BPD. While in patients with MDD cortisol administration failed to effect memory retrieval, patients with PTSD and BPD showed enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after cortisol administration. These results indicate an altered sensitivity to cortisol in these disorders. Results from one of our recent studies in the field of social cognition underline the importance of the MR. We found that emotional empathy was enhanced through stimulation of the MR via fludrocortisone in healthy participants and women with BPD. This review aims to integrate these findings and discuss potential mechanisms and implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance): a case-control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernaro, Marta; Pellegrini, Anna; Tessadri, Fabrizio; Zaina, Fabio; Zonta, Andrea; Negrini, Stefano

    2012-09-20

    Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace TREATMENT Management Guidelines (SBTMG) have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case-control study. Thirty-eight patients (15.8 ± 1.6 years; 26 females; 10 hyperkyphosis, 28 scoliosis of 29.2 ± 7.9° Cobb) extracted from a single orthotist database (between January 1, 2008 and September 1, 2009) and treated by the same physician; brace wearing at least 15 hours/day for a minimum of 6 months; age 10 or more. Braces: Sforzesco, Sibilla, Lapadula or Maguelone. Exercises: SEAS. Two questionnaires filled in blindly by patients: SRS-22 and one especially developed and validated with 25 questions on adherence to treatment. Groups (main risk factor): TEAM (private institute: satisfied 44/44 SOSORT criteria; grade of teamwork, "excellent") included 13 patients and NOT 25 (National Health Service Rehabilitation Department: 35/44 SOSORT criteria respected; grade, "insufficient"). TEAM was more compliant to bracing than NOT (97 ± 6% vs. 80 ± 24%) and performed nearly double the exercises (38 ± 12 vs. 20 ± 13 minutes/session). The self-reduction of bracing was significant in NOT (from 16.8 ± 3.7 to 14.8 ± 4.9 hours/day, , Pversus 7% of TEAM (P < 0.05). The populations did not differ at the baseline studied outcomes. The absence of a good team surrounding the patient increases by five times the risk of reduced compliance to bracing (odds ratio OR 5.5 - 95% confidence interval 95CI 3.6-7.4), along with more than 15 times that of QoL problems (OR 15.7 - 95CI 13.6-17.9) and pain (OR 16.8 - 95CI 14.5-19.1). Provided the limits of this first study on the topic, the SBTMG seems to be important for brace treatment, influencing pain, QoL and compliance (and so, presumably, final results). Future studies on the topic are advisable.

  20. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance: a case–control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavernaro Marta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace Treatment Management Guidelines (SBTMG have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. Purpose To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Materials and methods Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case–control study. Population: Thirty-eight patients (15.8 ± 1.6 years; 26 females; 10 hyperkyphosis, 28 scoliosis of 29.2 ± 7.9° Cobb extracted from a single orthotist database (between January 1, 2008 and September 1, 2009 and treated by the same physician; brace wearing at least 15 hours/day for a minimum of 6 months; age 10 or more. Treatment: Braces: Sforzesco, Sibilla, Lapadula or Maguelone. Exercises: SEAS. Methods: Two questionnaires filled in blindly by patients: SRS-22 and one especially developed and validated with 25 questions on adherence to treatment. Groups (main risk factor: TEAM (private institute: satisfied 44/44 SOSORT criteria; grade of teamwork, “excellent” included 13 patients and NOT 25 (National Health Service Rehabilitation Department: 35/44 SOSORT criteria respected; grade, “insufficient”. Results TEAM was more compliant to bracing than NOT (97 ± 6% vs. 80 ± 24% and performed nearly double the exercises (38 ± 12 vs. 20 ± 13 minutes/session. The self-reduction of bracing was significant in NOT (from 16.8 ± 3.7 to 14.8 ± 4.9 hours/day, , P Conclusions Provided the limits of this first study on the topic, the SBTMG seems to be important for brace treatment, influencing pain, QoL and compliance (and so, presumably, final results. Future studies on the topic are advisable.

  1. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance): a case–control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner

    OpenAIRE

    Tavernaro, Marta; Pellegrini, Anna; Tessadri, Fabrizio; Zaina, Fabio; Zonta, Andrea; Negrini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace Treatment Management Guidelines (SBTMG) have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. Purpose To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Materials and methods Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case–control study. Population: Thirty-eight pa...

  2. Rehabilitation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: results of exercises and bracing from a series of clinical studies. Europa Medicophysica-SIMFER 2007 Award Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, S; Atanasio, S; Zaina, F; Romano, M

    2008-06-01

    Rehabilitation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) requires a careful choice from among the possible treatments, such as bracing and exercises, according to the patient's needs. According to the literature, there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of these rehabilitation instruments. During the past few years, a full series of studies has been carried out to investigate their efficacy. The aim of this paper was to summarize all these results. Three systematic reviews (two on exercises and one on manual therapy), and four cohort prospective studies were performed. The prospective studies included two trials with a prospective control group on exercises (one to avoid bracing and one in preparation to bracing) and two trials with retrospective control group on a new brace developed by the Authors (Sforzesco brace and SPoRT concept of correction versus Lyon brace and Risser cast). Results show that in literature there is proof of level 1b on exercises but no studies on manual therapy. High quality exercises like Scientific Exercises Approach to Scoliosis (SEAS) have more efficacy than usual physiotherapy, significantly reducing brace prescription in one year from 25% of cases to 6%. Moreover, such exercises help to obtain the best results in bracing first correction. The Sforzesco brace has proved to have more efficacy than the Lyon brace, whereas it has the same efficacy--but reduced side effects and impact on quality of life--than the Risser brace. With an efficient management of data collection, it is possible to develop a set of studies aimed at verifying the efficacy of clinical daily rehabilitation approaches.

  3. Good recovery from aphasia is also supported by right basal ganglia: a longitudinal controlled PET study. EJPRM-ESPRM 2008 award winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boissezon, X; Marie, N; Castel-Lacanal, E; Marque, P; Bezy, C; Gros, H; Lotterie, J-A; Cardebat, D; Puel, M; Demonet, J-F

    2009-12-01

    It has long been a matter of debate whether recovery from aphasia after left perisylvian lesion is mediated by perilesional left hemispheric regions or by right homologous areas. To investigate the neural substrates of aphasia recovery, a longitudinal study in patients after a left single perisylvian stroke was performed. Thirteen aphasic patients were H2(15)O PET-scanned twice at a one year interval during a word generation task. Patients are divided into two groups according to language performance for the word generation task at PET2. For the Good Recovery (GR) group, patients' performances are indistinguishable from those of normal subjects, while patients from the Poor Recovery (PR) group keep language disorders. Using SPM2, Language-Rest contrast is computed for both groups at both PET stages. Then, Session Effect contrast (TEP2-TEP1>0) is calculated for both groups. For the GR group, the Session Effect contrast shows an increase of activations in the left Postero-Superior Temporal Gyrus PSTG but also in the right thalamus and lenticular nuclei; for PR patients, the right lenticular nucleus activation is more important at PET1 than PET2. The crucial role of the left temporal activation is confirmed and its increase is linked to behavioural recovery. The role of the right basal ganglia to support good recovery from aphasia is a new finding. Their activation may be more task-dependant and related to inhibition of the right frontal cortex.

  4. SOSORT Award Winner 2015: a multicentre study comparing the SPoRT and ART braces effectiveness according to the SOSORT-SRS recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaina, Fabio; de Mauroy, Jean Claude; Donzelli, Sabrina; Negrini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Data comparing different braces for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) are scant. The SRS criteria represent some guidelines for comparing results from different studies, but controlled studies are much more reliable. Recently, super-rigid braces have been introduced in clinical practice with the aim of replacing Risser and EDF casts. The aim of the present study is to compare the short-term radiographic results of two super-rigid braces, the ART and the SPORT (Sforzesco) brace. A group of consecutive patients with Cobb >40°, Risser 0-4, age >10 treated with the ART brace for 6 months were matched with a group of similar patients taken from a prospective database of patients treated with the Sforzesco brace. Patients were matched according to Cobb severity, pattern and localization of the curve. All patients had a full-time brace prescription (23-24 hours per day) and an indication to perform scoliosis-specific exercises and were assessed radiographically both immediately in the brace and after 6 months of treatment out of brace. Curves were analyzed according to the pattern and localization taking into consideration both the in-brace correction and the 6-month out-of-brace results. t-test, ANOVA, linear regression, alpha set at 0.05. Twenty-six patients were included in the ART brace group, and 26 in the Sforzesco brace group. At baseline, no differences were noted for gender (3 males for each group), age (14.1 ± 0.3 for ART vs 13.9 ± 0.3 for Sforzesco), ATR (11.8 ± 3.2 vs 11.5 ± 4.2 for thoracic curves and 7.8 ± 4.0 vs 7.1 ± 6.1 for lumbar/thoracolumbar), Cobb angle (44.8 ± 2 vs 45.5 ± 2 for thoracic; 43.8 ± 2 vs 46.0 ± 2 for lumbar/thoracolumbar) or Risser sign (median 2 for both groups). The in-brace correction was slightly better for the ART brace, but didn't reach statistical significance (24.3 ± 8.5 vs 28.0 ± 6.8 for thoracic; 23.7 ± 10.4 vs 29.9 ± 4.2 for lumbar/thoracolumbar). At 6 months, results were similar both for thoracic (34.4 ± 10.4 vs34.8 ± 6.8) and for lumbar/thoracolumbar (32.8 ± 10.8 vs 36.6 ± 5.2). Also, with regard to the pattern, results were similar for double major and for thoracic, while there were not enough data for single lumbar to make a comparison. No differences for ATR were found (7.8 ± 3.2 vs 8.6 ± 2.9 for thoracic; 4.3 ± 3.4 vs 4.3 ± 3.7 for lumbar/thoracolumbar). These two super-rigid braces showed similar short-term results, despite the better in-brace correction for lumbar curves shown by the ART brace. According to our data, the asymmetric design showed results similar to the symmetric one. After these preliminary data, further studies are needed to check end growth results and the impact of compliance, rigidity of curve, exercise and assessing quality of life.

  5. Curve progression after long-term brace treatment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: comparative results between over and under 30 Cobb degrees - SOSORT 2017 award winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo G. Aulisa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The factors influencing curve behavior following bracing are incompletely understood and there is no agreement if scoliotic curves stop progressing with skeletal maturity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the loss of the scoliotic curve correction in patients treated with bracing during adolescence and to compare patient outcomes of under and over 30 Cobb degrees, 10 years after brace removal. Methods We reviewed 93 (87 female of 200 and nine patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS who were treated with the Lyon or PASB brace at a mean of 15 years (range 10–35. All patients answered a simple questionnaire (including work status, pregnancy, and pain and underwent clinical and radiological examination. The population was divided into two groups based on Cobb degrees ( 30°. Statistical analysis was performed to test the efficacy of our hypothesis. Results The patients underwent a long-term follow-up at a mean age of 184.1 months (±72.60 after brace removal. The pre-brace scoliotic mean curve was 32.28° (± 9.4°; after treatment, the mean was 19.35° and increased to a minimum of 22.12° in the 10 years following brace removal. However, there was no significant difference in the mean Cobb angle between the end of weaning and long term follow-up period (p = 0.105. The curve angle of patients who were treated with a brace from the beginning was reduced by 13° during the treatment, but the curve size lost 3° at the follow-up period. The groups over 30° showed a pre-brace scoliotic mean curve of 41.15°; at the end of weaning, the mean curve angle was 25.85° and increased to a mean of 29.73° at follow-up; instead, the groups measuring ≤ 30° showed a pre-brace scoliotic mean curve of 25.58°; at the end of weaning, it was reduced to a mean of 14.24° and it increased to 16.38° at follow-up. There was no significant difference in the mean progression of curve magnitude between the ≤ 30° and > 30° groups at the long-term follow-up. Conclusions Scoliotic curves did not deteriorate beyond their original curve size after bracing in both groups at the 15-year follow-ups. These results are in contrast with the history of this pathology that normally shows a progressive and lowly increment of the curve at skeletal maturity. Bracing is an effective treatment method characterized by positive long-term outcomes, including for patients demonstrating moderate curves.

  6. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fill...... some of the gaps. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was directed electronically towards expatriate academics occupying regular positions in science faculty departments in universities in northern Europe. Findings – Results showed that job clarity was the dominating job factor with strong...... relationships with all of the five investigated work outcome variables, work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and time to proficiency. Job conflict and job freedom had an association with some of the work outcome variables but not with all of them. Neither workload nor job...

  7. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so......This doctoral thesis explores the key transnational institutions of European law academia and their role in the creation of a constitutional legal practice in the European Community from 1961 to 1993. Consisting of three case studies, it investigates the transnational federation gathering...

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2003-2004 lecture series. From today until April 25 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site : http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2003-2004 lecture series. From today until April 25 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site : http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  10. 5 CFR 534.405 - Performance awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... one-half of the membership of a Performance Review Board must be career SES appointees. The only...) This section covers the payment of performance awards to career appointees in the Senior Executive Service (SES). (1) To be eligible for an award, the individual must have been an SES career appointee as...

  11. 42 CFR 52.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... grant to those applicants whose approved projects will in the Secretary's judgment best promote the..., the grant will initially be for one year and subsequent continuation awards will also be for one year... application nor the award of any grant commits or obligates the United States in any way to make any...

  12. A Herdswoman Awarded with Global Medal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FLORA; CHANG

    1998-01-01

    SEPTEMBER 8, 1995 was an unforgettable day for Lai Xiao. On that morning, she was awarded with the "Global Rural Women Creation of Life Award" by the NGO Forum of the UN Fourth World Conference on Women, in Huairou, Beijing. Wearing sapphire-blue Mongolian attire,

  13. Innovative Catalytic Converter Wins National Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    emissions and urban air pollution has been named one of the years most important technological breakthroughs National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Benteler Industries Inc. of Grand Rapids, Mich.—to receive one of its prestigious 1996 R&D 100 awards. The annual awards recognize the years 100 most

  14. 2 CFR 175.15 - Award term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... iii. Use forced labor in the performance of the award or subawards under the award. 2. We as the... cost sharing or matching requirements. 2. “Forced labor” means labor obtained by any of the following methods: the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or...

  15. NOTE receives the prestigious ALICE Industrial Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "NOTE Lund has been given the ALICE Industrial Award due to good co-operation, great capacity for innovation and high quality of work, as a PCB manufacturer in the CERN project ALICE. Only a small number of awards have so far been conferred to a select number of companies."

  16. Tables Summarizing Awards Supported by IDRC

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2013-04-04

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC). A. Awards Granted Through Competitions. Updated April 4, 2013. Award Type. University Level. Who can apply. Description. Frequency & ... Explore a problem common to First Nations or Inuit. Communities of Canada ... reporting in one or more developing countries.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 winner, Sud-Chemie, developed a synthesis for solid oxide catalysts used to make hydrogen and clean fuels. The process creates little wastewater, no nitrates, and no or little NOx.

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  19. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  20. Academic Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  1. QUALITY AWARDS: AN IMAGE OF BUSINESS EXCELLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilies Liviu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, increasingly more governmental organizations and industrial are doing everything possible to promote quality and to survive, the basic principle remains customer satisfaction and even more than that, it speaks of the principle of customer delight. In this sense, quality has become the source of sustained competitive advantage that provides organizations the supremacy of the global markets characterized by competition which becoming more and more intensified. Juran, one of the highest quality gurus say that “just as the twentieth century was the century of productivity, the twenty-first century will be the quality century” which is a very relevant and comprehensive statement of the economic reality of the past and a profound forecast for future business of the twenty-first century. In this regard, in order to achieve this competitive advantage, quality must be managed and this is accomplished through Total Quality Management (TQM. Quality awards models are instruments of total quality management through which quality can be assessed and improved, thus, knowing the quality awards models is critical for findings the new ways to improve the quality and performance of the organizations. The present paper aims to illustrate the best practices on quality improvement in this respect we intend to present the general framework of the quality awards for business excellence. In this sense we present the most important international quality awards, namely: "Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award", "European Quality Award" and “Romanian Quality Award J. M. Juran". For this purpose we used as main sources of analyzing the structure and the operation mode of these three important quality awards, Juran's work (which is probably the most important work in the field of quality and other relevant sources in total quality management which treats issues related to quality awards and also we used as sources of updated information the official

  2. The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat: spontaneous expressions of medal winners of the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, David; Willingham, Bob

    2006-09-01

    Facial behaviors of medal winners of the judo competition at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games were coded with P. Ekman and W. V. Friesen's (1978) Facial Affect Coding System (FACS) and interpreted using their Emotion FACS dictionary. Winners' spontaneous expressions were captured immediately when they completed medal matches, when they received their medal from a dignitary, and when they posed on the podium. The 84 athletes who contributed expressions came from 35 countries. The findings strongly supported the notion that expressions occur in relation to emotionally evocative contexts in people of all cultures, that these expressions correspond to the facial expressions of emotion considered to be universal, that expressions provide information that can reliably differentiate the antecedent situations that produced them, and that expressions that occur without inhibition are different than those that occur in social and interactive settings. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Billig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artículo sugiere que esta época es la mejor y peor para la labor académica. La mejor en cuanto hay más publicaciones académicas que nunca. Y la peor porque sobra mucho de estas publicaciones. Trabajando en las condiciones competitivas del capitalismo académico, los académicos se sienten en la necesidad de continuar publicando, independientemente de que tengan algo que decir. Las presiones de publicar continuamente y promover la propia perspectiva se reflejan en la manera en la que los científicos sociales están escribiendo. Y es que los académicos utilizan un lenguaje técnico basado en sustantivos, con una precisión menor a la del lenguaje ordinario. Los estudiantes de postgrado han sido educados en esta manera de escribir como una condición previa a iniciarse en las ciencias sociales. Así, la naturaleza misma del capitalismo académico no sólo determina las condiciones en las que los académicos trabajan, sino que también afecta su manera de escribir.


    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scientists are writing. Academics use a noun-based technical language, which is less precise than ordinary language. Postgraduates are taught this way of writing as a precondition for entering the social sciences. In this way, the nature of academic capitalism not only determines the conditions under which academics are working but it affects the way that they are writing.

  4. Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristopher M; Apicella, Coren L

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. The effect of postural power displays (i.e. power poses) on hormone levels and decision-making has recently been challenged. While Carney et al. (2010) found that holding brief postural displays of power leads to increased testosterone, decreased cortisol and greater economic risk taking, this failed to replicate in a recent high-powered study (Ranehill et al. 2015). It has been put forward that subtle differences in social context may account for the differences in results. Power displays naturally occur within the context of competitions, as do changes in hormones, and researchers have yet to examine the effects of poses within this ecologically relevant context. Using a large sample of 247 male participants, natural winners and losers of a physical competition were randomly assigned to hold a low, neutral or high-power postural display. We found no main effect of pose type on testosterone, cortisol, risk or feelings of power. Winners assigned to a high-power pose had a relative, albeit small, rise in testosterone compared to winners who held neutral or low-power poses. For losers, we found little evidence that high-power poses lead to increased testosterone relative to those holding neutral or low-powered poses. If anything, the reverse was observed - losers had a reduction in testosterone after holding high-power poses. To the extent that changes in testosterone modulate social behaviors adaptively, it is possible that the relative reduction in testosterone observed in losers taking high-powered poses is designed to inhibit further "winner-like" behavior that could result in continued defeat and harm. Still, effects were small, multiple comparisons were made, and the results ran counter to our predictions. We thus treat these conclusions as preliminary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. We won a National award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meciarova, A.; Cicova, V.

    2011-01-01

    On the occasion of the 43 rd conference for water management in the industry results of the 3 rd competition were announced for the National Business Award for Environment in the Slovak Republic 2011 organized by the Association of Industrial Ecology in Slovakia (ASPEK). The first prize in the category 'product; went to the hands of Slovenske elektrarne representatives for providing the energy self-sufficiency of Tery Chalet, High Tatras, all year round with installing photovoltaic system. 'We have a complex programme of five energies through which we support culture, sports, humanity, education and environmental protection. Hence we try to support constant sustainability of biodiversity,' underlined Alena Meciarova, Manager of Environment at Slovenske elektrarne. (author)

  6. Fake Academic Degrees as an Indicator for Severe Reputation Crisis in the Scientific Community of Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostovtsev, A.; Kostinskiy, A.

    2016-07-01

    As is shown by our studies described below, awarding fake academic degrees to politicians, businessmen, doctors in clinics, professors in universities, and teachers in schools, that is, to all those who wish to use their new academic titles to step onto a faster career route, is widely accepted in Russia. Fake academic titles are awarded throughout the country. This business is based on the manufacture of falsified dissertations. In early 2013, a group of five researchers and journalists established a social network called “Dissernet”. Dissernet is a volunteer-effort free association aimed at making fraud and trickery in the awarding of academic titles transparent and exposed to the public. The scale of academic fraud in Russia has turned out to exceed the most pessimistic expectations. Statistics collected by Dissernet have yielded a number of conclusions discussed below. (Author)

  7. And the winner of the Golden CinéGlobe is…

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Three years after the first CinéGlobe festival, the CERN film club has just organised a second international festival of short films and science documentaries, attended by a host of film-makers and film fans alike. Six special prizes were awarded.   One of the Golden CinéGlobe awards The second Golden CinéGlobe award ceremony was held in the Globe on the evening of Saturday, 20 February. Now something of a magnet for local fans of short films and science documentaries, the CinéGlobe festival has become one of the most successful events organised by a CERN club. "Organising the festival has been a gratifying experience as many people have taken part in and enjoyed the event", says Quentin King, vice-chairman of the CERN film club, Open Your Eyes Films. "Time was our worst enemy. It took us a year to bring the project to fruition but we could have done with another year to refine some of the details". The 18 screenings...

  8. Versatile Networks of Simulated Spiking Neurons Displaying Winner-Take-All Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqing eChen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe simulations of large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons that can generate dynamically stable winner-take-all (WTA behavior. The network connectivity is a variant of center-surround architecture that we call center-annular-surround (CAS. In this architecture each neuron is excited by nearby neighbors and inhibited by more distant neighbors in an annular-surround region. The neural units of these networks simulate conductance-based spiking neurons that interact via mechanisms susceptible to both short-term synaptic plasticity and STDP. We show that such CAS networks display robust WTA behavior unlike the center-surround networks and other control architectures that we have studied. We find that a large-scale network of spiking neurons with separate populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons can give rise to smooth maps of sensory input. In addition, we show that a humanoid Brain-Based-Device (BBD under the control of a spiking WTA neural network can learn to reach to target positions in its visual field, thus demonstrating the acquisition of sensorimotor coordination.

  9. Versatile networks of simulated spiking neurons displaying winner-take-all behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqing; McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M

    2013-01-01

    We describe simulations of large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons that can generate dynamically stable winner-take-all (WTA) behavior. The network connectivity is a variant of center-surround architecture that we call center-annular-surround (CAS). In this architecture each neuron is excited by nearby neighbors and inhibited by more distant neighbors in an annular-surround region. The neural units of these networks simulate conductance-based spiking neurons that interact via mechanisms susceptible to both short-term synaptic plasticity and STDP. We show that such CAS networks display robust WTA behavior unlike the center-surround networks and other control architectures that we have studied. We find that a large-scale network of spiking neurons with separate populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons can give rise to smooth maps of sensory input. In addition, we show that a humanoid brain-based-device (BBD) under the control of a spiking WTA neural network can learn to reach to target positions in its visual field, thus demonstrating the acquisition of sensorimotor coordination.

  10. Population cycles and species diversity in dynamic Kill-the-Winner model of microbial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of species diversity in microbial ecosystems remain poorly understood. Bacteriophages are believed to increase the diversity by the virtue of Kill-the-Winner infection bias preventing the fastest growing organism from taking over the community. Phage-bacterial ecosystems are traditionally described in terms of the static equilibrium state of Lotka-Volterra equations in which bacterial growth is exactly balanced by losses due to phage predation. Here we consider a more dynamic scenario in which phage infections give rise to abrupt and severe collapses of bacterial populations whenever they become sufficiently large. As a consequence, each bacterial population in our model follows cyclic dynamics of exponential growth interrupted by sudden declines. The total population of all species fluctuates around the carrying capacity of the environment, making these cycles cryptic. While a subset of the slowest growing species in our model is always driven towards extinction, in general the overall ecosystem diversity remains high. The number of surviving species is inversely proportional to the variation in their growth rates but increases with the frequency and severity of phage-induced collapses. Thus counter-intuitively we predict that microbial communities exposed to more violent perturbations should have higher diversity. PMID:28051127

  11. A ''Winner-Take-All'' IC for determining the crystal of interaction in PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Beuville, E.; Ho, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present performance measurements of a Winner-Take-All (WTA) CMOS integrated circuit to be used with a pixel based PET detector module. Given n input voltages, it rapidly determines the input with the largest voltage, and outputs the encoded address of this input and a voltage proportional to this largest voltage. This is more desirable than a threshold approach for applications that require exactly one channel to be identified or when noise is a significant fraction of the input signal. A sixteen input prototype has been fabricated using two 1.2 microm processes (HP linear MOS capacitance and Orbit double-poly capacitance). ICs from both processes reliably identify (within 50 ns) the maximum channel if ΔV (the difference between the two highest channels) is >20 mV. The key element in the WTA circuit is an array of high gain nonlinear current amplifiers. There is one amplifier for each input channel, and each amplifier is composed of only two FETs. All amplifiers are supplied by a common, limited current source, so the channel with the largest input current takes all of this supply current while the other channels receive virtually none. Thus, these amplifier outputs become a set of logical bits that identify the maximum channel, which is encoded and used to select a multiplexer input. A voltage to current converter at each input channel turns this into a voltage sensitive device. This circuit uses very little power, drawing approximately 100 microA at 5 V

  12. ANALISIS PERBANDINGAN PENGHARGAAN KUALITAS MALCOLM BALDRIGE NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD DENGAN EUROPEAN QUALITY AWARD (MBNQA vs EQA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Bakhtiar Amalia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Persaingan bisnis global saat ini makin ketat. Dengan adanya Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA dan juga European Quality Award (EQA diharapkan mampu mendorong dan memotivasi perusahaan-perusahaan, baik yang sudah sukses maupun yang sedang berkembang, untuk selalu meningkatkan mutu dan kinerja, serta sebagai kunci daya saing. Dalam makalah ini, kita akan membahas penghargaan kualitas mengenai tujuan, manfaat dan perkembangan, dan trend saat ini, terutama untuk MBNQA dan EQM (European Quality Model. Kita akan membandingkan antara MBNQA dan EQM melalui pengertian, latar belakang, metode-metode, dan kriteria-kriteria, serta aplikasinya, sehingga dapat kita lakukan analisa perbandingan untuk keduanya. Kata Kunci  : Penghargaan Kualitas, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA   Emulation of global business in this time more and more to tighten. With existence of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA as well as European Quality Award (EQA expected can push and motivate companies, both for have successful and also which is expanding, to always increase the quality and performance, and also as competitiveness key. In this paper, we will discuss about national quality award concerning target, benefit, growth, and trend in this time, especially MBNQA and EQM (European Quality Model. We will compare between MBNQA and EQM through congeniality, background, method, and criterions, and also its application,  so that earn us to analyse comparison to both of its. Keyword        : Quality Award, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA

  13. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  14. 12 CFR 1806.204 - Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards. 1806... OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.204 Applications for Bank Enterprise... Enterprise Awards in accordance with this section and the applicable NOFA. After receipt of an application...

  15. 22 CFR 226.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special award conditions. 226.14 Section 226.14 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-award Requirements § 226.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or...

  16. 22 CFR 226.11 - Pre-award policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-award policies. 226.11 Section 226.11 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-award Requirements § 226.11 Pre-award policies. (a) Use of grants and...

  17. 28 CFR 523.16 - Lump sum awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... satisfactory performance of an unusually hazardous assignment; (c) An act which protects the lives of staff or... TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.16 Lump sum awards. Any staff member may recommend... award is calculated. No seniority is accrued for such awards. Staff may recommend lump sum awards of...

  18. 48 CFR 1552.216-77 - Award term incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... award term incentive periods] years. (c) Right not to grant or cancel the award term incentive. (1) The Government has the unilateral right not to grant or to cancel award term incentive periods and the associated... the award term incentive is cancelled, a unilateral modification will cite this clause as the...

  19. 48 CFR 452.216-70 - Award Fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Award Fee. 452.216-70... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 452.216-70 Award Fee. As prescribed in 416.405, insert a clause substantially as follows: Award Fee (FEB 1988) The amount of award fee...

  20. Kaizen Award in Romania: the KAIZEN™ way in obtaining the continuous improvement success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratu Julien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the times when the economic performance and sustainable management are representing two of the most challenging characteristics of the business environment, there are some methods and techniques that passed the test of time. The great majority of companies are using in the present the KAIZEN™ Business System, a system of management which has been expanding in all over the world, by having and implying the power of continuous improvement and standardization. Having as “role-model” the well-known Toyota Production System, KAIZEN™ Business System has become the fundamental way of managing a business, which led to the creation of personalized management systems for companies. In Romania, it was also developed the Kaizen by Harmony concept, as an approach of KAIZEN™ Business System, its results being highly appreciated at the international level. In the daily challenging task of changing the paradigms and mentalities, several companies succeeded in understanding the importance of KAIZEN™ Business System and have been applying the Kaizen by Harmony concept ever since. Their results are impressive, few companies reaching to the international benchmark level in their fields of activity and becoming leaders of the Romanian or European markets. Therefore, the Kaizen Award in Romania has become the proper way of acknowledging their results and efforts to strive for excellence in the endless cycle of the continuous improvement. The aim of this paper is to describe the competitive advantage offered by KAIZEN™ Business System and Kaizen by Harmony, in strong correlation with the practical approach of the case-studies representing the amazing stories of the Kaizen Award in Romania winners until the present moment. The use of these best practices will underline once again some important business characteristics that must exist in every company, for it to become and remain competitive.

  1. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the data structures to be implemented to provide the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD); a Computer System for the in-cave Bertha waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations in A59. (Author)

  2. Research Award: CommunicaƟons Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    The Communicaons Research Award focuses on corporate and research communicaon ... social media strategies, as well as other outreach programs. ... enrolled at a recognized university at the master's or doctoral level or have completed a.

  3. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Awards Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet Awards Argonne's Chemical Sciences and

  4. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  5. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth) ... Your proposal should demonstrate an understanding of the ... demonstrated ability to work independently, and strong written and oral communications skills are ...

  6. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  7. 48 CFR 922.608-5 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act 922.608-5 Award. The... Office in which the contractors place of business is located. Regional Office locations are specified at...

  8. Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations that are are at the leading edge of managing greenhouse gas emissions in their organizational supply chains.

  9. Institutionalizing the Ecohealth Approach : Training and Awards ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program will comprise three elements: a region-wide training and awards ... of the Ecohealth approach within INSP's graduate program; and a co-financing strategy to ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  10. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  11. 42 CFR 52d.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... objectives are designed to aid students: (i) To acquire a basic understanding of fundamental principles of... awards will be made after consideration of such factors as the grantee's progress and management...

  12. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program ... Strong writing and communication skills in English;; Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

  13. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the division through a variety of ... Strong research, analytical, and writing skills, and familiar with website applications.

  14. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-14

    Jan 14, 2018 ... We offer a number of research awards providing a unique ... What frameworks and methodologies present opportunities for ... How are governments and organizations identifying and addressing critical research gaps in ...

  15. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to ... What frameworks and methodologies present opportunities for strengthening the ... and organizations identifying and addressing critical research gaps in relation to the ...

  16. Research award: Governance and Justice 2019 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... as well as initiatives that eliminate impunity for Sexual and Gender-Based Violence, ... Applicants should clearly outline their qualifications for this position, and ... in the IDRC Research Awards 2019 Call page and, for this particular position, ...

  17. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  18. Research award: Food, Environment, and Health | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... ... skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... food systems research and interventions in low- and middle-income countries. ... the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the ...

  19. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes the operation of each of the components of the AWARD system. This document provides a simple reference guide for all users of the system and assumes a minimum degree of computer literacy. (Author)

  20. NCI Research Specialist Award (R50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Award enables scientists to pursue stable research careers within an existing cancer research program, but not serve as independent investigators. Letter of Intent due: January 2, 2017 Application due: February 2, 2017

  1. Research Award: Corporate Strategy and Evaluaon Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award ... and developmental evaluaon, to assess and adjust their program strategies? ... Be either currently enrolled at a recognized university at the master's or ...

  2. Rheumatology Research Foundation Clinician Scholar Educator Award: Fifteen Years Promoting Rheumatology Educators and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jessica R; O'Rourke, Kenneth S; Kolasinski, Sharon L; Aizer, Juliet; Wheatley, Mary J; Battistone, Michael J; Siaton, Bernadette C; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa; Pillinger, Michael H; Lazaro, Deana M

    2016-11-01

    The Rheumatology Research Foundation's Clinician Scholar Educator (CSE) award is a 3-year career development award supporting medical education research while providing opportunities for mentorship and collaboration. Our objective was to document the individual and institutional impact of the award since its inception, as well as its promise to strengthen the subspecialty of rheumatology. All 60 CSE Award recipients were surveyed periodically. Fifty-six of those 60 awardees (90%) responded to requests for survey information that included post-award activities, promotions, and further funding. Data were also collected from yearly written progress reports for each grant. Of the total CSE recipients to date, 48 of 60 (80%) are adult rheumatologists, 11 of 60 (18%) are pediatric rheumatologists, and 1 is an adult and pediatric rheumatologist. Two-thirds of survey respondents spend up to 30% of their total time in educational activities, and one-third spend greater than 30%. Thirty-one of the 60 CSE recipients (52%) have published a total of 86 medical education papers. Twenty-six of 52 (50%) had received an academic promotion following the award. Eleven awardees earned advanced degrees. We describe the creation and evolution of a grant program from a medical subspecialty society foundation and the impact on producing education research, individual identity formation, and ongoing support for educators. This community of rheumatology scholar educators now serves as an important resource at the national level for the American College of Rheumatology and its membership. We believe that this grant may serve as a model for other medical societies that want to promote education scholarship and leadership within their specialties. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  4. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for AWARD (the A59 Waste Repackaging Database); a computer-based system to record LLW sorting and repacking information from the North Cave Line in A59. A solution will be developed on the basis of this document. AWARD will record and store details entered from waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations. This document will be used as the basis of the development of the host computer system. (Author)

  5. Winners and losers of national and global efforts to reconcile agricultural intensification and biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Lukas; Meyer, Carsten; Scherber, Christoph; Kreft, Holger; Tscharntke, Teja

    2018-05-01

    Closing yield gaps within existing croplands, and thereby avoiding further habitat conversions, is a prominently and controversially discussed strategy to meet the rising demand for agricultural products, while minimizing biodiversity impacts. The agricultural intensification associated with such a strategy poses additional threats to biodiversity within agricultural landscapes. The uneven spatial distribution of both yield gaps and biodiversity provides opportunities for reconciling agricultural intensification and biodiversity conservation through spatially optimized intensification. Here, we integrate distribution and habitat information for almost 20,000 vertebrate species with land-cover and land-use datasets. We estimate that projected agricultural intensification between 2000 and 2040 would reduce the global biodiversity value of agricultural lands by 11%, relative to 2000. Contrasting these projections with spatial land-use optimization scenarios reveals that 88% of projected biodiversity loss could be avoided through globally coordinated land-use planning, implying huge efficiency gains through international cooperation. However, global-scale optimization also implies a highly uneven distribution of costs and benefits, resulting in distinct "winners and losers" in terms of national economic development, food security, food sovereignty or conservation. Given conflicting national interests and lacking effective governance mechanisms to guarantee equitable compensation of losers, multinational land-use optimization seems politically unlikely. In turn, 61% of projected biodiversity loss could be avoided through nationally focused optimization, and 33% through optimization within just 10 countries. Targeted efforts to improve the capacity for integrated land-use planning for sustainable intensification especially in these countries, including the strengthening of institutions that can arbitrate subnational land-use conflicts, may offer an effective, yet

  6. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  7. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  8. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  10. Academic Performance, Course Completion Rates, and Student Perception of the Quality and Frequency of Interaction in a Virtual High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Abigail; Graham, Charles R.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Barbour, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' perceptions of teacher-student interaction and academic performance at an asynchronous, self-paced, statewide virtual high school. Academic performance was measured by grade awarded and course completion. There were 2269 students who responded to an 18-item survey designed to measure student…

  11. Lecture by the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Professor Albert Fert, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for his work on giant magneto-resistance and spintronics, will give a lecture at the University of Geneva on 16 November on this booming field of science. (c) CNRS Photothèque - C. LebedinskyOn 9 October, the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics was jointly awarded to Albert Fert of the CNRS and Peter Grünberg of the Jülich Research Centre for their simultaneous and independent discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in 1988. This discovery had a significant impact in the fields of information technology and communications as it was rapidly used to develop extremely sensitive hard disk read-out heads that are capable of reading information stored at very high densities, thereby allowing further progress in the miniaturisation of data-storage devices. Since the first GMR read-out head was launched in 1997, the technology has become the standard in the m...

  12. Expanding the Field of Surgical Researchers: The Jahnigen Career Development Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Stacie

    2017-10-01

    Under a long-standing collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), the Atlantic Philanthropies (AP), and specialty societies in 10 targeted specialties, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has been working to improve quality of care provided to older adults by surgical and related medical specialists. To support and nurture future academic leaders, the Geriatrics-for-Specialists Initiative (GSI) established the Dennis W. Jahnigen Career Development Scholar Award (JCDA) program in 2002, with AP joining JAHF as a core funder of the awards in 2003. Commencing in 2011, the National Institute on Aging (NIA) launched the Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Specialists' Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) program, using an RO3 mechanism. Recipients of the JCDA and the GEMSSTAR are provided with 2 years of research support and networking opportunities with other scholars; 79 JCDA and 26 surgical and related medical specialty GEMSSTAR scholars have been funded through these award mechanisms, with AGS, JAHF, and surgical and related medical specialty societies providing matching support for 20 of the GEMSSTAR scholars for leadership development programs. One of the primary criteria for judging the overall success of the program was eventual transition of the award to a federally funded program, which was achieved when NIA launched the GEMSSTAR program in 2011. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Similarities and differences in the career trajectories of male and female career development award recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; DeCastro, Rochelle; Griffith, Kent A; Rangarajan, Soumya; Churchill, Cristina; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A

    2011-11-01

    To examine the careers of career development award recipients. In 2009, a postal survey was conducted of 818 recipients of K08 and K23 awards in 2000-2001 to examine career paths and personal characteristics. Of 589 respondents (72% response rate), 211 (35.9%) were female. Women were less likely to have children (Psuccessful (P=.002), and they published fewer papers (P=.001). Overall, 118 women (55.9%) and 274 men (72.5%) met at least one of the following criteria for success: serving as principal investigator on an R01 or grants>$1,000,000 since K award receipt, publishing at least 35 publications since K award year, or serving as dean, department chair, or division chief. In a multivariate model, gender (odds ratio 1.72, P=.003) was associated with the likelihood of success by this definition, and analysis revealed no significant interactions (including with parental status). Most of these promising investigators of both genders remained in academia and received promotions. However, gender differences in success existed, unrelated to parental status, suggesting a need for ongoing investigation of the causes of gender differences in academic medical careers.

  14. Tracking the Market Performance of Companies That Integrate a Culture of Health and Safety: An Assessment of Corporate Health Achievement Award Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabius, Raymond; Loeppke, Ronald R; Hohn, Todd; Fabius, Dan; Eisenberg, Barry; Konicki, Doris L; Larson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the hypothesis that stock market performance of companies achieving high scores on either health or safety in the Corporate Health Achievement Award (CHAA) process will be superior to average index performance. The stock market performance of portfolios of CHAA winners was examined under six different scenarios using simulation and past market performance in tests of association framed to inform the investor community. CHAA portfolios out-performed the S&P average on all tests. This study adds to the growing evidence that a healthy and safe workforce correlates with a company's performance and its ability to provide positive returns to shareholders. It advances the idea that a proven set of health and safety metrics based on the CHAA evaluation process merits inclusion with existing measures for market valuation.

  15. A 10-year analysis of American Society For Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimple, Randall J; Kao, Gary D

    2013-03-15

    Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimple, Randall J.; Kao, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members

  17. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kao, Gary D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members.

  18. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  20. Research award: Foundations for Innovation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... academic/non-academic partnerships in support of social or economic ... for scaling-up new, development-oriented technologies in LMICs. ... for this position, and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals.

  1. Stakeholder analysis in the portuguese artificial reef context: winners and losers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this stakeholder analysis related to the artificial reef (AR program located in the Algarve (Southern Portugal mainland 21 different stakeholder clusters were identified. Stakeholders were classified as primary, secondary and external. It was found that stakeholder interaction with the structures can be of private, public or cooperative interest. In the analysis there were also identified and mapped the impact of the program on stakeholders and their power to influence the ARs' outcomes. Stakeholders' interactions with the ARs were studied, along with their likely attitudes and behavior towards the man-made structures. Finally, all stakeholder clusters were classified according to their expected degree of involvement throughout the different AR stages. The purpose of this stakeholder analysis was to find out winners and losers connected with the reef deployment. It was found that most stakeholder clusters were affected positively, but also four clusters affected negatively. However, it is believed that those that may be affected negatively do not pose a serious threat to the expected AR development along its lifetime.Nesta análise de intervenientes relativa ao programa de recifes artificiais (RAs localizado na costa do Algarve (Sul de Portugal continental foram identificados 21 grupos de atores distintos. Os intervenientes foram classificados em 3 grupos: primários, secundários e externos. Verificou-se que o interesse dos intervenientes face às estruturas recifais (interação pode ser do tipo privado, público ou cooperativo. Na análise foram identificados os impactos do projeto sobre os intervenientes e o poder destes para influenciar os resultados do programa recifal. Foram definidas quais as interações e possíveis atitudes e comportamento dos intervenientes em relação aos RAs. Finalmente, todos os grupos de intervenientes foram classificados de acordo com o grau de envolvimento esperado ao longo das diferentes fases do programa

  2. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2002-2003 lecture series. From today until April 26 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site, you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate student lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee is offering 10 prizes of a self-teach web based training course to people who provide their email address when filling in the questionnaire. The 10 winners will be chosen randomly from the replies received before the closing date.

  4. CERN Press Office receives award from Euroscience

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Communication group has received an award for its efforts in communicating the LHC first beam to the media and the public. James Gillies, head of the Communication group was presented the AlphaGalileo Research Public Relations Award on Wednesday, 14 October during the Euroscience Media Award Ceremony in Hannover. "It’s great to receive this recognition," said Gillies. "Of course, we had great material to work with: the LHC is a fantastic story and one that is going to get even better. Angels, Demons and black holes also had their roles to play, but behind the media interest there’s been a lot of hard work by my team. This is for them." The CERN Communication group also works with communication professionals in all the CERN Member States and major physics labs around the world through the European Particle Physics Communication Network, and the InterAction collaboration. "Without them," says Gillies, &am...

  5. Prestigious US awards for CERN computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On 4 June in the distinguished surroundings of Washington's National Building Museum, IT Deputy Division Leader Les Robertson accepted a 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program on behalf of CERN. This prestigious award was made to CERN for its innovative application of information technology to the benefit of society. Members of the team that initiated the SHIFT project with the Computerworld trophy. The team was a collaboration between the Information Technology Division, the OPAL experiment and Indiana University. From left to right, Ben Segal, Matthias Schroeder, Gail Hanson, Bernd Panzer, Jean-Philippe Baud, Les Robertson and Frédéric Hemmer. CERN's award followed the Laboratory's nomination by Lawrence Ellison, Chairman and CEO of the Oracle Corporation. Ellison nominated CERN in recognition of 'pioneering work in developing a large scale data warehouse' - an innovative computing architecture that responds precisely to the global particle physics commun...

  6. Awards for Lyn Evans and Philippe Lebrun

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lyn Evans has received the American Physical Society’s Robert R. Wilson Prize, while Philippe Lebrun has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the Wrocław University of Technology in Poland. Lyn Evans in front of an LHC dipole magnet. Philippe Lebrun (centre) with the Dean of the Faculty of mechanical and power engineering of the Wrocław University during the ceremony (courtesy of Laurent Tavian).Numerous honours are going to the LHC and those behind it even before this exceptional machine begins operation. The LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, has recently been awarded the "Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators" by the American Physical Society (APS). According to the citation, the prize was awarded "for a sustained career of technical innovation and leadership in the SPS proton-antiproton collider, culminating in the construction and commissioning of the LHC&am...

  7. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  8. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Itwas therefore recommended that efforts should be made to look into other pressing factors like self-esteem, teacher's attitude, student's attitude, parental background among others which may be influencing student's poor academic achievement. Key words: Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination, Academic ...

  9. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  10. Dr William Kerr ‘Bill’ Collins, Recipient of the 2010 Tobacco Science Research Conference Lifetime Achievement Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore JM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is my distinct pleasure to make this presentation of the TSRC Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr Bill Collins from NC State University. Bill is well known in academic and industry circles for his contributions to Tobacco Science. Some have suggested that Bill Collins is the single person most identified with flue-cured tobacco at NC State and probably world-wide.

  11. IEEE Honors DeBlasio with Steinmetz Award | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    professional association, with the 2010 Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award. The award will be presented on Dec. 5 with the U.S. Department of the Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will be honored

  12. Research Brief. Punitive Damage Awards in Financial Injury Verdicts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moller, E

    1997-01-01

    .... While punitive damages are awarded in less than 4 percent of all civil jury verdicts, there is a 1-in-7 chance of a punitive award in disputes arising from contractual or commercial relationships...

  13. CMS rewards its best suppliers with the Crystal Award

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    A. Ingman of the Finnish company Outokumpu Pori Oy, F. Krähenbuhl of the Swiss firm Nexans Suisse and M. Niemerski of the American company Plascore receive the highest distinction in the CMS supplier awards - the Crystal Award.

  14. Audit of Cost-Plus-Award-Fee Contracts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The audit objectives were to determine whether award fees contain adequate incentive amounts for contractors to reduce costs and whether the DoD contracting officers were effectively using cost-plus-award-fee contracts...

  15. NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board | News | NREL NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board February 16, 2018 Fuel stability research advances innovation and bolsters industry confidence in biodiesel. Scott

  16. General FAQs regarding the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This award covers field research expenses for advanced doctoral students who intend ... serious security challenges, IDRC may ask you to delay your field research, .... Women candidates applying to IDRC Doctoral Research Awards calls in ...

  17. Establishing an academic laboratory: mentoring as a business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Valentina

    2014-11-01

    It is a tremendous honor for my group and me to receive the recognition of the 2014 Women in Cell Biology Junior Award. I would like to take the opportunity of this essay to describe my scientific journey, discuss my philosophy about running a group, and propose what I think is a generalizable model to efficiently establish an academic laboratory. This essay is about my view on the critical components that go into establishing a highly functional academic laboratory during the current tough, competitive times. © 2014 Greco.

  18. Research Award: Global Health Research Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  19. Research Award: Non‐Communicable Disease Prevenon

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  20. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  1. Research award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... ... research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... and the advancement of democracy, human rights, and economic growth. ... seeking a research award recipient to explore research questions centered on the ... fields such as engineering or computer/information science; and ...

  2. Round Two for Three ALICE Industrial Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Excellency in industrial collaboration with the LHC experimental teams is one important contribution to the successful development and realization of the experiments. A few weeks ago the ALICE collaboration presented a second round of awards to industrial collaborators for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems.

  3. Energies Best Paper Awards for 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Sciubba

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are pleased to announce the Energies Best Papers awards for 2015. Energies is an open access journal of energy-related scientific research, technology development, and policy and management studies. It publishes reviews, regular research articles, and communications in a number of fields related to the procurement, conversion and final uses of energy.[...

  4. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  5. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the software modules to be implemented to provide the user interface for the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD). The modules will consist of a front end menu with options giving access to the various screen forms and printed reports. (Author)

  6. Audience Perceptions of the Academy Awards Telecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Michael R.; Hassett, Christopher A.

    Residents in a southern California city were surveyed by telephone about their attitudes toward the telecast of the motion picture "Academy Awards" presentations. Of the 141 respondents, 71 had not watched the telecast, 42 had watched some of the broadcast, and 28 had watched all of it. Less than one third of the survey questions were specifically…

  7. Howard Feiertag receives hospitality industry award

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2004-01-01

    Howard Feiertag, of Blacksburg, an instructor in hospitality and tourism management at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, received the inaugural Excellence in Sales and Marketing Strategy Award at the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association/New York University Strategy Conference in New York recently.

  8. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, ... programming through a research acvity focusing on agriculture and food security, specifically on the gender and social (equity) dimensions of ...

  9. WIRED magazine announces rave awards nominees

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    WIRED Magazine has anounced the nominees for its fourth annual WIRED Rave Awards, celebrating innovation and the individuals transforming commerce and culture. Jeffrey Hangst of the University of Aarhus has been nominated in the science category, for his work on the ATHENA Experiment, CERN (1/2 page).

  10. 13 CFR 305.2 - Award requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Award requirements. 305.2 Section 305.2 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...) Acquisition, design and engineering, construction, rehabilitation, alteration, expansion, or improvement of...

  11. Award-term contracts: Good for business?

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Brett; Yoder, E. Cory

    2005-01-01

    The use of award-term contracts doesn’t seem to represent the best interests of the U.S. taxpayer—rather, it smacks terribly of the government acquisition environment of two decades ago that pre- ceded the passage of the Competition in Contracting Act.

  12. 42 CFR 59a.5 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... establishments, expansion, or improvement will, in the Secretary's judgment, best promote the purposes of section... available; and (2) The amount adequate to insure continuing financial support from non-Federal sources of... awards will be made after consideration of such factors as the grantee's progress and management...

  13. 40 CFR 35.718 - Award limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... included in the Performance Partnership Grant work plan. Hazardous Waste Management Program Grants (Pub.L... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Toxic Substances Compliance Monitoring (section 28) § 35.718 Award limitation. If the Toxic Substances Compliance Monitoring grant funds are included in a...

  14. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Award requirements. 306.2 Section 306.2 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...; (b) Benefits distressed Regions; (c) Demonstrates innovative approaches to stimulate economic...

  15. 13 CFR 307.4 - Award requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Award requirements. 307.4 Section 307.4 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... criteria provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, as applicable. (b) Strategy Grants. EDA will...

  16. Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, & Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the National Cancer Institute general timeline progression through Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, and Award Infographic. In the first month, Applicant prepares and submits Grant Application to Grants.gov in response to FOA. In month two, The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) assigns applications that fall under the category of R01s, etc. to a Scientific Review Group (SRG) or the CSR assigns applications that fall under the category of Program Projects and Center Grants to NCI Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). Months four through five: First-level review by Scientific Review Group (SRG) for Scientific Merit: SRG assigns Impact Scores. Month five Summary Sstatements are prepared and are available to NCI Program staff and applicants. Month six, second-level review by National Cancer Advisory board (NCAB) for NCI Funding determination begins. NCAB makes recommendation to NCI Director, NCI develops funding plan, Applications selected for Funding, “Paylists” forwarded to Office of Grant Administration (OGA). Month ten, Award Negotiations and Issuance: Award issued, Award received by Institution, and Investigator begins work. www.cancer.gov Icons made by Freepik from http://www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC BY3.0

  17. Ferox is awarded another contract by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Ferox, manufacturer of equipment for the chemical industry, has been awarded a second contract by the physical research centre CERN (Switzerland). The contract regards the delivery of 10 pcs of stainless containers for liquid nitrogen and argon with a capacity of 50 cu mt (1 paragraph).

  18. Balts show strong notes in Grammy Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Los Angeleses 8. veebr. Grammy Awards nominantide seas läti laulja Elina Garanca, dirigendid Paavo Järvi (Schumann "Cello Concerto" and Bloch's "Schelomo") ja Maris Jansons. Eelmisel aastal pälvis Grammy teos Sibelius "Cantatas" (esitajad Ellerheina tütarlastekoor Ester Loitme juhatusel, Eesti Rahvusmeeskoor, ERSO, dirigendid Ants Soots ja Paavo Järvi)

  19. 13 CFR 308.2 - Performance awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance awards. 308.2 Section 308.2 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Recipient's projection of private sector capital invested; (3) Meet or exceed target dates for Project start...

  20. Research Award: Non-Communicable Disease Prevention

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    perspective on crucial development issues. These one-year, paid, ... mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. ... strengthen tobacco control and health promotion efforts through innovative, sustainable financing. Three cross-cutting themes ...