WorldWideScience

Sample records for abutments

  1. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  2. Custom anatomic healing abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Gowda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants with their increasing success rates and predictability of final outcome are fast becoming the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth. Considering the success of immediate implant placement in reducing tissue loss and achieving good esthetic results, is making it a more popular treatment modality in implant dentistry. Understanding the management of gingival tissues in relation to implants to obtain maximum esthetics is of utmost importance. The use of provisional abutments and immediate temporization has a proven track record of their ability to produce optimal esthetics and to guide the tissue response during the healing phase. With careful patient selection and execution, customized healing abutments can provide an effective method to enhance the esthetic and emergence profile for anterior implant restorations.

  3. Evaluation of torque loss value of MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Alikhasi; Roshanak Baghaie; Nasim khosronejad

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: In response to esthetic demand of patients, ceramic abutments have been developed. Despite esthetic of zirconia abutments, machining accuracy of these abutments has always been a question. Any misfit in the abutment-implant interface connection can lead to detorque and screw loosening. The aim of this study was to compare torque loss value of manually aided design/manually aided manufacture (MAD/MAM) zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments. Materials and ...

  4. Integral Abutment and Jointless Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian-Claudiu Comisu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral bridges, or integral abutment and jointless bridges, as they are more commonly known in the USA, are constructed without any movement joints between spans or between spans and abutments. Typically these bridges have stub-type abutments supported on piles and continuous bridge deck from one embankment to the other. Foundations are usually designed to be small and flexible to facilitate horizontal movement or rocking of the support. Integrally bridges are simple or multiple span ones that have their superstructure cast integrally with their substructure. The jointless bridges cost less to construct and require less maintenance then equivalent bridges with expansion joints. Integral bridges present a challenge for load distribution calculations because the bridge deck, piers, abutments, embankments and soil must all be considered as single compliant system. This paper presents some of the important features of integral abutment and jointless bridge design and some guidelines to achieve improved design. The goal of this paper is to enhance the awareness among the engineering community to use integral abutment and jointless bridges in Romania.

  5. An introduction to single implant abutments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to single implant abutments and aims to provide basic information about abutments which are essential for all dental personnel who are involved in dental implantology. Clinical Relevance: This article provides a basic knowledge of implants and implant abutments which are of paramount importance, as replacement of missing teeth with oral implants has become a well-established clinical procedure.

  6. Evaluation of torque loss value of MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In response to esthetic demand of patients, ceramic abutments have been developed. Despite esthetic of zirconia abutments, machining accuracy of these abutments has always been a question. Any misfit in the abutment-implant interface connection can lead to detorque and screw loosening. The aim of this study was to compare torque loss value of manually aided design/manually aided manufacture (MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments. Materials and Methods: Seven titanium abutments (Branemark RP, Easy abutment and seven copy milled abutments which were duplicated from the prefabricated Zirkonzhan (ZirkonZahn, Sand in Taufers, Italy were prepared. After sintering process of zirconia abutment, all abutments were fastened with a torque screw under 35 Ncm. Detorque measurements were performed per group pushing the reverse button of the Torque controller soon after screw tightening with values registered. The mean torque loss were calculated and compared using Student's t test. Results: The mean of torque loss was 12.71 Ncm with standard deviation of 1.70 for prefabricated titanium abutments and 15.50 Ncm with standard deviation of 4.67 for MAD-MAM abutments. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.23. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, MAD-MAM ceramic abutments could maintain the applied torque comparing to the prefabricated abutments.

  7. Fracture Resistance of Implant Abutments Following Abutment Alterations by Milling the Margins: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Anuya; Kheur, Mohit; Kheur, Supriya; Lakha, Tabrez; Burhanpurwala, Murtuza

    2016-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different levels of preparation of an implant abutment on its fracture resistance. The study evaluated abutments that incorporated a platform switch (Myriad Plus Abutments, Morse Taper Connection) and Standard abutments (BioHorizons Standard Abutment, BioHorizons Inc). Each abutment was connected to an appropriate implant and mounted in a self-cured resin base. Based on the abutment preparation depths, 3 groups were created for each abutment type: as manufactured, abutment prepared 1 mm apical to the original margin, and abutment prepared 1.5 mm to the original margin. All the abutments were prepared in a standardized manner to incorporate a 0.5 mm chamfer margin uniformly. All the abutments were torqued to 30 Ncm on their respective implants. They were then subjected to loading until failure in a universal testing machine. Abutments with no preparation showed the maximum resistance to fracture for both groups. As the preparation depth increased, the fracture resistance decreased. The fracture resistance of implant abutment junction decreases as the preparation depth increases.

  8. A comparative study on microgap of premade abutments and abutments cast in base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalithamma, Jaini Jaini; Mallan, Sreekanth Anantha; Murukan, Pazhani Appan; Zarina, Rita

    2014-06-01

    The study compared the marginal accuracy of premade and cast abutments. Premade titanium, stainless steel, and gold abutments formed the control groups. Plastic abutments were cast in nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium and grade IV titanium. The abutment/implant interface was analyzed. Analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test revealed no significant difference in mean marginal microgap between premade gold and titanium abutments and between premade stainless steel and cast titanium abutments. Statistically significant differences (P < .001) were found among all other groups.

  9. Carbon film coating of abutment surfaces: effect on the abutment screw removal torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Pedro Henrique; de Moura Silva, Alecsandro; Cavalcanti Queiroz, José Renato; Salazar Marocho, Susana María; Bottino, Marco Antonia; Massi, Marcos; de Assunção e Souza, Rodrigo Othávio

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating of prefabricated implant abutment on screw removal torque (RT) before and after mechanical cycling (MC). Fifty-four abutments for external-hex implants were divided among 6 groups (n = 9): S, straight abutment (control); SC, straight coated abutment; SCy, straight abutment and MC; SCCy, straight coated abutment and MC; ACy, angled abutment and MC; and ACCy, angled coated abutment and MC. The abutments were attached to the implants by a titanium screw. RT values were measured and registered. Data (in Newton centimeter) were analyzed with analysis of variance and Dunnet test (α = 0.05). RT values were significantly affected by MC (P = 0.001) and the interaction between DLC coating and MC (P = 0.038). SCy and ACy showed the lowest RT values, statistically different from the control. The abutment coated groups had no statistical difference compared with the control. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed DLC film with a thickness of 3 μm uniformly coating the hexagonal abutment. DLC film deposited on the abutment can be used as an alternative procedure to reduce abutment screw loosening.

  10. Behavior and analysis of an integral abutment bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    As a result of abutment spalling on the integral abutment bridge over 400 South Street in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) instigated research measures to better understand the behavior of integral abutment bridges. ...

  11. [Effect of zirconia abutment angulation on stress distribution in the abutment and the bone around implant: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-zhong; Tian, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Yan-min

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of three different zirconia angular abutments on the stress distribution in bone and abutment using three-dimensional finite element analysis, and provide instruction for clinical application. Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to analyze the stress distribution of three different zirconia/titanium angular abutments and bone around implant. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in the straight abutment model. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the 20 ° angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in 15 ° angular abutment model. There was no significant difference between zirconia abutment model and titanium abutment model. The abutment angulation has a significant influence on the stress distribution in the abutment, bolt and bone, and exacerbates as the angulation increases, which suggest that we should take more attention to the implant orientation and use straight abutment or little angular abutment. The zirconia abutment can be used safely, and there is no noticeable difference between zirconia abutment and titanium abutment on stress distribution.

  12. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti; Dileep Nag Vinnakota; Srinivas Rao Pottem; Mahesh Pulagam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled t...

  13. Local scour at abutments: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    On the other hand, live-bed scour occurs when the scour hole is ... The primary vortex is elliptical in shape, with an inner core region being a .... The primary vortex is strong upstream of the abutment (see sections A–C) ...... Cardoso A H, Bettess R 1999 Effects of time and channel geometry on scour at bridge abutments. J.

  14. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search......-abutment connection. There were no significant differences between the two treatment modalities regarding professional or patient-reported outcome measures. Meta-analysis disclosed a mean difference of peri-implant marginal bone loss of 1.56 mm (confidence interval: 0.87 to 2.25), indicating significant more bone...... loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. CONCLUSIONS: A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must...

  15. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search...... of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment...... loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. CONCLUSIONS: A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must...

  16. Does Abutment Collar Length Affect Abutment Screw Loosening After Cyclic Loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Pirmoazen, Salma; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2015-07-01

    A significant vertical space that is corrected with vertical ridge augmentation may necessitate selection of longer abutments, which would lead to an increased vertical cantilever. This study investigated the influence of different abutment collar heights on single-unit dental implant screw-loosening after cyclic loading. Fifteen implant-abutment assemblies each consisted of an internal hexagonal implant were randomly assigned to 3 groups: Group1, consisting of 5 abutments with 1.5 mm gingival height (GH); Group2, 5 abutments with 3.5 mm GH; and Group3, 5 abutments with 5.5 mm GH. Each specimen was mounted in transparent auto-polymerizing acrylic resin block, and the abutment screw was tightened to 35 Ncm with an electric torque wrench. After 5 minutes, initial torque loss (ITL) was recorded for all specimens. Metal crowns were fabricated with 45° occlusal surface and were placed on the abutments. A cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 1 Hz were applied perpendicular to the long axis of each specimen. After 500 000 cycles, secondary torque loss (STL) was recorded. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate the effects of abutment collar height before and after cyclic loading. One-way ANOVA showed that ITL among the groups was not significantly different (P = .52), while STL was significantly different among the groups (P = .008). Post-hoc Tukey HSD tests showed that STL values were significantly different between the abutments with 1.5 mm GH (Group1) and with 5.5 mm GH (Group3) (P = .007). A paired comparison t-test showed that cyclic loading significantly influenced the STL in comparison with the ITL in each group. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increase in height of the abutment collar could adversely affect the torque loss of the abutment screw.

  17. The Influence of Torque Tightening on the Position Stability of the Abutment in Conical Implant-Abutment Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Wiebke Semper; Zulauf, Kris; Mehrhof, Jürgen; Nelson, Katja

    2015-01-01

    The influence of repeated system-specific torque tightening on the position stability of the abutment after de- and reassembly of the implant components was evaluated in six dental implant systems with a conical implant-abutment connection. An established experimental setup was used in this study. Rotation, vertical displacement, and canting moments of the abutment were observed; they depended on the implant system (P = .001, P abutment screw does not eliminate changes in position of the abutment.

  18. Influence of abutment materials on the implant-abutment joint stability in internal conical connection type implant systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Jae-Young; Yang, Dong-Seok; Huh, Jung-Bo; Heo, Jae-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the influence of abutment materials on the stability of the implant-abutment joint in internal conical connection type implant systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS Internal conical connection type implants, cement-retained abutments, and tungsten carbide-coated abutment screws were used. The abutments were fabricated with commercially pure grade 3 titanium (group T3), commercially pure grade 4 titanium (group T4), or Ti-6Al-4V (group TA) (n=5, each). In order to assess ...

  19. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  20. Measurement of the rotational misfit and implant-abutment gap of all-ceramic abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garine, Wael N; Funkenbusch, Paul D; Ercoli, Carlo; Wodenscheck, Joseph; Murphy, William C

    2007-01-01

    The specific aims of this study were to measure the implant and abutment hexagonal dimensions, to measure the rotational misfit between implant and abutments, and to correlate the dimension of the gap present between the abutment and implant hexagons with the rotational misfit of 5 abutment-implant combinations from 2 manufacturers. Twenty new externally hexed implants (n = 10 for Nobel Biocare; n = 10 for Biomet/3i) and 50 new abutments were used (n = 10; Procera Zirconia; Procera Alumina; Esthetic Ceramic Abutment; ZiReal; and GingiHue post ZR Zero Rotation abutments). The mating surfaces of all implants and abutments were imaged with a scanning electron microscope before and after rotational misfit measurements. The distances between the corners and center of the implant and abutment hexagon were calculated by entering their x and y coordinates, measured on a measuring microscope, into Pythagoras' theorem. The dimensional difference between abutment and implant hexagons was calculated and correlated with the rotational misfit, which was recorded using a precision optical encoder. Each abutment was rotated (3 times/session) clockwise and counterclockwise until binding. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were used to compare rotational misfit among groups (alpha = .05). With respect to rotational misfit, the abutment groups were significantly different from one another (P < .001), with the exception of the Procera Zirconia and Esthetic Ceramic groups (P = .4). The mean rotational misfits in degrees were 4.13 +/- 0.68 for the Procera Zirconia group, 3.92 +/- 0.62 for the Procera Alumina group, 4.10 +/- 0.67 for the Esthetic Ceramic group, 3.48 +/- 0.40 for the ZiReal group, and 1.61 +/- 0.24 for the GingiHue post ZR group. There was no correlation between the mean implant-abutment gap and rotational misfit. Within the limits of this study, machining inconsistencies of the hexagons were found for all implants and abutments tested. The GingiHue Post

  1. Segmented abutting fields irradiation using multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of segmented abutting fields irradiation (SAFI) using multileaf collimators (MLCs), in which the target volume is divided into several segments to create complex irregular field without use of alloy blocks. A linear accelerator with 26 pairs of roundly ended MLCs of 1 cm in width was tested in this study. In SAFI, radiation leakage occurs at the abutment sites with these MLCs. Film dosimetry was used to determine the optimal length of the MLC overlap to minimize dose profile variation in abutting fields. A mantle field was investigated as a clinical application. Without overlapping the MLCs, radiation leakage at the abutments appeared as a peak of the dose profile. With more overlapping, the profile exhibited a minimized variation with a two-peak pattern. With excessive overlapping, the peak was reversed due to decreased dose. Variation of the profile was minimized with an overlap of 2.0-2.2 mm. The level of variation and the optimal length of overlap were found to be independent of the sites of measurement. Reproducibility was confirmed by repeated measurements. With the mantle field, SAFI using MLCs revealed an profile equivalent to use of alloy blocking fields in all respects other than the variations at the abutting sites. If the length of the MLC abutment overlap differs by site, clinical application of SAFI using MLCs would be quite complicated. The optimal length of the overlap was found to be 2.0 mm and to be independent of the sites of abutment. Therefore, we conclude that SAFI using MLCs of 1 cm in width is feasible for clinical use. (author)

  2. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Krishna Chaitanya; Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Pottem, Srinivas Rao; Pulagam, Mahesh

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled to form 8 simulations. After discretization, the contact stresses developed for 150 N vertical and 100 N oblique load applications were analyzed, using ABAQUS. By assessing damage initiation and shortest fatigue load on screw threads, the SL for 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cyclic loads were estimated, using fe-safe program. The obtained values were compared for influence of connection design, abutment angulation, and screw length. In straight abutment models, conical connection showed more damage (14.3%-72.3%) when compared to trilobe (10.1%-65.73%) at 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cycles for both vertical and oblique loads, whereas in angulated abutments, trilobe (16.1%-76.9%) demonstrated more damage compared to conical (13.5%-70%). Irrespective of the connection type and abutment angulation, short screws showed more percentage of damage compared to long screws. The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  3. Implant Fixture Heat Transfer During Abutment Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Alkeraidis, Abdullah; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Altahawi, Hamdi; Lynch, Edward

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of water flow rate on the heat transmission in implants during abutment preparation using a diamond bur in a high-speed dental turbine. Titanium-alloy abutments (n = 32) were connected to a titanium-alloy implant embedded in an acrylic resin within a water bath at a controlled temperature of 37°C. The specimens were equally distributed into 2 groups (16 each) according to the water flow rate used during the preparation phase. Group 1 had a water flow rate of 24 mL/min, and group 2 had a water flow rate of 40 mL/min. Each abutment was prepared in the axial plane for 1 minute and in the occlusal plane for 1 minute with a coarse tapered diamond bur using a high-speed dental handpiece. Thermocouples embedded at the cervix of the implant surface were used to record the temperature of heat transmission from the abutment preparation. Heat generation was measured at 3 distinct times (immediately and 30 seconds and 60 seconds after the end of preparation). Statistical analyses were carried out using 2-way analysis of variance and the Student t test. Water flow rates (24 mL vs 40 mL) and time interval had no statistically significant effect on the implant's temperature change during the abutment preparation stage (P = .431 and P = .064, respectively). Increasing the water flow rate from 24 to 40 mL/min had no influence on the temperature of the implant fixture recorded during preparation of the abutment.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  5. The influence of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Linda J.; Shala, Kujtim Sh.; Pustina–Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of removable partial dentures (RPD) on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth. Materials and Methods: A total 107 patients with RPD participated in this study. It was examined 138 RPD, they were 87 with clasp-retained and 51 were RPD with attachments. The following periodontal parameters were evaluated for abutment and non-abutment teeth, plaque index (PLI), calculus index (CI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probin...

  6. Analytical and experimental position stability of the abutment in different dental implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection

    OpenAIRE

    Semper-Hogg, Wiebke; Kraft, Silvan; Stiller, Sebastian; Mehrhof, Juergen; Nelson, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Position stability of the abutment should be investigated in four implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection. Materials and methods Previously developed formulas and an established experimental setup were used to determine the position stability of the abutment in the four implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection and different positional index designs: The theoretical rotational freedom was calculated by using the dimensions of one randomly selecte...

  7. Fracture load of different crown systems on zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, T; Kirsten, A; Kappert, H F; Fischer, H

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture load of single zirconia abutment restorations using different veneering techniques and materials. The abutment restorations were divided into 6 groups with 20 samples each: test abutments (control group A), lithium disilicate ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group B), leucite ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group C), premolar abutments directly veneered with a fluor apatite ceramic (group D (layered) and group E (pressed)) and premolar abutments bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F). The fracture load of the restorations was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Half of each group was artificially aged (chewing simulation and thermocycling) before evaluating the fracture load with the exception of the test abutments. The fracture load of the test abutments was 705 ± 43N. Incisor abutments bonded with lithium disilicate or leucite ceramic crowns (groups B and C) showed fracture loads of about 580N. Premolar restorations directly veneered with fluor apatite ceramic (groups D and E) showed fracture loads of about 850N. Premolar restorations bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F) showed fracture loads of about 1850N. The artificial ageing showed no significant influence on the strength of the examined restorations. All ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, adhesively bonded to premolar abutments showed the highest fracture loads in this study. However, all tested groups can withstand physiological bite forces. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sinking and fit of abutment of locking taper implant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seung-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jung; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Unlike screw-retention type, fixture-abutment retention in Locking taper connection depends on frictional force so it has possibility of abutment to sink. PURPOSE In this study, Bicon® Implant System, one of the conical internal connection implant system, was used with applying loading force to the abutments connected to the fixture. Then the amount of sinking was measured. MATERIAL AND METHODS 10 Bicon® implant fixtures were used. First, the abutment was connected to the fixture with finger force. Then it was tapped with a mallet for 3 times and loads of 20 kg corresponding to masticatory force using loading application instrument were applied successively. The abutment state, slightly connected to the fixture without pressure was considered as a reference length, and every new abutment length was measured after each load's step was added. The amount of abutment sinking (mm) was gained by subtracting the length of abutment-fixture under each loading condition from reference length. RESULTS It was evident, that the amount of abutment sinking in Bicon® Implant System increased as loads were added. When loads of 20 kg were applied more than 5 - 7 times, sinking stopped at 0.45 ± 0.09 mm. CONCLUSION Even though locking taper connection type implant shows good adaption to occlusal force, it has potential for abutment sinking as loads are given. When locking taper connection type implant is used, satisfactory loads are recommended for precise abutment location. PMID:21165262

  9. Upper bound of abutment scour in laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used those data to develop envelope curves that define the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand on this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment scour data from other sources and evaluate upper bound patterns with this larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements of abutment scour were compiled into a digital database. This extensive database was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment scour envelope curves and to develop additional envelope curves that reflected the upper bound of abutment scour depth for the laboratory and field data. The envelope curves provide simple but useful supplementary tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment scour depth in the field setting.

  10. Support Ratio Between Abutment and Soft Tissue Under Overdentures: A Comparison Between Use of Two and Four Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Manami; Yang, Tsung-Chieh; Maeda, Yoshionobu; Ando, Takanori; Wada, Masahiro

    The purpose of this preliminary in vivo study was to compare force distribution on abutments (tooth or implant) and tissues supporting overdentures with two or four abutments. A convenience sample of five subjects with tooth and/or implant-supported overdentures was enrolled. Recordings were completed on each subject using a force-measuring system mounted on a metal framework with four anteroposterior spread abutments (A), four abutments with denture bases (B), and on two anterior abutments with denture bases (C). The tissue-support ratio (TSR) was calculated as (A-B)/A or (A-C)/A. TSR values changed 1.5 to 2 times when the number of abutments was reduced from four to two. The amount of tissue strain on the posterior residual ridge increased when the number of abutments was reduced.

  11. Mechanical properties of resin glass fiber-reinforced abutment in comparison to titanium abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasi Bassi, Mirko; Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffella; Ioppolo, Pietro; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: So far, definitive implant abutments have been performed with high elastic modulus materials, which prevented any type of shock absorption of the chewing loads and as a consequence, the protection of the bone-fixture interface. This is particularly the case when the esthetic restorative material chosen is ceramic rather than composite resin. The adoption of an anisotropic abutment, characterized by an elastic deformability, could allow decreasing the impulse of chewing forces transmitted to the crestal bone. Materials and Methods: According to research protocol, the mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment (TCFRA) prototype and compared to that of a titanium abutment (TA), thus eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging that the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. Results: In the TA group, both fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples while debonding 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited a greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group, the extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group, the intrusion was more frequent. Conclusion: The greater elasticity of TCFRA to the flexural load allows absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function, thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface. PMID:26229266

  12. Abutment Coating With Diamond-Like Carbon Films to Reduce Implant-Abutment Bacterial Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mayra; Sangalli, Jorgiana; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2016-02-01

    The influence of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on bacterial leakage through the interface between abutments and dental implants of external hexagon (EH) and internal hexagon (IH) designs was evaluated. Film deposition was performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Sets of implants and abutments (n = 30 per group, sets of 180 implants) were divided according to connection design and treatment of the abutment base: 1) no treatment (control); 2) DLC film deposition; and 3) Ag-DLC film deposition. Under sterile conditions, 1 μL Enterococcus faecalis was inoculated inside the implants, and abutments were tightened. The sets were tested for immediate external contamination, suspended in test tubes containing sterile culture broth, and followed for 5 days. Turbidity of the broth indicated bacterial leakage. At the end of the period, the abutments were removed and the internal content of the implants was collected with paper points and plated in Petri dishes. After 24-hour incubation, they were assessed for bacterial viability and colony-forming unit counting. Bacterial leakage was analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests (α = 5%). The percentage of bacterial leakage was 16.09% for EH implants and 80.71% for IH implants (P DLC and Ag-DLC films do not significantly reduce the frequency of bacterial leakage and bacteria load inside the implants.

  13. Wear at the Implant-Abutment Interface of Zirconia Abutments Manufactured by Three CAD/CAM Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro Tannure, Ana Luiza; Cunha, Alfredo Gonçalves; Borges Junior, Luiz Antônio; da Silva Concílio, Laís Regiane; Claro Neves, Ana Christina

    To evaluate the changes in the external-hexagon surface of the titanium (Ti) implant before and after mechanical cycling, when coupled with zirconia (Zr) abutments (A) manufactured by three computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems (Neodent Digital, Zirkonzahn, and AmannGirrbach) and the ZrTi abutment manufactured by Neodent. Four groups were formed (n = 6): titanium implant with Zr AmannGirrbach abutment (AZrAG), with Zr Zirkonzahn abutment (AZrZ), with Zr Neodent abutment (AZrN), and with Zr abutment with infrastructure in Ti Neodent (AZrTiN). Standardized abutments were made from three identical abutments milled in wax. Images of the surface of each side of the hexagons of the implant were obtained by scanning electron microscopy, before and after mechanical cycling, to evaluate the parameters: (1) scratches in the hexagon face; (2) hexagon superior shoulder kneading; (3) hexagon shoulder wear; (4) alterations on the hexagon base; and (5) scratches on the hexagon top. The abutments were coupled with the implants, and Cr-Co crowns were cemented. The implant/abutment/crown assemblies were submitted to mechanical cycling (400 N, 8.0 Hz) for 1 million cycles. The observed changes were classified as follows: absence (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (P abutments, the AZrN group had shown more surface alterations. Among the Zr groups, AZrZ samples had shown the most altered surfaces, suggesting that alterations on the implant/Zr abutment hexagon surfaces are related to the abutment milled hexagon shape.

  14. Abutment tooth loss in patients with overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Qian, Fang

    2004-06-01

    Since the 1960s, the use of natural teeth as overdenture abutments has become part of accepted clinical practice. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted, but tooth loss has not been reported to be a significant problem. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of tooth loss in a prospective cohort study of subjects wearing overdentures. The study, conducted between 1973 and 1994, evaluated 273 subjects (62.3 percent male) with a mean age of 59.6 years. Of the 273 subjects with 666 abutments, 74 lost 133 abutments. The most common cause of tooth loss was periodontal disease (29.3 percent) followed by periapical lesions (18.8 percent) and caries (16.5 percent). Through logistic regression, the authors found that subjects who lost teeth were more likely to have medical problems that could cause soft-tissue lesions of the oral mucosa, were less likely to use fluoride daily and were less likely to return for yearly recall visits. The authors found 22 vertical fractures in 17 subjects. Chi2 analysis revealed that overdenture teeth in the maxillary arch that were opposed by natural teeth were more likely to experience vertical fractures. In a study that followed up some patients for as long as 22 years, the rate of tooth loss was 20.0 percent. Many of these failures could have been prevented if patients had practiced better oral hygiene. The findings suggest that if a dentist recommends overdenture therapy, the patient needs to be examined regularly to reduce the risk of experiencing caries and periodontal disease. Also, if the abutments are in the maxilla and are opposed by natural teeth, the dentist should consider using thimble crowns to reduce the risk of vertical fractures.

  15. Fracture strength of zirconia implant abutments on narrow diameter implants with internal and external implant abutment connections: A study on the titanium resin base concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Asgeirsson, Asgeir G; Thoma, Daniel S; Fehmer, Vincent; Aspelund, Thor; Özcan, Mutlu; Pjetursson, Bjarni E

    2018-04-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the strength of zirconia abutments with internal and external implant abutment connections and zirconia abutments supported by a titanium resin base (Variobase, Straumann) for narrow diameter implants. To compare the fracture strength of narrow diameter abutments with different types of implant abutment connections after chewing simulation. Hundred and twenty identical customized abutments with different materials and implant abutment connections were fabricated for five groups: 1-piece zirconia abutment with internal connection (T1, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann Switzerland), 1-piece zirconia abutment with external hex connection (T2, Procera abutment-Branemark NP implant, Nobel Biocare, Sweden), 2-piece zirconia abutments with metallic insert for internal connection (T3, Procera abutment-Replace NP implant, Nobel Biocare), 2-piece zirconia abutment on titanium resin base (T4, LavaPlus abutment-VarioBase-Straumann BL-NC implant, 3M ESPE, Germany) and 1-piece titanium abutment with internal connection (C, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann, Switzerland). All implants had a narrow diameter ranging from 3.3 to 3.5 mm. Sixty un-restored abutments and 60 abutments restored with glass-ceramic crowns were tested. Mean bending moments were compared using ANOVA with p-values adjusted for multiple comparisons using Tukey's procedure. The mean bending moments were 521 ± 33 Ncm (T4), 404 ± 36 Ncm (C), 311 ± 106 Ncm (T1) 265 ± 22 Ncm (T3) and 225 ± 29 (T2) for un-restored abutments and 278 ± 84 Ncm (T4), 302 ± 170 Ncm (C), 190 ± 55 Ncm (T1) 80 ± 102 Ncm (T3) and 125 ± 57 (T2) for restored abutments. For un-restored abutments, C and T4 had similar mean bending moments, significantly higher than those of the three other groups (p internal connection had higher bending moments than zirconia abutments with external connection (T2) (p internal connected zirconia

  16. Temporal variation of clear-water scour at compound Abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Aminuddin Ab. Ghani; Reza Mohammadpour

    2016-01-01

    Most of actual abutments in rivers are built on foundation, while there is limited number of study available on the effects of the foundation on the local scour. In this study, temporal variation of local scour around compound abutment was investigated experimentally under clear-water conditions. The results showed that a suitable level of foundation is able to decrease the scour depth and increase scour time during the flood events. The trend of temporal scour depth at compound pier and abut...

  17. Custom-made laser-welded titanium implant prosthetic abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A

    2005-10-01

    A technique to create an individually modified implant prosthetic abutment is described. An overcasting is waxed onto a machined titanium abutment, cast in titanium, and joined to it with laser welding. With the proposed technique, a custom-made titanium implant prosthetic abutment is created with adequate volume and contour of metal to support a screw-retained, metal-ceramic implant-supported crown.

  18. Reduction of lateral loads in abutments using ground anchors

    OpenAIRE

    Laefer, Debra F.; Truong-Hong, Linh; Le, Khanh Ba

    2013-01-01

    In bridge design, economically addressing large, lateral earth pressures on bridge abutments is a major challenge. Traditional approaches employ enlargement of the abutment components to resist these pressures. This approach results in higher construction costs. As an alternative, a formal approach using ground anchors to resist lateral soil pressure on bridge abutments is proposed herein. The ground anchors are designed to minimise lateral forces at the pile cap base. Design examples for hig...

  19. Effect of mining thickness on abutment pressure of working face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Guang-xiang; Wang Lei [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China). Academy of Energy Sources and Security

    2008-04-15

    The distribution of the abutment pressure on the advancing front and on side of the working face was analyzed. Results show that the distribution of abutment pressure correlates with the thickness of the coal seam. The size of the abutment pressure peak is inversely proportional to the first mining thickness and the distance between peak and working face is proportional to the first mining thickness; that is to say the peak intensity falls as soon as the distribution range spreads. The distribution of side abutment pressure correlates somewhat with time. 6 refs.

  20. Influence of abutment materials on the implant-abutment joint stability in internal conical connection type implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jae-Young; Yang, Dong-Seok; Huh, Jung-Bo; Heo, Jae-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the influence of abutment materials on the stability of the implant-abutment joint in internal conical connection type implant systems. Internal conical connection type implants, cement-retained abutments, and tungsten carbide-coated abutment screws were used. The abutments were fabricated with commercially pure grade 3 titanium (group T3), commercially pure grade 4 titanium (group T4), or Ti-6Al-4V (group TA) (n=5, each). In order to assess the amount of settlement after abutment fixation, a 30-Ncm tightening torque was applied, then the change in length before and after tightening the abutment screw was measured, and the preload exerted was recorded. The compressive bending strength was measured under the ISO14801 conditions. In order to determine whether there were significant changes in settlement, preload, and compressive bending strength before and after abutment fixation depending on abutment materials, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test was performed. Group TA exhibited the smallest mean change in the combined length of the implant and abutment before and after fixation, and no difference was observed between groups T3 and T4 (P>.05). Group TA exhibited the highest preload and compressive bending strength values, followed by T4, then T3 (Pabutment material can influence the stability of the interface in internal conical connection type implant systems. The strength of the abutment material was inversely correlated with settlement, and positively correlated with compressive bending strength. Preload was inversely proportional to the frictional coefficient of the abutment material.

  1. The influence of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Linda J; Shala, Kujtim Sh; Pustina-Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of removable partial dentures (RPD) on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth. A total 107 patients with RPD participated in this study. It was examined 138 RPD, they were 87 with clasp-retained and 51 were RPD with attachments. The following periodontal parameters were evaluated for abutment and non-abutment teeth, plaque index (PLI), calculus index (CI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD) (mm) and tooth mobility (TM) index. These clinical measurements were taken immediately before insertion the RPD, then one and 3 months after insertion. The level of significance was set at (P abutment teeth and non-abutment teeth were no statistically significant at the time of insertion of RPD. After 1-month, PLI was statistically significant (0.57 ± 0.55 for abutment and 0.30 ± 0.46 for non-abutment teeth). After 3 months, there were significant differences between abutment and non-abutment teeth with regard to the BOP (1.53 ± 0.50 and 1.76 ± 0.43 respectively), PD (0.28 ± 0.45 and 0.12 ± 0.33 respectively) and PLI (1.20 ± 0.46 and 0.75 ± 0.64 respectively). No significant mean difference in TM and CI was found between the abutment and non-abutment teeth (P > 0.05). With carefully planned prosthetic treatment and adequate maintenance of the oral and denture hygiene, we can prevent the periodontal diseases.

  2. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Sook; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at ...

  3. Physicochemical and microscopic characterization of implant-abutment joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patricia A; Carreiro, Adriana F P; Nascimento, Rubens M; Vahey, Brendan R; Henriques, Bruno; Souza, Júlio C M

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Morse taper implant-abutment joints by chemical, mechanical, and microscopic analysis. Surfaces of 10 Morse taper implants and the correlated abutments were inspected by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) before connection. The implant-abutment connections were tightened at 32 Ncm. For microgap evaluation by FEG-SEM, the systems were embedded in epoxy resin and cross-sectioned at a perpendicular plane of the implant-abutment joint. Furthermore, nanoindentation tests and chemical analysis were performed at the implant-abutment joints. Results were statistically analyzed via one-way analysis of variance, with a significance level of P abutment surfaces. The minimum and maximum size of microgaps ranged from 0.5 μm up to 5.6 μm. Furthermore, defects were detected throughout the implant-abutment joint that can, ultimately, affect the microgap size after connection. Nanoindentation tests revealed a higher hardness (4.2 ± 0.4 GPa) for abutment composed of Ti6Al4V alloy when compared to implant composed of commercially pure Grade 4 titanium (3.2 ± 0.4 GPa). Surface defects produced during the machining of both implants and abutments can increase the size of microgaps and promote a misfit of implant-abutment joints. In addition, the mismatch in mechanical properties between abutment and implant can promote the wear of surfaces, affecting the size of microgaps and consequently the performance of the joints during mastication.

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Abutment Teeth with Gingival Discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Ljubisa; Dakovic, Dragana; Postic, Srdjan; Lazic, Zoran; Bacevic, Miljana; Vucevic, Dragana

    2017-04-06

    The grey-bluish discoloration of gingiva (known as "amalgam tattoo") does not appear only in the presence of amalgam restorations. It may also be seen in cases of teeth restored with cast dowels and porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations. The aim of this article was to determine the clinical characteristics of abutment teeth with gingival discoloration. This research was conducted on 25 patients referred for cast dowel and PFM restorations. These restorations were manufactured from Ni-Cr alloys. Ninety days after cementing the fixed prosthodontic restorations, the abutment teeth (n = 61) were divided into a group with gingival discoloration (GD) (n = 25) and without gingival discoloration (NGD) (n = 36). The control group (CG) comprised the contralateral teeth (n = 61). Plaque index, gingival index, clinical attachment level, and probing depth were assessed before fabrication and also 90 days after cementation of the PFM restorations. The gingival index, clinical attachment level, and probing depths of the abutment teeth that had GD were statistically higher before restoration, in comparison with the abutment teeth in the NGD and control groups. Ninety days after cementation, the abutment teeth with GD had significantly lower gingival indexes and probing depths, compared to the abutment teeth in the NGD group. Both abutment teeth groups (GD and NGD) had significantly higher values of clinical attachment levels when compared to the control group. There were no statistically significant differences in plaque index values between the study groups. The results of this study indicated that impairment of periodontal status of abutment teeth seemed to be related to the presence of gingival discolorations. Therefore, fabrication of fixed prosthodontic restorations requires careful planning and abutment teeth preparation to minimize the occurrence of gingival discolorations. With careful preparation of abutment teeth for cast dowels and crown restorations it may be

  5. Physicochemical and microscopic characterization of implant–abutment joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patricia A.; Carreiro, Adriana F. P.; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Vahey, Brendan R.; Henriques, Bruno; Souza, Júlio C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate Morse taper implant–abutment joints by chemical, mechanical, and microscopic analysis. Materials and Methods: Surfaces of 10 Morse taper implants and the correlated abutments were inspected by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) before connection. The implant–abutment connections were tightened at 32 Ncm. For microgap evaluation by FEG-SEM, the systems were embedded in epoxy resin and cross-sectioned at a perpendicular plane of the implant–abutment joint. Furthermore, nanoindentation tests and chemical analysis were performed at the implant–abutment joints. Statistics: Results were statistically analyzed via one-way analysis of variance, with a significance level of P abutment surfaces. The minimum and maximum size of microgaps ranged from 0.5 μm up to 5.6 μm. Furthermore, defects were detected throughout the implant–abutment joint that can, ultimately, affect the microgap size after connection. Nanoindentation tests revealed a higher hardness (4.2 ± 0.4 GPa) for abutment composed of Ti6Al4V alloy when compared to implant composed of commercially pure Grade 4 titanium (3.2 ± 0.4 GPa). Conclusions: Surface defects produced during the machining of both implants and abutments can increase the size of microgaps and promote a misfit of implant–abutment joints. In addition, the mismatch in mechanical properties between abutment and implant can promote the wear of surfaces, affecting the size of microgaps and consequently the performance of the joints during mastication. PMID:29657532

  6. Cleveland Dam East Abutment : seepage control project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, F.; Siu, D. [Greater Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Ahlfield, S.; Singh, N. [Klohn Crippen Consultants Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    North Vancouver's 91 meter high Cleveland Dam was built in the 1950s in a deep bedrock canyon to provide a reservoir for potable water to 18 municipalities. Flow in the concrete gravity dam is controlled by a gated spillway, 2 mid-level outlets and intakes and 2 low-level outlets. This paper describes the seepage control measures that were taken at the time of construction as well as the additional measures that were taken post construction to control piezometric levels, seepage and piping and slope instability in the East Abutment. At the time of construction, a till blanket was used to cover the upstream reservoir slope for 200 meters upstream of the dam. A single line grout curtain was used through the overburden from ground surface to bedrock for a distance of 166 meters from the dam to the East Abutment. Since construction, the safety of the dam has been compromised through changes in piezometric pressure, seepage and soil loss. Klohn Crippen Consultants designed a unique seepage control measure to address the instability risk. The project involved excavating 300,000 cubic meters of soil to form a stable slope and construction bench. A vertical wall was constructed to block seepage. The existing seepage control blanket was also extended by 260 meters. The social, environmental and technical issues that were encountered during the rehabilitation project are also discussed. The blanket extension construction has met design requirements and the abutment materials that are most susceptible to internal erosion have been covered by non-erodible blanket materials such as plastic and roller-compacted concrete (RCC). The project was completed on schedule and within budget and has greatly improved the long-term stability of the dam and public safety. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Velocity and turbulence at a wing-wall abutment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimental investigation of the 3D turbulent flow field around a 45° wing-wall abutment, resting on a rough rigid bed, is reported. The experiment was conducted ... The shear stresses acting on the bed around the abutment are estimated from the Reynolds stresses and velocity gradients. The data presented in this study ...

  8. Implant-abutment connections on single crowns: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, F M; Barnaba, P; Mazzoleni, S; Ottria, L; Gargari, M; Zuccon, A; Bruno, G; DI Fiore, A

    2017-01-01

    Different implant-abutment connections have been developed in the effort of reducing mechanical and biological failure. The most frequent complications are screw loosening, abutment or implant fracture and marginal bone loss due to overload and bacterial micro-leakage. Ideal connection should work as a one-piece implant avoiding the formation of a micro-gap at the implant-abutment interface. Different in vitro and in vivo researches have been published to compare the implant-abutment connections actually available: external hexagon, internal hexagon and conical finding different amount of micro-gap, micro-leakage and marginal bone loss. The aim of this article is to describe, according to the most recent literature, different kind of fixture-abutment connections and their clinical and mechanical advantages or disadvantages.

  9. Scour around vertical wall abutment in cohesionless sediment bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, M.; Sharma, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.

    2017-12-01

    At the time of floods, failure of bridges is the biggest disaster and mainly sub-structure (bridge abutments and piers) are responsible for this failure of bridges. It is very risky if these sub structures are not constructed after proper designing and analysis. Scour is a natural phenomenon in rivers or streams caused by the erosive action of the flowing water on the bed and banks. The abutment undermines due to river-bed erosion and scouring, which generally recognized as the main cause of abutment failure. Most of the previous studies conducted on scour around abutment have concerned with the prediction of the maximum scour depth (Lim, 1994; Melvill, 1992, 1997 and Dey and Barbhuiya, 2005). Dey and Barbhuiya (2005) proposed a relationship for computing maximum scour depth near an abutment, based on laboratory experiments, for computing maximum scour depth around vertical wall abutment, which was confined to their experimental data only. However, this relationship needs to be also verified by the other researchers data in order to support the reliability to the relationship and its wider applicability. In this study, controlled experimentations have been carried out on the scour near a vertical wall abutment. The collected data in this study along with data of the previous investigators have been carried out on the scour near vertical wall abutment. The collected data in this study along with data of the previous have been used to check the validity of the existing equation (Lim, 1994; Melvill, 1992, 1997 and Dey and Barbhuiya, 2005) of maximum scour depth around the vertical wall abutment. A new relationship is proposed to estimate the maximum scour depth around vertical wall abutment, it gives better results all relationships.

  10. Microbiological and clinical assessment of the abutment and non-abutment teeth of partial removable denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luciana; do Nascimento, Cássio; de Souza, Valéria Oliveira Pagnano; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was assessing the changes in both clinical and microbiological parameters of healthy individuals after rehabilitation with removable partial denture (RPD). 11 women received unilateral or bilateral free-end saddle RPD in the mandibular arch. Clinical and microbiological parameters of abutment, non-abutment, and antagonist teeth were assessed at baseline (RPD installation) and after 7, 30, 90, and 180days of function. The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique was used to identify and quantify up to 43 different microbial species from subgingival biofilm samples. Probing depth, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing were also investigated over time. The total and individual microbial genome counts were shown significantly increased after 180days with no significant differences between abutment, non-abutment, or antagonist teeth. Streptococcus spp., Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and other species associated to periodontitis (Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella nigrescens, and Tannerella forsythia), as well as opportunistic Candida spp., were recovered in moderate counts. Abutment teeth presented higher values of gingival recession when compared with non-abutment or antagonist teeth, irrespectively time of sampling (pabutment and non-abutment teeth with no significant differences regarding the microbial profile over time. Bleeding on probing and probing depth showed no significant difference between groups over time whereas gingival recession increased in the abutment teeth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of abutment type and esthetic veneering on preload maintenance of abutment screw of implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2014-02-01

    The effect of veneering materials on screw joint stability remains inconclusive. Thus, this study evaluated the preload maintenance of abutment screws of single crowns fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials. Sixty crowns were divided into five groups (n = 12): UCLA abutment in gold alloy with ceramic (group GC) and resin (group GR) veneering, UCLA abutment in titanium with ceramic (group TiC) and resin (group TiR) veneering, and zirconia abutment with ceramic veneering (group ZiC). Abutment screws made of gold were used with a 35 Ncm insertion torque. Detorque measurements were obtained initially and after mechanical cycling. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's exact test at a significance level of 5%. For the initial detorque means (in Ncm), group TiC (21.4 ± 1.78) exhibited statistically lower torque maintenance than groups GC (23.9 ± 0.91), GR (24.1 ± 1.34), and TiR (23.2 ± 1.33) (p abutment type and veneering material. More irregular surfaces in the hexagon area of the castable abutments were observed. The superiority of any veneering material concerning preload maintenance was not established. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Side abutment pressure distribution by field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-guo Wang; Yang Song; Xing-hua He; Jian Zhang [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, Xuzhou (China)

    2008-12-15

    Given the 7123 working face in the Qidong Coal Mine of the Wanbei Mining Group, nine dynamic roof monitors were installed in the crossheading to measure the amount and velocity of roof convergence in different positions and at different times and three steel bored stress sensors were installed in the return airway to measure rock stress at depth. On the basis of this arrangement, the rule of change of the distribution of the side abutment pressure with the advance of the working face and movement of overlying strata was studied. The rule of change and the stability of rock stress at depth were measured. Secondly, the affected area and stability time of the side abutment pressure were also studied. The results show that: 1) During working, the face advanced distance was from 157 m to 99 m, the process was not effected by mining induced pressure. When the distance was 82 m, the position of peak stress was 5 m away from the coal wall. When the distance was 37 m, the position of peak stress away from the coal wall was about 15 m to 20 m and finally reached a steady state; 2) the time and the range of the peak of side rock pressure obtained from stress sensors were consistent with the results from the dynamic roof monitors; 3) the position of the peak pressure was 25 m away from the coal wall. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Ryogo; Shionoya, Kaori; Kato, Hitoshi; Makino, Naoki

    1996-01-01

    Ulnocarpal abutment syndrome (UAS) is the impingement between lunate and ulnar head. Twenty-two wrists of 19 patients were diagnosed as UAS arthroscopically after having undergone MRI examination. Ten wrists had MRI both before and after ulnar recession arthroplasty. Spin-echo pulse sequences were taken. T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. On T1-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar part of the lunate was decreased in 18 wrists. On T2-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar aspect of the lunate were from high to low in 18 wrists. There was focal and abnormal signal intensity of the triquetrum found in 10 wrists and was abnormal signal intensity of the ulnar head in two wrists. After the operation, on the T1-weighted image signal intensity of the lunate shifted from low through slightly low to iso. On the T2-weighted images it shifted from low to high or iso. Focal low signal intensity of the lunate on T1-weighted images is diagnostic of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. The intensity of the signal from the lunate on T2-weighted images may indicate the severity of the disease. (author)

  14. Reliability and Failure Modes of a Hybrid Ceramic Abutment Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson Rfa; Teixeira, Hellen S; Silveira, Lucas M; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P

    2018-01-01

    A ceramic and metal abutment prototype was fatigue tested to determine the probability of survival at various loads. Lithium disilicate CAD-milled abutments (n = 24) were cemented to titanium sleeve inserts and then screw attached to titanium fixtures. The assembly was then embedded at a 30° angle in polymethylmethacrylate. Each (n = 24) was restored with a resin-cemented machined lithium disilicate all-ceramic central incisor crown. Single load (lingual-incisal contact) to failure was determined for three specimens. Fatigue testing (n = 21) was conducted employing the step-stress method with lingual mouth motion loading. Failures were recorded, and reliability calculations were performed using proprietary software. Probability Weibull curves were calculated with 90% confidence bounds. Fracture modes were classified with a stereomicroscope, and representative samples imaged with scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue results indicated that the limiting factor in the current design is the fatigue strength of the abutment screw, where screw fracture often leads to failure of the abutment metal sleeve and/or cracking in the implant fixture. Reliability for completion of a mission at 200 N load for 50K cycles was 0.38 (0.52% to 0.25 90% CI) and for 100K cycles was only 0.12 (0.26 to 0.05)-only 12% predicted to survive. These results are similar to those from previous studies on metal to metal abutment/fixture systems where screw failure is a limitation. No ceramic crown or ceramic abutment initiated fractures occurred, supporting the research hypothesis. The limiting factor in performance was the screw failure in the metal-to-metal connection between the prototyped abutment and the fixture, indicating that this configuration should function clinically with no abutment ceramic complications. The combined ceramic with titanium sleeve abutment prototype performance was limited by the fatigue degradation of the abutment screw. In fatigue, no ceramic crown or ceramic

  15. Fracture Strength of Titanium based Lithium Disilicate and Zirconia Abutment Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    zirconia abutment/lithium-disilicate crown. INTRODUCTION Dental implants and the use of esthetic abutments are widely practiced procedures for dentists...first implant abutments were fabricated from metals of mostly gold or titanium alloy. The downside of these materials, especially in esthetic areas...abutments presented esthetic complications. Because dentists and patients desire more naturally appearing restorations, the dental manufacturers

  16. Does Ferrule Effect Affect Implant-Abutment Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerfar, Maryam; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Geramy, Allahyar; Siadat, Hakimeh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of placing implant-supported crowns on the torque loss of the abutment screw before and after loading. Twenty implant-abutment assemblies were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group was consisted of abutments with abutment-level finishing line (abutment-level), and in the second group the crown margin was placed on the implant shoulder (implant-level). Initial torque loss was recorded for all specimens. After 500000 cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 2 Hz, post loading torque loss was recorded. Finite element model of each group was also modeled and screw energy, and stress were analyzed and compared between two groups. ANOVA for repeated measurements showed that the torque loss did not change significantly after cyclic loading (P=0.73). Crown margin also had no significant effect on the torque loss (P=0.56). However, the energy and stress of screw in abutment-level model (4.49 mJ and 22.74 MPa) was higher than implant-level model (3.52 mJ and 20.81 MPa). Although embracing the implant with crown produced less stress and energy in the abutment-implant screw, it did not have any significant influence on the torque loss of the screw. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  17. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrati S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  18. Evaluation of Dynamic Characteristics of the Footbridge with Integral Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pańtak Marek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of dynamic field tests and numerical analysis of the footbridge designed as a three-span composite structure with integral abutments. The adopted design solution which has allowed to achieve a high resistance of the structure to dynamic loads and to meet the requirements of the criteria of comfort of use with a large reserve has been characterized. For comparative purposes, numerical analyzes of three construction variants of the footbridge were presented: F-1 - construction with integral abutments (realized variant, F-2 - construction with girders anchored in the abutments by means of tension rocker bearings, F-3 - construction with concrete side spans.

  19. Evaluation of Dynamic Characteristics of the Footbridge with Integral Abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pańtak, Marek; Jarek, Bogusław

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the results of dynamic field tests and numerical analysis of the footbridge designed as a three-span composite structure with integral abutments. The adopted design solution which has allowed to achieve a high resistance of the structure to dynamic loads and to meet the requirements of the criteria of comfort of use with a large reserve has been characterized. For comparative purposes, numerical analyzes of three construction variants of the footbridge were presented: F-1 - construction with integral abutments (realized variant), F-2 - construction with girders anchored in the abutments by means of tension rocker bearings, F-3 - construction with concrete side spans.

  20. Prosthetic management of malpositioned implant using custom cast abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aishwarya; Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Patil, Sanket; Chatterjee, Debopriya; Dandekeri, Savita; Prabhu, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are reported with malpositioned implants. Both the implants were placed 6–7 months back. They had osseointegrated well with the surrounding bone. However, they presented severe facial inclination. Case I was restored with custom cast abutment with an auto polymerizing acrylic gingival veneer. Case II was restored with custom cast UCLA type plastic implant abutment. Ceramic was directly fired on the custom cast abutments. The dual treatment strategy resulted in functional and esthetic restorations despite facial malposition of the implants. PMID:26538957

  1. Periodontal Conditions of Abutments and Non-Abutments in Removable Partial Dentures over 7 Years of Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonte Porto Carreiro, Adriana; de Carvalho Dias, Kássia; Correia Lopes, Ana Lílian; Bastos Machado Resende, Camila Maria; Luz de Aquino Martins, Ana Rafaela

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the periodontal conditions and integrity of abutment and non-abutment teeth of patients evaluated 7 years after insertion of the removable partial denture (RPD). Twenty-two patients (17 women, 5 men) were assessed at the moment of denture insertion and 7 years later. The following items were verified in each assessment: bleeding on probing (BP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and mobility (M), comparing direct and indirect abutment teeth, and the teeth not involved in the denture design. Tooth integrity was also evaluated and classified as intact when no caries or fractures were observed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to reveal statistical significance between the groups (p = 0.05) as well as the Bonferrroni-corrected Mann-Whitney test for post hoc comparison. The Wilcoxon test was used for evaluation within the group over time. Fisher's exact test was applied to cross data about abutment integrity. Statistically significant differences were found for GR (baseline, p < 0.001; 7 years, p < 0.001) and PD (baseline, p = 0.001; 7 years = 0.004) between the three groups at baseline and after 7 years of follow-up. Mean BP and M values increased from initial assessment to after 7 years of RPD use in every group, but no statistically significant difference was found between the groups. For abutment integrity, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.028) was observed, and the direct abutment exhibited more (33.3%) caries and fractures. RPDs generated more periodontal damage to direct abutments, since higher gingival recession probing depth indexes, and presence of caries and fractures were observed in comparison to indirect abutments and non-abutments. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Long-term behavior of integral abutment bridges : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Integral abutment bridges, a type of jointless bridge, are the construction option of choice when designing highway bridges in many parts of the country. Rather than providing an expansion joint to separate the substructure from the superstructure to...

  3. Long-term behavior of integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Integral abutment (IA) construction has become the preferred method over conventional construction for use with typical : highway bridges. However, the use of these structures is limited due to state mandated length and skew limitations. To : expand ...

  4. Performance assessment of MSE abutment walls in Indiana : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report presents a numerical investigation of the behavior of steel strip-reinforced mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) direct bridge abutments under static loading. Finite element simulations were performed using an advanced two-surface boundin...

  5. Small Smooth Units ('Young' Lavas?) Abutting Lobate Scarps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliband, C. C.; Rothery, D. A.; Balme, M. R.; Conway, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    We have identified small units abutting, and so stratigraphy younger than, lobate scarps. This post dates the end of large scale smooth plains formation at the onset of global contraction. This elaborates the history of volcanism on Mercury.

  6. Integral abutment bridges under thermal loading : field monitoring and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have gained popularity throughout the United States due to their low construction and maintenance costs. Previous research on IABs has been heavily focused on substructure performance, leaving a need for better unders...

  7. Deterioration of J-bar reinforcement in abutments and piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Deterioration and necking of J-bars has been reportedly observed at the interface of the footing and stem wall during the demolition : of older retaining walls and bridge abutments. Similar deterioration has been reportedly observed between the pier ...

  8. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  9. Accuracy combining different brands of implants and abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo; Senent-Vicente, Gisela; González-de-Cossio, Inés; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the vertical misfit between different brands of dental implants and prosthetic abutments, with or without mechanical torque, and to study their possible combination. Five different brands of implant were used in the study: Biofit (Castemaggiore, Italy), Bioner S.A. (Barcelona, Spain), 3i Biomet (Palm Beach, U.S.A.), BTI (Alava, Spain) and Nobel Biocare (Göteborg, Sweden), with standard 4.1 mm heads and external hexagons, and their respective machined prosthetic abutments. The implant-to-abutment fit/misfit was evaluated at four points (vestibular, lingual/palatine, mesial and distal) between implants and abutments of the same brand and different brands, with or without mechanical torque, using SEM micrographs at 5000X. Image analysis was performed using NIS-Elements software (Nikon Instruments Europe B.V.). Before applying torque, vertical misfit (microgaps) of the different combinations tested varied between 1.6 and 5.4 microns and after applying torque, between 0.9 and 5.9 microns, an overall average of 3.46 ± 2.96 microns. For manual assembly without the use of mechanical torque, the best results were obtained with the combination of the 3i implant and the BTI abutment. The Nobel implant and Nobel abutment, 3i-3i and BTI-BTI and the combination of 3i implant with BTI or Nobel abutment provided the best vertical fit when mechanical torque was applied. The vertical fits obtained were within the limits considered clinically acceptable. The application of mechanical torque improved outcomes. There is compatibility between implants and abutments of different brand and so their combination is a clinical possibility.

  10. THE USE OF A CODED HEALING ABUTMENT AS AN IMPRESSION COPING TO DESIGN AND MILL AN INDIVIDUALIZED ANATOMIC ABUTMENT : A CLINICAL REPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    A coded implant healing abutment makes an impression at the implant level no longer necessary. An impression is made of the healing abutment, which is placed onto the implant directly after implant placement. The codes embedded in the occlusal surface of the healing abutment provide essential

  11. Settling of abutments into implants and changes in removal torque in five different implant-abutment connections. Part 1: Cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seong; Han, Jung-Suk; Lim, Young-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the settling of abutments into implants and the removal torque values (RTVs) before and after cyclic loading. Five different implant-abutment connections were tested: Ext = external butt joint + two-piece abutment; Int-H2 = internal hexagon + two-piece abutment; Int-H1 = internal hexagon + one-piece abutment; Int-O2 = internal octagon + two-piece abutment; and Int-O1 = internal octagon + one-piece abutment. Ten abutments from each group were secured to their corresponding implants (total n = 50). All samples were tested in a universal testing machine with a vertical load of 250 N for 100,000 cycles of 14 Hz. The amount of settling of the abutment into the implant was calculated from the change in the total length of the implant-abutment sample before and after loading, as measured with an electronic digital micrometer. The RTV after cyclic loading was compared to the initial RTV with a digital torque gauge. Statistical analysis was performed at a 5% significance level. A multiple-comparison test showed specific significant differences in settling values in each group after 250 N cyclic loading (Int-H1, Ext abutment type and related to the design characteristics of the implant-abutment connection.

  12. A comparative study of gold UCLA-type and CAD/CAM titanium implant abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Man; Lee, Jai-Bong; Heo, Seong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the interface accuracy of computer-assisted designed and manufactured (CAD/CAM) titanium abutments and implant fixture compared to gold-cast UCLA abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS An external connection implant system (Mark III, n=10) and an internal connection implant system (Replace Select, n=10) were used, 5 of each group were connected to milled titanium abutment and the rest were connected to the gold-cast UCLA abutments. The implant fixture and abutment were tightened to torque of 35 Ncm using a digital torque gauge, and initial detorque values were measured 10 minutes after tightening. To mimic the mastication, a cyclic loading was applied at 14 Hz for one million cycles, with the stress amplitude range being within 0 N to 100 N. After the cyclic loading, detorque values were measured again. The fixture-abutment gaps were measured under a microscope and recorded with an accuracy of ±0.1 µm at 50 points. RESULTS Initial detorque values of milled abutment were significantly higher than those of cast abutment (P.05). After cyclic loading, detorque values of cast abutment increased, but those of milled abutment decreased (Pabutment group and the cast abutment group after cyclic loading. CONCLUSION In conclusion, CAD/CAM milled titanium abutment can be fabricated with sufficient accuracy to permit screw joint stability between abutment and fixture comparable to that of the traditional gold cast UCLA abutment. PMID:24605206

  13. Microleakage at the Different Implant Abutment Interface: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Ramesh; Kumari, Shail

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Presence of gap at the implant-abutment interface, leads to microleakage and accumulation of bacteria which can affect the success of dental implants. Aim To evaluate the sealing capability of different implant connections against microleakage. Materials and Methods In January 2017 an electronic search of literature was performed, in Medline, EBSCO host and Pubmed data base. The search was focused on ability of different implant connections in preventing microleakage. The related titles and abstracts available in English were screened, and the articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected for full text reading. Results In this systematic review, literature search initially resulted in 78 articles among which 30 articles only fulfilled the criteria for inclusion and were finally included in the review. Almost all the studies showed that there was some amount of microleakage at abutment implant interface. Microleakage was very less in Morse taper implants in comparison to other implant connections. Majority of studies showed less microleakage in static loading conditions and microleakage increases in dynamic loading conditions. Conclusion In this systematic review maximum studies showed that there was some amount of microleakage at abutment implant interface. External hexagon implants failed completely to prevent microleakage in both static and dynamic loading conditions of implants. Internal hexagon implants mainly internal conical (Morse taper) implants are very promising in case of static loading and also showed less microleakage in dynamic loading conditions. Torque recommended by manufacturer should be followed strictly to get a better seal at abutment implant interface. Zirconia abutments are more to microleakage than Titanium abutments and there use should be discouraged. Zirconia abutments should be only restricted to cases where there was very high demand of aesthetics. PMID:28764310

  14. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted. No language or year of publication restriction was applied. The search provided 298 titles. Three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies were characterized by low or moderate risk of bias. Survival of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. There were no significant differences between the two treatment modalities regarding professional or patient-reported outcome measures. Meta-analysis disclosed a mean difference of peri-implant marginal bone loss of 1.56 mm (confidence interval: 0.87 to 2.25), indicating significant more bone loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must be rejected. However, further long-term randomized controlled trials assessing implant treatment outcome with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided about the beneficial use of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection on preservation of the peri-implant marginal bone level.

  15. Mechanism Research of Arch Dam Abutment Forces during Overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research on the abutment forces of a double-curvature arch dam during overload based on numerical calculation results obtained through finite element method by Ansys. Results show that, with an increase in elevation, the abutment forces and bending moment of the arch dam increase first and then decrease from the bottom to the top of the dam. Abutment forces and bending moment reach their maximum at the middle or middle-down portion of the dam. The distributions of abutment forces and moment do not change during overload. The magnitude of each arch layer’s forces and moment increases linearly during overload. This result indicates that each arch layer transmits bearing loads to the rocks of the left and right banks steadily. This research explains the operating mechanism of an arch dam under normal and overload conditions. It provides a simple method to calculate the distribution of forces Fx and Fy and a new method to calculate the overload factor of an arch dam through the estimation of arch layers based on the redistribution characteristic of arch abutment forces.

  16. Fatigue induced changes in conical implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kai; Wiest, Wolfram; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Dittmann, Jonas; Rack, Alexander; Maier, Dominik; Thomann, Ralf; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Kohal, Ralf Joachim; Zabler, Simon; Nelson, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Based on the current lack of data and understanding of the wear behavior of dental two-piece implants, this study aims for evaluating the microgap formation and wear pattern of different implants in the course of cyclic loading. Several implant systems with different conical implant-abutment interfaces were purchased. The implants were first evaluated using synchrotron X-ray high-resolution radiography (SRX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implant-abutment assemblies were then subjected to cyclic loading at 98N and their microgap was evaluated after 100,000, 200,000 and 1 million cycles using SRX, synchrotron micro-tomography (μCT). Wear mechanisms of the implant-abutment connection (IAC) after 200,000 cycles and 1 million cycles were further characterized using SEM. All implants exhibit a microgap between the implant and abutment prior to loading. The gap size increased with cyclic loading with its changes being significantly higher within the first 200,000 cycles. Wear was seen in all implants regardless of their interface design. The wear pattern comprised adhesive wear and fretting. Wear behavior changed when a different mounting medium was used (brass vs. polymer). A micromotion of the abutment during cyclic loading can induce wear and wear particles in conical dental implant systems. This feature accompanied with the formation of a microgap at the IAC is highly relevant for the longevity of the implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abutment region dosimetry for serial tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa; Dempsey, James F.; Markman, Jerry; Goddu, S. Murty; Purdy, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A commercial intensity modulated radiation therapy system (Corvus, NOMOS Corp.) is presently used in our clinic to generate optimized dose distributions delivered using a proprietary dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) (MIMiC) composed of 20 opposed leaf pairs. On our accelerator (Clinac 600C/D, Varian Associates, Inc.) each MIMiC leaf projects to either 1.00 x 0.84 or 1.00 x 1.70 cm 2 (depending on the treatment plan and termed 1 cm or 2 cm mode, respectively). The MIMiC is used to deliver serial (axial) tomotherapy treatment plans, in which the beam is delivered to a nearly cylindrical volume as the DMLC is rotated about the patient. For longer targets, the patient is moved (indexed) between treatments a distance corresponding to the projected leaf width. The treatment relies on precise indexing and a method was developed to measure the precision of indexing devices. A treatment planning study of the dosimetric effects of incorrect patient indexing and concluded that a dose heterogeneity of 10% mm -1 resulted. Because the results may be sensitive to the dose model accuracy, we conducted a measurement-based investigation of the consequences of incorrect indexing using our accelerator. Although the indexing provides an accurate field abutment along the isocenter, due to beam divergence, hot and cold spots will be produced below and above isocenter, respectively, when less than 300 deg. arcs were used. A preliminary study recently determined that for a 290 deg. rotation in 1 cm mode, 15% cold and 7% hot spots were delivered to 7 cm above and below isocenter, respectively. This study completes the earlier work by investigating the dose heterogeneity as a function of position relative to the axis of rotation, arc length, and leaf width. The influence of random daily patient positioning errors is also investigated. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using 8.0 cm diameter cylindrical target volumes within a homogeneous rectilinear film

  18. Soil-structure interaction studies for understanding the behavior of integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Integral Abutment Bridges (IAB) are bridges without any joints within the bridge deck or between the : superstructure and the abutments. An IAB provides many advantages during construction and maintenance of : a bridge. Soil-structure interactions at...

  19. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access ...

  20. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

    OpenAIRE

    de Jesus Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso; Xible, Anuar Antônio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10) of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricate...

  1. Temporal variation of clear-water scour at compound Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminuddin Ab. Ghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of actual abutments in rivers are built on foundation, while there is limited number of study available on the effects of the foundation on the local scour. In this study, temporal variation of local scour around compound abutment was investigated experimentally under clear-water conditions. The results showed that a suitable level of foundation is able to decrease the scour depth and increase scour time during the flood events. The trend of temporal scour depth at compound pier and abutment is similar. The scour depth develops to top of foundation quickly, and then the foundation postpones the scour development (lag–time. Duration of lag–time depends on the foundation level, velocity ratio (U/Uc and foundation dimension. This study highlights that proper design of foundation level increases duration of scouring and provides enough time to treat bridge foundation after the flood events.

  2. Fracture strength and failure mode of maxillary implant-supported provisional single crowns: a comparison of composite resin crowns fabricated directly over PEEK abutments and solid titanium abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik Jacob; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the fracture strength of implant-supported composite resin crowns on PEEK and solid titanium temporary abutments, and to analyze the failure types. Three types of provisional abutments, RN synOcta Temporary Meso Abutment (PEEK; Straumann), RN synOcta Titanium Post for Temporary Restorations (Straumann), and Temporary Abutment Engaging NobRplRP (Nobel Biocare) were used, and provisional screw-retained crowns using composite resin (Solidex) were fabricated for four different locations in the maxilla. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until fracture occurred. The failure types were analyzed and further categorized as irreparable (Type 1) or reparable (Type 2). No significant difference was found between different abutment types. Only for the position of the maxillary central incisor, composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments showed significantly lower (p Provisional crowns on PEEK abutments showed similar fracture strength as titanium temporary abutments except for central incisors. Maxillary right central incisor composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments fractured below the mean anterior masticatory loading forces reported to be approximately 206 N. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  5. Non-rigid connector: The wand to allay the stresses on abutment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Saurav; Khongshei, Arlingstone; Gupta, Tapas; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01

    The use of rigid connectors in 5-unit fixed dental prosthesis with a pier abutment can result in failure of weaker retainer in the long run as the pier abutment acts as a fulcrum. Non-rigid connector placed on the distal aspect of pier seems to reduce potentially excess stress concentration on the pier abutment.

  6. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  7. Torque loss of different abutment sizes before and after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Izabela Cristina; Faria, Adriana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3.8- and 4.8-mm abutments submitted to simulations of masticatory cycles to examine whether abutment diameter and cemented vs screw-retained crowns affect torque loss of the abutments and crowns. Forty implant/abutment sets were divided into the following groups (n = 10 in each group): (1) G4.8S included 4.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; (2) G4.8C included 4.8-mm abutment with cemented crown; (3) G3.8S included 3.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; and (4) G3.8C included 3.8-mm abutment with cemented crown. All abutments were tightened with torque values of 20 Ncm, and 10 Ncm for screw-retained crowns. Torque loss was measured before and after cycling loading (300,000 cycles). Torque loss of screw-retained crowns significantly increased after cycling in abutments of groups G3.8S (P ≤ .05) and G4.8S (P = .001). No difference was noted between the abutments before cycling (P = .735), but G3.8S abutments presented greater torque loss than the other groups after cycling (P = .008). Significant differences were noted in the abutment torque loss before and after cycling loading only for the G3.8C group (P ≤ .05). The abutment diameter affects torque loss of screw-retained crowns and leads to failure during the test; mechanical cycling increases torque loss of abutment screw and screw-retained crowns.

  8. Integral abutment bridge for Louisiana's soft and stiff soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have been designed and constructed in a few US states in the past few : decades. The initial purpose of building such bridges was to eliminate the expansion joints and resolve the : joint-induced problems. Although IA...

  9. FEA and microstructure characterization of a one-piece Y-TZP abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Lucas Hian; Ribeiro, Sebastião; Borges, Alexandre Luís Souto; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Tango, Rubens Nisie

    2014-11-01

    The most important drawback of dental implant/abutment assemblies is the need for a fixing screw. This study aimed to develop an esthetic one-piece Y-TZP abutment to suppress the use of the screw. Material characterization was performed using a bar-shaped specimen obtained by slip-casting to validate the method prior to prototype abutment fabrication by the same process. The mechanical behavior of the prototype abutment was verified and compared with a conventional abutment by finite element analysis (FEA). The abutment was evaluated by micro-CT analysis and its density was measured. FEA showed stress concentration at the first thread pitch during installation and in the cervical region during oblique loading for both abutments. However, stress concentration was observed at the base of the screw head and stem in the conventional abutment. The relative density for the fabricated abutment was 95.68%. Micro-CT analysis revealed the presence of elongated cracks with sharp edges over the surface and porosity in the central region. In the light of these findings, the behavior of a one-piece abutment is expected to be better than that of the conventional model. New studies should be conducted to clarify the performance and longevity of this one-piece Y-TZP abutment. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Abutment Angle on Implant Strain When Supporting a Distal Extension Removable Partial Dental Prosthesis: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Toshihito; Tomita, Akiko; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    This study evaluated the impact of angled abutments on strain in implants supporting a distal extension removable partial denture. An in vitro model of an implant supporting a distal extension removable partial denture was developed. The implant was positioned with a 17- or 30-degree mesial inclination, with either a healing abutment or a corrective multiunit abutment. Levels of strain under load were compared, and the results were compared using t test (P = .05). Correcting angulation with a multiunit angled abutment significantly decreased strain (P abutment. An angled abutment decreased the strain on an inclined implant significantly more than a healing abutment when loaded under a distal extension removable partial denture.

  11. Axial displacements in external and internal implant-abutment connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dae-Gon; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the axial displacement of the abutments during clinical procedures by the tightening torque and cyclic loading. Two different implant-abutment connection systems were used (external butt joint connection [EXT]; internal tapered conical connection [INT]). The master casts with two implant replicas, angulated 10° from each other, were fabricated for each implant connection system. Four types of impression copings were assembled and tightened with the corresponding implants (hex transfer impression coping, non-hex transfer impression coping, hex pick-up impression coping, non-hex pick-up impression coping). Resin splinted abutments and final prosthesis were assembled. The axial displacement was measured from the length of each assembly, which was evaluated repeatedly, after 30 Ncm torque tightening. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis for 1,000,000 cycles, additional axial displacement was recorded. The mean axial displacement was statistically analyzed (repeated measured ANOVA). There was more axial displacement in the INT group than that of the EXT group in impression copings, resin splinted abutments, and final prosthesis. Less axial displacement was found at 1-piece non-hex transfer type impression coping than other type of impression copings in the INT group. There was more axial displacement at the final prosthesis than resin splinted abutments in the INT and the EXT groups. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis, the INT group showed more axial displacement than that of the EXT group. Internal tapered conical connection demonstrated a varying amount of axial displacement with tightening torque and cyclic loading. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Three-Dimensional Displacement of Nine Different Abutments for an Implant with an Internal Hexagon Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andy B; Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians need to know whether there are any differences among the many abutment options available for restoring a particular implant. This study aims to compare nine abutments for one implant system for positional changes between hand tightening and torqueing. Nine Tapered Screw-Vent (TSV) implants were placed into a resin block. Five specimens of nine different abutments (n = 45) were tried in one of the nine implants. Initially, the abutments were torqued to 20 Ncm to represent hand tightening. Abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm using a torque driver as recommended by the manufacturer for final seating. Images were recorded in 12-second intervals for approximately 10 minutes after the torque was applied. The spatial relationship of the abutments to the resin block was determined using three-dimensional digital image correlation. Commercial image correlation software was used to analyze the displacements. Mean displacements for the nine different abutments were calculated in all three dimensions and for overall displacement in space. A t test with a step-down Bonferroni correction was used for a pairwise comparison of each abutment's mean displacements to the other abutments to determine statistical differences (α = .05). The Atlantis titanium, Inclusive titanium, and Legacy zirconia abutments showed mean displacements that were statistically significantly higher than other abutments in the horizontal direction. The overall three-dimensional displacement of the Atlantis titanium abutment after an applied 30-Ncm torque was significantly higher than that of six of the other eight abutments (P displacement between hand tightening and torqueing than the Atlantis titanium or Inclusive titanium abutments when used to restore a TSV implant.

  13. Comparison of the impact of scaler material composition on polished titanium implant abutment surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasturk, Hatice; Nguyen, Daniel Huy; Sherzai, Homa; Song, Xiaoping; Soukos, Nikos; Bidlack, Felicitas B; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of the removal of biofilm with hand scalers of different material composition on the surface of implant abutments by assessing the surface topography and residual plaque after scaling using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Titanium implant analogs from 3 manufacturers (Straumann USA LLC, Andover, Maine, Nobel BioCare USA LLC, Yorba Linda, Cali, Astra Tech Implant Systems, Dentsply, Mölndal, Sweden) were mounted in stone in plastic vials individually with authentic prosthetic abutments. Plaque samples were collected from a healthy volunteer, inoculated into growth medium and incubated with the abutments anaerobically for 1 week. A blinded, calibrated hygienist performed scaling to remove the biofilm using 6 implant scalers (in triplicate), 1 scaler for 1 abutment. The abutments were mounted on an imaging stand and processed for SEM. Images were captured in 3 randomly designated areas of interest on each abutment. Analysis of the implant polished abutment surface and plaque area measurements were performed using ImageJ image analysis software. Surface alterations were characterized by the number, length, depth and the width of the scratches observed. Glass filled resin scalers resulted in significantly more and longer scratches on all 3 abutment types compared to other scalers, while unfilled resin scalers resulted in the least surface change (p abutments with regard to plaque removal. The impact of scalers on implant abutment surfaces varies between abutment types presumably due to different surface characteristics with no apparent advantage of one abutment type over the other with regard to resistance to surface damage. Unfilled resin was found consistently to be the least damaging to abutment surfaces, although all scalers of all compositions caused detectable surface changes to polished surfaces of implant abutments.

  14. Fracture resistance of zirconia-based implant abutments after artificial long-term aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahhaf, Abdulaziz; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the survival rate, fracture strength, bending moments, loading to fracture and fracture modes of different designs of zirconia abutments after dynamic loading with thermocycling, and compare these values to titanium abutments. A total of 80 abutment samples were divided into 5 test groups of 16 samples in each group. The study included the following groups, "Group 1" CAD/CAM produced all-zirconia abutments, "Group 2" titanium abutments, "Group 3" zirconia-abutments adhesively luted to a titanium base, "Group 4" prefabricated all-zirconia abutments and "Group 5" zirconia-abutments glass soldered to a titanium base. Half the number of samples in each group was exposed to 1.2 million loading cycles (5-years simulation) in the chewing simulator. The samples that survived the artificial aging were later tested for fracture strength in a universal testing machine. The remaining 8 samples of the group were directly tested for fracture strength. All samples exposed to the 5-years artificial aging survived except of six samples in one group (Group 1). The surviving samples were later fracture tested in the universal testing machine. The bending moments (Ncm) values were as follow: Exposed groups: "Group 1" 94.5Ncm; "Group 2" 599.2Ncm; "Group 3" 477.5Ncm; "Group 4" 314.4Ncm; "Group 5" 509.4Ncm. Non-exposed groups: "Group 1" 269.3Ncm; "Group 2" 474.2Ncm; "Group 3" 377.6Ncm; "Group 4" 265.4Ncm; "Group 5" 372.4Ncm. Except in Group 1, the values were higher in the exposed groups, although, statistically there was no difference (p>0.05). The one-piece ZrO2-abutment group (Group 1 and Group 4) exhibited lower values, while the two-piece ZrO2-abutment groups (Group 3 and Group 5) showed similar values and fracture modes like the titanium abutment group. The titanium abutment group showed the highest values of bending moments among all groups. The implant-abutment connection area appeared to influence the bending moment value and the fracture mode of the tested

  15. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE JESUS TAVAREZ, Rudys Rodolfo; BONACHELA, Wellington Cardoso; XIBLE, Anuar Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. Material and Methods Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10) of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricated abutment; Group 4, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; and Group 5, external hexagon implant and Ceraone abutment. For groups 1, 2, 3 and 5, the crowns were cemented on the abutments and in group 4 crowns were screwed directly on the implant. The specimens were subjected to 500,000 cycles at 19.1 Hz of frequency and non-axial load of 133 N in a MTS 810 machine. The vertical misfit (μm) at the implant/abutment interface was evaluated before (B) and after (A) application of the cyclic loading. Data were analyzed statistically by using two-away ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (pabutment connection may develop a role on the vertical misfit at the implant/abutment interface. PMID:21437464

  16. Two Different Percutaneous Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Abutment Systems: Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; İşeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Yılmazer, Ayça Başkadem; Enver, Necati; Ceylan, Didem; Kara, Ahmet; Güldiken, Yahya; Çomoğlu, Şenol

    2016-04-01

    To compare two different percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) abutment systems regarding operation time, scar healing, quality of life, implant stability, audiologic results, and complications. The study involves a prospective multi-center clinical evaluation. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had undergone BAHA surgery from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary centers were included in the study. The Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was used to assess the patients at least 6 months after surgery. The operation time and complications were recorded. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Holger's classification was used to evaluate skin reactions. The mean length of the operation was 39.2±4 min for standard abutment and 18.3±5.7 min for hydroxyapatite-coated abutment. ISQ scores were significantly better for standard abutment in all tests. The mean total Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was 39.3±19 for the standard abutment and 46.3±24.5 for the hydroxyapatite-coated abutment groups, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups. There was no difference in audiological improvement between the two groups after surgery. Hydroxyapatite-coated abutment provided a shorter operation time that was significantly different from standard abutment. There were no significant differences between standard abutment and hydroxyapatite-coated abutment regarding audiologic improvement, quality of life, loading time, and complications.

  17. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  18. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  19. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongju; Shin, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA. PMID:29065610

  20. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement-retained crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C; Saba, Juliana N; Meyer, Clark A; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-11-01

    Recent literature indicates that the long-term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment - cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri-implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown-abutment margins post-crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D-printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck-margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post-cement-retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall.

  1. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement‐retained crown restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C.; Saba, Juliana N.; Meyer, Clark A.; Chung, Kwok‐Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent literature indicates that the long‐term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment – cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri‐implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown‐abutment margins post‐crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D‐printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck‐margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post‐cement‐retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall. PMID

  2. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dasht

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial dentures for his lower mandible. Due to the lack of parallelism in the supporting implants, prefabricated ball abutment could not be used. As a result, a customized ball abutment was fabricated in order to correct the non-parallelism of the implants. Conclusion: Using UCLA abutments could be a cost-efficient approach for the correction of misaligned implant abutments in implant-supported overdentures.

  3. Numerical simulation of abutment pressure redistribution during face advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, S. V.; Lavrikov, S. V.; Revuzhenko, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation data on the abutment pressure redistribution in rock mass during face advance, including isolines of maximum shear stress and pressure epures. The stress state of rock in the vicinity of a breakage heading is calculated by the finite element method using a 2D nonlinear model of a structurally heterogeneous medium with regard to plasticity and internal self-balancing stress. The thus calculated stress field is used as input data for 3D discrete element modeling of the process. The study shows that the abutment pressure increases as the roof span extends and that the distance between the face breast and the peak point of this pressure depends on the elastoplastic properties and internal self-balancing stress of a rock medium.

  4. Evaluation of abutment scour prediction equations with field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, S.T.; Deshpande, N.; Aziz, N.M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with FHWA, compared predicted abutment scour depths, computed with selected predictive equations, with field observations collected at 144 bridges in South Carolina and at eight bridges from the National Bridge Scour Database. Predictive equations published in the 4th edition of Evaluating Scour at Bridges (Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18) were used in this comparison, including the original Froehlich, the modified Froehlich, the Sturm, the Maryland, and the HIRE equations. The comparisons showed that most equations tended to provide conservative estimates of scour that at times were excessive (as large as 158 ft). Equations also produced underpredictions of scour, but with less frequency. Although the equations provide an important resource for evaluating abutment scour at bridges, the results of this investigation show the importance of using engineering judgment in conjunction with these equations.

  5. Analysis of full scale impact into an abutment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullard, K.; Dowler, H.J.; Soanes, T.P.T.

    1985-01-01

    A 60mph impact into a tunnel abutment, of a flask on a railway flatrol with following vehicles, is shown to be a much less severe event for the flask than a 9 metre drop test to IAEA regulations. This involves the use of mathematical models of the full scale event of the same type as were employed in studying the behaviour of quarter scale models. The latter were subject to actual impact testing as part of the validation process. (author)

  6. Accuracy combining different brands of implants and abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Sol?-Ru?z, Mar?a F.; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo; Senent-Vicente, Gisela; Gonz?lez-de-Cossio, In?s; Amig?-Borr?s, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the vertical misfit between different brands of dental implants and prosthetic abutments, with or without mechanical torque, and to study their possible combination. Study design: Five different brands of implant were used in the study: Biofit (Castemaggiore, Italy), Bioner S.A. (Barcelona, Spain), 3i Biomet (Palm Beach, U.S.A.), BTI (Alava, Spain) and Nobel Biocare (G?teborg, Sweden), with standard 4.1 mm heads and external hexagons, and their respective machined prost...

  7. Effect of Cyclic Loading on Micromotion at the Implant-Abutment Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Taylor, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic loading may cause settling of abutments mounted on dental implants, potentially affecting screw joint stability and implant-abutment micromotion. It was the goal of this in vitro study to compare micromotion of implant-abutment assemblies before and after masticatory simulation. Six groups of abutments (n = 5) for a specific tissue-level implant system with an internal octagon were subject to micromotion measurements. The implant-abutment assemblies were loaded in a universal testing machine, and an apparatus and extensometers were used to record displacement. This was done twice, in the condition in which they were received from the abutment manufacturer and after simulated loading (100,000 cycles; 100 N). Statistical analysis was based on analysis of variance, two-sample t tests (Welch tests), and Pearson product moment correlation (α = .05). The mean values for micromotion ranged from 33.15 to 63.41 μm and from 30.03 to 42.40 μm before and after load cycling. The general trend toward reduced micromotion following load cycling was statistically significant only for CAD/CAM zirconia abutments (P = .036) and for one type of clone abutment (P = .012), with no significant correlation between values measured before and after cyclic loading (Pearson product moment correlation; P = .104). While significant differences in micromotion were found prior to load cycling, no significant difference among any of the abutment types tested could be observed afterward (P > .05 in all cases). A quantifiable settling effect at the implant-abutment interface seems to result from cyclic loading, leading to a decrease in micromotion. This effect seems to be more pronounced in low-quality abutments. For the implant system tested in this study, retightening of abutment screws is recommended after an initial period of clinical use.

  8. On the Performance of Super-Long Integral Abutment Bridges: Parametric Analyses and Design Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "integral abutment bridge" has recently become a topic of remarka-ble interest among bridge engineers, not only for newly built bridges but also during refurbishment processes. The system constituted by the substructure and the superstructure can achieve a composite action responding as a single structural unit; the elimination of expansion joint and bearings on the abutments, greatly reduce the construction and maintenance costs. To maximize the benefits from integral abutment...

  9. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis on Stress Distribution of Internal Implant-Abutment Engagement Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yun-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    To investigate the stress distribution in an implant-abutment complex with a preloaded abutment screw by comparing implant-abutment engagement features using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). For FEA modeling, two implants-one with a single (S) engagement system and the other with a double (D) engagement system-were placed in the human mandibular molar region. Two types of abutments (hexagonal, conical) were connected to the implants. Different implant models (a single implant, two parallel implants, and mesial and tilted distal implants with 1-mm bone loss) were assumed. A static axial force and a 45-degree oblique force of 200 N were applied as the sum of vectors to the top of the prosthetic occlusal surface with a preload of 30 Ncm in the abutment screw. The von Mises stresses at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces were measured. In the single implant model, the S-conical abutment type exhibited broader stress distribution than the S-hexagonal abutment. In the double engagement system, the stress concentration was high in the lower contact area of the implant-abutment engagement. In the tilted implant model, the stress concentration point was different from that in the parallel implant model because of the difference in the bone level. The double engagement system demonstrated a high stress concentration at the lower contact area of the implant-abutment interface. To decrease the stress concentration, the type of engagement features of the implant-abutment connection should be carefully considered.

  10. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an ac...

  11. The total occlusal convergence of the abutment of a partial fixed dental prosthesis: A definition and a clinical technique for its assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The abutment(s) of a partial fixed dental prosthesis (PFDP) should have a minimal total occlusal convergence (TOC), also called a taper, in order to ensure adequate retention of a PFDP that will be made for the abutment(s), given the height of the abutment(s). This article reviews the concept of PFDP abutment TOC and presents an alternative definition of what TOC is, defining it as the extent to which the shape of an abutment differs from an ideal cylinder shape of an abutment. This article also reviews experimental results concerning what is the ideal TOC in degrees and explores clinical techniques of estimating the TOC of a crown abutment. The author suggests that Dentists use high magnification loupes (×6-8 magnification or greater) or a surgical operating microscope when preparing crown abutments, to facilitate creating a minimum abutment TOC. PMID:24932130

  12. The fracture strength by a torsion test at the implant-abutment interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumihiko; Hiroyasu, Kazuhiko; Ueda, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Fractured connections between implants and implant abutments or abutment screws are frequently encountered in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate fracture strength using a torsion test at the interface between the implant and the abutment. Thirty screw-type implant with diameters of 3.3, 3.8, 4.3, 5.0, and 6.0 mm were submitted to a torsion test. Implants of each size were connected to abutments with abutment screws tightened to 20 N · cm. Mechanical stress was applied with a rotational speed of 3.6 °/min until fracture occurred, and maximum torque (fracture torque) and torsional yield strength were measured. The mean values were calculated and then compared using Tukey's test. The abutments were then removed, and the implant-abutment interfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). No significant differences in mean fracture torque were found among 3.3, 3.8, and 4.3 mm-diameter implants, but significant differences were found between these sizes and 5.0 and 6.0 mm-diameter implants (p abutment corresponding to the internal notches of the implant body had been destroyed. Smaller diameter implants demonstrated lower fracture torque and torsional yield strength than implants with larger diameters. In internal tube-in-tube connections, three abutment projections corresponding to rotation-prevention notches were destroyed in each implant.

  13. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). Conclusion: The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal. PMID:25628660

  14. Application of reverse engineering in the production of individual dental abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusov, A. V.; Kashapov, R. N.; Kashapov, L. N.; Statsenko, E. O.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop a method of manufacturing individual dental abutments for a variety of dental implants. System of industrial X-ray microtomography Phoenix V|tome|X S 240 has been applied for creation of highly accurate model of the dental abutment. Scanning of dental abutment and the optimization of model was produced. The program of milling the individual abutment with a standard conical neck of hexagon was produced for the five-axis milling machine imes - icore 450i from the materials titanium and zirconium oxide.

  15. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Manual Torque Values Applied to Implant-Abutment Complex by Different Clinicians and Abutment Screw Loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Sabit; Cene, Erhan; Aya, Serhan Aydın; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2017-01-01

    Preload is applied to screws manually or using a torque wrench in dental implant systems, and the preload applied must be appropriate for the purpose. The aim of this study was to assess screw loosening and bending/torsional moments applied by clinicians of various specialties following application of manual tightening torque to combinations of implants and abutments. Ten-millimeter implants of 3.7 and 4.1 mm diameters and standard or solid abutments were used. Each group contained five implant-abutment combinations. The control and experimental groups comprised 20 and 160 specimens, respectively. Implants in the experimental group were tightened by dentists of different specialties. Torsional and bending moments during tightening were measured using a strain gauge. Control group and implants with preload values close to the ideal preload were subjected to a dynamic loading test at 150 N, 15 Hz, and 85,000 cycles. The implants that deformed in this test were examined using an optical microscope to assess deformities. Manual tightening did not yield the manufacturer-recommended preload values. Dynamic loading testing suggested early screw loosening/fracture in samples with insufficient preload. PMID:28473988

  17. Evaluation of stability of interface between CCM (Co-Cr-Mo) UCLA abutment and external hex implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Joon; Park, Young-Bum; Choi, Hyunmin; Cho, Youngsung; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Keun-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the stability of interface between Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) UCLA abutment and external hex implant. Sixteen external hex implant fixtures were assigned to two groups (CCM and Gold group) and were embedded in molds using clear acrylic resin. Screw-retained prostheses were constructed using CCM UCLA abutment and Gold UCLA abutment. The external implant fixture and screw-retained prostheses were connected using abutment screws. After the abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm torque, 5 kg thermocyclic functional loading was applied by chewing simulator. A target of 1.0 × 10 6 cycles was applied. After cyclic loading, removal torque values were recorded using a driving torque tester, and the interface between implant fixture and abutment was evaluated by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The means and standard deviations (SD) between the CCM and Gold groups were analyzed with independent t-test at the significance level of 0.05. Fractures of crowns, abutments, abutment screws, and fixtures and loosening of abutment screws were not observed after thermocyclic loading. There were no statistically significant differences at the recorded removal torque values between CCM and Gold groups ( P >.05). SEM analysis revealed that remarkable wear patterns were observed at the abutment interface only for Gold UCLA abutments. Those patterns were not observed for other specimens. Within the limit of this study, CCM UCLA abutment has no statistically significant difference in the stability of interface with external hex implant, compared with Gold UCLA abutment.

  18. Abutments with reduced diameter for both cement and screw retentions: analysis of failure modes and misfit of abutment-crown-connections after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Izabela Cristina Maurício; Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze failure modes and misfit of abutments with reduced diameter for both cement and screw retentions after cyclic loading. Forty morse-taper abutment/implant sets of titanium were divided into four groups (N = 10): G4.8S-4.8 abutment with screw-retained crown; G4.8C-4.8 abutment with cemented crown; G3.8S-3.8 abutment with screw-retained crown; and G3.8C-3.8 abutment with cemented crown. Copings were waxed on castable cylinders and cast by oxygen gas flame and injected by centrifugation. After, esthetic veneering ceramic was pressed on these copings for obtaining metalloceramic crowns of upper canine. Cemented crowns were cemented on abutments with provisional cement (Temp Bond NE), and screw-retained crowns were tightened to their abutments with torque recommended by manufacturer (10 N cm). The misfit was measured using a stereomicroscope in a 10× magnification before and after cyclic loading (300,000 cycles). Tests were visually monitored, and failures (decementation, screw loosening and fractures) were registered. Misfit was analyzed by mixed linear model while failure modes by chi-square test (α = 0.05). Cyclic loading affected misfit of 3.8C (P ≤ 0.0001), 3.8S (P = 0.0055) and 4.8C (P = 0.0318), but not of 4.8S (P = 0.1243). No differences were noted between 3.8S with 4.8S before (P = 0.1550) and after (P = 0.9861) cyclic loading, but 3.8C was different from 4.8C only after (P = 0.0015) loading. Comparing different types of retentions at the same diameter abutment, significant difference was noted before and after cyclic loading for 3.8 and 4.8 abutments. Analyzing failure modes, retrievable failures were present at 3.8S and 3.8C groups, while irretrievable were only present at 3.8S. The cyclic loading decreased misfit of cemented and screw-retained crowns on reduced diameter abutments, and misfit of cemented crowns is greater than screw-retained ones. Abutments of reduced diameter failed more than

  19. A comparative finite elemental analysis of glass abutment supported and unsupported cantilever fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishaniah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Elsharawy, Mohamed A; Alsaleh, Ayman K; Ismail Mohamed, Karem M; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the load distribution and displacement of cantilever prostheses with and without glass abutment by three dimensional finite element analysis. Micro-computed tomography was used to study the relationship between the glass abutment and the ridge. The external surface of the maxilla was scanned, and a simplified finite element model was constructed. The ZX-27 glass abutment and the maxillary first and second premolars were created and modified. The solid model of the three-unit cantilever fixed partial denture was scanned, and the fitting surface was modified with reference to the created abutments using the 3D CAD system. The finite element analysis was completed in ANSYS. The fit and total gap volume between the glass abutment and dental model were determined by Skyscan 1173 high-energy spiral micro-CT scan. The results of the finite element analysis in this study showed that the cantilever prosthesis supported by the glass abutment demonstrated significantly less stress on the terminal abutment and overall deformation of the prosthesis under vertical and oblique load. Micro-computed tomography determined a gap volume of 6.74162 mm(3). By contacting the mucosa, glass abutments transfer some amount of masticatory load to the residual alveolar ridge, thereby preventing damage to the periodontal microstructures of the terminal abutment. The passive contact of the glass abutment with the mucosa not only preserves the health of the mucosa covering the ridge but also permits easy cleaning. It is possible to increase the success rate of cantilever FPDs by supporting the cantilevered pontic with glass abutments. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of splinting periodontally compromised removable partial denture abutments on bone stresses: a three-dimensional finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: Splinting a very weak abutment to an adjacent healthy tooth might not be beneficial. The acceptable crown to root ratio for fixed splinting a weak abutment to an adjacent normal tooth was around 1.65-2.

  1. A novel abutment construction technique for rapid bridge construction : controlled low strength Materials (CLSM) with full-height concrete panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    One of the major obstacles facing rapid bridge construction for typical span type bridges is the time required to construct bridge abutments and foundations. This can be remedied by using the controlled low strength materials (CLSM) bridge abutment. ...

  2. Antibacterial effect of doxycycline-coated dental abutment surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Rui; Tiainen, Hanna; Shabestari, Maziar; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Haugen, Håvard J; Witsø, Ingun L; Lönn-Stensrud, Jessica; Jugowiec, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation on dental abutment may lead to peri-implant mucositis and subsequent peri-implantitis. These cases are clinically treated with antibiotics such as doxycycline (Doxy). Here we used an electrochemical method of cathodic polarization to coat Doxy onto the outer surface of a dental abutment material. The Doxy-coated surface showed a burst release in phosphate-buffered saline during the first 24 h. However, a significant amount of Doxy remained on the surface for at least 2 weeks especially on a 5 mA–3 h sample with a higher Doxy amount, suggesting both an initial and a long-term bacteriostatic potential of the coated surface. Surface chemistry was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Surface topography was evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and blue-light profilometry. Longer polarization time from 1 h to 5 h and higher current density from 1 to 15 mA cm −2 resulted in a higher amount of Doxy on the surface. The surface was covered by a layer of Doxy less than 100 nm without significant changes in surface topography. The antibacterial property of the Doxy-coated surface was analyzed by biofilm and planktonic growth assays using Staphylococcus epidermidis. Doxy-coated samples reduced both biofilm accumulation and planktonic growth in broth culture, and also inhibited bacterial growth on agar plates. The antibacterial effect was stronger for samples of 5 mA–3 h coated with a higher amount of Doxy compared to that of 1 mA–1 h. Accordingly, an abutment surface coated with Doxy has potential for preventing bacterial colonization when exposed to the oral cavity. Doxy-coating could be a viable way to control peri-implant mucositis and prevent its progression into peri-implantitis. (paper)

  3. Study of displacements of a bridge abutment using FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymysłowski Michał

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Steel sheet piles are often used to support excavations for bridge foundations. When they are left in place in the permanent works, they have the potential to increase foundation bearing capacity and reduce displacements; but their presence is not usually taken into account in foundation design. In this article, the results of finite element analysis of a typical abutment foundation, with and without cover of sheet piles, are presented to demonstrate these effects. The structure described is located over the Więceminka river in the town of Kołobrzeg, Poland. It is a single-span road bridge with reinforced concrete slab.

  4. Study of displacements of a bridge abutment using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymysłowski, Michał; Kurałowicz, Zygmunt

    2016-06-01

    Steel sheet piles are often used to support excavations for bridge foundations. When they are left in place in the permanent works, they have the potential to increase foundation bearing capacity and reduce displacements; but their presence is not usually taken into account in foundation design. In this article, the results of finite element analysis of a typical abutment foundation, with and without cover of sheet piles, are presented to demonstrate these effects. The structure described is located over the Więceminka river in the town of Kołobrzeg, Poland. It is a single-span road bridge with reinforced concrete slab.

  5. Influence of abutment screw preload on stress distribution in marginal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraisat, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Changes in an implant assembly after abutment connection might possibly cause deformation in the implant/abutment joint and even in the marginal bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of abutment screw preload through the implant collar on marginal bone stress without external load application. Models of three implant parts made of titanium (implant, abutment, and abutment screw) and cortical bone were built and positioned with computer-aided design software. Meshing and generation of boundary conditions, loads, and interactions were performed. Each part was meshed independently. The sole load applied to the model was a torque of 32 Ncm on the abutment screw about its axis of rotation. The implant collar was deformed axially after the screw was tightened (3 μm). This deformation resulted in 60 MPa of stress in the marginal bone. Moreover, pressure on the marginal bone in a radial direction was observed. It can be concluded that, without any external load application, abutment screw preload exerts stresses on the implant collar and the marginal bone. These findings should help guide the development of new implant/abutment joint designs that exert less stress on the marginal bone.

  6. Mechanical resistance of zirconium implant abutments: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of aesthetic demands, together with the successful outcome of current implants, has renewed interest in the search for new materials with enough mechanical properties and better aesthetic qualities than the materials customarily used in implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Among these materials, zirconium has been used in different types of implants, including prosthetic abutments. The aim of the present review is to analyse current scientific evidence supporting the use of this material for the above mentioned purposes. We carried out the review of the literature published in the last ten years (2000 through 2010) of in vitro trials of dynamic and static loading of zirconium abutments found in the databases of Medline and Cochrane using the key words zirconium abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. Although we have found a wide variability of values among the different studies, abutments show favourable clinical behaviour for the rehabilitation of single implants in the anterior area. Such variability may be explained by the difficulty to simulate daily mastication under in vitro conditions. The clinical evidence, as found in our study, does not recommend the use of implanto-prosthetic zirconium abutments in the molar area. Key words: Zirconium abutment, zirconium implant abutment, zirconia abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. PMID:22143702

  7. Soft tissue response to zirconia and titanium implant abutments : an in vivo within-subject comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brakel, Ralph; Meijer, Gert J.; Verhoeven, Jan Willem; Jansen, John; de Putter, Cornelis; Cune, Marco S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To compare the health of the soft tissues towards zirconia and titanium abutments in man, as observed using histological data. Material and Methods Twenty patients received two mandibular implants with either a zirconia or titanium abutment (split mouth study design, left-right randomization).

  8. Fitting of an 8.5-millimeter abutment for bone conduction devices: indications and postintervention course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dun, C.A.J.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We present indications and clinical outcomes of fitting an 8.5-mm abutment for bone conduction devices. METHODS: In 39 cases with a follow-up time of more than 12 months after fitting of an 8.5-mm abutment, the preintervention and postintervention courses were retrospectively evaluated.

  9. The bacterial sealing capacity of morse taper implant-abutment systems in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Rogerio; Ferreira, Andreia; Souza, Emmanuel; Arcoverde, Joao; Dametto, Fabio; Gade-Neto, Cicero; Seabra, Flavio; Sarmento, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    The use of Morse taper systems in dental implantology has been associated widely with a more precise adaptation between implants and their respective abutments. This may lead to an increase in the stability of the implant system and may also prevent microbial invasion through the implant-abutment interface. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the ability of four commercially available Morse taper system units to impede bacterial penetration through their implant-abutment interfaces. Abutments were screwed onto the implants, and the units were subsequently immersed in Streptococcus sanguinis bacterial broth (1 × 10(8) colony forming units/mL) for 48 hours. The units were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under three conditions: 1) with the implant-abutment components assembled as units to investigate for both the existence of microgaps and the presence of bacteria; 2) with the implants and abutments separated for examination of internal surfaces; and 3) with the implant-abutment components again assembled as units to measure any microgaps detected. The mean size of the microgaps in each unit was determined by measuring, under SEM, their width in four equidistant points. Microgaps were detected in all units with no significant differences in dimension (Kruskal-Wallis test, P >0.05). Within all units, the presence of bacteria was also observed. The seals provided by the interfaces of the commercially available Morse taper implant-abutment units tested were not sufficiently small to shield the implant from bacterial penetration.

  10. Soft tissue response to zirconia and titanium implant abutments: an in vivo within-subject comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakel, R. van; Meijer, G.J.; Verhoeven, J.W.; Jansen, J.A.; Putter, C. de; Cune, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the health of the soft tissues towards zirconia and titanium abutments in man, as observed using histological data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients received two mandibular implants with either a zirconia or titanium abutment (split mouth study design, left-right randomization).

  11. The upper bound of abutment scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of abutment scour with the larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published abutment-scour data, and selected data, consisting of 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements, were compiled for the analysis. These data encompassed a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 6 states within the United States. The data set was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment-scour envelope curves. Additionally, the data were used to evaluate a dimensionless abutment-scour envelope curve developed by Melville (1992), highlighting the distinct difference in the upper bound for laboratory and field data. The envelope curves evaluated in this investigation provide simple but useful tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment-scour depth in the field setting.

  12. Abutment-to-fixture load transfer and peri-implant bone stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, R.F.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To uncover design principles for the abutment-fixture complex that reduce the stress concentration on the bone. Methods: A 3-dimensional finite element model was used to vary shape, elasticity, and connectivity of the abutment-fixture complex. We compared peri-implant bone stress of these

  13. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Aloisio Fleck NEUMANN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1, polyetheretherketone (PEEK screws (Group 2, and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3. The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05. Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  14. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  15. Fracture Strength and Failure Mode of Maxillary Implant-Supported Provisional Single Crowns : A Comparison of Composite Resin Crowns Fabricated Directly Over PEEK Abutments and Solid Titanium Abutments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, H.J.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Ozcan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. Purpose: The objectives of this

  16. Comparison Study of Percutaneous Osseointegrated Bone Conduction Device Complications When Using the 9 mm Abutment Versus 6 mm Abutment at Initial Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sean R; LaRouere, Jacqueline S; Bojrab, Dennis I; LaRouere, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    To assess differences in the incidence, type, and management of complications encountered with implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices when using a 9 mm abutment versus 6 mm abutment at initial implantation. Retrospective cohort study. One hundred thirty consecutive patients between January 2010 and December 2011 underwent single-stage percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction device implantation using a 9 or 6 mm abutment. Clinical outcomes assessed for the two groups included the incidence, type, and management of postoperative complications. Abutment size, age, sex, indication for surgery, implant device type, duration of follow-up, and patient comorbidities were evaluated as potential factors affecting outcomes. Average duration of follow-up was 16 months (range 6-29 mo). Postoperative complications occurred in 38 (29.2%) patients. Twenty-four (18.4%) patients experienced minor complications requiring simple, local care; eight (6.1%) patients required in-office procedural intervention; and six (4.6%) patients required revision surgery in the operating room. Implant extrusion occurred in three (2.3%) patients. Eleven (8.5%) patients required placement of a longer abutment. Patients receiving the 6 mm abutment at initial surgery were significantly more likely to encounter a complication requiring in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery (p = 0.001). Minor complications after implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices are common. The vast majority of these complications are due to localized skin reactions, most of which are readily addressed through local care. Patients receiving the 9 mm abutment during initial implantation are significantly less likely to require in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery postoperatively as compared with those receiving the shorter, 6 mm abutment.

  17. [A computer aided design approach of all-ceramics abutment for maxilla central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-chun; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Wang, Yong; Han, Jing-yun; Lin, Ye; Lü, Pei-jun

    2010-10-01

    To establish the computer aided design (CAD) software platform of individualized abutment for the maxilla central incisor. Three-dimentional data of the incisor was collected by scanning and geometric transformation. Data mainly included the occlusal part of the healing abutment, the location carinae of the bedpiece, the occlusal 1/3 part of the artificial gingiva's inner surface, and so on. The all-ceramic crown designed in advanced was "virtual cutback" to get the original data of the abutment's supragingival part. The abutment's in-gum part was designed to simulate the individual natural tooth root. The functions such as "data offset", "bi-rail sweep surface" and "loft surface" were used in the process of CAD. The CAD route of the individualized all-ceramic abutment was set up. The functions and application methods were decided and the complete CAD process was realized. The software platform was basically set up according to the requests of the dental clinic.

  18. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkut, Ahmad; Abu-Hammad, Osama; Frazer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations. PMID:29563457

  19. Evaluation of Maryland abutment scour equation through selected threshold velocity methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Maryland State Highway Administration, used field measurements of scour to evaluate the sensitivity of the Maryland abutment scour equation to the critical (or threshold) velocity variable. Four selected methods for estimating threshold velocity were applied to the Maryland abutment scour equation, and the predicted scour to the field measurements were compared. Results indicated that performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation was sensitive to the threshold velocity with some threshold velocity methods producing better estimates of predicted scour than did others. In addition, results indicated that regional stream characteristics can affect the performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation with moderate-gradient streams performing differently from low-gradient streams. On the basis of the findings of the investigation, guidance for selecting threshold velocity methods for application to the Maryland abutment scour equation are provided, and limitations are noted.

  20. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Kutkut

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations.

  1. Experimental conical-head abutment screws on the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface: an in vitro analysis using target-specific DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Murillo S; do Nascimento, Cássio; Dos Santos, Carla G P; Pires, Isabela M; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to identify and quantify up to 38 microbial species from human saliva penetrating through the implant-abutment interface in two different implant connections, external hexagon and tri-channel internal connection, both with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head abutment screws. Forty-eight two-part implants with external hexagon (EH; n = 24) or tri-channel internal (TI; n = 24) connections were investigated. Abutments were attached to implants with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head screws. After saliva incubation, Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was used to identify and quantify up to 38 bacterial colonizing the internal parts of the implants. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni's post-tests for multiple comparisons was used for statistical analysis. Twenty-four of thirty-eight species, including putative periodontal pathogens, were found colonizing the inner surfaces of both EH and TI implants. Peptostreptococcus anaerobios (P = 0.003), Prevotella melaninogenica (P abutment screws have impacted the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface. Implants attached with experimental conical-head abutment screws showed lower counts of microorganisms when compared with conventional flat-head screws. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Abutment Material Effect on Peri-implant Soft Tissue Color and Perceived Esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Campbell, Stephen D; Viana, Marlos A G; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant abutment material on peri-implant soft tissue color using intraoral spectrophotometric analysis and to compare the clinical outcomes with patient and clinician perception and satisfaction. Thirty patients and four prosthodontic faculty members participated. Abutments were zirconia, gold-hued titanium, and titanium. Peri-implant mucosa color of a single anterior implant restoration was compared to the patient's control tooth. Spectrophotometric analysis using SpectroShade TM Micro data determined the color difference (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*) between the midfacial peri-implant soft tissue for each abutment material and the marginal gingiva of the control tooth. Color difference values of the abutment groups were compared using ANOVA (α = 0.05). Patient and clinician satisfaction surveys were also conducted using a color-correcting light source. The results of each patient and clinician survey question were compared using chi-square analysis (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation analyses identified the relationship between the total color difference (ΔE) and the patient/clinician perception and satisfaction, as well as between ΔE and tissue thickness. Zirconia abutments displayed significantly smaller spectrophotometric gingival color difference (ΔE) compared to titanium and gold-hued titanium abutments (respectively, 3.98 ± 0.99; 7.22 ± 3.31; 5.65 ± 2.11; p abutment materials, and no correlation between ΔE and the patient and clinician satisfaction. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher than clinician, and patient-perceived differences were lower than clinicians' (p abutments demonstrated significantly lower mean color difference compared to titanium or gold-hued titanium abutments as measured spectrophotometrically; however, no statistical difference in patient or clinician perception/satisfaction among abutment materials was demonstrated. Patients were significantly more satisfied than

  3. Histological evaluations and inflammatory responses of different dental implant abutment materials: A human histology pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampatanukul, Teeratida; Serichetaphongse, Pravej; Pimkhaokham, Atiphan

    2018-04-01

    Improvements of soft tissue to the abutment surface results in more stable peri-implant conditions, however, few human histological studies have compared soft tissue responses around different abutment materials. To describe the peri-implant tissue around 3 abutment materials; titanium, zirconia, and gold alloy, over an 8-week healing period. Fifteen edentulous sites were treated with implants. Eight weeks later, peri-implant tissue was harvested and processed using a nonseparation resin embedded technique. The tissue attachment characteristics were assessed at clinical stages using the gingival index (GI) score, surgical stage (surgical score), and histological stage (histological attachment percentage). Additionally, the inflammatory responses were evaluated using inflammatory extent and inflammatory cellularity grades. Nonparametrical statistics were used to describe the GI and surgical scores, and analytical statistics were used to analyze the histological attachment percentages as well as the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades amongst the 3 groups. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups for GI score (P = .071) and surgical score (P = .262). Titanium and zirconia exhibited nearly similar mean histological attachment percentages while gold alloy had a significantly lower percentage (P = .004). For the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades, the odds of being one grade higher for gold alloy abutment was 5.18 and 17.8 times that of titanium abutment, respectively. However, for the zirconia abutment, the odds were 0.87 and 7.5 times higher than the titanium group. The tissue around the gold alloy abutments resulted in worse attachment conditions compared with the titanium and zirconia abutments. Inflammation tended to be higher in the tissue around the gold alloy abutments than the titanium and zirconia abutments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Uncertainty Instability Risk Analysis of High Concrete Arch Dam Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties associated with concrete arch dams rise with the increased height of dams. Given the uncertainties associated with influencing factors, the stability of high arch dam abutments as a fuzzy random event was studied. In addition, given the randomness and fuzziness of calculation parameters as well as the failure criterion, hazard point and hazard surface uncertainty instability risk ratio models were proposed for high arch dam abutments on the basis of credibility theory. The uncertainty instability failure criterion was derived through the analysis of the progressive instability failure process on the basis of Shannon’s entropy theory. The uncertainties associated with influencing factors were quantized by probability or possibility distribution assignments. Gaussian random theory was used to generate random realizations for influence factors with spatial variability. The uncertainty stability analysis method was proposed by combining the finite element analysis and the limit equilibrium method. The instability risk ratio was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method and fuzzy random postprocessing. Results corroborate that the modeling approach is sound and that the calculation method is feasible.

  5. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of the Stress Distribution at the Internal Implant-Abutment Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated stress distribution in four different implant-abutment interface conditions in the internal tapered connection implant system. Four different implant diameters (3.5 mm, 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, and 5.0 mm) and two abutment types (hexagonal and conical) were simulated. Four unique implant-abutment interface conditions were assumed based on wall thickness, mating surface length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape. Axial and oblique loading was applied during abutment screw preload, and the Von Mises stresses were measured at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces. The implant-abutment interface stress decreased as the wall thickness increased. As the mating surface increased, the stress distribution trended downward, and when the distance to the implant vertical stop was 0 μm, the Von Mises stress was extremely high at the vertical stop. Despite their different shapes, the abutments showed similar stress distributions. However, the maximum Von Mises stress was higher in the conical connection than in the hexagonal connection, particularly at the contralateral side to loading. To decrease the stress distribution at the implant-abutment interface, the implant wall thickness, mating surface contact length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape should be carefully considered.

  6. A prospective, split-mouth study comparing tilted implants with angulated connection versus conventional implants with angulated abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weehaeghe, Manú; De Bruyn, Hugo; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    An angulation of the implant connection could overcome the problems related to angulated abutments. This study compares conventional implants with angulated abutment to tilted implants with an angulated connection. Twenty patients were treated in the edentulous mandible. In the posterior jaw locations, one conventional tilted implant with angulated abutment and one angulated implant without abutment were placed. In the anterior jaw, two conventional implants were placed, one with and one without abutment. Implants were immediately loaded and 3 months later, the final bridge (PFM or monolithic zirconia) was placed. After a follow-up of 48 months, 17 patients were available for clinical examination. The mean overall marginal bone loss (MBL) was 1.26 mm. No significant differences in implant survival, MBL, periodontal indices, patients' satisfaction, or complications was found between implants restored on abutment or implant level, between the posteriorly located angulated implant nor angulated abutment, and between both anterior implants with or without abutment. The posterior implants demonstrated less MBL compared to the anterior implants (P abutment were replaced and four loose bridge screws connected to the angulated abutments had to be tightened. Patients were overall satisfied (4.74/5). An implant with angulated connection may results in a stronger connection but does not affect the marginal bone loss. No difference in MBL was seen between implants restored on abutment or implant level. Zirconia seems to reduce the amount of plaque. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Can the Hydroxyapatite-Coated Skin-Penetrating Abutment for Bone Conduction Hearing Implants Integrate with the Surrounding Skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Marc; Wigren, Stina; Duimel, Hans; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Flynn, Mark; Stokroos, Robert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous implants, such as bone conduction hearing implants, suffer from complications that include inflammation of the surrounding skin. A sealed skin-abutment interface can prevent the ingress of bacteria, which should reduce the occurrence of peri-abutment dermatitis. It was hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated abutment in conjunction with soft tissue preservation surgery should enable integration with the adjacent skin. Previous research has confirmed that integration is never achieved with as-machined titanium abutments. Here, we investigate, in vivo, if skin integration is achievable in patients using a HA-coated abutment. One titanium abutment (control) and one HA-coated abutment (case) together with the surrounding skin were surgically retrieved from two patients who had a medical indication for this procedure. Histological sections of the skin were investigated using light microscopy. The abutment was qualitatively analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The titanium abutment only had a partial and thin layer of attached amorphous biological material. The HA-coated abutment was almost fully covered by a pronounced thick layer of organized skin, composed of different interconnected structural layers. Proof-of-principle evidence that the HA-coated abutment can achieve integration with the surrounding skin was presented for the first time.

  8. Method of Retention Control for Compromised Periodontal Bone Support Abutment of Conical Crown Retained Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Hsiang Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Conical crown-retained dentures (CCRD show a higher survival rate and greater patient satisfaction than transitional removable partial dentures during long-term follow-up. However, unsustainable denture retention force on supporting abutments after initial delivery and loss retention are frequently seen in long-term follow-up of clinical cases. The main causes are insufficient information concerning denture retention designs and the retention-tolerance of the supporting abutments. Monitoring by dental technicians of the quality of dental prostheses is critical. This case report describes an optimal method for CCRD construction that determines and distributes an optimal denture retention force on the supporting abutments to allow the patient to easily remove the denture while ensuring that the CCRD remains in place during physiologic activities. Oral rehabilitation with CCRD should consider the condition of the abutment periodontal support, the interarch occlusal relationship, supplemental fatigue of the terminal abutment, and patient's estimated bite force. The effects of friction on the abutment's inner crown were based on an optimal a angle. The dental laboratory used these measurements to fabricate a CCRD using a Koni-Meter to adjust the retention of the inner crown. This method protects the abutments and reduces the wear between the inner and outer crowns. The CCRD achieved good esthetic results and physiologic functions. Periodic long-term follow-up of the patient and CCRD after initial placement is recommended.

  9. Connective Tissue Characteristics around Healing Abutments of Different Geometries: New Methodological Technique under Circularly Polarized Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Abboud, Marcus; Ramirez-Fernandez, Maria Piedad; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Negri, Bruno; Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo; Markovic, Aleksa

    2015-08-01

    To describe contact, thickness, density, and orientation of connective tissue fibers around healing abutments of different geometries by means of a new method using coordinates. Following the bilateral extraction of mandibular premolars (P2, P3, and P4) from six fox hound dogs and a 2-month healing period, 36 titanium implants were inserted, onto which two groups of healing abutments of different geometry were screwed: Group A (concave abutments) and Group B (wider healing abutment). After 3 months the animals were sacrificed and samples extracted containing each implant and surrounding soft and hard tissues. Histological analysis was performed without decalcifying the samples by means of circularly polarized light under optical microscope and a system of vertical and horizontal coordinates across all the connective tissue in an area delimited by the implant/abutment, epithelium, and bone tissue. In no case had the connective tissue formed a connection to the healing abutment/implant in the internal zone; a space of 35 ± 10 μm separated the connective tissue fibers from the healing abutment surface. The total thickness of connective tissue in the horizontal direction was significantly greater in the medial zone in Group B than in Group A (p connective tissue thickness. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of abutted fields using asymmetric collimators for treatment of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Krishna, Komanduri V.; Enke, Charles A.; Hussey, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to reevaluate the dose nonuniformity of abutted fields defined using asymmetric collimators and one isocenter for treatment of the head and neck region. Methods and Materials: Bilateral parallel-opposed fields abutted to the anterior field at one isocenter were implemented in the treatment of head and neck. The effect of digital display tolerance can produce dose nonuniformity at the junction of the abutted fields. The amount of dose nonuniformity was quantified using both mathematical summation of dose profiles and by direct measurement of doses at the junction of the two abutted fields. The dose nonuniformity was obtained by irradiating the superior part of a film using bilateral parallel-opposed fields and the inferior part by an anterior field with a gap or an overlap. Dose profiles were taken at the depth of maximum dose for the anterior field across the abutted fields. The dose nonuniformity was determined for the case where the asymmetric jaw was set at -2 mm, -1 mm, 0, +1 mm, and +2 mm from the beam central axis. Results: The dose at the junction increases systematically as the abutment of the fields changes from a gap to an overlap. The dose nonuniformity with 1-mm gap and 1-mm overlap is about 15% underdose and overdose, respectively. Conclusion: Imperfect abutment of split fields due to digital display tolerance (no. +-no. 1 mm) of asymmetric collimator can cause an underdose or overdose of 15% of the delivered dose

  11. Effects of Screw Configuration on the Preload Force of Implant-Abutment Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Holger; Rathe, Florian; Pinz, Sören; Schlotmann, Luca; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Ratka, Christoph

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tightening torque, screw head angle, and thread number on the preload force of abutment screws. The test specimens consisted of three self-manufactured components (ie, a thread sleeve serving as an implant analog, an abutment analog, and an abutment screw). The abutment screws were fabricated with metric M1.6 external threads. The thread number varied between one and seven threads. The screw head angles were produced in eight varying angles (30 to 180 degrees). A sensor unit simultaneously measured the preload force of the screw and the torsion moment inside the screw shank. The tightening of the screw with the torque wrench was performed in five steps (15 to 35 Ncm). The torque wrench was calibrated before each step. Only the tightening torque and screw head angle affected the resulting preload force of the implant-abutment connection. The thread number had no effect. There was an approximately linear correlation between tightening torque and preload force. The tightening torque and screw head angle were the only study parameters that affected the resulting preload force of the abutment screw. The results obtained from this experiment are valid only for a single torque condition. Further investigations are needed that analyze other parameters that affect preload force. Once these parameters are known, it will add value for a strong, but detachable connection between the implant and abutment. Short implants and flat-to-flat connections especially will benefit significantly from this knowledge.

  12. Analysis of the Generating and Influencing Factors of Vertical Cracking in Abutments during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the causes of cracking in abutments subject to concrete shrinkage and temperature variation during the construction process and to determine factors affecting the mechanical properties of the abutment, nonlinear calculations capturing abutment behavior are conducted with Midas/FEA software. Using these calculations, the cracking mechanism is identified, and the influence of the evaluated factors is analyzed. It is concluded that the deformation between the pile cap and abutment backwall as constrained by a pile foundation when subjected to concrete shrinkage and temperature changes is the basic cause of abutment cracks during construction; these cracks form over the piles and develop upward. For a given reinforcement ratio, the distribution of horizontal crack-control steel using small, closely spaced bars is more beneficial. When pile-bearing capacity meets the standard, the width of the generated cracks tends to decrease with the decrease in the diameter of the piles. The existence of a postcast strip in the abutment backwall also contributes to the decrease in the depth of the crack. Finally, the impact of age difference between the pile cap concrete and abutment backwall concrete on cracking is inconsequential.

  13. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-10-01

    The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this paper describes a practical method for chair-side fabrication of non-occlusal loaded provisional crowns used by the authors for several years successfully. Twenty two patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age, 36,72 years) with one missing anterior tooth were treated by using the presented method. Metal definitive abutments instead of provisional abutments were used and provisional crowns were fabricated on the definitive abutments for all of the patients. The marginal fit was finished on a laboratory analogue and temporarily cemented to the abutments. The marginal adaptation of the crowns was evaluated radiographically. The patients were all satisfied with the final appearance and no complications occurred until the implants were loaded with permanent restorations. The use of the definitive abutments for provisional crowns instead of provisional abutments reduces the costs and the same results can be obtained.

  14. Effect of intentional abutment disconnection on the micro-movements of the implant-abutment assembly: a 3D digital image correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Ana; Rocha, Salomão; Calha, Nuno; Neto, Maria Augusta; Nicolau, Pedro; Guerra, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Implant-abutment assembly stability is critical for the success of implant-supported rehabilitation. The intentional removal of the prosthetic components may hamper the achievement of the essential stability due to preload reduction in the screw joint and implant-screw mating surface changes. To evaluate the effect of intentional abutment disconnection and reconnection in the stability of internal locking hex implants and corresponding abutments using the method of 3D digital image correlation. Ten conical shape and internal hexagon connection implants were embedded in acrylic resin and assembled to prosthetic abutments with 30 Ncm torque and assigned to two groups: group 1 - tested for static load-bearing capacity at 30° off-axis for two times and group 2 - underwent intentional disconnection and reconnection between tests. Micro-movements were captured with two high-speed photographic cameras and analyzed with video correlation system in three spacial axes U, V and W. Screw abutment and internal implant thread morphology was observed with a field-emission scanning electron microscopy. After the intentional disconnection of the abutment, group 2 showed generally higher maximum displacements for U and V directions. Under 50N load, mean difference was 24.7 μm (P = 0.008) for U direction and -7.7 μm (P = 0.008) for V direction. No significant differences were found for maximum and minimum displacements in the W direction. Mean displacement of the speckle surface presented was statistically different in the two groups (P = 0.016). SEM revealed non-homogenous screw surfaces with scoring on group 2 plus striations and debris in the implant threads. Micro-movements were higher for the group submitted to intentional disconnection and reconnection of the abutment, particularly under average bite forces. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of Repeated Screw Tightening on Implant Abutment Interfaces in Terms of Bacterial and Yeast Leakage in Vitro: One-Time Abutment Versus the Multiscrewing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Roberta; Di Girolamo, Michele; Mirisola, Concetta; Baggi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Screw loosening can damage the interfaces of implant components, resulting in susceptibility to contamination of the internal parts by microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of abutment screw retightening on the leakage of two different types of bacteria, Streptococcus sanguinis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and of the yeast Candida albicans. Two types of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces were tested. Groups A and B each used a different type of system that consisted of 20 different pieces that were assembled according to the manufacturer's torque recommendations; four samples in each group were closed just one time, four samples three times, four samples five times, four samples seven times, and four samples nine times. The implants of groups A and B were contaminated with 0.1 μL of microbial solution just before being assembled for the last time to minimize the possibility of contamination. Results showed a direct correlation between the number of colony-forming units grown in the plates and the closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment systems. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate the possibility that repeated closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment unit may influence bacterial/yeast leakage, most likely as a consequence of decreased precision of the coupling between the abutment and the internal part of the dental implant. These findings suggest that a one-time abutment technique may avoid microbiologic leakage in cases of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces.

  16. Evaluation of Bond Strength between Grooved Titanium Alloy Implant Abutments and Provisional Veneering Materials after Surface Treatment of the Abutments: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Gowtham; Krishnan, Murugesan; Srinivasan, Suganya; Balasubramanian, Muthukumar

    2017-01-01

    Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell-Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc test. The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this study confirmed that a combination of surface treatments and bond agents enhances the

  17. Displacement comparison of CAD-CAM titanium and zirconia abutments to implants with different conical connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Hashemzadeh, Shervin; Seidt, Jeremy D; Clelland, Nancy L

    2018-04-01

    To compare the displacements of CAD-CAM zirconia and titanium abutments into different internal connection systems after torquing. OsseoSpeed EV and OsseoSpeed TX implants (n=10) were placed in resin blocks. Zirconia and titanium abutments (n=5) were first hand tightened and then tightened to the recommended torque (20Ncm for TX and 25Ncm for EV). Displacements of abutments between screw tightening by hand and torque driver was measured using three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) technique. Displacements were measured in U (front/back), V (into/outward), W (right/left) directions and 3-dimensionally (3D). ANOVA with restricted maximum likelihood estimation method was used to analyze the data. Bonferroni-corrected t tests was used to determine the statistical differences (α=0.05). 3D displacement of zirconia and titanium abutments was significantly greater in OsseoSpeed EV implant (PDisplacement of zirconia and titanium abutments was not significantly different within implant systems, 3D (P≥0.386) and in each direction (P≥0.382). In U and V directions, zirconia and titanium abutments displaced significantly more towards negative in OsseoSpeed EV implant (Pdisplaced significantly more in V direction compared to the U and W (P≤0.005), and within the Osseospeed EV system, abutment displacements were significantly different amongst directions and displacements in V were the greatest (Pdisplaced more in the implant that required higher torque values to tighten the abutment. The amount of displacement in both systems was clinically small. Abutment material did not affect the magnitude of displacement. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic crown systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Armağanci, Arzu; Ceylan, Gözlem; Celik, Ersan; Cankaya, Soner; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-11-01

    Ceramics are widely used for anterior restorations; however, clinical color reproduction still constitutes a challenge particularly when the ceramic crowns are used on titanium implant abutments. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic material systems. Forty disks (11×1.5 mm, shade A2) were fabricated from medium-opacity (mo) and high-translucency (ht) lithium disilicate (IPS e.max) blocks, an aluminous ceramic (VITA In-Ceram Alumina), and a zirconia (Zirkonzahn) ceramic system. Disks were fabricated to represent 3 different implant abutments (zirconia, gold-palladium, and titanium) and dentin (composite resin, A2 shade) as background (11×2 mm). Disk-shaped composite resin specimens in A2 shade were fabricated to represent the cement layer. The color measurements of ceramic specimens were made on composite resin abutment materials using a spectrophotometer. CIELab color coordinates were recorded, and the color coordinates measured on composite resin background served as the control group. Color differences (ΔE 00 ) between the control and test groups were calculated. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and compared with the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The ceramics system, abutment material, and their interaction were significant for ΔE 00 values (P2.25) were observed for lithium disilicate ceramics on titanium abutments (2.46-2.50). The ΔE 00 values of lithium disilicate ceramics for gold-palladium and titanium abutments were significantly higher than for other groups (P2.25) of an implant-supported lithium disilicate ceramic restoration may be clinically unacceptable if it is fabricated over a titanium abutment. Zirconia may be a more suitable abutment material for implant-supported ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Torque Removal Evaluation of Screw in One-Piece and Two-Piece Abutments Tightened with a Handheld screwdriver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some clinicians use a handheld screw driver instead of a torque wrench to definitively tighten abutment screws. The aim of this study was to compare the removal torque of one-piece and two-piece abutments tightened with a handheld driver and a torque control ratchet. Methods: 40 ITI implants were placed in acrylic blocks and divided into 4 groups. In groups one and two, 10 ITI one-piece abutments (Solid® and in groups three and four, 10 ITI two-piece abutments (Synocta® were placed on the implants. In groups one and three abutments were tightened by 5 experienced males and 5 experienced females using a handheld driver. In groups two and four abutments were tightened using a torque wrench with torque values of 10, 20 and 35 N.cm. Insertion torque and removal torque values of the abutments were measured with a digital torque meter. Results: The insertion torque values (ITVs of males in both abutments were significantly higher than those of females. ITVs in both Solid® and Synocta® abutments tightened with a handheld screwdriver were similar to the torque of 20 N.cm in the torque wrench. Removal torque values (RTVs of solid® abutments were higher than those of synocta® abutments. Conclusion: The one- piece abutments (solid® showed higher RTVs than the two-piece abutments (synocta®. Hand driver does not produce sufficient preload force for the final tightening of the abutment

  20. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Preload, Coefficient of Friction, and Thread Friction in an Implant-Abutment-Screw Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentaschek, Stefan; Tomalla, Sven; Schmidtmann, Irene; Lehmann, Karl Martin

    To examine the screw preload, coefficient of friction (COF), and tightening torque needed to overcome the thread friction of an implant-abutment-screw complex. In a customized load frame, 25 new implant-abutment-screw complexes including uncoated titanium alloy screws were torqued and untorqued 10 times each, applying 25 Ncm. Mean preload values decreased significantly from 209.8 N to 129.5 N according to the number of repetitions. The overall COF increased correspondingly. There was no comparable trend for the thread friction component. These results suggest that the application of a used implant-abutment-screw complex may be unfavorable for obtaining optimal screw preload.

  2. A Simple Method for Making Diagnostic Casts for Dental Implants Using Acrylic Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Siadat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of multiple implants in the same jaw requires a detailed knowledge of abutment angulation. The position and angulation of the abutments play an important role in treatment planning and fabrication of the custom tray. Therefore diagnostic casts thatcontain cover screws may cause problems during implant therapy.The current article describes a technique for making a preliminary cast with acrylic custom abutments in order to help the clinician select an appropriate impression technique and evaluate the location and angulations of the implant bodies. This method can also aid the technician to provide adequate and proper space for the fabrication of an open custom tray.

  3. Assessment of the NCHRP abutment scour prediction equations with laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in coopeation with nthe National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) is assessing the performance of several abutment-scour predcition equations developed in NCHRP Project 24-15(2) and NCHRP Project 24-20. To accomplish this assssment, 516 laboratory and 329 fiels measurements of abutment scor were complied from selected sources and applied tto the new equations. Results will be used to identify stregths, weaknesses, and limitations of the NCHRP abutment scour equations, providing practical insights for applying the equations. This paper presents some prelimiray findings from the investigation.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of Individual All-Ceramic Abutments Used in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziębowicz B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of finite element analysis and experimental testing under simulated physiological loading conditions on issues shaping the functional properties of individual all-ceramic abutments manufactured by CAD/CAM technology. The conducted research have cognitive significance showing the all-ceramic abutment behavior, as a key element of the implantological system, under the action of cyclic load. The aim of this study was evaluation the fatigue behavior of yttria-stabilized zirconia abutment submitted to cyclic stresses, conducted in accordance with EN ISO 14801 applies to dynamic fatigue tests of endosseous dental implants.

  5. Tightening techniques for the retaining screws of universal abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wittcinski REGALIN

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study evaluated the torque maintenance of universal abutment retaining screws using different tightening techniques, and coated or uncoated screws. Material and method The screws were tightened to implants as following: Control – 32 Ncm torque; H20 – holding 32 Ncm torque for 20 s; R – 32 Ncm torque, repeated after 10 min (retorque; and H20+R – combining the two tightening techniques. Titanium and coated screws were also evaluated. Result Statistical analysis showed higher maintained torque for titanium screws (p<0.001. The H20+R technique showed the highest maintained torque (p=0.003, but the H20 technique’s maintained torque was similar. Conclusion Titanium screws associating the two tightening techniques can improve maintained torque.

  6. In vitro analysis of post-fatigue reverse-torque values at the dental abutment/implant interface for a unitarian abutment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Paul M; Schneider, Robert L; Schneider, Galen B; Stanford, Clark M; Clancy, James M; Qian, Fang

    2011-10-01

    This study analyzed baseline and post-fatigue reverse-torque values (RTVs) for a specific brand control abutment relative to a third party compatible abutment. The purpose of this study was to compare the abutments' fatigue resistance to simulated function, using RTVs as an indication of residual preload at the implant/abutment interface. Forty Straumann tissue-level implants were mounted in resin and divided into four groups (n = 10). Forty abutments were seated, 20 control and 20 third-party abutments, according to manufacturer guidelines. Ten abutments from each manufacturer were evaluated for RTV without fatigue loading, using a calibrated digital torque gauge to provide a baseline RTVs. Fatigue loading was carried out on the remaining ten specimens from each manufacturer according to ISO 14801 guidelines. A moving-magnet linear motor was used to load one specimen per sequence, alternating from 10 to 200 N at 15 Hz for 5×10(6) cycles. RTV was recorded post-fatigue loading. The results were subjected to two-sample t-testing and two-way ANOVA. Scanning electron microphotography was carried out on three specimens from both manufacturers at baseline and post-fatigue cycling to visualize thread geometry and the abutment/implant interface. The data indicated that mean post-fatigue RTV observed for the control group was significantly higher than the third-party group (RTV 42.65 ± 6.70 N vs. 36.25 ± 2.63 N, p= 0.0161). Visual differences at the macro/microscopic level were also apparent for thread geometry, with third-party abutments demonstrating considerably greater variation in geometrical architecture than control specimens. Within the limitations of this in vitro model, the effect of component manufacturer resulted in a significantly higher RTV in the control group (two-way ANOVA, p= 0.0032) indicating greater residual preload; however, there was no significant decrease in post-fatigue RTV for either manufacturer compared to baseline. © 2011 by The American

  7. Thermal behavior of IDOT integral abutment bridges and proposed design modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) has increasingly constructed integral abutment bridges (IABs) : over the past few decades, similar to those in many other states. Because the length and skew limitations : currently employed by IDOT ha...

  8. Effect of the vitality of the overdenture abutment tooth on stability of the tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ahmad Omar Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It was concluded that the overdenture over vital abutment teeth was more stable, with a lower incidence of tooth mobility and less attachment loss than overdentures placed on nonvital teeth.

  9. Nonlinear load-deflection behavior of abutment backwalls with varying height and soil density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    We address the scaling of abutment wall lateral response with wall height and compaction condition through testing and analytical work. The : analytical work was undertaken to develop hyperbolic curves representing the load-deflection response of bac...

  10. Integral abutment bridge for Louisiana's soft and stiff soils : Tech summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this project, fi eld-instrumentation, monitoring, and analyzing the design and : construction of full integral abutment bridges for Louisianas fi ne sand and silty sand : deposit and clay soil conditions were conducted. Comparison of results wa...

  11. Marginal Vertical Fit along the Implant-Abutment Interface: A Microscope Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mobilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the marginal vertical fit along two different implant-abutment interfaces: (1 a standard abutment on an implant and (2 a computer-aided-design/computer-aided-machine (CAD/CAM customized screw-retained crown on an implant. Four groups were compared: three customized screw-retained crowns with three different “tolerance” values (CAD-CAM 0, CAD-CAM +1, CAD-CAM −1 and a standard titanium abutment. Qualitative analysis was carried out using an optical microscope. Results showed a vertical gap significantly different from both CAD-CAM 0 and CAD-CAM −1, while no difference was found between standard abutment and CAD-CAM +1. The set tolerance in producing CAD/CAM screw-retained crowns plays a key role in the final fit.

  12. Proposal for monitoring concrete painting as a preventive maintenance tool (Abutments and pier caps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    One of the growing number of preventive bridge maintenance activities conducted by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) is washing and applying thin film protective coatings to bridge abutments and piers. Previous work conducted by Kentucky Tra...

  13. Integral abutment bridges under thermal loading : numerical simulations and parametric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have become of interest due to their decreased construction and maintenance costs in : comparison to conventional jointed bridges. Most prior IAB research was related to substructure behavior, and, as a result, most :...

  14. Soil Structure Interaction for Integral Abutment Bridge Using Spring Analogy Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanoon, W A; Abdulrazeg, A A; Jaafar, M S; Kohnehpooshi, O; Noorzaei, J

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of the backfill behind the abutments and adjacent to the piles plays a significant role in the behavior of the Integral bridge. The handling of soil-structure interaction in the analysis and design of integral abutment bridges has always been problematic due to its complexity. This study describes the implementation of a 2-D finite element model of IAB system which explicitly incorporates the soil response. The superstructure members and the pile have been represented by means of three-node isoperimetric beam elements with three degree of freedom per node. The Eight node isoperimetric quadrilateral element has been used to model the abutment. The backfill was idealized by uncoupled 'Winkler' spring. The applic1ability of this model is demonstrated by analyzing a single span IA bridge. The results have shown that the shear forces at the tops of the supported piles were only 12% to 16% of the load which at the top of abutment.

  15. Soil Structure Interaction for Integral Abutment Bridge Using Spring Analogy Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanoon, W A [Faculty Engineering, Nizwa University (Oman); Abdulrazeg, A A; Jaafar, M S; Kohnehpooshi, O [Department of Civil Engineering, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Noorzaei, J, E-mail: jamal@eng.upm.edu.my [Institute of Advance Technology, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The reaction of the backfill behind the abutments and adjacent to the piles plays a significant role in the behavior of the Integral bridge. The handling of soil-structure interaction in the analysis and design of integral abutment bridges has always been problematic due to its complexity. This study describes the implementation of a 2-D finite element model of IAB system which explicitly incorporates the soil response. The superstructure members and the pile have been represented by means of three-node isoperimetric beam elements with three degree of freedom per node. The Eight node isoperimetric quadrilateral element has been used to model the abutment. The backfill was idealized by uncoupled 'Winkler' spring. The applic1ability of this model is demonstrated by analyzing a single span IA bridge. The results have shown that the shear forces at the tops of the supported piles were only 12% to 16% of the load which at the top of abutment.

  16. [A study on the mechanical behaviors of abutment teeth with various coping designs under overdenture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, M S; Cho, J H

    1990-04-01

    An overdenture is a complete denture supported by both soft tissue and a few remaining natural teeth. The purpose of this study was to analyze the stress distribution of the teeth and supporting structures when various type of coping under overdenture was applied. The analysis was conducted by using the finite element method and changing the condition such as the direction of the load, the shape of coping on the abutment: The model included overdenture copings, abutment tooth and supporting structures. The results of analysis were as follows: 1. The short dome coping showed well distribution of stress. 2. The dome shaped design produced higher stress distribution than square and inclined plane design. 3. As the height of copings on the abutment was increased, the displacements increased. 4. The magnitude and direction of the abutment displacements were influenced by the direction of load application.

  17. Live-bed scour experiments with 45° wing-wall abutments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Live-bed scour experiments with 45° wing-wall abutments ... Department of Civil Engineering, Silchar Polytechnic, Silchar 788 010, India; Department of Civil ... Manuscript received: 19 December 2012; Manuscript revised: 13 November 2013 ...

  18. Thermal response of integral abutment bridges with mechanically stabilized earth walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The advantages of integral abutment bridges (IABs) include reduced maintenance costs and increased useful life spans. : However, improved procedures are necessary to account for the impacts of cyclic thermal displacements on IAB components, : includi...

  19. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.; Silva, Wander José da; Faot, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the dental implant system. • The highest stress was located at first thread of the abutment's screw. • The preload is the main factor in the abutment's screw stress. • Abutment configuration and material can have a positive contribution for the stress distribution

  20. Evaluation of concordance between CAD/CAM and clinical positions of abutment shoulder against mucosal margin: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruski, Jan K; Skurska, Anna; Bernaczyk, Anna; Milewski, Robert; Pietruska, Maria Julia; Gehrke, Peter; Pietruska, Małgorzata D

    2018-05-02

    While working on CAD/CAM-customized abutments, the use of standard impression copings with a circular diameter produces inconsistency within the emergence profile. It may begin with a collapse of the supra-implant mucosa during impression taking, then lead to a computer-generated mismatch of the position and outline of the abutment shoulder, and consequently result in a compromised outcome of anticipated treatment. The aim of the study was to compare the virtual and clinical positions of the abutment shoulder in relation to the mucosal margin after the abutment delivery. Conventional open-tray impression takings followed uncovering surgery. Master casts were scanned with a desktop scanner. Clinical examinations took place after abutment's insertion and temporization (T1) and prior to cementation of the definitive crown (T2). The distances between the abutment shoulder and marginal soft tissue were measured intraorally in four aspects and juxtaposed with those on the virtual model. The study evaluated 257 dental implants and CAD/CAM-customized abutments. As T1 and T2 showed, there was a positive correlation between the virtually designed abutment shoulder position and matching clinical location relative to the mucosal margin. In 42.1% of cases, the distance between the mucosal margin and the abutment shoulder did not change. It increased in 36.3% of cases while a decrease occurred in 21.6% of them. Computer-set position of the abutment shoulder in relation to the mucosal margin can be predictably implemented in clinical practice.

  1. Implant-Abutment Contact Surfaces and Microgap Measurements of Different Implant Connections Under 3-Dimensional X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Degidi, Marco; Pecci, Raffaella; Piattelli, Adriano; de Oliveira, P S; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2016-10-01

    The presence of a microgap between implant and abutment could produce a bacterial reservoir which could interfere with the long-term health of the periimplant tissues. The aim of this article was to evaluate, by x-ray 3-dimensional microtomography, implant-abutment contact surfaces and microgaps at the implant-abutment interface in different types of implant-abutment connections. A total of 40 implants were used in this in vitro study. Ten implants presented a screw-retained internal hexagon abutment (group I), 10 had a Morse Cone taper internal connection (group II), 10 another type of Morse Cone taper internal connection (group III), and 10 had a screwed trilobed connection (group IV). In both types of Morse Cone internal connections, there was no detectable separation at the implant-abutment in the area of the conical connection, and there was an absolute congruity without any microgaps between abutment and implant. No line was visible separating the implant and the abutment. On the contrary, in the screwed abutment implants, numerous gaps and voids were present. The results of this study support the hypothesis that different types of implant-abutment joints are responsible for the observed differences in bacterial penetration.

  2. Removal Torque and Biofilm Accumulation at Two Dental Implant-Abutment Joints After Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge; Morsch, Carolina S; Henriques, Bruno; Nascimento, Rubens M; Benfatti, Cesar Am; Silva, Filipe S; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio Cm

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque and in vitro biofilm penetration at Morse taper and hexagonal implant-abutment joints after fatigue tests. Sixty dental implants were divided into two groups: (1) Morse taper and (2) external hexagon implant-abutment systems. Fatigue tests on the implant-abutment assemblies were performed at a normal force (FN) of 50 N at 1.2 Hz for 500,000 cycles in growth medium containing human saliva for 72 hours. Removal torque mean values (n = 10) were measured after fatigue tests. Abutments were then immersed in 1% protease solution in order to detach the biofilms for optical density and colony-forming unit (CFU/cm²) analyses. Groups of implant-abutment assemblies (n = 8) were cross-sectioned at 90 degrees relative to the plane of the implant-abutment joints for the microgap measurement by field-emission guns scanning electron microscopy. Mean values of removal torque on abutments were significantly lower for both Morse taper (22.1 ± 0.5 μm) and external hexagon (21.1 ± 0.7 μm) abutments after fatigue tests than those recorded without fatigue tests (respectively, 24 ± 0.5 μm and 24.8 ± 0.6 μm) in biofilm medium for 72 hours (P = .04). Mean values of microgap size for the Morse taper joints were statistically signicantly lower without fatigue tests (1.7 ± 0.4 μm) than those recorded after fatigue tests (3.2 ± 0.8 μm). Also, mean values of microgap size for external hexagon joints free of fatigue were statistically signicantly lower (1.5 ± 0.4 μm) than those recorded after fatigue tests (8.1 ± 1.7 μm) (P abutments (Abs630nm at 0.06 and 2.9 × 10⁴ CFU/cm²) than that on external hexagon abutments (Abs630nm at 0.08 and 4.5 × 10⁴ CFU/cm²) (P = .01). The mean values of removal torque, microgap size, and biofilm density recorded at Morse taper joints were lower in comparison to those recorded at external hexagon implant-abutment joints after fatigue tests in a simulated oral environment for 72 hours.

  3. The influence of implant-abutment connection on the screw loosening and microleakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Katsuhiro; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Matsuzaki, Tatsuya; Kihara, Masafumi; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2018-04-09

    There are some spaces between abutment and implant body which can be a reservoir of toxic substance, and they can penetrate into subgingival space from microgap at the implant-abutment interface. This penetration may cause periimplantitis which is known to be one of the most important factors associated with late failure. In the present study, three kinds of abutment connection system, external parallel connection (EP), internal parallel connection (IP), and internal conical connection (CC), were studied from the viewpoint of microleakage from the gap between the implant and the abutment and in connection with the loosening of abutment screw. We observed dye leakage from abutment screw hole to outside through microgap under the excessive compressive and tensile load and evaluated the anti-leakage characteristics of these connection systems. During the experiment, one abutment screw for EP and two screws for IP, out of seven samples in each group, were fractured. After the 2000 cycles of compressive tensile loadings, removal torque value (RTV) of abutment screw represented no statistical differences among three groups. Standard deviation was largest in the RTV of EP and smallest in that of CC. The results of microleakage of toluidine blue from implant-abutment connection indicated that microleakage generally increased as loading procedure progressed. The amount of microleakage was almost plateau at 2000 cycles in CC, but still increasing in other two groups. The value of microleakage greatly scattered in EP, but the deviation of that in CC is significantly smaller. At 500 cycles of loading, there were no significant differences in the amount of microleakage among the groups, but at 1000, 1500, and 2000 cycles of loading, the amount of microleakage in CC was significantly smaller than that in IP. Throughout the experiment, the amount of microleakage in EP was largest, but no statistical difference was indicated due to the high standard deviation. Within the

  4. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

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    Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10 of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricated abutment; Group 4, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; and Group 5, external hexagon implant and Ceraone abutment. For groups 1, 2, 3 and 5, the crowns were cemented on the abutments and in group 4 crowns were screwed directly on the implant. The specimens were subjected to 500,000 cycles at 19.1 Hz of frequency and non-axial load of 133 N in a MTS 810 machine. The vertical misfit (μm at the implant/abutment interface was evaluated before (B and after (A application of the cyclic loading. Data were analyzed statistically by using two-away ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Before loading values showed no difference among groups 2 (4.33±3.13, 3 (4.79±3.43 and 5 (3.86±4.60; between groups 1 (12.88±6.43 and 4 (9.67±3.08, and among groups 2, 3 and 4. However, groups 1 and 4 were significantly different from groups 2, 3 and 5. After loading values of groups 1 (17.28±8.77 and 4 (17.78±10.99 were significantly different from those of groups 2 (4.83±4.50, 3 (8.07±4.31 and 5 (3.81±4.84. There was a significant increase in misfit values of groups 1, 3 and 4 after cyclic loading, but not for groups 2 and 5. CONCLUSIONS: The cyclic loading and type of implant/abutment connection may develop a role on the vertical misfit at the implant/abutment interface.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of different abutment-implant connections - A nonlinear finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Muhammad Ikman; Shafi, Aisyah Ahmad; Rosli, M. U.; Khor, C. Y.; Zakaria, M. S.; Rahim, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Abd; Jamalludin, Mohd Riduan

    2017-09-01

    The success of dental implant surgery is majorly dependent on the stability of prosthesis to anchor to implant body as well as the integration of implant body to bone. The attachment between dental implant body and abutment plays a vital role in attributing to the stability of dental implant system. A good connection between implant body cavity to abutment may minimize the complications of abutment loosening and implant fractures as widely reported in clinical findings. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of different abutment-implant connections on stress dispersion within the abutment and implant bodies as well as displacement of implant body via three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA). A 3-D model of mandible was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) image datasets using an image-processing software with the selected region of interest was the left side covering the second premolar, first molar and second molar regions. The bone was modelled as compact (cortical) and porous (cancellous) structures. Besides, three implant bodies and three generic models of abutment with different types of connections - tapered interference fit (TIF), tapered integrated screwed-in (TIS) and screw retention (SR) were created using computer-aided design (CAD) software and all models were then analysed via 3D FEA software. Occlusal forces of 114.6 N, 17.2 N and 23.4 N were applied in the axial, lingual and mesio-distal directions, respectively, on the top surface of first molar crown. All planes of the mandibular bone model were rigidly fixed. The result exhibited that abutment with TIS connection produced the most favourable stress and displacement outcomes as compared to other attachment types. This is due to the existence of integrated screw at the bottom portion of tapered abutment which increases the motion resistance.

  6. Performance of conical abutment (Morse Taper) connection implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christian M; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Lai, Jim Yuan; Brito, Carlos; Döring, Hendrik; Nonhoff, Jörg

    2014-02-01

    In this systematic review, we aimed to compare conical versus nonconical implant-abutment connection systems in terms of their in vitro and in vivo performances. An electronic search was performed using PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases with the logical operators: "dental implant" AND "dental abutment" AND ("conical" OR "taper" OR "cone"). Names of the most common conical implant-abutment connection systems were used as additional key words to detect further data. The search was limited to articles published up to November 2012. Recent publications were also searched manually in order to find any relevant studies that might have been missed using the search criteria noted above. Fifty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. As the data and methods, as well as types of implants used was so heterogeneous, this mitigated against the performance of meta-analysis. In vitro studies indicated that conical and nonconical abutments showed sufficient resistance to maximal bending forces and fatigue loading. However, conical abutments showed superiority in terms of seal performance, microgap formation, torque maintenance, and abutment stability. In vivo studies (human and animal) indicated that conical and nonconical systems are comparable in terms of implant success and survival rates with less marginal bone loss around conical connection implants in most cases. This review indicates that implant systems using a conical implant-abutment connection, provides better results in terms of abutment fit, stability, and seal performance. These design features could lead to improvements over time versus nonconical connection systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of Abutment Design on Clinical Status of Peri-Implant Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Taiyeb-Ali, T. B.; Toh, C. G.; Siar, C. H.; Seiz, D.; Ong, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical soft tissue responses around implant tooth-supported 3-unit bridges using tapered abutments with those using butt-joint abutments. Methods: In a split-mouth design study, 8 mm Ankylos (Dentsply Friadent, Germany) implants were placed in the second mandibular molar region of 8 adult Macaca fascicularis monkeys about I month after extraction of all mandibular molars. After 3 months of submerged healing, 3-unit metal bridges were constructed. Clinical data was ...

  8. Effects of artificial aging conditions on yttria-stabilized zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Cardoso, Kátia Vieira; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Rizkalla, Amin Sami; Santos Junior, Gildo Coelho; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2016-08-01

    Most ceramic abutments are fabricated from yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). However, Y-TZP undergoes hydrothermal degradation, a process that is not well understood. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of artificial aging conditions on the fracture load, phase stability, and surface microstructure of a Y-TZP abutment. Thirty-two prefabricated Y-TZP abutments were screwed and tightened down to external hexagon implants and divided into 4 groups (n = 8): C, control; MC, mechanical cycling (1×10(6) cycles; 10 Hz); AUT, autoclaving (134°C; 5 hours; 0.2 MPa); and TC, thermal cycling (10(4) cycles; 5°/55°C). A single-load-to-fracture test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min to assess the assembly's resistance to fracture (ISO Norm 14801). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was applied to observe and quantify the tetragonal-monoclinic (t-m) phase transformation. Representative abutments were examined with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the surface characteristics of the abutments. Load-to-fracture test results (N) were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test (α=.05). XRD measurements revealed the monoclinic phase in some abutments after each aging condition. All the aging conditions reduced the fracture load significantly (Paging conditions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cracking Behavior of a Concrete Arch Dam with Weak Upper Abutment

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    Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cracking behavior and failure mode of a 78 m high concrete double-curvature arch dam with weak upper abutment are investigated through performing cracking analysis. The mechanical behavior of concrete is simulated using a smeared crack model, in which a combination of the compression yield surface and the crack detection surface with a damaged elasticity concept is employed to describe the failure of concrete. The arch dam with practical mechanical properties of the upper and lower abutments is firstly studied with emphasis on its cracking behavior during overloading. Then, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the influence of the ratio of the mechanical properties of upper abutment to those of lower abutment on dam failure with prime attention placed on the failure mode. Simulation results indicate the adopted smeared crack model is well-suited to the crack analysis of concrete arch dam. It is shown that cracking is localized around the interface between upper and lower abutments, which leads to a fast crack growth in the through-thickness direction of dam and finally causes the dam failure. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis presents three types of failure modes corresponding to different ratio value, wherein Modes II and III should be avoided since the weak upper abutment plays a predominant role in the cracking and failure of concrete arch dam.

  10. A new system of implant abutment connection: how to improve a two piece implant system sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecchi, F; DI Girolamo, M; Cura, F; Candotto, V; Carinci, F

    2017-01-01

    Implant dentistry has become one of the most successful dentistry techniques for replacing missing teeth. The success rate of implant dentistry is above 80%. However, peri-implantitis is a later complication of implant dentistry that if untreated, can lead to implant loss. One of the hypotized causes of peri-implantis is the bacterial leakage at the level of implant-abutment connection. Bacterial leakage is favored to the presence of a micro gap at the implant-abutment interface, allowing microorganisms to penetrate and colonize the inner part of the implant leading to biofilm accumulation and consequently to peri-implantitis development. To identify the capability of the implant to protect the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified Escherichia coli across implant-abutment interface was evaluated. Implants were immerged in a bacterial culture for twenty-four hours and then bacteria amount was measured inside implant-abutment interface with Real-time PCR. Bacteria were detected inside all studied implants, with a median percentage of 9%. The reported results are better to those of previous studies carried out on different implant systems. Until now, none implant-abutment system has been proven to seal the gap between implant and abutment.

  11. Abutment height influences the effect of platform switching on peri-implant marginal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; León-Cano, Ana; Monje, Alberto; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; O'Valle, Francisco; Catena, Andrés

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to radiographically analyze and compare the marginal bone loss (MBL) between implants with different mismatching distance and to study the influence of the prosthetic abutment height on the MBL in association with the related mismatching distances. This retrospective study included 108 patients in whom 228 implants were placed, 180 with diameter of 4.5 mm and 48 with diameter of 5 mm. All patients received OsseoSpeed™ implants with internal tapered conical connection (Denstply Implants). Different mismatching distances were obtained, given that all implants were loaded with the same uni-abutment type (Lilac; Denstply Implants). Data were gathered on age, gender, bone substratum, smoking habits, previous history of periodontitis, and prosthetic features. MBL was analyzed radiographically at 6 and 18 months post-loading. Mixed linear analysis of mesial and distal MBL values yielded significant effects of abutment, implant diameter, follow-up period, bone substratum, smoking, and abutment × time interaction. MBL was greater at 18 vs. 6 months, for short vs. long abutments, for grafted vs. pristine bone, for a heavier smoking habit, and for implants with a diameter of 5.0 vs. 4.5 mm. Greater mismatching does not minimize the MBL; abutment height, smoking habit, and bone substratum may play a role in the MBL over the short- and medium term. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effects of rock joint geometrical parameters on safety of concrete arch dam abutments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, S.; Yazdani, M.; Joorabchi, A.E. [Tarbiat Modares Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD) has stated that foundation failure is the primary cause of dam failure following overtopping. As such, concrete arch dams require strong and stiff abutments. The failure of jointed rock mass at abutments is one of the key mechanisms that may lead to uncontrolled leakage. For that reason, this study investigated the affect of the joint geometrical parameters on the stability of the concrete arch dam abutments. The study also considered the role of joints on the behaviour mechanism of rock mass because it is governed by mechanical and hydraulic properties. The orientation of joints was considered since kinematic conditions are needed for a block to move. The hydromechanical influence of joint apertures on the stability of the foundation was also investigated through nonlinear analyses of different joint orientations and apertures on a hypothetical jointed abutment. Dam abutment safety was estimated by finding the values of maximum sliding and maximum opening and determining the water flow along discontinuities. The values of these 3 indices were derived for different orientations of joints. It was concluded that abutment safety was highly dependent on the geometrical characteristics of joints. 8 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  13. Heat Generation on Implant Surface During Abutment Preparation at Different Elapsed Time Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Keraidis, Abdullah; Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Al-Tahawi, Hamdi; Hsu, Ming-Lun; Lynch, Edward; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate heat generation at the implant surface caused by abutment preparation using a diamond bur in a high-speed dental turbine in vitro at 2 different water-coolant temperatures. Thirty-two titanium-alloy abutments were connected to a titanium-alloy implant embedded in an acrylic resin placed within a water bath at a controlled temperature of 37°C. The specimens were equally distributed into 2 groups (16 each). Group 1: the temperature was maintained at 20 ± 1°C; and group 2: the temperature was maintained at 32 ± 1°C. Each abutment was prepared in the axial plane for 1 minute and in the occlusal plane for 1 minute. The temperature of the heat generated from abutment preparation was recorded and measured at 3 distinct time intervals. Water-coolant temperature (20°C vs 32°C) had a statistically significant effect on the implant's temperature change during preparation of the abutment (P water-coolant temperature of 20 ± 1°C during preparation of the implant abutment decreased the temperature recorded at the implant surface to 34.46°C, whereas the coolant temperature of 32 ± 1°C increased the implant surface temperature to 40.94°C.

  14. A novel dental implant abutment with micro-motion capability--development and biomechanical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Yin; Chen, Weng-Pin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel dental implant abutment with a micro-motion mechanism that imitates the biomechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament, with the goal of increasing the long-term survival rate of dental implants. Computer-aided design software was used to design a novel dental implant abutment with an internal resilient component with a micro-motion capability. The feasibility of the novel system was investigated via finite element analysis. Then, a prototype of the novel dental implant abutment was fabricated, and the mechanical behavior was evaluated. The results of the mechanical tests and finite element analysis confirmed that the novel dental implant abutment possessed the anticipated micro-motion capability. Furthermore, the nonlinear force-displacement behavior apparent in this micro-motion mechanism imitated the movement of a human tooth. The slope of the force-displacement curve of the novel abutment was approximately 38.5 N/mm before the 0.02-mm displacement and approximately 430 N/mm after the 0.03-mm displacement. The novel dental implant abutment with a micro-motion mechanism actually imitated the biomechanical behavior of a natural tooth and provided resilient function, sealing, a non-separation mechanism, and ease-of-use. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of Abutment Pressure in Coal Mines with Extremely Thick Alluvium Stratum: A Typical Kind of Rockburst Mines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sitao; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Fuxing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the abutment pressure distribution in coal mines with extremely thick alluvium stratum (ETAS), which is a typical kind of mines encountering frequent intense rockbursts in China. This occurs due to poor understanding to abutment pressure distribution pattern and the consequent inappropriate mine design. In this study, a theoretical computational model of abutment pressure for ETAS longwall panels is proposed based on the analysis of load transfer mechanisms of key stratum (KS) and ETAS. The model was applied to determine the abutment pressure distribution of LW2302S in Xinjulong Coal Mine; the results of stress and microseismic monitoring verified the rationality of this model. The calculated abutment pressure of LW2302S was also used in the terminal mining line design of LW2301N for rockburst prevention, successfully protecting the main roadway from the adverse influence of the abutment pressure.

  16. Effect of modifying the screw access channels of zirconia implant abutment on the cement flow pattern and retention of zirconia restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2014-07-01

    The effect of managing the screw access channels of zirconia implant abutments in the esthetic zone has not been extensively evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an insert placed within the screw access channel of an anterior zirconia implant abutment on the amount of cement retained within the restoration-abutment system and on the dislodging force. Thirty-six paired zirconia abutments and restorations were fabricated by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing and were divided into 3 groups: open abutment, with the screw access channel unfilled; closed abutment, with the screw access channel sealed; and insert abutment, with a thin, tubular metal insert projection continuous with the screw head and placed into the abutment screw access channel. The restorations were cemented to the abutments with preweighed eugenol-free zinc oxide cement (TempBond NE). Excess cement was removed, and the weight of the cement that remained in the restoration-abutment system was measured. Vertical tensile dislodging forces were recorded at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min after incubation in a 37°C water bath for 24 hours. The specimens were examined for the cement flow pattern into the screw access channel after dislodgement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, followed by multiple comparisons by using the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = .05). The mean (standard deviation) of retentive force values ranged from 108.1 ± 29.9 N to 148.3 ± 21.0 N. The retentive force values differed significantly between the insert abutment and both the open abutment (P abutment groups (P abutment and insert abutment being greater than closed abutment (P abutment with a metal insert significantly affected both the cement retained within the abutment itself and the retention capabilities of the zirconia restoration cemented with TempBond NE cement. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier

  17. Multifactorial risk assessment for survival of abutments of removable partial dentures based on practice-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Sayaka; Ikebe, Kazunori; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the tooth survival is such a great challenge for evidence-based dentistry. To prevent further tooth loss of partially edentulous patients, estimation of individualized risk and benefit for each residual tooth is important to the clinical decision-making. While there are several reports indicating a risk of losing the abutment teeth of RPDs, there are no existing reports exploring the cause of abutment loss by multifactorial analysis. The aim of this practice-based longitudinal study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting the survival period of RPD abutments using a multifactorial risk assessment. One hundred and forty-seven patients had been previously provided with a total of 236 new RPDs at the Osaka University Dental Hospital; the 856 abutments for these RPDs were analyzed. Survival of abutment teeth was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted by Cox's proportional hazard modelling. The 5-year survival rates were 86.6% for direct abutments and 93.1% for indirect abutments, compared with 95.8% survival in non-abutment teeth. The multivariate analysis showed that abutment survival was significantly associated with crown-root ratio (hazard ratio (HR): 3.13), root canal treatment (HR: 2.93), pocket depth (HR: 2.51), type of abutments (HR: 2.19) and occlusal support (HR: 1.90). From this practice-based longitudinal study, we concluded that RPD abutment teeth are more likely to be lost than other residual teeth. From the multifactorial risk factor assessment, several prognostic factors, such as occlusal support, crown-root ratio, root canal treatment, and pocket depth were suggested. These results could be used to estimate the individualized risk for the residual teeth, to predict the prognosis of RPD abutments and to facilitate an evidence-based clinical decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of repeated manual disassembly and reassembly on the position stability of various implant-abutment complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Semper, Wiebke

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment the precision of manually repositioned abutments in five implant systems with various implant-abutment interfaces was evaluated. Material und Method Of these five implant systems (Straumann, Astra Tech, Replace Select, Camlog, SteriOss) six angled (0°, 5°, 15°) implants each were fixated in a prefabricated metal block. Three persons with differing experience and knowledge of the hypothesis placed and removed a prefabricated abutment with anti-rotational features ...

  19. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional

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    Seyyed Mohammad Abrisham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  20. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional Luting Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ganbarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  1. Evaluation of bond strength between grooved titanium alloy implant abutments and provisional veneering materials after surface treatment of the abutments: An in vitro study

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    Gowtham Venkat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Materials and Methods: Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell–Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman–Keuls post hoc test. Results: The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Conclusion: Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this

  2. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Hosseini Ghavam, Fereshteh; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly ( P =.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant ( P =.40). Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement.

  3. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). RESULTS The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly (P=.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant (P=.40). CONCLUSION Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement. PMID:29503708

  4. Evaluation of resilient abutment components on measured strain using dynamic loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D; Stanford, C M; Aquilino, S A

    1998-07-01

    Factors that affect transmission of strain from prostheses to bone may affect the long-term success of loaded implants. Current in vitro models are theoretically predictive (finite element modeling) or facsimile (photoelastic) in nature. A more clinically relevant in vitro model for strain evaluation should be investigated. This study attempted: (1) to validate a human cadaver bone model for vitro measurement of cortical bone strain, and (2) to evaluate the effect on cortical strain measurements of a resilient plastic component incorporated within a titanium implant in response to variable dynamic loading. Two IMZ (Interpore International) abutment alternatives were used: the titanium Abutment Complete and the polyoxymethylene Intra-mobile Element. The model system consisted of two implants placed in unfixed human cadaver ulna bone to simulate an implant bound edentulous region. Four biaxial rosette strain gauges simultaneously recorded cortical bone strain immediately mesial and distal to each implant. During experimentation a simulated prosthetic framework supported by either titanium or polyoxymethylene abutments was dynamically loaded 6 min from the terminal abutment along a cantilever extension. Cyclic nominal peak loads were applied with a materials testing machine at 20-N intervals from 20 to 200 N at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute. The protocol allowed frequency of load application to vary. A Newtonian linear correlation (r2 > or = 0.98) between load application and strain output was determined for each gauge position except for the terminal gauge located opposite the cantilever. Cortical strains recorded were within reported physiologic ranges involved in bone modeling and remodeling. Further, the polyoxymethylene abutment components did not result in reduction of peak microstrain at any gauge position. The Intra-mobile Element abutments, however, did increase the time required to complete 10 loading cycles when compared with the titanium Abutment

  5. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S. [Dept. of Informatics, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to {+-} 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This

  6. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to ± 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This overdose could be smoothed

  7. Soft tissues stability of cad-cam and stock abutments in anterior regions: 2-year prospective multicentric cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lops, Diego; Bressan, Eriberto; Parpaiola, Andrea; Sbricoli, Luca; Cecchinato, Denis; Romeo, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to verify if the type of implant abutment manufacturing, stock or cad-cam, could influence the maintenance of stable gingival margins around single restorations in anterior areas. After 16 weeks of healing, implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech Dental Implant) were positioned. Depending on the different fixture inclination and the thickness of buccal peri-implant soft tissue, abutment selection resulted in four groups: Group 1 (patients with zirconia ZirDesign(®) stock abutments), Group 2 (titanium stock TiDesign(®) abutments), Group 3 (zirconia cad-cam abutments), and Group 4 (titanium cad-cam abutments). The following parameters were assessed: buccal gingival margin modification (BGM). The modification of the implant gingival margin was followed at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. A computerized analysis was performed for measurements. Differences between soft tissue margin at baseline and after 2 years measured the gingival margin recession. A general linear model was used to evaluate each group in relation to gingival recession after two years. Tukey's post hoc test was used to compare the mean REC indexes of each group of abutments. Seventy-two healthy patients (39 males and 33 females; mean age of 46 years) scheduled for single gap rehabilitation in anterior areas were enrolled. A 100% of implant survival rate was observed after 24 months of function. One failure occurred due to fracture of a Zirconia cad-cam abutment. Moreover, two abutment screw unscrewing were observed. Both for zirconia and titanium stock abutments (Group 1 and 2), the mean recession of implant buccal soft tissue was of 0.3 mm (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). Soft tissue mean recession of zirconia and titanium cad-cam abutments (Group 3 and 4) was of 0.1 and -0.3 mm, respectively (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). REC values of cad-cam titanium abutments (Group 4) were significantly lower than that of Group 1 (-0.57 mm), Group 2 (-0.61 mm), and Group 3 (-0.40 mm

  8. Influence of implant location on the clinical outcomes of implant abutments: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElHoussiney, Amr G; Zhang, He; Song, Jinlin; Ji, Ping; Wang, Lu; Yang, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To compare the failure events and incidence of complications of different abutment materials in anterior and posterior regions. Failure was defined as complete loss of the abutment requiring replacement by a new abutment. Materials and methods Electronic searches using PubMed/Medline and Google Scholar complemented with manual searches were performed with specific search terms. Searches were restricted to publications in English between January 2006 and March 2016. Results A total of 863 and 1,264 implants were inserted in the anterior and posterior regions, respectively, in a total of 1,529 patients. No titanium abutments failed in anterior or posterior regions. On the other hand, 1.6% of zirconia abutments failed in the anterior region and 1.5% failed in the posterior region. Technical complications occurred mostly in the posterior region and mostly involved zirconia abutment. Meta-analysis was possible only for zirconia-abutment failure, due to considerable heterogeneity of studies and outcome variables. No significant difference in failure rate was found between anterior and posterior zirconia abutments (risk ratio 1.53, 95% CI 0.49–4.77; P=0.47). Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis showed similar outcomes of different abutment materials when used in anterior and posterior regions in terms of failure events and biological and aesthetic complications. The only significant finding was the increased incidence of technical complications in the posterior region, mostly involving zirconia abutments. Abutment-screw loosening was the most common technical complication. PMID:29520162

  9. Investigating the micromorphological differences of the implant-abutment junction and their clinical implications: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, Nikos; Li, Xiaona; Zampelis, Antonios; Ma, Li; Janda, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the morphological micro-features of three commercially available implant-abutment joints, using compatible and original prosthetic components. Furthermore, possible correlations between the micromorphology and potential functional complications were investigated with the use of finite element analysis. Three abutments (one original and two compatibles) were torqued on original Straumann RN implants, as according to each of the manufacturer's instructions. The implant-abutment units were sliced in the microtome and photographed under different magnifications (10×-500×) through a scanning electron microscope. Finite element analysis models were reconstructed for each of the implant-abutment units using the precise measurements from the SEM. Differences in stress, strain and deformation for the three different abutments were then calculated using ANSYS Workbench v13. Major dimensional differences were identified between all studied contact areas of the three units. The tight contact in the implant shoulder was similar in all three units, but engagement of the internal connection and, in particular, the anti-rotation elements was seriously compromised in the compatible abutments. One compatible abutment demonstrated compromised engagement of the abutment screw as well. Equivalent stress and strain in the FEA were much higher for the compatible abutments. An evaluation of the sequence of preload application revealed differences in the pattern of deformation between the original and compatible abutments, which can have serious clinical implications. Compatible abutments can present critical morphological differences from the original ones. The differences in the cross-sectional geometry result in large differences in the overall contact areas, both in terms of quality and quantity which could have serious implications for the long-term stability of the prosthesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  10. A three-dimensional finite element study on the stress distribution pattern of two prosthetic abutments for external hexagon implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Wagner; Hermann, Caio; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Balbinoti, Jean Anacleto; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of two different straight prosthetic abutments (one- and two-piece) for external hex butt-joint connection implants using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Two 3D-FEA models were designed, one for the two-piece prosthetic abutment (2 mm in height, two-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent) and another one for the one-piece abutment (2 mm in height, Slim Fit one-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent), with their corresponding screws and implants (Titamax Ti, 3.75 diameter by 13 mm in length, Neodent). The model simulated the single restoration of a lower premolar using data from a computerized tomography of a mandible. The preload (20 N) after torque application for installation of the abutment and an occlusal loading were simulated. The occlusal load was simulated using average physiological bite force and direction (114.6 N in the axial direction, 17.1 N in the lingual direction and 23.4 N toward the mesial at an angle of 75° to the occlusal plan). The regions with the highest von Mises stress results were at the bottom of the initial two threads of both prosthetic abutments that were tested. The one-piece prosthetic abutment presented a more homogeneous behavior of stress distribution when compared with the two-piece abutment. Under the simulated chewing loads, the von Mises stresses for both tested prosthetic-abutments were within the tensile strength values of the materials analyzed which thus supports the clinical use of both prosthetic abutments.

  11. Effectiveness of screw surface coating on the stability of zirconia abutments after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Butignon, Luis Eduardo; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2012-01-01

    Different surface treatments have been developed in attempts to prevent the loosening of abutment screws. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of titanium alloy screws with tungsten-doped diamond-like carbon (W-DLC) coating and uncoated screws in providing stability to zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic abutments after cyclic loading. Twenty prefabricated ZrO2 ceramic abutments on their respective external-hex implants were divided into two groups of equal size according to the type of screw used: uncoated titanium alloy screw (Ti) or titanium alloy screw with W-DLC coating (W-DLC/Ti). The removal torque value (preload) of the abutment screw was measured before and after loading. Cyclic loading between 11 and 211 N was applied at an angle of 30 degrees to the long axis of the implants at a frequency of 15 Hz. A target of 0.5 X 106 cycles was defined. Group means were calculated and compared using analysis of variance and the F test (α = .05). Before cyclic loading, the preload for Ti screws was significantly higher than that for W-DLC/Ti screws (P = .021). After cyclic loading, there was no significant difference between them (P = .499). Under the studied conditions, it can be concluded that, after cyclic loading, both abutment screws presented a significant reduction in the mean retained preload and similar effectiveness in maintaining preload.

  12. [Evaluation of cermet fillings in abutment teeth in removable partial prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulic, S; Tihacek-Sojic, Lj

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical process of setting the purpose filling on abutment teeth, after finishing the removable partial dentures. The aim was also to investigate the use of cermet glass-ionomer cement for the purpose filling in the abutment teeth for removable partial dentures, as well as to investigate the surface of the purpose filling. For the clinical evaluation of purpose filling slightly modified criteria according to Ryg's were used in 20 patients with different type of edentulousness. Changes occurring on the surface of purpose filling have been experimentally established by the method of scanning electron microscopy on the half-grown third molars in seven patients. It could be concluded that cement glass-ionomer was not the appropriate material for the purpose fillings in abutment teeth for removable partial dentures.

  13. Evaluation of the Periodontal Status of Abutment Teeth in Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, André Ricardo Maia; da Silva Lobo, Fábio Daniel; Miranda, Mónica Célia Pereira; Framegas de Araújo, Filipe Miguel Soares; Santos Marques, Tiago Miguel

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of removable partial dentures affects the periodontal status of abutment teeth. An observational cross-sectional study was done on a sample of patients rehabilitated with removable partial dentures (2010 to 2013). At a recall appointment, a clinical examination was done to collect data related to the rehabilitation and periodontal status of the abutment teeth. Of 145 invited patients, 54 attended the requested follow-up appointment (37.2%). Mean patient age was 59.1 years, and the study population was 42.6% male and 57.4% female. The mean follow-up time for the prosthesis was 26 months. Abutment teeth had higher values in all periodontal variables (P removable partial dentures is affected by these rehabilitations. A recall program for these patients involving removable prosthodontics and periodontology appointments is mandatory.

  14. Short-term retrospective case series of implant-assisted removable partial dentures with locator abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Puigpelat, Octavi; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Cabratosa-Termes, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case series was to report on the clinical performance of implant-assisted removable partial dentures (IARPDs) with Locator abutments in different partial edentulism situations, with a mean follow-up period of 28.6 months. Twelve consecutive patients were treated with IARPDs. A total of 24 implants were placed in the edentulous area. Minimum follow-up period was 12 months. Overall patient satisfaction, health of peri-implant tissues, survival of implants and abutments, and prosthetic complications were reported. Overall implant survival was 91.6%; two implants failed. No major complications were reported-only one IARPD metal framework broke. No Locator abutment loosening was reported. Within the limitations of this retrospective study, treatment with IARPDs can improve the patient's function, phonetics, and esthetics without the need for extensive bone regeneration surgeries and prosthodontic rehabilitations. However, well-designed prospective clinical studies on IARPDs are needed to support their long-term use.

  15. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    , the selection of restoration materials should be based on proper optical characteristics in addition to biocompatibility and sufficient strength of materials. Abutments and crowns based on zirconia are one of the most recent alternatives to metal abutments and metal-ceramic crowns. To date, only few comparative...... and to estimate long-term biomechanical results of zirconia-based versus metal-based restorations. The aim of study I was to analyse the mode of fracture and number of cyclic loadings until veneering fracture of zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations compared to metal-ceramic restorations. The aim of study II...... was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical...

  16. Bacterial microleakage at the abutment-implant interface, in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrucea, Carlos; Conrado, Aparicio; Olivares, Denise; Padilla, Carlos; Barrera, Andrea; Lobos, Olga

    2018-02-15

    In implant rehabilitation, a microspace is created at the abutment-implant interface (AII). Previous research has shown that oral microbiome can proliferate in this microspace and affect periimplant tissues, causing inflammation in peri-implant tissues. Preventing microbial leakages through the AII is therefore an important goal in implantology. To determine the presence of marginal bacterial microleakage at the AII according to the torque applied to the prosthetic implant in vitro. Twenty-five Ticare Inhex internal conical implants (MG Mozo-Grau, Valladolid, España) were connected to a prosthetic abutment using torques of micro TC, while the rest were mounted on devices according to the bacterial leakage model with Porphyromonas gingivalis. Bacterial leakage was observed only in the implant adjustment as determined by micro-CT. The different torques applied to the abutment-implant system condition the bacterial leakage at the implant interface. No microleakage was observed at 20 and 30 N. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cone-morse implant connection system significantly reduces bacterial leakage between implant and abutment: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, A; Bolzoni, A; Russillo, A; Lauritano, D; Palmieri, A; Cura, F; Silvestre, F J; Giannì, A B

    2017-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants are very popular dental treatments today in the world. In osseointegrated implants, the occlusal forces are transmitted from prosthesis through an abutment to a dental implant. The abutment is connected to the implant by mean of a screw. A screw is the most used mean for connecting an implant to an abutment. Frequently the screws break and are lost. There is an alternative to screw retained abutment systems: the cone-morse connection (CMC). The CMC, thanks to the absence of the abutment screw, guarantees no micro-gaps, no micro-movements, and a reduction of bacterial leakage between implant and abutment. As P. gingivalis and T. forsythia penetration might have clinical relevance, it was the purpose of this investigation to evaluate molecular leakage of these two bacteria in a new CMC implants systems (Leone Spa®, Florence, Italy). To identify the capability of the implant to protect the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified Escherichia coli across implant-abutment interface was evaluated. Four cone-morse Leone implants (Leone® Spa, Florence, Italy) were immerged in a bacterial culture for 24 h and bacteria amount was then measured inside implant-abutment interface with Real-time PCR. Bacteria were detected inside all studied implants, with a median percentage of 3% for P. gingivalis and 4% for T. forsythia. Cone-morse connection implant system has very low bacterial leakage percentage and is similar to one-piece implants.

  18. Marginal Bone Remodeling around healing Abutment vs Final Abutment Placement at Second Stage Implant Surgery: A 12-month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nabih; Aboulhosn, Maissa; Berberi, Antoine; Manal, Cordahi; Younes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The periimplant bone level has been used as one of the criteria to assess the success of dental implants. It has been documented that the bone supporting two-piece implants undergoes resorption first following the second-stage surgery and later on further to abutment connection and delivery of the final prosthesis. The aim of this multicentric randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the crestal bone resorption around internal connection dental implants using a new surgical protocol that aims to respect the biological distance, relying on the benefit of a friction fit connection abutment (test group) compared with implants receiving conventional healing abutments at second-stage surgery (control group). A total of partially edentulous patients were consecutively treated at two private clinics, with two adjacent two-stage implants. Three months after the first surgery, one of the implants was randomly allocated to the control group and was uncovered using a healing abutment, while the other implant received a standard final abutment and was seated and tightened to 30 Ncm. At each step of the prosthetic try-in, the abutment in the test group was removed and then retightened to 30 Ncm. Horizontal bone changes were assessed using periapical radiographs immediately after implant placement and at 3 (second-stage surgery), 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up examinations. At 12 months follow-up, no implant failure was reported in both groups. In the control group, the mean periimplant bone resorption was 0.249 ± 0.362 at M3, 0.773 ± 0.413 at M6, 0.904 ± 0.36 at M9 and 1.047 ± 0.395 at M12. The test group revealed a statistically significant lower marginal bone loss of 20.88% at M3 (0.197 ± 0.262), 22.25% at M6 (0.601 ± 0.386), 24.23% at M9 (0.685 ± 0.341) and 19.2% at M9 (0.846 ± 0.454). The results revealed that bone loss increased over time, with the greatest change in bone loss occurring between 3 and 6 months. Alveolar bone loss was significantly greater in the

  19. Axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection evaluated by linear mixed model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Hyon-Woo; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kim, Shin-Koo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection after cyclic loading. Three groups of external abutments (Ext group), an internal tapered one-piece-type abutment (Int-1 group), and an internal tapered two-piece-type abutment (Int-2 group) were prepared. Cyclic loading was applied to implant-abutment assemblies at 150 N with a frequency of 3 Hz. The amount of axial displacement, the Periotest values (PTVs), and the removal torque values(RTVs) were measured. Both a repeated measures analysis of variance and pattern analysis based on the linear mixed model were used for statistical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the surface of the implant-abutment connection. The mean axial displacements after 1,000,000 cycles were 0.6 μm in the Ext group, 3.7 μm in the Int-1 group, and 9.0 μm in the Int-2 group. Pattern analysis revealed a breakpoint at 171 cycles. The Ext group showed no declining pattern, and the Int-1 group showed no declining pattern after the breakpoint (171 cycles). However, the Int-2 group experienced continuous axial displacement. After cyclic loading, the PTV decreased in the Int-2 group, and the RTV decreased in all groups. SEM imaging revealed surface wear in all groups. Axial displacement and surface wear occurred in all groups. The PTVs remained stable, but the RTVs decreased after cyclic loading. Based on linear mixed model analysis, the Ext and Int-1 groups' axial displacements plateaued after little cyclic loading. The Int-2 group's rate of axial displacement slowed after 100,000 cycles.

  20. Salivary bacterial leakage into implant-abutment connections: preliminary results of an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencio, F; Papi, P; Di Carlo, S; Pompa, G

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of bacterial leakage in the internal surface of implants, through implant-abutment interface (IAI), is one of the parameters for analyzing the fabrication quality of the connections. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate two different types of implant-abutment connections: the screwed connection (Group 1) and the cemented connection (Group 2), analyzing the permeability of the IAI to bacterial colonization, using human saliva as culture medium. A total of twelve implants were tested, six in each experimental group. Five healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Two milliliters of non-stimulated saliva were collected from each subject and mixed in a test tube. After 14 days of incubation of the bacteria sample in the implant fixtures, a PCR-Real Time analysis was performed. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the proportions of implant-abutment assembled structures detected with bacterial leakage. Differences in the bacterial counts of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. A p value abutment connections compared to the cemented implant-abutment connections. A mean total bacterial count of 1.2E+07 (± 0.25E+07) for Group 1 and of 7.2E+04 (± 14.4E+04) for Group 2 was found, with a high level of significance, p = .0001. Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that bacterial species from human saliva may penetrate along the implant-abutment interface in both connections, however the cemented connection implants showed the lowest amount of bacterial colonization.

  1. Minimum Abutment Height to Eliminate Bone Loss: Influence of Implant Neck Design and Platform Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinato, Sergio; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Bernardello, Fabio; Zaffe, Davide

    This retrospective study quantitatively analyzed the minimum prosthetic abutment height to eliminate bone loss after 4.7-mm-diameter implant placement in maxillary bone and how grafting techniques can affect the marginal bone loss in implants placed in maxillary areas. Two different implant types with a similar neck design were singularly placed in two groups of patients: the test group, with platform-switched implants, and the control group, with conventional (non-platform-switched) implants. Patients requiring bone augmentation underwent unilateral sinus augmentation using a transcrestal technique with mineralized xenograft. Radiographs were taken immediately after implant placement, after delivery of the prosthetic restoration, and after 12 months of loading. The average mesial and distal marginal bone loss of the control group (25 patients) was significantly more than twice that of the test group (26 patients), while their average abutment height was similar. Linear regression analysis highlighted a statistically significant inverse relationship between marginal bone loss and abutment height in both groups; however, the intercept of the regression line, both mesially and distally, was 50% lower for the test group than for the control group. The marginal bone loss was annulled with an abutment height of 2.5 mm for the test group and 3.0 mm for the control group. No statistically significant differences were found regarding marginal bone loss of implants placed in native maxillary bone compared with those placed in the grafted areas. The results suggest that the shorter the abutment height, the greater the marginal bone loss in cement-retained prostheses. Abutment height showed a greater influence in platform-switched than in non-platform-switched implants on the limitation of marginal bone loss.

  2. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  3. Prospective assessment of CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations: 2.4 year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lyndon F; Stanford, Clark; Feine, Jocelyne; McGuire, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Single-tooth implant restorations are commonly used to replace anterior maxillary teeth. The esthetic, functional, and biologic outcomes are, in part, a function of the abutment and crown. The purpose of this clinical study was to describe the implant, abutment, and crown survival and complication rates for CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations for single-tooth implants. As part of a broader prospective investigation that enrolled and treated 141 participants comparing tissue responses at the conical interface (CI; AstraTech OsseoSpeed), flat-to-flat interface (FI; NobelSpeedy), and platform-switch interface (PS; NanoTite Certain Prevail) of single-tooth implants, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia abutments (ATLANTIS Abutment) and cemented lithium disilicate (e.max) crowns were used in the restoration of all implants. After 2.4 years in function (3 years after implant placement), the implant, abutment, and crown of 110 participants were evaluated. Technical and biologic complications were recorded. Demographic results were tabulated as percentages with mean values and standard deviations. Abutment survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. After 2.4 years, no abutments or crowns had been lost. Abutment complications (screw loosening, screw fracture, fracture) were absent for all 3 implant groups. Crown complications were limited to 2 crowns debonding and 1 with excess cement (2.5%). Five biological complications (4.0%) were recorded. The overall complication rate was 6.5%. CAD/CAM zirconia abutments restored with cemented lithium disilicate crowns demonstrated high survival on 3 different implant-abutment interface designs. No abutment or abutment screw fracture occurred. The technical complications observed after 2.4 years were minor and reversible. The use of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments with cemented lithium disilicate crowns is associated with high technical and biologic success at 2

  4. Management of broken dental implant abutment in a patient with bruxism: A rare case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al-Almaie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This rare case report describes prosthodontic complications resulting from a dental implant was placed surgically more distally in the area of the missing mandibular first molar with a cantilever effect and a crest width of >12 mm in a 59-year-old patient who had a history of bruxism. Fracture of abutment is a common complication in implant was placed in area with high occlusal forces. Inability to remove the broken abutment may most often end up in discarding the implant. Adding one more dental implant mesially to the previously placed implant, improvisation of technique to remove the broken abutment without sacrificing the osseointegrated dental implant, fabrication with cemented custom-made abutment to replace the broken abutment for the first implant, and the use of the two implants to replace a single molar restoration proved reliable and logical treatment solutions to avoid these prosthodontic complications.

  5. Management of Broken Dental Implant Abutment in a Patient with Bruxism: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2017-01-01

    This rare case report describes prosthodontic complications resulting from a dental implant was placed surgically more distally in the area of the missing mandibular first molar with a cantilever effect and a crest width of >12 mm in a 59-year-old patient who had a history of bruxism. Fracture of abutment is a common complication in implant was placed in area with high occlusal forces. Inability to remove the broken abutment may most often end up in discarding the implant. Adding one more dental implant mesially to the previously placed implant, improvisation of technique to remove the broken abutment without sacrificing the osseointegrated dental implant, fabrication with cemented custom-made abutment to replace the broken abutment for the first implant, and the use of the two implants to replace a single molar restoration proved reliable and logical treatment solutions to avoid these prosthodontic complications.

  6. Assessment of reliability of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Nuno Marques; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Zheng, Cheng; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-08-01

    Information is lacking about the fatigue resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) tooth-colored implant custom abutment materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the reliability of different types of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments. Zirconia (Lava Plus), lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD), and resin-based composite (Lava Ultimate) abutments were fabricated using CAD-CAM technology and bonded to machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy inserts for conical connection implants (NobelReplace Conical Connection RP 4.3×10 mm; Nobel Biocare). Three groups (n=19) were assessed: group ZR, CAD-CAM zirconia/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; group RC, CAD-CAM resin-based composite/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; and group LD, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments. Fifty-seven implant abutments were secured to implants and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin according to ISO standard 14801. Static failure load (n=5) and fatigue failure load (n=14) were tested. Weibull cumulative damage analysis was used to calculate step-stress reliability at 150-N and 200-N loads with 2-sided 90% confidence limits. Representative fractured specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to observe fracture patterns. Weibull plots revealed β values of 2.59 for group ZR, 0.30 for group RC, and 0.58 for group LD, indicating a wear-out or cumulative fatigue pattern for group ZR and load as the failure accelerating factor for groups RC and LD. Fractographic observation disclosed that failures initiated in the interproximal area where the lingual tensile stresses meet the compressive facial stresses for the early failure specimens. Plastic deformation of titanium inserts with fracture was observed for zirconia abutments in fatigue resistance testing. Significantly higher reliability was found in group ZR, and no significant differences in reliability were

  7. Innovation in abutment-free bone-anchored hearing devices in children: Updated results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shaun; Centric, Aaron; Chennupati, Sri Kiran

    2015-10-01

    Bone-anchored hearing devices are an accepted treatment option for hearing restoration in various types of hearing loss. Traditional devices have a percutaneous abutment for attachment of the sound processor that contributes to a high complication rate. Previously, our institution reported on the Sophono (Boulder, CO, USA) abutment-free system that produced similar audiologic results to devices with abutments. Recently, Cochlear Americas (Centennial, CO, USA) released an abutment-free bone-anchored hearing device, the BAHA Attract. In contrast to the Sophono implant, the BAHA Attract utilizes an osseointegrated implant. This study aims to demonstrate patient benefit abutment-free devices, compare the results of the two abutment-free devices, and examine complication rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for the first eleven Sophono implanted patients and for the first six patients implanted with the BAHA Attract at our institution. Subsequently, we analyzed patient demographics, audiometric data, clinical course and outcomes. Average improvement for the BAHA Attract in pure-tone average (PTA) and speech reception threshold (SRT) was 41dB hearing level (dBHL) and 56dBHL, respectively. Considering all frequencies, the BAHA Attract mean improvement was 39dBHL (range 32-45dBHL). The Sophono average improvement in PTA and SRT was 38dBHL and 39dBHL, respectively. The mean improvement with Sophono for all frequencies was 34dBHL (range 24-43dBHL). Significant improvements in both pure-tone averages and speech reception threshold for both devices were achieved. In direct comparison of the two separate devices using the chi-square test, the PTA and SRT data between the two devices do not show a statistically significant difference (p-value 0.68 and 0.56, respectively). The complication rate for these abutment-free devices is lower than that of those featuring the transcutaneous abutment, although more studies are needed to further assess this potential advantage

  8. Analysis of load distribution in tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures by the use of resilient abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisić, Mirko; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Grbović, Aleksandar; Todorović, Aleksandar; Marković, Aleksa; Trifković, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Differences between the tooth and implant response to load can lead to many biological and technical implications in the conditions of occlusal forces. The objective of this study was to analyze load distribution in tooth/implant-supported fixed partial dentures with the use of resilient TSA (Titan Shock Absorber, BoneCare GmbH, Augsburg, Germany) abutment and conventional non-resilient abutment using finite element method. This study presents two basic 3D models. For one model a standard non-resilient abutment is used, and on the implant of the second model a resilient TSA abutment is applied. The virtual model contains drawn contours of tooth, mucous membranes, implant, cortical bones and spongiosa, abutment and suprastructure. The experiment used 500 N of vertical force, applied in three different cases of axial load. Calculations of von Mises equivalent stresses of the tooth root and periodontium, implants and peri-implant tissue were made. For the model to which a non-resilient abutment is applied, maximum stress values in all three cases are observed in the cortical part of the bone (maximum stress value of 49.7 MPa). Measurements of stress and deformation in the bone tissue in the model with application of the resilientTSA abutment demonstrated similar distribution; however, these values are many times lower than in the model with non-resilient TSA abutment (maximum stress value of 28.9 MPa). Application of the resilient TSA abutment results in more equal distribution of stress and deformations in the bone tissue under vertical forces. These values are many times lower than in the model with the non-resilient abutment.

  9. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Dasht; Mohammadreza Nakhaei; Nafiseh teimouri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial ...

  10. Mechanical Properties of Abutments: Resin-Bonded Glass Fiber-Reinforced Versus Titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Mirko Andreasi; Bedini, Rosells; Pecci, Raffaela; Ioppolo, Pietro; Laritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success and longevity of endosseous implants, after their prosthetic finalization, mainly depends on mechanical factors. Excessive mechanical stress has been shown to cause initial bone loss around implants in the presence of a rigid implant-prosthetic connection. The implant abutments are manufactured with high elastic modulus materials such as titanium, steel, precious alloys, or esthetic ceramics. These materials do not absorb any type of shock from the chewing loads or ensure protection of the bone-implant interface, especially when the esthetic restorative material is ceramic rather than composite resin. The mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment prototype (TCFRA) and compared to that of a similarly shaped titanium abutment (TA). Eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. In the TA group, fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples, while debonding occurred in 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present, in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group intrusion was more frequent. TCFRA demonstrated a greater elasticity than did TAs to the flexural load, absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function and thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface.

  11. Implant-abutment gap versus microbial colonization : Clinical significance based on a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; May, Liliana Gressler; Faria, Renata; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms from the oral cavity may settle at the implant-abutment interface (IAI). As a result, tissue inflammation could occur around these structures. The databases MEDLINE/PubMed and PubMed Central were used to identify articles published from 1981 through 2012 related to the microbial

  12. Long-term stability analysis of the left bank abutment slope at Jinping I hydropower station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent behavior of the left bank abutment slope at Jinping I hydropower station has a major influence on the normal operation and long-term safety of the hydropower station. To solve this problem, a geomechanical model containing various faults and weak structural planes is established, and numerical simulation is conducted under normal water load condition using FLAC3D, incorporating creep model proposed based on thermodynamics with internal state variables theory. The creep deformations of the left bank abutment slope are obtained, and the changes of principal stresses and deformations of the dam body are analyzed. The long-term stability of the left bank abutment slope is evaluated according to the integral curves of energy dissipation rate in domain and its derivative with respect to time, and the non-equilibrium evolution rules and the characteristic time can also be determined using these curves. Numerical results show that the left bank abutment slope tends to be stable in a global sense, and the stress concentration is released. It is also indicated that more attention should be paid to some weak regions within the slope in the long-term deformation process.

  13. Evaluation of contiguous implants with cement-retained implant-abutment connections. A minipig study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rezende Martins de Barros

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The presence of a microgap at the implant-abutment interface may permit bacterial contamination and lead to bone resorption, interfering with papillae formation. The present study evaluated adjacent implants with cement-retained abutments as an option to control such deleterious effects. Materials and methods Seven minipigs had their bilateral mandibular premolars previously extracted. After 8 weeks, four implants were installed in each hemi-mandible of each animal. The adjacent implants were randomly inserted on one side at the crestal bone level and on the other, 1.5 mm subcrestally. Immediately, a non-submerged healing and functional loading were provided with the abutments cementation and prostheses installation. Clinical examination and histomorphometry served to analyze the implant success. Results A total of 52 implants were evaluated at the end of the study. The subcrestal group achieved statistical better results when compared to the crestal group, clinically in papillae formation (1.97 x 1.57 mm and histomorphometrically in crestal bone remodeling (1.17 x 1.63 mm, bone density (52.39 x 45.22% and bone-implant contact (54.13 x 42.46%. Conclusion The subcrestal placement of cement-retained abutment implants showed better indexes of osseointegration and also improved papillae formation and crestal bone remodeling at the interimplant area after immediate loading, making them a promising option for the treatment of esthetic regions.

  14. Removal torque evaluation of three different abutment screws for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paepoemsin, T; Reichart, P A; Chaijareenont, P; Strietzel, F P; Khongkhunthian, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque of three different abutment screws and pull out strength of implant-abutment connection for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading. The study was performed in accordance with ISO 14801:2007. Three implant groups (n=15) were used: group A, PW Plus® with flat head screw; group B, PW Plus® with tapered screw; and group C, Conelog® with flat head screw. All groups had the same implant-abutment connection feature: cone with mandatory index. All screws were tightened with manufacturer's recommended torque. Ten specimens in each group underwent cyclic loading (1×106 cycles, 10 Hz, and 250 N). Then, all specimens were un-tightened, measured for the removal torque, and underwent a tensile test. The force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture was recorded. The data were analysed using independent sample t-test, ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Before cyclic loading, removal torque in groups A, B and C were significantly different (B> A> C, Pabutment from implant fixture increased immensely after cyclic loading.

  15. Comparison of two different abutment designs on marginal bone loss and soft tissue development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep C.; den Hartog, Laurens; van Heereveld, Christiaan; Jagdale, Aditi; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the response of soft tissues around two different abutment designs in healed sites in the esthetic zone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-six subjects received two endosseous implants in healed, bilateral implant sites in the esthetic zone in the maxilla or the mandible. After 17 to

  16. Resisting momentum in the abutment to rotating of freight car bogie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavels GAVRILOVS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the Latvian railway, derailments of freight cars take place in the course of shunting work on marshalling yards. A number of factors during shunting work on marshalling yards may contribute to the derailments of rolling stock: longitudinal dynamics during braking of cars with the turned off brakes by locomotive, hauling down cars from a marshalling hill with braking position controlled by an operator, dry internal rails in curves, absence of greasing in the pivot unit of freight bogies. At present, measures allowing elimination of the car derailments during shunting work are developed.During the period between repairs, the abutment unit of freight car often works in conditions of dry friction. Our observations suggest that at the time of taking a car into repair, there is often an absence of greasing between trail bearing and center plate of the abutment, and a presence of sandy dust. It increases a friction and, together with high contact pressures and dynamic influence, hinders the turn of bogie at motion of car.In this paper, the results of studying the resisting moment in the abutment to turning of bogie is reported. The study was conducted on the basis of freight bogie of type 18-100; the body was leant on the center plate unit of the abutment, on the center plate unit, and on the sliders. Experiments were conducted, with the use of greasing and at the dry friction of center plate unit.

  17. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  19. Evaluation on Impact Interaction between Abutment and Steel Girder Subjected to Nonuniform Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the impact interaction between the abutment and the girder subjected to nonuniform seismic excitation. An impact model based on tests is presented by taking material properties of the backfill of the abutment into consideration. The conditional simulation is performed to investigate the spatial variation of earthquake ground motions. A two-span continuous steel box girder bridge is taken as the example to analyze and assess the pounding interaction between the abutment and the girder. The detailed nonlinear finite element (FE model is established and the steel girder and the reinforced concrete piers are modeled by nonlinear fiber elements. The pounding element of the abutment is simulated by using a trilinear compression gap element. The elastic-perfectly plastic element is used to model the nonlinear rubber bearings. The comparisons of the pounding forces, the shear forces of the nonlinear bearings, the moments of reinforced concrete piers, and the axial pounding stresses of the steel girder are studied. The made observations indicate that the nonuniform excitation for multisupport bridge is imperative in the analysis and evaluation of the pounding effects of the bridges.

  20. Distribution of Side Abutment Stress in Roadway Subjected to Dynamic Pressure and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Qiangling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The borehole stress-meter was employed in this study to investigate the distribution of the side abutment stress in roadway subjected to dynamic pressure. The results demonstrate that the side abutment stress of the mining roadway reaches a peak value when the distance to the gob is 8 m and the distribution curve of the side abutment stress can be divided into three zones: stress rising zone, stress stabilizing zone, and stress decreasing zone. Further numerical investigation was carried out to study the effect of the coal mass strength, coal seam depth, immediate roof strength, and thickness on the distribution of the side abutment stress. Based on the research results, we determined the reasonable position of the mining roadway and the optimal width of the barrier pillar. The engineering application demonstrates that the retention of the barrier pillar with a width of 5 m along the gob as the haulage roadway for the next panel is feasible, which delivers favorable technological and economic benefits.

  1. Evaluation of torque loss in Co-Cr castable abutments after cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Zeighami

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Misfit between the castable implant components can cause torque loss before and after cyclic loading. However, it is more appropriate to relate the results of this study to the screw loosening of the above mentioned abutments than judging their clinical performance.

  2. Repair of fractured abutment teeth under pre-existing crowns: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Mascarenhas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a technique for repair of abutment tooth which fractured during removal of a provisional restoration before bisque trial. The technique uses plastic templates to fabricate new composite core foundation for the existing crowns. This technique helps the dentist to rebuild the core in a single appointment.

  3. Cancer of Oral Cavity Abutting the Mandible; Predictors of Loco-regional Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, T.K.; Hussein, H.A.; Mebeed, A.H.; El Sebai, H.I.; Sami, I.; Farahat, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the causes of Loco-regional failure in 51 patients with tumors of the oral cavity abutting the mandible. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study (27 patients were operated upon in the retrospective section and 24 patients in the prospective section of the study) was done in the department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, from January 2003 to January 2008. Fifty-one patients, with oral cavity cancerous lesions abutting the mandible, were operated upon by segmental mandibulectomy en-bloc with primary tumor resection in addition to modified radical or selective neck dissection according to the status of the cervical lymph nodes. Results: During a median follow-up of 2 years, 29 patients (56.8%) had local recurrences, the incidence of nodal recurrence after neck dissection was detected in 4 patients (7.8%). On multivariate analysis, tumor depth, tumor grade, oral mucosa, soft tissue and bone surgical margins in addition to metastatic lymphadenopathy were independent prognostic factors of loco-regional failure and disease-free survival. Conclusion: Oral cavity cancers abutting the mandible should be treated with great caution by a multidisciplinary oncology team (resection and reconstruction surgeons) as it has a very aggressive biologic behavior. Negative intraoperative pathological margins should be attempted since this is the critical point for patients with cancers abutting the mandible? Further research on the biologic margin and genetic study is required

  4. Comparison of fit accuracy and torque maintenance of zirconia and titanium abutments for internal tri-channel and external-hex implant connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mousavi, Niloufar; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2017-08-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of implant connection design (external vs. internal) on the fit discrepancy and torque loss of zirconia and titanium abutments. Two regular platform dental implants, one with external connection (Brånemark, Nobel Biocare AB) and the other with internal connection (Noble Replace, Nobel Biocare AB), were selected. Seven titanium and seven customized zirconia abutments were used for each connection design. Measurements of geometry, marginal discrepancy, and rotational freedom were done using video measuring machine. To measure the torque loss, each abutment was torqued to 35 Ncm and then opened by means of a digital torque wrench. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at α=0.05 of significance. There were significant differences in the geometrical measurements and rotational freedom between abutments of two connection groups ( P internal and external connection implants in terms of rotational freedom ( P internal abutments but also customized external abutments did not have the exact geometry of prefabricated abutments ( P internal connection showed less rotational freedom. However, better marginal fit was observed in externally connected abutments. Also, customized abutments with either connection could not duplicate the exact geometry of their corresponding prefabricated abutment. However, neither abutment connection nor material affected torque loss values.

  5. Comparison of fit accuracy and torque maintenance of zirconia and titanium abutments for internal tri-channel and external-hex implant connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mousavi, Niloufar

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of implant connection design (external vs. internal) on the fit discrepancy and torque loss of zirconia and titanium abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two regular platform dental implants, one with external connection (Brånemark, Nobel Biocare AB) and the other with internal connection (Noble Replace, Nobel Biocare AB), were selected. Seven titanium and seven customized zirconia abutments were used for each connection design. Measurements of geometry, marginal discrepancy, and rotational freedom were done using video measuring machine. To measure the torque loss, each abutment was torqued to 35 Ncm and then opened by means of a digital torque wrench. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at α=0.05 of significance. RESULTS There were significant differences in the geometrical measurements and rotational freedom between abutments of two connection groups (Pabutments of internal and external connection implants in terms of rotational freedom (Pabutments but also customized external abutments did not have the exact geometry of prefabricated abutments (Pabutment material (P=.38) affected torque loss. CONCLUSION Abutments with internal connection showed less rotational freedom. However, better marginal fit was observed in externally connected abutments. Also, customized abutments with either connection could not duplicate the exact geometry of their corresponding prefabricated abutment. However, neither abutment connection nor material affected torque loss values. PMID:28874994

  6. Misfit of Three Different Implant-Abutment Connections Before and After Cyclic Load Application: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Prados Frutos, Juan Carlos; Prados-Privado, María; Dedavid, Berenice Anina; Granero Marín, Jose Manuel; Calvo Guirado, José Luiz

    This study aimed to evaluate the misfit of three different implant-abutment connections before and after cycling load. One hundred twenty dental implants and correspondent prefabricated titanium abutments were used. Three different implant-abutment connections were evaluated: Morse taper (MT group), external hexagon (EH group), and internal hexagon (IH group). Forty implants and 40 abutments were used per group. The parameters for the mechanical evaluation were set as: 360,000 cycles, load of 150 N, and frequency of 4 Hz. Samples were sectioned in their longitudinal and transversal axes, and the misfit of the implant-abutment connection was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy analysis. One-way analyses of variance, Tukey post hoc analyses (α = .05), and t test (P .05). Transversally, only the MT group showed full fitting after cycling load compared with the other groups (EH and IH) (P abutment connection in internal, external, and Morse taper connections. In the longitudinal direction, the accommodation decreases and/or eliminates the gap observed initially (before load). In the horizontal direction, Morse cone implant-abutment connections experience a complete accommodation with the elimination of the gap.

  7. Effect of fiber post length and abutment height on fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars prepared for zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akikazu; Botelho, Michael George; Zheng, Zhiqiang

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance, mode of fracture, and stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth prepared with three different fiber post lengths and two different abutment heights, using both experimental and finite element (FE) approaches. Forty-eight human maxillary premolars with two roots were selected and endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly distributed into six equally sized groups (n = 8) with different combinations of post lengths (7.5, 11, and 15 mm) and abutment heights (3 and 5 mm). All the teeth restored with glass fiber post (Rely X Fiber Post, 3M ESPE, USA) and a full zirconia crown. All the specimens were thermocycled and then loaded to failure at an oblique angle of 135°. Statistical analysis was performed for the effects of post length and abutment height on failure loads using ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant difference test. In addition, corresponding FE models of a premolar restored with a glass fiber post were developed to examine mechanical responses. The factor of post length (P abutment height (P > 0.05) did not have a significant effect on failure load. The highest mean fracture resistance was recorded for the 15 mm post length and 5 mm abutment height test group, which was significantly more resistant to fracture than the 7.5 mm post and 5 mm abutment height group (P abutment heights.

  8. Influences of microgap and micromotion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around implant neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-11-01

    To review the influences and clinical implications of micro-gap and micro-motion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of implant. Literatures were searched based on the following Keywords: implant-abutment interface/implant-abutment connection/implant-abutment conjunction, microgap, micromotion/micromovement, microleakage, and current control methods available. The papers were then screened through titles, abstracts, and full texts. A total of 83 studies were included in the literature review. Two-piece implant systems are widely used in clinics. However, the production error and masticatory load result in the presence of microgap and micromotion between the implant and the abutment, which directly or indirectly causes microleakage and mechanical damage. Consequently, the degrees of microgap and micromotion further increase, and marginal bone absorption finally occurs. We summarize the influences of microgap and micromotion at the implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of the implant. We also recommend some feasible methods to reduce their effect. Clinicians and patients should pay more attention to the mechanisms as well as the control methods of microgap and micromotion. To reduce the corresponding detriment to the implant marginal bone, suitable Morse taper or hybrid connection implants and platform switching abutments should be selected, as well as other potential methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of modified abutment characteristics on peri-implant soft tissue health: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Martín, Ignacio; Sanz-Sánchez, Ignacio; Carrillo de Albornoz, Ana; Figuero, Elena; Sanz, Mariano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of the abutment characteristics on peri-implant tissue health and to identify the most suitable material and surface characteristics. A protocol was developed aimed to answer the following focused question: "Which is the effect of the modification of the abutment design in regard to the maintenance of the peri-implant soft tissue health?" Further subanalysis aimed to investigate the impact of the abutment material, macroscopic design, surface topography and surface manipulation. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a follow-up of at least 6 months after implant loading were considered as inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses were performed whenever possible. Nineteen final publications from thirteen investigations were included. The results from the meta-analysis indicated that zirconia abutments (Zi) experienced less increase in BOP values over time [n = 3; WMD = -26.96; 95% CI (-45.00; -8.92); p = .003] and less plaque accumulation [n = 1; MD = -20.00; 95% CI (-41.47; 1.47); p = .068] when compared with titanium abutments (Ti). Bone loss was influenced by the method of abutment decontamination [n = 1; MD = -0.44; 95% CI (-0.65; -0.23); p abutment did not have a significant influence on peri-implant inflammation. In contrast, the abutment material demonstrated increased BOP values over time for Ti when compared to Zi abutments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Dynamic analysis of the rigid fixed bridge and related tissue after intrusion of abutment with micro screw implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Xu, Pei-cheng; Lu, Liu-lei

    2013-08-01

    To study the variety of mechanical behavior of fixed bridge after abutments being intruded by micro screw implant and to provide theoretical principles for clinical practice of teeth preparation after intrusion of abutments under dynamic loads. Two-dimensional images of maxilla, teeth and supporting tissues of healthy people were scanned by spiral CT and were synthesized by Mimics10.01, Ansys13.0, etc. The three-dimensional finite element mathematical model of rigid fixed bridge repairing on double end of maxillary molar was developed. Under the condition of 10% simulative abutment alveolar absorption, vertical and oblique dynamic forces were applied in a circle of mastication(0.875 s) to build mathematical model after the abutment had been intruded for 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm. Stress variety of prosthesis, teeth, periodontal ligaments and supporting tissues were compared before and after intrusion of abutments. Stress variety of the prosthesis occurred, which had close relationship with the structure of prosthesis and teeth, the areas of periodontal ligaments increased, stress on the whole decreased along with the increase of the length of intrusion. With time accumulating, the stress value in prosthesis, teeth, periodontal ligaments and supporting tissues increased gradually and loads in oblique direction induced peak value stress in a masticatory cycle. Some residual stress left after unloading. By preparing the fixed bridge after abutment intrusion by micro screw implant, the service life of abutment and fixed bridge prosthesis can be reduced. The abutment and its related tissue have time-dependent mechanical behaviors during one mastication. The influence of oblique force on stress was greater than vertical force. There is some residual stress left after one mastication period. With the increase of the intrusion on abutment, residual stress reduced.

  11. Improvement of dose distributions in abutment regions of intensity modulated radiation therapy and electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to radiate tumors that are in close proximity to vital organs. Targets consisting of a deep-seated region followed by a superficial one may be treated with abutting photon and electron fields. However, no systematic study regarding matching of IMRT and electron beams was reported. In this work, a study of dose distributions in the abutment region between tomographic and step-and-shoot IMRT and electron fields was carried out. A method that significantly improves dose homogeneity between abutting tomographic IMRT and electron fields was developed and tested. In this method, a target region that is covered by IMRT was extended into the superficial target area by ∼2.0 cm. The length and shape of IMRT target extension was chosen such that high isodose lines bent away from the region treated by the electrons. This reduced the magnitude of hot spots caused by the 'bulging effect' of electron field penumbra. To account for the uncertainties in positioning of the IMRT and electron fields, electron field penumbra was modified using conventional (photon) multileaf collimator (MLC). The electron beam was delivered in two steps: half of the dose delivered with MLCs in retracted position and another half with MLCs extended to the edge of electron field that abuts tomographic IMRT field. The experimental testing of this method using film dosimetry has demonstrated that the magnitude of the hot spots was reduced from ∼45% to ∼5% of the prescription dose. When an error of ±1.5 mm in field positioning was introduced, the dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region did not exceed ±15% of the prescription dose. With step-and-shoot IMRT, the most homogeneous dose distribution was achieved when there was a 3 mm gap between the IMRT and electron fields

  12. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for the Hepatocellular Carcinoma Abutting the Diaphragm: Assessment of Safety and Therapeutic Efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Young Sun; Choi, Dong Il; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the safety and therapeutic efficacy of a percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) abutting the diaphragm. We retrospectively assessed 80 patients who underwent a percutaneous RF ablation for a single nodular (< 4 cm) HCC over the last four years. Each patient underwent an ultrasound-guided RF ablation using internally cooled electrodes for the first-line treatment. We divided patients into two subgroups based on whether the index tumor was abutting (less than 5 mm) the diaphragm or not: group A (abutting; n = 31) versus group B (non-abutting; n = 49). We compared the two subgroups for complications and therapeutic efficacy using image and the review of medical records. The statistical assessment included an independent t-test, Fisher's exact test, and chi-square test. The assessment of the diaphragmatic swelling at CT immediately following the procedure was more severe in group A than group B (mean thickness change:1.44 vs. 0.46 mm, p = 0.00). Further, right shoulder pain was more common in group A than B (p = 0.01). Although minor complications (hemothorax 1 case, pleural effusion 1 case) were noted only in group A, no major thoracic complication occurred in either group. The technical success rate was lower in group A than group B (84% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). As well, the primary and secondary technique effectiveness rates in group A and group B were 90% versus 98% (p = 0.29) and 79% versus 91% (p = 0.25), respectively. The local tumor progression rate was higher in group A than in group B (29% vs. 6%, p = 0.02). We found that the percutaneous RF ablation for the HCC abutting the diaphragm is a safe procedure without major complications. However, it is less effective with regard to technical success and local tumor control

  13. The role of dental implant abutment design on the aesthetic outcome: preliminary 3-month post-loading results from a multicentre split-mouth randomised controlled trial comparing two different abutment designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Cardaropoli, Daniele; Gobbato, Luca; Scutellà, Fabio; Fabianelli, Andrea; Mascellani, Saverio; Delli Ficorelli, Gianluca; Mazzocco, Fabio; Sbricoli, Luca; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna

    To evaluate whether there are aesthetic and clinical benefits to using a newly designed abutment (Curvomax), over a conventional control abutment (GingiHue). A total of 49 patients, who required at least two implants, had two sites randomised according to a split-mouth design to receive one abutment of each type at seven different centres. The time of loading (immediate, early or delayed) and of prosthesis (provisional crowns of fixed prosthesis) was decided by the clinicians, but they had to restore both implants in a similar way. Provisional prostheses were replaced by definitive ones 3 months after initial loading, when the follow-up for the initial part of this study was completed. Outcome measures were: prosthesis failures, implant failures, complications, pink esthetic score (PES), peri-implant marginal bone level changes, and patient preference. In total, 49 Curvomax and 49 GingiHue abutments were delivered. Two patients dropped out. No implant failure, prosthesis failure or complication was reported. There were no differences at 3 months post-loading for PES (difference = -0.15, 95% CI -0.55 to 0.25; P (paired t test) = 0.443) and marginal bone level changes (difference = -0.02 mm, 95% CI -0.20 to 0.16; P (paired t test) = 0.817). The majority of the patients (30) had no preference regarding the two abutment designs; 11 patients preferred the Curvomax, while five patients preferred the GingiHue abutments (P (McNemar test) = 0.210). The preliminary results of the comparison between two different abutment designs did not disclose any statistically significant differences between the evaluated abutments. However the large number of missing radiographs and clinical pictures casts doubt on the reliability of the results. Longer follow-ups of wider patient populations are needed to better understand whether there is an effective advantage with one of the two abutment designs. Conflict of interest statement: This research project was originally partially funded by

  14. Influence of implant abutment material and ceramic thickness on optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirajariyavej, Bundhit; Wanapirom, Peeraphorn; Anunmana, Chuchai

    2018-05-01

    Anterior shade matching is an essential factor influencing the esthetics of a ceramic restoration. Dentists face a challenge when the color of an implant abutment creates an unsatisfactory match with the ceramic restoration or neighboring teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment material and ceramic thickness on the final color of different ceramic systems. Four experimental and control ceramic specimens in shade A3 were cut from IPS e.max CAD, IPS Empress CAD, and VITA Suprinity PC blocks. These specimens had thicknesses of 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 2.5 mm, respectively, for the experimental groups, and 4 mm for the controls. Background abutment specimens were fabricated to yield 3 different shades: white zirconia, yellow zirconia, and titanium at a 3-mm thickness. All 3 ceramic specimens in each thickness were placed in succession on different abutment backgrounds with glycerin optical fluid in between, and the color was measured. A digital spectrophotometer was used to record the specimen color value in the Commission Internationale De L'éclairage (CIELab) color coordinates system and to calculate the color difference (ΔE) between the control and experimental groups. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to analyze the effect of ceramic thickness on different abutments, and the pair-wise test was used to evaluate within the group (α=.05). The color differences between the test groups and the control decreased with increasing ceramic thickness for every background material. In every case, significant differences were found between 1.0- and 2.5-mm ceramic thicknesses. Only certain 2.5-mm e.max CAD, VITA Suprinity PC, and Empress CAD specimens on yellow-shade zirconia or VITA Suprinity PC on titanium were identified as clinically acceptable (ΔEabutment background decreased the color mismatch. Increasing the thickness of ceramic on a yellow-shaded zirconia abutment rather than on titanium or white zirconia yielded a more

  15. Comparison of the fracture resistance of dental implants with different abutment taper angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Geng, Jianping; Jones, David; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of abutment taper angles on the fracture strength of dental implants with TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) connection. Thirty prototype cylindrical titanium alloy 5.0mm-diameter dental implants with different TIS-connection designs were divided into six groups and tested for their fracture strength, using a universal testing machine. These groups consisted of combinations of 3.5 and 4.0 mm abutment diameter, each with taper angles of 6°, 8° or 10°. 3-Dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was also used to analyze stress states at implant-abutment connection areas. In general, the mechanical tests found an increasing trend of implant fracture forces as the taper angle enlarged. When the abutment diameter was 3.5 mm, the mean fracture forces for 8° and 10° taper groups were 1638.9 N ± 20.3 and 1577.1 N ± 103.2, respectively, both larger than that for the 6° taper group of 1475.0 N ± 24.4, with the largest increasing rate of 11.1%. Furthermore, the difference between 8° and 6° taper groups was significant, based on Tamhane's multiple comparison test (Pabutment groups, as the taper angle was enlarged from 6° to 8° and 10°, the mean fracture value was increased from 1066.7 N ± 56.1 to 1241.4 N ± 6.4 and 1419.3 N ± 20.0, with the largest increasing rate of 33.1%, and the differences among the three groups were significant (Pabutment taper angles and supported the findings of the static tests. In conclusion, increases of the abutment taper angle could significantly increase implant fracture resistance in most cases established in the study, which is due to the increased implant wall thickness in the connection part resulting from the taper angle enlargement. The increasing effects were notable when a thin implant wall was present to accommodate wide abutments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the effect of curved shape of bridge abutment provided with collar on local scour, experimentally and numerically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abdallah Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scour around bridge supports such as abutments can result in structural collapse and loss of life and property, so there is a need to control and minimize the local scour depth. In this paper, numerical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the effect of different relative radii of the bridge abutment provided with collar on local scour depth. A 3-D numerical model is developed to simulate the scour at bridge abutment using SSIIM program. This model solves 3-D Navier–Stokes equations and a bed load conservation equation. The k–ε turbulence model is used to solve the Reynolds-stress term. It was found the curvature shape of bridge abutment provided with collar could share to reduce the local scour depth by more 95%. In addition, the results of simulation models agree well with the experimental data.

  17. The clinical outcome and microbiological profile of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS) with different abutment topographies: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobos, Margarita; Johansson, Martin Lars; Jonhede, Sofia; Peters, Hanna; Hoffman, Maria; Omar, Omar; Thomsen, Peter; Hultcrantz, Malou

    2018-06-01

    In this prospective clinical pilot study, abutments with different topologies (machined versus polished) were compared with respect to the clinical outcome and the microbiological profile. Furthermore, three different sampling methods (retrieval of abutment, collection of peri-abutment exudate using paper-points, and a small peri-abutment soft-tissue biopsy) were evaluated for the identification and quantification of colonising bacteria. Twelve patients, seven with machined abutment and five with polished abutment, were included in the analysis. Three different sampling procedures were employed for the identification and quantification of colonising bacteria from baseline up to 12 months, using quantitative culturing. Clinical outcome measures (Holgers score, hygiene, pain, numbness and implant stability) were investigated. The clinical parameters, and total viable bacteria per abutment or in tissue biopsies did not differ significantly between the polished and machined abutments. The total CFU/mm 2 abutment and CFU/peri-abutment fluid space of anaerobes, aerobes and staphylococci were significantly higher for the polished abutment. Anaerobic bacteria were detected in the tissue biopsies before BAHS implantation. Anaerobes and Staphylococcus spp. were detected in all three compartments after BAHS installation. For most patients (10/12), the same staphylococcal species were found in at least two of the three compartments at the same time-point. The common skin coloniser Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in all patients but one (11/12), whereas the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in five of the patients. Several associations between clinical and microbiological parameters were found. There was no difference in the clinical outcome with the use of polished versus machined abutment at 3 and 12 months after implantation. The present pilot trial largely confirmed a suitable study design, sampling and analytical methodology to determine the effects

  18. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo, E-mail: hugo.e.peixoto@hotmail.com [Implantology Team, Latin American Institute of Research and Education in Dentistry, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Bordin, Dimorvan, E-mail: dimorvan_bordin@hotmail.com [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Del Bel Cury, Altair A., E-mail: altcury@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Silva, Wander José da, E-mail: wanderjose@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Faot, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.faot@gmail.com [Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Gonçalves Chaves, 457, 2nd floor, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul 96015-560 (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p < 0.05). Results: Titanium and zirconia abutments showed similar von Mises stresses in the mechanical part of the four models. The area with the highest concentration of stress was the screw thread, following by the screw body. The highest stress levels occurred in screw thread was observed during the preloading phase in the ZM1 model (931 MPa); and during the combined loading in the TM1 model (965 MPa). Statistically significant differences were observed for loading, the material × loading interaction, and the loading × geometry interaction (p < 0.05). Preloading contributed for 77.89% of the stress (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences to the other factors (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the

  19. Impact of Intentional Overload on Joint Stability of Internal Implant-Abutment Connection System with Different Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2017-09-05

    To evaluate the axial displacement of the implant-abutment assembly of different implant diameter after static and cyclic loading of overload condition. An internal conical connection system with three diameters (Ø 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0) applying identical abutment dimension and the same abutment screw was evaluated. Axial displacement of abutment and reverse torque loss of abutment screw were evaluated under static and cyclic loading conditions. Static loading test groups were subjected to vertical static loading of 250, 400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 N consecutively. Cyclic loading test groups were subjected to 500 N cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of excessive masticatory loading. After abutment screw tightening for 30 Ncm, axial displacement was measured upon 1, 3, 10, and 1,000,000 cyclic loadings of 500 N. Repeated-measure ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). The increasing magnitude of vertical load and thinner wall thickness of implant increased axial displacement of abutment and reverse torque loss of abutment screw (p < 0.05). Implants in the Ø 5.0 diameter group demonstrated significantly low axial displacement, and reverse torque loss after static loading than Ø 4.0 and Ø 4.5 diameter groups (p < 0.05). In the cyclic loading test, all diameter groups of implant showed significant axial displacement after 1 cycle of loading of 500 N (p < 0.05). There was no significant axial displacement after 3, 10, or 1,000,000 cycles of loading (p = 0.603). Implants with Ø 5.0 diameter demonstrated significantly low axial displacement and reverse torque loss after the cyclic and static loading of overload condition. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Mechanical solution of the maximum point of dynamic abutment pressure under deep long-wall working face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, F.; Ma, Q. [Shandong University of Science and Technology, Tai' an (China). College of Resource and Environmental Engineering

    2002-06-01

    The paper studies the dynamic relationship between abutment pressure and overburden collapse precess with advancing of working face. The result shows that the abutment pressure reaches its maximum value when the working face dimension is 1.27 times of the mining depth. This result confirms the statistical result from the strata movement surveys that overburden reaches its full movement stage when extracting dimension reaches 1.2 1.4 times of the mining depth. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. One-time versus repeated abutment connection for platform-switched implant: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Qing; Dai, Ruoxi; Cao, Chris Ying; Fang, Hui; Han, Min; Li, Quan-Li

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to compare peri-implant tissue changes in terms of clinical and radiographic aspects of implant restoration protocol using one-time abutment to repeated abutment connection in platform switched implant. A structured search strategy was applied to three electronic databases, namely, Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science. Eight eligible studies, including seven randomised controlled studies and one controlled clinical study, were identified in accordance with inclusion/exclusion criteria. Outcome measures included peri-implant bone changes (mm), peri-implant soft tissue changes (mm), probing depth (mm) and postsurgical complications. Six studies were pooled for meta-analysis on bone tissue, three for soft tissue, two for probing depth and four for postsurgical complications. A total of 197 implants were placed in one-time abutment group, whereas 214 implants were included in repeated abutment group. The implant systems included Global implants, Ankylos, JDEvolution (JdentalCare), Straumann Bone level and Conelog-Screwline. One-time abutment group showed significantly better outcomes than repeated abutment group, as measured in the standardised differences in mean values (fixed- and random-effect model): vertical bone change (0.41, 3.23) in 6 months, (1.51, 14.81) in 12 months and (2.47, 2.47) in 3 years and soft tissue change (0.21, 0.23). No significant difference was observed in terms of probing depth and complications. Our meta-analysis revealed that implant restoration protocol using one-time abutment is superior to repeated abutment for platform switched implant because of less bone resorption and soft tissue shifts in former. However, future randomised clinical trials should be conducted to further confirm these findings because of the small samples and the limited quality of the original research.

  2. Color variation induced by abutments in the superior anterior maxilla: an in vitro study in the pig gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atash, Ramin; Boularbah, Mohamed-Reda; Sibel, Cetik

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate different types of materials used for making implant abutments, by means of an in vitro study and a review of the literature, in order to identify the indications for a better choice of an implant-supported restoration in the anterior section. 5 implant abutments were tested in a random order in the superior anterior maxilla of pig gingiva (n = 8): titanium dioxide (Nobel Biocare); zirconium dioxide, Standard BO shade (Nobel Biocare, Kloten, Switzerland); zirconium dioxide, Light BI shade (Nobel Biocare); zirconium dioxide, Intense A 3.5 shade (Nobel Biocare); and aluminium oxide. Each abutment was tested for 2 mm and 3 mm thickness. To determine color variation, VITA Easyshade Advance spectrophotometer (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Sackingen, Germany) was used. Results showed that the color variation induced by the abutment would be affected by the abutment material and gingival thickness, when the gingival thickness is 2 mm. All materials except zirconium dioxide (Standard shade) caused a visible change of color. Then, as the thickness of the gingiva increased to 3 mm, the color variation was attenuated in a significant manner and became invisible for all types of abutments, except those made of aluminium oxide. Zirconium dioxide is the material causing the lowest color variation at 2 mm and at 3 mm, whereas aluminium oxide causes the highest color variation no matter the thickness.

  3. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis. PMID:26884772

  4. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Bahrami, Mehran; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-06-01

    This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis.

  5. Comparison of implant-abutment interface misfits after casting and soldering procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Flávio Domingues das; Elias, Gisele Araújo; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; de Medeiros Dantas, Lucas Costa; da Mota, Adérito Soares; Neto, Alfredo Júlio Fernandes

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare vertical and horizontal adjustments of castable abutments after conducting casting and soldering procedures. Twelve external hexagonal implants (3.75 × 10 mm) and their UCLA abutments were divided according their manufacturer and abutment type: PUN (plastic UCLA, Neodent), PUC (plastic UCLA, Conexão), PU3i (plastic UCLA, Biomet 3i), and PUTN (plastic UCLA with Tilite milled base, Neodent). Three infrastructures of a fixed partial implant-supported bridge with 3 elements were produced for each group. The measurements of vertical (VM) and horizontal (HM) misfits were obtained via scanning electron microscopy after completion of casting and soldering. The corresponding values were determined to be biomechanically acceptable to the system, and the results were rated as a percentage. Statistical analysis establishes differences between groups by chi-square after procedures, and McNeman's test was applied to analyze the influence of soldering over casting (α ≤ .05). For the values of VM and HM, respectively, when the casting process was complete, it was observed that 83.25% and 100% (PUTN), 33.3% and 27.75% (PUN), 33.3% and 88.8% (PUC), 33.3% and 94.35% (PU3i) represented acceptable values. After completing the requisite soldering, acceptable values were 50% and 94.35% (PUTN), 16.6% and 77.7% (PUN), 38.55% and 77.7% (PUC), and 27.75% and 94.35% (PU3i). Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the premachined abutments presented more acceptable VM values. The HM values were within acceptable limits before and after the soldering procedure for most groups. Further, the soldering procedure resulted in an increase of VM in all groups.

  6. Improved field abutment-wedge design for 6-MV x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyerick, C.E.; Steadham, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an improved abutment wedge for matching large photon fields. The wedge is used with a 6-MV Linac accelerator and generates a 5-cm pseudopenumbra at the 50% relative dose juncture. The features allow treatment of fields up to 40 cm long in any fractional step of increment, simultaneous generation of two wide penumbrae or one wide and one sharp penumbra, and attachment of the device downstream of standard beam-shaping accessories in any 90 degrees angular orientation

  7. Trends of Abutment-Scour Prediction Equations Applied to 144 Field Sites in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Deshpande, Nikhil; Aziz, Nadim M.; Conrads, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration in which predicted abutment-scour depths computed with selected predictive equations were compared with field measurements of abutment-scour depth made at 144 bridges in South Carolina. The assessment used five equations published in the Fourth Edition of 'Evaluating Scour at Bridges,' (Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18), including the original Froehlich, the modified Froehlich, the Sturm, the Maryland, and the HIRE equations. An additional unpublished equation also was assessed. Comparisons between predicted and observed scour depths are intended to illustrate general trends and order-of-magnitude differences for the prediction equations. Field measurements were taken during non-flood conditions when the hydraulic conditions that caused the scour generally are unknown. The predicted scour depths are based on hydraulic conditions associated with the 100-year flow at all sites and the flood of record for 35 sites. Comparisons showed that predicted scour depths frequently overpredict observed scour and at times were excessive. The comparison also showed that underprediction occurred, but with less frequency. The performance of these equations indicates that they are poor predictors of abutment-scour depth in South Carolina, and it is probable that poor performance will occur when the equations are applied in other geographic regions. Extensive data and graphs used to compare predicted and observed scour depths in this study were compiled into spreadsheets and are included in digital format with this report. In addition to the equation-comparison data, Water-Surface Profile Model tube-velocity data, soil-boring data, and selected abutment-scour data are included in digital format with this report. The digital database was developed as a resource for future researchers and is especially valuable for evaluating the reasonableness of future equations that may be developed.

  8. Long-term stability analysis of the left bank abutment slope at Jinping I hydropower station

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Long; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Yaoru

    2016-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the left bank abutment slope at Jinping I hydropower station has a major influence on the normal operation and long-term safety of the hydropower station. To solve this problem, a geomechanical model containing various faults and weak structural planes is established, and numerical simulation is conducted under normal water load condition using FLAC3D, incorporating creep model proposed based on thermodynamics with internal state variables theory. The creep defo...

  9. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this pap...

  10. Clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment teeth: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Linda J; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana D; Shala, Kujtim Sh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of removable partial dentures in periodontal abutment teeth in relation to the type of denture support and design of RPD in a five-year worn period. Methods : A total of 64 patients with removable partial dentures (RPDs), participated in this study. It were examined ninety-one RPDs. There were seventy-five RPDs with clasp-retained and sixteenth were RPDs with attachments. There were 28 females and 36 males, aged between 40-64 years, 41 maxillary and 50 mandible RPDs. For each subjects the following data were collected: denture design, denture support, and Kennedy classification. Abutment teeth were assessed for plaque index (PI), calculus index (CI), blending on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), tooth mobility (TM). Level of significance was set at pdenture support of RPD, BOP, PD, PI, GR, CI and TM-index showed no statistically significant difference. Based on the denture design of RPD's, BOP, PD, PI, CI, and TM-index proved no statistically significant difference. Except GR-index according to denture design confirmed statistically significant difference in RPD with clasp pdentures and below the clasp arms in abutment teeth.

  11. Nanomechanical properties of bone around cement-retained abutment implants. A minipig study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R.M. de Barros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim The nanomechanical evaluation can provide additional information about the dental implants osseointegration process. The aim of this study was to quantify elastic modulus and hardness of bone around cemented-retained abutment implants positioned at two different crestal bone levels. Materials and methods The mandibular premolars of 7 minipigs were extracted. After 8 weeks, 8 implants were inserted in each animal: crestally on one side of the mandible and subcrestally on the other (crestal and subcrestal groups. Functional loading were immediately provided with abutments cementation and prostheses installation. Eight weeks later, the animals euthanasia was performed and nanoindentation analyses were made at the most coronal newly formed bone region (coronal group, and below in the threaded region (threaded group of histologic sections. Results The comparisons between subcrestal and crestal groups did not achieve statistical relevance; however the elastic modulus and hardness levels were statistically different in the two regions of evaluation (coronal and threaded. Conclusions The crestal and subcrestal placement of cement-retained abutment implants did not affect differently the nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. However the different regions of newly formed bone (coronal and threaded groups were extremely different in both elastic modulus and hardness, probably reflecting their differences in bone composition and structure.

  12. Microscopic evaluation of implant platform adaptation with UCLA-type abutments: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Anéas RODRIGUES

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The fit between abutment and implant is crucial to determine the longevity of implant-supported prostheses and the maintenance of peri-implant bones. Objective To evaluate the vertical misfit between different abutments in order to provide information to assist abutment selection. Material and method UCLA components (N=40 with anti-rotational system were divided as follows: components usinated in titanium (n=10 and plastic components cast proportionally in titanium (n=10, nickel-chromium-titanium-molybdenum (n=10 and nickel-chromium (n=10 alloys. All components were submitted to stereomicroscope analysis and were randomly selected for characterization by SEM. Result Data were analyzed using mean and standard deviation and subjected to ANOVA-one way, where the groups proved to statistically different (p=<0.05, followed by Tukey’s test. Conclusion The selection of material influences the value of vertical misfit. The group machined in Ti showed the lowest value while the group cast in Ni Cr showed the highest value of vertical misfit.

  13. Accuracy of different abutment level impression techniques in All-On-4 dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Passive fit of prosthetic frameworks is a major concern in implant dentistry. Impression technique is one of the several variables that may affect the outcome of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to compare the three dimensional accuracy of direct and indirect abutment level implant impressions ofALL-ON-4 treatment plan.Materials and Methods: A reference acrylic resin model with four Branemark fixtures was made according to All-On-4 treatment plan. Multiunit abutments were screwed into the fixtures and two special trays were made for direct and indirect impression techniques. Ten direct and ten indirect impression techniques with respective impression transfers were made. Impressions were poured with stone and the positional accuracy of the abutment analogues in each dimension of x, y, and z axes and also angular displacement (Δθ were evaluated using a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM. Data were analyzed using T- test.Results: The results showed that direct impression technique was significantly more accurate than indirect technique (P<0.001.Conclusion: The results showed that the accuracy of direct impression technique was significantly more than that of indirect technique in Δθ and Δr coordinate and also Δx, Δy, Δz.

  14. Development of a new quantitative gas permeability method for dental implant-abutment connection tightness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Most dental implant systems are presently made of two pieces: the implant itself and the abutment. The connection tightness between those two pieces is a key point to prevent bacterial proliferation, tissue inflammation and bone loss. The leak has been previously estimated by microbial, color tracer and endotoxin percolation. Methods A new nitrogen flow technique was developed for implant-abutment connection leakage measurement, adapted from a recent, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative method used to assess endodontic sealing. Results The results show very significant differences between various sealing and screwing conditions. The remaining flow was lower after key screwing compared to hand screwing (p = 0.03) and remained different from the negative test (p = 0.0004). The method reproducibility was very good, with a coefficient of variation of 1.29%. Conclusions Therefore, the presented new gas flow method appears to be a simple and robust method to compare different implant systems. It allows successive measures without disconnecting the abutment from the implant and should in particular be used to assess the behavior of the connection before and after mechanical stress. PMID:21492459

  15. Correction of Malpositioned Implants through Periodontal Surgery and Prosthetic Rehabilitation Using Angled Abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Dorigatti de Avila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When dental implants are malpositioned in relation to the adjacent teeth and alveolar bone or in an excessive buccal or lingual position, the final prosthesis rehabilitation impairs the peri-implant health of the gingival tissues and the aesthetics of the patient. Thus, the purpose of this case was to report and discuss a multidisciplinary protocol for the treatment of a compromised maxillary tooth in a patient with an abscess in his right central incisor due to an excessive buccal implant position. The patient presented with an implant-supported provisional restoration on his right maxillary central incisor and a traumatic injury in his left central incisor. The treatment protocol consisted in (i abutment substitution to compensate the incorrect angulation of the implant, (ii clinical crown lengthening, (iii atraumatic extraction of the left central incisor, and (iv immediate implant placement. Finally, (v a custom abutment was fabricated to obtain a harmonious gingival contour around the prosthetic crown. In conclusion, when implants are incorrectly positioned in relation to the adjacent teeth, associated with soft-tissue defects, the challenge to create a harmonious mucogingival contours may be achieved with an interdisciplinary approach and with the placement of an appropriate custom abutment.

  16. The role in masseter muscle activities of functionally elicited periodontal afferents from abutment teeth under overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushimoto, E

    1981-09-01

    Five overdenture wearers with a small number of remaining natural teeth were selected to evaluate the effect of the afferent input from periodontal mechanoreceptors on masseter activity in man. As a control, a full denture wearer was included. The subjects were instructed to chew a piece of gum, and/or tap their teeth. Surface EmG from the bilateral masseter muscles were recorded and analysed. When functional pressure was applied, during chewing, to the abutment teeth as well as to mucosa through the denture base, masseter activities were encouraged. Following application of anaesthesia to the periodontal membrane of the abutments, masseter activities were reduced. The duration of the silent period (SP) appearing in the EMG burst following tooth tapping was significantly increased with root support compared to mucosal support only. With topical anaesthesia of the periodontal tissues, SP duration decreased significantly. In conclusion, it has become apparent that the pressure sensibility of abutment teeth bearing functional pressure under an overdenture base is capable of facilitating masseter activity, as one of the sources of oral sensory input during mastication.

  17. Effect of abutment height on interproximal implant bone level in the early healing: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Juan; Pico, Alexandre; Caneiro, Leticia; Nóvoa, Lourdes; Batalla, Pilar; Martín-Lancharro, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the effect on the interproximal implant bone loss (IBL) of two different heights (1 and 3 mm) of definitive abutments placed at bone level implants with a platform switched design. Twenty-two patients received forty-four implants (6.5-10 mm length and 3.5-4 mm diameter) to replace at least two adjacent missing teeth, one bridge set to each patient-two implants per bridge. Patients were randomly allocated, and two different abutment heights, 1 and 3 mm using only one abutment height per bridge, were used. Clinical and radiological measurements were performed at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Interproximal bone level changes were compared between treatment groups. The association between IBL and categorical variables (history of periodontitis, smoking, implant location, implant diameter, implant length, insertion torque, width of keratinized mucosa, bone density, gingival biotype and antagonist) was also performed. At 3 months, implants with a 1-mm abutment had significantly greater IBL (0.83 ± 0.19 mm) compared to implants with a 3-mm abutment (0.14 ± 0.08 mm). At 6 months, a greater IBL was observed at implants with 1-mm abutments compared to implants with 3-mm abutments (0.91 ± 0.19 vs. 0.11 ± 0.09 mm). The analysis of the relation between patient characteristics and clinical variables with IBL revealed no significant differences at any moment except for smoking. Abutment height is an important factor to maintain interproximal implant bone level in early healing. Short abutments led to a greater interproximal bone loss in comparison with long abutments after 6 months. Other variables except smoking showed no relation with interproximal bone loss in early healing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparison of clasp retention on enamel and composite resin-recontoured abutments following repeated removal in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Sadighpour, Leyla; Jahanian, Ghasem

    2010-04-01

    Loss of prosthetic retention over time is a concern with removable prostheses. Use of composite resin to modify an abutment contour receiving a removable partial denture clasp may offer a reasonable, less invasive method of improving removable prosthesis retention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the removal force of clasps over composite resin-recontoured abutments during a simulated 4 years of service. Twenty first mandibular premolars were selected to form 2 groups of specimens (n=5) resembling a tooth-supported edentulous space. A packable composite resin (Filtek P60) was used to create a 0.25-mm undercut on the buccal abutment surfaces of the composite resin group. Teeth in the natural abutment group were mounted in angulation to produce 0.25-mm undercuts on the buccal surfaces. The chrome-cobalt framework consisted of 2 individually fabricated T-clasps. Both groups were subjected to 4500 cycles of repeated removal using a small shaker. Removal forces were recorded before the repeated removal test (T(0)), after 500 and 1000 cycles, and at 1000-cycle intervals thereafter. The mean values of forces between the 2 groups were compared at each stage using the Mann-Whitney test (alpha=.05). No debonding occurred during the test. At T(0), the highest and lowest force values were observed in the composite resin group (3.75 N and 17.5 N, respectively). There was a significant difference between the removal forces of the 2 groups after 500 cycles and at test completion (P=.008). Retention loss was 3 times greater in the composite resin group than in the natural abutments group (53.65% vs. 15.80%). Within the limitations of the study, removal forces of the composite resin-recontoured abutments were threefold less than those of natural abutments after 4 years of simulated service. Copyright 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A study of the bending resistance of implant-supported reinforced alumina and machined zirconia abutments and copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, Anders; Sjögren, Göran

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the bending resistance of implant-supported CAD/CAM-processed restorations made out of zirconia or manually shaped made out of reinforced alumina. Units of abutments and copies made of (i) a prefabricated hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) yttrium oxide partially-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) (Denzir), (ii) a prefabricated densely-sintered magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ) (Denzir-M) or, copies made of (iii) a prefabricated partially-sintered, porous reinforced alumina ceramic (RN synOcta-In-Ceram) were subjected to static loading perpendicularly at the long axis. The abutments were attached to either stainless steel analogs or titanium implant fixtures. The Y-TZP and Mg-PSZ copies were bonded onto the ceramic abutments with a dual-cured resin composite (Rely-X Unicem). Units of titanium abutment attached to a titanium implant fixtures were used as reference. The units comprising Denzir abutments as delivered (pstainless steel analogs exhibited significantly higher bending resistance than the control. The heat-treated Denzir copies bonded to the heat-treated Denzir M abutments attached to titanium implant fixtures and the In-Ceram specimens attached to stainless steel analogs showed significantly (pstainless steel analogs. No statistically significant (p>0.05) differences were seen among the other groups studied. All the ceramic abutments and copies exhibited values that were equal or superior to that of the control and exceeded the reported value, up to 300 N, for maximum incisal bite forces. To assess the clinical behavior long-term clinical studies should be conducted.

  20. Simultaneous minimizing monitor units and number of segments without leaf end abutment for segmental intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Kaile; Dai Jianrong; Ma Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Leaf end abutment is seldom studied when delivering segmental intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields. We developed an efficient leaf sequencing method to eliminate leaf end abutment for segmental IMRT delivery. Our method uses simple matrix and sorting operations to obtain a solution that simultaneously minimizes total monitor units and number of segments without leaf end abutment between segments. We implemented and demonstrated our method for multiple clinical cases. We compared the results of our method with the results from exhaustive search method. We found that our solution without leaf end abutment produced equivalent results to the unconstrained solutions in terms of minimum total monitor units and minimum number of leaf segments. We conclude that the leaf end abutment fields can be avoided without affecting the efficiency of segmental IMRT delivery. The major strength of our method is its simplicity and high computing speed. This potentially provides a useful means for generating segmental IMRT fields that require high spatial resolution or complex intensity distributions

  1. Cleaning, Disinfection, and Sterilization Protocols Employed for Customized Implant Abutments: An International Survey of 100 Universities Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canullo, Luigi; Tallarico, Marco; Chu, Stephen; Peñarrocha, David; Özcan, Mutlu; Pesce, Paolo

    American and European standards recommend sterilization of customized abutments before connecting them to implants, as customized abutments are considered semi-critical medical devices. Since standardized procedures could not be identified in the literature on implantology, this survey evaluated the protocols employed at different universities worldwide to clean, disinfect, and/or sterilize customized abutments before their connection to bone-level implants. The survey took place between October 2015 and January 2016. A single question acquiring information on how customized abutments were treated prior to connection to the implants was sent by email to researchers affiliated at 100 universities worldwide. To avoid any bias, the survey was kept rigorously anonymous. A total of 100 universities from Europe (56), USA and Canada (25), Latin America (9), South Africa (1), Asia (6), and Australia and New Zealand (3) were invited to participate in the survey. Altogether, 85 universities responded to the survey question, and 22 (25.9%) declared that no cleaning protocols were adopted. More than half of the respondents (n = 49, 57.6%) performed only one of the three procedures required by the standards (cleaning, disinfection, or sterilization). Twelve respondents (14.1%) adopted two procedures, and only two universities performed all three required procedures (2.4%). This survey indicated substantial heterogeneity in treating customized abutments before connecting them to implants. This study demonstrated that the majority of the universities applied either cleaning, disinfection, or sterilization which may not meet the prevailing standards.

  2. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Methods Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). Results The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical

  3. White light scanner-based repeatability of 3-dimensional digitizing of silicon rubber abutment teeth impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Lee, Kyung-Tak; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of the digitizing of silicon rubber impressions of abutment teeth by using a white light scanner and compare differences in repeatability between different abutment teeth types. Silicon rubber impressions of a canine, premolar, and molar tooth were each digitized 8 times using a white light scanner, and 3D surface models were created using the point clouds. The size of any discrepancy between each model and the corresponding reference tooth were measured, and the distribution of these values was analyzed by an inspection software (PowerInspect 2012, Delcamplc., Birmingham, UK). Absolute values of discrepancies were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple comparisons (α=.05). The discrepancy between the impressions for the canine, premolar, and molar teeth were 6.3 µm (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-7.2), 6.4 µm (95% CI, 5.3-7.6), and 8.9 µm (95% CI, 8.2-9.5), respectively. The discrepancy of the molar tooth impression was significantly higher than that of other tooth types. The largest variation (as mean [SD]) in discrepancies was seen in the premolar tooth impression scans: 26.7 µm (95% CI, 19.7-33.8); followed by canine and molar teeth impressions, 16.3 µm (95% CI, 15.3-17.3), and 14.0 µm (95% CI, 12.3-15.7), respectively. The repeatability of the digitizing abutment teeth's silicon rubber impressions by using a white light scanner was improved compared to that with a laser scanner, showing only a low mean discrepancy between 6.3 µm and 8.9 µm, which was in an clinically acceptable range. Premolar impression with a long and narrow shape showed a significantly larger discrepancy than canine and molar impressions. Further work is needed to increase the digitizing performance of the white light scanner for deep and slender impressions.

  4. In vitro effect of chlorhexidine gel on torque and detorque values of implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Neshandar Asli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Use of chlorhexidine (CHX gel to eliminate the malodor of implant cavity may decrease the friction coefficient and effective preload and result in abutment screw loosening. This study aimed to assess the effect of CHX gel on the preload, torque, and detorque values. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on three groups of five implants. Group A (G1 was the control group and no material was applied to the implant cavity. In Group B (G2, implant cavity was filled with saliva before abutment screw tightening. In Group C (G3, implant cavity was first filled with saliva and then with CHX gel. The abutments were torqued to 24 N/cm2 according to the manufacturer's instructions and were then loosened. These processes were repeated five times. The ratio of the mean percentage of detorque to torque values was measured in all groups. The collected data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: No significant difference was noted between G1 and G2. Group G2 had significantly higher detorque value (p < 0.05. ANOVA detected a significant difference in the mean torque (p < 0.05 and detorque (p < 0.001 values among the three groups. G3 showed maximum difference between torque and detorque values; the minimum difference was noted in G2. Conclusion: Application of CHX gel (to decrease the malodor of the implant cavity decreases the detorque and preload values and increases the risk of screw loosening.

  5. Comparisons of maximum deformation and failure forces at the implant–abutment interface of titanium implants between titanium-alloy and zirconia abutments with two levels of marginal bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Zirconia materials are known for their optimal aesthetics, but they are brittle, and concerns remain about whether their mechanical properties are sufficient for withstanding the forces exerted in the oral cavity. Therefore, this study compared the maximum deformation and failure forces of titanium implants between titanium-alloy and zirconia abutments under oblique compressive forces in the presence of two levels of marginal bone loss. Methods Twenty implants were divided into Groups A and B, with simulated bone losses of 3.0 and 1.5 mm, respectively. Groups A and B were also each divided into two subgroups with five implants each: (1) titanium implants connected to titanium-alloy abutments and (2) titanium implants connected to zirconia abutments. The maximum deformation and failure forces of each sample was determined using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using the nonparametric Mann–Whitney test. Results The mean maximum deformation and failure forces obtained the subgroups were as follows: A1 (simulated bone loss of 3.0 mm, titanium-alloy abutment) = 540.6 N and 656.9 N, respectively; A2 (simulated bone loss of 3.0 mm, zirconia abutment) = 531.8 N and 852.7 N; B1 (simulated bone loss of 1.5 mm, titanium-alloy abutment) = 1070.9 N and 1260.2 N; and B2 (simulated bone loss of 1.5 mm, zirconia abutment) = 907.3 N and 1182.8 N. The maximum deformation force differed significantly between Groups B1 and B2 but not between Groups A1 and A2. The failure force did not differ between Groups A1 and A2 or between Groups B1 and B2. The maximum deformation and failure forces differed significantly between Groups A1 and B1 and between Groups A2 and B2. Conclusions Based on this experimental study, the maximum deformation and failure forces are lower for implants with a marginal bone loss of 3.0 mm than of 1.5 mm. Zirconia abutments can withstand physiological occlusal forces applied in the anterior region. PMID

  6. Influence of preparation depths on the fracture load of customized zirconia abutments with titanium insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Han-Sung; Yang, Hong-So; Park, Sang-Won; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Ji, Min-Kyung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the fracture load of customized zirconia abutments with titanium insert according to preparation depths, with or without 5-year artificial aging. Thirty-six identical lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max press) were fabricated to replace a maxillary right central incisor and cemented to the customized zirconia abutment with titanium insert on a 4.5×10 mm titanium fixture. Abutments were fabricated with 3 preparation depths (0.5 mm, 0.7 mm, and 0.9 mm). Half of the samples were then processed using thermocycling (temperature: 5-55℃, dwelling time: 120s) and chewing simulation (1,200,000 cycles, 49 N load). All specimens were classified into 6 groups depending on the preparation depth and artificial aging (non-artificial aging groups: N5, N7, N9; artificial aging groups: A5, A7, A9). Static load was applied at 135 degrees to the implant axis in a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses of the results were performed using 1-way ANOVA, 2-way ANOVA, independent t-test and multiple linear regression. The fracture loads were 539.28 ± 63.11 N (N5), 406.56 ± 28.94 N (N7), 366.66 ± 30.19 N (N9), 392.61 ± 50.57 N (A5), 317.94 ± 30.05 N (A7), and 292.74 ± 37.15 N (A9). The fracture load of group N5 was significantly higher than those of group N7 and N9 (P<.017). Consequently, the fracture load of group A5 was also significantly higher than those of group A7 and A9 (P<.05). After artificial aging, the fracture load was significantly decreased in all groups with various preparation depths (P<.05). The fracture load of a single anterior implant restored with lithium disilicate crown on zirconia abutment with titanium insert differed depending on the preparation depths. After 5-year artificial aging, the fracture loads of all preparation groups decreased significantly.

  7. Probabilistic analysis of preload in the abutment screw of a dental implant complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Teja; Ross, Thomas A; Lang, Lisa A; Millwater, Harry R

    2008-09-01

    Screw loosening is a problem for a percentage of implants. A probabilistic analysis to determine the cumulative probability distribution of the preload, the probability of obtaining an optimal preload, and the probabilistic sensitivities identifying important variables is lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the inherent variability of material properties, surface interactions, and applied torque in an implant system to determine the probability of obtaining desired preload values and to identify the significant variables that affect the preload. Using software programs, an abutment screw was subjected to a tightening torque and the preload was determined from finite element (FE) analysis. The FE model was integrated with probabilistic analysis software. Two probabilistic analysis methods (advanced mean value and Monte Carlo sampling) were applied to determine the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of preload. The coefficient of friction, elastic moduli, Poisson's ratios, and applied torque were modeled as random variables and defined by probability distributions. Separate probability distributions were determined for the coefficient of friction in well-lubricated and dry environments. The probabilistic analyses were performed and the cumulative distribution of preload was determined for each environment. A distinct difference was seen between the preload probability distributions generated in a dry environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 347 (61.9) N) compared to a well-lubricated environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 616 (92.2) N). The probability of obtaining a preload value within the target range was approximately 54% for the well-lubricated environment and only 0.02% for the dry environment. The preload is predominately affected by the applied torque and coefficient of friction between the screw threads and implant bore at lower and middle values of the preload CDF, and by the applied torque and the elastic modulus of the abutment

  8. Effects of the type and rigidity of the retainer and the number of abutting teeth on stress distribution of telescopic-retained removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Sahin

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: RPDs with an ARTR and both retainer types with a rigid design produced more strain distal to the abutting teeth. Using more than two abutting teeth did not improve the strain patterns of the tested RPDs. More strain was produced on the posterior edentulous ridges.

  9. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simindokht Zarrati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated.Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated; 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software.Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate.Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis.      

  10. Longitudinal Improvement in Periodontal Parameters between RPD Abutment Teeth with Direct and Indirect Retainers, after Periodontal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana Linhares; Tôrres, Ana Clara Soares de Paiva; de Oliveira, Kleiton Clécio; Calderon, Patrícia Dos Santos; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto; Gurgel, Bruno César de Vasconcelos

    2018-03-06

    To evaluate the effect of basic periodontal treatment on clinical periodontal parameters associated with abutment teeth of patients with mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial dentures (RPD) 18 months after treatment. Thirty patients with periodontal disease were treated and evaluated according to the following periodontal parameters: visible plaque index (VPI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and keratinized mucosa (KM). These parameters were compared between abutment teeth with direct and indirect retainers at baseline, and after 6 and 18 months. Data were analyzed by Friedman Test and Wilcoxon Test for all variables. Most patients (n = 26; 86.7%) included in the study were female and had a mean age of 61 years (±7.54). Results showed that VPI and BOP decreased over time, and that VPI values were higher in abutment teeth with direct retainers (p = 0.001). There was a reduction in PD after 6 months, which was maintained up to 18 months. In general, abutment teeth with direct retainers had significantly higher values for PD, GR, and CAL (p = 0.029). Data also indicated that the parameters for VPI, BOP, and PD improved; however, abutment teeth with direct retainers presented smaller improvements, compared with abutment teeth with indirect retainers, which presented significant improvements for almost all variables. Periodontal treatment and oral hygiene care of patients were adequate for maintenance of adequate periodontal conditions, regardless of the use of prostheses. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. The substitution of the implant and abutment for their analogs in mechanical studies: In vitro and in silico analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2017-01-01

    The use of analogs could reduce the cost of mechanical tests involving implant-supported crowns, but it is unclear if it would negatively affect the data accuracy. This study evaluated the substitution of the implant by implants analogs or abutment analogs as a support for crowns in mechanical tests, taking into account stress distribution and fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns. Thirty lithium disilicate monolithic crowns were randomized into three groups according to the set: Implant + abutment (IA); implant analog + abutment (IAA); abutment analog (AA). The specimens were subjected to mechanical fatigue (10 6 cycles, 200 N, 2 Hz) and thermal fatigue (10 4 cycles, 5°–55 °C). A final compression load was applied and the maximum fracture load was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). The experiment was validated by finite element analysis and the maximum principal stress was recorded. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean fracture load among groups (P > 0.05). The failure mode was similar for all groups with the origin of crack propagation located at the load point application. Finite element analysis showed similar stress distribution and stress peak values for all groups. The use of implant's or abutment's analog does not influence the fracture load and stress distribution for cemented implant-supported crowns. - Highlights: • A less costly methodology for evaluate implant-supported crowns is proposed. • It is suggested the substitution of the implant or abutment for their analogs. • The outcomes of fracture load are not influenced by these replacements.

  12. Diamondlike carbon coating as a galvanic corrosion barrier between dental implant abutments and nickel-chromium superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Erbil, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy, to investigate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating over titanium on galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and Ni-Cr alloy, and to evaluate the effect of DLC coating over titanium abutments on the fit and integrity of prosthetic assemblies by scanning electron microcopy (SEM). Five Ni-Cr and 10 titanium disks with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 3 mm were prepared. DLC coating was applied to five titanium disks. Electrode samples were prepared, and open circuit potential measurements, galvanic current measurements over platinum electrodes, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out. For the SEM evaluation, 20 Ni-Cr alloy and 10 gold alloy superstructures were cast and prepared over 30 abutments. DLC coating was applied to 10 of the abutments. Following the fixation of prosthetic assemblies, the samples were embedded in acrylic resin and cross sectioned longitudinally. Internal fit evaluations were carried out through examination of the SEM images. Titanium showed more noble and electrochemically stable properties than Ni-Cr alloy. DLC coating over the cathode electrode served as an insulating film layer over the surface and prevented galvanic coupling. Results of the SEM evaluations indicated that the DLC-coated and titanium abutments showed no statistically significant difference in fit. Hence, no adverse effects on the adaptation of prosthetic components were found with the application of DLC coating over abutment surfaces. DLC coating might serve as a galvanic corrosion barrier between titanium abutments and Ni-Cr superstructures.

  13. Fracture and Fatigue Resistance of Cemented versus Fused CAD-on Veneers over Customized Zirconia Implant Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossair, Shereen Ahmed; Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Morsi, Tarek Salah

    2015-01-05

    To evaluate the fracture mechanics of cemented versus fused CAD-on veneers on customized zirconia implant abutments. Forty-five identical customized CAD/CAM zirconia implant abutments (0.5 mm thick) were prepared and seated on short titanium implant abutments (Ti base). A second scan was made to fabricate 45 CAD-on veneers (IPS Empress CAD, A2). Fifteen CAD-on veneers were cemented on the zirconia abutments (Panavia F2.0). Another 15 were fused to the zirconia abutments using low-fusing glass, while manually layered veneers served as control (n = 15). The restorations were subjected to artificial aging (3.2 million cycles between 5 and 10 kg in a water bath at 37°C) before being axially loaded to failure. Fractured specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy to detect fracture origin, location, and size of critical crack. Stress at failure was calculated using fractography principles (alpha = 0.05). Cemented CAD-on restorations demonstrated significantly higher (F = 72, p CAD-on and manually layered restorations. Fractographic analysis of fractured specimens indicated that cemented CAD-on veneers failed due to radial cracks originating from the veneer/resin interface. Branching of the critical crack was observed in the bulk of the veneer. Fused CAD-on veneers demonstrated cohesive fracture originating at the thickest part of the veneer ceramic, while manually layered veneers failed due to interfacial fracture at the zirconia/veneer interface. Within the limitations of this study, cemented CAD-on veneers on customized zirconia implant abutments demonstrated higher fracture than fused and manually layered veneers. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. The substitution of the implant and abutment for their analogs in mechanical studies: In vitro and in silico analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha, E-mail: altair@unicamp.br

    2017-06-01

    The use of analogs could reduce the cost of mechanical tests involving implant-supported crowns, but it is unclear if it would negatively affect the data accuracy. This study evaluated the substitution of the implant by implants analogs or abutment analogs as a support for crowns in mechanical tests, taking into account stress distribution and fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns. Thirty lithium disilicate monolithic crowns were randomized into three groups according to the set: Implant + abutment (IA); implant analog + abutment (IAA); abutment analog (AA). The specimens were subjected to mechanical fatigue (10{sup 6} cycles, 200 N, 2 Hz) and thermal fatigue (10{sup 4} cycles, 5°–55 °C). A final compression load was applied and the maximum fracture load was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). The experiment was validated by finite element analysis and the maximum principal stress was recorded. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean fracture load among groups (P > 0.05). The failure mode was similar for all groups with the origin of crack propagation located at the load point application. Finite element analysis showed similar stress distribution and stress peak values for all groups. The use of implant's or abutment's analog does not influence the fracture load and stress distribution for cemented implant-supported crowns. - Highlights: • A less costly methodology for evaluate implant-supported crowns is proposed. • It is suggested the substitution of the implant or abutment for their analogs. • The outcomes of fracture load are not influenced by these replacements.

  15. Management of broken dental implant abutment in a patient with bruxism: A rare case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Al-Almaie

    2017-01-01

    This rare case report describes prosthodontic complications resulting from a dental implant was placed surgically more distally in the area of the missing mandibular first molar with a cantilever effect and a crest width of >12 mm in a 59-year-old patient who had a history of bruxism. Fracture of abutment is a common complication in implant was placed in area with high occlusal forces. Inability to remove the broken abutment may most often end up in discarding the implant. Adding one more den...

  16. 3D Discrete element approach to the problem on abutment pressure in a gently dipping coal seam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, S. V.; Revuzhenko, A. F.

    2017-09-01

    Using the discrete element method, the authors have carried out 3D implementation of the problem on strength loss in surrounding rock mass in the vicinity of a production heading and on abutment pressure in a gently dripping coal seam. The calculation of forces at the contacts between particles accounts for friction, rolling resistance and viscosity. Between discrete particles modeling coal seam, surrounding rock mass and broken rocks, an elastic connecting element is introduced to allow simulating coherent materials. The paper presents the kinematic patterns of rock mass deformation, stresses in particles and the graph of the abutment pressure behavior in the coal seam.

  17. Effects of Cement, Abutment Surface Pretreatment, and Artificial Aging on the Force Required to Detach Cantilever Fixed Dental Prostheses from Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Chepura, Taras; Schmitter, Marc; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    To examine the in vitro effects of different cements, abutment surface preconditioning, and artificial aging on the maximum tensile force needed to detach cantilever fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) from dental implants with titanium abutments. A total of 32 tissue-level implants were combined with standardized titanium abutments. For each test group, eight cantilever FDPs were fabricated using selective laser melting (cobalt-chromium [CoCr] alloy). The inner surfaces of the cantilever FDPs and half of the abutments were sandblasted and then joined by use of four different cements (two permanent and two semi-permanent) in two different amounts per cement. Subgroups were tested after either artificial aging (thermocycling and chewing simulation) or 3 days of water storage. Finally, axial pull off-tests were performed for each abutment separately. Cement type and surface pretreatment significantly affected decementation behavior. The highest retention forces (approximately 1,200 N) were associated with sandblasted abutments and permanent cements. With unconditioned abutments, temporary cements (Fu cement (Fu ≈ 100 N), resulted in rather low retention forces. Zinc phosphate cement guaranteed high retention forces. After aging, retention was sufficient only for cementation with zinc phosphate cement and for the combination of sandblasted abutments and glass-ionomer cement. When glass-ionomer cement is used to fix cantilever FDPs on implants, sandblasting of standard titanium abutments may help prevent loss of retention. Retention forces were still high for FDPs fixed with zinc phosphate cement, even when the abutments were not pretreated. Use of permanent cements only, however, is recommended to prevent unwanted loosening of cantilever FDPs.

  18. PULPAL BLOOD FLOW CHANGES IN ABUTMENT TEETH OF REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunt, Göknil Ergün; Kökçü, Deniz; Ceylan, Gözlem; Yılmaz, Nergiz; Güler, Ahmet Umut

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth supported (TSD) and toothtissue supported (TTSD) removable partial denture wearing on pulpal blood flow (PBF) of the abutment teeth by using Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF). Measurements were carried out on 60 teeth of 28 patients (28 teeth and 12 patients of TTSD group, 32 teeth and 16 patients of TSD group) who had not worn any type of removable partial dentures before, had no systemic problems and were non smokers. PBF values were recorded by LDF before insertion (day 0) and after insertion of dentures at day 1, day 7 and day 30. Statistical analysis was performed by student t test and covariance analyses of repeated measurements. In the group TTSD, the mean values of PBF decreased statistically significantly at day 1 after insertion when compared with PBF values before insertion (p<0,01). There was no statistically significant difference among PBF mean values on 1st, 7th and 30th day. However, in the group TSD, there was no statistically significant difference among PBF mean values before insertion and on 1st, 7th and 30th day. In other words, PBF mean values in group TSD continued without changing statistically significant on 1st, 7th and 30th day. TTSD wearing may show negative effect on the abutment teeth due to decreasing basal PBF. PMID:20001995

  19. Pulpal blood flow changes in abutment teeth of removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göknil Ergün Kunt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth supported (TSD and toothtissue supported (TTSD removable partial denture wearing on pulpal blood flow (PBF of the abutment teeth by using Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF.Measurements were carried out on 60 teeth of 28 patients (28 teeth and 12 patients of TTSD group, 32 teeth and 16 patients of TSD group who had not worn any type of removable partial dentures before, had no systemic problems and were non smokers. PBF values were recorded by LDF before insertion (day 0 and after insertion of dentures at day 1, day 7 and day 30. Statistical analysis was performed by student t test and covariance analyses of repeated measurements.In the group TTSD, the mean values of PBF decreased statistically significantly at day 1 after insertion when compared with PBF values before insertion (p<0,01. There was no statistically significant difference among PBF mean values on 1st, 7th and 30th day. However, in the group TSD, there was no statistically significant difference among PBF mean values before insertion and on 1st, 7th and 30th day. In other words, PBF mean values in group TSD continued without changing statistically significant on 1st, 7th and 30th day.TTSD wearing may show negative effect on the abutment teeth due to decreasing basal PBF.

  20. Accuracy of 3D white light scanning of abutment teeth impressions: evaluation of trueness and precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of digitizing dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner and to compare the findings among teeth types. To assess precision, impressions of the canine, premolar, and molar prepared to receive all-ceramic crowns were repeatedly scanned to obtain five sets of 3-D data (STL files). Point clouds were compared and error sizes were measured (n=10 per type). Next, to evaluate trueness, impressions of teeth were rotated by 10°-20° and scanned. The obtained data were compared with the first set of data for precision assessment, and the error sizes were measured (n=5 per type). The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate precision and trueness among three teeth types, and post-hoc comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction (α=.05). Precision discrepancies for the canine, premolar, and molar were 3.7 µm, 3.2 µm, and 7.3 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest precision for the molar (Pimpressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner was assessed to be a highly accurate method and provided discrepancy values in a clinically acceptable range. Further study is needed to improve digitizing performance of white light scanning in axial wall.

  1. Combination of natural teeth and osseointegrated implants as prosthesis abutments in a posterior cantilever bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have been used for several decades. Patients of all ages have chosen dental implants to replace a single tooth or several teeth or to support partial or full dentures. This paper reports two cases of patients treated with dental implant as alternative to replace the missing teeth and connected with natural tooth as abutments in a fixed restoration with distal cantilever bridge. The underlining reasons that we decided to make such kind fixed prostheses are because of clinically imposible to put the implant on certain area and the patients asked for prostheses as optimum as possible, so the mastication function could return to the homeostasis condition. The benefit of these treatments are that prostheses could be made as optimum as possible with a more economic price, so the patients feel quite satisfied. The result shows that a few years after the treatments finished there is no any disadvantageous effect of connecting teeth to implants as abutments in fixed partial dentures and there is no sign of a harmful effect to the opposing teeth either.

  2. Histology of a dental implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Perrotti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peri-implant crestal bone must be stable for aesthetic reasons. Aim of this study was a histologic analysis of an implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection. Materials and methods: A 32-year-old male patient participated in this study. The patient needed a bilateral mandibular restoration. Four implants were used, and were immediately restored and loaded the same day of insertion. After a 6 weeks healing period, one implant with platform-switched abutment was retrieved with trephine. Before retrieval the implant was osseointegrated and not mobile. On one side of the implant, a 1 mm resorption of the crestal bone was present. On the contrary, on the other side no bone resorption had occurred and about 1 mm of bone was present over the implant shoulder. Results: The bone-implant contact percentage was 65.1 ± 6.3 %. Platform- switching could help in maintaining the height of the peri-implant crestal bone.

  3. Analyses of Biofilm on Implant Abutment Surfaces Coating with Diamond-Like Carbon and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huacho, Patricia Milagros Maquera; Nogueira, Marianne N Marques; Basso, Fernanda G; Jafelicci Junior, Miguel; Francisconi, Renata S; Spolidorio, Denise M P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface free energy (SFE), wetting and surface properties as well as antimicrobial, adhesion and biocompatibility properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated surfaces. In addition, the leakage of Escherichia coli through the abutment-dental implant interface was also calculated. SFE was calculated from contact angle values; R a was measured before and after DLC coating. Antimicrobial and adhesion properties against E. coli and cytotoxicity of DLC with human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. Further, the ability of DLC-coated surfaces to prevent the migration of E. coli into the external hexagonal implant interface was also evaluated. A sterile technique was used for the semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (semi-quantitative PCR). The surfaces showed slight decreases in cell viability (p0.05). It was concluded that DLC was shown to be a biocompatible material with mild cytotoxicity that did not show changes in R a, SFE, bacterial adhesion or antimicrobial properties and did not inhibit the infiltration of E. coli into the abutment-dental implant interface.

  4. Effect of magnetic attachment with stress breaker on lateral stress to abutment tooth under overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, T; Ikebe, K; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a newly developed magnetic attachment with stress breaker was used in retentive components in overdentures. Excessive lateral stress has a more harmful effect on natural teeth than axial stress, and the magnetic attachment with stress breaker is expected to reduce lateral forces on abutment teeth and protect it teeth from excessive stress. However, the properties of this retainer have not yet been determined experimentally. This study compares the lateral forces on abutment teeth for three retainers under loading on the denture base in a model study. A mandibular simulation model is constructed to measure lateral stress. Three types of retentive devices are attached to the canine root. These devices include the conventional root coping, the conventional magnetic attachment and the new magnetic attachment with stress breaker. For each retentive device, load is generated on the occlusal table of the model overdenture, and the lateral stress on the canine root and the displacement of the overdenture measured. The magnetic attachment with stress breaker does not displace the denture and exhibits lower lateral stress in the canine root than conventional root coping and magnetic attachments.

  5. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs - Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    Purpose: To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients

  6. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant–abutment couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant–abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt–chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (Pabutment size or connection (Pabutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant–abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant–abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  7. Autonomous measurements of bridge pier and abutment scour using motion-sensing radio transmitters : technical transfer summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Scour around the foundations (piers and abutments) of a bridge due to river flow is often referred to as bridge scour. Bridge scour is a problem of national scope that has dramatic impacts on economics and safety of the traveling public. Bridge...

  8. Redesign of a fixture mount to be used as an impression coping and a provisional abutment as well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hsuan-Chen Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: An integrated fixture mount/impression coping/ temporary abutment can provide many advantages for immediate loading of dental implants, such as simpler procedure, less chair time, cost reduction, and comfort for the patients. Materials and Methods: A newly designed dental implant fixture mount (DIFMA can be used as an impression coping for taking an immediate impression. An immediate load provisional prosthesis can then be fabricated shortly after implant placement to immediately load the implants. This fixture mount can also serve as a temporary abutment for immediate chair-side fabrication of provisional prosthesis. Two clinical cases are presented. Results: A clinical case utilizing the fixture mount abutment (DIFMA/implant assembly is presented. The precision of fitting between the impression copings and implants is secured with this system. The chair time for taking an immediate impression is greatly reduced. Less cost for the restoration is provided and patient comfort is delivered. Conclusions: More patient satisfaction can be conferred by employing the fixture mount in the process of immediate impression taking and as an immediate provisional abutment.

  9. Effect of using nano and micro airborne abrasive particles on bond strength of implant abutment to prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Shadmehr, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Connecting prostheses to the implant abutments has become a concern and achieving a satisfactory retention has been focused in cement-retention prostheses recently. Sandblasting is a method to make a roughened surface for providing more retention. The aim of this study was to compare effects of nano and micro airborne abrasive particles (ABAP) in roughening surface of implant abutments and further retention of cemented copings. Thirty Xive abutments and analogues (4.5 D GH1) were mounted vertically in self-cured acrylic blocks. Full metal Ni-Cr copings with a loop on the top were fabricated with appropriate marginal adaptation for each abutment. All samples were divided into 3 groups: first group (MPS) was sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 micro ABAP, second group (NSP) was sandblasted with 80 nm Al2O3 nano ABAP, and the third group (C) was assumed as control. The samples were cemented with provisional cement (Temp Bond) and tensile bond strength of cemented copings was evaluated by a universal testing machine after thermic cycling. The t test for independent samples was used for statistical analysis by SPSS software (version 15) at the significant level of 0.05. Final result showed significant difference among all groups (pmicro ABAP is an efficient way for increasing bond strengths significantly, but it seems that micro ABAP was more effective.

  10. Marginal bone and soft tissue behavior following platform switching abutment connection/disconnection--a dog model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Célia C; Muñoz, Fernando; Cantalapiedra, António; Ramos, Isabel; Neves, Manuel; Blanco, Juan

    2015-09-01

    The effect on the marginal peri-implant tissues following repeated platform switching abutment removal and subsequent reconnection was studied. Six adult female Beagle dogs were selected, and Pm3 and Pm4 teeth, both left and right sides, were extracted and the sites healed for 3 months. At this time, 24 bone level (BL) (Straumann, Basel, Switzerland) Ø 3.3/8 mm implants were placed, 2 in each side on Pm3 and Pm4 regions. In one side (control group), 12 bone level conical Ø 3.6 mm healing abutments and, on the other side (test group), 12 Narrow CrossFit (NC) multibase abutments (Straumann) , Basel, Switzerland) were connected at time of implant surgery. On test group, all prosthetic procedures were carried out direct to multibase abutment without disconnecting it, where in the control group, the multibase abutment was connected/disconnected five times (at 6/8/10/12/14 weeks) during prosthetic procedures. Twelve fixed metal bridges were delivered 14 weeks after implant placement. A cleaning/control appointment was scheduled 6 months after implant placement. The animals were sacrificed at 9 months of the study. Clinical parameters and peri-apical x-rays were registered in every visit. Histomorphometric analysis was carried out for the 24 implants. The distance from multibase abutment shoulder to the first bone implant contact (S-BIC) was defined as the primary histomorphometric parameter. Wilcoxon comparison paired test (n = 6) found no statistically significant differences (buccal P = 0.917; Lingual P = 0.463) between test and control groups both lingually and buccally for S-BIC distance. Only Pm3 buccal aBE-BC (distance from the apical end of the barrier epithelium to the first bone implant contact) (P = 0.046) parameter presented statistically significant differences between test and control groups. Control group presented 0.57 mm more recession than test group, being this difference statistically significant between the two groups (P < 0.001). It can be conclude

  11. Bone Loss at Implant with Titanium Abutments Coated by Soda Lime Glass Containing Silver Nanoparticles: A Histological Study in the Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Arturo; Guitián, Francisco; López-Píriz, Roberto; Bartolomé, José F.; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression. PMID:24466292

  12. Stress distribution difference between Lava Ultimate full crowns and IPS e.max CAD full crowns on a natural tooth and on tooth-shaped implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Ivo; Daher, René

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this short communication is to present finite element analysis comparison of the stress distribution between CAD/CAM full crowns made of Lava Ultimate and of IPS e.max CAD, adhesively luted to natural teeth and to implant abutments with the shape of natural teeth. Six 3D models were prepared using a 3D content-creating software, based on a micro-CT scan of a human mandibular molar. The geometry of the full crown and of the abutment was the same for all models representing Lava Ultimate full crowns (L) and IPS e.max CAD full crowns (E) on three different abutments: prepared natural tooth (n), titanium abutment (t) and zirconia abutment (z). A static load of 400 N was applied on the vestibular and lingual cusps, and fixtures were applied to the base of the models. After running the static linear analysis, the post-processing data we analyzed. The stress values at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lt and Lz groups were significantly higher than the stress values at the same interface of all the other models. The high stress concentration in the adhesive at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lava Ultimate group on implants might be one of the factors contributing to the reported debondings of crowns.

  13. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Kim, Seok-Gyu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (Pabutment shade (Pabutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations.

  14. Bone loss at implant with titanium abutments coated by soda lime glass containing silver nanoparticles: a histological study in the dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Martinez

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression.

  15. Stock Versus CAD/CAM Customized Zirconia Implant Abutments – Clinical and Patient‐Based Outcomes in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Henny J.A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Single‐tooth replacement often requires a prefabricated dental implant and a customized crown. The benefits of individualization of the abutment remain unclear. Purpose This randomized controlled clinical trial aims to study potential benefits of individualization of zirconia implant abutments with respect to preservation of marginal bone level and several clinical and patient‐based outcome measures. Material and Methods Fifty participants with a missing premolar were included and randomly assigned to standard (ZirDesign, DentsplySirona Implants, Mölndal, Sweden) or computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) customized (Atlantis, DentsplySirona Implants, Mölndal, Sweden) zirconia abutment therapy. Peri‐implant bone level (primary outcome), Plaque‐index, calculus formation, bleeding on probing, gingiva index, probing pocket depth, recession, appearance of soft tissues and patients' contentment were assessed shortly after placement and one year later. Results No implants were lost and no complications related to the abutments were observed. Statistically significant differences between stock and CAD/CAM customized zirconia abutments could not be demonstrated for any of the operationalized variables. Conclusion The use of a CAD/CAM customized zirconia abutment in single tooth replacement of a premolar is not associated with an improvement in clinical performance or patients' contentment when compared to the use of a stock zirconia abutment. PMID:27476829

  16. Influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capability of straight or angulated zirconia abutments in implant/tooth-supported fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Doppler, Klaus E; Erdelt, Kurt J; Knauber, Andreas W; Pospiech, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the fracture behavior of straight and angulated zirconia implant abutments used in ZirDesign (Astra Tech) implant/tooth-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in the maxilla. Four different test groups (n = 8) representing anterior implant/tooth-supported FPDs were prepared. Groups 1 and 2 simulated a clinical situation with an ideal implant position (maxillary left central incisor) from a prosthetic point of view, which allowed for the use of a straight, prefabricated zirconia abutment. Groups 3 and 4 simulated a situation with a compromised implant position that required an angulated (20-degree) abutment. OsseoSpeed implants (4.5 3 13 mm, Astra Tech) as well as metal tooth analogs (maxillary right lateral incisor) with simulated periodontal mobility were mounted in polymethyl methacrylate. The FPDs (chromium-cobalt alloy) were cemented with glass ionomer. Groups 2 and 4 were thermomechanically loaded and subjected to static loading until failure. Statistical analysis of force data at the fracture site was performed using nonparametric tests. All samples survived thermomechanical loading. Artificial aging did not lead to a significant decrease in load-bearing capacity in either the straight abutments or the angulated abutments. The restorations that used angulated abutments exhibited higher fracture loads than the restorations with straight abutments (group 1: 209.13 ± 39.11 N; group 2: 233.63 ± 30.68 N; group 3: 324.62 ± 108.07 N; group 4: 361.75 ± 73.82 N). This difference in load-bearing performance was statistically significant, both with and without artificial aging. All abutment fractures occurred below the implant shoulder. Compensation for angulated implant positions with an angulated zirconia abutment is possible without reducing the load-bearing capacity of implant/tooth-supported anterior FPDs.

  17. Axial displacement of abutments into implants and implant replicas, with the tapered cone-screw internal connection, as a function of tightening torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Bruno; Jordan, Laurence; Blind, Olivier; Tavernier, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The passive fit of a superstructure on implant abutments is essential to success. One source of error when using a tapered cone-screw internal connection may be the difference between the tightening torque level applied to the abutments by the laboratory technician compared to that applied by the treating clinician. The purpose of this study was to measure the axial displacement of tapered cone-screw abutments into implants and their replicas as a function of the tightening torque level. Twenty tapered cone-screw abutments were selected. Two groups were created: 10 abutments were secured into 10 implants, and 10 abutments were secured into 10 corresponding implant replicas. Each abutment was tightened in increasing increments of 5 Ncm, from 0 Ncm to 45 Ncm, with a torque controller. The length of each sample was measured repeatedly with an Electronic Digital Micrometer. The mean axial displacement for the implant group and the replica group was calculated. The data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney and Spearman tests. For both groups, there was always an axial displacement of the abutment upon each incremental application of torque. The mean axial displacement values varied between 7 and 12 microm for the implant group and between 6 and 21 microm for the replica group at each 5-Ncm increment. From 0 to 45 Ncm, the total mean axial displacement values were 89 microm for the implant group and 122 microm for the replica group. There was a continuous axial displacement of the abutments into implants and implant replicas when the applied torque was raised from 0 to 45 Ncm. Torque applied above the level recommended by the manufacturer increased the difference in displacement between the two groups.

  18. Evaluation of the Surface Treatment on Bone Healing in a Transmucosal 1-mm Area of Implant Abutment: An Experimental Study in the Rabbit Tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; da Silva Neto, Ulisses Tavares

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect on bone tissue healing patterns in 1-mm area treated in the transmucosal surface of the abutment in the tibia of rabbits. Forty-six abutments were divided into two groups: control group (CG) with 14 abutments with smooth surface and experimental group (EG) with 32 abutments presenting a 1-mm area of the transmucosal surface treated through sandblasting with microparticles of titanium oxide followed by acid etching. Five samples of each group were analyzed using an optical laser profilometer for surface roughness characterization. Thirty-six Morse taper implants (3.5 mm in diameter and 7 mm in length) were inserted 1.5 mm subcrestal into the tibiae of nine rabbits. The implants were removed after 8, 10, and 12 weeks for histological analysis. The histological slides were prepared and analyzed qualitatively in relation to the new bone at the interface bone-abutment and quantitatively, in relation to bone height from the base of the implant. These data were computed and statistically compared inside the groups using analysis of variance and the U-test between groups for same time. Both groups exhibited bone growth in the direction and over the surface of the abutments, with good healing. However, the EG group showed an increased height of bone formation in the crestal direction, and highly significant differences were observed (p abutment with treatment of the surface facilitated the maintenance of bone height around the abutment compared with the same abutment with the totally smooth surface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs-Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    2017-07-01

    To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Twenty-six patients with nonadjacent missing teeth in the esthetic zone were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial (within-subject comparison). Two implants placed in each were restored using abutments of different geometry. Patients' appreciation was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) by recording answers to three questions, and dentists' appreciation was determined by means of the Pink Esthetic Score (PES) at T0 (crown cementation, baseline) and at T12 (1 year post-cementation). ANOVA with post hoc analysis was used to identify differences between groups and at different moments in time. Pearson correlations were calculated between all variables, both at T0 and at T12. No statistically significant differences were found at any time between the control and experimental abutment design, either for the PES or for the VAS score. PES slightly improved after 1 year, as did the VAS rating related to functioning with the implant-crown compared to the natural teeth. All PES and VAS scores demonstrated highly significant correlation. Both patient satisfaction and professional appreciation of muco-gingival conditions after single implant treatment in the esthetic zone were high; however, the curved, experimental abutment design performed no better than the conventional, divergent type. Curved abutment design does not significantly impact crown or gingival esthetics as assessed by PES and VAS scored by dentists and patients, respectively. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Influence of Abutment Design on Stiffness, Strength, and Failure of Implant-Supported Monolithic Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Tim; Huber, Samuel; Bürki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Brägger, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Recent technical development allows the digital manufacturing of monolithic reconstructions with high-performance materials. For implant-supported crowns, the fixation requires an abutment design onto which the reconstruction can be bonded. The aim of this laboratory investigation was to analyze stiffness, strength, and failure modes of implant-supported, computer-assisted design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-generated resin nano ceramic (RNC) crowns bonded to three different titanium abutments. Eighteen monolithic RNC crowns were produced and loaded in a universal testing machine under quasi-static condition according to DIN ISO 14801. With regard to the type of titanium abutment, three groups were defined: (1) prefabricated cementable standard; (2) CAD/CAM-constructed individualized; and (3) novel prefabricated bonding base. Stiffness and strength were measured and analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Sections of the specimens were examined microscopically. Stiffness demonstrated high stability for all specimens loaded in the physiological loading range with means and standard deviations of 1,579 ± 120 N/mm (group A), 1,733 ± 89 N/mm (group B), and 1,704 ± 162 N/mm (group C). Mean strength of the novel prefabricated bonding base (group C) was 17% lower than of the two other groups. Plastic deformations were detectable for all implant-abutment crown connections. Monolithic implant crowns made of RNC seem to represent a feasible and stable prosthetic construction under laboratory testing conditions with strength higher than the average occlusal force, independent of the different abutment designs used in this investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Economical bridge solutions based on innovative composite dowels and integrated abutments ecobridge

    CERN Document Server

    Băncilă, Radu

    2015-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the research project “ECOBRIDGE – Demonstration of ECOnomical BRIDGE solutions based on innovative composite dowels and integrated abutments – RFCS – CT 2010-00024”, which has been co-funded by the Research Fund for Coal and Steel (R.F.C.S.) of the European Community. The main topics of the book are the following: design of integral bridges, innovative composite dowels for the shear transmission, construction of bridges, structural analysis of bridges and monitoring. The book joins the technical experience and the contributions of the involved research partners. The technical content of all the papers is present-day in the field of the design, construction and monitoring of innovative composite bridges. The efficient design and construction improve and consolidate the market position of steel construction and steel producing industry. In addition, the advanced forms of construction are contributing to savings in material and energy consumption for the structure during prod...

  2. Radioactive or natural tracer techniques for leak determining of dam abutment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiansheng; Du Guoping; Zheng Zheng; Sun Jing

    1995-01-01

    Infiltration and localization of preferential infiltration zones at the dam abutment are measured using radioactive tracer tests of flow in boreholes, meanwhile interconnection between boreholes and the observing water points is analysed. The theory and practice of radioactive tracer synthetic detective method are described to give methods and calculation formulae used under the condition of stable flow in single well to measure permeability coefficient and hydrostatic heads. Major single hole techniques including measurement for seepage line, velocity, rate of seepage flow and relationship of recharge of groundwater in aquifers are introduced briefly. The possibilities offered by natural tracers are analysed, including electric-conduct, ph-value and temperature of water as well as stable isotopes (D, 18 O) and tritium. Furthermore, the sensibilities of this theory and methods were confirmed by detecting seepage flow field of Xinanjiang Dam

  3. Influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyon-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jeong; Jeon, Young-Chan; Chang, Brian Myung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Regular and wide-diameter implant systems with three different joint connection designs: an external butt joint, a one-stage internal cone, and a two-stage internal cone were divided into seven groups (n=5, in each group). The initial removal torque values of the abutment screw were measured with a digital torque gauge. The postload removal torque values were measured after 100,000 cycles of a 150 N and a 10 Hz cyclic load had been applied. Subsequently, the rates of the initial and postload removal torque losses were calculated to evaluate the effect of the joint connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Each group was compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test as post-hoc test (α=0.05). THE POSTLOAD REMOVAL TORQUE VALUE WAS HIGH IN THE FOLLOWING ORDER WITH REGARD TO MAGNITUDE: two-stage internal cone, one-stage internal cone, and external butt joint systems. In the regular-diameter group, the external butt joint and one-stage internal cone systems showed lower postload removal torque loss rates than the two-stage internal cone system. In the wide-diameter group, the external butt joint system showed a lower loss rate than the one-stage internal cone and two-stage internal cone systems. In the two-stage internal cone system, the wide-diameter group showed a significantly lower loss rate than the regular-diameter group (P<.05). The results of this study showed that the external butt joint was more advantageous than the internal cone in terms of the postload removal torque loss. For the difference in the implant diameter, a wide diameter was more advantageous in terms of the torque loss rate.

  4. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied

  5. Dose distribution at junctional area abutting X-ray and electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kwang Mo

    2004-01-01

    For the head and neck radiotherapy, abutting photon field with electron field is frequently used for the irradiation of posterior neck when tolerable dose on spinal cord has been reached. Using 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron beams of Clinac1800(Varian, USA) linear accelerator, we performed film dosimetry by the X-OMAT V film of Kodak in solid water phantom according to depths(0 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron(1 Gy) were exposes to 8 cm depth and surface(SSD 100 cm) of phantom. The dose distribution to the junction line between photon(10 x 10 cm field with block) and electron(15 cm x 15 cm field with block) fields was also measured according to depths(0 cm, 0.5 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). At the junction line between photon and electron fields, the hot spot was developed on the side of the photon field and a cold spot was developed on that of the electron field. The hot spot in the photon side was developed at depth 1.5 cm with 7 mm width. The maximum dose of hot spot was increased to 6% of reference doses in the photon field. The cold spot in the electron side was developed at all measured depths(0.5 cm-3 cm) with 1-12.5 mm widths. The decreased dose in the cold spot was 4.5-30% of reference dose in the electron field. When we make use of abutting photon field with electron field for the treatment of head and neck cancer we should consider the hot and cold dose area in the junction of photon and electron field according to location of tumor.

  6. Influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyon-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jeong; Jeon, Young-Chan; Chang, Brian Myung

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. MATERIALS AND METHODS Regular and wide-diameter implant systems with three different joint connection designs: an external butt joint, a one-stage internal cone, and a two-stage internal cone were divided into seven groups (n=5, in each group). The initial removal torque values of the abutment screw were measured with a digital torque gauge. The postload removal torque values were measured after 100,000 cycles of a 150 N and a 10 Hz cyclic load had been applied. Subsequently, the rates of the initial and postload removal torque losses were calculated to evaluate the effect of the joint connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Each group was compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test as post-hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The postload removal torque value was high in the following order with regard to magnitude: two-stage internal cone, one-stage internal cone, and external butt joint systems. In the regular-diameter group, the external butt joint and one-stage internal cone systems showed lower postload removal torque loss rates than the two-stage internal cone system. In the wide-diameter group, the external butt joint system showed a lower loss rate than the one-stage internal cone and two-stage internal cone systems. In the two-stage internal cone system, the wide-diameter group showed a significantly lower loss rate than the regular-diameter group (P<.05). CONCLUSION The results of this study showed that the external butt joint was more advantageous than the internal cone in terms of the postload removal torque loss. For the difference in the implant diameter, a wide diameter was more advantageous in terms of the torque loss rate. PMID:24843398

  7. Effect of metal opaquer on the final color of 3 ceramic crown types on 3 abutment configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rabia; Yilmaz, Burak; Mortazavi, Aras; Ozcelik, Tuncer B; Johnston, William M

    2018-04-30

    The effect of a recently introduced metal opaquer when used to mask the color of a titanium abutment under ceramic crown systems is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the color coordinates of 3 ceramic crown types-characterized monolithic lithium disilicate (LDC) (IPS e.max; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), layered lithium disilicate (LDL) (IPS e.max; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), and layered zirconia (ZL) (H.C. Starck)-on 3 abutment configurations, nonopaqued titanium (Ti), resin opaqued titanium (Op), and zirconia (Zir). In addition, the color differences (CIEDE2000) were evaluated among the 3 crown types on 3 different abutment substrates. Ten Ti disks (10×1 mm) were fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) to represent the Ti abutments. Five Ti specimens were opaqued (Op) (whiteMetal Opaquer wMO; Blue Sky Bio), and 5 were not opaqued (Ti). Ten zirconia disks were fabricated with CAD-CAM and sintered (10×1.2 mm). Five disks were used as backings to represent Zir abutments, and 5 disks were layered with 1 mm of porcelain (B1, IPS e.Max Ceram; Ivoclar Vivadent AG) to represent layered zirconia crowns (ZL). Ten lithium disilicate plates (14×14×1.2 mm) were sectioned from CAD blocks (B1 IPS e.Max CAD; Ivoclar Vivadent AG). Five plates were layered with the same porcelain (B1, 1 mm), and 5 plates were surface characterized and glazed. An LDL crown on a Zir abutment configuration was used as the control. The 3 simulated crown types (n=5) were optically connected to each of the 3 abutment types, and the color of the 9 groups was measured using a spectroradiometer. Measured data were reported in CIELab coordinates. CIELab data were used to calculate color differences between the control and the 8 experimental groups. Color data were summarized for each group, and analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA. For pairwise comparisons, a Bonferroni correction of t tests was used, and for interpretive analysis of resulting color difference

  8. Effect of platform connection and abutment material on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations: a nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Pessanha Henriques, Guilherme Elias

    2014-11-01

    Although various abutment connections and materials have recently been introduced, insufficient data exist regarding the effect of stress distribution on their mechanical performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different abutment materials and platform connections on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations with the finite element method. Nine experimental groups were modeled from the combination of 3 platform connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse tapered) and 3 abutment materials (titanium, zirconia, and hybrid) as follows: external hexagon-titanium, external hexagon-zirconia, external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, internal hexagon-zirconia, internal hexagon-hybrid, Morse tapered-titanium, Morse tapered-zirconia, and Morse tapered-hybrid. Finite element models consisted of a 4×13-mm implant, anatomic abutment, and lithium disilicate central incisor crown cemented over the abutment. The 49 N occlusal loading was applied in 6 steps to simulate the incisal guidance. Equivalent von Mises stress (σvM) was used for both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the implant and abutment in all the groups and the maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses for the numerical comparison of the zirconia parts. The highest abutment σvM occurred in the Morse-tapered groups and the lowest in the external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, and internal hexagon-hybrid groups. The σmax and σmin values were lower in the hybrid groups than in the zirconia groups. The stress distribution concentrated in the abutment-implant interface in all the groups, regardless of the platform connection or abutment material. The platform connection influenced the stress on abutments more than the abutment material. The stress values for implants were similar among different platform connections, but greater stress concentrations were observed in internal connections

  9. Influence of abutment material on peri-implant soft tissues in anterior areas with thin gingival biotype: a multicentric prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lops, Diego; Stellini, Edoardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Cea, Niccolò; Romeo, Eugenio; Bressan, Eriberto

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present clinical trial was to analyze, through spectrophotometric digital technology, the influence of the abutment material on the color of the peri-implant soft tissue in patients with thin gingival biotype. Thirty-seven patients received an endosseous dental implant in the anterior maxilla. At time of each definitive prosthesis delivery, an all-ceramic crown has been tried on gold, titanium and zirconia abutment. Peri-implant soft-tissue color has been measured through a spectrophotometer after the insertion of each single abutment. Also facial peri-implant soft-tissue thickness was measured at the level of the implant neck through a caliper. A specific software has been utilized to identify a standardized tissue area and to collect the data before the statistical analysis in Lab* color space. ΔE parameters of the selected abutments were tested for correlation with mucosal thickness. Pearson correlation test was used. Only 15 patients met the study inclusion criteria on peri-implant soft-tissue thickness. Peri-implant soft-tissue color was different from that around natural teeth, no matter which type of restorative material was selected. Measurements regarding all the abutments were above the critical threshold of ΔE 8.74 for intraoral color distinction by the naked eye. The ΔE mean values of gold and zirconium abutments were similar (11.43 and 11.37, respectively) and significantly lower (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively) than the titanium abutment (13.55). In patients with a facial soft-tissue thickness ≤2 mm, the ΔE mean value of gold and zirconia abutments was significantly lower than that of titanium abutments (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively) and much more close to the reference threshold of 8.74. For peri-implant soft tissue of ≤2 mm, gold or zirconia abutments could be selected in anterior areas treatment. Moreover, the thickness of the peri-implant soft tissue seemed to be a crucial factor in the abutment impact

  10. Effects of the implant design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement: three-dimensional finite element analysis of original computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Imazato, Satoshi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-09-01

    Occlusal overloading causes peri-implant bone resorption. Previous studies examined stress distribution in alveolar bone around commercial implants using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. However, the commercial implants contained some different designs. The purpose of this study is to reveal the effect of the target design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement. Six 3D implant models were created for different implant-abutment joints: 1) internal joint model (IM); 2) external joint model (EM); 3) straight abutment (SA) shape; 4) tapered abutment (TA) shapes; 5) platform switching (PS) in the IM; and 6) modified TA neck design (reverse conical neck [RN]). A static load of 100 N was applied to the basal ridge surface of the abutment at a 45-degree oblique angle to the long axis of the implant. Both stress distribution in peri-implant bone and abutment micromovement in the SA and TA models were analyzed. Compressive stress concentrated on labial cortical bone and tensile stress on the palatal side in the EM and on the labial side in the IM. There was no difference in maximum principal stress distribution for SA and TA models. Tensile stress concentration was not apparent on labial cortical bone in the PS model (versus IM). Maximum principal stress concentrated more on peri-implant bone in the RN than in the TA model. The TA model exhibited less abutment micromovement than the SA model. This study reveals the effects of the design of specific components on peri-implant bone stress and abutment displacement after implant-supported single restoration in the anterior maxilla.

  11. Effects of different abutment material and surgical insertion torque on the marginal adaptation of an internal conical interface: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Davide; Pieroni, Stefano; Mangano, Francesco Guido; Briguglio, Francesco; Re, Dino

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the marginal adaptation at implant-abutment connection of an implant featuring a conical (45° taper) internal hexagonal abutment with a connection depth of 2.5mm, comparing the performance of two identical abutments of different material (titanium grade-4 and Co-Cr-alloy). Twenty implants (3.75 mm×15 mm) were connected to non-matching abutments (5.5 mm×10 mm) of two different materials (titanium grade-4: n=10; Co-Cr-alloy: n=10). The specimens were separately embedded in epoxylite resin, inside copper cylinders, and submerged without covering the most coronal portion (5 mm) of the fixture. Five specimens per group were stressed simulating a surgical 100 Ncm insertion torque, while the others had no torque simulation. All specimens were subjected to a non-axial static load (100 N) in a universal testing machine, under an angle of 30° with respect to the implant axis. Once 100 N load was reached, low shrinkage self-curing resin was injected inside the cylinders, and load was maintained until complete resin polymerization. Specimens were cut and analyzed with optical and scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) to evaluate the marginal adaptation at the implant-abutment connection. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA (p=0.02). None of the 20 samples failed. The implant-abutment connection was able to guarantee a good optical seal; SEM analysis confirmed the absence of microgaps. Within the limits of this study (small sample size, limited time) the marginal adaptation of the implant-abutment connection was not affected by the abutment material nor by the application of surgical insertion torque. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of fit accuracy and torque maintenance of zirconia and titanium abutments for internal tri-channel and external-hex implant connections

    OpenAIRE

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mousavi, Niloufar; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of implant connection design (external vs. internal) on the fit discrepancy and torque loss of zirconia and titanium abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two regular platform dental implants, one with external connection (Br?nemark, Nobel Biocare AB) and the other with internal connection (Noble Replace, Nobel Biocare AB), were selected. Seven titanium and seven customized zirconia abutments were used for each connection design. Measurement...

  13. Effect of Repeated Screw Joint Closing and Opening Cycles and Cyclic Loading on Abutment Screw Removal Torque and Screw Thread Morphology: Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mahnaz; Mahgoli, Hosseinali; Payaminia, Leila

    To evaluate the effect of repeated screw joint closing and opening cycles and cyclic loading on abutment screw removal torque and screw thread morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three groups (n = 10 in each group) of implant-abutment-abutment screw assemblies were created. There were also 10 extra abutment screws as new screws in group 3. The abutment screws were tightened to 12 Ncm with an electronic torque meter; then they were removed and removal torque values were recorded. This sequence was repeated 5 times for group 1 and 15 times for groups 2 and 3. The same screws in groups 1 and 2 and the new screws in group 3 were then tightened to 12 Ncm; this was also followed by screw tightening to 30 Ncm and retightening to 30 Ncm 15 minutes later. Removal torque measurements were performed after screws were subjected to cyclic loading (0.5 × 10⁶ cycles; 1 Hz; 75 N). Moreover, the surface topography of one screw from each group before and after cyclic loading was evaluated with SEM and compared with an unused screw. All groups exhibited reduced removal torque values in comparison to insertion torque in each cycle. However, there was a steady trend of torque loss in each group. A comparison of the last cycle of the groups before loading showed significantly greater torque loss value in the 15th cycle of groups 2 and 3 compared with the fifth cycle of group 1 (P abutment is definitively placed.

  14. Custom CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) block and bonded to a titanium insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a technique in which a custom-made computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) healing abutment milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block is fabricated and bonded to a titanium metal insert. An impression is made during dental implant surgery, and the CAD-CAM custom-made healing abutment is fabricated before second-stage surgery while appropriate healing time is allowed for the dental implant to osseointegrate. The contours of the healing abutment are based on the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The healing tissue obtains contours that will be compatible with the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After the milling process is complete, a titanium metal insert is bonded to the healing abutment. Placement of the custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment at second-stage surgery allows the tissue to obtain contours similar to those of the definitive prosthesis. A custom-made CAD-CAM impression coping milled from a PMMA block and with a titanium insert is used for the definitive impression after the soft tissue has healed. This technique allows guided soft tissue healing by using a custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Heat Transfer to the Implant-Bone Interface During Removal of Metal Copings Cemented onto Titanium Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakan, Umut; Cakan, Murat; Delilbasi, Cagri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the temperature increase due to heat transferred to the implant-bone interface when the abutment screw channel is accessed or a metal-ceramic crown is sectioned buccally with diamond or tungsten carbide bur using an air rotor, with or without irrigation. Cobalt-chromium copings were cemented onto straight titanium abutments. The temperature changes during removal of the copings were recorded over a period of 1 minute. The sectioning of coping with diamond bur and without water irrigation generated the highest temperature change at the cervical part of the implant. Both crown removal methods resulted in an increase in temperature at the implant-bone interface. However, this temperature change did not exceed 47°C, the potentially damaging threshold for bone reported in the literature.

  16. A study on seismic behavior of pile foundations of bridge abutment on liquefiable ground through shaking table tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Mitsuhiko; Tanimoto, Shunsuke; Ishida, Shuichi; Ohsumi, Michio; Hoshikuma, Jun-ichi

    2017-10-01

    There is risk of bridge foundations to be damaged by liquefaction-induced lateral spreading of ground. Once bridge foundations have been damaged, it takes a lot of time for restoration. Therefore, it is important to assess the seismic behavior of the foundations on liquefiable ground appropriately. In this study, shaking table tests of models on a scale of 1/10 were conducted at the large scale shaking table in Public Works Research Institute, Japan, to investigate the seismic behavior of pile-supported bridge abutment on liquefiable ground. The shaking table tests were conducted for three types of model. Two are models of existing bridge which was built without design for liquefaction and the other is a model of bridge which was designed based on the current Japanese design specifications for highway bridges. As a result, the bending strains of piles of the abutment which were designed based on the current design specifications were less than those of the existing bridge.

  17. Surrounding rock abutment pressure distribution and thickness effect of dynamic catastrophic in fully mechanized sublevel mining stope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, G.; Yang, K.; Chang, J.; Wang, L. [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2006-12-15

    Numerical simulation was carried out to analyse the distribution of surrounding rock stress with coal seams of different thickness (3.0, 5.4, 8.0, 12.0 m) based on engineering geology and exploitation technology of the 151(3) fully mechanized sublevel caving face in Xieqiao colliery. The research indicates that the variation of abutment pressure has obvious difference in coal seams of different thickness. The effect of abutment pressure distribution in seams of different thickness on coal-methane outbursts was analysed. With an increase in thickness of the caving seam, the research illustrates that the elastic energy resilience is reduced and the capability of resisting damage and deformation is strengthened in coal around the stope. The results show that fully mechanized sublevel caving slows down dynamic catastrophes. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all Pabutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  19. The influence of implant-abutment connection to peri-implant bone loss: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricasulo, Riccardo; Malchiodi, Luciano; Ghensi, Paolo; Fantozzi, Giuliano; Cucchi, Alessandro

    2018-05-15

    Different implant-abutment connections are available and it has been claimed they could have an effect on marginal bone loss. The aim of this review is to establish if implant connection configuration influences peri-implant bone loss (PBL) after functional loading. A specific question was formulated according to the Population, Intervention, Control, and Outcome (PICO): Does the type of implant-abutment connection (external, internal, or conical) have an influence on peri-implant bone loss? A PubMed/MEDLINE electronic search was conducted to identify English language publications published in international journals during the last decade (from 2006 to 2016). The search was conducted by using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords "dental implants OR dental abutment AND external connection OR internal connection OR conical connection OR Morse Taper." Selected studies were randomized clinical trials and prospective studies; in vitro studies, case reports and retrospective studies were excluded. Titles and abstracts and, in the second phase, full texts, were evaluated autonomously and in duplicate by two reviewers. A total of 1649 articles were found, but only 14 studies met the pre-established inclusion criteria and were considered suitable for meta-analytic analysis. The network meta-analysis (NMA) suggested a significant difference between the external and the conical connections; this was less evident for the internal and conical ones. Platform-switching (PS) seemed to positively affect bone levels, non-regarding the implant-connection it was applied to. Within the limitations of this systematic review, it can be concluded that crestal bone levels are better maintained in the short-medium term when internal kinds of interface are adopted. In particular, conical connections seem to be more advantageous, showing lower peri-implant bone loss, but further studies are necessary to investigate the efficacy of implant-abutment connection on stability of crestal

  20. Effect of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on removal torque in external and internal hex implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hnd Hadi; Lee, Jin-Han; Bae, Ji-Myung; Cho, Hye-Won

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on the removal torque (RTV) in external hex (EH) and internal hex (IH) implants. Forty screw-retained single crowns were connected to external and internal hex implants. The prepared titanium abutment screws were classified into 8 groups based on the number of threads (n = 5 per group): EH 12.5, 6.5, 3.5, 2.5 and IH 6.5, 5, 3.5, 2.5 threads. The abutment screws were tightened with 20 Ncm torque twice with 10-minute intervals. After 5 minutes, the initial RTVs of the abutment screws were measured with a digital torque gauge (MGT12). A customized jig was constructed to apply a load along the implant long axis at the central fossa of the maxillary first molar. The post-loading RTVs were measured after 16,000 cycles of mechanical loading with 50 N at a 1-Hz frequency. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The post-loading RTVs were significantly lower than the initial RTVs in the EH 2.5 thread and IH 2.5 thread groups (P<.05). The initial RTVs exhibited no significant differences among the 8 groups, whereas the post-loading RTVs of the EH 6.5 and EH 3.5 thread groups were higher than those of the IH 3.5 thread group (P<.05). Within the limitations of this study, the external hex implants with short screw lengths were more advantageous than internal hex implants with short screw lengths in torque maintenance after cyclic loading.

  1. The effects of simulated bone loss on the implant-abutment assembly and likelihood of fracture: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Behzad; Suleiman, Mahmood; Palmer, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    The crestal bone level around a dental implant may influence its strength characteristics by offering protection against mechanical failures. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of simulated bone loss on modes, loads, and cycles to failure in an in vitro model. Different amounts of bone loss were simulated: 0, 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 mm from the implant head. Forty narrow-diameter (3.0-mm) implant-abutment assemblies were tested using compressive bending and cyclic fatigue testing. Weibull and accelerated life testing analysis were used to assess reliability and functional life. Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher-Exact test and the Spearman ranked correlation. Compressive bending tests showed that the level of bone loss influenced the load-bearing capacity of implant-abutment assemblies. Fatigue testing showed that the modes, loads, and cycles to failure had a statistically significant relationship with the level of bone loss. All 16 samples with bone loss of 3.0 mm or more experienced horizontal implant body fractures. In contrast, 14 of 16 samples with 0 and 1.5 mm of bone loss showed abutment and screw fractures. Weibull and accelerated life testing analysis indicated a two-group distribution: the 0- and 1.5-mm bone loss samples had better functional life and reliability than the 3.0- and 4.5-mm samples. Progressive bone loss had a significant effect on modes, loads, and cycles to failure. In addition, bone loss influenced the functional life and reliability of the implant-abutment assemblies. Maintaining crestal bone levels is important in ensuring biomechanical sustainability and predictable long-term function of dental implant assemblies.

  2. Redesign of a fixture mount to be used as an impression coping and a provisional abutment as well

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Glenn Hsuan-Chen; Tian, Chen; Hung, Yuen-Siang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An integrated fixture mount/impression coping/ temporary abutment can provide many advantages for immediate loading of dental implants, such as simpler procedure, less chair time, cost reduction, and comfort for the patients. Materials and Methods: A newly designed dental implant fixture mount (DIFMA) can be used as an impression coping for taking an immediate impression. An immediate load provisional prosthesis can then be fabricated shortly after implant placement to immediately lo...

  3. Microgap and Micromotion at the Implant Abutment Interface Cause Marginal Bone Loss Around Dental Implant but More Evidence is Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqutaibi, Ahmed Yaseen; Aboalrejal, Afaf Noman

    2018-06-01

    Influences of micro-gap and micromotion of the implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around implant neck. Liu Y, Wang J. Arch Oral Biol 2017;83:153-60. This study was financially supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81570956) and the Bureau of Science and Technology of Wuhan ([2014]160, 2015060101010051) TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Comprehensive literature review. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coating dental implant abutment screws with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles: the effect on maintaining torque after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesqueur, Laura Soares; de Figueiredo, Viviane Maria Gonçalves; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Massi, Marcos; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of maintaining torque after mechanical cycling of abutment screws that are coated with diamondlike carbon and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles, with external and internal hex connections. Sixty implants were divided into six groups according to the type of connection (external or internal hex) and the type of abutment screw (uncoated, coated with diamondlike carbon, and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles). The implants were inserted into polyurethane resin and crowns of nickel chrome were cemented on the implants. The crowns had a hole for access to the screw. The initial torque and the torque after mechanical cycling were measured. The torque values maintained (in percentages) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test, with a significance level of 5%. The largest torque value was maintained in uncoated screws with external hex connections, a finding that was statistically significant (P = .0001). No statistically significant differences were seen between the groups with and without coating in maintaining torque for screws with internal hex connections (P = .5476). After mechanical cycling, the diamondlike carbon with and without diamond doping on the abutment screws showed no improvement in maintaining torque in external and internal hex connections.

  5. Post and core build-ups in crown and bridge abutments: Bio-mechanical advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John

    2017-06-01

    Dentists often place post and core buildups on endodontically treated abutments for crown and bridge restorations. This article analyzes the bio-mechanical purposes, advantages and disadvantages of placing a core or a post and core in an endodontically treated tooth and reviews literature on post and core biomechanics. The author assesses the scientific rationale of the claim that the main purpose of a post is to retain a core, or the claim that posts weaken teeth. More likely, the main function of a post is to help prevent the abutment, on which a crown is cemented, from fracturing such that the abutment separates from the tooth root, at a fracture plane that is located approximately and theoretically at the level of the crown (or ferrule) margin. A post essentially improves the ferrule effect that is provided by the partial fixed denture prosthesis. This paper also explores the difference between bio-mechanical failures of crowns caused by lack of retention or excess taper, versus failures due to a sub-optimal ferrule effect in crown and bridge prostheses.

  6. Origin and tectonic evolution of early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Fu-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Zhong-Biao; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Cao, Hua-Hua; Yang, Chuan

    2017-12-01

    The origin and tectonic evolution of the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) are widely debated. This paper presents detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data of early Paleozoic strata in the Zhangjiatun arc terrane of central Jilin Province, northeast (NE) China, and compares them with the Bainaimiao and Jiangyu arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC. Detrital zircons from early Paleozoic strata in three arc terranes exhibit comparable age groupings of 539-430, 1250-577, and 2800-1600 Ma. The Paleoproterozoic to Neoarchean ages and Hf isotopic composition of the detrital zircons imply the existence of the Precambrian fragments beneath the arc terranes. Given the evidences from geology, igneous rocks, and detrital zircons, we proposed that the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC are a united arc terrane including the exotic Precambrian fragments, and these fragments shared a common evolutionary history from Neoproterozoic to early-middle Paleozoic.

  7. An in vitro comparison of the accuracy of implant impressions with coded healing abutments and different implant angulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdullah, Khaled; Zandparsa, Roya; Finkelman, Matthew; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Fabricating implant definitive casts with CAD/CAM technology (Robocasts) from coded healing abutment impressions represents a simpler and innovative alternative to conventional implant impression techniques. However, information about the accuracy of the impressions and the resultant definitive casts is limited. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Robocasts and compare them to those definitive casts fabricated with conventional implant impression techniques (open tray with splinted impression copings technique). A reference epoxy resin cast was fabricated and shaped to simulate a dental arch. Two regular platform implant replicas (Biomet 3i Certain, 4.1 mm diameter and 15 mm length) with internal connections were placed 10 mm apart with a 10-degree convergence for one side of the reference resin cast and a 30-degree convergence for the other. Coded healing abutments (Encode) were placed at 3 different heights above the level of the soft tissue replication material (approximately 1, 2, and 4 mm) and served as test groups (E1, E2, and E4), and open trays with splinted impression copings (OTSC) served as a control group. The control group was compared to the impressions of the coded healing abutments by using a standardized measurement protocol. Impressions were made for each group (n=18) and poured with vacuum mixed (100 g powder/20 mL water) Type IV dental stone. The vertical discrepancy (Z axis) between 2 prefabricated passively fitting titanium reference frameworks and the platforms of the implant replicas was measured with an optical comparator applying the 1 screw test. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U tests, as well as the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The Bonferroni correction was used to account for multiple comparisons. The significance level (α) used in a given set of tests was equal to .05 divided by the number of tests performed in that set. The median vertical discrepancy of each coded healing

  8. A New Experimental Design for Bacterial Microleakage Investigation at the Implant-Abutment Interface: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Holger; Miatke, Sven; Hmaidouch, Rim; Lauer, Hans-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to test bacterial microleakage at the implant-abutment interface (IAI) before and after dynamic loading using a new chewing simulation. Fourteen implant systems (n = 5 samples of each) were divided into two groups: (1) systems with conical implant-abutment connections (IACs), and (2) systems with flat IACs. For collecting samples without abutment disconnection, channels (Ø = 0.3 mm) were drilled into implants perpendicularly to their axes, and stainless-steel cannulas were adhesively glued inside these channels to allow a sterilized rinsing solution to enter the implant interior and to exit with potential contaminants for testing. Implants were embedded in epoxy resin matrices, which were supported by titanium cylinders with lateral openings for inward and outward cannulas. Abutments were tightened and then provided with vertically adjustable, threaded titanium balls, which were cemented using composite cement. Specimens were immersed in a bacterial liquid and after a contact time of 15 minutes, the implant interior was rinsed prior to chewing simulation (0 N ≘ static seal testing). Specimens were exposed to a Frankfurt chewing simulator. Two hundred twenty force cycles per power level (110 in ± X-axis) were applied to simulate a daily masticatory load of 660 chewing cycles (equivalent to 1,200,000 cycles/5 years). The applied load was gradually increased from 0 N to a maximum load of 200 N in 25-N increments. The implant interior was rinsed to obtain samples before each new power level. All samples were tested using fluorescence microscopy; invading microorganisms could be counted and evaluated. No bacterial contamination was detected under static loading conditions in both groups. After loading, bacterial contamination was detected in one sample from one specimen in group 1 and in two samples from two specimens in group 2. Controlled dynamic loading applied in this study simulated a clinical situation and enabled time-dependent analysis

  9. Rock mass joint treated by jet grouting at Diavik A418 dike south abutment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisre, C.A. [SNC-Lavalin, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Hatch Energy, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In order to exploit the diamond pipes at the Diavik mines, located in the Northwest Territories, two dikes were built into the Lac de Gras, dikes A154 and A418. However, during the construction of the curtain grouting of the A418 Dike, the pressure grouting technique did not achieve the desired closure of a subhorizontal joint located at variable depth beneath the dike foundation into the granite rock mass at the south abutment. The joint was filled mainly with silt, sand and gravel. This paper reviewed the problems with the pressure grouting treatment methodology, and the final decision of the designers and construction manager to treat the joint by jet grouting. The paper outlined pressure grouting, with particular reference to technical specifications; curtain grouting analysis; and joint grouting investigation. The joint treatment by jet grouting was described and the most important features of the core drilling after jetting were outlined. The permeability of the joint was reduced significantly in the treated area, according to observations made during jetting and in the recovered cores and the permeability tests. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  10. Influence of different abutment diameter of implants on the peri-implant stress in the crestal bone: A three-dimensional finite element analysis--In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradya, Anupama; Kumar, U Krishna; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate and compare stress distribution in transcortical section of bone with normal abutment and platform switched abutment under vertical and oblique forces in posterior mandible region. A three-dimensional finite element model was designed using ANSYS 13.0 software. The type of bone selection for the model was made of type II mandibular bone, having cortical bone thickness ranging from 0.595 mm to 1.515 mm with the crestal region measuring 1.5 mm surrounding dense trabecular bone. The implant will be modulated at 5 mm restorative platform and tapering down to 4.5 mm wide at the threads, 13 mm long with an abutment 3 mm in height. The models will be designed for two situations: (1) An implant with a 5 mm diameter abutment representing a standard platform in the posterior mandible region. (2) An implant with a 4.5 mm diameter abutment representing platform switching in the posterior mandible region. Force application was performed in both oblique and vertical conditions using 100 N as a representative masticatory force. For oblique loading, a force of 100 N was applied at 15° from the vertical axis. von Mises stress analysis was evaluated. The results of the study showed cortical stress in the conventional and platform switching model under oblique forces were 59.329 MPa and 39.952 MPa, respectively. Cortical stress in the conventional and platform switching model under vertical forces was 13.914 MPa and 12.793 MPa, respectively. Results from this study showed the platform switched abutment led to relative decrease in von Mises stress in transcortical section of bone compared to normal abutment under vertical and oblique forces in posterior mandible region.

  11. Soft and Hard Tissue Changes around Tissue-Oriented Tulip-Design Implant Abutments: A 1-Year Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Levi, Guy; Blumenfeld, Israel; Machtei, Eli E

    2015-10-01

    The advantages of platform switching using narrower abutments remain controversial. Many researchers suggest that platform switching can yield enhanced clinical results, while others remain skeptical. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of platform switching might be associated with the degree of reduction in size of the abutment. To radiographically and clinically examine a new abutment design created to move the implant-abutment interface farther medially. This was a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial that included 27 patients (41 MIS Lance Plus® implants; MIS Implant Technologies, Karmiel, Israel). The patients' age ranged from 39 to 75 years. At the second stage of the surgery, the implants were randomly assigned to either the new platform switch Tulip abutment (TA) design or to the standard platform abutment (SA). Implant probing depth (IPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded at baseline and after 12 months. Standardized periapical radiographs were taken (at baseline and at 12 months) and the marginal bone height measured. All implants were successfully integrated. The mean IPD at 1 year post-op was 2.91 mm for the SA group and 2.69 mm for the TA group (p > .05). Similarly, the BOP at 1 year was almost identical in both groups. The mean values of bone resorption at baseline were 0.98 ± 0.37 mm and 0.69 ± 0.20 for the TA and SA groups, respectively (p > .05). Bone loss (baseline to 12 months) was significantly greater in the SA group compared with the TA group. Use of the new TA, with its significantly downsized diameter, resulted in reduced bone loss at 1 year. Further research will be required to assess the long-term effect of this abutment on peri-implant health. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The influence of repeated abutment changes on peri-implant tissue stability: 3-year post-loading results from a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; D'Avenia, Ferdinando; Neumann, Konrad; Sbricoli, Luca; Luongo, Giuseppe; Esposito, Marco

    To evaluate the influence of at least three abutment disconnections in conventional loaded implants against placement of a definitive abutment in immediately non-occlusal loaded implants on hard and soft tissue changes. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the presence of less than 2 mm of keratinised mucosa is associated with increased peri-implant marginal bone loss and soft tissue recessions. Eighty patients requiring one single crown or one fixed partial prosthesis supported by a maximum of three implants were randomised, after implants were placed with more than 35 Ncm, according to a parallel group design to receive definitive abutments that were loaded immediately (definitive abutment or immediate loading group) or transmucosal abutments, which were delayed loaded after 3 months and removed at least three times: 1. At impression taking (3 months after implant placement); 2. When checking the zirconium core on titanium abutments at single crowns or the fitting the metal structure at prostheses supported by multiple implants; 3. At delivery of the definitive prostheses (repeated disconnection or conventional loading group). Patients were treated at four centres and each patient contributed to the study, with only one prosthesis followed for 3 years after initial loading. Outcome measures were: prosthesis failures, implant failures, complications, pink aesthetic score (PES), buccal recessions, patient satisfaction, peri-implant marginal bone level changes and height of the keratinised mucosa. Forty patients were randomly allocated to each group according to a parallel group design. Six patients from the definitive abutment group dropped out or died, and one left from the repeated disconnection group. One implant, from the repeated disconnection group, fractured (difference = 3%; CI 95%: -2%, 8%; P = 1). Four provisional crowns and one definitive single crown had to be remade because of poor fitting, and one definitive crown and one definitive prosthesis

  13. An in vivo assessment of the effects of using different implant abutment occluding materials on implant microleakage and the peri-implant microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Caroline

    Microleakage may be a factor in the progression of peri-implant pathology. Microleakage in implant dentistry refers to the passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules or ions between the abutment-implant interface to and from the surrounding periodontal tissues. This creates a zone of inflammation and reservoir of bacteria at the implant-abutment interface. Bone loss typically occurs within the first year of abutment connection and then stabilizes. It has not yet been definitively proven that the occurrence of microleakage cannot contribute to future bone loss or impede the treatment of peri-implant disease. Therefore, strategies to reduce or eliminate microleakage are sought out. Recent evidence demonstrates that the type of implant abutment channel occluding material can affect the amount of microleakage in an in vitro study environment. Thus, we hypothesize that different abutment screw channel occluding materials will affect the amount of observed microleakage, vis-a-vis the correlation between the microflora found on the abutment screw channel occluding material those found in the peri-implant sulcus. Additional objectives include confirming the presence of microleakage in vivo and assessing any impact that different abutment screw channel occluding materials may have on the peri-implant microbiome. Finally, the present study provides an opportunity to further characterize the peri-implant microbiome. Eight fully edentulous patients restored with at dental implants supporting screw-retained fixed hybrid prostheses were included in the study. At the initial appointment (T1), the prostheses were removed and the implants and prostheses were cleaned. The prostheses were then inserted with polytetrafluoroethylene tape (PTFE, TeflonRTM), cotton, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), or synthetic foam as the implant abutment channel occluding material and sealed over with composite resin. About six months later (T2), the prostheses were removed and the materials collected. Paper

  14. Bacterial colonization of the implant-abutment interface of conical connection with an internal octagon: an in vitro study using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, A; Beltramini, G A; Bolzoni, A; Cura, F; Palmieri, A; Scarano, A; Ottria, L; Giannì, A B

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial leakage at the implant-abutment connection of a two-piece implant system is considered the main cause of peri-implantitis. Prevention of bacterial leakage at the implant-abutment connection is mandatory for reducing inflammation process around implant neck and achieving bone stability. Micro-cavities at implant-abutment connection level can favour bacterial leakage, even in modern two-piece implant systems. The conical connection with an internal octagon (CCIO) is considered to be more stable mechanically and allows a more tight link between implant and abutment. As P. gingivalis and T. forsythia penetration might have clinical relevance, it was the purpose of this investigation to evaluate molecular leakage of these two bacteria in a new two-implant system with an internal conical implant-abutment connection with internal octagon (Shiner XT, FMD Falappa Medical Devices S.p.A. Rome, Italy). To verify the ability of the implant in protecting the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified Escherichia c oli across implant-abutment interface was evaluated. Four Shiner XT implants (FMD, Falappa Medical Devices®, Rome, Italy) were immerged in a bacterial culture for 24 h and bacteria amount was measured inside implant-abutment interface with Real-time PCR. Bacteria were detected inside all studied implants, with a median percentage of 6% for P. gingivalis and 5% for T. forsythia. Other comparable studies about the tightness of the tested implant system reported similar results. The gap size at the implant-abutment connection of CCIOs was measured by other authors discovering a gap size of 1–2μm of the AstraTech system and of 4μm for the Ankylos system. Bacterial leakage along implant-abutment connection of cylindrical and tapered implants, Shiner XT, (FMD Falappa Medical Devices S.p.A. Rome, Italy) showed better results compared to other implants. Additional studies are needed to explore the relationship in terms of

  15. [The study of the colorimetric characteristics of the cobalt-chrome alloys abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns by using dental spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Liu, Hongchun; Meng, Yukun; Chao, Yonglie; Liu, Changhong

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the optical data of the different sites of the cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) alloy abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns and the color difference between the crowns and target tab using a digital dental spectrophotometer. Ten Co-Cr alloy abutments were made and tried in four different groups of all-ceramic crowns, namely, Procera aluminia, Procera zirconia, Lava zirconia (Lava-Zir), and IPS E.max glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced monolithic. The color data of the cervical, body, and incisal sites of the samples were recorded and analyzed by dental spectrophotometer. The CIE L*, a*, b* values were again measured after veneering. The color difference between the abutments covered by all-ceramic crowns and A2 dentine shade tab was evaluated. The L* and b* values of the abutments can be increased by all of the four groups of all-ceramic copings, but a* values were decreased in most groups. A statistical difference was observed among four groups. After being veneered, the L* values of all the copings declined slightly, and the values of a*, b* increased significantly. When compared with A2 dentine shade tab, the ΔE of the crowns was below 4. Four ceramic copings were demonstrated to promote the lightness and hue of the alloy abutments effecttively. Though the colorimetric baseline of these copings was uneven, veneer porcelain can efficiently decrease the color difference between the samples and thee target.

  16. The effect of photodynamic therapy on pathogenic bacteria around peri-implant sulcus and in the cavity between abutment and implant after healing phase: A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin-Yi; Shi, Jun-Yu; Zhu, Yu; Qian, Shu-Jiao; Lai, Hong-Chang; Gu, Ying-Xin

    2018-05-14

    To compare levels of pathogens from peri-implant sulcus versus abutment screw cavities after photodynamic therapy. Twenty patients were included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was applied both in sulcus and cavities after sampling following suprastructures loading, and repeated after 2 weeks. Two samples each containing four paper points were collected for each implant at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 months: (i) peri-implant sulcus and (ii) abutment screw cavities. Seventy-five percent ethanol was applied in another 20 patients as the control group in the same way. qPCR was used to quantify periodontal pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans. PDT showed a better bacterial reduction than ethanol. P. g. and F. n. were most frequently detected, while less for S. m. P. gingivalis' proportion from both sites was significantly higher than the other two bacteria (P abutment screw cavities were always less than those from peri-implant sulcus and was significantly lower for total bacteria at 3 months (P abutment screw cavities significantly reduced at 3 months compared to baseline (P abutment screw cavities in the long run, suggesting PDT an effective way sterilizing inner surface of oral implant suprastrutures. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Effects of Subcrestal Implant Placement on Crestal Bone Levels and Bone-to-Abutment Contact: A Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetner, Michael; Fetner, Alan; Koutouzis, Theofilos; Clozza, Emanuele; Tovar, Nick; Sarendranath, Alvin; Coelho, Paulo G; Neiva, Kathleen; Janal, Malvin N; Neiva, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Implant design and the implant-abutment interface have been regarded as key influences on crestal bone maintenance over time. The aim of the present study was to determine crestal bone changes around implants placed at different depths in a dog model. Thirty-six two-piece dental implants with a medialized implant-abutment interface and Morse taper connection (Ankylos, Dentsply) were placed in edentulous areas bilaterally in six mongrel dogs. On each side of the mandible, three implants were placed randomly at the bone crest, 1.5 mm subcrestally, or 3.0 mm subcrestally. After 3 months, the final abutments were torqued into place. At 6 months, the animals were sacrificed and samples taken for microcomputed tomographic (micro-CT) and histologic evaluations. Micro-CT analysis revealed similar crestal or marginal bone loss among groups. Both subcrestal implant groups lost significantly less crestal and marginal bone than the equicrestal implants. Bone loss was greatest on the buccal of the implants, regardless of implant placement depth. Histologically, implants placed subcrestally were found to have bone in contact with the final abutment and on the implant platform. Implants with a centralized implant-abutment interface and Morse taper connection can be placed subcrestally without significant loss of crestal or marginal bone. Subcrestal placement of this implant system appears to be advantageous in maintaining bone height coronal to the implant platform.

  18. Three-dimensional accuracy of a digitally coded healing abutment implant impression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Simon D; Tan, Keson B; Teoh, K H; Cheng, Ansgar C; Nicholls, Jack I

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the three-dimensional (3D) accuracy of the Encode Impression System (EN) in transferring the locations of two implants from master models to test models and compared this to the direct impression (DI) technique. The effect of interimplant angulation on the 3D accuracy of both impression techniques was also evaluated. Seven sectional polymethyl methacrylate mandibular arch master models were fabricated with implants in the first premolar and first molar positions. The implants were placed parallel to each other or angulated mesiodistally or buccolingually with total divergent angles of 10, 20, or 30 degrees. Each master model was secured onto an aluminum block containing a gauge block, which defined the local coordinate references. Encode healing abutments were attached to the implants before impressions were made for the EN test models; pickup impression copings were attached for the DI test models. For the seven test groups of each impression technique, a total of 70 test models were fabricated (n = 5). The EN test models were sent to Biomet 3i for implant analog placement. The centroid of each implant or implant analog and the angular orientation of the long axis relative to the x- and y-axes were measured with a coordinate measuring machine. Statistical analyses were performed. Impression technique had a significant effect on y distortion, global linear distortion, and absolute xz and yz angular distortions. Interimplant angulation had significant effects on x and y distortions. However, neither impression technique nor interimplant angulation had a significant effect on z distortion. Distortions were observed with both impression techniques. However, the results suggest that EN was less accurate than DI.

  19. Evaluation Criteria and Results of Full Scale Testing of Bridge Abutment Made from Reinforced Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Maciej; Rybak, Jarosław

    2017-10-01

    Structures made of reinforced soil can be evaluated for their safety based on a load testing. Measurement results are essentially evaluated by displacements of surcharge (mainly in vertical direction) and facing elements (mainly in horizontal direction). Displacements are within several tenths to several millimetres and they can be taken by common geodetic equipment. Due to slow soil consolidation (progress of displacements) under constant load, observations should be made over several days or even weeks or months. A standard procedure of heating of geotextiles, used in laboratory conditions to simulate long term behaviour cannot be used in a natural scale. When the load is removed, the soil unloading occurs. Both the progress of displacements and soil unloading after unloading of the structure are the key presumptions for evaluating its safety (stability). Assessment of measuring results must be preceded by assuming even the simplest model of the structure, so as it could be possible to estimate the expected displacements under controlled load. In view of clearly random nature of soil parameters of retaining structure composed of reinforced soil and due to specific erection technology of reinforced soil structure, the assessment of its condition is largely based on expert’s judgment. It is an essential and difficult task to interpret very small displacements which are often enough disturbed by numerous factors like temperature, insolation, precipitation, vehicles, etc. In the presented paper, the authors tried to establish and juxtapose some criteria for a load test of a bridge abutment and evaluate their suitability for decision making. Final remarks are based on authors experience from a real full scale load test.

  20. Grinding efficiency of abutment tooth with both dentin and core composite resin on axial plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miho, Otoaki; Sato, Toru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grinding efficiency in abutment teeth comprising both dentin and core composite resin in the axial plane. Grinding was performed over 5 runs at two loads (0.5 or 0.25 N) and two feed rates (1 or 2 mm/sec). The grinding surface was observed with a 3-D laser microscope. Tomographic images of the grinding surfaces captured perpendicular to the feed direction were also analyzed. Using a non-ground surface as a reference, areas comprising only dentin, both dentin and core composite resin, or only core composite resin were analyzed to determine the angle of the grinding surface. Composite resins were subjected to the Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests. Multiple regression analysis was performed for load, feed rate, and Vickers hardness of the build-up material depending on number of runs. When grinding was performed at a constant load and feed rate, a greater grinding angle was observed in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or only composite resin than in areas consisting of dentin alone. A correlation was found between machinability and load or feed rate in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or composite resin alone, with a particularly high correlation being observed between machinability and load. These results suggest that great caution should be exercised in a clinical setting when the boundary between the dentin and composite resin is to be ground, as the angle of the grinding surface changes when the rotating diamond point begins grinding the composite resin.

  1. Strains Around Abutment Teeth with Different Attachments Used for Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Partial Overdentures: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELsyad, Moustafa Abdou; Omran, Abdelbaset Omar; Fouad, Mohammed Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare strain around abutment teeth with different attachments used for implant-assisted distal extension partial overdentures (IADEPODs). A mandibular Kennedy class I acrylic model (remaining teeth from first premolar to first premolar) was constructed. A conventional partial denture was constructed over the model (control, group 1). Two laboratory implants were then placed bilaterally in the first molar areas parallel to each other and perpendicular to the residual ridge. Three additional experimental partial overdentures (PODs) were constructed and connected to the implants using ball (group 2), magnetic (group 3), and Locator (group 4) attachments. Three linear strain gauges were bonded buccal, lingual, and distal to the first premolar abutment tooth at the right (loading) and the left (nonloading) sides. For each group, a universal testing device was used to apply a unilateral vertical static load (50 N) on the first molar area, and the strain was recorded using a multichannel digital strainometer. Significant differences between groups and between sites of strain gauges were detected. Strains recorded for all groups were compressive (negative) in nature. Group 1 demonstrated the highest strain, followed by group 3 and group 4; group 2 recorded the lowest strain. For group 2, the highest strain was recoded at the lingual nonloading side. For group 1, group 3, and group 4, the highest strain was recorded at the buccal loading side. Within the limitation of the present study, ball attachments used to retain IADEPODs to the implants were associated with lower strains around abutment teeth than Locator and magnetic attachments. The highest strain was recorded with conventional partial dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. The effect of DLC-coating deposition method on the reliability and mechanical properties of abutment's screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Dimorvan; Coelho, Paulo G; Bergamo, Edmara T P; Bonfante, Estevam A; Witek, Lukasz; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2018-04-10

    To characterize the mechanical properties of different coating methods of DLC (diamond-like carbon) onto dental implant abutment screws, and their effect on the probability of survival (reliability). Seventy-five abutment screws were allocated into three groups according to the coating method: control (no coating); UMS - DLC applied through unbalanced magnetron sputtering; RFPA-DLC applied through radio frequency plasma-activated (n=25/group). Twelve screws (n=4) were used to determine the hardness and Young's modulus (YM). A 3D finite element model composed of titanium substrate, DLC-layer and a counterpart were constructed. The deformation (μm) and shear stress (MPa) were calculated. The remaining screws of each group were torqued into external hexagon abutments and subjected to step-stress accelerated life-testing (SSALT) (n=21/group). The probability Weibull curves and reliability (probability survival) were calculated considering the mission of 100, 150 and 200N at 50,000 and 100,000 cycles. DLC-coated experimental groups evidenced higher hardness than control (p1 indicating that fatigue contributed to failure. High reliability was depicted at a mission of 100N. At 200N a significant decrease in reliability was detected for all groups (ranging from 39% to 66%). No significant difference was observed among groups regardless of mission. Screw fracture was the chief failure mode. DLC-coating have been used to improve titanium's mechanical properties and increase the reliability of dental implant-supported restorations. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immediate Restoration of Immediate Implants in the Esthetic Zone of the Maxilla Via the Copy-Abutment Technique: 5-Year Follow-Up of Pink Esthetic Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhauser, Rudolf; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Haas, Robert; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Pommer, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Implant esthetics may benefit from individualized zirconia abutments copying the emergence profile of the natural tooth and delivered within days after immediate implant insertion. To investigate the esthetic outcome of the Copy-Abutment technique using the Pink Esthetic Score (PES). A total of 77 patients with single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla restored at the day of immediate implant placement using Copy-Abutments and provisional crowns were followed-up after 1 week, 1 month, 4 months, 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years to assess implant esthetics. PES ranged between 7 and 14 (median: 13) and improved significantly between the 6 month and 1 year follow-up (p esthetic zone show satisfactory long-term esthetic outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Clinical study of the effect of preventing dentine hypersensitiveness by using Fluor Protector and Green Or on the prepared vital pulp abutment teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jia-nan; Lu, Yu-miao; Zhou, Xiao-yan

    2005-04-01

    To study and evaluate the effect preventing dentine hypersensitiveness by using Fluor Protector or Green Or on the prepared vital pulp abutment teeth of PFM bridges. 118 cases, 246 prepared vital pulp abutment teeth, were randomly divided into three groups: Experimental Group A--treated with the Fluor Protector and temporary crown; Experimental Group B--treated with the Green Or and temporary crown, and Control Group--only using temporary crown. The results of desensitization in 3 groups were evaluated. F test was used for analysis (DSPV6.01). Significant differences were found between experimental Group A, B and the control group after 1 week (when cementing the PFM bridges); and also after 1 month (P0.05). The effect of preventing dental hypersensitiveness by using Fluor Protector or Green Or on the prepared vital pulp abutment teeth of PFM bridges is ideal. It is easy to use and worth being widely applied.

  5. The single-tooth implant treatment of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using angled abutments: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Hakan Tuna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary lateral incisor is the second most common congenitally absent tooth. There are several treatment options for replacing the missing maxillary lateral incisor, including canine substitution, tooth-supported restoration, or single-tooth implant. Dental implants are an appropriate treatment option for replacing missing maxillary lateral incisor teeth in adolescents when their dental and skeletal development is complete. This case report presents the treatment of a patient with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using dental implants with angled abutments.

  6. Shielding the spinal cord is necessary when junctioning abutting fields with independent collimation in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David I.; McDonough, James; Kassaee, Alireza

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Asymmetric collimation is a relatively new method of junctioning abutting fields with non-diverging beam edges. When this technique is used at the junction of lateral and low anterior fields in three field head and neck set ups, there should, in theory, be a perfect match. There should be no overdose or underdose at the match line. We have performed dosimetric measurements to evaluate the actual dosimetry at the central axis. Materials and Methods: X-ray verification film was placed in a water-equivalent phantom at a depth of 4 cm, corresponding to an isocentric distance of 100 cm. A double exposure technique was used to mimic two half-beam blocked fields abutting at the central axis. Each half of the film was irradiated with 50 monitor units using a 6 MV photon beam. One of the collimators was set to an off-axis position to force a gap or overlap of the radiation fields at the isocenter in increments of 1 mm. The films were scanned with a laser densitometer with a resolution of 300 μm. The beam profiles were evaluated at the region of overdose or underdose around the match line. Results: The dose on the central axis varied linearly from - 50% (field gap of 3 mm) to + 50% (field overlap of 3 mm). Surprisingly, the width (defined as a full-width, half-maximum, FWHM) of the region of overdose or underdose around the match line is 3 mm for field gaps or overlaps of 1 and 2 mm. The width of the region is 4.5 mm for field gaps or overlaps of 3 mm. The larger than expected width of this region is due to the addition of the two abutting penumbras. Conclusion: Asymmetric collimation with half-beam blocks may overdose the spinal cord. Calibration specifications generally allow for a 1 mm tolerance in the position of each independent jaw. In a calibrated machine, this could lead to a 2 mm field overlap. A field overlap of just 1 mm results in a FWHM region of overdose measuring 3 mm with a maximum dose of 140%. To our knowledge, there are no current recommendations

  7. Measurements of Repeated Tightening and Loosening Torque of Seven Different Implant/Abutment Connection Designs and Their Modifications: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevica, Alena; Nathanson, Dan; Pober, Richard; Strating, Herman

    2018-02-01

    Repeated tightening and loosening of the abutment screw may alter its mechanical and physical properties affecting the optimal torque and ultimate reliability of an implant/abutment connection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated tightening and loosening of implant/abutment screws on the loosening torque of implant/abutment connections of commercially available implant systems. Seven different implant/abutment connections and their modifications were tested. The screws of each system were tightened according to the manufacturer's specifications. After 20 minutes the screws were loosened. This procedure was repeated ten times, and the differences between the 1st and 10th cycle were expressed as a percentage change RTq(%) and correlated with initial torque, the number of threads, the length of shank, and thread surface area employing Spearman's analysis. All systems showed significant differences in residual torque (RTq) value (p 0.05). All connections but group 3 (p = 1.000) showed a significant change from the initial torque (ITq) to the RTq values. The first successive RTq values increased in two connection groups 1 and 2. The remaining connections showed reduced RTq values ranging from -1.2 % (group 5) to -23.5% (group 6). The RTq values declined gradually with every repeated tightening in groups 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 11, 12. In group 2, after the tenth tightening the RTq was still above the ITq value. Only length of shank demonstrated a correlation with the RTq(%) change over the successive tightening loosening cycles (p abutment screws caused varying torque level changes among the different systems. These observations can probably be attributed to connection design. Limiting the number of tightening/loosening cycles in clinical and laboratory procedures is advisable for most of the implant systems tested. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Evaluation of removal forces of implant-supported zirconia copings depending on abutment geometry, luting agent and cleaning method during re-cementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Rödiger, Matthias; Rinke, Sven; Ehret-Kleinau, Fenja; Pohlmeyer, Franziska; Lange, Katharina; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of different abutment geometries in combination with varying luting agents and the effectiveness of different cleaning methods (prior to re-cementation) regarding the retentiveness of zirconia copings on implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Implants were embedded in resin blocks. Three groups of titanium abutments (pre-fabricated, height: 7.5 mm, taper: 5.7°; customized-long, height: 6.79 mm, taper: 4.8°; customized-short, height: 4.31 mm, taper: 4.8°) were u...

  9. Assessment of bridge abutment scour and sediment transport under various flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilja, Gordon; Valyrakis, Manousos; Michalis, Panagiotis; Bekić, Damir; Kuspilić, Neven; McKeogh, Eamon

    2017-04-01

    Safety of bridges over watercourses can be compromised by flow characteristics and bridge hydraulics. Scour process around bridge foundations can develop rapidly during low-recurrence interval floods when structural elements are exposed to increased flows. Variations in riverbed geometry, as a result of sediment removal and deposition processes, can increase flood-induced hazard at bridge sites with catastrophic failures and destructive consequences for civil infrastructure. The quantification of flood induced hazard on bridge safety generally involves coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport models (i.e. 2D numerical or physical models) for a range of hydrological events covering both high and low flows. Modelled boundary conditions are usually estimated for their probability of occurrence using frequency analysis of long-term recordings at gauging stations. At smaller rivers gauging station records are scarce, especially in upper courses of rivers where weirs, drops and rapids are common elements of river bathymetry. As a result, boundary conditions that accurately represent flow patterns on modelled river reach cannot be often reliably acquired. Sediment transport process is also more complicated to describe due to its complexity and dependence to local flow field making scour hazard assessment a particularly challenging issue. This study investigates the influence of flow characteristics to the development of scour and sedimentation processes around bridge abutments of a single span masonry arch bridge in south Ireland. The impact of downstream weirs on bridge hydraulics through variation of downstream model domain type is also considered in this study. The numerical model is established based on detailed bathymetry data surveyed along a rectangular grid of 50cm spacing. Acquired data also consist of riverbed morphology and water level variations which are monitored continuously on bridge site. The obtained data are then used to compare and calibrate

  10. Accuracy of single-abutment digital cast obtained using intraoral and cast scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Jun; Jeong, Ii-Do; Park, Jin-Young; Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2017-02-01

    Scanners are frequently used in the fabrication of dental prostheses. However, the accuracy of these scanners is variable, and little information is available. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of cast scanners with that of intraoral scanners by using different image impression techniques. A poly(methyl methacrylate) master model was fabricated to replicate a maxillary first molar single-abutment tooth model. The master model was scanned with an accurate engineering scanner to obtain a true value (n=1) and with 2 intraoral scanners (CEREC Bluecam and CEREC Omnicam; n=6 each). The cast scanner scanned the master model and duplicated the dental stone cast from the master model (n=6). The trueness and precision of the data were measured using a 3-dimensional analysis program. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the different sets of scanning data, followed by a post hoc Mann-Whitney U test with a significance level modified by Bonferroni correction (α/6=.0083). The type 1 error level (α) was set at .05. The trueness value (root mean square: mean ±standard deviation) was 17.5 ±1.8 μm for the Bluecam, 13.8 ±1.4 μm for the Omnicam, 17.4 ±1.7 μm for cast scanner 1, and 12.3 ±0.1 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between the Bluecam and the cast scanner 1 and between the Omnicam and the cast scanner 2 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but a statistically significant difference was found between all the other pairs (POmnicam, 9.2 ±1.2 μm for cast scanner 1, and 6.9 ±2.6 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between Bluecam and Omnicam and between Omnicam and cast scanner 1 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but there was a statistically significant difference between all the other pairs (POmnicam in video image impression had better trueness than a cast scanner but with a similar level of precision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  11. In vitro infrared thermography assessment of temperature peaks during the intra-oral welding of titanium abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Merla, Arcangelo; Piattelli, Adriano

    2012-07-01

    Control of heat dissipation and transmission to the peri-implant area during intra-oral welding is very important to limit potential damage to the surrounding tissue. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess, by means of thermal infrared imaging, the tissue temperature peaks associated with the thermal propagation pathway through the implants, the abutments and the walls of the slot of the scaffold, generated during the welding process, in three different implant systems. An in vitro polyurethane mandible model was prepared with a 7.0 mm v-shape slot. Effects on the maximum temperature by a single welding procedure were studied using different power supplies and abutments. A total of 36 welding procedures were tested on three different implant systems. The lowest peak temperature along the walls of the 7.0 mm v-shaped groove (31.6 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the specimens irrigated with sterile saline solution. The highest peak temperature (42.8 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the samples with a contemporaneous power overflow and premature pincers removal. The results of our study suggest that the procedures used until now appear to be effective to avoid thermal bone injuries. The peak tissue temperature of the in vitro model did not surpass the threshold limits above which tissue injury could occur.

  12. Stress distribution and displacement of abutment of middle implant-natural teeth fixed bridge under different loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Erjun; Zhou Yanmin; Ma Chenchun; Cong Zhiqiang; Jiang Yonghua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study stress distribution and displacement of abutment of middle implant-natural teeth fixed bridge under different loading. Methods: The stress distribution and displacement of abutment were studied and analyzed by means of three-dimensional finite element when different loading was applied. Results: The biggest stress of middle implant was 4-5 times as big as that of natural teeth. Under concentrated vertical loading, the biggest stress of implant was about 2 times higher than that under dispersed vertical loading. There was no significant difference of biggest stress on the implant between concentrated oblique loading and dispersed oblique loading. The biggest stress of implant under oblique loading was 3 times as big as that under dispersed vertical loading. The biggest stress of natural teeth under dispersed loading was lower than that under concentrated loading. The maximum displacement of implant in occlusal-gum direction was great lower than that of natural teeth. Both in buccal-lingual direction and medial-distal direction, the displacement of implant were about equal to that of natural teeth. Conclusion: The oblique loading is the main force to destroy the middle implant-natural teeth fixed bridge. The lean of cusp should be reduced. The abnormally high occlusal points should be deleted. The bite points should be well distributed. The fixed bridge is feasible. (authors)

  13. Fixture-abutment connection surface and micro-gap measurements by 3D micro-tomographic technique analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Meleo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT is a miniaturized form of conventional computed axial tomography (CAT able to investigate small radio-opaque objects at a-few-microns high resolution, in a nondestructive, non-invasive, and tri-dimensional way. Compared to traditional optical and electron microscopy techniques, which provide two-dimensional images, this innovative investigation technology enables a sample tri-dimensional analysis without cutting, coating or exposing the object to any particular chemical treatment. X-ray micro-tomography matches ideal 3D microscopy features: the possibility of investigating an object in natural conditions and without any preparation or alteration; non-invasive, non-destructive, and sufficiently magnified 3D reconstruction; reliable measurement of numeric data of the internal structure (morphology, structure and ultra-structure. Hence, this technique has multi-fold applications in a wide range of fields, not only in medical and odontostomatologic areas, but also in biomedical engineering, materials science, biology, electronics, geology, archaeology, oil industry, and semi-conductors industry. This study shows possible applications of micro-CT in dental implantology to analyze 3D micro-features of dental implant to abutment interface. Indeed, implant-abutment misfit is known to increase mechanical stress on connection structures and surrounding bone tissue. This condition may cause not only screw preload loss or screw fracture, but also biological issues in peri-implant tissues.

  14. Impact of implant–abutment connection and positioning of the machined collar/microgap on crestal bone level changes: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; Hegewald, Andrea; Becker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To address the following focused question: What is the impact of implant–abutment configuration and the positioning of the machined collar/microgap on crestal bone level changes? Material and methods Electronic databases of the PubMed and the Web of Knowledge were searched for animal and human studies reporting on histological/radiological crestal bone level changes (CBL) at nonsubmerged one-/two-piece implants (placed in healed ridges) exhibiting different abutment configurations, positioning of the machined collar/microgap (between 1992 and November 2012: n = 318 titles). Quality assessment of selected full-text articles was performed according to the ARRIVE and CONSORT statement guidelines. Results A total of 13 publications (risk of bias: high) were eligible for the review. The weighted mean difference (WMD) (95% CI) between machined collars placed either above or below the bone crest amounted to 0.835 mm favoring an epicrestal positioning of the rough/smooth border (P abutment configurations. Due to a high heterogeneity, a meta-analysis was not feasible. Conclusions While the positioning of the machined neck and microgap may limit crestal bone level changes at nonsubmerged implants, the impact of the implant–abutment connection lacks documentation. PMID:23782338

  15. Investigation on the Influence of Abutment Pressure on the Stability of Rock Bolt Reinforced Roof Strata Through Physical and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongpu; Li, Jianzhong; Yang, Jinghe; Gao, Fuqiang

    2017-02-01

    In underground coal mining, high abutment loads caused by the extraction of coal can be a major contributor to many rock mechanic issues. In this paper, a large-scale physical modeling of a 2.6 × 2.0 × 1.0 m entry roof has been conducted to investigate the fundamentals of the fracture mechanics of entry roof strata subjected to high abutment loads. Two different types of roof, massive roof and laminated roof, are considered. Rock bolt system has been taken into consideration. A distinct element analyses based on the physical modeling conditions have been performed, and the results are compared with the physical results. The physical and numerical models suggest that under the condition of high abutment loads, the massive roof and the laminated roof fail in a similar pattern which is characterized as vertical tensile fracturing in the middle of the roof and inclined shear fracturing initiated at the roof and rib intersections and propagated deeper into the roof. Both the massive roof and the laminated roof collapse in a shear sliding mode shortly after shear fractures are observed from the roof surface. It is found that shear sliding is a combination of tensile cracking of intact rock and sliding on bedding planes and cross joints. Shear sliding occurs when the abutment load is much less than the compressive strength of roof.

  16. A comparative study to evaluate the effect of two different abutment designs on soft tissue healing and stability of mucosal margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; van Brakel, Ralph; Iyer, Kavita; Huddleston Slater, James; de Putter, Cornelis; Cune, Marco

    Aim To evaluate the effect of two different abutment designs on soft tissue healing and the stability of the mucosal margin in vivo. Materials and methods Twenty-nine subjects received two, non-adjacent endosseous implants in the esthetic zone. Subsequently, conventional (control) and curved

  17. Stock Versus CAD/CAM Customized Zirconia Implant Abutments - Clinical and Patient-Based Outcomes in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepke, Ulf; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco

    BackgroundSingle-tooth replacement often requires a prefabricated dental implant and a customized crown. The benefits of individualization of the abutment remain unclear. PurposeThis randomized controlled clinical trial aims to study potential benefits of individualization of zirconia implant

  18. Effect of lubricant on the reliability of dental implant abutment screw joint: An in vitro laboratory and three-dimension finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingting; Fan, Hongyi; Ma, Ruiyang; Chen, Hongyu; Li, Zhi; Yu, Haiyang

    2017-06-01

    Biomechanical factors play a key role in the success of dental implants. Fracture and loosening of abutment screws are major issues. This study investigated the effect of lubricants on the stability of dental implant-abutment connection. As lubricants, graphite and vaseline were coated on the abutment screw surface, respectively, and a blank without lubricant served as the control. The total friction coefficient (μ tot ), clamping force, fatigue behavior and detorque of the joint combined with dynamic cyclic loading were measured under different lubricating conditions. Further, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to investigate stress distribution, in conjunction with experimental images. The results showed that the lubricant reduced μ tot , which in turn led to an increase in clamping force. Decrease in loading increased the fatigue life of the screw. However, use of lubricant at high load reduced the fatigue life. Ductile fracture at the first thread of the screw was the chief failure mode, which was due to maximum von Mises stress. Higher stress levels occurred in the lubricant groups. Lubricated screws resulted in lower detorque which made the joint easier to loosen. In conclusion, the lubricant cannot effectively improve the reliability of dental implant-abutment connection. Keeping the interfaces of implant-screw uncontaminated and strengthening the surface of the screw may be recommend for clinical operation and future design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing ceramic crowns cemented on solid abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stona, Deborah; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    Because no information was found in the dental literature regarding the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns using CEREC (Sirona) computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) system on solid abutments, the authors conducted a study. Sixty synOcta (Straumann) implant replicas and regular neck solid abutments were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned (n = 20 per group). Three types of ceramics were used: feldspathic, CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II (VITA); leucite, IPS Empress CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent); and lithium disilicate, IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent). The crowns were fabricated by the CEREC CAD-CAM system. After receiving glaze, the crowns were cemented with RelyX U200 (3M ESPE) resin cement under load of 1 kilogram. For each ceramic, one-half of the specimens were subjected to the fracture resistance testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 millimeter per minute, and the other half were subjected to the fractured resistance testing after 1,000,000 cyclic fatigue loading at 100 newtons. According to a 2-way analysis of variance, the interaction between the material and mechanical cycling was significant (P = .0001). According to a Tukey test (α = .05), the fracture resistance findings with or without cyclic fatigue loading were as follows, respectively: CEREC VITABLOCKS Mark II (405 N/454 N) was statistically lower than IPS Empress CAD (1169 N/1240 N) and IPS e.max CAD (1378 N/1025 N) (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD did not differ statistically (P > .05). According to a t test, there was no statistical difference in the fracture resistance with and without cyclic fatigue loading for CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II and IPS Empress CAD (P > .05). For IPS e.max CAD, the fracture resistance without cyclic fatigue loading was statistically superior to that obtained with cyclic fatigue loading (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD showed higher fracture resistance compared with CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II. The cyclic

  20. Clinical Outcome of Inter-Proximal Papilla between a Tooth and a Single Implant Treated with CAD/CAM Abutments: a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Borges

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes achieved with Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing implant abutments in the anterior maxilla.Material and Methods: Nineteen patients with a mean age of 41 (range form 26 to 63 years, treated with 21 single tooth implants and 21 Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAD/CAM abutments in the anterior maxillary region were included in this study. The patients followed 4 criteria of inclusion: (1 had a single-tooth implant in the anterior maxilla, (2 had a CAD/CAM abutment, (3 had a contralateral natural tooth, (4 the implant was restored and in function for at least 6 months up to 2 years. Cases without contact point were excluded. Presence/absence of the interproximal papilla, inter tooth-implant distance (ITD and distance from the base of the contact point to dental crest bone of adjacent tooth (CPB were accessed. Results: Forty interproximal spaces were evaluated, with an average mesial CPB of 5.65 (SD 1.65 mm and distal CPB of 4.65 (SD 1.98 mm. An average mesial ITD of 2.49 (SD 0.69 mm and an average distal ITD of 1.89 (SD 0.63 mm were achieved. Papilla was present in all the interproximal spaces accessed. Conclusions: The restoration of dental implants using CAD/CAM abutments is a predictable treatment with improved aesthetic results. These type of abutments seem to help maintaining a regular papillary filling although the variations of the implant positioning or the restoration teeth relation.

  1. Optimization of the Conical Angle Design in Conical Implant-Abutment Connections: A Pilot Study Based on the Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kuang-Ta; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Huang, Chang-Hung; Kao, Hung-Chan; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2018-02-01

    Conical implant-abutment connections are popular for their excellent connection stability, which is attributable to frictional resistance in the connection. However, conical angles, the inherent design parameter of conical connections, exert opposing effects on 2 influencing factors of the connection stability: frictional resistance and abutment rigidity. This pilot study employed an optimization approach through the finite element method to obtain an optimal conical angle for the highest connection stability in an Ankylos-based conical connection system. A nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element parametric model was developed according to the geometry of the Ankylos system (conical half angle = 5.7°) by using the ANSYS 11.0 software. Optimization algorithms were conducted to obtain the optimal conical half angle and achieve the minimal value of maximum von Mises stress in the abutment, which represents the highest connection stability. The optimal conical half angle obtained was 10.1°. Compared with the original design (5.7°), the optimal design demonstrated an increased rigidity of abutment (36.4%) and implant (25.5%), a decreased microgap at the implant-abutment interface (62.3%), a decreased contact pressure (37.9%) with a more uniform stress distribution in the connection, and a decreased stress in the cortical bone (4.5%). In conclusion, the methodology of design optimization to determine the optimal conical angle of the Ankylos-based system is feasible. Because of the heterogeneity of different systems, more studies should be conducted to define the optimal conical angle in various conical connection designs.

  2. Implant-level prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a comparison with conventional abutment-level prostheses after 5 years of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Lars; Smedberg, Jan-Ivan; Pettersson, Mattias; Jemt, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Long-term comparisons of frameworks at the implant or abutment level are not available, and knowledge of the clinical function of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy frameworks is limited. Primarily, the aim of this study was to compare the 5-year clinical performance of frameworks with or without abutment connections to implants. Secondly, the outcomes of prostheses made from Co-Cr alloy with porcelain veneers to those made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) with acrylic veneers were compared. The test groups comprised patients treated with screw-retained fixed prostheses made at the implant level according to the Cresco method in either dental porcelain-veneered Co-Cr alloy (n = 15) or acrylic-veneered CP Ti (n = 25). A control group of 40 randomly selected patients were provided with prostheses made at the standard abutment level in CP Ti with acrylic veneers. For all patients, clinical and radiologic 5-year data were retrospectively collected and evaluated. Five-year implant cumulative survival rates (CSRs) were 98.6% and 97.6% for test and control groups, respectively (P > .05). No major differences in bone level were demonstrated between the groups after 5 years (P > .05). Significantly more complications occurred in the test groups compared to the control group (P level prostheses made of porcelain-veneered Co-Cr or acrylic-veneered CP Ti seem comparable to acrylic-veneered titanium prostheses made at the standard abutment level regarding implant CSR and bone levels. However, more complications were registered in implant-level prostheses compared to the standard abutment-level prostheses.

  3. The effects of loading on the preload and dimensions of the abutment screw for a 3-unit cantilever-fixed prosthesis design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Gaurav; Yousef, Hoda; Ehrenberg, David; Luke, Allyn; Weiner, Saul

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an in vitro model system to compare the effects on the screw torque and screw dimensions within 2 commercially available implant systems from occlusal loading on a cantilevered-fixed partial denture. Cantilevered implant-supported 3-unit prostheses with 2 premolar abutments and 1 premolar pontic (7.3 mm in length) were made on resin casts containing 2 implant analogs for 2 implant systems: BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant System (Birmingham, AL) and Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant System (Carlsbad, CA) with 10 samples in each group. Each sample was loaded with either of 2 protocols: (1) a load of 50 N on the cantilevered pontic unit and (2) a loading of 150 N on all 3 units. The outcome measures were (1) changes in residual torque of the abutment screws and (2) changes in screw dimension. The BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant group demonstrated slight but statistically significant torque loss 18.8% to 28.5% in both abutment screws for both protocols, P ≤ 0.05, without any changes in screw dimension. In the Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant group, there was a significant elongation of the abutment screws and a markedly significant 44.4%, (P ≤ 0.01) loss in torque in the mesial screw and a 28.5%, (P ≤ 0.05) loss in torque in the distal screw when the cantilever alone was loaded. Differences in screw design influence the maintenance of preload and distortion of the shank. The influence of the interface design, namely an internal hex of 1 mm versus an external hex did not influence the preload. Cantilevered prostheses can cause loss of torque and dimensional changes in abutment screws.

  4. History, observation and mathematical models in the seismic analysis of the Valadier abutment area in the Colosseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D'Ayala

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to outline the need to investigate different fields of research to interpret the structural behaviour of a monument as complex as the Colosseum. It is shown how defining the numerical models first. then refining them, followed by interpretation of results. is strictly linked with the inforination gathered from historical records and observation of the ~nonumenta s it is today. The study is confined to the area of the Valadier abutment. analysing its state and its seismic behaviour before and after the XIX century restoration using different ilumerical tools, from the elastic modal analysis to the non linear step by step time history direct integration. The procedure comparatiely evaluates the reliability in the interpretation of the results and identifies future lines or research.

  5. Implant replacement of the maxillary central incisor utilizing a modified ceramic abutment (Thommen SPI ART) and ceramic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The prosthetic restoration of a missing anterior tooth with a dental implant is a challenge. Treatment coordination with a multidisciplinary team is critical in the successful outcome of this type of patient treatment. Newer surgical treatment modalities in the management of hard and soft tissues are becoming common, with very good predictability and long-term stability. Additionally, the use of advanced dental technology and materials such as sintered zirconium allows the restorative practitioner the opportunity to fabricate an esthetic, precise-fitting, biocompatible, and strong definitive prosthesis for the patient, with good longevity. The use of an all-ceramic abutment and restoration is described, along with the "soft tissue sculpting" procedure through the use of a custom provisional restoration. The relative ease and convenience of the procedure is also illustrated.

  6. Three-dimensional assessment of crestal bone levels at titanium implants with different abutment microstructures and insertion depths using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kathrin; Klitzsch, Inka; Stauber, Martin; Schwarz, Frank

    2017-06-01

    To (i) assess the impact of insertion depth and abutment microstructure on the three-dimensional crestal bone-level changes at endosseous titanium implant using μCT and computerized image processing and (ii) to correlate the findings with previously reported histology. Titanium implants (conical abutment connection) were inserted in each hemimandible of n = 6 foxhounds with the implant shoulder (IS) located either in epicrestal (0 mm), supracrestal (+1 mm) or subcrestal (-1 mm) positions and randomly (split-mouth design) connected with machined or partially micro-grooved healing abutments. At 20 weeks, the tissue biopsies were processed for μCT and histological (HI) analyses. The volumetric dehiscence profile around the implants was computed as distance between the implant shoulder (IS) and the most coronal bone-to-implant contact (CBI) using MATLAB. The respective buccal and oral values were averaged, and agreement with the respective IS-CBI scores from HI was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A median net bone gain was observed for supracrestal insertion depths at both abutment types, but lower bounds of the 75% quartile experienced net bone losses. Epicrestal and subcrestal insertion depths were linked to slight bone losses, and the buccal and oral dehiscences were smaller compared to supracrestal positioning. Bland-Altman plots yielded a moderate agreement of IS-CBI values measured with μCT and HI. The novel image processing method allowed reliable evaluations and pointed to a direct impact of insertion depths on crestal bone-level changes. Additionally, it demonstrated that HI morphometry crucially depends on the chosen cutting position. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. In vitro assessment of 3 dentifrices containing fluoride in preventing demineralization of overdenture abutments and root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettsche, Zachary S; Ettinger, Ronald L; Wefel, James S; Hogan, Mary M; Harless, Jeffery D; Qian, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Caries development under overdentures has been a continuing problem and requires the daily use of fluoride to prevent demineralization. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effectiveness of dentifrices containing tricalcium phosphate or calcium phosphosilicate in combination with fluoride to prevent the demineralization of overdenture abutments and root surfaces. A total of 56 caries-free extracted teeth were prepared as overdenture abutments. The teeth were painted with acid-resistant varnish, leaving one 1×4-mm window on occlusal and root surfaces. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups: a control group treated with distilled/deionized water only, a group treated with ClinPro 5000, a group treated with ReNew, and a group treated with Prevident 5000 gel. Each tooth was subjected to a demineralizing/remineralizing cycling protocol for 12 days with the appropriate treatment products. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally through both windows. Photomicrographs were made of 3 representative sections from each tooth. A representative section was defined as one that included both windows and was cut from the part of the tooth that had the flattest surface to reduce the edge effect. The depths of the lesions were measured on representative sections from each group. A 1-way MANOVA and a 1-way ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey-Kramer test were used to evaluate the treatment effects on the criterion variables (α=.05). The total lesion depths of the control teeth on the occlusal surface were not statistically significantly deeper than for the 3 dentifrices (P=.7705). However, all 3 dentifrices had narrower cavitation depths than the control (mean cavitation band depth, 43.59 [ReNew] versus 37.99 [Prevident 5000 gel] versus 36.70 [ClinPro 5000] versus 246.86 [control]) (Pteeth treated with Prevident 5000 gel had the shallowest total lesion depth and were statistically significantly different from those treated with ReNew and Clin

  8. The Effect of Tissue Entrapment on Screw Loosening at the Implant/Abutment Interface of External- and Internal-Connection Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeno, Helios A; Buitrago, Renan L; Sternberger, Sidney S; Patt, Marisa E; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo; Kurtz, Kenneth S; Tuminelli, Frank J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the removal of torque values of machined implant abutment connections (internal and external) with and without soft tissue entrapment using an in vitro model. Thirty external- and 30 internal-connection implants were embedded in urethane dimethacrylate. Porcine tissue was prepared and measured to thicknesses of 0.5 and 1.0 mm. Six groups (n = 10) were studied: External- and internal-connection implants with no tissue (control), 0.5, and 1.0 mm of tissue were entrapped at the implant/abutment interface. Abutments were inserted to 20 Ncm for all six groups. Insertion torque values were recorded using a digital torque gauge. All groups were then immersed in 1 M NaOH for 48 hours to dissolve tissue. Subsequent reverse torque measurements were recorded. Mean and standard deviation were determined for each group, and one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test were used for statistical analysis. All 60 specimens achieved a 20-Ncm insertion torque, despite tissue entrapment. Reverse torque measurements for external connection displayed a statistically significant difference (p internal-connection groups. In all specimens, tissue did not completely dissolve after 48 hours. External-connection implants were significantly affected by tissue entrapment; the thicker the tissue, the lower the reverse torque values noted. Internal-connection implants were less affected by tissue entrapment. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Live-Load Testing Application Using a Wireless Sensor System and Finite-Element Model Analysis of an Integral Abutment Concrete Girder Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Fausett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of an investigation on the performance of integral abutment bridges, a single-span, integral abutment, prestressed concrete girder bridge near Perry, Utah was instrumented for live-load testing. The live-load test included driving trucks at 2.24 m/s (5 mph along predetermined load paths and measuring the corresponding strain and deflection. The measured data was used to validate a finite-element model (FEM of the bridge. The model showed that the integral abutments were behaving as 94% of a fixed-fixed support. Live-load distribution factors were obtained using this validated model and compared to those calculated in accordance to recommended procedures provided in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications (2010. The results indicated that if the bridge was considered simply supported, the AASHTO LRFD Specification distribution factors were conservative (in comparison to the FEM results. These conservative distribution factors, along with the initial simply supported design assumption resulted in a very conservative bridge design. In addition, a parametric study was conducted by modifying various bridge properties of the validated bridge model, one at a time, in order to investigate the influence that individual changes in span length, deck thickness, edge distance, skew, and fixity had on live-load distribution. The results showed that the bridge properties with the largest influence on bridge live-load distribution were fixity, skew, and changes in edge distance.

  10. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments: A Randomized, Multicenter Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  11. The effect of one-time abutment placement on interproximal bone levels and peri-implant soft tissues: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Ana; Sanz-Sánchez, Ignacio; Martín, Conchita; Blanco, Juan; Sanz, Mariano

    2017-04-01

    To compare the effect of placing the definitive abutment at the time of implant placement versus at a later stage, on the soft and hard tissue changes around dental implants. Platform-switched implants were placed in the posterior maxilla or mandible of partial edentulous patients and they were randomized to receive the definitive abutment at the moment of implant placement, or 6-12 weeks later. Final prostheses were delivered 2-4 weeks later. Radiographic assessment of vertical bone level changes (primary outcome), clinical status of peri-implant tissues, changes in soft tissues margin, papilla filling, patient-related outcomes and adverse events were assessed 6 and 12 months after loading. 60 implants were placed in 40 patients, replacing single or multiple absent teeth. One implant was lost 1 week after insertion (overall survival rate: 98.3%). A statistically significant greater bone resorption from surgery to 6 months post-loading was observed for those implants subjected to abutment change (control group: -1.24 ± 0.79 mm; test group: -0.61 ± 0.40 mm; P = 0.028). Periodontal clinical parameters and patient-related outcomes, however, did not demonstrate significant differences between groups at any time point. A significant increase in papilla height was observed from loading to 12 months in all implants (control group: 1.17 ± 1.47 mm; test group: 0.98 ± 0.89 mm) and a slight but not significant coronal migration of the gingival margin. The connection and disconnection of healing abutments is associated with significantly increased bone loss during the healing period between implant placement and 6 months post-loading, when compared to one-time abutment placement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Influence of space size of abutment screw access channel on the amount of extruded excess cement and marginal accuracy of cement-retained single implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Al-Qarni, Mohammed N; Al-Bakri, Ahmed S; Al-Maflehi, Nassr S; Abualsaud, Haythem S

    2018-02-01

    The detrimental effect of extruded excess cement on peri-implant tissue has been well documented. Although several techniques have been proposed to reduce this effect by decreasing the amount of extruded cement, how the space size of the abutment screw access channel (SAC) affects the amount of extruded cement and marginal accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the size of the unfilled space of the abutment SAC on the amount of extruded excess cement and the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings. Twelve implant replicas and corresponding standard abutments were attached and embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) zirconia copings with a uniform 30-μm cement space were fabricated by 1 dental technician using the standard method. The copings were temporarily cemented 3 times at different sizes of the left space of the SAC as follows: the nonspaced group (NS), in which the entire SAC was completely filled, the 1-mm-spaced group (1MMS), and the 2-mm-spaced group (2MMS). Abutments and crowns were ultrasonically cleaned, steam cleaned, and air-dried. The excess cement was collected and weighed. To measure the marginal accuracy, 20 measurements were made every 18 degrees along the coping margin at ×300 magnification and compared with the pre-cementation readings. One-way ANOVA was calculated to determine whether the amount of extruded excess cement differed among the 3 groups, and the Tukey test was applied for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The mean weights (mg) of extruded excess cement were NS (33.53 ±1.5), 1MMS (22.97 ±5.4), and 2MMS (15.17 ±5.9). Multiple comparisons showed significant differences in the amount of extruded excess cement among the 3 test groups (Pcemented group (29.5 ±8.2) was significantly different (Pcement by 55% in comparison with the nonspaced abutments. However, no effect was found on the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings

  13. Influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of conventional and digital methods of obtaining dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal Mejía, Jeison B; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2017-09-01

    Direct (intraoral) and indirect (desktop) digital scanning can record abutment tooth preparations despite their geometry. However, little peer-reviewed information is available regarding the influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of digital methods of obtaining dental impressions. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of conventional and digital methods of obtaining dental impressions in terms of trueness and precision. Crown preparations with known total occlusal convergence (TOC) angles (-8, -6, -4, 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 22 degrees) were digitally created from a maxillary left central incisor and printed in acrylic resin. Each of these 9 reference models was scanned with a highly accurate reference scanner and saved in standard tessellation language (STL) format. Then, 5 conventional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions were made from each reference model, which was poured with Type IV dental stone scanned using both the reference scanner (group PVS) and the desktop scanner and exported as STL files. Additionally, direct digital impressions (intraoral group) of the reference models were made, and the STL files were exported. The STL files from the impressions obtained were compared with the original geometry of the reference model (trueness) and within each test group (precision). Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA with the post hoc least significant difference test (α=.05). Overall trueness values were 19.1 μm (intraoral scanner group), 23.5 μm (desktop group), and 26.2 μm (PVS group), whereas overall precision values were 11.9 μm (intraoral), 18.0 μm (PVS), and 20.7 μm (desktop). Simple main effects analysis showed that impressions made with the intraoral scanner were significantly more accurate than those of the PVS and desktop groups when the TOC angle was less than 8 degrees (Pimpression and the TOC angle on the precision of single-tooth dental impressions (F=2

  14. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  15. Comparison of external and internal implant-abutment connections for implant supported prostheses. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Bonfante, Estevam Augusto; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2018-03-01

    The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to answer the PICO question: "Do patients that received external connection implants show similar marginal bone loss, implant survival and complication rates as internal connection implants?". Meta-analyses of marginal bone loss, survival rates of implants and complications rates were performed for the included studies. Study eligibility criteria included (1) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and/or prospective, (2) studies with at least 10 patients, (3) direct comparison between connection types and (4) publications in English language. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the quality and risk of bias in RCTs, while Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used for non-RCTs. A comprehensive search strategy was designed to identify published studies on PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and The Cochrane Library databases up to October 2017. The search identified 661 references. Eleven studies (seven RCTs and four prospective studies) were included, with a total of 530 patients (mean age, 53.93 years), who had received a total of 1089 implants (461 external-connection and 628 internal-connection implants). The internal-connection implants exhibited lower marginal bone loss than external-connection implants (PInternal connections had lower marginal bone loss when compared to external connections. However, the implant-abutment connection had no influence on the implant's survival and complication rates. Based on the GRADE approach the evidence was classified as very low to moderate due to the study design, inconsistency, and publication bias. Thus, future research is highly encouraged. Internal connection implants should be preferred over external connection implants, especially when different risk factors that may contribute to increased marginal bone loss are present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of accuracy of complete-arch multiple-unit abutment-level dental implant impressions using different impression and splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted or nonsplinted direct impression techniques using various splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The effect of two different impression materials on the accuracy of the implant casts was also evaluated for abutment-level impressions. A reference model with six internal-connection implant replicas placed in the completely edentulous mandibular arch and connected to multi-base abutments was fabricated from heat-curing acrylic resin. Forty impressions of the reference model were made, 20 each with polyether (PE) and polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression materials using the open tray technique. The PE and PVS groups were further subdivided into four subgroups of five each on the bases of splinting type: no splinting, bite registration PE, bite registration addition silicone, or autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The positional accuracy of the implant replica heads was measured on the poured casts using a coordinate measuring machine to assess linear differences in interimplant distances in all three axes. The collected data (linear and three-dimensional [3D] displacement values) were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference resin model and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). No significant differences were found between the various splinting groups for both PE and PVS impression materials in terms of linear and 3D distortions. However, small but significant differences were found between the two impression materials (PVS, 91 μm; PE, 103 μm) in terms of 3D discrepancies, irrespective of the splinting technique employed. Casts obtained from both impression materials exhibited differences from the reference model. The impression material influenced impression inaccuracy more than the splinting material for multiple-unit abutment-level impressions.

  17. Quality assurance of MLC leaf position accuracy and relative dose effect at the MLC abutment region using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated an electronic portal image device (EPID)-based method to see whether it provides effective and accurate relative dose measurement at abutment leaves in terms of positional errors of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf position. A Siemens ONCOR machine was used. For the garden fence test, a rectangular field (0.2x20 cm) was sequentially irradiated 11 times at 2-cm intervals. Deviations from planned leaf positions were calculated. For the nongap test, relative doses at the MLC abutment region were evaluated by sequential irradiation of a rectangular field (2x20 cm) 10 times with a MLC separation of 2 cm without a leaf gap. The integral signal in a region of interest was set to position A (between leaves) and B (neighbor of A). A pixel value at position B was used as background and the pixel ratio (A/Bx100) was calculated. Both tests were performed at four gantry angles (0, 90, 180 and 270deg) four times over 1 month. For the nongap test the difference in pixel ratio between the first and last period was calculated. Regarding results, average deviations from planned positions with the garden fence test were within 0.5 mm at all gantry angles, and at gantry angles of 90 and 270deg tended to decrease gradually over the month. For the nongap test, pixel ratio tended to increase gradually in all leaves, leading to a decrease in relative doses at abutment regions. This phenomenon was affected by both gravity arising from the gantry angle, and the hardware-associated contraction of field size with this type of machine. (author)

  18. Red flag on the white reporter: a versatile insulator abuts the white gene in Drosophila and is omnipresent in mini-white constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Chetverina, Darya; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Maksimenko, Oksana; Melnikova, Larisa; Zaytseva, Olga; Parshikov, Alexander; Galkin, Alexander V.; Georgiev, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Much of the research on insulators in Drosophila has been done with transgenic constructs using the white gene (mini-white) as reporter. Hereby we report that the sequence between the white and CG32795 genes in Drosophila melanogaster contains an insulator of a novel kind. Its functional core is within a 368 bp segment almost contiguous to the white 3′UTR, hence we name it as Wari (white-abutting resident insulator). Though Wari contains no binding sites for known insulator proteins and does ...

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage at Implant-Abutment Connection of Three Implant Systems Having the Same Prosthetic Interface Using Rhodamine B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Berberi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Hollow space between implant and abutment may act as reservoir for commensal and/or pathogenic bacteria representing a potential source of tissue inflammation. Microbial colonization of the interfacial gap may ultimately lead to infection and bone resorption. Using Rhodamine B, a sensitive fluorescent tracer dye, we aim in this study to investigate leakage at implant-abutment connection of three implant systems having the same prosthetic interface. Materials and Methods. Twenty-one implants (seven Astra Tech, seven Euroteknika, and seven Dentium with the same prosthetic interface were connected to their original abutments, according to the manufacturers’ recommendation. After determination of the inner volume of each implant systems, the kinetic quantification of leakage was evaluated for each group using Rhodamine B (10−2 M. For each group, spectrophotometric analysis was performed to detect leakage with a fluorescence spectrophotometer at 1 h (T0 and 48 h (T1 of incubation time at room temperature. Results. Astra Tech had the highest inner volume (6.8 μL, compared to Dentium (4 μL and Euroteknika (2.9 μL. At T0 and T1, respectively, the leakage volume and percentage of each system were as follows: Astra Tech 0.043 μL or 1.48% (SD 0.0022, 0.08 μL or 5.56% (SD 0.0074, Euroteknika 0.09 μL or 6.93% (SD 0.0913, 0.21 μL or 20.55% (SD 0.0035, and Dentium 0.07 μL or 4.6% (SD 0.0029, 0.12 μL or 10.47% (SD 0.0072. Conclusion. The tested internal conical implant-abutment connections appear to be unable to prevent leakage. In average, Astra Tech implants showed the highest inner volume and the least leakage.

  20. Peri-implant soft tissue and marginal bone adaptation on implant with non-matching healing abutments: micro-CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelle, Gary; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios E V; Souza, André B; Katebi, Negin; Gallucci, German O; Araújo, Mauricio G

    2015-04-01

    To assess (i) the outcome of changing the horizontal-offset dimension on the peri-implant soft tissues and the crestal bone and (ii) the effect of different healing abutments (flared vs. straight) on the marginal peri-implant soft tissues and crestal bone. Two-piece dental implants diameters of 3.5 and 4.5 mm were placed at least 1 mm subcrestal in five beagle dogs. Three different investigational groups: (i) 3.5-mm-diameter implant with narrow healing abutment (3.5N), (ii) 4.5-mm-diameter implant with narrow healing abutment (4.5N), and (iii) 3.5-mm-diameter implant with wide healing abutment (3.5W), were assessed. After 4 months of healing, the vertical distance from the marginal crestal bone (MB) to the implant shoulder (IS); the vertical distance from the IS to the first bone-to-implant contact; and the horizontal distance of bone ingrowth on the implant platform were measured with a high-resolution micro-CT (Xradia MicroXCT-200 system). Implants with a narrow healing caps showed an interproximal MB located between 0 and 1 mm above the implant shoulder, while the 3.5W group exhibits a mean value -0.50 mm. As all implants in group 3.5N presented a fBIC located at the level of the IS. For the 4.5N group, the mean fBIC-IS distance was -0.52 mm apically to the IS. For the 3.5WC group, the mean fBIC-IS distance was -1.42 mm. Horizontal bone apposition was only observed for the 3.5N group and the 4.5N group. The dimension of the horizontal offset would play a minimal role in reducing bone remodeling, whereas the configuration of the transmucosal component would directly influence marginal bone remodeling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The effects of healing abutments of different size and anatomic shape placed immediately in extraction sockets on peri-implant hard and soft tissues. A pilot study in foxhound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Patricia J; Mareque-Bueno, Javier; Boquete-Castro, Ana; Aguilar-Salvatierra Raya, Antonio; Martínez-González, José M; Calvo-Guirado, José L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to compare the effects of narrow, concave-straight and wide anatomic healing abutments on changes to soft tissues and crestal bone levels around implants immediately placed into extraction sockets in foxhound dogs. Forty-eight titanium implants (Bredent Medical GMBH, Germany) of the same dimensions were placed in six foxhound dogs. They were divided into two groups (n = 24): test (implants with anatomic abutment) and control (implants with concave-straight abutment). The implants were inserted randomly in the post extraction sockets of P2 , P3 , P4, and M1 bilaterally in six dogs. After eight and twelve weeks, the animals were sacrificed and samples extracted containing the implants and the surrounding soft and hard tissues. Soft tissue and crestal bone loss (CBL) were evaluated by histology and histomorphometry. All implants were clinically and histologically osseointegrated. Healing patterns were examined microscopically at eight and twelve weeks. After eight and twelve weeks, for hard tissues, the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact (IS-C) was higher for control group in the lingual aspect with statistical significance (P < 0.05). For soft tissues (STL), the distance from the top of the peri-implant mucosa to the apical portion of the junction epithelium (PM-Je) was significantly less on the lingual aspect in the test group (with wider abutment) at eight and twelve weeks (P < 0.05). The distance from the top of the apical portion of the junction epithelium to the first bone-to-implant contact (Je-C) was significantly higher in the test group (wider abutment) in the lingual aspect at eight and twelve weeks (P < 0.05). There was no connective tissue contact with any abutment surface. Within the limitations of this animal study, anatomic healing abutments protect soft and hard tissues and reduce crestal bone resorption compared with concave-straight healing abutments. © 2014 John Wiley

  2. Multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization to define abutting and overlapping gene expression in the embryonic zebrafish brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauptmann Giselbert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, mapping of overlapping and abutting regulatory gene expression domains by chromogenic two-color in situ hybridization has helped define molecular subdivisions of the developing vertebrate brain and shed light on its basic organization. Despite the benefits of this technique, visualization of overlapping transcript distributions by differently colored precipitates remains difficult because of masking of lighter signals by darker color precipitates and lack of three-dimensional visualization properties. Fluorescent detection of transcript distributions may be able to solve these issues. However, despite the use of signal amplification systems for increasing sensitivity, fluorescent detection in whole-mounts suffers from rapid quenching of peroxidase (POD activity compared to alkaline phosphatase chromogenic reactions. Thus, less strongly expressed genes cannot be efficiently detected. Results We developed an optimized procedure for fluorescent detection of transcript distribution in whole-mount zebrafish embryos using tyramide signal amplification (TSA. Conditions for hybridization and POD-TSA reaction were optimized by the application of the viscosity-increasing polymer dextran sulfate and the use of the substituted phenol compounds 4-iodophenol and vanillin as enhancers of POD activity. In combination with highly effective bench-made tyramide substrates, these improvements resulted in dramatically increased signal-to-noise ratios. The strongly enhanced signal intensities permitted fluorescent visualization of less abundant transcripts of tissue-specific regulatory genes. When performing multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments, the highly sensitive POD reaction conditions required effective POD inactivation after each detection cycle by glycine-hydrochloric acid treatment. This optimized FISH procedure permitted the simultaneous fluorescent visualization of up to three unique transcripts

  3. In vitro synchrotron-based radiography of micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, A.; Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Zabler, S.; Nelson, K.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-radiography using hard X-ray synchrotron radiation is the first potential tool to allow an evaluation of the mechanical behavior of the dental implant–abutment complex during force application, thus enabling the enhancement of the design of dental implants which has been based on theoretical analysis to date. Micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants was investigated in vitro using high-resolution radiography in combination with hard X-ray synchrotron radiation. Images were taken with the specimen under different mechanical loads of up to 100 N. The aim of this investigation was to prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. Synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in highly attenuating objects. The first illustration of a micro-gap which was previously indistinguishable by laboratory methods underlines that the complex micro-mechanical behavior of implants requires further in vitro investigations where synchrotron-based micro-imaging is one of the prerequisites

  4. Experimental Research on Foamed Mixture Lightweight Soil Mixed with Fly-Ash and Quicklime as Backfill Material behind Abutments of Expressway Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To promote the utilization of fly-ash, based on the orthogonal experiment method, wet density and unconfined compressive strength of Foamed Mixture Lightweight Soil mixed with fly-ash and quicklime (FMLSF are studied. It is shown that the wet density and unconfined compressive strength of FMLSF increase with the increase of cement content, while decreasing with the increase of foam content. With the mixing content of fly-ash increase, the wet density and unconfined compressive strength of FMLSF increase firstly and then decrease. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM tests show that ball effect or microaggregate effect of fly-ash improves the wet density and unconfined compressive strength of FMLSF. With the mixing content of quicklime increase, the wet density and unconfined compressive strength of FMLSF increase firstly within a narrow range and then decrease. In addition, the primary and secondary influence order on wet density and 28-day compressive strength of FMLSF are obtained, as well as the optimal mixture combination. Finally, based on two abutments in China, behind which they are filled with FMLSF and Foamed Mixture Lightweight Soil (FMLS, the construction techniques and key points of quality control behind abutment are compared and discussed in detail, and the feasibility of utilization fly-ash as FMLSF is verified by the experimental results.

  5. In vitro synchrotron-based radiography of micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, A., E-mail: arack@snafu.de [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Rack, T. [Charité, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Navigation and Robotics, Berlin (Germany); Stiller, M. [Charité, Department of Maxillofacial and Facial-Plastic Surgery, Division of Oral Medicine, Radiology and Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Riesemeier, H. [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Division Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, Berlin (Germany); Zabler, S. [Technical University of Berlin, Institute for Materials Engineering (Germany); Nelson, K. [Charité, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Navigation and Robotics, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-01

    Micro-radiography using hard X-ray synchrotron radiation is the first potential tool to allow an evaluation of the mechanical behavior of the dental implant–abutment complex during force application, thus enabling the enhancement of the design of dental implants which has been based on theoretical analysis to date. Micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants was investigated in vitro using high-resolution radiography in combination with hard X-ray synchrotron radiation. Images were taken with the specimen under different mechanical loads of up to 100 N. The aim of this investigation was to prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. Synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in highly attenuating objects. The first illustration of a micro-gap which was previously indistinguishable by laboratory methods underlines that the complex micro-mechanical behavior of implants requires further in vitro investigations where synchrotron-based micro-imaging is one of the prerequisites.

  6. In vitro fatigue tests and in silico finite element analysis of dental implants with different fixture/abutment joint types using computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Machado, Lucas S; Matsumoto, Shuji; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue resistance of dental fixtures with two different fixture-abutment connections by in vitro fatigue testing and in silico three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) using original computer-aided design (CAD) models. Dental implant fixtures with external connection (EX) or internal connection (IN) abutments were fabricated from original CAD models using grade IV titanium and step-stress accelerated life testing was performed. Fatigue cycles and loads were assessed by Weibull analysis, and fatigue cracking was observed by micro-computed tomography and a stereomicroscope with high dynamic range software. Using the same CAD models, displacement vectors of implant components were also analyzed by 3D FEA. Angles of the fractured line occurring at fixture platforms in vitro and of displacement vectors corresponding to the fractured line in silico were compared by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue testing showed significantly greater reliability for IN than EX (pimplant fixture platforms. FEA demonstrated that crack lines of both implant systems in vitro were observed in the same direction as displacement vectors of the implant fixtures in silico. In silico displacement vectors in the implant fixture are insightful for geometric development of dental implants to reduce complex interactions leading to fatigue failure. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Short implants with a nanometer-sized CaP surface provided with either a platform-switched or platform-matched abutment connection in the posterior region : a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, G.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Vissink, A.; Raghoebar, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo assess the performance of short nanorough implants (8.5mm in length) provided with either a platform-matched or a platform-switched implant-abutment connection, placed in the resorbed posterior region of partially dentate patients. Materials and MethodsA total of 149 implants with a

  8. Implant-abutment interface

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A search of electronic database from 1990 to 2014 in Pubmed search engine using key words like ... space exists between the mating parts e.g. external or .... recess due to friction, resulting in a virtual 'cold weld'.

  9. An investigation of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface when drilling through a zirconia crown attached to a titanium or zirconia abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Amy G; Sutton, Alan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-11-01

    Thermal injury to the implant-bone interface may lead to bone necrosis and loss of osseointegration. This is a concern during manipulation of the implant throughout the restorative phase of treatment. The risk of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface during abutment preparation or prosthesis removal should be considered. The purpose of the study was to examine the amount of heat transferred to the implant-bone interface when a zirconia crown is drilled to access the screw channel or section a crown with a high-speed dental handpiece. Of the 64 ceramic-veneered zirconia crowns fabricated, 32 had a coping thickness of 0.5 mm and 32 had a coping thickness of 1.0 mm. The crowns were cemented on either titanium stock abutments or zirconia stock abutments. Each group was further subdivided to evaluate heat transfer when the screw channel was accessed or the crown was sectioned with a high-speed handpiece with or without irrigation. Temperature change was recorded for each specimen at the cervical and apical aspect of the implant with thermocouples and a logging thermometer. ANOVA was used to assess the statistical significance in temperature change between the test combinations, and nonparametric Mann-Whitney U tests were used to evaluate the findings. The use of irrigation during both crown removal processes yielded an average temperature increase of 3.59 ±0.35°C. Crown removal in the absence of irrigation yielded an average temperature increase of 18.76 ±3.09°C. When all parameter combinations in the presence of irrigation were evaluated, the maximum temperature change was below the threshold of thermal injury to bone. The maximum temperature change was above the threshold for thermal injury at the coronal aspect of the implant and below the threshold at the apical aspect in the absence of irrigation. Within the limitations of this investigation, the use of irrigation with a high-speed dental handpiece to remove a ceramic-veneered zirconia crown results in

  10. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of a passive and friction fit implant abutment interface and the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress distribution pattern on the implant and surrounding bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaraz, Hasan; Paulose, Anoopa; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth; Hussain, Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the stress distribution pattern in the implant and the surrounding bone for a passive and a friction fit implant abutment interface and to analyze the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress generated. Materials and Methods: CAD models of two different types of implant abutment connections, the passive fit or the slip-fit represented by the Nobel Replace Tri-lobe connection and the friction fit or active fit represented by the Nobel active conical connection were made. The stress distribution pattern was studied at different occlusal dimension. Six models were constructed in PRO-ENGINEER 05 of the two implant abutment connection for three different occlusal dimensions each. The implant and abutment complex was placed in cortical and cancellous bone modeled using a computed tomography scan. This complex was subjected to a force of 100 N in the axial and oblique direction. The amount of stress and the pattern of stress generated were recorded on a color scale using ANSYS 13 software. Results: The results showed that overall maximum Von Misses stress on the bone is significantly less for friction fit than the passive fit in any loading conditions stresses on the implant were significantly higher for the friction fit than the passive fit. The narrow occlusal table models generated the least amount of stress on the implant abutment interface. Conclusion: It can thus be concluded that the conical connection distributes more stress to the implant body and dissipates less stress to the surrounding bone. A narrow occlusal table considerably reduces the occlusal overload. PMID:26929518

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of the natural abutment teeth in combined tooth-implant-supported telescopic prostheses: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chao; Huang, Yuanding; Feng, Tianming; Zou, Huawei; Fan, Yubo

    2017-07-01

    Telescopic overdentures supported by the combination of natural teeth and implants have been thought a valuable treatment for the severely compromised partially edentulous patients. But the combination of teeth and implants involves highly complex biomechanical problems. This study is to evaluate biomechanical behaviors of the natural abutment teeth with the treatment of combined tooth-implant supported telescopic crown prostheses in mandible through 3D FEA. According to this study, the prosthetic option supported by a combination of teeth and implants and retained by double crowns could protect teeth and their periodontal support tissues acting as a rigid splint, and may be a valuable treatment option for partially edentulous patients with severely reduced remaining teeth in mandible.

  12. In vitro synchrotron-based radiography of micro-gap formation at the implant-abutment interface of two-piece dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, A; Rack, T; Stiller, M; Riesemeier, H; Zabler, S; Nelson, K

    2010-03-01

    Micro-gap formation at the implant-abutment interface of two-piece dental implants was investigated in vitro using high-resolution radiography in combination with hard X-ray synchrotron radiation. Images were taken with the specimen under different mechanical loads of up to 100 N. The aim of this investigation was to prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. Synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in highly attenuating objects. The first illustration of a micro-gap which was previously indistinguishable by laboratory methods underlines that the complex micro-mechanical behavior of implants requires further in vitro investigations where synchrotron-based micro-imaging is one of the prerequisites.

  13. Clinical Performance of One-Piece, Screw-Retained Implant Crowns Based on Hand-Veneered CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments After a Mean Follow-up Period of 2.3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, Nicole; Forrer, Fiona Alena; Brägger, Urs; Hicklin, Stefan Paul

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns based on hand-veneered computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection at least 1 year after insertion of the crown. Consecutive patients who had received at least one Straumann bone level implant and one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns fabricated with CARES zirconium dioxide abutments were reexamined. Patient satisfaction, occlusal and peri-implant parameters, mechanical and biologic complications, radiologic parameters, and esthetics were recorded. A total of 50 implant crowns in the anterior and premolar region were examined in 41 patients. The follow-up period of the definitive reconstructions ranged from 1.1 to 3.8 years. No technical and no biologic complications had occurred. At the reexamination, 100% of the implants and reconstructions were in situ. Radiographic evaluation revealed a mean distance from the implant shoulder to the first visible bone-to-implant contact of 0.06 mm at the follow-up examination. Screw-retained crowns based on veneered CAD/CAM zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection seem to be a promising way to replace missing teeth in the anterior and premolar region. In the short term, neither failures of components nor complications were noted, and the clinical and radiographic data revealed stable hard and soft tissue conditions.

  14. Potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering method for improving abutment dosimetry in eMLC-delivered segmented-field electron conformal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Parker, Brent C.; Price, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering of the higher energy electron fields for improving abutment dosimetry in the planning volume when using an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: A discrete (five-step) Gaussian edge spread function was used to match dose penumbras of differing beam energies (6-20 MeV) at a specified depth in a water phantom. Software was developed to define the leaf eMLC positions of an eMLC that most closely fit each electron field shape. The effect of 1D edge feathering of the higher energy field on dose homogeneity was computed and measured for segmented-field ECT treatment plans for three 2D PTVs in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of the x-axis (parallel to leaf motion) and remained constant along the y-axis (perpendicular to leaf motion). Additionally, the effect of 2D edge feathering was computed and measured for one radially symmetric, 3D PTV in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of both axes. For the 3D PTV, the feathering scheme was evaluated for 0.1-1.0-cm leaf widths. Dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam dose algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Dose verification measurements were made using a prototype eMLC (1-cm leaf width). Results: 1D discrete Gaussian edge feathering reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 2D PTVs by 34, 34, and 39%. In the 3D PTV, the broad leaf width (1 cm) of the eMLC hindered the 2D application of the feathering solution to the 3D PTV, and the standard deviation of dose increased by 10%. However, 2D discrete Gaussian edge feathering with simulated eMLC leaf widths of 0.1-0.5 cm reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 3D PTV by 33-28%, respectively. Conclusions: A five-step discrete Gaussian edge

  15. The effect of independent collimator misalignment on the dosimetry of abutted half-beam blocked fields for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, D.I.; McDonough, J.; Kassaee, A.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: Independent collimation conveniently allows for the junctioning of abutting fields with non-diverging beam edges. When this technique is used at the junction of multiple fields, e.g. lateral and low anterior fields in three-field head and neck set-ups, there should be a dosimetric match with no overdose or underdose at the matchline. We set out to evaluate the actual dosimetry at the central match plane. Materials and methods: Independent jaws were used to mimic two half-beam blocked fields abutting at the central axis. X-Ray verification film was exposed in a water-equivalent phantom and the dose at the matchline was evaluated with laser densitometry. Collimators were then programmed to force a gap or overlap of the radiation fields to evaluate the effect of jaw misalignment within the tolerance of the manufacturer's specification. Diode measurements of the field edges were also performed. Four beam energies from four different linear accelerators were evaluated. Results: Small systematic inhomogeneities were found along the matchline in all linear accelerators tested. The maximum dose on the central axis varied linearly with small programmed jaw misalignments. For a gap or overlap of 2 mm between the jaws, the matchline dose increased or decreased by 30-40%. The region of overdose or underdose around the matchline is 3-4 mm wide. The discrepancy between the width of jaw separation and the width of the region of altered dose is explained by a penumbra effect.Conclusion: We recommend that independent jaw alignment be evaluated routinely and provide a simple method to estimate dose inhomogeneity at the match plane. If there is a field gap or overlap resulting in a clinically significant change in dosimetry, jaw misalignment should be corrected. If it cannot be corrected, part of the benefit of asymmetric collimation is lost and other methods of field junctioning may have to be considered. We routinely use a small block over the spinal cord at

  16. A Survey of Removable Partial Denture (RPD) Retentive Elements in Relation to the Type of Edentulism and Abutment Teeth Found in Commercial Laboratories, Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Michael; Zissis, Alcibiades

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this survey was to record removable partial denture (RPD) retentive elements and abutment teeth in partially edentulous patients, identified in commercial laboratories in Athens, Greece. Material and Methods 628 master casts with the corresponding cast metal frameworks used in the construction of RPDs were evaluated. Casts were photographed to identify the number and position of existing teeth, the partial edentulism class and the retentive elements. Prevalence tables and the x2 test were used for the statistical analysis of the collected data (α=.05). Results There were 276 maxillary (43.9%) and 352 (56.1%) mandibular casts. Maxillary edentulism entailed almost a total absence of right third molars in 96.7% and left third molars 96.0% of casts, with lower rates for the first and second molars. Edentulism in the posterior mandible presented a similar pattern. The most profound findings concerning retentive elements were: 91.9% of the retainers used were clasps and the remaining 8.1% were attachments. Of the clasps used, 48.9% were of the Roach Τ type, a finding more common in Kennedy Class I as compared to other Kennedy Classes (p<0.01). The circumferential clasps accounted for 19.3% of the total clasps used, and it was less frequently presented (8.8%) in Kennedy I Classes (p<0.01). Conclusions Roach clasps were used in the majority of cases whereas RPI clasps and attachments were rarely used. PMID:27688367

  17. Red flag on the white reporter: a versatile insulator abuts the white gene in Drosophila and is omnipresent in mini-white constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetverina, Darya; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Maksimenko, Oksana; Melnikova, Larisa; Zaytseva, Olga; Parshikov, Alexander; Galkin, Alexander V; Georgiev, Pavel

    2008-02-01

    Much of the research on insulators in Drosophila has been done with transgenic constructs using the white gene (mini-white) as reporter. Hereby we report that the sequence between the white and CG32795 genes in Drosophila melanogaster contains an insulator of a novel kind. Its functional core is within a 368 bp segment almost contiguous to the white 3'UTR, hence we name it as Wari (white-abutting resident insulator). Though Wari contains no binding sites for known insulator proteins and does not require Su(Hw) or Mod(mdg4) for its activity, it can equally well interact with another copy of Wari and with unrelated Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, gypsy or 1A2. In its natural downstream position, Wari reinforces enhancer blocking by any of the three insulators placed between the enhancer and the promoter; again, Wari-Wari, Wari-gypsy or 1A2-Wari pairing results in mutual neutralization (insulator bypass) when they precede the promoter. The distressing issue is that this element hides in all mini-white constructs employed worldwide to study various insulators and other regulatory elements as well as long-range genomic interactions, and its versatile effects could have seriously influenced the results and conclusions of many works.

  18. A Survey of Removable Partial Denture (RPD Retentive Elements in Relation to Type of Edentulism and Abutment Teeth in Commercial Laboratories in Athens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sotiriou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this survey was to record removable partial denture (RPD retentive elements and abutment teeth in partially edentulous patients, identified in commercial laboratories in Athens, Greece. Material and Methods. 628 master casts with the corresponding cast metal frameworks used in the construction of RPDs were evaluated. Casts were photographed to identify the number and position of existing teeth, the partial edentulism class and the retentive elements. Prevalence tables and the x2 test were used for the statistical analysis of the collected data (α=.05. Results. There were 276 maxillary (43.9% and 352 (56.1% mandibular casts. Maxillary edentulism entailed almost a total absence of right third molars in 96.7% and left third molars 96.0% of casts, with lower rates for the first and second molars. Edentulism in the posterior mandible presented a similar pattern. The most profound findings concerning retentive elements were: 91.9% of the retainers used were clasps and the remaining 8.1% were attachments. Of the clasps used, 48.9% were of the Roach Τ type, a finding more common in Kennedy Class I as compared to other Kennedy Classes (p<0.01. The circumferential clasps accounted for 19.3% of the total clasps used, and it was less frequently presented (8.8% in Kennedy I Classes (p<0.01. Conclusions. Roach clasps were used in the majority of cases whereas RPI clasps and attachments were rarely used.

  19. A Novel Scheme and Evaluations on a Long-Term and Continuous Biosensor Platform Integrated with a Dental Implant Fixture and Its Prosthetic Abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Jung; Lu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-09-25

    A miniature intra-oral dental implant system including a built-in biosensor device is proposed in this article. The dental implant system, or platform, is replaced over maxilla and allows relatively non-invasive procedures for a novel biosensing scheme for human blood analysis. Due to placement of the implant fixture, periodontal ligaments and the pulp structure, which are regarded as the main origin of pain, are thus removed, and long-term, continuous blood analysis and management through maxillary bone marrow becomes achievable through the dental implant platform. The new pathway of biological sensing is for the first time presented to realize an accurate and painless approach without injections. The dental implant system mainly consists of an implant fixture and a prosthetic abutment, a biosensor module, a bluetooth 4.0 wireless module and a dc button cell battery. The electrochemical biosensor possesses three electrodes, including working, reference and counter ones, which are arranged to pass through the titanium implant fixture below the biosensor module. The electrodes are exposed to the blood pool inside the maxillary bone marrow and perform oxidation/reduction reactions with the coating of biosensing enzyme. To prove the proposed platform, the immobilization process of glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme and in vitro detections of glucose levels are successfully carried out, and proven sensitivity, linearity and repeatability of the glucose biosensor system are obtained. Moreover, a preliminary canine animal model adopting the new pathway shows significant consistency with the traditional method through dermal pricks for blood sugar detection. Despite the prospective results, further challenges in engineering implementation and clinical practices are addressed and discussed. In brief, the novel biosensing pathway and intra-oral biosensor platform may increasingly reveal their promising value and feasibilities in current bio-medical analysis, diagnosis, drug

  20. A Novel Scheme and Evaluations on a Long-Term and Continuous Biosensor Platform Integrated with a Dental Implant Fixture and Its Prosthetic Abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jung Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A miniature intra-oral dental implant system including a built-in biosensor device is proposed in this article. The dental implant system, or platform, is replaced over maxilla and allows relatively non-invasive procedures for a novel biosensing scheme for human blood analysis. Due to placement of the implant fixture, periodontal ligaments and the pulp structure, which are regarded as the main origin of pain, are thus removed, and long-term, continuous blood analysis and management through maxillary bone marrow becomes achievable through the dental implant platform. The new pathway of biological sensing is for the first time presented to realize an accurate and painless approach without injections. The dental implant system mainly consists of an implant fixture and a prosthetic abutment, a biosensor module, a bluetooth 4.0 wireless module and a dc button cell battery. The electrochemical biosensor possesses three electrodes, including working, reference and counter ones, which are arranged to pass through the titanium implant fixture below the biosensor module. The electrodes are exposed to the blood pool inside the maxillary bone marrow and perform oxidation/reduction reactions with the coating of biosensing enzyme. To prove the proposed platform, the immobilization process of glucose oxidase (GOD enzyme and in vitro detections of glucose levels are successfully carried out, and proven sensitivity, linearity and repeatability of the glucose biosensor system are obtained. Moreover, a preliminary canine animal model adopting the new pathway shows significant consistency with the traditional method through dermal pricks for blood sugar detection. Despite the prospective results, further challenges in engineering implementation and clinical practices are addressed and discussed. In brief, the novel biosensing pathway and intra-oral biosensor platform may increasingly reveal their promising value and feasibilities in current bio-medical analysis

  1. Correção por eletroerosão de bordas e bases de assentamento de parafusos de estruturas implanto-retidas : influencia no desajuste marginal e nas tensões transferidas aos abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Sotero Fragoso

    2007-01-01

    Resumo: A longevidade das reabilitações implanto-retidas é comprometida quando tensões provenientes do desajuste marginal e conduzidas às fixações causam dano à junção osso-implante. Este trabalho teve o propósito de avaliar os desajustes marginais e as tensões aferidas nos abutments de infra-estruturas implanto-retidas fundidas em titânio comercialmente puro (Ti c.p.) pelas técnicas monobloco, soldagem laser e fundição-sobre-análogos e também avaliou a influência de processos de eletroerosão...

  2. Marginal fit at cylinder-abutment interface before and after overcasting procedure Adaptação marginal na interface intermediário-cilindro antes e após as sobrefundições

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Martins Cres Moraes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure marginal fit at cylinder-abutment interface, before and after overcasting procedure. A hexagonal implant was fixed to a stainless steel base and a Estheticone-like abutment used during all the experiment. Before casting procedure, gold (Group I and Ni-Cr-Be (Group II premachined cylinders were tightened to the abutment with gold and titanium screws (in both groups, with 10Ncm and 20Ncm torque values for the same screw type. Vertical measures were taken at the light microscope (Mitutoyo 5050, Tokyo, Japan three times in six different parts along the abutment-cylinder interface for each torque value. Cylinders were overcast with Ag-Pd (Group I or Ni-Cr-Be (Group II alloy. After casting, the same measures and torque values were repeated. Intragroup differences (10 or 20Ncm torque values, before and after casting and intergroup differences (10 and 20Ncm torque values, before or after casting were analyzed by the Paired t Test; (pO objetivo deste estudo foi medir a adaptação marginal na interface intermediário-cilindro, antes e após a sobrefundição. Um implante do tipo hexágono externo afixado numa base de aço inoxidável e um intermediário do tipo Estheticone foram usados durante todo o experimento. Antes das fundições, cilindros pré-usinados de ouro (Grupo I e de Ni-Cr-Be (Grupo II foram aparafusados ao intermediário com parafusos de ouro e titânio em ambos os grupos, com torques de 10Ncm e 20Ncm para o mesmo tipo de parafuso. As medidas verticais foram feitas num microscópio óptico (Mitutoyo 5050, Tóquio, Japão três vezes em seis locais diferentes ao longo da interface intermediário-cilindro para cada valor de torque. Os cilindros foram encerados e fundidos tanto em liga de Ag-Pd (Grupo I ou liga de Ni-Cr-Be (Grupo II. Após as fundições, as mesmas medidas e os mesmos valores de torque foram repetidos. As diferenças intra-grupo (torques de 10 ou 20Ncm, antes e após as fundições e as

  3. Análisis del comportamiento mecánico de una aleación Ni-Cr-Mo para pilares dentales/Analysis of Mechanical Behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo alloy for Dental Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Laguado Villamizar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio caracteriza una aleación aplicable al diseño de pilares para implantes dentales. Se propone un material biocompatible y de alta resistencia mecánica como alternativa a las aleaciones de Titanio, disminuyendo los costos de materia prima y procesamiento. Se realizan pruebas mecánicas de tracción y de compresión a la aleación de Ni-Cr-Mo, posteriormente se realiza modelado 3D y simulación de sus propiedades mecánicas por medio de análisis de elementos finitos. Como resultado se obtiene que el material disminuye su resistencia mecánica después del proceso de fundición empleado. El modelo de simulación es válido para análisis de resistencia en pilares dentales.This study presents the characterization of a dental implant alloy for abutments. It proposes a biocompatible material and high mechanical resistance as an alternative to Titanium alloys, lowering costs of raw materials and processing. Mechanical testing of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloy and subsequently perform simulations of its mechanical properties by means of finite element analysis. As a result is obtained that the material reduces its mechanical strength after the casting for electric induction molding process. The simulation model is valid to make analysis of resistance to this type of dental devices.

  4. [Reinforcement for overdentures on abutment teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Tomoko

    2006-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of the position of reinforcement wires, differences in artificial teeth, and framework designs on the breaking strength of overdentures. The basal surfaces of composite resin teeth and acrylic resin teeth were removed using a carbide bur. A reinforcement wire or a wrought palatal bar was embedded near the occlusal surface or basal surface. Four types of framework structures were designed : conventional skeleton (skeleton), housing with skeleton (housing), housing plus short metal backing (metal backing), and housing plus long metal backing (double structure). After the wires, bars, and frameworks were sand-blasted with 50 microm Al(2)O(3) powder, they were primed with a metal primer and embedded in a heat-polymerized denture base resin. The breaking strengths (N) and maximum stiffness (N/mm) of two-week aged (37 degrees C) specimens were measured using a bending test (n=8). All data obtained at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey's test (alpha=0.01). There were no statistical differences between the two kinds of artificial teeth (p>0.01). The wrought palatal bar had significantly higher strength than the reinforcement wire (p0.01). The breaking strength and maximum stiffness of the double structure framework were significantly greater (poverdentures were influenced by the size and position of the reinforcement wires. Double structure frameworks are recommended for overdentures to promote a long-term prognosis without denture breakage.

  5. The fitness of copings constructed over UCLA abutments and the implant, constructed by different techniques: casting and casting with laser welding Adaptação de copings de ritânio ao implante, construídos sobre pilares UCLA por duas técnicas: fundição e fundição com soldagem de bordo laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Maria Valadares da Costa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The alternative for the reposition of a missing tooth is the osteointegrated implant being the passive adaptation between the prosthodontic structure and the implant a significant factor for the success of this experiment, a comparative study was done between the two methods for confectioning a single prosthodontic supported by an implant. To do so a screwed implant with a diameter of 3.75mm and a length of 10.0mm (3i Implant innovations, Brasil was positioned in the middle of a resin block and over it we screwed 15 UCLA abutments shaped and anti-rotationable (137CNB, Conexão Sistemas de Próteses, Brasil with a torque of 20N.cm without any laboratorial procedure (control group - CTRLG. From a silicon model 15 UCLA-type calcinatable compounds (56CNB, Conexão Sistemas de Próteses, Brasil were screwed (20 N.cm, received a standard waxing (plain buccal surface and were cast in titanium (casting group - CG and other 15 compounds, UCLA - type shaped in titanium (137 CNB, Conexão Sistemas de Próteses, Brasil received the same standard waxing. These last copings were cast in titanium separated from each other and were laser-welded to the respective abutments on their border (Laser-welding group - LWG. The border adaptation was observed in the implant/compound interface, under measurement microscope, on the y axis, in 4 vestibular, lingual, mesial and distal referential points previously marked on the block. The arithmetical means were obtained and an exploratory data analysis was performed to determine the most appropriate statistical test. Descriptive statistics data (µm for Control (mean±standard deviation: 13.50 ± 21.80; median 0.00, for Casting (36.20±12.60; 37.00, for Laser (10.50 ±12.90; 3.00 were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA, alpha = 5%. Results test showed that distorsion median values differ statistically (kw = 17.40; df =2; p = 0.001A reposição de um elemento dentário pode ser feita por um implante osseointegrado sendo que a

  6. Smart timber bridge on geosynthetic reinforced soil (GRS) abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Senalik; James P. Wacker; Travis K. Hosteng; John Hermanson

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Buchanan County, Iowa, has cooperated with the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), and Iowa State University’s Bridge Engineering Center (ISU–BEC) to initiate a project involving the construction and monitoring of a glued-laminated (glulam) timber superstructure on geosynthetic reinforced soil (...

  7. Lateral resistance of piles near vertical MSE abutment walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Full scale lateral load tests were performed on eight piles located at various distances behind MSE walls. The objective of the testing was to determine the effect of spacing from the wall on the lateral resistance of the piles and on the force induc...

  8. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  9. Abutting Absence : Love Letters from Two Eras / Tiina Kirss

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kirss, Tiina, 1957-

    2008-01-01

    Irene Lääne ja Toomas Hiio koostatud raamatust "Ühtekuuluvuse teel : Johan Laidoneri kirjad abikaasale" (Tallinn : Varrak, 2008) ja Käbi Laretei raamatust "Kuhu kadus kõik see armastus?" (Tallinn : SE & JS, 2008)

  10. Assessment of the periapical health of abutment teeth: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... teeth restored with crowns and bridge retainers through a retrospective analysis of orthopantomographs (OPTGs) in an adult Turkish .... The fixed dentures were either single .... design, population selection, evaluation criteria, and length ... fixed partial dentures: Life‑span and causes for loss of serviceability.

  11. Time-wise variation of scouring at bridge abutments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    provides useful information for the degree of scour counter-measure to be imple- mented against ..... the extension of the area of protection as well as the size, layer thickness, and surface elevation .... 275, School of Engineering, University of.

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 3-unit fixed dental prostheses : Are the results of 2 abutment implants comparable to the results of 2 abutment teeth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, C. W. P.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Kerdijk, W.; Boven, G. C.; Cune, M. S.; Meijer, H. J. A.

    The purpose of the systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the performance of 3-unit bridges on teeth with 3-unit bridges on implants, evaluating survival of the bridges, survival of the teeth or implants, condition of the hard and soft tissues surrounding the supports, complications and

  13. Removable Partial Denture Supported by Implants with Prefabricated Telescopic Abutments - A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Komal

    2014-01-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapy—biologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs. PMID:25121066

  14. A New Trend in Recording Subgingival Tissue around an Implant While Making a Direct Abutment Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C. Deogade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful implant-supported restoration must provide adequate function and esthetics. Osseointegrated implants have given an alternative choice for patients who have lost their teeth. Most commonly encountered problems while doing a transfer from patient to the master cast in restoring implant-supported crowns are an uneven distribution of occlusal loads and undue torquing forces on the various elements of implant. This is caused due to poor fit of frameworks connected to implant, which further leads to marginal bone loss, loosening of screws, fatigue fracture of implant components, and ultimately implant failure. This paper presents a simplified and easy solution to overcome such problems by introducing an innovative gingival retraction system for restoring implant-supported crowns to achieve superior and predictable long-term outcomes.

  15. Long-term remote sensing system for bridge piers and abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Scour and other natural hazards have the potential to undermine the stability of piers in highway bridges. This has led to brid : collapse in the past, and significant efforts have been undertaken to address the potential danger of scour and other ha...

  16. Live-bed scour experiments with 45 wing-wall abutments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    construction cost. ∗. For correspondence ... was connected to the water supply system in the laboratory. A sediment trap was ..... scour conditions, the factor, Kh accounting approaching flow depth, may be taken equal to 1. Envelope curve in ...

  17. Removable partial denture supported by implants with prefabricated telescopic abutments - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sehgal, Komal

    2014-06-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapy-biologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs.

  18. A testing apparatus and a method of operating the same

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    by other sample holders, and each comprising a first abutment being fixed with respect to the sample holder. The testing apparatus comprises at least one second abutment, and each of the multiple first abutments or the second abutment comprises two separate abutment surfaces. Furthermore either each...... of the multiple first abutments or the second abutment is fixed with respect to the support structure (11), and the testing apparatus further comprises a transport mechanism (7, 12) adapted for relatively moving the other of the multiple first abutments or the second abutment in such a way that each of the first...... abutments on the multiple sample holders sequentially passes the second abutment and so that the two abutment surfaces on either each of the multiple first abutments or the second abutment passes on each side of at least a part of the other abutment....

  19. Evaluation of the accuracy of extraoral laboratory scanners with a single-tooth abutment model: A 3D analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Federico; Gherlone, Enrico; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different laboratory scanners using a calibrated coordinate measuring machine as reference. A sand blasted titanium reference model (RM) was scanned with an industrial 3D scanner in order to obtain a reference digital model (dRM) that was saved in the standard tessellation format (.stl). RM was scanned ten times with each one of the tested scanners (GC Europe Aadva, Zfx Evolution, 3Shape D640, 3Shape D700, NobilMetal Sinergia, EGS DScan3, Open Technologies Concept Scan Top) and all the scans were exported in .stl format for the comparison. All files were imported in a dedicated software (Geomagic Qualify 2013). Accuracy was evaluated calculating trueness and precision. Trueness values (μm [95% confidence interval]) were: Aadva 7,7 [6,8-8,5]; Zfx Evolution 9,2 [8,6-9,8]; D640 18,1 [12,2-24,0]; D700 12,8 [12,4-13,3]; Sinergia 31,1 [26,3-35,9]; DScan3 15,6 [11,5-19,7]; Concept Scan Top 28,6 [25,6-31,6]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (p<.0005). Precision values (μm [95% CI]) were: Aadva 4,0 [3,8-4,2]; Zfx Evolution 5,1 [4,4-5,9]; D640 12,7 [12,4-13,1]; D700 11,0 [10,7-11,3]; Sinergia 16,3 [15,0-17,5]; DScan3 9,5 [8,3-10,6]; Concept Scan Top 19,5 [19,1-19,8]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (p<.0005). The use a standardized scanning procedure fabricating a titanium reference model is useful to compare trueness and precision of different laboratory scanners; two laboratory scanners (Aadva, Zfx Evolution) were significantly better that other tested scanners. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collision loads on bridge piers : phase 2, report of guidelines for designing bridge piers and abutments for vehicle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    An instrumented, simulated bridge pier was constructed, and two full-scale collisions with an : 80,000-lb van-type tractor-trailer were performed on it. The trailer was ballasted with bags of sand on : pallets. The simulated pier was 36 inches in dia...

  1. Clear-water abutment and contraction scour in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces of South Carolina, 1996-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, collected observations of clear-water aburment and contraction scour at 146 bridges in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of South Carolina. Scour depths ranged from 0 to 23.6 feet. Theoretical scour depths were computed at each bridge and compared with observed scour. This comparison showed that theoretical scour depths, in general, exceeded the observed scour depths and often were excessive. A comparison of field data with dimensionless relations for laboratory data showed that the range of dimensionless variables used in laboratory investigations was outside of the range for field data in South Carolina, suggesting laboratory relations may not be applicable to field conditions in South Carolina. Variables determined to be important in developing scour within laboratory studies were investigated to understand their influence within the South Carolina field data, and many of these variables appeared to be insignificant under field conditions found in South Carolina. The strongest explanatory variables were embankment length, geometric-contraction ratio, approach velocity, and soil cohesion. Envelope curves developed with the field data are useful tools for assessing reasonable ranges of scour depth in South Carolina. These tools are simple to apply and are an improvement over the current methods for predicting theoretical scour.

  2. Clinical Bonding of Resin Nano Ceramic Restorations to Zirconia Abutments : A Case Series within a Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepke, Ulf; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: New dental materials are introduced and promoted in the field without extensive clinical testing. Using those materials in a clinical setting might result in unacceptable early failure rates. Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to analyze bonding of a new dental restorative material

  3. Clinical Evaluation of an Acrylic Pontic ’Adhesively’ Bonded to Uncut Abutment Teeth: 18 Month Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-23

    in greater detail by a dental manufacturerI0 advocates the use of a composite Bis -GMA resin+ to "ad- hesively" bond an acrylic pontic directly to...interface between the pontic and Bis -GMA resin used to cement the pontic to the natural teeth. This consistent mode of failure suggested that an...examination of the failed "bridges" showed that delamination occurred at the interface between the pontic and Bis -GMA resin used to cement the pontic to the

  4. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma abutting the diaphragm and gastrointestinal tracts with the use of artificial ascites: safety and technical efficacy in 143 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Inyoung; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with the use of artificial ascites for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) adjacent to the diaphragm and gastrointestinal tract. One hundred forty-three patients with 181 HCCs who underwent US-guided percutaneous RFA with the use of artificial ascites were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 181 HCCs, 148 HCCs were defined as problematic nodules for two major reasons: poor sonic window or possible thermal injury. We artificially induced ascites before performing RFA by dripping 5% dextrose in a water solution. We assessed the technical success of introducing artificial ascites, technical feasibility of the use of artificial ascites and complications. The technical success rate, as well as the primary and secondary technique success rate, was assessed by regular follow-up CT examinations. RFA with artificial ascites was successfully achieved in 130 of 143 patients. The primary technique effectiveness was 85.3%. During follow-up (mean, 20.4 months), remote intrahepatic recurrence occurred in 49 patients and local tumor progression occurred in 15 patients. Three (2.1%) of the 143 patients experienced major complications (hemoperitoneum, lobar infarction and biloma) related to the RFA procedure. The use of artificial ascites is a simple and useful technique to minimize collateral thermal injury and to improve the sonic window. (orig.)

  5. Soft tissue development in the esthetic zone : a clinical trial on abutment geometry and it's effect on muco-gingival esthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    Dental implants have been offered as favorable options the world over to replace missing teeth and with increasing human life expectancy the need for long-term maintenance of implant- teeth for esthetics and function has become ever so important, especially the soft tissue (gums)formation around

  6. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  7. Effect of the gonadal integrity and the gender on responses of bone crestal levels in dogs with two dental prosthetic abutment types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Valenzuela Vásquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catorce perros mestizos adultos (5 intactos y 9 esterilizados, compuestos por siete machos y siete hembras fueron utilizadas para evaluar el efecto de dos tipos de aditamentos protésicos de implantes dentales sobre el nivel de la cresta ósea alveolar. Los implantes dentales fueron colocados quirúrgicamente en zonas de cuartos premolares inferiores y restaurados con aditamentos protésicos convencionales (CONV y de cambio de plataforma (PFS. Ambos aditamentos protésicos fueron evaluados en cada perro. El estudio duró 180 días, en los que se realizó la restauración al día 60 post-quirúrgicamente colocados los implantes, la evaluación del nivel de la cresta ósea alveolar se realizó en los días 0, 30, 60 y 90 después de la restauración (corona cementada a través de medición indirecta utilizando un sensor radiográfico digital. Los datos experimentales se analizaron mediante un diseño completamente al azar, la unidad experimental fue el perro (efecto aleatorio, el tratamiento era el tipo de pilar protésico (efectos fijos, y el nivel de la cresta ósea de cada lado del implante (mesial y distal fue la observación. Además, factores como la condición gonadal (intactos y castrados y el género (masculino y femenino se incluyeron en el análisis estadístico para evaluar su papel en la magnitud de los cambios (interacciones en los niveles de cresta ósea alveolar. El promedio de pérdida de hueso crestal fue 0.400 ± 0.186 mm. En general, los perros con CONV tuvieron una mayor pérdida de la cresta ósea que los perros con PFS. En los perros intactos que recibieron PFS se observó una menor pérdida ósea, pero en perros castrados, el tipo de aditamento no tuvo efecto (P = 0,98 en el nivel de pérdida de la cresta ósea; por lo tanto, se detectó una interacción (P 0.77 entre el género y el tipo de aditamento, de manera similar, analizado como único factor de variación, el género no tuvo efecto (P = 0,26 en las respuestas del nivel de la cresta ósea al tipo de pilar protésico (-0.401vs. -0.385 mm, para macho y hembras respectivamente. Sin importar el tipo de pilar protésico, tanto machos como hembras mostraron pérdidas similares (-0.405 vs. -0.393, P>0.65, mientras que los perros castrados mostraron una mayor (30,8%, P <0,01 pérdida ósea crestal comparado con perros intactos. En conclusión, los perros con PFS mostraron una menor pérdida ósea crestal que áquellos que recibieron CONV; sin embargo, independientemente del género, esta respuesta sólo se mantuvo en perros intactos, por lo tanto, la condición gonadal tiene un efecto sobre la magnitud de los cambios de los niveles de hueso crestal alveolares como respuesta al tipo de aditamento protésico en perros con implantes dentales .

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of Axial Wall Modification and Coping Design on the Retention of Cement-retained Implant-supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derafshi, Reza; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Torabi, Kianoosh; Farzin, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Because of compromised angulations of implants, the abutments are sometimes prepared. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of removing one wall of the implant abutment on the retention of cement-retained crowns. Materials and methods. Four prefabricated abutments were attached to analogues and embedded in acrylic resin blocks. The first abutment was left intact. Axial walls were partially removed from the remaining abutments to produce abutments with three walls. The screw access channel for the first and second abutments were completely filled with composite resin. For the third and fourth abutments, only partial filling was done. Wax-up models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The copings of fourth abutment had an extension into the screw access channel. Copings were cemented with Temp Bond. The castings were removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. A one-way ANOVA was used to test for a significant difference followed by the pairwise comparisons. Results. The abutments with opened screw access channel had a significantly higher retention than the two other abutments. The abutment with removed wall and no engagement into the hole by the castings exhibited the highest retention. Conclusion. Preserving the opening of screw access channel significantly increases the retention where one of the axial walls of implant abutments for cement-retained restorations is removed during preparation. PMID:25973152

  9. Doelmatigheid en duurzaamheid van telescoopprothesen op pijlerelementen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaarden, E; van Pelt, A W J; Meisberger, E W; Tams, J; Cune, M S

    2016-01-01

    In a study, the effectivity and durability of telescopic dentures on abutment teeth provided with telescope crowns were investigated. The prognosis for the prosthetic structure and for the abutment teeth were both investigated. The survival rate of 234 telescopic dentures (886 abutment teeth) in 147

  10. Evaluation of pre-tightening in abutments and prosthetic screws on different implant connections = Avaliação do pré-aparafusamento em pilares e parafusos protéticos em diferentes conexões de implante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panza, Leonardo Henrique Vadenal

    2010-01-01

    Conclusão: Os tipos de conexão do implante ou pilar fetaram a manutenção do préaparafusamento. As conexões de hexágono interno e externo foram efetivas para evitar o deslocamento horizontal das coroas

  11. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of a passive and friction fit implant abutment interface and the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress distribution pattern on the implant and surrounding bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Sarfaraz

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion : It can thus be concluded that the conical connection distributes more stress to the implant body and dissipates less stress to the surrounding bone. A narrow occlusal table considerably reduces the occlusal overload.

  12. Speech Understanding with a New Implant Technology: A Comparative Study with a New Nonskin Penetrating Baha System

    OpenAIRE

    Kurz, Anja; Flynn, Mark; Caversaccio, Marco; Kompis, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare hearing and speech understanding between a new, nonskin penetrating Baha system (Baha Attract) to the current Baha system using a skin-penetrating abutment. Methods. Hearing and speech understanding were measured in 16 experienced Baha users. The transmission path via the abutment was compared to a simulated Baha Attract transmission path by attaching the implantable magnet to the abutment and then by adding a sample of artificial skin and the external parts of the Baha...

  13. Retention Strength of Conical Welding Caps for Fixed Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Diego; Degidi, Marco; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Tebbel, Florian; Marchetti, Claudio

    This study evaluated the retention strength of welding caps for Ankylos standard abutments using a pull-out test. Each sample consisted of an implant abutment and its welding cap. The tests were performed with a Zwick Roell testing machine with a 1-kN load cell. The retention strength of the welding caps increased with higher abutment diameters and higher head heights and was comparable or superior to the values reported in the literature for the temporary cements used in implant dentistry. Welding caps provide a reliable connection between an abutment and a fixed prosthesis without the use of cement.

  14. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    including an abutment part, which extends inwards from the inner side of the retention web such as to form an abutment surface for the respective screw web when the latter is positioned to be retained in the retention device, and extends from the abutment part into a locking part, which extends at an angle...... to the abutment part and at a distance from the respective retention web. Each locking part comprising a first resilient locking pin adapted to lock a first screw web configuration and a second, separate resilient locking pin adapted to lock a second screw web configuration, the first and second screw web...

  15. Engineering and Design: Characterization and Measurement of Discontinuities in Rock Slopes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1983-01-01

    This ETL provides guidance for characterizing and measuring rock discontinuities on natural slopes or slopes constructed in rock above reservoirs, darn abutments, or other types of constructed slopes...

  16. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Dashti, Hossin; Karamad, Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    The final position of the abutment changes with the amount of tightening torque. This could eventually lead to loss of passivity and marginal misfit of prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different tightening torques on the marginal adaptation of 3-unit cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Two implants (Straumann) were inserted in an acrylic block so that one of the implants was placed vertically and the other at a 15° vertical angle. A straight abutment and a 15° angulated abutment were connected to the vertically and obliquely installed implants, respectively, so that the two abutments were parallel. Then, 10 cement-retained FDPs were waxed and cast. Abutments were tightened with 10, 20, and 35 Ncm torques, respectively. Following each tightening torque, FDPs were luted on respective abutments with temporary cement. The marginal adaptation of the retainers was evaluated using stereomicroscope. FDPs were then removed from the abutments and were sectioned at the connector sites. The retainers were luted again on their respective abutments. Luting procedures and marginal adaptation measurement were repeated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). After cutting the FDP connectors, the independent samples t-test was used to compare misfit values (α = 0.05). Following 10, 20, and 35 Ncm tightening torques, the marginal discrepancy of the retainers of FDPs significantly increased (P marginal discrepancies of these two retainers (P > 0.05). The marginal gap values of angulated abutment retainers (ANRs) were significantly higher than those of the straight abutment after cutting the connectors (P = 0.026). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After cutting the connectors, the marginal misfit of the ANRs was higher than those of the straight abutment retainers.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-FREE ENERGY ON SUPRAGINGIVAL AND SUBGINGIVAL PLAQUE MICROBIOLOGY - AN IN-VIVO STUDY ON IMPLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    QUIRYNEN, M; VANDERMEI, HC; BOLLEN, CML; VANDENBOSSCHE, LH; DOORNBUSCH, GI; VANSTEENBERGHE, D; BUSSCHER, HJ

    THE INFLUENCE OF SURFACE FREE ENERGY on supra- and subgingival plaque microbiology was examined in 9 patients with functional fixed prostheses supported by endosseous titanium implants. Two abutments (trans-mucosal part of the 2 stage implant) were replaced by either a new titanium abutment or a

  18. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bridge abutment; scour depth; riprap; scour holes; river engineering. ... Accurate estimation of the maximum possible depth of scour at bridge abutments is important in decision-making for the safe depth of burial of footings. ... Using this information, an empirical relation was developed for temporal variation of scour depth.

  19. Oral Abstract Session 3: Orthognathic/Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlev, Jens

    Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study......Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study...

  20. A set of robotic building elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    connector (103) configured as a plug integrated with or installed in at least some of the end-portions (121). The connectors (103) comprise: an abutment face (201) with a centre portion (202); a diagonally magnetized magnet arranged behind the abutment face (201); and a pair of a female engagement member...

  1. JPRS Report, East Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-24

    of the assortment of manufactured parts for partial and complete frames, as well as abutments , support walls, and bridgehead construction...Uniform Series II Generation based on anticipated spans; and • Increased effectiveness of prefabrication for steel and masonry bridge construction...support structures and abutments . Parallel to and on an equal par with standard primary construction trades already cited, the scientific-technical

  2. Analysis of experimental data sets for local scour depth around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of soft computing techniques to analyse and interpret the experimental data of local scour depth around bridge abutment, measured at different laboratory conditions and environment, is presented. The scour around bridge piers and abutments is, in the majority of cases, the main reason for bridge failures.

  3. Influence of different tightening forces before laser welding to the implant/framework fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira-Júnior, Clebio Domingues; Neves, Flávio Domingues; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Prado, Célio Jesus; Simamoto-Júnior, Paulo César

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of abutment screw tightening force before laser welding procedures on the vertical fit of metal frameworks over four implants. To construct the frameworks, prefabricated titanium abutments and cylindrical titanium bars were joined by laser welding to compose three groups: group of manual torque (GMT), GT10 and GT20. Before welding, manual torque simulating routine laboratory procedure was applied to GTM. In GT10 and GT20, the abutment screws received 10 and 20 Ncm torque, respectively. After welding, the implant/framework interfaces were assessed by optical comparator microscope using two methods. First, the single screw test (SST) was used, in which the interfaces of the screwed and non-screwed abutments were assessed, considering only the abutments at the framework extremities. Second, the interfaces of all the abutments were evaluated when they were screwed. In the SST, intergroup analysis (Kruskal Wallis) showed no significant difference among the three conditions of tightening force; that is, the different tightening force before welding did not guarantee smaller distortions. Intragroup analysis (Wilcoxon) showed that for all groups, the interfaces of the non-screwed abutments were statistically greater than the interfaces of the screwed abutments, evidencing distortions in all the frameworks. ANOVA was applied for the comparison of interfaces when all the abutments were screwed and showed no significant difference among the groups. Under the conditions of this study, pre-welding tightness on abutment screws did not influence the vertical fit of implant-supported metal frameworks.

  4. Influence of ZOE and formocressol on shear bond strength of composite to the dentin of primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleymani AA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  5. Face support for strongly inclined stratification. Strebausbau fuer die stark geneigte Lagerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, K.

    1981-07-30

    In a face support for a strongly inclined stratification consisting of three superimposed shield-type support assemblies the alignment of the lower and upper support assemblies can be carried out without larger frictional resistance during the walking. A sufficient driving space is provided between the abutement and the shield-type support assembly. For this purpose a bottom plate fitting to the floor is placed between the abutement and the middle shield-type support assembly. Driving troughs also fitting to the floor are provided as the face-side final parts of the guiding devices jointly connected to the abutement. (HGOE).

  6. Nuclear fuel assemblies and fuel pins usable in such assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1982-01-01

    A novel end cap for a nuclear fuel assembly is described in detail. It consists of a trisection arrangement which is received within a cell of a cellular grid. The cell contains abutment means with which the trisection comes into abutment. The grid also contains an abutment means for preventing the trisections from being inserted into the cell in an incorrect orientation. The present design allows fuel pins to be securely held in a hold-down grid of a sub-assembly. The design also allows easier dis-assembly of the swollen and embrittled fuel pins prior to reprocessing. (U.K.)

  7. Fracture mode during cyclic loading of implant-supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Kleven, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    restorations of zirconia abutment-retained crowns with zirconia copings veneered with glass-ceramics (n=8) and feldspathic ceramics (n=8). The control group was composed of 16 metal ceramic restorations of titanium abutment-retained crowns with gold alloy copings veneered with glass (n=8) and feldspathic...... ceramics (n=8). The palatal surfaces of the crowns were exposed to cyclic loading of 800 N with a frequency of 2 Hz, which continued to 4.2 million cycles or until fracture of the copings, abutments, or implants. The number of cycles and the fracture modes were recorded. The fracture modes were analyzed...

  8. Upper Mississippi River System, Environment Management Program, Definite Project Report with Integrated Environmental Assessment (R-8). Bay Island, Missouri Rehabilitation and Enhancement. Pool 22, Mississippi River Miles 311 through 312, Marion County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    work under- taken by the drainage district. The new bridge will have a prefabricated deck set on concrete abutments . The span length will be 42 feet...FaciLities & Sanctuaries (Access Road Bridge) 06.3.C.9 Prefabricated Deck & Wearing Surface I LS 20,000.00 20,000 5,000 06.3.C.0 Structural Concrete 54... abutments with wing walls. The existing bridge abutments will remain in place. Installation of the pump station will involve site preparation using

  9. Translations on Eastern Europe, Political, Sociological and Military Affairs, Number 1579

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-23

    front of the bridge abutments . The weight-volume ratio was so selected that the rail girders and the road- way or track plates would float in the...respect to the required posi- tion. 2-3 Abutment with Highway Connection ThP abutment , in its silkiest form, consists of a railroad tie stack; but...it c£ Sso be built up of massive prefabricated parts or locally prepared concrete. A portion of the start-up approach/ and braking forces is di

  10. Monitoring bridge scour using fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The scouring process excavates and carries away materials from the bed and banks of streams, and from : around the piers and abutments of bridges. Scour undermines bridges and may cause bridge failures due to : structural instability. In the last 30 ...

  11. Rapid bridge construction technology : precast elements for substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this research was to propose an alternate system of precast bridge substructures which can : substitute for conventional cast in place systems in Wisconsin to achieve accelerated construction. : Three types of abutment modules (hollow wal...

  12. Fit Analysis of Different Framework Fabrication Techniques for Implant-Supported Partial Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Bacchi, Atais; Trevisani, Alexandre; Farina, Ana Paula; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks made using different techniques to obtain passive fit. Thirty three-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 10) using three fabrication methods: one-piece casting, framework cemented on prepared abutments, and laser welding. The vertical misfit between the frameworks and the abutments was evaluated with an optical microscope using the single-screw test. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = .05). The one-piece casted frameworks presented significantly higher vertical misfit values than those found for framework cemented on prepared abutments and laser welding techniques (P Laser welding and framework cemented on prepared abutments are effective techniques to improve the adaptation of three-unit implant-supported prostheses. These techniques presented similar fit.

  13. Structural lineaments from the magnetic anomaly maps of the eastern continental margin of India (ECMI) and NW Bengal Fan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.; Rao, T.C.S.; Subrahmanyam, A; Rao, M.M.M.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    extension of 85 degrees E ridge, abutting the continental shelf off Chilka Lake and (3) trend 3, locted over the continental shelf/slope between Visakhapatnm and Paradip represents a folded (ridges and depressions) nature of the continental basement...

  14. Three-dimensional evaluation of the repeatability of scans of stone models and impressions using a blue LED scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Jung, Il-Do; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the repeatability of scans of stone models and impressions of abutment teeth using a blue LED scanner and compared the findings between different abutment teeth types. For the stone models as well as impression of the canines, premolars, and molars, we generated 10 color-difference-maps and reports for each tooth type (n=10 per tooth type). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and independent t-tests were performed to evaluate the repeatability of scans of the stone models and impressions obtained from a blue LED scanner. Our results indicate a high repeatability of scans of stone models and impressions of abutment teeth using the blue LED scanner and suggest a possible clinical advantage for scanning impressions of different abutment teeth types.

  15. 76 FR 63914 - Sabine River Authority of Texas and Sabine River Authority, State of Louisiana; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...-foot-high powerhouse located in the right abutment, containing two vertical Kaplan turbines with an... adjacent to the powerhouse. The Sabine River Authorities propose to construct a 1.3-MW minimum flow turbine...

  16. The histology of the adrenal gland of the African elephant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-22

    Jan 22, 1991 ... cells contain granules of different sizes and structure. Die histologie, veral die .... these cells abut on the zona glomerulosa, small lipid drop- lets are seen in their .... for the typical zona intermedia; thus its classification as a.

  17. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    -tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow......-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation...... and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. RESULTS: The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three...

  18. Axial clamp for nuclear reactor head penetration conoseal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackley, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming a sealed coupling between two bodies each body presenting an abutment surface, the bodies being arranged so that their respective abutment surfaces are axially adjacent one another and define a space therebetween in which a deformable gasket is disposed. An axial external force is applied to the bodies for compressing the abutment surfaces together against the gasket to form a seal between the bodies and the bodies are immobilized relative to one another while the external force is being applied to the bodies so that sufficient compression will be maintained by the abutment surfaces to preserve the integrity of the seal when the external axial force is withdrawn. The external axial force is then withdrawn, leaving the two bodies coupled together via the seal. (author)

  19. Tom Bevill Upper Lock Approach, Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, Alabama: Hydraulic Navigation Investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winkler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... The lock is connected to the dam with a 150-ft abutment wall. A strong crosscurrent or outdraft existing in and around the upstream lock entrance causes difficulty for tow traffic navigating the lock...

  20. CT diagnosis of pleural dissemination without pleural effusion in primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Murakami, Junji; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Torii, Yoshikuni; Masuda, Kouji; Ishida, Teruyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 25 primary lung cancers with disseminated pleural nodules or minimal malignant pleural effusion that were not recognized preparatively. Special attention was devoted to abutting interlobar fissures, thick major fissures, and disseminated nodules on the chest wall, the diaphragm, and in the interlobar fissures. Among 10 primary tumors abutting interlobar fissures, nine (90%) had at least one of these findings. Among 15 primary lung tumors which did not abut interlobar fissures, four (27%) had at least one of these findings. We conclude that CT is a useful modality for detecting the pleural dissemination of primary lung cancers when primary lung cancers abut interlobar fissures even if no pleural effusion is detectable on CT. (author)

  1. Device having expandable mandrel for making nuclear fuel element storage tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, F.; Weis, O.

    1984-01-01

    A device for manufacturing containers for storing nuclear materials. The purpose of the device is to maintain angular sheet metals in the precise position required during the welding operation which is performed along the outer edges of their flange portions. The device includes a core, a thrust bearing and a counter-pressure bearing. The core is sub-divided into two separate core portions. Spring means tend to draw the core portions toward each other. Fluid operated cylinder-piston units tend to separate the core portions against the action of said spring means. Adjustment screw means provided with abutment means and screwed into one of said core portions project into the other of said core portions with the abutment means thereof. The second core portion has abutment means cooperating with the abutment means on said adjustment screw means

  2. Outdraft at Lock Approach, Tom Bevill Lock and Dam, Alabama: Hydraulic Model Investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lynch, Gary

    2001-01-01

    .... The lock is connected to the dam with a 150-ft abutment wall. A strong crosscurrent or outdraft existing in and around the upstream lock entrance causes difficulty for tow traffic navigating the lock...

  3. A resilient locking device for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curulla, M.V.; Smith, B.A.; Ashton, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a device wherein a spring and an abutment are maintained captive on a retaining screw. That device comprises a spring provided with at least one blade-shaped resilient portion and with an upper portion comprising an unthreaded hole, an abutment, a screw provided with a head, an intermediate stem portion and a threaded end-portion the diameter of which is higher than that of said intermediate stem portion, said spring and abutment being maintained trapped on said intermediate stem portion through the deformation of adjacent threads of said threaded end-protion of the screw and of the threaded hole of the abutment upper portion, in order to prevent said members from being separated [fr

  4. 75 FR 73068 - Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Applications Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ..., 75-foot-long prefabricated concrete walls attached to the downstream side of the Corps dam which... on the left bank of the dam, requiring removal of part of the left dam abutment; (2) a proposed...

  5. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two levels of fluvial terraces have developed along the ... (a) Two levels of alluvial terraces abutting against the .... source mechanics; (eds) Das J, Boatwright J, Scholz C H, ... tectonics and alluvial rivers; Cambridge University Press. NY, 276 ...

  6. Effects of ambient temperature changes on integral bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Integral bridges (IBs) are jointless bridges whereby the deck is continuous and monolithic with abutment walls. IBs are outperforming their non-integral counterparts in economy and safety. Their principal advantages are derived from the absence of ex...

  7. Maxillary implant-retained partial overdenture with Dolder bar attachment: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongil; Buhite, Robert J; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    This article describes a technique for maintaining a maxillary Kennedy III partial removable dental prosthesis design in a patient who had non-restorable failing abutments by replacing the abutments with dental implants. Two implants were placed immediately after extraction of the abutment teeth in the anterior maxilla. After the implants were fully integrated, a Dolder bar attachment was fitted onto the implants. A new maxillary partial removable dental prosthesis was fabricated using the implants and the remaining natural teeth as abutments to restore function and esthetics. With the aid of dental implants, this Kennedy III maxillary removable dental prosthesis design could provide additional retention and support by promoting cross-arch stability and tissue, implant and tooth support. The patient's satisfaction was significantly increased.

  8. [A PhD completed 3. Soft tissue development around an implant in the aesthetic zone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, R C

    2016-01-01

    A randomised clinical trial was carried out in order to determine whether changes in the abutment design result in improved quality of the peri-implant mucosal tissue according to the parameters attachment strength, sotft tissue stability and developmemt, and maintenance of bone levels. Twenty-nine patients were included. They received 2, non-adjacent endosseous implants replacing missing teeth in the aesthetic zone. Subsequently, conv