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Sample records for abundant plasma protein

  1. Low abundance plasma proteins in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Heesom, Kate; Phillips, Robert; Chen, Lina; Trinder, Jo; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-10-01

    Every year, millions of births worldwide are complicated by prematurity or difficult post-term deliveries, resulting in a high incidence of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Our poor understanding of human parturition is a key reason for our inability to improve the management of preterm and post-term birth. In this study, we used proteomic techniques to look into protein changes in placental blood plasma obtained from women before or after spontaneous or induced labour, with vaginal or caesarean section deliveries. Our aim was to understand the basic mechanisms of human parturition regardless of whether the signals that trigger labour are of maternal and/or fetal origin. We found proteins from 33 genes with significantly altered expression profiles in relation to mode of labour and delivery. Most changes in labour occurred in proteins associated with 'immune and defence responses'. Although the signal transduction and regulation of these pathways varied among modes of delivery, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox A emerged as a shared protein in the mechanism of labour. Moreover, several apolipoproteins such as apolipoprotein A-IV and APOE were found to change with labour, and these changes were also confirmed in maternal plasma. This study has identified significant protein changes in placental intervillous plasma with labour and has revealed several pathways related to human parturition.

  2. Depletion of abundant plasma proteins by poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylic acid) hydrogel particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Ventura-Espejo, Estela; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-01-01

    the application of pH-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylic acid) hydrogel particles for removal of abundant plasma proteins, prior to proteome analysis by MS. Protein depletion occurs by two separate mechanisms: (1) hydrogel particles incubated with low concentrations of plasma capture abundant proteins...... at higher efficiency than low abundance proteins, which are enriched in the supernatants, whereas (2) hydrogel particles incubated with high concentrations of plasma capture and irreversibly trap abundant proteins. During the elution step, irreversibly trapped proteins remain captured while low abundance...... (SRM) liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS. This novel use of hydrogel particles opens new perspectives for biomarker analysis based on mass spectrometry....

  3. A differential protein solubility approach for the depletion of highly abundant proteins in plasma using ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Mills, Ian G; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-12-21

    Depletion of highly abundant proteins is an approved step in blood plasma analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, we explored a precipitation and differential protein solubility approach as a fractionation strategy for abundant protein removal from plasma. Total proteins from plasma were precipitated with 90% saturated ammonium sulfate, followed by differential solubilization in 55% and 35% saturated ammonium sulfate solutions. Using a four hour liquid chromatography (LC) gradient and an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, a total of 167 and 224 proteins were identified from the 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate fractions, whereas 235 proteins were found in the remaining protein fractions with at least two unique peptides. SDS-PAGE and exclusive total spectrum counts from LC-MS/MS analyses clearly showed that majority of the abundant plasma proteins were solubilized in 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate solutions, indicating that the remaining protein fraction is of potential interest for identification of less abundant plasma proteins. Serum albumin, serotransferrin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transthyretin were the abundant proteins that were highly enriched in 55% ammonium sulfate fractions. Immunoglobulins, complement system proteins, and apolipoproteins were among other abundant plasma proteins that were enriched in 35% ammonium sulfate fractions. In the remaining protein fractions a total of 40 unique proteins were identified of which, 32 proteins were identified with at least 10 exclusive spectrum counts. According to PeptideAtlas, 9 of these 32 proteins were estimated to be present at low μg ml(-1) (0.12-1.9 μg ml(-1)) concentrations in the plasma, and 17 at low ng ml(-1) (0.1-55 ng ml(-1)) range.

  4. Enhanced Detection of Low-Abundance Human Plasma Proteins by Integrating Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation and Immunoaffinity Depletion.

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    Liu, Zhao; Fan, Songhua; Liu, Haipeng; Yu, Jia; Qiao, Rui; Zhou, Mi; Yang, Yongtao; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The enormous depth complexity of the human plasma proteome poses a significant challenge for current mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies in terms of detecting low-level proteins in plasma, which is essential for successful biomarker discovery efforts. Typically, a single-step analytical approach cannot reduce this intrinsic complexity. Current simplex immunodepletion techniques offer limited capacity for detecting low-abundance proteins, and integrated strategies are thus desirable. In this respect, we developed an improved strategy for analyzing the human plasma proteome by integrating polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation with immunoaffinity depletion. PEG fractionation of plasma proteins is simple, rapid, efficient, and compatible with a downstream immunodepletion step. Compared with immunodepletion alone, our integrated strategy substantially improved the proteome coverage afforded by PEG fractionation. Coupling this new protocol with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, 135 proteins with reported normal concentrations below 100 ng/mL were confidently identified as common low-abundance proteins. A side-by-side comparison indicated that our integrated strategy was increased by average 43.0% in the identification rate of low-abundance proteins, relying on an average 65.8% increase of the corresponding unique peptides. Further investigation demonstrated that this combined strategy could effectively alleviate the signal-suppressive effects of the major high-abundance proteins by affinity depletion, especially with moderate-abundance proteins after incorporating PEG fractionation, thereby greatly enhancing the detection of low-abundance proteins. In sum, the newly developed strategy of incorporating PEG fractionation to immunodepletion methods can potentially aid in the discovery of plasma biomarkers of therapeutic and clinical interest.

  5. [Removal of high-abundance proteins in plasma of the obese by improved TCA/acetone precipitation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Feng, Liru; Yu, Wei; Xu, Jian; Yang, Hui; Liu, Xiaoli

    2013-09-01

    To develop an improved trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation method for removal of high-abundance proteins in plasma of the obese. Volumes of TCA/acetone solution (1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 20 times of the sample) and concentrations of TCA (10%, 30%, 50%, 60%, 70% TCA/acetone solution) have been investigated to optimize the conditions of sample preparation. SDS-PAGE were used to separate and tested proteins in the supernatant and sediment. The best concentration of the TCA/acetone solution was first determined by SDS-PAGE. The protein in precipitation from 10% TCA/acetone solution processing and the new determined concentration TCA/acetone solution processing were verified by 2-D-SDS-PAGE. And then the digested products of the protein in precipitation and supernatant by trypsin were analyzed by nano HPLC-Chip-MS/MS to verify which is the best concentration to process the plasma. The best volume of TCA/acetone is four times to sample, which less or more TCA/acetone would reduce the removal efficiency of high-abundance proteins. The concentration of TCA in acetone solution should be 60%, which may remove more high-abundance proteins in plasma than 10%, 30%, 50% TCA in acetone solution. If the TCA concentration is more than 60%, the reproducibility will be much poorer due to fast precipitation of proteins. The results of mass identification showed that human plasma prepared with 60% TCA/acetone (4 times sample volume) could be verified more low-abundance proteins than 10%. The most desirable conditions for removal of high-abundance proteins in plasma is 60% TCA/acetone (4 times sample volume), especially for the plasma of obesity.

  6. Differentiation of type 2 diabetes mellitus with different complications by proteomic analysis of plasma low abundance proteins.

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    Yeh, Shu-Hui; Chang, Wan-Ching; Chuang, Hau; Huang, Hui-Cheng; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Yang, Kuender D

    2015-01-01

    Few biomarkers of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are replicable in the differentiation of T2DM with different complications. We aimed to identify proteomic biomarkers among T2DM patients with nephropathy or retinopathy. Plasma low abundance proteins were enriched by depletion of 14 high abundance proteins using an affinity removal system, and subjected to nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (nano LC-ESI) mass spectrometry after a gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion. The plasma differential proteomes between normal adults and diabetic patients were validated by another cohort of 149 T2DM patients. A total of 826 proteins in plasma were consistently identified from 8 plasma samples of normal adults, and 817 proteins were consistently identified in 8 plasma samples of T2DM patients. Using the MetaCore analysis, low abundance proteins in plasma between normal adults and T2DM patients were significantly different in 5 functional pathways. Moreover, plasma prolactin-induced protein (PIP), thrombospondin-2 (THBS2), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels were higher in T2DM patients. Further, PIP, THBS2 and NGAL were significantly higher in T2DM patients with nephropathy (albuminuria) but not in those with retinopathy, while L1CAM levels were higher in T2DM patients with retinopathy. This study identified that higher PIP, THBS2 and/or NGAL levels were significantly associated with nephropathy of T2DM, and higher L1CAM but normal PIP, THBS2 or NGAL was significantly associated with retinopathy of T2DM.

  7. Analysis of the Plasma Proteome in COPD: Novel Low Abundance Proteins Reflect the Severity of Lung Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Salim; Barrero, Carlos A.; Bowler, Russell P.; Chen, Diane Er; Criner, Gerard; Braverman, Alan; Litwin, Samuel; Yeung, Anthony; Kelsen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    The search for COPD biomarkers has largely employed a targeted approach that focuses on plasma proteins involved in the systemic inflammatory response and in lung injury and repair. This proof of concept study was designed to test the idea that an open, unbiased, in-depth proteomics approach could identify novel, low abundance plasma proteins i.e., ng/mL concentration, which could serve as potential biomarkers. Differentially expressed proteins were identified in a discovery group with severe COPD (FEV1 <45% predicted; n = 10). Subjects with normal lung function matched for age, sex, ethnicity and smoking history served as controls (n = 10). Pooled plasma from each group was exhaustively immunodepleted of abundant proteins, d separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and extensively fractionated prior to LC-tandem mass spectroscopy (GeLC-MS). Thirty one differentially expressed proteins were identified in the discovery group including markers of lung defense against oxidant stress, alveolar macrophage activation, and lung tissue injury and repair. Four of the 31 proteins (i.e., GRP78, soluble CD163, IL1AP and MSPT9) were measured in a separate verification group of 80 subjects with varying COPD severity by immunoassay. All 4 were significantly altered in COPD and 2 (GRP78 and soluble CD163) correlated with both FEV1 and the extent of emphysema. In-depth, plasma proteomic analysis identified a group of novel, differentially expressed, low abundance proteins that reflect known pathogenic mechanisms and the severity of lung remodeling in COPD. These proteins may also prove useful as COPD biomarkers. PMID:24111704

  8. Analysis of the plasma proteome in COPD: Novel low abundance proteins reflect the severity of lung remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Salim; Barrero, Carlos A; Bowler, Russell P; Chen, Diane Er; Criner, Gerard; Braverman, Alan; Litwin, Samuel; Yeung, Anthony; Kelsen, Steven G

    2014-04-01

    The search for COPD biomarkers has largely employed a targeted approach that focuses on plasma proteins involved in the systemic inflammatory response and in lung injury and repair. This proof of concept study was designed to test the idea that an open, unbiased, in-depth proteomics approach could identify novel, low abundance plasma proteins i.e., ng/mL concentration, which could serve as potential biomarkers. Differentially expressed proteins were identified in a discovery group with severe COPD (FEV1 <45% predicted; n = 10). Subjects with normal lung function matched for age, sex, ethnicity and smoking history served as controls (n = 10). Pooled plasma from each group was exhaustively immunodepleted of abundant proteins, d separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and extensively fractionated prior to LC-tandem mass spectroscopy (GeLC-MS). Thirty one differentially expressed proteins were identified in the discovery group including markers of lung defense against oxidant stress, alveolar macrophage activation, and lung tissue injury and repair. Four of the 31 proteins (i.e., GRP78, soluble CD163, IL1AP and MSPT9) were measured in a separate verification group of 80 subjects with varying COPD severity by immunoassay. All 4 were significantly altered in COPD and 2 (GRP78 and soluble CD163) correlated with both FEV1 and the extent of emphysema. In-depth, plasma proteomic analysis identified a group of novel, differentially expressed, low abundance proteins that reflect known pathogenic mechanisms and the severity of lung remodeling in COPD. These proteins may also prove useful as COPD biomarkers.

  9. Avoiding nonspecific interactions in studies of the plasma proteome: practical solutions to prevention of nonspecific interactions for label-free detection of low-abundance plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Lunt, Elizabeth A M; Sanger, Daniel; McKenzie, Graeme; O'Shea, Paul

    2009-11-01

    The molecular constitution of blood can be highly representative of the physiological state of an individual and offers an ideal target for studies of biomarkers. High-abundance plasma proteins, particularly albumin, dominate the plasma proteome, but it is the low-abundance proteins (such as cytokines) that are commonly associated with many pathophysiological states. Several detection strategies, and particularly those that involve label-free detection, are available for low-abundance protein detection in plasma, but all can be severely compromised by the high-abundance of serum albumin. In the present study, we examine the effect of albumin interference on accurate label-free detection by protein microarrays. Albumin was found to disrupt specific antigen-antibody binding interactions of low-abundance proteins. In clinical analysis, where it is imperative to preserve the integrity of samples, depletion of albumin may further undermine quantitative measurements. We have optimized procedures that permit accurate analysis to be undertaken without the need for prior treatment of samples. The emphasis is placed on disrupting nonspecific interactions including both electrostatic (i.e., Colulombic) and electrodynamic (hydrophobic and other nonpolar based) interactions. These protocols appear to be generic with potential applications in several areas of analytical biotechnology.

  10. Strategy for purification and mass spectrometry identification of SELDI peaks corresponding to low-abundance plasma and serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertin, Marie; Burdese, Justine; Beseme, Olivia; Amouyel, Philippe; Bauters, Christophe; Pinet, Florence

    2011-04-01

    Analysis by SELDI-TOF-MS of low abundance proteins makes it possible to select peaks as candidate biomarkers. Our aim was to define a purification strategy to optimise identification by MS of peaks detected by SELDI-TOF-MS from plasma or serum, regardless of any treatment by a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL). We describe 2 principal steps in purification. First, choosing the appropriate sample containing the selected peak requires setting up a databank that records all the m/z peaks detected from samples in different conditions. Second, the specific purification process must be chosen: separation was achieved with either chromatographic columns or liquid-phase isoelectric focusing, both combined when appropriate with reverse-phase chromatography. After purification, peaks were separated by gel electrophoresis and the candidate proteins were analyzed by nano-liquid-chromatography-MS/MS. We chose 4m/z peaks (9400, 13,571, 13,800 and 15,557) selected for their differential expression between two conditions, as examples to explain the different strategies of purification, and we successfully identified 3 of them. Despite some limitations, our strategy to purify and identify peaks selected from SELDI-TOF-MS analysis was effective. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Post-Translational Modifications from Serum/Plasma by Immunoaffinity Enrichment and LC-MS/MS Analysis Without Depletion of Abundant Proteins.

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    Gu, Hongbo; Ren, Jianmin; Jia, Xiaoying; Stokes, Matthew P

    2017-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment combined with LC-MS/MS enables identification of Post-translational modifications (PTMs) from serum/plasma samples without abundant protein depletion. Here we described the workflow in details in identifying various types of PTMs such as lysine acetylation and arginine methylation from cancer serum. The method described is compatible with all common proteomic analysis platforms and quantitative methods.

  12. Detection and quantitation of twenty-seven cytokines, chemokines and growth factors pre- and post-high abundance protein depletion in human plasma

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    Seong-Beom Ahn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines, chemokines and growth factors (CCGFs in human plasma are analyzed for identification of biomarkers. However concentrations of CCGFs are very low; it is difficult to identify and quantify low abundance proteins in the presence of the high abundance proteins (HAPs unless HAPs are removed prior to analysis. However, there is a concern that the low abundance proteins such as CCGFs may also be removed during the HAP depletion process. In this study, we have examined whether or not depletion of the HAPs enhances detection of the CCGFs by immuno-assays. Top 14 HAPs were depleted from 10 healthy volunteers’ plasma using MARS-14 immuno-depletion column and a total of 27 CCGFs were analyzed by bead-based multiplexed immuno-assay. All 27 CCGFs were detected in neat plasma (NP, 25 were detected in flow through fraction (FT and 21 were detected in bound protein (BP fraction. Concentrations of 22 CCGFs were significantly higher in NP compared to FT and BP. Only one CCGF had higher concentration in FT compared to NP. The remaining 2 CCGFs were not different between NP and FT. It was counter-productive for the detection of 24 CCGFs after HAP removal, primarily due to post-depletion protein precipitation and/or re-suspension of pellets.

  13. Genetic studies of low-abundance human plasma proteins. V. Evidence for a second orosomucoid structural locus (ORM2) expressed in plasma.

    OpenAIRE

    Escallon, M H; Ferrell, R E; Kamboh, M I

    1987-01-01

    Orosomucoid (ORM) or alpha-1-acid glycoprotein is an acute-phase protein of human plasma whose function is suggested to be the competitive inhibition of cellular recognition by infective agents. Genetically determined variation in ORM has been reported, with two major alleles segregating in all populations studied to date. Isoelectric focusing-immunoblotting studies of ORM revealed the presence of isoprotein species that did not segregate with the predominant alleles at the ORM locus and sugg...

  14. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Ja; Griffin, Nm; Long, F; Li, Y; Latterich, M; Schnitzer, Je

    2013-01-29

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show.

  15. Protein Biophysics Explains Why Highly Abundant Proteins Evolve Slowly

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    Adrian W.R. Serohijos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The consistent observation across all kingdoms of life that highly abundant proteins evolve slowly demonstrates that cellular abundance is a key determinant of protein evolutionary rate. However, other empirical findings, such as the broad distribution of evolutionary rates, suggest that additional variables determine the rate of protein evolution. Here, we report that under the global selection against the cytotoxic effects of misfolded proteins, folding stability (ΔG, simultaneous with abundance, is a causal variable of evolutionary rate. Using both theoretical analysis and multiscale simulations, we demonstrate that the anticorrelation between the premutation ΔG and the arising mutational effect (ΔΔG, purely biophysical in origin, is a necessary requirement for abundance–evolutionary rate covariation. Additionally, we predict and demonstrate in bacteria that the strength of abundance–evolutionary rate correlation depends on the divergence time separating reference genomes. Altogether, these results highlight the intrinsic role of protein biophysics in the emerging universal patterns of molecular evolution.

  16. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    proteins. Proteins involved in energy metabolism as well as those with binding function were also found in high copy number while proteins annotated with the terms metabolism, transcription, transport, and cellular organization were rare. The barrel-sandwich fold was found to be the structural fold......Background: Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein...... protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  17. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  18. Seminal Plasma Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    P Perumal

    2012-01-01

    The ejaculated semen consists of two major components viz. sperm cells (spermatozoa) and the fluid part obtained after centrifugation called seminal plasma. The spermatozoa originate from the semniferous tubule and are suspended in the seminal plasma. The seminal plasma is composed of secretions contributed by the testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, ampullae, prostate and bulbourethral glands. About 60-80 % of the ejaculated semen of the bull originates from these sources. Seminal plasma is...

  19. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

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    Mann Matthias

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein concentrations have been difficult to measure on a large scale, but proteomic technologies have now advanced to a stage where this information becomes readily accessible. Results Here, we describe an experimental scheme to maximize the coverage of proteins identified by mass spectrometry of a complex biological sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed emPAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal proteins. Proteins involved in energy metabolism as well as those with binding function were also found in high copy number while proteins annotated with the terms metabolism, transcription, transport, and cellular organization were rare. The barrel-sandwich fold was found to be the structural fold with the highest abundance. Highly abundant proteins are predicted to be less prone to aggregation based on their length, pI values, and occurrence patterns of hydrophobic stretches. We also find that abundant proteins tend to be predominantly essential. Additionally we observe a significant correlation between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work

  20. Evaluation of three high abundance protein depletion kits for umbilical cord serum proteomics

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    Nie Jing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High abundance protein depletion is a major challenge in the study of serum/plasma proteomics. Prior to this study, most commercially available kits for depletion of highly abundant proteins had only been tested and evaluated in adult serum/plasma, while the depletion efficiency on umbilical cord serum/plasma had not been clarified. Structural differences between some adult and fetal proteins (such as albumin make it likely that depletion approaches for adult and umbilical cord serum/plasma will be variable. Therefore, the primary purposes of the present study are to investigate the efficiencies of several commonly-used commercial kits during high abundance protein depletion from umbilical cord serum and to determine which kit yields the most effective and reproducible results for further proteomics research on umbilical cord serum. Results The immunoaffinity based kits (PROTIA-Sigma and 5185-Agilent displayed higher depletion efficiency than the immobilized dye based kit (PROTBA-Sigma in umbilical cord serum samples. Both the PROTIA-Sigma and 5185-Agilent kit maintained high depletion efficiency when used three consecutive times. Depletion by the PROTIA-Sigma Kit improved 2DE gel quality by reducing smeared bands produced by the presence of high abundance proteins and increasing the intensity of other protein spots. During image analysis using the identical detection parameters, 411 ± 18 spots were detected in crude serum gels, while 757 ± 43 spots were detected in depleted serum gels. Eight spots unique to depleted serum gels were identified by MALDI- TOF/TOF MS, seven of which were low abundance proteins. Conclusions The immunoaffinity based kits exceeded the immobilized dye based kit in high abundance protein depletion of umbilical cord serum samples and dramatically improved 2DE gel quality for detection of trace biomarkers.

  1. Determinants of protein abundance and translation efficiency in S. cerevisiae.

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    Tamir Tuller

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The translation efficiency of most Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes remains fairly constant across poor and rich growth media. This observation has led us to revisit the available data and to examine the potential utility of a protein abundance predictor in reinterpreting existing mRNA expression data. Our predictor is based on large-scale data of mRNA levels, the tRNA adaptation index, and the evolutionary rate. It attains a correlation of 0.76 with experimentally determined protein abundance levels on unseen data and successfully cross-predicts protein abundance levels in another yeast species (Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The predicted abundance levels of proteins in known S. cerevisiae complexes, and of interacting proteins, are significantly more coherent than their corresponding mRNA expression levels. Analysis of gene expression measurement experiments using the predicted protein abundance levels yields new insights that are not readily discernable when clustering the corresponding mRNA expression levels. Comparing protein abundance levels across poor and rich media, we find a general trend for homeostatic regulation where transcription and translation change in a reciprocal manner. This phenomenon is more prominent near origins of replications. Our analysis shows that in parallel to the adaptation occurring at the tRNA level via the codon bias, proteins do undergo a complementary adaptation at the amino acid level to further increase their abundance.

  2. Age-related differences in plasma proteins: how plasma proteins change from neonates to adults.

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    Vera Ignjatovic

    Full Text Available The incidence of major diseases such as cardiovascular disease, thrombosis and cancer increases with age and is the major cause of mortality world-wide, with neonates and children somehow protected from such diseases of ageing. We hypothesized that there are major developmental differences in plasma proteins and that these contribute to age-related changes in the incidence of major diseases. We evaluated the human plasma proteome in healthy neonates, children and adults using the 2D-DIGE approach. We demonstrate significant changes in number and abundance of up to 100 protein spots that have marked differences in during the transition of the plasma proteome from neonate and child through to adult. These proteins are known to be involved in numerous physiological processes such as iron transport and homeostasis, immune response, haemostasis and apoptosis, amongst others. Importantly, we determined that the proteins that are differentially expressed with age are not the same proteins that are differentially expressed with gender and that the degree of phosphorylation of plasma proteins also changes with age. Given the multi-functionality of these proteins in human physiology, understanding the differences in the plasma proteome in neonates and children compared to adults will make a major contribution to our understanding of developmental biology in humans.

  3. Fundamental constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence

    2015-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media w...

  4. On ribosome load, codon bias and protein abundance.

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    Stefan Klumpp

    Full Text Available Different codons encoding the same amino acid are not used equally in protein-coding sequences. In bacteria, there is a bias towards codons with high translation rates. This bias is most pronounced in highly expressed proteins, but a recent study of synthetic GFP-coding sequences did not find a correlation between codon usage and GFP expression, suggesting that such correlation in natural sequences is not a simple property of translational mechanisms. Here, we investigate the effect of evolutionary forces on codon usage. The relation between codon bias and protein abundance is quantitatively analyzed based on the hypothesis that codon bias evolved to ensure the efficient usage of ribosomes, a precious commodity for fast growing cells. An explicit fitness landscape is formulated based on bacterial growth laws to relate protein abundance and ribosomal load. The model leads to a quantitative relation between codon bias and protein abundance, which accounts for a substantial part of the observed bias for E. coli. Moreover, by providing an evolutionary link, the ribosome load model resolves the apparent conflict between the observed relation of protein abundance and codon bias in natural sequences and the lack of such dependence in a synthetic gfp library. Finally, we show that the relation between codon usage and protein abundance can be used to predict protein abundance from genomic sequence data alone without adjustable parameters.

  5. Enrichment of low-abundance brain proteins by preparative electrophoresis.

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    Fountoulakis, Michael; Juranville, Jean François

    2003-02-15

    Detection of low-copy-number gene products is essential for the development of novel drugs, however, it represents a major drawback of proteomics and simultaneously a scientific challenge. We studied the enrichment of rat brain cytosolic proteins by preparative electrophoresis using the PrepCell apparatus. The electrophoresis was performed in the presence of 0.1% lithium dodecyl sulfate. The proteins eluted from the gel were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass specrometry. Lithium dodecyl sulfate was easily exchanged against agents compatible with isoelectric focusing. Low-abundance proteins, which had not been found before, including neuronal-specific and calcium-binding proteins, were detected. In particular, low-molecular-mass proteins, such as hippocalcin, visinin-like proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins were strongly enriched by preparative electrophoresis.

  6. Oxidative stress causes plasma protein modification.

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    Tetik, Sermin; Kiliç, Arzu; Aksoy, Halil; Rizaner, Nahit; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Yardimci, Turay

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of oxidative systems on plasma proteins using Chloramine-T, a source of free radicals. Plasma specimens from 10 healthy volunteers were treated with 40 mmol/L Chloramine-T (1:1 v/v). Total protein and plasma carbonyl levels were evaluated spectrophotometrically. Identification of plasma proteins modifications was performed by SDS-PAGE, protein and lipid electrophoresis. Protein fragmentation was evaluated by HPLC. Total protein levels of oxidised plasmas were significantly lower (4.08 ± 0.12 g/dL) than control (7.86 ± 0.03 g/dL) (P < 0.01). Plasma carbonyl levels were higher (1.94 ± 0.38 nmol/mg protein) in oxidised plasma than that of control (0.03 ± 0.01 nmol/mg protein) (P < 0.01). Plasma oxidation had no significant effect on the levels of proteins and lipids. Protein fragmentations were detected in oxidised groups compared to those of the control. We conclude that protein modifications have direct effect on the protein functions, which are related to stress agent, its treatment period(s), and the methodology used for evaluating such experimental results.

  7. CALM, a clathrin assembly protein, influences cell surface GluR2 abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Asaff; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2011-03-01

    The clathrin assembly protein, CALM, promotes the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. In a previous study, we showed that CALM controls the level of the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP2 at the plasma membrane by regulating VAMP2 endocytosis. Here, we provide evidence that CALM also influences the cell surface level of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2. Although mechanistic details as well as the physiological relevance of CALM and GluR2 in the neuron have yet to be established, CALM-mediated trafficking could function as a component of a dedicated system for controlling postsynaptic abundance of GluR2.

  8. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  9. Industrial-scale proteomics: from liters of plasma to chemically synthesized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Keith; Bougueleret, Lydie; Baussant, Thierry; Böhm, Günter; Botti, Paolo; Colinge, Jacques; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaertner, Hubert; Gleizes, Anne; Heller, Manfred; Jimenez, Silvia; Johnson, Andrew; Kussmann, Martin; Menin, Laure; Menzel, Christoph; Ranno, Frederic; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Rogers, John; Saudrais, Cedric; Villain, Matteo; Wetmore, Diana; Bairoch, Amos; Hochstrasser, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Human blood plasma is a useful source of proteins associated with both health and disease. Analysis of human blood plasma is a challenge due to the large number of peptides and proteins present and the very wide range of concentrations. In order to identify as many proteins as possible for subsequent comparative studies, we developed an industrial-scale (2.5 liter) approach involving sample pooling for the analysis of smaller proteins (M(r) generally < ca. 40 000 and some fragments of very large proteins). Plasma from healthy males was depleted of abundant proteins (albumin and IgG), then smaller proteins and polypeptides were separated into 12 960 fractions by chromatographic techniques. Analysis of proteins and polypeptides was performed by mass spectrometry prior to and after enzymatic digestion. Thousands of peptide identifications were made, permitting the identification of 502 different proteins and polypeptides from a single pool, 405 of which are listed here. The numbers refer to chromatographically separable polypeptide entities present prior to digestion. Combining results from studies with other plasma pools we have identified over 700 different proteins and polypeptides in plasma. Relatively low abundance proteins such as leptin and ghrelin and peptides such as bradykinin, all invisible to two-dimensional gel technology, were clearly identified. Proteins of interest were synthesized by chemical methods for bioassays. We believe that this is the first time that the small proteins in human blood plasma have been separated and analyzed so extensively.

  10. Plasma Levels of Total Proteins, Albumin, Globulin and Plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma levels of total protein, albumin and globulin were estimated in 25 HIV positive subjects and 25 age and sex-matched controls. Test subjects were recruited from the Haematology day Clinic and Medical wards of the. OAUTHC, lle-Ife. The controls were equally obtained from staff and students within the OAUTHC, ...

  11. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Plasma protein haptoglobin modulates renal iron loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Gburek, Jakub; Hirsch, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Haptoglobin is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for hemoglobin. The strength of hemoglobin binding and the existence of a specific receptor for the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the monocyte/macrophage system clearly suggest that haptoglobin may have a crucial role in heme...... morphological and functional parameters of renal damage. These data demonstrate that haptoglobin crucially prevents glomerular filtration of hemoglobin and, consequently, renal iron loading during aging and following acute plasma heme-protein overload....... distribution of hemoglobin in haptoglobin-deficient mice resulted in abnormal iron deposits in proximal tubules during aging. Moreover, iron also accumulated in proximal tubules after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury or after an acute plasma heme-protein overload caused by muscle injury, without affecting...

  13. Plasma Protein Turnover Rates in Rats Using Stable Isotope Labeling, Global Proteomics, and Activity-Based Protein Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Tyrrell, Kimberly J.; Hansen, Joshua R.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Murphree, Taylor A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Luders, Teresa; Madden, James M.; Li, Yunying; Wright, Aaron T.; Piehowski, Paul D.

    2017-12-06

    Protein turnover is important for general health on cellular and organism scales providing a strategy to replace old, damaged, or dysfunctional proteins. Protein turnover also informs of biomarker kinetics, as a better understanding of synthesis and degradation of proteins increases the clinical utility of biomarkers. Here, turnover rates of plasma proteins in rats were measured in vivo using a pulse-chase stable isotope labeling experiment. During the pulse, rats (n=5) were fed 13C6-labeled lysine (“heavy”) feed for 23 days to label proteins. During the chase, feed was changed to an unlabeled equivalent feed (“light”), and blood was repeatedly sampled from rats over 10 time points for 28 days. Plasma samples were digested with trypsin, and analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). MaxQuant was used to identify peptides and proteins, and quantify heavy:light lysine ratios. A system of ordinary differential equations was used to calculate protein turnover rates. Using this approach, 273 proteins were identified, and turnover rates were quantified for 157 plasma proteins with half-lives ranging 0.3-103 days. For the ~70 most abundant proteins, variability in turnover rates among rats was low (median coefficient of variation: 0.09). Activity-based protein profiling was applied to pooled plasma samples to enrich serine hydrolases using a fluorophosphonate (FP2) activity-based probe. This enrichment resulted in turnover rates for an additional 17 proteins. This study is the first to measure global plasma protein turnover rates in rats in vivo, measure variability of protein turnover rates in any animal model, and utilize activity-based protein profiling for enhancing measurements of targeted, low-abundant proteins, such as those commonly used as biomarkers. Measured protein turnover rates will be important for understanding of the role of protein turnover in cellular and organism health as well as increasing the utility of protein

  14. [Comparison of acetonitrile, ethanol and chromatographic column to eliminate high-abundance proteins in human serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Liao, Ming; He, Xiao; Zhou, Yi; Luo, Rong; Li, Hongtao; Wang, Yun; He, Min

    2012-11-01

    To compare the effects of acetonitrile precipitation, ethanol precipitation and multiple affinity chromatography column Human 14 removal to eliminate high-abundance proteins in human serum. Elimination of serum high-abundance proteins performed with acetonitrile precipitation, ethanol precipitation and multiple affinity chromatography column Human 14 removal. Bis-Tris Mini Gels electrophoresis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to detect the effect. Grey value analysis from 1-DE figure showed that after serum processed by acetonitrile method, multiple affinity chromatography column Human 14 removal method and ethanol method, the grey value of albumin changed into 157.2, 40.8 and 8.2 respectively from the original value of 19. 2-DE analysis results indicated that using multiple affinity chromatography column Human 14 method, the protein points noticeable increased by 137 compared to the original serum. After processed by acetonitrile method and ethanol method, the protein point reduced, but the low abundance protein point emerged. The acetonitrile precipitation could eliminate the vast majority of high abundance proteins in serum and gain more proteins of low molecular weight, ethanol precipitation could eliminate part of high abundance proteins in serum, but low abundance proteins less harvested, and multiple affinity chromatography column Human 14 method could effectively removed the high abundance proteins, and keep a large number of low abundance proteins.

  15. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    The detection of low-abundance protein disease biomarkers from human blood poses significant challenges due to the high dynamic range of protein concentrations that span more than 10 orders of magnitude, as well as the extreme complexity of the serum/plasma proteome. Therefore, experimental strategies that include the removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum, plasma, and other body fluids to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage. However, both the specificity and reproducibility of the high-abundance protein depletion process represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of the performance of two commercially available immunoaffinity subtraction systems commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization by high resolution LC-MS/MS. One system uses mammalian IgG antibodies to remove six of the most abundant plasma proteins, and the other uses chicken immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibodies to remove twelve of the most abundant plasma proteins. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed using these two systems, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. Removal of target proteins by both immunoaffinity subtraction systems proved reproducible and efficient. Nontarget proteins, including spiked protein standards, were also observed to bind to the columns, but in a fairly reproducible manner. The results suggest that these multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems are both highly effective and reproducible for removing high-abundance proteins and therefore, can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies.

  16. The Origin of Solar Filament Plasma Inferred from In Situ Observations of Elemental Abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H. Q.; Chen, Y.; Li, B. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Li, L. P. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhao, L. [Department of Climate and Space sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); He, J. S.; Duan, D. [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cheng, X. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: hqsong@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about 100 times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this Letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s{sup −1} near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high first ionization potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.

  17. Fibroblastic synoviocytes secrete plasma proteins via α2 -macroglobulins serving as intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2015-11-01

    Changes in plasma protein levels in synovial fluid (SF) have been implicated in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It was previously thought that the presence of plasma proteins in SF reflected ultrafiltration or extravasation from the vasculature, possibly due to retraction of inflamed endothelial cells. Recent proteomic analyses have confirmed the abundant presence of plasma proteins in SF from control and arthritic patients. Systematic depletion of high-abundance plasma proteins from SF and conditioned media from synoviocytes cultured in serum, and protein analysis under denaturing/reducing conditions have limited our understanding of sources and the native structures of "plasma protein" complexes in SF. Using Western blotting, qPCR, and mass spectrometry, we found that Hig-82 lapine fibroblastic synovicytes cultured under serum-free conditions expressed and secreted plasma proteins, including the cytokine-binding protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kDa (Spp24) and many of the proteases and protease inhibitors found in SF. Treating synoviocytes with TGF-β1 or BMP-2 for 24 h upregulated the expression of plasma proteins, including Spp24, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, IGF-1, and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, many of the plasma proteins of mass <151 kDa were secreted as disulfide-bound complexes with members of the α2 -macroglobulin (A2M) family, which serve as intracellular and extracellular chaperones, not protease inhibitors. Using brefeldin A to block vesicular traffic and protease inhibitors to inhibit endogenous activation of naïve A2M, we demonstrated that the complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and that Ca(2+) cysteine protease-dependent processes are involved. © Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  19. Genomic Determinants of Protein Abundance Variation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros I. Roumeliotis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of genomic alterations on protein networks is fundamental in identifying the mechanisms that shape cancer heterogeneity. We have used isobaric labeling to characterize the proteomic landscapes of 50 colorectal cancer cell lines and to decipher the functional consequences of somatic genomic variants. The robust quantification of over 9,000 proteins and 11,000 phosphopeptides on average enabled the de novo construction of a functional protein correlation network, which ultimately exposed the collateral effects of mutations on protein complexes. CRISPR-cas9 deletion of key chromatin modifiers confirmed that the consequences of genomic alterations can propagate through protein interactions in a transcript-independent manner. Lastly, we leveraged the quantified proteome to perform unsupervised classification of the cell lines and to build predictive models of drug response in colorectal cancer. Overall, we provide a deep integrative view of the functional network and the molecular structure underlying the heterogeneity of colorectal cancer cells.

  20. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Dumpala

    Full Text Available Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05 difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri.

  1. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-03-04

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC's potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ∼2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories, we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies.

  2. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Carlis, John V.; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC’s potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ~2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies. PMID:21142092

  3. In-depth analysis of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum using different fractionation techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Asger; Bendixen, Emøke; Ingvartsen, Klaus Lønne

    2012-01-01

    abundant proteins. Moreover, the composition of colostrum is complex and the proteins are located within different physical fractions that make up the colostrum. To gain a more exhaustive picture of the bovine colostrum proteome and gather information on protein location, we performed an extensive pre...

  4. Evaluation of four different strategies to characterize plasma membrane proteins from banana roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Antunes Lourençoni Garcia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane proteins constitute a very important class of proteins. They are involved in the transmission of external signals to the interior of the cell and selective transport of water, nutrients and ions across the plasma membrane. However, the study of plasma membrane proteins is challenging because of their poor solubility in aqueous media and low relative abundance. In this work, we evaluated four different strategies for the characterization of plasma membrane proteins from banana roots: (i the aqueous-polymer two-phase system technique (ATPS coupled to gelelectrophoresis (gel-based, and (ii ATPS coupled to LC-MS/MS (gel free, (iii a microsomal fraction and (iv a full proteome, both coupled to LC-MS/MS. Our results show that the gel-based strategy is useful for protein visualization but has major limitations in terms of time reproducibility and efficiency. From the gel-free strategies, the microsomal-based strategy allowed the highest number of plasma membrane proteins to be identified, followed by the full proteome strategy and by the ATPS based strategy. The high yield of plasma membrane proteins provided by the microsomal fraction can be explained by the enrichment of membrane proteins in this fraction and the high throughput of the gel-free approach combined with the usage of a fast high-resolution mass spectrometer for the identification of proteins.

  5. Electroejaculation increases low molecular weight proteins in seminal plasma modifying sperm quality in Corriedale rams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, A; Manes, J; Cesari, A; Alberio, R; Hozbor, F

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of seminal collection method (artificial vagina or electroejaculation) on the protein composition of seminal plasma and sperm quality parameters in Corriedale rams. To address this question, we assessed the effect of seminal collection method on motility, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, mitochondrial functionality and the decondensation state of nuclear chromatin in sperm cells. Volume, pH, osmolarity, protein concentration, total protein content and protein profile using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2-D polyacrylamide electrophoresis of seminal plasma collected with artificial vagina and electroejaculation were also analysed. The main findings from this study were that ejaculates obtained with electroejaculation had (i) a higher number of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and functional mitochondria and (ii) a higher proportion of seminal plasma, total protein content and relative abundance of low molecular weight proteins than ejaculates obtained with artificial vagina. Five of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry: binder of sperm 5 precursor; RSVP14; RSVP22; epididymal secretory protein E1 and clusterin. One protein spot with molecular weight of approximately 31 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.8 was only found in the seminal plasma from electroejaculation. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. The Abundance of Helium in the Source Plasma of Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2017-11-01

    Studies of patterns of abundance enhancements of elements, relative to solar coronal abundances, in large solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, and of their power-law dependence on the mass-to-charge ratio, A/Q, of the ions, have been used to determine the effective source-plasma temperature, T, that defines the Q-values of the ions. We find that a single assumed value for the coronal reference He/O ratio in all SEP events is often inconsistent with the transport-induced power-law trend of the other elements. In fact, the coronal He/O varies rather widely from one SEP event to another. In the large Fe-rich SEP events with T ≈ 3 MK, where shock waves, driven out by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), have reaccelerated residual ions from impulsive suprathermal events that occur earlier in solar active regions, He/O ≈ 90, a ratio similar to that in the slow solar wind, which may also originate from active regions. Ions in the large SEP events with T solar wind. Other than He, reference coronal abundances for heavier elements show little temperature dependence or systematic difference between SEP events; He, the element with the highest first-ionization potential, is unique. The CME-driven shock waves probe the same regions of space, at ≈ 2 RS near active regions, which are also likely sources of the slow solar wind, providing complementary information on conditions in those regions.

  7. Identification of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Talens (Simone); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); D.C. Rijken (Dingeman)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSeveral proteins are known to bind to a fibrin network and to change clot properties or function. In this study we aimed to get an overview of fibrin clot-bound plasma proteins. A plasma clot was formed by adding thrombin, CaCl2 and aprotinin to citrated platelet-poor plasma and unbound

  8. Overexpression Analysis of emv2 gene coding for Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Vigna radiata (Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are speculated to protect against water stress deficit in plants. An over expression system for mungbean late embryogenesis abundant protein, emv2 was constructed in a pET29a vector, designated pET-emv2 which is responsible for higher expression under the transcriptional/translational control of T7/lac promoter incorporated in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3.Induction protocol was optimized for pET recombinants harboring the target gene. Overexpressed EMV2 protein was purified to homogeneity and the protein profile monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  9. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  10. With or without you - Proteomics with or without major plasma/serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianazza, Elisabetta; Miller, Ingrid; Palazzolo, Luca; Parravicini, Chiara; Eberini, Ivano

    2016-05-17

    The first sections of this review compile and discuss strategies and protocols for managing plasma/serum as a source of biomarkers relevant to human disease. In many such cases, depletion of abundant protein(s) is a crucial preliminary step to the procedure; specific conceptual and technical approaches, however, make it possible to effectively use to this purpose whole plasma/serum. The final sections focus instead on the complexity associated with each of the major serum/plasma proteins in terms of both, multiple molecular structures (existence of a number of protein species) and of multiple molecular functions (behavior as multifunctional/multitasking/moonlighting proteins). Reviewing evidence in these and some related fields (regulation of the synthetic pattern by proteins and non-protein compounds and its connection with health and disease) prompts the suggestion/recommendation that information on the abundant components of plasma/serum proteome is routinely obtained and processed/mined as a valuable contribution to the characterization of any non-physiological condition and to the understanding of its mechanisms and of its implications/sequels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ali Ahmad, H.; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and

  12. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, Mehran; Ng, E. -P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Rostami, F. Bakhshandeh; de Vries, Marcel; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and

  13. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rahimi (Mehran); E.-P. Ng; K. Bakhtiari (Kamran); M. Vinciguerra (Manlio); H.A. Ahmad (H. Ali); H. Awala; S. Mintova; M. Daghighi (Mojtaba); F. Bakhshandeh Rostami; M. de Vries (Marieke); M.M. Motazacker (Mohammad); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); M. Mahmoudi; F. Rezaee (Farhad)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein

  14. Elevated Abundance, Size, and MicroRNA Content of Plasma Extracellular Vesicles in Viremic HIV-1+ Patients: Correlations With Known Markers of Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Audrey; Subra, Caroline; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Tremblay Labrecque, Pierre-François; Tremblay, Cécile; Laffont, Benoit; Provost, Patrick; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Gilbert, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Because of factors only partly understood, the generalized elevated immune activation and inflammation characterizing HIV-1-infected patients are corrected incompletely with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes and microvesicles released by several cell types may contribute to immune activation and dysfunction. EV size, abundance, and content appear to differ according to infection phase, disease progression, and ART. We examined whether the size of EVs and the abundance of exosomes in plasma are associated with cell and tissue activation as well as with viral production. Acetylcholinesterase-bearing (AChE+) exosomes in plasma were quantified using an AChE assay. EV size was analyzed using dynamic light scattering. Proteins and microRNAs present in EVs were detected by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Exosomes were found more abundant in the plasma of ART-naive patients. EV size was larger in ART-naive than in ART-suppressed patients, elite controllers, or healthy control subjects. Both exosome abundance and EV sizes were inversely correlated with CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio and neutrophil, platelet, and CD4 T-cell counts and positively correlated with CD8 T-cell counts. A negative correlation was found between CD4 T-cell nadir and exosome abundance, but not EV size. Levels of miR-155 and miR-223 but not miR-92 were strongly correlated negatively with EV abundance and size in ART-naive patients. Monitoring of circulating EVs and EV-borne microRNA is possible and may provide new insight into HIV-1 pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated inflammatory state, as well as the efficacy of ART and the treatments intended to reduce immune activation.

  15. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  16. Intact stable isotope labeled plasma proteins from the SILAC-labeled HepG2 secretome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangrum, John B; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2015-09-01

    The plasma proteome remains an attractive biospecimen for MS-based biomarker discovery studies. The success of these efforts relies on the continued development of quantitative MS-based proteomics approaches. Herein we report the use of the SILAC-labeled HepG2 secretome as a source for stable isotope labeled plasma proteins for quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements. The HepG2 liver cancer cell line secretes the major plasma proteins including serum albumin, apolipoproteins, protease inhibitors, coagulation factors, and transporters that represent some of the most abundant proteins in plasma. The SILAC-labeled HepG2 secretome was collected, spiked into human plasma (1:1 total protein), and then processed for LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 62 and 56 plasma proteins were quantified (heavy:light (H/L) peptide pairs) from undepleted and depleted (serum albumin and IgG), respectively, with log2 H/L = ± 6. Major plasma proteins quantified included albumin, apolipoproteins (e.g., APOA1, APOA2, APOA4, APOB, APOC3, APOE, APOH, and APOM), protease inhibitors (e.g., A2M and SERPINs), coagulation factors (e.g., Factor V, Factor X, fibrinogen), and transport proteins (e.g., TTR). The average log2 H/L values for shared plasma proteins in both undepleted and depleted plasma samples were 0.43 and 0.44, respectively. This work further expands the SILAC strategy into MS-based biomarker discovery of clinical biospecimens. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Identification of Trypanosome Proteins in Plasma from African Sleeping Sickness Patients Infected with T. b. rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyaru, John C.; Carr, Steven A.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Control of human African sleeping sickness, caused by subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is based on preventing transmission by elimination of the tsetse vector and by active diagnostic screening and treatment of infected patients. To identify trypanosome proteins that have potential as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of African sleeping sickness, we have used a ‘deep-mining” proteomics approach to identify trypanosome proteins in human plasma. Abundant human plasma proteins were removed by immunodepletion. Depleted plasma samples were then digested to peptides with trypsin, fractionated by basic reversed phase and each fraction analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This sample processing and analysis method enabled identification of low levels of trypanosome proteins in pooled plasma from late stage sleeping sickness patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. A total of 254 trypanosome proteins were confidently identified. Many of the parasite proteins identified were of unknown function, although metabolic enzymes, chaperones, proteases and ubiquitin-related/acting proteins were found. This approach to the identification of conserved, soluble trypanosome proteins in human plasma offers a possible route to improved disease diagnosis and monitoring, since these molecules are potential biomarkers for the development of a new generation of antigen-detection assays. The combined immuno-depletion/mass spectrometric approach can be applied to a variety of infectious diseases for unbiased biomarker identification. PMID:23951171

  18. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Manipulation of Proteins in Food Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolouie, Haniye; Hashemi, Maryam; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    of plasma on the conformation and function of proteins with food origin, especially enzymes and allergens, as well as protein-made packaging films. In enzyme manipulation with plasma, deactivation has been reported to be either partial or complete. In addition, an activity increase has been observed in some...... where there is thermal sensitivity. As it is a very recent application, the impact of cold plasma treatment has been studied on the protein structures of food and pharmaceutical systems, as well as in the packaging industry. Proteins, as a food constituent, play a remarkable role in the techno...... cases. These variations are caused by the effect of different active species of plasma on the enzyme structure and its function. The level and type of variations in the functional properties of food proteins, purified proteins in food, and plasma-treated protein films are affected by a number of control...

  19. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then q...

  20. Informing the Human Plasma Protein Binding of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The free fraction of a xenobiotic in plasma (Fub) is an important determinant of chemical adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity, yet experimental plasma protein binding data is scarce for environmentally relevant chemicals. The presented work explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to predict Fub for environmentally relevant chemicals via machine learning techniques. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were constructed with k nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM), and random forest (RF) machine learning algorithms from a training set of 1045 pharmaceuticals. The models were then evaluated with independent test sets of pharmaceuticals (200 compounds) and environmentally relevant ToxCast chemicals (406 total, in two groups of 238 and 168 compounds). The selection of a minimal feature set of 10-15 2D molecular descriptors allowed for both informative feature interpretation and practical applicability domain assessment via a bounded box of descriptor ranges and principal component analysis. The diverse pharmaceutical and environmental chemical sets exhibit similarities in terms of chemical space (99-82% overlap), as well as comparable bias and variance in constructed learning curves. All the models exhibit significant predictability with mean absolute errors (MAE) in the range of 0.10-0.18 Fub. The models performed best for highly bound chemicals (MAE 0.07-0.12), neutrals (MAE 0

  1. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  2. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with (15NH42SO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaud Saula Goulart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15N, ussing nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Piratã 1 with 1.394 atoms%15N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L-1 NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 ± 0.011; 1.403 ± 0.012; 1.399 ± 0.007 and 1.399 ± 0.028 atoms % of 15N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05. However, a difference was found (P < 0.05 between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 ± 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L¹ NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Airway Cilia Identifies Previously Uncharacterized Proteins of High Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Kevin; Bustamante-Marin, Ximena; Yin, Weining; Goshe, Michael B; Ostrowski, Lawrence E

    2017-04-07

    Cilia are essential to many diverse cellular processes. Although many major axonemal components have been identified and studied, how they interact to form a functional axoneme is not completely understood. To further our understanding of the protein composition of human airway cilia, we performed a semiquantitative analysis of ciliary axonemes using label-free LC/MSE, which identified over 400 proteins with high confidence. Tubulins were the most abundant proteins identified, with evidence of 20 different isoforms obtained. Twelve different isoforms of axonemal dynein heavy chain were also identified. Absolute quantification of the nontubulin components demonstrated a greater than 75-fold range of protein abundance (RSPH9;1850 fmol vs CCDC103;24 fmol), adding another level of complexity to axonemal structure. Of the identified proteins, ∼70% are known axonemal proteins. In addition, many previously uncharacterized proteins were identified. Unexpectedly, several of these, including ERICH3, C1orf87, and CCDC181, were present at high relative abundance in the cilia. RT-PCR analysis and immunoblotting confirmed cilia-specific expression for eight uncharacterized proteins, and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated unique axonemal localizations. These studies have provided the first quantitative analysis of the ciliary proteome and have identified and characterized several previously unknown proteins as major constituents of human airway cilia.

  4. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney...... transplant recipients and quantified 359 plasma proteins simultaneously using nano-Liquid-Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry in individual samples and plasma C-reactive protein on the index day and the next day. Next-day C-reactive protein increased in 59 patients whereas it decreased in 32 patients....... The prediction model selected and validated 82 plasma proteins which determined increased next-day C-reactive protein (area under receiver-operator-characteristics curve, 0.772; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 0.876; P protein signature (P 

  5. Rapid and individual-specific glycoprofiling of the low abundance N-glycosylated protein tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS and MS/MS. The method proved to be fast and sensitive and furthermore yielded a comprehensive site-specific glycan analysis, allowing a differentiation of the glycoprofiles of the two sources of recombinant protein, both comprising N......-glycans of a highly heterogeneous nature. To test the potential of the method, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), a secreted low abundance N-glycosylated protein and a cancer marker, was purified in an individual-specific manner from plasma of five healthy individuals using IgG depletion...... and immunoaffinity chromatography. The corresponding TIMP-1 glycoprofiles were determined to be highly similar, comprising mainly bi- and triantennary complex oligosaccharides. Additionally it was shown that platelet-derived TIMP-1 displayed a similar glycoprofile. This is the first study to investigate...

  6. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  7. Nanoparticle size matters in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-09-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, proteins would interact with NPs to form the protein corona that can critically impact the biological identity of the nanomaterial. Owing to their fundamental scientific interest and potential applications, Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes have been developed for applications in cell separation and protein separation and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), etc. Here, we investigated whether nanoparticle size affects the formation of protein coronas around Fe3O4 NPs. Both the identification and quantification results demonstrated that particle size does play an important role in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 NPs; it not only influenced the protein composition of the formed plasma protein corona but also affected the abundances of the plasma proteins within the coronas. Understanding the different binding profiles of human plasma proteins on Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes would facilitate the exploration of the bio-distributions and biological fates of Fe3O4 NPs in biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of altered protein abundances in cholesteatoma matrix via mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Derrick R; Park, Phillip S; Chau, Justin K

    2015-11-25

    Cholesteatoma are cyst-like structures lined with a matrix of differentiated squamous epithelium overlying connective tissue. Although epithelium normally exhibits self-limited growth, cholesteatoma matrix erodes mucosa and bone suggesting changes in matrix protein constituents that permit destructive behaviour. Differential proteomic studies can measure and compare the cholesteatoma proteome to normal tissues, revealing protein alterations that may propagate the destructive process. Human cholesteatoma matrix, cholesteatoma-involved ossicles, and normal middle ear mucosa, post-auricular skin, and non-involved ossicles were harvested. These tissues were subjected to multiplex peptide labeling followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Relative protein abundances were compared and evaluated for ontologic function and putative involvement in cholesteatoma. Our methodology detected 10 764 peptides constituting 1662 unique proteins at 95 % confidence or greater. Twenty-nine candidate proteins were identified in soft tissue analysis, with 29 additional proteins showing altered abundances in bone samples. Ontologic functions and known relevance to cholesteatoma are discussed, with several candidates highlighted for their roles in epithelial integrity, evasion of apoptosis, and immunologic function. This study produced an extensive cholesteatoma proteome and identified 58 proteins with altered abundances contributing to disease pathopathysiology. As well, potential biomarkers of residual disease were highlighted. Further investigation into these proteins may provide useful options for novel therapeutics or monitoring disease status.

  9. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  10. Plasma proteins of Barbus holubi and Clarias gariepinus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The plasma proteins of the teleosts, Barbus holubl and ClariDs gariepllUl3 were investigated by means of ... The methods used for anaesthetization, blood sampling, centrifugation, plasma protein determination, etc. ... (a) Chromatography on Sephadex G-l00equilibrated with Tris-HCI buffer, pH 7,5 and 0,05 M.

  11. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  12. Snake venoms are integrated systems, but abundant venom proteins evolve more rapidly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Steven D; Aggarwal, Shikha; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Tin, Mandy Man-Ying; Terada, Kouki; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2015-08-28

    While many studies have shown that extracellular proteins evolve rapidly, how selection acts on them remains poorly understood. We used snake venoms to understand the interaction between ecology, expression level, and evolutionary rate in secreted protein systems. Venomous snakes employ well-integrated systems of proteins and organic constituents to immobilize prey. Venoms are generally optimized to subdue preferred prey more effectively than non-prey, and many venom protein families manifest positive selection and rapid gene family diversification. Although previous studies have illuminated how individual venom protein families evolve, how selection acts on venoms as integrated systems, is unknown. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrometry, we examined microevolution in two pitvipers, allopatrically separated for at least 1.6 million years, and their hybrids. Transcriptomes of parental species had generally similar compositions in regard to protein families, but for a given protein family, the homologs present and concentrations thereof sometimes differed dramatically. For instance, a phospholipase A2 transcript comprising 73.4 % of the Protobothrops elegans transcriptome, was barely present in the P. flavoviridis transcriptome (venoms. Protein evolutionary rates were positively correlated with transcriptomic and proteomic abundances, and the most abundant proteins showed positive selection. This pattern holds with the addition of four other published crotaline transcriptomes, from two more genera, and also for the recently published king cobra genome, suggesting that rapid evolution of abundant proteins may be generally true for snake venoms. Looking more broadly at Protobothrops, we show that rapid evolution of the most abundant components is due to positive selection, suggesting an interplay between abundance and adaptation. Given log-scale differences in toxin abundance, which are likely correlated with biosynthetic costs, we

  13. Protein changes in macrophages induced by plasma from rats exposed to 35 GHz millimeter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypniewska, Roza K; Millenbaugh, Nancy J; Kiel, Johnathan L; Blystone, Robert V; Ringham, Heather N; Mason, Patrick A; Witzmann, Frank A

    2010-12-01

    A macrophage assay and proteomic screening were used to investigate the biological activity of soluble factors in the plasma of millimeter wave-exposed rats. NR8383 rat macrophages were incubated for 24 h with 10% plasma from male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been exposed to sham conditions, or exposed to 42 °C environmental heat or 35 GHz millimeter waves at 75 mW/cm² until core temperature reached 41.0 °C. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, image analysis, and Western blotting were used to analyze approximately 600 protein spots in the cell lysates for changes in protein abundance and levels of 3-nitrotyrosine, a marker of macrophage stimulation. Proteins of interest were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Compared to plasma from sham-exposed rats, plasma from environmental heat- or millimeter wave-exposed rats increased the expression of 11 proteins, and levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in seven proteins, in the NR8383 cells. These altered proteins are associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, and energy metabolism. Findings of this study indicate both environmental heat and 35 GHz millimeter wave exposure elicit the release of macrophage-activating mediators into the plasma of rats.

  14. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic Investigation of Ram Spermatozoa and the Proteins Conferred by Seminal Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Taylor; Leahy, Tamara; Soleilhavoup, Clement; Tsikis, Guillaume; Labas, Valerie; Combes-Soia, Lucie; Harichaux, Gregoire; Rickard, Jessica P; Druart, Xavier; de Graaf, Simon P

    2016-10-07

    Sperm proteomes have emerged for several species; however, the extent of species similarity is unknown. Sheep are an important agricultural species for which a comprehensive sperm proteome has not been produced. In addition, potential proteomic factors from seminal plasma that may contribute to improved fertility after cervical insemination are yet to be explored. Here we use liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the proteome of ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with quantitative comparison to epididymal spermatozoa. We also present a comparison to published proteomes of five other species. We identified 685 proteins in ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with the most abundant proteins involved in metabolic pathways. Only 5% of ram sperm proteins were not detected in other species, which suggest highly conserved structures and pathways. Of the proteins present in both epididymal and ejaculated ram spermatozoa, 7% were more abundant in ejaculated spermatozoa. Only two membrane-bound proteins were detected solely in ejaculated sperm lysates: liver enriched gene 1 (LEG1/C6orf58) and epidermal growth factor-like repeats and discoidin I-like domains 3 (EDIL3). This is the first evidence that despite its relatively complex proteomic composition, seminal plasma exposure leads to few novel proteins binding tightly to the ram sperm plasma membrane.

  16. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  17. Quantitative variability of 342 plasma proteins in a human twin population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yansheng; Buil, Alfonso; Collins, Ben C; Gillet, Ludovic CJ; Blum, Lorenz C; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Vitek, Olga; Mouritsen, Jeppe; Lachance, Genevieve; Spector, Tim D; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    The degree and the origins of quantitative variability of most human plasma proteins are largely unknown. Because the twin study design provides a natural opportunity to estimate the relative contribution of heritability and environment to different traits in human population, we applied here the highly accurate and reproducible SWATH mass spectrometry technique to quantify 1,904 peptides defining 342 unique plasma proteins in 232 plasma samples collected longitudinally from pairs of monozygotic and dizygotic twins at intervals of 2–7 years, and proportioned the observed total quantitative variability to its root causes, genes, and environmental and longitudinal factors. The data indicate that different proteins show vastly different patterns of abundance variability among humans and that genetic control and longitudinal variation affect protein levels and biological processes to different degrees. The data further strongly suggest that the plasma concentrations of clinical biomarkers need to be calibrated against genetic and temporal factors. Moreover, we identified 13 cis-SNPs significantly influencing the level of specific plasma proteins. These results therefore have immediate implications for the effective design of blood-based biomarker studies. PMID:25652787

  18. Identification of Proteins of Altered Abundance in Oil Palm Infected with Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel R. Al-Obaidi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal stem rot is a common disease that affects oil palm, causing loss of yield and finally killing the trees. The disease, caused by fungus Ganoderma boninense, devastates thousands of hectares of oil palm plantings in Southeast Asia every year. In the present study, root proteins of healthy oil palm seedlings, and those infected with G. boninense, were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. When the 2-DE profiles were analyzed for proteins, which exhibit consistent significant change of abundance upon infection with G. boninense, 21 passed our screening criteria. Subsequent analyses by mass spectrometry and database search identified caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, enolase, fructokinase, cysteine synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase as among proteins of which abundances were markedly altered.

  19. Identification of Proteins of Altered Abundance in Oil Palm Infected with Ganoderma boninense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R.; Mohd-Yusuf, Yusmin; Razali, Nurhanani; Jayapalan, Jaime Jacqueline; Tey, Chin-Chong; Md-Noh, Normahnani; Junit, Sarni Mat; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2014-01-01

    Basal stem rot is a common disease that affects oil palm, causing loss of yield and finally killing the trees. The disease, caused by fungus Ganoderma boninense, devastates thousands of hectares of oil palm plantings in Southeast Asia every year. In the present study, root proteins of healthy oil palm seedlings, and those infected with G. boninense, were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). When the 2-DE profiles were analyzed for proteins, which exhibit consistent significant change of abundance upon infection with G. boninense, 21 passed our screening criteria. Subsequent analyses by mass spectrometry and database search identified caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, enolase, fructokinase, cysteine synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase as among proteins of which abundances were markedly altered. PMID:24663087

  20. Introduction of enteral food increases plasma GLP-2 and decreases GLP-2 receptor mRNA abundance during pig development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Yvette M; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) may mediate in part the rapid growth effects of luminal nutrients in the small intestine of newborns. The objectives of this study were to determine plasma GLP-2 concentrations and small intestinal GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) mRNA abundance (measured by reverse...... of the response was delayed in premature newborn pigs. Small intestinal GLP-2R mRNA abundance was highest at birth and decreased with enteral food intake in fetal, suckling and weaned pigs (P

  1. Effect of plasma protein and tissue binding on the time course of drug concentration in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, P J; Levy, G; Gibaldi, M

    1979-04-01

    We have studied by digital computer simulation the effect of concentration-dependent plasma protein and tissue binding on the time course of drug concentrations (both unbound and total) in plasma following rapid injection of a drug whose elimination rate is proportional to either free or total drug concentration in plasma, assuming instantaneous equilibration of the drug between vascular and nonvascular spaces. The following observations were made when elimination rate was assumed to be a function of free drug concentration: (a) when plasma protein binding is nonlinear and there is either no tissue binding or linear tissue binding, log concentration-time plots of free drug are always concave whereas such plots for total (sum of free and bound) drug can be convex, almost linear, or concave (apparently biexponential) depending on the plasma protein binding parameters relative to the initial concentration; (b) linear tissue binding in association with nonlinear plasma protein binding can reduce the concavity or enhance the convexity of log total concentration-time plots. When drug elimination rate was assumed to be a function of total concentration in plasma, nonlinear plasma protein binding in association with linear or no tissue binding yielded convex log total concentration-time plots which could sometimes be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In general, drug concentration-dependent changes in the apparent volume of distribution resulting from nonlinear plasma protein and (where applicable) tissue binding have a pronounced effect on the slope of log total plasma concentration-time plots. It appears that under clinically realistic conditions an otherwise marked curvature of such plots, due to nonlinear plasma protein binding, may in fact be dampened or overcome by linear tissue binding.

  2. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  3. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  4. Rapid Upregulation of Orai1 Abundance in the Plasma Membrane of Platelets Following Activation with Thrombin and Collagen Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilai Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood platelets accomplish primary hemostasis following vascular injury and contribute to the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Platelets are activated by an increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which is accomplished by Ca2+-release from intracellular stores and subsequent store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE through Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel moiety Orai1. Powerful activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which are in part effective by activation of small G- protein Rac1. The present study explored the influence of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i in platelets drawn from wild type mice. Methods: Orai1 protein surface abundance was quantified utilizing CF™488A conjugated antibodies, and [Ca2+]i was determined with Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: In resting platelets, Orai1 protein abundance and [Ca2+]i were low. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml and CRP (5ug/ml within 2 min increased [Ca2+]i and Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface. [Ca2+]i was further increased by Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM and by store depletion with the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 µM. However, Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface was not significantly affected by ionomycin and only slightly increased by thapsigargin. The effect of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 abundance and [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (50 µM. Conclusion: The increase of [Ca2+]i following stimulation of platelets with thrombin and collagen related peptide is potentiated by ultrarapid Rac1 sensitive translocation of Orai1 into the cell membrane.

  5. Proteomics of plasma membranes from poplar trees reveals tissue distribution of transporters, receptors, and proteins in cell wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Robert; Bernfur, Katja; Gustavsson, Niklas; Bygdell, Joakim; Wingsle, Gunnar; Larsson, Christer

    2010-02-01

    By exploiting the abundant tissues available from Populus trees, 3-4 m high, we have been able to isolate plasma membranes of high purity from leaves, xylem, and cambium/phloem at a time (4 weeks after bud break) when photosynthesis in the leaves and wood formation in the xylem should have reached a steady state. More than 40% of the 956 proteins identified were found in the plasma membranes of all three tissues and may be classified as "housekeeping" proteins, a typical example being P-type H(+)-ATPases. Among the 213 proteins predicted to be integral membrane proteins, transporters constitute the largest class (41%) followed by receptors (14%) and proteins involved in cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism (8%) and membrane trafficking (8%). ATP-binding cassette transporters (all members of subfamilies B, C, and G) and receptor-like kinases (four subfamilies) were two of the largest protein families found, and the members of these two families showed pronounced tissue distribution. Leaf plasma membranes were characterized by a very high proportion of transporters, constituting almost half of the integral proteins. Proteins involved in cell wall synthesis (such as cellulose and sucrose synthases) and membrane trafficking were most abundant in xylem plasma membranes in agreement with the role of the xylem in wood formation. Twenty-five integral proteins and 83 soluble proteins were exclusively found in xylem plasma membranes, which identifies new candidates associated with cell wall synthesis and wood formation. Among the proteins uniquely found in xylem plasma membranes were most of the enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis, which suggests that they may exist as a complex linked to the plasma membrane.

  6. QSARs for Plasma Protein Binding: Source Data and Predictions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset has all of the information used to create and evaluate 3 independent QSAR models for the fraction of a chemical unbound by plasma protein (Fub) for...

  7. Establishment of a Strategy for the Discovery and Verification of Low-Abundance Biomarker Peptides in Plasma Using Two Types of Stable-Isotope Tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Yoshio; Hido, Yuya; Kato, Rika; Saito, Tatsuya; Kawashima, Yusuke; Minamida, Satoru; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2014-01-01

    Serum and plasma contain thousands of different proteins and peptides, which can provide valuable information about the numerous processes that take place within the body. However, detailed analysis of proteins and peptides in serum and plasma remains challenging due to the presence of many high-abundance proteins, the large dynamic range of protein and peptide concentrations, the extensive complexity caused by posttranslational modifications, and considerable individual variability. In particular, detailed analysis and identification of native peptides is extremely difficult due to the tremendous variety of cleavage possibilities and posttranslational modifications, which results in extremely high complexity. Therefore, widely ranging searches based on peptide identification are difficult. Herein, we describe the highly accurate and sensitive quantitative analysis of over 2,500 peptides with the concentration limit of about 10 pM. The strategy combined isobaric tag labeling, amine-reactive 6-plex tandem mass tag labeling, and a modified differential solubilization method for high-yield peptide extraction [Saito, T. et al. J. Electrophoresis 2013 57: 1-9]. Using this strategy, we quantitatively analyzed six pooled plasma samples (three pre-surgery and three post-surgery) to discover potential candidate biomarker peptides of renal cell carcinoma. The concentrations of 27 peptides were found to be altered following surgery. A preliminary validation study was conducted using about 80 plasma samples to demonstrate the possibility that even unidentified potential candidate biomarker peptides can be verified using the isotope tag/dimethyl labeling method. We also discuss technical consideration and potential of this strategy for facilitating native peptide research.

  8. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  9. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ali Ahmad, H; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-11-30

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

  10. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  11. Cold atmospheric plasma manipulation of proteins in food systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolouie, Haniye; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Ghomi, Hamid; Hashemi, Maryam

    2017-06-14

    Plasma processing has been getting a lot of attention in recent applications as a novel, eco-friendly, and highly efficient approach. Cold plasma has mostly been used to reduce microbial counts in foodstuff and biological materials, as well as in different levels of packaging, particularly in cases where there is thermal sensitivity. As it is a very recent application, the impact of cold plasma treatment has been studied on the protein structures of food and pharmaceutical systems, as well as in the packaging industry. Proteins, as a food constituent, play a remarkable role in the techno-functional characteristics of processed foods and/or the physico-chemical properties of protein-based films. At the same time, some proteins are responsible for reduction in quality and nutritional value, and/or causing allergic reactions in the human body. This study is a review of the influences of different types of plasma on the conformation and function of proteins with food origin, especially enzymes and allergens, as well as protein-made packaging films. In enzyme manipulation with plasma, deactivation has been reported to be either partial or complete. In addition, an activity increase has been observed in some cases. These variations are caused by the effect of different active species of plasma on the enzyme structure and its function. The level and type of variations in the functional properties of food proteins, purified proteins in food, and plasma-treated protein films are affected by a number of control factors, including treatment power, time, and gas type, as well as the nature of the substance and the treatment environment.

  12. Protein Adsorption on Various Plasma-Treated Polyethylene Terephthalate Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stana-Kleinschek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein adhesion and cell response to plasma-treated polymer surfaces were studied. The polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET was treated in either an oxygen plasma to make the surface hydrophilic, or a tetrafluoromethane CF4 plasma to make the surface hydrophobic. The plasma source was radiofrequency (RF discharge. The adsorption of albumin and other proteins from a cell-culture medium onto these surfaces was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The cellular response to plasma-treated surfaces was studied as well using an MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The fastest adsorption rate was found on the hydrophilic oxygen plasma-treated sample, and the lowest was found on the pristine untreated sample. Additionally, the amount of adsorbed proteins was higher for the oxygen-plasma-treated surface, and the adsorbed layer was more viscoelastic. In addition, cell adhesion studies support this finding because the best cell adhesion was observed on oxygen-plasma-treated substrates.

  13. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhu

    Full Text Available Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish or non-meat proteins (casein or soy for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  14. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  15. Proteomic discovery of 21 proteins expressed in human plasma-derived but not platelet-derived microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, David M; Root, Karen E; Cho, Hyungjun; Ross, Mark M; Ley, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small membrane vesicles generated by essentially all cell types. In the plasma, most MPs are derived from platelets, but those from other sources, particularly leukocytes (macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils), endothelial cells, and even smooth muscle cells can be detected and appear to play an important role in normal physiology and various diseases. In previous work we analyzed the proteome of MPs generated from isolated platelets (platelet MPs). Here, we report on a comparative analysis of microparticles isolated from plasma (plasma MPs) versus platelet MP using two complementary methods of comparative analysis. The first method, spectral count analysis, yielded 21 proteins detected in plasma MPs (with a total spectral count of 10 or greater) that were essentially absent in platelet MPs (with a total spectral count of 1 or 0). An additional two proteins (von Willebrand Factor, albumin) were present in both types of MPs but enriched in the plasma MPs. The second method, isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling of proteins, supported the spectral count results for the more abundant proteins and provided better relative quantitation of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins present only in the plasma MPs include several associated with apoptosis (CD5-like antigen, galectin 3 binding protein, several complement components), iron transport (transferrin, transferrin receptor, haptoglobin), immune response (complement components, immunoglobulin J and kappa chains), and the coagulation process (protein S, coagulation factor VIII).

  16. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis. PMID:25971257

  17. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-02

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, responsible for listeriosis a rare but severe infection disease, can survive in the food processing environment for month or even years. So-called persistent L. monocytogenes strains greatly increase the risk of (re)contamination of food products, and are therefore a great challenge for food safety. However, our understanding of the mechanism underlying persistence is still fragmented. In this study we compared the exoproteome of three persistent strains with the reference strain EGDe under mild stress conditions using 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis including all differentially abundant protein spots showed that the exoproteome of strain EGDe (sequence type (ST) 35) is distinct from that of the persistent strain R479a (ST8) and the two closely related ST121 strains 4423 and 6179. Phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus ST genes showed similar grouping of the strains. Comparing the exoproteome of strain EGDe and the three persistent strains resulted in identification of 22 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 16 proteins. Six proteins were significantly increased in the persistent L. monocytogenes exoproteomes, among them proteins involved in alkaline stress response (e.g. the membrane anchored lipoprotein Lmo2637 and the NADPH dehydrogenase NamA). In parallel the persistent strains showed increased survival under alkaline stress, which is often provided during cleaning and disinfection in the food processing environments. In addition, gene expression of the proteins linked to stress response (Lmo2637, NamA, Fhs and QoxA) was higher in the persistent strain not only at 37 °C but also at 10 °C. Invasion efficiency of EGDe was higher in intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells compared to the persistent strains. Concurrently we found higher expression of proteins involved in virulence in EGDe e.g. the actin-assembly-inducing protein ActA and the

  18. Peripheral plasma protein and progesterone profile in brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiment was done to determine total protein (TP) in eight multiparous Brown Savannah goats between two weeks preparturm and seven weeks post-partum. The mean value of plasma total protein, 8.17 ± 0.62 gm% obtained two weeks before parturition was higher than normal range of 6.0-7.5 gm% for caprine species.

  19. Multiple reaction monitoring-based, multiplexed, absolute quantitation of 45 proteins in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyk, Michael A; Smith, Derek; Yang, Juncong; Cross, Tyra J; Jackson, Angela M; Hardie, Darryl B; Anderson, N Leigh; Borchers, Christoph H

    2009-08-01

    Mass spectrometry-based multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) quantitation of proteins can dramatically impact the discovery and quantitation of biomarkers via rapid, targeted, multiplexed protein expression profiling of clinical samples. A mixture of 45 peptide standards, easily adaptable to common plasma proteomics work flows, was created to permit absolute quantitation of 45 endogenous proteins in human plasma trypsin digests. All experiments were performed on simple tryptic digests of human EDTA-plasma without prior affinity depletion or enrichment. Stable isotope-labeled standard peptides were added immediately following tryptic digestion because addition of stable isotope-labeled standard peptides prior to trypsin digestion was found to generate elevated and unpredictable results. Proteotypic tryptic peptides containing isotopically coded amino acids ([(13)C(6)]Arg or [(13)C(6)]Lys) were synthesized for all 45 proteins. Peptide purity was assessed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the peptide quantity was determined by amino acid analysis. For maximum sensitivity and specificity, instrumental parameters were empirically determined to generate the most abundant precursor ions and y ion fragments. Concentrations of individual peptide standards in the mixture were optimized to approximate endogenous concentrations of analytes and to ensure the maximum linear dynamic range of the MRM assays. Excellent linear responses (r > 0.99) were obtained for 43 of the 45 proteins with attomole level limits of quantitation (proteins. Analytical precision for 44 of the 45 assays varied by proteins are within a factor of 2 of reported literature values. This mixture of internal standards has many uses and can be applied to the characterization of trypsin digestion kinetics and plasma protein expression profiling because 31 of the 45 proteins are putative biomarkers of cardiovascular disease.

  20. Proteomic identification of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowinska, M; Nynca, J; Arnold, G J; Fröhlich, T; Jankowski, J; Kozlowski, K; Mostek, A; Ciereszko, A

    2017-09-01

    SDS-PAGE combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF) were applied to characterize the turkey seminal plasma proteome. LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 175 proteins, which were classified according to their function and to corresponding biochemical pathways. Using 2DE and MALDI TOF/TOF, 34 different turkey seminal plasma proteins could be identified, of which 20 were found in more than one spot, indicating different proteoforms of these proteins. For validation, antibodies against turkey albumin and ovoinhibitor as well as sperm acrosin were used in 2DE Western blots experiments. The bioinformatic analysis of the results indicates that turkey seminal plasma proteins may be involved in regulation of lipid metabolism [liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor (LXR/RXR) activation and farnesoid X receptor/retinoid X receptor (FXR/RXR) activation pathways)], endocytic entry of proteins and lipids at the plasma membrane (clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway), and defense against pathogens (acute phase response signaling pathway) and energy production (glycolysis and gluconeogenesis). Moreover, a comparative meta-analysis of seminal plasma proteomes from other species indicated the presence of proteins specific for avian reproduction, but distinct differences between turkey and chicken seminal plasma proteomes were detected. The results of our study provide basic knowledge of the protein composition of turkey seminal plasma highlighting important physiological pathways which may play crucial roles in the sperm environment after ejaculation. This knowledge can be the basis to further develop procedures improving the reproduction of farmed turkeys. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of proteins in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    M) with diluted fresh human plasma has been shown to generate material that oxidizes 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid; these oxidants are believed to be chloramines formed from the reaction of HOCl with protein amine groups. Chloramines have also been detected with isolated plasma proteins treated with HOCl. In both...... cases chloramine formation accounts for approx. 20-30% of the added HOCl. These chloramines decompose in a time-dependent manner when incubated at 20 or 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. Ascorbate and urate remove these chloramines in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with the former being....... Radical formation was inhibited by excess methionine, implicating protein-derived chloramines (probably from lysine side chains) as the radical source. Plasma protein fragmentation occurs in a time- and HOCl-concentration-dependent manner, as evidenced by the increased mobility of the EPR spin adducts...

  2. Adsorption of plasma proteins on uncoated PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempf, Karim; Arrey, Tabiwang; Gelperina, Svetlana; Schorge, Tobias; Meyer, Björn; Karas, Michael; Kreuter, Jörg

    2013-09-01

    The biodistribution of nanoparticles is significantly influenced by their interaction with plasma proteins. In order to optimize and possibly monitor the delivery of drugs bound to nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the protein adsorption pattern of uncoated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles after their incubation in human plasma was studied by mass spectrometry. After washing of the particles with water, the proteins were directly digested on the nanoparticle surface using trypsin and then analyzed by nLC MALDI-TOF/TOF. Up to now, the standard method for investigation into the plasma protein adsorption to the particles was 2D gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), in certain cases followed by mass spectrometry. The non-gel-based method proposed in the present study provides novel insights into the protein corona surrounding the nanoparticles. The proteins adsorbed on the PLGA nanoparticles after incubation that gave the best signal in terms of quality (high MASCOT score) in human plasma were apolipoprotein E, vitronectin, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen-1. These proteins also are constituents of HDL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutrophils Turn Plasma Proteins into Weapons against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Speth

    Full Text Available As a consequence of innate immune activation granulocytes and macrophages produce hypochlorite/hypochlorous acid (HOCl via secretion of myeloperoxidase (MPO to the outside of the cells, where HOCl immediately reacts with proteins. Most proteins that become altered by this system do not belong to the invading microorganism but to the host. While there is no doubt that the myeloperoxidase system is capable of directly inactivating HIV-1, we hypothesized that it may have an additional indirect mode of action. We show in this article that HOCl is able to chemically alter proteins and thus turn them into Idea-Ps (Idea-P = immune defence-altered protein, potent amyloid-like and SH-groups capturing antiviral weapons against HIV-1. HOCl-altered plasma proteins (Idea-PP have the capacity to bind efficiently and with high affinity to the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120, and to its receptor CD4 as well as to the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI. Idea-PP was able to inhibit viral infection and replication in a cell culture system as shown by reduced number of infected cells and of syncytia, resulting in reduction of viral capsid protein p24 in the culture supernatant. The unmodified plasma protein fraction had no effect. HOCl-altered isolated proteins antithrombin III and human serum albumin, taken as representative examples of the whole pool of plasma proteins, were both able to exert the same activity of binding to gp120 and inhibition of viral proliferation. These data offer an opportunity to improve the understanding of the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and allow the generation of the following hypothetical scheme: natural immune defense mechanisms generate by posttranslational modification of plasma proteins a potent virucidal weapon that immobilizes the virus as well as inhibits viral fusion and thus entry into the host cells. Furthermore simulation of this mechanism in vitro might provide an interesting new therapeutic approach against

  4. An Abundant Evolutionarily Conserved CSB-PiggyBac Fusion Protein Expressed in Cockayne Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John C.; Bailey, Arnold D.; Fan, Hua-Ying; Pavelitz, Thomas; Weiner, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3′ terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1–5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein. PMID:18369450

  5. An abundant evolutionarily conserved CSB-PiggyBac fusion protein expressed in Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Newman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3' terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1-5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein.

  6. Measuring plasma membrane protein endocytic rates by reversible biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Luke; Stevens, Zachary; Melikian, Haley

    2009-12-23

    Plasma membrane proteins are a large, diverse group of proteins comprised of receptors, ion channels, transporters and pumps. Activity of these proteins is responsible for a variety of key cellular events, including nutrient delivery, cellular excitability, and chemical signaling. Many plasma membrane proteins are dynamically regulated by endocytic trafficking, which modulates protein function by altering protein surface expression. The mechanisms that facilitate protein endocytosis are complex and are not fully understood for many membrane proteins. In order to fully understand the mechanisms that control the endocytic trafficking of a given protein, it is critical that the protein s endocytic rate be precisely measured. For many receptors, direct endocytic rate measurements are frequently achieved utilizing labeled receptor ligands. However, for many classes of membrane proteins, such as transporters, pumps and ion channels, there is no convenient ligand that can be used to measure the endocytic rate. In the present report, we describe a reversible biotinylation method that we employ to measure the dopamine transporter (DAT) endocytic rate. This method provides a straightforward approach to measuring internalization rates, and can be easily employed for trafficking studies of most membrane proteins.

  7. LEAping to conclusions: A computational reanalysis of late embryogenesis abundant proteins and their possible roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wise Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins cover a number of loosely related groups of proteins, originally found in plants but now being found in non-plant species. Their precise function is unknown, though considerable evidence suggests that LEA proteins are involved in desiccation resistance. Using a number of statistically-based bioinformatics tools the classification of a large set of LEA proteins, covering all Groups, is reexamined together with some previous findings. Searches based on peptide composition return proteins with similar composition to different LEA Groups; keyword clustering is then applied to reveal keywords and phrases suggestive of the Groups' properties. Results Previous research has suggested that glycine is characteristic of LEA proteins, but it is only highly over-represented in Groups 1 and 2, while alanine, thought characteristic of Group 2, is over-represented in Group 3, 4 and 6 but under-represented in Groups 1 and 2. However, for LEA Groups 1 2 and 3 it is shown that glutamine is very significantly over-represented, while cysteine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine and tryptophan are significantly under-represented. There is also evidence that the Group 4 LEA proteins are more appropriately redistributed to Group 2 and Group 3. Similarly, Group 5 is better found among the Group 3 LEA proteins. Conclusions There is evidence that Group 2 and Group 3 LEA proteins, though distinct, might be related. This relationship is also evident in the overlapping sets of keywords for the two Groups, emphasising alpha-helical structure and, at a larger scale, filaments, all of which fits well with experimental evidence that proteins from both Groups are natively unstructured, but become structured under stress conditions. The keywords support localisation of LEA proteins both in the nucleus and associated with the cytoskeleton, and a mode of action similar to chaperones, perhaps the cold shock chaperones

  8. Screening preeclamptic cord plasma for proteins associated with decreased breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Hoi Pang; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Qiu, Li; Chang, Chien-I; Strohsnitter, William C; Norwitz, Errol R; Tam, Sun W; Evans, James E; Green, Karin M; Paulo, Joao A; Lambe, Mats; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, has been found to reduce the subsequent risk for breast cancer in female offspring. As this protective effect could be due to exposure to preeclampsia-specific proteins during intrauterine life, the proteomic profiles of umbilical cord blood plasma between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies were compared. Umbilical cord plasma samples, depleted of 14 abundant proteins, were subjected to proteomic analysis using the quantitative method of nanoACQUITY ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with elevated energy mode of acquisition(E) (NanoUPLC-MS(E)). Sixty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 15 and 6 proteins were only detected in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies, respectively. Additionally, expression of 8 proteins (gelsolin, complement C5, keratin type I cytoskeletal 10, pigment epithelium-derived factor, complement factor B, complement component C7, hemoglobin subunit gamma-2 and alpha-fetoprotein) were up-regulated in preeclampsia with a fold change of ≥2.0 when compared to normotensive pregnancies. The identification of alpha-fetoprotein in preeclamptic umbilical cord blood plasma supported the validity of this screen as alpha-fetoprotein has anti-estrogenic properties and has previously been linked to preeclampsia as well as a reduced breast cancer risk. The findings of this pilot study may provide new insights into the mechanistic link between preeclampsia and potentially reduced breast cancer susceptibility in adult life. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Predicting network modules of cell cycle regulators using relative protein abundance statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Cihan; Watson, Layne T; Baumann, William T; Tyson, John J

    2017-02-28

    Parameter estimation in systems biology is typically done by enforcing experimental observations through an objective function as the parameter space of a model is explored by numerical simulations. Past studies have shown that one usually finds a set of "feasible" parameter vectors that fit the available experimental data equally well, and that these alternative vectors can make different predictions under novel experimental conditions. In this study, we characterize the feasible region of a complex model of the budding yeast cell cycle under a large set of discrete experimental constraints in order to test whether the statistical features of relative protein abundance predictions are influenced by the topology of the cell cycle regulatory network. Using differential evolution, we generate an ensemble of feasible parameter vectors that reproduce the phenotypes (viable or inviable) of wild-type yeast cells and 110 mutant strains. We use this ensemble to predict the phenotypes of 129 mutant strains for which experimental data is not available. We identify 86 novel mutants that are predicted to be viable and then rank the cell cycle proteins in terms of their contributions to cumulative variability of relative protein abundance predictions. Proteins involved in "regulation of cell size" and "regulation of G1/S transition" contribute most to predictive variability, whereas proteins involved in "positive regulation of transcription involved in exit from mitosis," "mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint" and "negative regulation of cyclin-dependent protein kinase by cyclin degradation" contribute the least. These results suggest that the statistics of these predictions may be generating patterns specific to individual network modules (START, S/G2/M, and EXIT). To test this hypothesis, we develop random forest models for predicting the network modules of cell cycle regulators using relative abundance statistics as model inputs. Predictive performance is assessed by the

  10. Effects of Long-Term Storage Time and Original Sampling Month on Biobank Plasma Protein Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Enroth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of clinical biobank samples is crucial to their value for life sciences research. A number of factors related to the collection and storage of samples may affect the biomolecular composition. We have studied the effect of long-time freezer storage, chronological age at sampling, season and month of the year and on the abundance levels of 108 proteins in 380 plasma samples collected from 106 Swedish women. Storage time affected 18 proteins and explained 4.8–34.9% of the observed variance. Chronological age at sample collection after adjustment for storage-time affected 70 proteins and explained 1.1–33.5% of the variance. Seasonal variation had an effect on 15 proteins and month (number of sun hours affected 36 proteins and explained up to 4.5% of the variance after adjustment for storage-time and age. The results show that freezer storage time and collection date (month and season exerted similar effect sizes as age on the protein abundance levels. This implies that information on the sample handling history, in particular storage time, should be regarded as equally prominent covariates as age or gender and need to be included in epidemiological studies involving protein levels.

  11. The nano-plasma interface: Implications of the protein corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability of coagulation proteins in lyophilized plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, I; Kitchen, D P; Woods, T A L; Kitchen, S; Preston, F E; Walker, I D

    2015-08-01

    External quality assessment (EQA) is an important component of quality assurance for laboratory tests of haemostasis. Lyophilization of plasma confers stability of labile clotting factors, allowing valid comparison of results between participating centres. However, elevated ambient temperatures in some geographical areas could affect the stability of lyophilized samples in transit. The effect on lyophilized plasma samples of consistent elevated temperature with respect to haemostasis tests was determined in a single centre. The temperature to which packages were exposed during transit was also monitored. Survey packages were exposed to average temperatures up to 31.9 °C and maximum temperatures up to 39.7 °C over delivery periods between 1 and 8 weeks. In-house studies revealed samples to be stable over a 6-week period at a constant 30 °C, and only small changes were observed for samples exposed to 37 °C for 4 weeks. 6-week storage at 37 °C was associated with average changes of up to 15% in factor assay activity. Lyophilized EQA material employed in UK NEQAS surveys is stable under conditions encountered for the majority of participants, but in cases of delayed delivery of samples, the effect of temperature on sample integrity must be considered when assessing laboratory performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Discrepancy between mRNA and protein abundance: insight from information retrieval process in computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Degeng

    2008-12-01

    Discrepancy between the abundance of cognate protein and RNA molecules is frequently observed. A theoretical understanding of this discrepancy remains elusive, and it is frequently described as surprises and/or technical difficulties in the literature. Protein and RNA represent different steps of the multi-stepped cellular genetic information flow process, in which they are dynamically produced and degraded. This paper explores a comparison with a similar process in computers-multi-step information flow from storage level to the execution level. Functional similarities can be found in almost every facet of the retrieval process. Firstly, common architecture is shared, as the ribonome (RNA space) and the proteome (protein space) are functionally similar to the computer primary memory and the computer cache memory, respectively. Secondly, the retrieval process functions, in both systems, to support the operation of dynamic networks-biochemical regulatory networks in cells and, in computers, the virtual networks (of CPU instructions) that the CPU travels through while executing computer programs. Moreover, many regulatory techniques are implemented in computers at each step of the information retrieval process, with a goal of optimizing system performance. Cellular counterparts can be easily identified for these regulatory techniques. In other words, this comparative study attempted to utilize theoretical insight from computer system design principles as catalysis to sketch an integrative view of the gene expression process, that is, how it functions to ensure efficient operation of the overall cellular regulatory network. In context of this bird's-eye view, discrepancy between protein and RNA abundance became a logical observation one would expect. It was suggested that this discrepancy, when interpreted in the context of system operation, serves as a potential source of information to decipher regulatory logics underneath biochemical network operation.

  14. Ion-Exchange Sample Displacement Chromatography as a Method for Fast and Simple Isolation of Low- and High-Abundance Proteins from Complex Biological Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Srajer Gajdosik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sample displacement chromatography (SDC in reversed phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced at the end of 1980s. This chromatographic method was first used for preparative purification of synthetic peptides, and subsequently adapted for protein fractionation, mainly in anion-exchange mode. In the past few years, SDC has been successfully used for enrichment of low- and medium-abundance proteins from complex biological fluids on both monolithic and bulk chromatographic supports. If aqueous mobile phase is used with the application of mild chromatographic conditions, isolated proteins are not denatured and can also keep their biological activity. In this paper, the use of SDC in anion-exchange mode on a high-capacity chromatographic resin for separation of proteins from complex biological mixtures such as human plasma is demonstrated. By use of three and more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent parallel elution of detached columns, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Highly enriched human serum albumin fraction and a number of physiologically active medium- and low-abundance proteins could be fractionated and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The use of the aforementioned columns that can be sanitized with 1 M sodium hydroxide for further application of SDC in biotechnology and food technology was discussed.

  15. Maternal bisphenol A exposure alters rat offspring hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signaling protein abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyon, Kristina D; Farshidi, Farnoosh; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G; Desai, Mina; Jellyman, Juanita K

    2017-03-01

    The obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of the environmental toxin bisphenol A during critical windows of development are well recognized. Liver and skeletal muscle play a central role in the control of glucose production, utilization, and storage. We hypothesized that maternal bisphenol A exposure disrupts insulin signaling in rat offspring liver and skeletal muscle. We determined the protein expression of hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signaling molecules including insulin receptor beta, its downstream target insulin receptor substrate 1 and glucose transporters (glucose transporter 2, glucose transporter 4), and hepatic glucose-regulating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucokinase. Rat dams had ad libitum access to filtered drinking water (control) or drinking water with bisphenol A from 2 weeks prior to mating and through pregnancy and lactation. Offspring litters were standardized to 4 males and 4 females and nursed by the same dam. At weaning, bisphenol A exposure was removed from all offspring. Glucose tolerance was tested at 6 weeks and 6 months. Liver and skeletal muscle was collected from 3 week old and 10 month old offspring for protein expression (Western blot) of insulin receptor beta, insulin receptor substrate 1, glucose transporter 2, glucose transporter 4, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucokinase. Male, but not female, bisphenol A offspring had impaired glucose tolerance at 6 weeks and 6 months. Both male and female adult offspring had higher glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as well as the ratio of stimulated insulin to glucose. Male bisphenol A offspring had higher liver protein abundance of the 200 kDa insulin receptor beta precursor (2-fold), and insulin receptor substrate 1 (1.5-fold), whereas glucose transporter 2 was 0.5-fold of the control at 3 weeks of age. In adult male bisphenol A offspring, the abundance of insulin receptor beta was higher (2-fold) and glucose transporter 4 was 0.8-fold of the control in

  16. RECOMBINANT PROTEIN PRODUCTION OF ABUNDANT LARVAL TRANSCRIPT (ALT-2 IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is a major tropical disease caused by mosquito born nematodes Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. Vaccine against filariasis must generate immunity to infective mosquito derived L3 stage. Two highly expressed genes designated abundant larval transcript-1 and -2 (alt-1 and alt-2. ALT-1 and ALT-2 represent closely related protein (79% it. Now, expression of this alt gene in E. coli BL21plysS for the production of vaccine is major challenge as no vaccine is available against this disease. Work was carried out to express this protein at laboratory scale bioreactor. At first optimization of different parameter like suitability of media, inducer concentration, induction time was done for getting maximum amount of recombinant protein. In shake flask studies, after induction (max cell density and max specific growth rate stage good expression of ALT-2 protein was found. However, at laboratory scale production done in bioreactor, expression level drastically decreased. Plasmid stability analysis was done in reactor and was found to be cause for decreased productivity. The stability was improved by increasing antibiotic concentration in the medium and also by pulsing antibiotic during induction. This led to better plasmid stability and increased expression levels in reactor similar to expression levels in shake flask studies.

  17. Spectrophotometric and Refractometric Determination of Total Protein in Avian Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Căpriță

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the total protein values obtained in heparin plasma of chickens by a spectrophotometric technique (biuret method, and the values obtained on the same day in the same samples by refractometry. The results obtained by refractometry (average value 2.638±0.153g% were higher than those obtained by the spectrophotometric method (average value 2.441±0.181g%. There was a low correlation (r = 0.6709 between the total protein values, determined with both methods. Protein is the major determinant of plasma refractive index, but glucose contributes too. The refractometric method is not recommended in chickens for the determination of total protein, because avian blood glucose concentration averages about twice than in mammalian blood.

  18. [Determination of plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin with ultrafiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue-Ying; Wang, Wei; Tan, Ri-Qiu; Dou, De-Qiang

    2013-02-01

    To determine the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin. The ultrafiltration combined with HPLC was employed to determine the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin as well as rat plasma and healthy human plasma proteins. The plasma protein binding rate of arctiin with rat plasma at the concentrations of 64. 29, 32.14, 16.07 mg x L(-1) were (71.2 +/- 2.0)%, (73.4 +/- 0.61)%, (78.2 +/- 1.9)%, respectively; while the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin with healthy human plasma at the above concentrations were (64.8 +/- 3.1)%, (64.5 +/- 2.5)%, (77.5 +/- 1.7)%, respectively. The plasma protein binding rate of arctigenin with rat plasma at the concentrations of 77.42, 38.71, 19.36 mg x L(-1) were (96.7 +/- 0.41)%, (96.8 +/- 1.6)%, (97.3 +/- 0.46)%, respectively; while the plasma protein binding rate of arctigenin with normal human plasma at the above concentrations were (94.7 +/- 3.1)%, (96.8 +/- 1.6)%, (97.9 +/- 1.3)%, respectively. The binding rate of arctiin with rat plasma protein was moderate, which is slightly higher than the binding rate of arctiin with healthy human plasma protein. The plasma protein binding rates of arctigenin with both rat plasma and healthy human plasma are very high.

  19. Red blood cell morphology and plasma proteins electrophoresis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-04

    Jul 4, 2007 ... (Mateo et al., 1984, Canfield and Shea, 1988; Cannon et al., 1996; Alleman et al., 1992; Sevinç et al., 2000;. Sevinç and Ugˇurta, 2001). Plasma protein electropho- resis (Gicking et al., 2004) which has been proposed for use in reptile and amphibian medicine to aid in the diagnosis of disease (Zaias and ...

  20. Plasma Proteins Of Barbus holubi and Clarias Gariepinus (Teleostei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plasma proteins of the teleosts, Barbus holubi and Clarias gariepinus were investigated by means of cellulose-acetate and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Characteristic patterns were obtained with both methods for each species. It was found that the application of human nomenclature to the patterns obtained in ...

  1. Plasma proteins production and excretion in diabetic nephropathy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    Plasma proteins,. Diabetic nephropathy,. Diabetes mellitus. ABSTRACT. Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of cardiovascular mortality in both developed and developing countries. In type II diabetes patients with normoalbuminuria, fibrinogen production is increased, ...

  2. Association of plasma protein C levels and coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies have shown the risk factor causes of coronary heart disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that plasma protein C level might be used as a biomarker for coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction. The study included 60 men that were classified into 3 groups according to clinical examination; ...

  3. Tight junction protein gene expression patterns and changes in transcript abundance during development of model fish gill epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Dennis; Chasiotis, Helen; Kelly, Scott P

    2014-05-15

    In vertebrates, tight junction (TJ) proteins play an important role in epithelium formation and development, the maintenance of tissue integrity and regulation of TJ permeability. In this study, primary cultured model gill epithelia composed of pavement cells (PVCs) were used to examine TJ protein transcript abundance during the development of epithelium confluence and epithelium resistive properties. Differences in TJ protein expression patterns and transcript abundance between gill models composed of PVCs and models composed of PVCs and mitochondrion-rich cells (MRCs) were also examined. Marked alterations in TJ protein transcript abundance were observed as cells developed to confluence in flask-cultured model gill epithelia. In contrast, during the formation of tissue resistance in insert-cultured epithelia (i.e. epithelia cultured on a permeable substrate), changes in TJ protein mRNA abundance were conservative, despite paracellular marker flux decreasing by orders of magnitude. In both cases significant changes in claudin-8b, -8d, -27b, -28b and -32a transcript abundance were observed, suggesting that temporal alterations in the abundance of these genes are important end points of model gill epithelium integrity. When MRCs were present in cultured gill models, the mRNA abundance of several TJ proteins significantly altered and claudin-10c, -10d and -33b were only detected in preparations that included MRCs. These data provide insight into the role of select TJ proteins in the formation and development of gill epithelia and the maintenance of gill barrier properties. In addition, observations reveal a heterogeneous distribution of claudin TJ proteins in the gill epithelial cells of rainbow trout. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5–6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5–6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  5. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development.

  6. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass and phospholipid transfer protein activity are associated with leptin in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, R. P. F.; de Vries, R.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; van Tol, A.; Sluiter, W. J.

    Adipose tissue contributes to plasma levels of lipid transfer proteins and is also the major source of plasma adipokines. We hypothesized that plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass, phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity and cholesteryl ester transfer (CET, a measure of CETP

  7. Comparative proteome analysis of egg yolk plasma proteins during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Qiu, Ning; Liu, Yaping; Ma, Meihu

    2017-06-01

    Physical changes such as chicken egg white thinning and egg yolk flattening occur during storage, implying a decline in egg quality. To reveal the deteriorative process related to chicken egg internal quality, a comparative proteomic method was used in this study to analyze the alterations in egg yolk plasma proteins at different storage times (0, 20 and 40 days) under an ambient temperature of 22 ± 2 °C. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry, 33 protein spots representing 12 proteins were identified with significant (P albumin, vitellogenin fragments, IgY chains, ovalbumin, ovoinhibitor, α 2 -macroglobulin-like protein 1-like, hemopexin, transthyretin, apolipoprotein A-I and β 2 -glycoprotein I precursor. Accelerating degradation for most egg yolk plasma proteins was observed after prolonged storage (from day 20 to day 40). It is likely that the increased degradation of protease inhibitors such as ovoinhibitor and α 2 -macroglobulin-like protein 1-like during prolonged storage lead to an imbalance of protease and antiprotease in egg yolk, which may play a key role in the degradation of egg yolk proteins. These findings will provide an insight into the effects of storage on egg yolk protein changes and give a deeper understanding of the deteriorative process of chicken egg yolk. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Prediction of colorectal cancer diagnosis based on circulating plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surinova, Silvia; Choi, Meena; Tao, Sha; Schüffler, Peter J; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Vysloužil, Kamil; Khoylou, Marta; Srovnal, Josef; Liu, Yansheng; Matondo, Mariette; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Weisser, Hendrik; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hajdúch, Marián; Brenner, Hermann; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-09-01

    Non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer with blood-based markers is a critical clinical need. Here we describe a phased mass spectrometry-based approach for the discovery, screening, and validation of circulating protein biomarkers with diagnostic value. Initially, we profiled human primary tumor tissue epithelia and characterized about 300 secreted and cell surface candidate glycoproteins. These candidates were then screened in patient systemic circulation to identify detectable candidates in blood plasma. An 88-plex targeting method was established to systematically monitor these proteins in two large and independent cohorts of plasma samples, which generated quantitative clinical datasets at an unprecedented scale. The data were deployed to develop and evaluate a five-protein biomarker signature for colorectal cancer detection. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Identification of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor/CD163 as a natural soluble protein in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Peterslund, Niels Anker; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2002-01-01

    The hemoglobin scavenger receptor (HbSR/CD163) is an interleukin-6- and glucocorticoid-regulated macrophage/monocyte receptor for uptake of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes. Moreover, there are strong indications that HbSR serves an anti-inflammatory function. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting...... enabled identification of a soluble plasma form of HbSR (sHbSR) having an electrophoretic mobility equal to that of recombinant HbSR consisting of the extracellular domain (scavenger receptor cysteine-rich 1-9). A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established and used to measure the s...... a level of sHbSR above the range of healthy persons. Patients with myelomonocytic leukemias and pneumonia/sepsis exhibited the highest levels (up to 67.3 mg/L). In conclusion, sHbSR is an abundant plasma protein potentially valuable in monitoring patients with infections and myelomonocytic leukemia....

  10. Adsorption of proteins from plasma at polyester non-wovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomp, A J; Engbers, G H; Mol, J; Terlingen, J G; Feijen, J

    1999-07-01

    Polyester non-wovens in filters for the removal of leukocytes from platelet concentrates (PCs) must be platelet compatible. In PC filtration, the adsorption of proteins at the plasma-non-woven interface can be of great importance with respect to the yield of platelets. Unmodified and radio frequency glow discharge (RFGD) treated poly(ethylene terephthalate) non-woven (NW-PET) and two commercial surface-modified non-wovens were contacted with human plasma. Protein desorption by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The desorbed proteins were characterized by gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Compared to the commercial surface-modified non-wovens, unmodified and RFGD-treated NW-PETs adsorbed a relatively high amount of protein. Significantly more protein was removed from the hydrophobic NW-PET by SDS than from the hydrophilic RFGD-treated non-wovens. RFGD treatment of NW-PET reduces the reversibility of protein adsorption. Less albumin and fibrinogen were removed from the RFGD-treated non-wovens than from NW-PET. In addition, a large amount of histidine-rich glycoprotein was removed from RFGD-treated non-wovens, but not from NW-PET. The different behaviour of RFGFD-treated non-wovens towards protein adsorption is probably caused by differences in the chemical reactivity of the non-woven surfaces.

  11. Disproportional changes in hematocrit, plasma volume, and proteins during exercise and bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L.

    1972-01-01

    The interrelationships between the changes in plasma volume, hematocrit, and plasma proteins during muscular exercise and bed rest were investigated. Proportionally, the changes in hematocrit are always smaller than the changes in plasma volume. For this reason changes in the concentration of blood constituents can only be quantitated on the basis of plasma volume changes. During short periods of intensive exercise, there was a small loss of plasma proteins. With prolonged submaximal exercise there was a net gain in plasma protein, which contributes to stabilization of the vascular volume. Prolonged bed rest induced hypoproteinemia; this loss of plasma protein probably plays an important role in recumbency hypovolemia.

  12. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  13. Haptoglobin-related protein is a high-affinity hemoglobin-binding plasma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Petersen, Steen Vang; Jacobsen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a primate-specific plasma protein associated with apolipoprotein L-I (apoL-I)-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles shown to be a part of the innate immune defense. Despite the assumption hitherto that Hpr does not bind to hemoglobin, the present...

  14. QSAR models for the prediction of plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafourian, Taravat; Amin, Zeshan

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb) is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationships (QSAR) for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group) and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART), Boosted trees and Random Forest. Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  15. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Separomics applied to the proteomics and peptidomics of low-abundance proteins: choice of methods and challenges - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Baracat-Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enrichment and isolation of proteins are considered limiting steps in proteomic studies. Identification of proteins whose expression is transient, those that are of low-abundance, and of natural peptides not described in databases, is still a great challenge. Plant extracts are in general complex, and contaminants interfere with the identification of proteins involved in important physiological processes, such as plant defense against pathogens. This review discusses the challenges and strategies of separomics applied to the identification of low-abundance proteins and peptides in plants, especially in plants challenged by pathogens. Separomics is described as a group of methodological strategies for the separation of protein molecules for proteomics. Several tools have been used to remove highly abundant proteins from samples and also non-protein contaminants. The use of chromatographic techniques, the partition of the proteome into subproteomes, and an effort to isolate proteins in their native form have allowed the isolation and identification of rare proteins involved in different processes.

  17. Absolute Quantification of Protein and mRNA Abundances Demonstrate Variability in GeneSpecific Translation Efficiency in Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Sanchez, Benjamin J.; Smialowska, Agata

    2017-01-01

    environmental conditions and protein turnover for 1,384 proteins under a reference condition. The overall correlation between mRNA and protein abundances across all conditions was low (0.46), but for differentially expressed proteins (n = 202), the median mRNA-protein correlation was 0.88. We used these data...... analysis further showed that only mitochondrial fluxes were positively associated with changes at the transcript level. The present dataset represents a crucial expansion to the current resources for future studies on yeast physiology....

  18. Cell responses only partially shape cell-to-cell variations in protein abundances in Escherichia coli chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Vieland, Veronica J; Das, Jayajit

    2013-11-12

    Cell-to-cell variations in protein abundance in clonal cell populations are ubiquitous in living systems. Because protein composition determines responses in individual cells, it stands to reason that the variations themselves are subject to selective pressures. However, the functional role of these cell-to-cell differences is not well understood. One way to tackle questions regarding relationships between form and function is to perturb the form (e.g., change the protein abundances) and observe the resulting changes in some function. Here, we take on the form-function relationship from the inverse perspective, asking instead what specific constraints on cell-to-cell variations in protein abundance are imposed by a given functional phenotype. We develop a maximum entropy-based approach to posing questions of this type and illustrate the method by application to the well-characterized chemotactic response in Escherichia coli. We find that full determination of observed cell-to-cell variations in protein abundances is not inherent in chemotaxis itself but, in fact, appears to be jointly imposed by the chemotaxis program in conjunction with other factors (e.g., the protein synthesis machinery and/or additional nonchemotactic cell functions, such as cell metabolism). These results illustrate the power of maximum entropy as a tool for the investigation of relationships between biological form and function.

  19. Effect of paracetamol on the plasma protein binding of quinine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to investigate if the co-administration of quinine and paracetamol could have an effect on the protein binding of quinine. Exactly 5ml of plasma contained in a dialysis sack was placed into 20ml of varying concentrations (2 -10µg/ml) of test sample at 37oC. 2ml of the dialysate was basified with ...

  20. Use of refractometry for determination of psittacine plasma protein concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated both poor and good correlation of total protein concentrations in various avian species using refractometry and biuret methodologies. The purpose of the current study was to compare these 2 techniques of total protein determination using plasma samples from several psittacine species and to determine the effect of cholesterol and other solutes on refractometry results. Total protein concentration in heparinized plasma samples without visible lipemia was analyzed by refractometry and an automated biuret method on a dry reagent analyzer (Ortho 250). Cholesterol, glucose, and uric acid concentrations were measured using the same analyzer. Results were compared using Deming regression analysis, Bland-Altman bias plots, and Spearman's rank correlation. Correlation coefficients (r) for total protein results by refractometry and biuret methods were 0.49 in African grey parrots (n=28), 0.77 in Amazon parrots (20), 0.57 in cockatiels (20), 0.73 in cockatoos (36), 0.86 in conures (20), and 0.93 in macaws (38) (PMethod and species-specific reference intervals should be used in the interpretation of total protein values.

  1. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Inefficient quality control of thermosensitive proteins on the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolded proteins are generally recognised by cellular quality control machinery, which typically results in their ubiquitination and degradation. For soluble cytoplasmic proteins, degradation is mediated by the proteasome. Membrane proteins that fail to fold correctly are subject to ER associated degradation (ERAD, which involves their extraction from the membrane and subsequent proteasome-dependent destruction. Proteins with abnormal transmembrane domains can also be recognised in the Golgi or endosomal system and targeted for destruction in the vacuole/lysosome. It is much less clear what happens to membrane proteins that reach their destination, such as the cell surface, and then suffer damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have tested the ability of yeast cells to degrade membrane proteins to which temperature-sensitive cytoplasmic alleles of the Ura3 protein or of phage lambda repressor have been fused. In soluble form, these proteins are rapidly degraded upon temperature shift, in part due to the action of the Doa10 and San1 ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome. When tethered to the ER protein Use1, they are also degraded. However, when tethered to a plasma membrane protein such as Sso1 they escape degradation, either in the vacuole or by the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Membrane proteins with a misfolded cytoplasmic domain appear not to be efficiently recognised and degraded once they have escaped the ER, even though their defective domains are exposed to the cytoplasm and potentially to cytoplasmic quality controls. Membrane tethering may provide a way to reduce degradation of unstable proteins.

  3. Glycotope sharing between snail hemolymph and larval schistosomes: larval transformation products alter shared glycan patterns of plasma proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P Yoshino

    Full Text Available Recent evidence supports the involvement of inducible, highly diverse lectin-like recognition molecules in snail hemocyte-mediated responses to larval Schistosoma mansoni. Because host lectins likely are involved in initial parasite recognition, we sought to identify specific carbohydrate structures (glycans shared between larval S. mansoni and its host Biomphalaria glabrata to address possible mechanisms of immune avoidance through mimicry of elements associated with the host immunoreactivity. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mABs to specific S. mansoni glycans was used to identify the distribution and abundance of shared glycan epitopes (glycotopes on plasma glycoproteins from B. glabrata strains that differ in their susceptibilities to infection by S. mansoni. In addition, a major aim of this study was to determine if larval transformation products (LTPs could bind to plasma proteins, and thereby alter the glycotopes exposed on plasma proteins in a snail strain-specific fashion. Plasma fractions ( 100 kDa from susceptible (NMRI and resistant (BS-90 snail strains were subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses using mAB to LacdiNAc (LDN, fucosylated LDN variants, Lewis X and trimannosyl core glycans. Results confirmed a high degree of glycan sharing, with NMRI plasma exhibiting a greater distribution/abundance of LDN, F-LDN and F-LDN-F than BS-90 plasma ( 100 kDa fraction. Our data suggest that differential binding of S. mansoni LTPs to plasma proteins of susceptible and resistant B. glabrata strains may significantly impact early anti-larval immune reactivity, and in turn, compatibility, in this parasite-host system.

  4. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.R. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wu, B. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, H.Y. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xie, P. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-09-08

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Processes of plasma protein N-homocysteinylation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, A; Bełtowski, J; Bartosik-Psujek, H; Wójcicka, G; Rejdak, K

    2017-08-01

    Homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) is a cyclic thioester of homocysteine (Hcy) contributing to the toxicity of this amino acid. HTL spontaneously reacts with protein lysine residues leading to altered properties of target proteins and induction of immune response. HTL is hydrolyzed to Hcy by plasma enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Although both Hcy and PON1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), protein modification by HTL in this disease has not been studied so far. Purpose/Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the level of Hcy, HTL and autoantibodies against N-homocysteinylated proteins as well as PON1 activity in patients with MS. The studies were performed in 61 MS patients with relapsing-remitting (RR group, n = 25) and secondary-progressive type of MS (SP group, n = 36), and in healthy people (C - control group, n = 44). Homocysteine level was significantly higher in MS patients comparing to control group (C vs. RR p < 0.01; C vs. SP p < 0.05). The level of HTL tended to be higher in RR-MS in comparison to control group, but it did not reach the level of significance. The level of antibodies against N-homocysteinylated proteins did not differ significantly between studied groups. PON1 activity was significantly lower in SP type of MS (SP vs. C p < 0.05; SP vs. RR p < 0.05). Although plasma Hcy concentration is higher in MS patients and PON1 activity is reduced in the SP form, MS is associated with minor or no changes in protein-attached HTL and anti-homocysteinylated protein immune response.

  7. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...... recognised role for PAPP-A in ageing and in the development of age-related disease. PAPP-A is a secreted metalloproteinase that cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Ervinas Gaidamauskas studied the mechanism of IGF-modulated proteolysis of IGFBPs by PAPP-A and the structural...... determinants for cleavage. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), he also analysed the intermodular structural organisation of the C-terminal domain of PAPP-A involved in substrate binding. Detailed knowledge of interactions between PAPP-A and its substrates is required to understand the modulatory role...

  8. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsuan Chang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490-535 and PARS-II (aa 590-650, and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50.

  9. Intravenous delivery of hydrophobin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles: stability, plasma protein adsorption and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarparanta, Mirkka; Bimbo, Luis M; Rytkönen, Jussi; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo J; Laaksonen, Päivi; Nyman, Markus; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2012-03-05

    Rapid immune recognition and subsequent elimination from the circulation hampers the use of many nanomaterials as carriers to targeted drug delivery and controlled release in the intravenous route. Here, we report the effect of a functional self-assembled protein coating on the intravenous biodistribution of (18)F-labeled thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles in rats. (18)F-Radiolabeling enables the sensitive and easy quantification of nanoparticles in tissues using radiometric methods and allows imaging of the nanoparticle biodistribution with positron emission tomography. Coating with Trichoderma reesei HFBII altered the hydrophobicity of (18)F-THCPSi nanoparticles and resulted in a pronounced change in the degree of plasma protein adsorption to the nanoparticle surface in vitro. The HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles were biocompatible in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HepG2 liver cells making their intravenous administration feasible. In vivo, the distribution of the nanoparticles between the liver and spleen, the major mononuclear phagocyte system organs in the body, was altered compared to that of uncoated (18)F-THCPSi. Identification of the adsorbed proteins revealed that certain opsonins and apolipoproteins are enriched in HFBII-functionalized nanoparticles, whereas the adsorption of abundant plasma components such as serum albumin and fibrinogen is decreased.

  10. Temporal course of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A in angioplasty-treated ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients and potential significance of concomitant heparin administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian J; Oxvig, Claus; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a putative plaque instability marker. In acute coronary syndromes, the disrupted culprit plaque contains abundant PAPP-A, and circulating PAPP-A levels predict clinical outcomes. Determinants of circulating PAPP-A levels, however, are not fully...

  11. QSAR Models for the Prediction of Plasma Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshan Amin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure – Activity Relationships (QSAR for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Methods: Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART, Boosted trees and Random Forest. Results: Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Conclusion: Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  12. Deep-Dive Targeted Quantification for Ultrasensitive Analysis of Proteins in Nondepleted Human Blood Plasma/Serum and Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Song [Biological Sciences Division; Shi, Tujin [Biological Sciences Division; Fillmore, Thomas L. [Biological Sciences Division; Schepmoes, Athena A. [Biological Sciences Division; Brewer, Heather [Biological Sciences Division; Gao, Yuqian [Biological Sciences Division; Song, Ehwang [Biological Sciences Division; Wang, Hui [Biological Sciences Division; Rodland, Karin D. [Biological Sciences Division; Qian, Wei-Jun [Biological Sciences Division; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division; Liu, Tao [Biological Sciences Division

    2017-08-11

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics (e.g., selected reaction monitoring, SRM) is emerging as an attractive alternative to immunoassays for protein quantification. Recently we have made significant progress in SRM sensitivity for enabling quantification of low ng/mL to sub-ng/mL level proteins in nondepleted human blood plasma/serum without affinity enrichment. However, precise quantification of extremely low abundant but biologically important proteins (e.g., ≤100 pg/mL in blood plasma/serum) using targeted proteomics approaches still remains challenging. To address this need, we have developed an antibody-independent Deep-Dive SRM (DD-SRM) approach that capitalizes on multidimensional high-resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) separation for target peptide enrichment combined with precise selection of target peptide fractions of interest, significantly improving SRM sensitivity by ~5 orders of magnitude when compared to conventional LC-SRM. Application of DD-SRM to human serum and tissue has been demonstrated to enable precise quantification of endogenous proteins at ~10 pg/mL level in nondepleted serum and at <10 copies per cell level in tissue. Thus, DD-SRM holds great promise for precisely measuring extremely low abundance proteins or protein modifications, especially when high-quality antibody is not available.

  13. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple...... in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented...... for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples....

  14. Changes in total plasma content of electrolytes and proteins with maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Strand, J. C.; Petrofsky, J. S.; Hipskind, S. G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    To determine to what extent the increases in concentration of plasma proteins and electrolytes with short maximal work were a result of hemoconcentration, the changes in plasma volume and total content of the plasma constituents were simultaneously evaluated. The results obtained from six human subjects indicated that in comparison to preexercise values there was a net decrease in total content of plasma protein, sodium, and chloride in the first 2 min of the postexercise period, due primarily to a significant loss (13-15%) of plasma fluid. The total plasma potassium content was increased immediately after exercise but was significantly below the preexercise plasma content after 2 min of recovery.

  15. Highly abundant defense proteins in human sweat as revealed by targeted proteomics and label free quantification mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csősz, Éva; Emri, Gabriella; Kalló, Gergő; Tsaprailis, George; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The healthy human skin with its effective antimicrobial defense system forms an efficient barrier against invading pathogens. There is evidence suggesting that the composition of this chemical barrier varies between diseases, making the easily-collected sweat an ideal candidate for biomarker discoveries. OBJECTIVE Our aim was to provide information about the normal composition of the sweat, and to study the chemical barrier found at the surface of skin. METHODS Sweat samples from healthy individuals were collected during sauna bathing, and the global protein panel was analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry. SRM-based targeted proteomic methods were designed and stable isotope labeled reference peptides were used for method validation. RESULTS 95 sweat proteins were identified, 20 of them were novel proteins. It was shown that dermcidin is the most abundant sweat protein, and along with apolipoprotein D, clusterin, prolactin inducible protein and serum albumin, they make up 91% of secreted sweat proteins. The roles of these highly abundant proteins were reviewed; all of which have protective functions, highlighting the importance of sweat glands in composing the first line of innate immune defense system, and maintaining the epidermal barrier integrity. CONCLUSION Our findings in regards to the proteins forming the chemical barrier of the skin as determined by label free quantification and targeted proteomics methods are in accordance with previous studies, and can be further used as a starting point for non-invasive sweat biomarker research. PMID:26307449

  16. Ribosome abundance regulates the recovery of skeletal muscle protein mass upon recuperation from postnatal undernutrition in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A; Sosa, Horacio A; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Estrada, Irma; Fleischmann, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Nutritionally-induced growth faltering in the perinatal period has been associated with reduced adult skeletal muscle mass; however, the mechanisms responsible for this are unclear. To identify the factors that determine the recuperative capacity of muscle mass, we studied offspring of FVB mouse dams fed a protein-restricted diet during gestation (GLP) or pups suckled from postnatal day 1 (PN1) to PN11 (E-UN), or PN11 to PN22 (L-UN) on protein-restricted or control dams. All pups were refed under control conditions following the episode of undernutrition. Before refeeding, and 2, 7 and 21 days later, muscle protein synthesis was measured in vivo. There were no long-term deficits in protein mass in GLP and E-UN offspring, but in L-UN offspring muscle protein mass remained significantly smaller even after 18 months (P < 0.001). E-UN differed from L-UN offspring by their capacity to upregulate postprandial muscle protein synthesis when refed (P < 0.001), a difference that was attributable to a transient increase in ribosomal abundance, i.e. translational capacity, in E-UN offspring (P < 0.05); translational efficiency was similar across dietary treatments. The postprandial phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases were similar among treatments. However, activation of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 via mTOR (P < 0.02), and total upstream binding factor abundance were significantly greater in E-UN than L-UN offspring (P < 0.02). The results indicate that the capacity of muscles to recover following perinatal undernutrition depends on developmental age as this establishes whether ribosome abundance can be enhanced sufficiently to promote the protein synthesis rates required to accelerate protein deposition for catch-up growth. PMID:25239457

  17. Dataset of proteins mapped on HepG2 cells and those differentially abundant after expression of the dengue non-structural 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Kíssila; Trugilho, Monique R O; Costa, Simone M; Ferreira, André T S; Carvalho, Paulo C; Perales, Jonas; Alves, Ada M B

    2017-02-01

    The data supplied in this article are related to the research article entitled "The effect of the dengue non-structural 1 protein expression over the HepG2 cell proteins in a proteomic approach" (K. Rabelo, M.R. Trugillo, S.M. Costa, B.A. Pereira, O.C. Moreira, A.T. Ferreira et al., 2016) [1]. The present article provides the inventory of peptides and proteins mapped in a hepatocyte cell line (HepG2) by mass spectrometry in the presence of the non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of Dengue 2 virus (DENV2). Cells were transfected with pcENS1 plasmid, which encodes the DENV2 NS1 protein, or the controls pcDNA3 (negative control) or pMAXGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), a protein unrelated to dengue. Differentially abundant protein lists were obtained by comparing cells transfected with pcENS1 and controls.

  18. Drug-plasma protein binding assay by electrokinetic chromatography-frontal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Yasushi; Miwa, Toshinobu; Asakawa, Naoki

    2002-03-01

    We developed a rapid, microscale and reliable analytical method for binding of drugs to plasma proteins using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with ionic cyclodextrins (CD) combined with frontal analysis. These CDs were used as pseudostationary phases of electrokinetic chromatography (EKC). The CD-modified EKC (CDEKC) approach allowed us to separate anionic drugs from plasma proteins, whereas CZE could not separate these drugs from plasma proteins because they had a similar mobility like plasma proteins. CDs uniquely interact with these drugs but not with plasma proteins. Therefore, CDEKC could be coupled with frontal analysis to measure the binding of anionic drugs to plasma proteins. The binding values obtained by CDEKC were highly consistent with those determined by the ultrafiltration method. Our CDEKC approach should expand the applicability of CE to protein binding analysis.

  19. Optimizing High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for the Identification of Low-Abundance Post-Translational Modifications of Intact Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Kilpatrick, Eric L

    2017-09-01

    Intact protein analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is now possible due to the improved capabilities of mass spectrometers yielding greater resolution, mass accuracy, and extended mass ranges. Concurrent measurement of post-translational modifications (PTMs) during LC-MS of intact proteins is advantageous while monitoring critical proteoform status, such as for clinical samples or during production of reference materials. However, difficulties exist for PTM identification when the protein is large or contains multiple modification sites. In this work, analyses of low-abundance proteoforms of proteins of clinical or therapeutic interest, including C-reactive protein, vitamin D-binding protein, transferrin, and immunoglobulin G (NISTmAb), were performed on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. This work investigated the effect of various instrument parameters including source temperatures, in-source CID, microscan type and quantity, resolution, and automatic gain control on spectral quality. The signal-to-noise ratio was found to be a suitable spectral attribute which facilitated identification of low abundance PTMs. Source temperature and CID voltage were found to require specific optimization for each protein. This study identifies key instrumental parameters requiring optimization for improved detection of a variety of PTMs by LC-MS and establishes a methodological framework to ensure robust proteoform identifications, the first step in their ultimate quantification.

  20. Serum Copper and Plasma Protein Status in Normal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nushrat Noor, Nasim Jahan, Nayma Sultana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Gradual alteration of serum copper and some plasma protein levels may occur with advancement of pregnancy, which is associated with increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality.Objective: To observe serum copper and plasma protein levels in normal pregnant women of different trimesters in order to find out their nutritional status.Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College (SSMC, Dhaka, between 1st January 2010 and December 2010. Ninety normal pregnant women of different trimesters with age 20-30 years were included in the study group. They were selected from Out Patient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, SSMC. Age matched 30 non-pregnant women were taken as control. Serum copper level was measured by Spectrophotometric method, serum total protein and albumin levels were estimated by standard method. Statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA, Bonferroni and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test as applicable.Results: Serum Cu levels were significantly higher in all trimesters of pregnant women compared to control. Again, this value was significantly higher in 3rd trimester than that of in 1st and 2nd trimester and also in 2nd trimester than that of in 1st trimester. In addition, mean serum total protein level was significantly lower in 3rd trimester than control but no statistically significant difference was observed among different trimesters. Again, mean serum albumin level was significantly lower in 2nd and 3rd trimester than 1st trimester and control. In addition, serum Cu concentration showed significant positive correlation with different trimesters of gestation.Conclusion: This study reveals that hypercupremia along with hypoproteinemia occur in pregnant women from 1st to 3rd trimester of gestation. This gradual alteration of micro and macronutrients become more profound with advancement of pregnancy.

  1. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donohue-Rolfe Arthur

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1 causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1 in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Results Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate, including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA, OM lipoproteins (NlpD, chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release

  2. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntumalla, Srilatha; Zhang, Quanshun; Braisted, John C; Fleischmann, Robert D; Peterson, Scott N; Donohue-Rolfe, Arthur; Tzipori, Saul; Pieper, Rembert

    2011-06-24

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures) and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets) was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate), including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM) proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome) contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA) and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB) indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB) implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB) were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA), OM lipoproteins (NlpD), chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB) and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp) were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins) required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release of bacteria into the host cell

  3. A Plasma α-Tocopherome Can Be Identified from Proteins Associated with Vitamin E Status in School-Aged Children of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Keith P; Cole, Robert N; Shrestha, Sudeep; Schulze, Kerry J; Lee, Sun Eun; Betz, Joshua; Nonyane, Bareng As; Wu, Lee S-F; Yager, James D; Groopman, John D; Christian, Parul

    2015-12-01

    The term vitamin E describes a family of 8 vitamers, 1 of which is α-tocopherol, that is essential for human health. Vitamin E status remains largely unknown in low-income countries because of the complexity and cost of measurement. Quantitative proteomics may offer an approach for identifying plasma proteins for assessing vitamin E status in these populations. To improve options for vitamin E status assessment, we sought to detect and quantify a set of plasma proteins associated with α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations in a cohort of 500 rural Nepalese children aged 6-8 y and, based on nutrient-protein associations, to predict the prevalence of vitamin E deficiency (α-tocopherol Plasma α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma aliquots were depleted of 6 high-abundance proteins, digested with trypsin, labeled with isobaric mass tags, and assessed for relative protein abundance by tandem mass spectrometry. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the association between α-tocopherol status and relative protein abundance and to predict deficiency. We quantified 982 plasma proteins in >10% of all child samples, of which 119 correlated with α-tocopherol (false discovery rate, q Proteins were primarily involved in lipid transport, coagulation, repair, innate host defenses, neural function, and homeostasis. Six proteins [apolipoprotein (apo)C-III; apoB; pyruvate kinase, muscle; forkhead box 04; unc5 homolog C; and regulator of G-protein signaling 8] explained 71% of the variability in plasma α-tocopherol, predicting an in-sample population prevalence of vitamin E deficiency of 51.4% (95% CI: 46.4%, 56.3%) compared with a measured prevalence of 54.8%. Plasma γ-tocopherol was associated with 12 proteins (q plasma α-tocopherome from which 6 proteins predicted the prevalence of vitamin E deficiency. The findings illustrate that protein biomarkers, once absolutely quantified, can potentially predict

  4. Pathogen reduction of fresh plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: effects on plasma coagulation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Valerie S; Drummond, Olive; Morrison, Alex; McMillan, Loraine; MacGregor, Ian R; Prowse, Chris V

    2009-10-01

    Treatment with riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light reduces the pathogens present in blood components. This study assessed changes to the coagulation proteins that had occurred during this treatment of fresh plasma units before freezing. Twenty fresh plasma units (230 +/- 30 mL) were treated by the Mirasol process (CaridianBCT Biotechnologies) and frozen within 8 hours of donation. Plasma units were combined with 35 mL of a 500 micromol/L riboflavin solution in an illumination bag to achieve a final concentration of approximately 60 micromol/L riboflavin. The bag was placed in the Mirasol illuminator and exposed to UV light (6.24 J/mL). Samples were frozen before and after treatment. Recoveries observed were 67.7 +/- 3.9% Factor (F)XI, 68.5 +/- 3.3% FVIII:C, 78.8 +/- 4.5% fibrinogen, 78.9 +/- 4.1% FV, 79.0 +/- 4.2% FVII, 79.0 +/- 8.6% F IX, 79.7 +/- 2.6% FX, and 85.0 +/- 3.7% FII. Von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen, VWF:ristocetin cofactor, and ADAMTS13 recoveries were 87.0 +/- 7.1, 85.5 +/- 6.6, and 73.3 +/- 15.2%, respectively, while that of protein C was 83.6 +/- 2.6%. A loss of high-molecular-weight VWF multimers was observed in most units. Recoveries for protein S, antithrombin, and plasmin inhibitor were greater than 90%. The mean FVIII:C concentration, after treatment, was 0.76 +/- 0.17 IU/mL. As with other pathogen reduction technologies, the Mirasol process resulted in some loss of coagulation factor activity. For most Mirasol-treated units and for most of the tested factors this is unlikely to have clinical impact, but trials are required to demonstrate this.

  5. In vitro, in silico and integrated strategies for the estimation of plasma protein binding. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinidis, George; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2015-06-23

    Plasma protein binding (PPB) strongly affects drug distribution and pharmacokinetic behavior with consequences in overall pharmacological action. Extended plasma protein binding may be associated with drug safety issues and several adverse effects, like low clearance, low brain penetration, drug-drug interactions, loss of efficacy, while influencing the fate of enantiomers and diastereoisomers by stereoselective binding within the body. Therefore in holistic drug design approaches, where ADME(T) properties are considered in parallel with target affinity, considerable efforts are focused in early estimation of PPB mainly in regard to human serum albumin (HSA), which is the most abundant and most important plasma protein. The second critical serum protein α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), although often underscored, plays also an important and complicated role in clinical therapy and thus the last years it has been studied thoroughly too. In the present review, after an overview of the principles of HSA and AGP binding as well as the structure topology of the proteins, the current trends and perspectives in the field of PPB predictions are presented and discussed considering both HSA and AGP binding. Since however for the latter protein systematic studies have started only the last years, the review focuses mainly to HSA. One part of the review highlights the challenge to develop rapid techniques for HSA and AGP binding simulation and their performance in assessment of PPB. The second part focuses on in silico approaches to predict HSA and AGP binding, analyzing and evaluating structure-based and ligand-based methods, as well as combination of both methods in the aim to exploit the different information and overcome the limitations of each individual approach. Ligand-based methods use the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) methodology to establish quantitate models for the prediction of binding constants from molecular descriptors, while they provide

  6. Depletion of Plasma Albumin for Proteomic Analysis of Bothrops jararaca Snake Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    de Morais-Zani, Karen; Grego, Kathleen Fernandes; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita Mitico

    2011-01-01

    The proteomic analysis of plasma samples represents a challenge as a result of the presence of highly abundant proteins such as albumin. To enable the detection of biomarkers, which are commonly low-abundance proteins, in complex blood fluids, it is necessary to remove high-abundance proteins efficiently. Moreover, there is a range of about 10 orders of magnitude for the abundance of different protein species in serum. Here, we describe for the first time a study of reptilian albumin depletio...

  7. Simulating the influence of plasma protein on measured receptor affinity in biochemical assays reveals the utility of Schild analysis for estimating compound affinity for plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, D; Sykes, D A; Ensor, P; Bertran, E; Aston, P J; Charlton, S J

    2015-11-01

    Plasma protein binding (PPB) influences the free fraction of drug available to bind to its target and is therefore an important consideration in drug discovery. While traditional methods for assessing PPB (e.g. rapid equilibrium dialysis) are suitable for comparing compounds with relatively weak PPB, they are not able to accurately discriminate between highly bound compounds (typically >99.5%). The aim of the present work was to use mathematical modelling to explore the potential utility of receptor binding and cellular functional assays to estimate the affinity of compounds for plasma proteins. Plasma proteins are routinely added to in vitro assays, so a secondary goal was to investigate the effect of plasma proteins on observed ligand-receptor interactions. Using the principle of conservation of mass and the law of mass action, a cubic equation was derived describing the ligand-receptor complex [LR] in the presence of plasma protein at equilibrium. The model demonstrates the profound influence of PPB on in vitro assays and identifies the utility of Schild analysis, which is usually applied to determine receptor-antagonist affinities, for calculating affinity at plasma proteins (termed KP ). We have also extended this analysis to functional effects using operational modelling and demonstrate that these approaches can also be applied to cell-based assay systems. These mathematical models can potentially be used in conjunction with experimental data to estimate drug-plasma protein affinities in the earliest phases of drug discovery programmes. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Differential effects of insulin deprivation and systemic insulin treatment on plasma protein synthesis in type 1 diabetic people

    OpenAIRE

    Jaleel, Abdul; Klaus, Katherine A.; Morse, Dawn M.; Karakelides, Helen; Ward, Lawrence E.; Irving, Brian A.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2009-01-01

    It remains to be determined whether systemic insulin replacement normalizes synthesis rates of different plasma proteins and whether there are differential effects on various plasma proteins. We tested a hypothesis that insulin deprivation differentially affects individual plasma protein synthesis and that systemic insulin treatment may not normalize synthesis of all plasma proteins. We measured synthesis rates of 41 plasma proteins in seven each of type 1 diabetic (T1DM) and nondiabetic part...

  9. SPAK and OSR1 Sensitive Cell Membrane Protein Abundance and Activity of KCNQ1/E1 K+ Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Elvira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: KCNQ1/E1 channels are expressed in diverse tissues and serve a variety of functions including endolymph secretion in the inner ear, cardiac repolarization, epithelial transport and cell volume regulation. Kinases involved in regulation of epithelial transport and cell volume include SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1, which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys] kinases. The present study explored whether KCNQ1/E1 channels are regulated by SPAK and/or OSR1. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNQ1/E1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, WNK insensitive T233ASPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1, WNK insensitive T185AOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp and KCNQ1/E1 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing chemiluminescence of KCNQ1/E1 containing an extracellular Flag tag epitope (KCNQ1-Flag/E1. Results: KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly enhanced by wild-type SPAK and T233ESPAK, but not by T233ASPAK and D212ASPAK. Similarly, KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly increased by wild-type OSR1 and T185EOSR1, but not by T185AOSR1 and D164AOSR1. Conclusions: SPAK and OSR1 participate in the regulation of KCNQ1/E1 protein abundance and activity.

  10. SPAK and OSR1 Sensitive Cell Membrane Protein Abundance and Activity of KCNQ1/E1 K+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Bernat; Warsi, Jamshed; Fezai, Myriam; Munoz, Carlos; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    KCNQ1/E1 channels are expressed in diverse tissues and serve a variety of functions including endolymph secretion in the inner ear, cardiac repolarization, epithelial transport and cell volume regulation. Kinases involved in regulation of epithelial transport and cell volume include SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1), which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys]) kinases. The present study explored whether KCNQ1/E1 channels are regulated by SPAK and/or OSR1. cRNA encoding KCNQ1/E1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, WNK insensitive T233ASPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1, WNK insensitive T185AOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp and KCNQ1/E1 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing chemiluminescence of KCNQ1/E1 containing an extracellular Flag tag epitope (KCNQ1-Flag/E1). KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly enhanced by wild-type SPAK and T233ESPAK, but not by T233ASPAK and D212ASPAK. Similarly, KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly increased by wild-type OSR1 and T185EOSR1, but not by T185AOSR1 and D164AOSR1. SPAK and OSR1 participate in the regulation of KCNQ1/E1 protein abundance and activity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Determination of chicken and turkey plasma and serum protein concentrations by refractometry and the biuret method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, C B; Latimer, K S; Kircher, I M; Brown, J

    1989-01-01

    Plasma and serum protein concentrations were determined in chickens and turkeys by refractometry (with human and veterinary refractometers) and by the biuret method. Chicken and turkey serum protein values were significantly lower than respective plasma protein values according to both methods. Refractometer readings for both plasma and serum correlated closely with the results of the biuret test (r2 = 0.72 to 0.97). These findings indicate that plasma and serum protein values may be determined accurately in chickens and turkeys with a handheld refractometer.

  12. Profiling of serum and tissue high abundance acute-phase proteins of patients with epithelial and germ line ovarian carcinoma

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    Abdul-Rahman Puteri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute-phase response involves the simultaneous altered expression of serum proteins in association to inflammation, infection, injury or malignancy. Studies of the acute-phase response usually involve determination of the levels of individual acute-phase serum proteins. In the present study, the acute-phase response of patients with epithelial (EOCa and germ-line (GOCa ovarian carcinoma was investigated using the gel-based proteomic approach, a technique which allowed the simultaneous assessment of the levels of the acute-phase serum high abundance proteins. Data obtained were validated using ELISA and immunostaining of biopsy samples. Results Enhanced expression of clusterin (CLU, α1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin and leucine rich glycoprotein was detected in all patients. However, the levels of α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT was only enhanced in EOCa patients, while patients with GOCa were typically characterized by elevated levels of ceruloplasmin but lower levels of α2-HS glycoprotein. The enhanced expression of CLU in EOCa and GOCa patients and up-regulated expression of ACT specifically in EOCa patients were confirmed by ELISA. Immunohistochemical staining of biopsy samples of EOCa and GOCa patients demonstrated correlation of the acute-phase protein expression. Conclusion Patients with EOCa and GOCa demonstrated distinctive aberrant expression of serum and tissue high abundance acute-phase proteins compared to negative control women.

  13. A high confidence, manually validated human blood plasma protein reference set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schenk, Susann; Schoenhals, Gary J; de Souza, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The immense diagnostic potential of human plasma has prompted great interest and effort in cataloging its contents, exemplified by the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Plasma Proteome Project (PPP) pilot project. Due to challenges in obtaining a reliable blood plasma protein list...... the full diagnostic potential of blood plasma, we feel that there is still a need for an ultra-high confidence reference list (at least 99% confidence) of blood plasma proteins. METHODS: To address the complexity and dynamic protein concentration range of the plasma proteome, we employed a linear ion...... consecutive stages of tandem mass spectrometry (MS3). The combination of MS3 with very high mass accuracy in the parent peptide allows peptide identification with orders of magnitude more confidence than that typically achieved. RESULTS: Herein we established a high confidence set of 697 blood plasma proteins...

  14. Development stage-specific proteomic profiling uncovers small, lineage specific proteins most abundant in the Aspergillus Fumigatus conidial proteome

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    Suh Moo-Jin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent infectious cause of death in severely immunocompromised individuals such as leukemia and bone marrow transplant patients. Germination of inhaled conidia (asexual spores in the host is critical for the initiation of infection, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this process. Results To gain insights into early germination events and facilitate the identification of potential stage-specific biomarkers and vaccine candidates, we have used quantitative shotgun proteomics to elucidate patterns of protein abundance changes during early fungal development. Four different stages were examined: dormant conidia, isotropically expanding conidia, hyphae in which germ tube emergence has just begun, and pre-septation hyphae. To enrich for glycan-linked cell wall proteins we used an alkaline cell extraction method. Shotgun proteomic resulted in the identification of 375 unique gene products with high confidence, with no evidence for enrichment of cell wall-immobilized and secreted proteins. The most interesting discovery was the identification of 52 proteins enriched in dormant conidia including 28 proteins that have never been detected in the A. fumigatus conidial proteome such as signaling protein Pil1, chaperones BipA and calnexin, and transcription factor HapB. Additionally we found many small, Aspergillus specific proteins of unknown function including 17 hypothetical proteins. Thus, the most abundant protein, Grg1 (AFUA_5G14210, was also one of the smallest proteins detected in this study (M.W. 7,367. Among previously characterized proteins were melanin pigment and pseurotin A biosynthesis enzymes, histones H3 and H4.1, and other proteins involved in conidiation and response to oxidative or hypoxic stress. In contrast, expanding conidia, hyphae with early germ tubes, and pre-septation hyphae samples were enriched for proteins responsible for

  15. Quantitative analysis of plasma proteins in whole blood-derived fresh frozen plasma prepared with three pathogen reduction technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea, Luis; Ortiz-de-Salazar, María-Isabel; Martínez, Patricia; Roig, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Several plasma pathogen reduction technologies (PRT) are currently available. We evaluated three plasma PRT processes: Cerus Amotosalen (AM), Terumo BCT riboflavin (RB) and Macopharma methylene blue (MB). RB treatment resulted in the shortest overall processing time and in the smallest volume loss (1%) and MB treatment in the largest volume loss (8%). MB treatment retained the highest concentrations of factors II, VII, X, IX, Protein C, and Antithrombin and the AM products of factor V and XI. Each PRT process evaluated offered distinct advantages such as procedural simplicity and volume retention (RB) and overall plasma protein retention (MB). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation of Low Abundance Proteins and Cells Using Buoyant Glass Microbubble Chromatography

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    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional protein affinity chromatography relies on highly porous resins that have large surface areas. These properties are ideal for fast flow separation of proteins from biological samples with maximum yields, but these properties can also lead to increased nonspecific protein binding. In certain applications where the purity of an isolated protein is more important than the yield, using a glass solid phase could be advantageous as glass is nonporous and hydrophilic and has a low surface area and low nonspecific protein binding. As a proof of principle, we used protein A-conjugated hollow glass microbubbles to isolate fluorescently labeled neurofilament heavy chain spiked into serum and compared them to protein A Sepharose and protein A magnetic beads (Dynabeads using an anti-neurofilament protein antibody. As expected, a greater volume of glass bubbles was required to match the binding capacity of the magnetic beads and Sepharose resins. On the other hand, nonspecific protein binding to glass bubbles was greatly reduced compared to the other resins. Additionally, since the glass bubbles are buoyant and transparent, they are well suited for isolating cells from biological samples and staining them in situ.

  17. Application of an Improved Proteomics Method for Abundant Protein Cleanup: Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms Study in Plant Defense*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2013-01-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  18. Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.

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    Eric D Merkley

    Full Text Available The rapid pace of bacterial evolution enables organisms to adapt to the laboratory environment with repeated passage and thus diverge from naturally-occurring environmental ("wild" strains. Distinguishing wild and laboratory strains is clearly important for biodefense and bioforensics; however, DNA sequence data alone has thus far not provided a clear signature, perhaps due to lack of understanding of how diverse genome changes lead to convergent phenotypes, difficulty in detecting certain types of mutations, or perhaps because some adaptive modifications are epigenetic. Monitoring protein abundance, a molecular measure of phenotype, can overcome some of these difficulties. We have assembled a collection of Yersinia pestis proteomics datasets from our own published and unpublished work, and from a proteomics data archive, and demonstrated that protein abundance data can clearly distinguish laboratory-adapted from wild. We developed a lasso logistic regression classifier that uses binary (presence/absence or quantitative protein abundance measures to predict whether a sample is laboratory-adapted or wild that proved to be ~98% accurate, as judged by replicated 10-fold cross-validation. Protein features selected by the classifier accord well with our previous study of laboratory adaptation in Y. pestis. The input data was derived from a variety of unrelated experiments and contained significant confounding variables. We show that the classifier is robust with respect to these variables. The methodology is able to discover signatures for laboratory facility and culture medium that are largely independent of the signature of laboratory adaptation. Going beyond our previous laboratory evolution study, this work suggests that proteomic differences between laboratory-adapted and wild Y. pestis are general, potentially pointing to a process that could apply to other species as well. Additionally, we show that proteomics datasets (even archived data

  19. Studies on the interaction of lidocaine with plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adotey, J.

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to quantitate lidocaine's interaction with alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), human serum albumin (HSA), and AAG in the presence of HSA, and to determine the extent of displacement of lidocaine from its binding site(s) by selected cardiovascular drugs (dipyridamole, disopyramide and quinidine). Since the limited experimental work reported in this area has involved the use of a single lidocaine concentration, this study involved the evaluation of a range of lidocaine concentrations. Lidocaine interaction with plasma proteins (AAG and HSA) was studied at 37/sup 0/C using an isothermal equilibrium dialysis system and /sup 14/C-lidocaine HCl. A dialysis membrane (M.W. cutoff 12,000 to 14,000) separated the two chambers of each dialysis cell. The extent of /sup 14/C-lidocaine dialysis was studied with respect to both drug and protein concentrations. Aliquots of each chamber of each of the cells were subjected to liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analyses for /sup 14/C-lidocaine. The ratio of bound to free (R/F) lidocaine was evaluated as a function of AAG concentration from the LSC data. Scatchard and/or Rosenthal analyses were employed to evaluate n and k values where appropriate. Linear and multiple linear regression analyses of the data were appropriately performed.

  20. Ultrasensitive Quantitation of Plasma Membrane Proteins via isRTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tao; Wang, Bei; Shi, Liu; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xiang, Yang; Anzai, Jun-Ichi; Li, Genxi

    2017-10-17

    Quantitation of plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) is fundamental and frequently performed daily in the lab. However, challenged by the inherent/interacting heterostructures and complex surroundings of the PMPs in lipid membrane, quantitative techniques for PMP often require complex treatments (e.g., labeling, isolation, purification, and determination), and the sensitivity is usually not satisfactory. To address this problem, we have proposed a novel method that enables quantitation of PMPs with extremely high sensitivity, in an easier-to-manipulate and more streamlined way. This method is based on the design of an in situ rolling cycling replication-templated amplification strategy (isRTA). In fact, two rounds of DNA cascade isothermal amplifications have been conducted. The first round of amplification can provide templates for the second round of amplification; thus, significant enhancement of quantitative signals can be achieved. In this way, PMPs are quantified with ultrahigh sensitivity; as few as 25 copies of PMPs can be detected per cell. Moreover, the advantages of isRTA have been demonstrated by simultaneous identification of several PMP biomarkers (MUC1, EpCAM, and HER2) that are expressed over a wide distribution range on breast cancer cells. The precise typing of breast cancer cell subsets is thus possible because of the "quantitative-to-qualitative" strategy. Therefore, the unprecedented sensitivity and high usability of the isRTA method may present significant prospects for delving into membrane proteins and their related biofunctions in many research fields.

  1. Recombinant antibodies generated from both clonal and less abundant plasma cell immunoglobulin G sequences in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brain are directed against measles virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Mark P; Caldas, Yupanqui A; Keays, Kathryne M; Yu, Xiaoli; Gilden, Donald H; Owens, Gregory P

    2012-01-01

    Increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) and intrathecally produced oligoclonal bands (OGBs) are characteristic of a limited number of inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases and are often directed against the cause of disease. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), the cause of disease and the target of the oligoclonal response is measles virus (MV). The authors previously showed that clonally expanded populations of CD38+ plasma cells in SSPE brain, the likely source of OGBs, are directed against MV. In characterizing the breadth of the plasma cell reactivities, the authors found that a large proportion of the less abundant plasma cells are also directed against MV. The intrathecal response may be useful in determining the causes of other inflammatory CNS diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Behcet’s disease, and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:17065133

  2. Different altered stage correlative expression of high abundance acute-phase proteins in sera of patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Boon-Kiong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general enhanced expression of α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT, clusterin (CLU, α1-antitrypsin (AAT, haptoglobin β-chain (HAP, and leucine rich glycoprotein (LRG in the sera of patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOCa was recently reported. In the present study, we compared the expression of the serum acute-phase proteins (APPs in the patients according to their stages of cancer. Results Different altered stage correlative expression of the high abundance serum APPs was demonstrated in sera of the patients studied. While the expression of ACT, HAP and AAT appeared to demonstrate positive correlation with the three initial stages of the cancer, inverse correlation was apparently detected in the expression of LRG and CLU. For patients who were diagnosed with stage IV of the cancer, expression of the serum APPs did not conform to the altered progression changes. Conclusion Our results highlight the potential prognostic significance of selective high abundance serum APPs in patients with EOCa.

  3. Blood plasma proteins and protein fractions in roe deer Capreolus capreolus L.

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    Dorota CYGAN-SZCZEGIELNIAK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to investigate some selected biochemical blood parameters in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.. The experiment covered 15 from 2 to 3-year-old bucks from Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship. The animals were shot by individual hunters on the shooting grounds during the hunting season of 2008/2009 (in the accordance with the Journal of Laws No 48. The material for the research was blood plasma obtained after centrifuging full, nonhemolyzed blood. The blood was collected from the zygomatic vein directly to the test tubes with EDTA and transported in cooling conditions to the laboratory. After transporting the samples of blood to a certified analytical laboratory, the following elements of the obtained blood plasma were examined: ceruloplasmin . using turbidimetric method; transferrin . using immunoturbimetric method; troponin- using a third generation assay on an Elecsys; total protein, albumin, globulin . using spectrophotometric method and total iron . using colorimetric method. The results were statistically analyzed, i.e. the correlation between the parameters was measured by means of Pearsonfs correlation coefficient. The analysis of the results revealed a number of statistically significant relations between the parameters under the investigation, especially among the compounds directly responsible for metabolism of iron and copper. A statistically important positive correlation was observed between ceruloplasmin and ferritin (r = 0.563; P.0.05 and a negative one between transferrin and troponin (r = -0.609; P.0.05. Moreover, the content of transferrin . an iron-binding protein . was 0.17 g/l, while the concentration of iron was 58 ƒĘmol/l. The content of ceruloplasmin . a protein responsible for metabolism of copper . was very low (0.036 g/l. The level of proteins in the blood plasma of the animals under the research was approximately 72 g/l, with the share of albumins about 46%. The albumin-globulin ratio was 0.86.

  4. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, B Anne; Sheridan, Paul O; Harris, Hugh M B; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P; O'Toole, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28). The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  5. Isolation and characterization of multiple abundant lipid transfer protein isoforms in developing sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ah Mi; Lee, Saet Buyl; Cho, Sung Ho; Hwang, Inhwan; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Suh, Mi Chung

    2008-02-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is an important oilseed crop; approximately 50% of the seed dry weight is storage oil. In a previous report, developing sesame seed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) revealed that ESTs encoding lipid transfer protein (LTPs) were one of the most abundant groups of sesame ESTs. LTP functions in the transfer of wax or cutin monomers and in the defense response against pathogen attack. To study the biological role of the abundant LTP isoforms in developing seeds, 122 ESTs out of 3328 sesame ESTs were analyzed against Arabidopsis and rice proteome databases. LTP fraction, which was partially purified from developing sesame seeds, actively transferred fluorescent phospholipids and bound to fatty acids. Full-length cDNAs of five out of 21 LTP isoforms were isolated and named SiLTP1-SiLTP5. The predicted amino acid sequences of the five SiLTPs harbor typical characteristics of LTPs, including conserved arrangement of cysteine residues. Northern blot analysis revealed that the five SiLTP isoforms were most abundantly expressed in developing seeds, but were also detected in flower tissues. Also, SiLTP3 and SiLTP4 transcripts were expressed in leaves and seed-pot walls, respectively. In addition, SiLTP2 and SiLTP4 transcripts were significantly induced in 6-day-old sesame seedlings by application of NaCl, mannitol, and abscisic acid (ABA). Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that SiLTP1 and SiLTP2 were secreted by different pathways. Taken together, the abundant LTPs in developing sesame seeds are involved in lipid transfer into the extracellular matrix. Possible biological roles of SiLTPs related to organ-specific expression and abiotic stresses are discussed.

  6. A novel in vivo method to quantify slit diaphragm protein abundance in murine proteinuric kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Haase

    Full Text Available Injury of the glomerular filter causes proteinuria by disrupting the sensitive interplay of the glomerular protein network. To date, studies of the expression and trafficking of glomerular proteins have been mostly limited to in vitro or histologic studies. Here, we report a novel in vivo biotinylation assay that allows the quantification of surface expression of glomerular proteins in mice. Kidneys were perfused in situ with biotin before harvest. Afterwards glomeruli were isolated and lyzed. The protein of interest was separated by immunoprecipitation and the amount of surface-expressed protein was quantified by Western blot analysis with streptavidin staining. As proof-of-concept, we examined the presence of nephrin in the slit diaphragm in two well-established murine models of proteinuric kidney disease: nephrotoxic nephritis and adriamycin nephropathy. In proteinuric animals, significantly less nephrin was detected in the slit diaphragm. When proteinuria decreased once again during the course of disease, the amount of surface nephrin returned to the baseline. Our present results suggest that our assay is a valuable tool to study the glomerular filter in proteinuric kidney diseases. Note that the assay is not limited to proteins expressed in the slit diaphragm, and all surface proteins that are accessible to biotin perfusion and immunoprecipitation qualify for this analysis.

  7. An odorant-binding protein is abundantly expressed in the nose and in the seminal fluid of the rabbit.

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    Rosa Mastrogiacomo

    Full Text Available We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers "urinary" and "salivary" and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3 expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose.

  8. One-step non-chromatography purification of a low abundant fucosylated protein from complex plant crude extract

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    Lindsay Arnold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective methods for isolation and purification of glycoproteins and other glycoconjugates are important to biopharmaceutical industry and diagnostic industry. They are also critical to an emerging field of glycoproteomics. In this work, we applied the newly-developed affinity ligand, a fusion protein of elastic like polymer (ELP and a bacterial lectin, in an affinity precipitation process to purify soybean peroxidase (SBP based on the presence of fucoseon the protein surface. We addressed, in particular, the challenge of purifying a low abundant protein from a complex dilute crude plant extract. The novel affinity precipitation developed in this work was very promising. One step binding and precipitation resulted in >95% recovery yield directly from crude extract and a 22.7 fold purification, giving a specific activity of 420 U/mg. The SBP isolated using this affinity precipitation meets or exceeds the quality specifications of reagent grade products by Sigma. We showed that the recovery yield had a strong dependence on the molar ratio of ligand to target fucosylated protein, with a ratio of three giving nearly full recovery, which could be predicted based on the total fucose content per protein molecule and the number of binding site per ligand molecule. We additionally developed a method of ligand regeneration and investigated its reuse. A simple wash with pH buffer was shown to be effective to regenerate the binding capacity for the ligand, and the ligand could be used for 10 times, giving an averaged 80% isolation yield based on initial input of soybean peroxidase. Taken together, an effective method of affinity precipitation was developed, which could be used to enrich a low abundant target glycoprotein from a complex mixture with a high recovery yield. The high selectivity for fucosylated protein and its ease of operation make this method particularly useful for purification of low abundant glycoprotein from natural sources. This work

  9. Mapping of 79 loci for 83 plasma protein biomarkers in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard; Fauman, Eric; Sabater-Lleal, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in highly multiplexed immunoassays have allowed systematic large-scale measurement of hundreds of plasma proteins in large cohort studies. In combination with genotyping, such studies offer the prospect to 1) identify mechanisms involved with regulation of protein expression...... in plasma, and 2) determine whether the plasma proteins are likely to be causally implicated in disease. We report here the results of genome-wide association (GWA) studies of 83 proteins considered relevant to cardiovascular disease (CVD), measured in 3,394 individuals with multiple CVD risk factors. We...... drug targets....

  10. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann S Dufour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage.

  11. A strategy of plasma protein quantitation by selective reaction monitoring of an intact protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qin C; Rodila, Ramona; Gage, Eric M; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol A

    2003-12-15

    Immunoassays are used extensively in the quantitative analysis of proteins in plasma, urine, and other biological matrixes to support preclinical and clinical studies. Although immunoassays are both sensitive and rapid, difficulties during development of these assays are compounded by the need to have a specific antibody or antigen to the protein of interest. Furthermore, calibration curves of immunoassays are inherently nonlinear, and the technique often detects many structurally related components in addition to the analyte of interest. We have developed a novel strategy of analyzing protein concentrations in plasma by utilizing 96-well solid-phase extraction and LC-MS/MS detection of the intact protein. This strategy has been successfully applied in method development and assay validation of quantitatively analyzing protein rK5 concentrations in monkey plasma samples. Additional techniques such as precolumn regeneration and column heating were also incorporated into the assay. Total run time for each sample was approximately 15 min. An LLOQ of 99.2 ng/mL from a sample volume of 50 microL, corresponding to only 380 fmol (3.97 ng) of the rK5 analyte being injected onto the analytical column (assuming 100% extraction recovery), was obtained. The validated linear dynamic range was between 99.2 and 52 920.0 ng/mL, with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) ranging from 0.9972 and 0.9994. The intraassay CV for this assay was between 0.6 and 3.8%, and the interassay CV was between 1.7 and 3.2%. Interassay mean accuracies were between 101.5 and 104.7%. The assay has proven rugged and specific and has been employed to generate data in support of preclinical studies. This strategy for rK5 assay could be used for the development of bioanalytical assays to provide preclinical and clinical support for other protein drug candidates and, furthermore, for the validation of biomarkers discovered from proteomic research.

  12. Plasma protein carbonyl responses to anaerobic exercise in female cyclists

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    M.E Afzalpour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single bouts of aerobic exercise may leads to oxidative stress due to the use of oxygen for metabolism and the generation of reactive oxygen. In athletes, oxidative stress can lead to several deleterious performance effects, such as muscular oxidative damage, muscle soreness, loss of skeletal muscle force production and/or inflammation. However, little is known regarding the severity and duration of oxidative stress arising from intensive anaerobic modes of exercise in aerobically-trained athletes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single bout of intensive anaerobic exercise on plasma protein carbonyl (PC in aerobically-trained women. Aerobically-trained, provincial female cyclists [n = 18, age: 24.2±2.7 years; stature: 163.6±4.6 cm; body mass: 53.4±4.2 kg] were randomly assigned into either a non-exercising control (CON; n = 9 or experimental (EXP; n = 9 group that underwent a 30-second anaerobic (Wingate cycle ergometer exercise session. Blood sampling took place before exercise, immediately after the exercise (IE, and 24 hours following the exercise (24HR bout. In the EXP, results indicated significant (P ≤ 0.05 differences in PC levels between the pre-test and IE (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0149±0.0420 mmol/milt; P = 0.010, and IE and 24HR (0.0149±0.0420 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.013. No significant differences were observed between pre-test and 24HR (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.371. These results indicate that oxidative protein damage, as indicated by PC levels, rises immediately with the onset of anaerobic exercise, but returns to resting levels within 24 hours following exercise in aerobically-trained women.

  13. Functional and structural diversities of C-reactive proteins present in horseshoe crab hemolymph plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, D; Osaki, T; Mizunoe, Y; Wai, S N; Iwanaga, S; Kawabata, S

    1999-09-01

    Limulin, a sialic-acid-binding and phosphorylethanolamine-binding hemagglutinin in the hemolymph plasma of the American horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus), is a hemolytic C-reactive protein [Armstrong, P.B., Swarnakar, S., Srimal, S., Misquith, S., Hahn, E.A., Aimes, R. T. & Quigley, J.P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 14717-14721]. We have now identified three types of C-reactive protein in the plasma of the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus), based on different affinities against fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose determined by quantitative precipitin assays using fetuin and an artificial phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate. Partial amino acid sequences of the isolated C-reactive proteins identified homologous proteins which were named Tachypleus tridentatus CRP-1 (tCRP-1), tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, each of which possibly constitute isoprotein mixtures. tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, but not tCRP-1, agglutinated mammalian erythrocytes. tCRP-1, the most abundant C-reative protein in the plasma, exhibited the highest affinity to the phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate but lacked both sialic-acid-binding and hemolytic activities. tCRP-2 bound to both fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent hemolytic and sialic-acid-binding activities, suggestive of limulin-like properties. Furthermore, tCRP-2 exhibited a higher affinity to colominic acid, a bacterial polysialic acid. By contrast, tCRP-3 shows stronger hemolytic, sialic-acid-binding and hemagglutinating activities than tCRP-2. tCRP-3 has no affinity to phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate and colominic acid. This suggests tCRP-3 is a novel hemolytic C-reactive protein lacking a common characteristic of phosphorylethanolamine-agarose binding affinity. Twenty-two clones of tCRPs with different deduced amino acid sequences were obtained by PCR using oligonucleotide primers based on the N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of t

  14. Rupturing Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles to Form Micron-sized Supported Cell Plasma Membranes with Native Transmembrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chieh; Tanady, Kevin; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2017-11-09

    Being able to directly obtain micron-sized cell blebs, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), with native membrane proteins and deposit them on a planar support to form supported plasma membranes could allow the membrane proteins to be studied by various surface analytical tools in native-like bilayer environments. However, GPMVs do not easily rupture on conventional supports because of their high protein and cholesterol contents. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of using compression generated by the air-water interface to efficiently rupture GPMVs to form micron-sized supported membranes with native plasma membrane proteins. We demonstrated that not only lipid but also a native transmembrane protein in HeLa cells, Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), is mobile in the supported membrane platform. This convenient method for generating micron-sized supported membrane patches with mobile native transmembrane proteins could not only facilitate the study of membrane proteins by surface analytical tools, but could also enable us to use native membrane proteins for bio-sensing applications.

  15. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  16. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Mammad Oglu Rashydov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986 and Fukushima (2011. The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  17. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  18. A simple microfluidic platform to study age-dependent protein abundance and localization changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Margarita Cabrera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae divides asymmetrically, with a smaller daughter cell emerging from its larger mother cell. While the daughter lineage is immortal, mother cells age with each cell division and have a finite lifespan. The replicative ageing of the yeast mother cell has been used as a model to study the ageing of mitotically active human cells. Several microfluidic platforms, which use fluid flow to selectively remove daughter cells, have recently been developed that can monitor cell physiology as mother cells age. However, these platforms are not trivial to set up and users often require many hours of training. In this study, we have developed a simple system, which combines a commercially available microfluidic platform (the CellASIC ONIX Microfluidic Platform and a genetic tool to prevent the proliferation of daughter cells (the Mother Enrichment Program, to monitor protein abundance and localization changes during approximately the first half of the yeast replicative lifespan. We validated our system by observing known age-dependent changes, such as decreased Sir2 abundance, and have identified a protein with a previously unknown age-dependent change in localization.

  19. Natural carbon isotope abundance of plasma metabolites and liver tissue differs between diabetic and non-diabetic Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

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    Jean-Philippe Godin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 'You are what you eat' is an accurate summary for humans and animals when it comes to carbon isotope abundance. In biological material, natural(13C/(12C ratio is subject to minute variations due to diet composition (mainly from ingestion of C3 and C4 metabolism plants and to the discrimination between 'light' and 'heavy' isotopes during biochemical reactions (isotope effects and isotopic fractionation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carbon isotopic abundance was measured in ZDF (fa/+ and ZDF (fa/fa, (lean and obese-diabetic rats respectively fed the same diet. By analysing plasma metabolites (glucose and non-esterified fatty acids, breath and liver tissue by high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry, we demonstrate for the first time statistically distinguishable metabolic carbon isotope abundance between ZDF (fa/+ and ZDF (fa/fa rats based on plasma glucose, palmitic, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic acids and bulk analysis of liver tissue (P<0.005 resulting into clear isotopic fingerprints using principal component analysis. We studied the variation of isotopic abundance between both groups for each metabolite and through the metabolic pathways using the precursor/product approach. We confirmed that lipids were depleted in (13C compared to glucose in both genotypes. We found that isotopic abundance of linoleic acid (C18: 2n-6, even though both groups had the same feed, differed significantly between both groups. The likely reason for these changes between ZDF (fa/+ and ZDF (fa/fa are metabolic dysregulation associated with various routing and fluxes of metabolites. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This work provides evidence that measurement of natural abundance isotope ratio of both bulk tissue and individual metabolites can provide meaningful information about metabolic changes either associated to phenotype or to genetic effects; irrespective of concentration. In the future measuring the natural abundance δ(13C of key metabolites

  20. Functional Regulation of the Plasma Protein Histidine-Rich Glycoprotein by Zn2+ in Settings of Tissue Injury

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    Kristin M. Priebatsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Divalent metal ions are essential nutrients for all living organisms and are commonly protein-bound where they perform important roles in protein structure and function. This regulatory control from metals is observed in the relatively abundant plasma protein histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, which displays preferential binding to the second most abundant transition element in human systems, Zinc (Zn2+. HRG has been proposed to interact with a large number of protein ligands and has been implicated in the regulation of various physiological and pathological processes including the formation of immune complexes, apoptotic/necrotic and pathogen clearance, cell adhesion, antimicrobial activity, angiogenesis, coagulation and fibrinolysis. Interestingly, these processes are often associated with sites of tissue injury or tumour growth, where the concentration and distribution of Zn2+ is known to vary. Changes in Zn2+ levels have been shown to modify HRG function by altering its affinity for certain ligands and/or providing protection against proteolytic disassembly by serine proteases. This review focuses on the molecular interplay between HRG and Zn2+, and how Zn2+ binding modifies HRG-ligand interactions to regulate function in different settings of tissue injury.

  1. Abundance and diversity of dockerin-containing proteins in the fiber-degrading rumen bacterium, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

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    Marco T Rincon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellulosome is a multi-enzyme machine, which plays a key role in the breakdown of plant cell walls in many anaerobic cellulose-degrading microorganisms. Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, a major fiber-degrading bacterium present in the gut of herbivores, has the most intricate cellulosomal organization thus far described. Cellulosome complexes are assembled through high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. More than two-hundred dockerin-containing proteins have been identified in the R. flavefaciens genome, yet the reason for the expansion of these crucial cellulosomal components is yet unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have explored the full spectrum of 222 dockerin-containing proteins potentially involved in the assembly of cellulosome-like complexes of R. flavefaciens. Bioinformatic analysis of the various dockerin modules showed distinctive conservation patterns within their two Ca(2+-binding repeats and their flanking regions. Thus, we established the conceptual framework for six major groups of dockerin types, according to their unique sequence features. Within this framework, the modular architecture of the parent proteins, some of which are multi-functional proteins, was evaluated together with their gene expression levels. Specific dockerin types were found to be associated with selected groups of functional components, such as carbohydrate-binding modules, numerous peptidases, and/or carbohydrate-active enzymes. In addition, members of other dockerin groups were linked to structural proteins, e.g., cohesin-containing proteins, belonging to the scaffoldins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report profiles the abundance and sequence diversity of the R. flavefaciens FD-1 dockerins, and provides the molecular basis for future understanding of the potential for a wide array of cohesin-dockerin specificities. Conserved differences between dockerins may be reflected in their stability, function or expression within

  2. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  3. Reduced Abundance and Subverted Functions of Proteins in Prion-Like Diseases: Gained Functions Fascinate but Lost Functions Affect Aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Phuoc, Kim; Leighton, Patricia L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Prions have served as pathfinders that reveal many aspects of proteostasis in neurons. The recent realization that several prominent neurodegenerative diseases spread via a prion-like mechanism illuminates new possibilities for diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus, key proteins in Alzheimer Disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including amyloid-β precursor protein, Tau and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), spread to adjacent cells in their misfolded aggregated forms and exhibit template-directed misfolding to induce further misfolding, disruptions to proteostasis and toxicity. Here we invert this comparison to ask what these prion-like diseases can teach us about the broad prion disease class, especially regarding the loss of these key proteins’ function(s) as they misfold and aggregate. We also consider whether functional amyloids might reveal a role for subverted protein function in neurodegenerative disease. Our synthesis identifies SOD1 as an exemplar of protein functions being lost during prion-like protein misfolding, because SOD1 is inherently unstable and loses function in its misfolded disease-associated form. This has under-appreciated parallels amongst the canonical prion diseases, wherein the normally folded prion protein, PrPC, is reduced in abundance in fatal familial insomnia patients and during the preclinical phase in animal models, apparently via proteostatic mechanisms. Thus while template-directed misfolding and infectious properties represent gain-of-function that fascinates proteostasis researchers and defines (is required for) the prion(-like) diseases, loss and subversion of the functions attributed to hallmark proteins in neurodegenerative disease needs to be integrated into design towards effective therapeutics. We propose experiments to uniquely test these ideas. PMID:29064456

  4. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  5. Preliminary study on plasma proteins in pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczubiał, Marek; Wawrzykowski, Jacek; Dąbrowski, Roman; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Kankofer, Marta

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we used a combined approach based on 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), difference in gel electrophoresis (DIGE), and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the plasma protein composition in pregnant female dogs and compared it with non-pregnant female dogs. We used the plasma samples obtained from four female dogs during I, II, and III thirds of pregnancy, three days after parturition, as well as from four non-pregnant female dogs in diestrus phase. Analysis of 2-DE gel image exhibited of 249 protein spots. The intensity of staining of 35 spots differed significantly (P proteins. Five identified protein spots, including zinc finger BED domain-containing protein 5, hemoglobin subunit beta-2, integrator complex subunit 7, apolipoprotein A-I, and glutamyl aminopeptidase were differentially presented in the plasma of pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the plasma protein profile of pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs. In this study, we identified proteins that have not been previously identified in dogs. Our findings showed that numerous protein spots were differentially presented in the plasma of female dogs during normal pregnancy. Although we identified only a limited number of differentially presented proteins, our study demonstrated that the plasma protein profile changed during pregnancy in female dogs, which suggests its importance in maintaining pregnancy. Further studies are necessary to define complete plasma protein profile of pregnant female dogs and to identify all proteins that are differentially presented in the pregnant animals compared with the non-pregnant ones. In addition, studies are warranted to explain the role of those proteins in maintaining the pregnancy and their usefulness in detection of early pregnancy. Furthermore, our results indicated that DIGE technique is useful in the comparison of samples originated from different states and time points in dogs. Copyright

  6. An attempt to understand kidney's protein handling function by comparing plasma and urine proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the help of proteomics technology, the human plasma and urine proteomes, which closely represent the protein compositions of the input and output of the kidney, respectively, have been profiled in much greater detail by different research teams. Many datasets have been accumulated to form "reference profiles" of the plasma and urine proteomes. Comparing these two proteomes may help us understand the protein handling aspect of kidney function in a way, however, which has been unavailable until the recent advances in proteomics technology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After removing secreted proteins downstream of the kidney, 2611 proteins in plasma and 1522 in urine were identified with high confidence and compared based on available proteomic data to generate three subproteomes, the plasma-only subproteome, the plasma-and-urine subproteome, and the urine-only subproteome, and they correspond to three groups of proteins that are handled in three different ways by the kidney. The available experimental molecular weights of the proteins in the three subproteomes were collected and analyzed. Since the functions of the overrepresented proteins in the plasma-and-urine subproteome are probably the major functions that can be routinely regulated by excretion from the kidney in physiological conditions, Gene Ontology term enrichment in the plasma-and-urine subproteome versus the whole plasma proteome was analyzed. Protease activity, calcium and growth factor binding proteins, and coagulation and immune response-related proteins were found to be enriched. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison method described in this paper provides an illustration of a new approach for studying organ functions with a proteomics methodology. Because of its distinctive input (plasma and output (urine, it is reasonable to predict that the kidney will be the first organ whose functions are further elucidated by proteomic methods in the near future. It

  7. LucTrap vectors are tools to generate luciferase fusions for the quantification of transcript and protein abundance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Kuhnle, Carola; Li, Hanbing; Rosso, Mario; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2006-05-01

    Proper plant growth and development strongly rely on the plant's ability to respond dynamically to signals and cues from the intra- and extracellular environment. Whereas many of these responses require specific changes at the level of gene expression, in recent years it has become increasingly clear that many plant responses are at least in part also controlled at the level of protein turnover. It is a challenge for signal transduction research to understand how distinct incoming signals are integrated to generate specific changes at the transcript or protein level. The activity of luciferase (LUC) reporters can be detected in nondestructive qualitative and quantitative assays in vivo. Therefore, LUC reporters are particularly well suited for the detection of changes at the transcript and protein level. To the best of our knowledge, the number of plant transformation vectors for LUC fusions is very limited. In this article, we describe the LucTrap plant transformation vectors that allow generation of targeted and random transcriptional and translational fusions with the modified firefly LUC reporter LUC+. We demonstrate that LucTrap-based fusions can be used to monitor rapid changes in gene expression and protein abundance in vivo.

  8. Proteomics analysis of vesicles isolated from plasma and urine of prostate cancer patients using a multiplex, aptamer-based protein array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Louise Welton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics analysis of biofluid-derived vesicles holds enormous potential for discovering non-invasive disease markers. Obtaining vesicles of sufficient quality and quantity for profiling studies has, however, been a major problem, as samples are often replete with co-isolated material that can interfere with the identification of genuine low abundance, vesicle components. Here, we used a combination of ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate and analyse vesicles of plasma or urine origin. We describe a sample-handling workflow that gives reproducible, quality vesicle isolations sufficient for subsequent protein profiling. Using a semi-quantitative aptamer-based protein array, we identified around 1,000 proteins, of which almost 400 were present at comparable quantities in plasma versus urine vesicles. Significant differences were, however, apparent with elements like HSP90, integrin αVβ5 and Contactin-1 more prevalent in urinary vesicles, while hepatocyte growth factor activator, prostate-specific antigen–antichymotrypsin complex and many others were more abundant in plasma vesicles. This was also applied to a small set of specimens collected from men with metastatic prostate cancer, highlighting several proteins with the potential to indicate treatment refractory disease. The study provides a practical platform for furthering protein profiling of vesicles in prostate cancer, and, hopefully, many other disease scenarios.

  9. Seminal plasma proteins regulate the association of lipids and proteins within detergent-resistant membrane domains of bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Julie; Frenette, Gilles; Sullivan, Robert

    2008-05-01

    Maturing spermatozoa acquire full fertilization competence by undergoing major changes in membrane fluidity and protein composition and localization. In epididymal spermatozoa, several proteins are associated with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains. These proteins dissociate from DRM in capacitated sperm cells, suggesting that DRM may play a role in the redistribution of integral and peripheral proteins in response to cholesterol removal. Since seminal plasma regulates sperm cell membrane fluidity, we hypothesized that seminal plasma factors could be involved in DRM disruption and redistribution of DRM-associated proteins. Our results indicate that: 1) the sperm-associated proteins, P25b and adenylate kinase 1, are linked to DRM of epididymal spermatozoa, but were exclusively associated with detergent-soluble material in ejaculated spermatozoa; 2) seminal plasma treatment of cauda epididymal spermatozoa significantly lowered the content of cholesterol and the ganglioside, GM1, in DRM; and 3), seminal plasma dissociates P25b from DRM in epididymal spermatozoa. We found that the seminal plasma protein, Niemann-Pick C2 protein, is involved in cholesterol and GM1 depletion within DRM, then leading to membrane redistribution of P25b that occurs in a very rapid and capacitation-independent manner. Together, these data suggest that DRM of ejaculated spermatozoa are reorganized by specific seminal plasma proteins, which induce lipid efflux as well as dissociation of DRM-anchored proteins. This process could be physiologically relevant in vivo to allow sperm survival and attachment within the female reproductive tract and to potentiate recognition, binding, and penetration of the oocyte.

  10. On the variability of the salting-out curves of proteins of normal human plasma and serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyn-Parvé, Elizabeth P.; Hout, A.J. van den

    1953-01-01

    Salting-out curves of proteins of normal human plasma reflect the influence of a number of other factors besides the protein composition: the manner of obtaining the blood, the nature of the anti-coagulant used, the non-protein components of the plasma. Diagrams of serum and plasma obtained from

  11. Identification of Central Nervous System Proteins in Human Blood Serum and Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Yu V; Petushkova, N A; Teryaeva, N B; Lisitsa, A V; Zgoda, V G; Belyaev, A Yu; Potapov, A A

    2015-11-01

    Mass-spectrometric identification of proteins in human blood plasma and serum was performed by comparing mass-spectra of fragmented peptides using Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB databases of amino acid sequences. After choosing the appropriate identification conditions we found that combination of spectrum search parameters are optimal for identification of CNS proteins. In the studied plasma and serum samples, 9 proteins involved into pathological processes in the nervous tissue were identified; 7 of them were identified in both plasma and serum.

  12. The AP2 clathrin adaptor protein complex regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garafalo, Steven D; Luth, Eric S; Moss, Benjamin J; Monteiro, Michael I; Malkin, Emily; Juo, Peter

    2015-05-15

    Regulation of glutamate receptor (GluR) abundance at synapses by clathrin-mediated endocytosis can control synaptic strength and plasticity. We take advantage of viable, null mutations in subunits of the clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex in Caenorhabditis elegans to characterize the in vivo role of AP2 in GluR trafficking. In contrast to our predictions for an endocytic adaptor, we found that levels of the GluR GLR-1 are decreased at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of animals with mutations in the AP2 subunits APM-2/μ2, APA-2/α, or APS-2/σ2. Rescue experiments indicate that APM-2/μ2 functions in glr-1-expressing interneurons and the mature nervous system to promote GLR-1 levels in the VNC. Genetic analyses suggest that APM-2/μ2 acts upstream of GLR-1 endocytosis in the VNC. Consistent with this, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of apm-2 mutants. However, GLR-1 does not appear to accumulate at the plasma membrane of the cell body as expected, but instead accumulates in intracellular compartments including Syntaxin-13- and RAB-14-labeled endosomes. This study reveals a novel role for the AP2 clathrin adaptor in promoting the abundance of GluRs at synapses in vivo, and implicates AP2 in the regulation of GluR trafficking at an early step in the secretory pathway. © 2015 Garafalo et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Meal composition and plasma amino acid ratios: Effect of various proteins or carbohydrates, and of various protein concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of meals containing various proteins and carbohydrates, and of those containing various proportions of protein (0 percent to 20 percent of a meal, by weight) or of carbohydrate (0 percent to 75 percent), on plasma levels of certain large neutral amino acids (LNAA) in rats previously fasted for 19 hours were examined. Also the plasma tryptophan ratios (the ratio of the plasma trytophan concentration to the summed concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids) and other plasma amino acid ratios were calculated. (The plasma tryptophan ratio has been shown to determine brain tryptophan levels and, thereby, to affect the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter serotonin). A meal containing 70 percent to 75 percent of an insulin-secreting carbohydrate (dextrose or dextrin) increased plasma insulin levels and the tryptophan ratio; those containing 0 percent or 25 percent carbohydrate failed to do so. Addition of as little as 5 percent casein to a 70 percent carbohydrate meal fully blocked the increase in the plasma tryptophan ratio without affecting the secretion of insulin - probably by contributing much larger quantities of the other LNAA than of tryptophan to the blood. Dietary proteins differed in their ability to suppress the carbohydrate-induced rise in the plasma tryptophan ratio. Addition of 10 percent casein, peanut meal, or gelatin fully blocked this increase, but lactalbumin failed to do so, and egg white did so only partially. (Consumption of the 10 percent gelatin meal also produced a major reduction in the plasma tyrosine ratio, and may thereby have affected brain tyrosine levels and catecholamine synthesis.) These observations suggest that serotonin-releasing neurons in brains of fasted rats are capable of distinguishing (by their metabolic effects) between meals poor in protein but rich in carbohydrates that elicit insulin secretion, and all other meals. The changes in brain serotonin caused by carbohydrate-rich, protein

  14. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA and independent (DIA mass spectrometric (MS workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3 of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014 [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964.

  15. Changes of proteins induced by anticoagulants can be more sensitively detected in urine than in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, MengLin; Zhao, MinDi; Gao, YouHe

    2014-07-01

    The most fundamental property of biomarkers is change. But changes are hard to maintain in plasma since it is strictly controlled by homeostatic mechanisms of the body. There is no homeostatic mechanism for urine. Besides, urine is partly a filtration of blood, and systematic information can be reflected in urine. We hypothesize that change of blood can be reflected in urine more sensitively. Here we introduce the interference into the blood by two anticoagulants heparin or argatroban. Plasma and urine proteins were profiled by LC-MS/MS and then validated by Western blot in totally six SD female rats before and after the drug treatments. In argatroban treated group, with exactly the same experimental procedure and the same cutoff value for both plasma and urine proteins, 62 proteins changed in urine, only one of which changed in plasma. In heparin treated group, 27 proteins changed in urine but only three other proteins changed in plasma. Both LC-MS/MS and Western blot analyses demonstrated drug-induced increases in transferrin and hemopexin levels in urine but not in plasma. Our data indicates that urine may serve as a source for more sensitive detection of protein biomarkers than plasma.

  16. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lineage 7 and Lineage 4 Strains Reveals Differentially Abundant Proteins Linked to Slow Growth and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon A. Yimer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to decipher the nature of the slowly growing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis lineage 7, the differentially abundant proteins in strains of M. tuberculosis lineage 7 and lineage 4 were defined. Comparative proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry was employed to identify, quantitate and compare the protein profiles of strains from the two M. tuberculosis lineages. Label-free peptide quantification of whole cells from M. tuberculosis lineage 7 and 4 yielded the identification of 2825 and 2541 proteins, respectively. A combined total of 2867 protein groups covering 71% of the predicted M. tuberculosis proteome were identified. The abundance of 125 proteins in M. tuberculosis lineage 7 and 4 strains was significantly altered. Notably, the analysis showed that a number of M. tuberculosis proteins involved in growth and virulence were less abundant in lineage 7 strains compared to lineage 4. Five ABC transporter proteins, three phosphate binding proteins essential for inorganic phosphate uptake, and six components of the type 7 secretion system ESX-3 involved in iron acquisition were less abundant in M. tuberculosis lineage 7. This proteogenomic analysis provided an insight into the lineage 7-specific protein profile which may provide clues to understanding the differential properties of lineage 7 strains in terms of slow growth, survival fitness, and pathogenesis.

  17. One-step isolation of plasma membrane proteins using magnetic beads with immobilized concanavalin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Block, Gregory; Chen, Huiwen

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for isolating and purifying plasma membrane proteins from various cell types. This one-step affinity-chromatography method uses the property of the lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and the technique of magnetic bead separation to obtain highly purified plasma membrane...... proteins from crude membrane preparations or cell lines. ConA is immobilized onto magnetic beads by binding biotinylated ConA to streptavidin magnetic beads. When these ConA magnetic beads were used to enrich plasma membranes from a crude membrane preparation, this procedure resulted in 3.7-fold enrichment...... of plasma membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase activity with 70% recovery of the activity in the crude membrane fraction of rat liver. In agreement with the results of 5'-nucleotidase activity, immunoblotting with antibodies specific for a rat liver plasma membrane protein, CEACAM1, indicated that CEACAM1...

  18. Quantitative Age-specific Variability of Plasma Proteins in Healthy Neonates, Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelosevic, Stefan; Pascovici, Dana; Ping, Hui; Karlaftis, Vasiliki; Zaw, Thiri; Song, Xiaomin; Molloy, Mark P; Monagle, Paul; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2017-05-01

    Human blood plasma is a complex biological fluid containing soluble proteins, sugars, hormones, electrolytes, and dissolved gasses. As plasma interacts with a wide array of bodily systems, changes in protein expression, or the presence or absence of specific proteins are regularly used in the clinic as a molecular biomarker tool. A large body of literature exists detailing proteomic changes in pathologic contexts, however little research has been conducted on the quantitation of the plasma proteome in age-specific, healthy subjects, especially in pediatrics. In this study, we utilized SWATH-MS to identify and quantify proteins in the blood plasma of healthy neonates, infants under 1 year of age, children between 1-5 years, and adults. We identified more than 100 proteins that showed significant differential expression levels across these age groups, and we analyzed variation in protein expression across the age spectrum. The plasma proteomic profiles of neonates were strikingly dissimilar to the older children and adults. By extracting the SWATH data against a large human spectral library we increased protein identification more than 6-fold (940 proteins) and confirmed the concentrations of several of these using ELISA. The results of this study map the variation in expression of proteins and pathways often implicated in disease, and so have significant clinical implication. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. HIP2: An online database of human plasma proteins from healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Changyu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the introduction of increasingly powerful mass spectrometry (MS techniques for clinical research, several recent large-scale MS proteomics studies have sought to characterize the entire human plasma proteome with a general objective for identifying thousands of proteins leaked from tissues in the circulating blood. Understanding the basic constituents, diversity, and variability of the human plasma proteome is essential to the development of sensitive molecular diagnosis and treatment monitoring solutions for future biomedical applications. Biomedical researchers today, however, do not have an integrated online resource in which they can search for plasma proteins collected from different mass spectrometry platforms, experimental protocols, and search software for healthy individuals. The lack of such a resource for comparisons has made it difficult to interpret proteomics profile changes in patients' plasma and to design protein biomarker discovery experiments. Description To aid future protein biomarker studies of disease and health from human plasma, we developed an online database, HIP2 (Healthy Human Individual's Integrated Plasma Proteome. The current version contains 12,787 protein entries linked to 86,831 peptide entries identified using different MS platforms. Conclusion This web-based database will be useful to biomedical researchers involved in biomarker discovery research. This database has been developed to be the comprehensive collection of healthy human plasma proteins, and has protein data captured in a relational database schema built to contain mappings of supporting peptide evidence from several high-quality and high-throughput mass-spectrometry (MS experimental data sets. Users can search for plasma protein/peptide annotations, peptide/protein alignments, and experimental/sample conditions with options for filter-based retrieval to achieve greater analytical power for discovery and validation.

  20. Plasma protein binding of tetrodotoxin in the marine puffer fish Takifugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanuma, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Kazuma; Jeon, Joong-Kyun; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the involvement of plasma protein binding in the disposition of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in puffer fish, we used equilibrium dialysis to measure protein binding of TTX in the plasma of the marine puffer fish Takifugu rubripes and the non-toxic greenling Hexagrammos otakii, and in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). TTX (100-1000 microg/mL) bound to protein in T. rubripes plasma with low affinity in a non-saturable manner. The amount of bound TTX increased linearly with the TTX concentration, reaching 3.92+/-0.42 microg TTX/mg protein at 1000 microg TTX/mL. Approximately 80% of the TTX in the plasma of T. rubripes was unbound in the concentration range of TTX examined, indicating that TTX exists predominantly in the unbound form in the circulating blood of T. rubripes at a wide range of TTX concentrations. TTX also bound non-specifically to H. otakii plasma proteins, BSA, and bovine AGP. The amount of the bound TTX in the plasma of H. otakii and BSA, respectively, was 1.86+/-0.36 and 4.65+/-0.70 microg TTX/mg protein at 1000 microg TTX/mL, and that in the bovine AGP was 8.78+/-0.25 microg TTX/mg protein at 200 microg TTX/mL. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The abundant and essential HU proteins in Deinococcus deserti and Deinococcus radiodurans are translated from leaderless mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Blanchard, Laurence; Dulermo, Rémi; Ludanyi, Monika; Devigne, Alice; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; de Groot, Arjan

    2015-12-01

    HU proteins have an important architectural role in nucleoid organization in bacteria. Compared with HU of many bacteria, HU proteins from Deinococcus species possess an N-terminal lysine-rich extension similar to the eukaryotic histone H1 C-terminal domain involved in DNA compaction. The single HU gene in Deinococcus radiodurans, encoding DrHU, is required for nucleoid compaction and cell viability. Deinococcus deserti contains three expressed HU genes, encoding DdHU1, DdHU2 and DdHU3. Here, we show that either DdHU1 or DdHU2 is essential in D. deserti. DdHU1 and DdHU2, but not DdHU3, can substitute for DrHU in D. radiodurans, indicating that DdHU3 may have a non-essential function different from DdHU1, DdHU2 and DrHU. Interestingly, the highly abundant DrHU and DdHU1 proteins, and also the less expressed DdHU2, are translated in Deinococcus from leaderless mRNAs, which lack a 5'-untranslated region and, hence, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unexpectedly, cloning the DrHU or DdHU1 gene under control of a strong promoter in an expression plasmid, which results in leadered transcripts, strongly reduced the DrHU and DdHU1 protein level in D. radiodurans compared with that obtained from the natural leaderless gene. We also show that the start codon position for DrHU and DdHU1 should be reannotated, resulting in proteins that are 15 and 4 aa residues shorter than initially reported. The expression level and start codon correction were crucial for functional characterization of HU in Deinococcus.

  2. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Amyloid proteins are highly abundant in water-repellent but not wettable soils: microbial differentiation matters to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kat; Dudley, Ed; Swain, Martin; Doerr, Stefan; Matthews, Peter; Francis, Lewis; Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is a common phenomenon affecting the hydrological responses of many soil and land use types in different climates. This in turn leads to decreased water infiltration, reduced vegetation cover, fertiliser run off and soil erosion. The fundamental (biological) causes of (bulk) soil repellency and its dynamic behaviour remain poorly understood. We have applied soil metaproteomics, the systemic extraction and identification of proteins from a soil, to understand the biological (adaptive) processes and potential for bio-modification of mineral surfaces, which occur at the molecular level in soils switching between wettable and repellent states. Extreme, moderate and sub-critical water-repellent UK silt-loam soils under permanent grass vegetation, including Park Grass at Rothamsted Research, were sampled below the root zone depth under wettable and repellent conditions. Soils were subjected to our new extraction methods for determining the specific ultrahydrophobic and total metaproteomes. Using our ultrahydrophobic extraction protocol, we have identified more than 200, mostly novel amyloid, proteins, which could be extracted from water-repellent soils, but were absent in the comparable wettable soils. One of the novel amyloid proteins was highly abundant in all soils, which has the potential as a soil biomarker for precision land management, especially in irrigation. Comparative profiling of the total metaproteomes of wettable and repellent soils has revealed similarities and dissimilarities in microbial diversity and their activities, which have created a deeper understanding of soil system processes common and adaptive to soil moisture and to the severity of repellence.

  5. Role of plasma adiponectin /C-reactive protein ratio in obesity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and T2D. Objective(s): We examined relations between fasting plasma adiponectin (ADIP), C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and markers of T2D in African Americans (AA). Methods: Fasting plasma ADIP, CRP, Insulin (IN), HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, body ...

  6. Prednisolone-induced predisposition to femoral head separation and the accompanying plasma protein changes in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femoral head separation (FHS) is an idiopathic bone problem that causes lameness and production losses in commercial poultry. In a model of prednisolone induced susceptibility to FHS, the changes in plasma proteins and peptides were analyzed to find possible biomarkers. Plasma from control and FHS-s...

  7. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and the vulnerable plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Camilla H B; Vestergaard, Kirstine R; Schou, Morten

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) has been examined for its relation to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the vulnerable plaque. This review summarizes the current knowledge of plasma PAPP-A in relation to nonpregnant individuals focusing on patients with ACS...

  8. Early Diagnosis of Intestinal Ischemia Using Urinary and Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuijls, Geertje; van Wijck, Kim; Grootjans, Joep; Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Heineman, Erik; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Buurman, Wim A.; Poeze, Martijn

    Objective: This study aims at improving diagnosis of intestinal ischemia, by measuring plasma and urinary fatty acid binding protein (FABP) levels. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients suspected of intestinal ischemia were included and blood and urine were sampled at time of suspicion. Plasma and

  9. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...... proteins are major targets of the signalling cascades, we developed a protocol to monitor their phosphorylation state starting from a single mouse cerebellum. An aqueous polymer two-phase system was used to enrich for plasma membrane proteins. Subsequently, calcium phosphate precipitation, immobilized...... with a confidence level of 99% or higher. 41.4% of the identified proteins were allocated to the plasma membrane and about half of the phosphorylation sites have not been reported previously. A bioinformatic screen for 12 consensus sequences identified putative kinases for 642 phosphorylation sites. In summary...

  10. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein increases the antiatherogenic potential of high density lipoproteins in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); A. van Tol (Arie); P. Vermeulen; M. Jauhiainen; T. van Gent (Teus); P.M. van den Berg (Paul); S. Ehnholm (Sonja); A.W.M. van der Kamp (Arthur); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPlasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) transfers phospholipids between lipoprotein particles and alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction patterns in vitro, but its physiological function is poorly understood. Transgenic mice that overexpress

  11. Automation of plasma protein binding assay using rapid equilibrium dialysis device and Tecan workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengqi; Zetterberg, Craig; Gao, Hong

    2017-06-05

    Binding of drug molecules to plasma proteins is an important parameter in assessing drug ADME properties. Plasma protein binding (PPB) assays are routinely performed during drug discovery and development. A fully automated PPB assay was developed using rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) device and Tecan workstation coupled to an automated incubator. The PPB assay was carried out in unsealed RED plates which allowed the assay to be fully automated. The plasma pH was maintained at 7.4 during the 6-h dialysis under 2% CO2 condition. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The percent bound results of 10 commercial drugs in plasma protein binding were very similar between the automated and manual assays, and were comparable to literature values. The automated assay increases laboratory productivity and is applicable to high-throughput screening of drug protein binding in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass Spectrometry of Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Peptidomes Reveals Strong Effects of Protein Abundance and Turnover on Antigen Presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    HLA class I molecules reflect the health state of cells to cytotoxic T cells by presenting a repertoire of endogenously derived peptides. However, the extent to which the proteome shapes the peptidome is still largely unknown. Here we present a high-throughput mass-spectrometry-based workflow...... that allows stringent and accurate identification of thousands of such peptides and direct determination of binding motifs. Applying the workflow to seven cancer cell lines and primary cells, yielded more than 22,000 unique HLA peptides across different allelic binding specificities. By computing a score...... representing the HLA-I sampling density, we show a strong link between protein abundance and HLA-presentation (p

  13. Plasma Protein Oxidation and Its Correlation with Antioxidant Potential During Human Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanti Bhooshan Pandey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that the main molecular characteristic of aging is the progressive accumulation of oxidative damages in cellular macromolecules. Proteins are one of the main molecular targets of age-related oxidative stress, which have been observed during aging process in cellular systems. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can lead to oxidation of amino acid side chains, formation of protein-protein cross-linkages, and oxidation of the peptide backbones. In the present study, we report the age-dependent oxidative alterations in biomarkers of plasma protein oxidation: protein carbonyls (PCO, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs and plasma total thiol groups (T-SH in the Indian population and also correlate these parameters with total plasma antioxidant potential. We show an age dependent decrease in T-SH levels and increase in PCO and AOPPs level. The alterations in the levels of these parameters correlated significantly with the total antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The levels of oxidized proteins in plasma provide an excellent biomarker of oxidative stress due to the relative long half-life of such oxidized proteins.

  14. Plasma protein oxidation and its correlation with antioxidant potential during human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan; Mehdi, Mohd Murtaza; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the main molecular characteristic of aging is the progressive accumulation of oxidative damages in cellular macromolecules. Proteins are one of the main molecular targets of age-related oxidative stress, which have been observed during aging process in cellular systems.. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to oxidation of amino acid side chains, formation of protein-protein cross-linkages, and oxidation of the peptide backbones. In the present study, we report the age-dependent oxidative alterations in biomarkers of plasma protein oxidation: protein carbonyls (PCO), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and plasma total thiol groups (T-SH) in the Indian population and also correlate these parameters with total plasma antioxidant potential. We show an age dependent decrease in T-SH levels and increase in PCO and AOPPs level. The alterations in the levels of these parameters correlated significantly with the total antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The levels of oxidized proteins in plasma provide an excellent biomarker of oxidative stress due to the relative long half-life of such oxidized proteins.

  15. Plasma protein concentrations of the young and adult Amazona brasiliensis parrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Elizabeth Moreira Dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Red-tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis is an endangered species of the Psittacine family, and for which various data are important for a comprehensive preservation plan. Data about plasma protein gel electrophoresis of Amazon parrot blood are scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine plasma protein concentrations and concentrations of major protein bands in blood of young and adult Red-tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis. Materials and Methods. Blood samples from eight young and eight adult healthy free-living parrots were obtained. Plasma protein concentration and fractions were determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare variables. Results and Conclusions. Six major protein bands with the following molecular weights were identified by SDS-PAGE: 170 kDa, 117 kDa, 85 kDa (putative ovotransferrin, 60 kDa, 45 kDa and 23 kDa. Adult parrots had significantly higher concentrations of total proteins, albumin and other proteins with similar mobility (around 60 kDa. Young birds had significantly higher levels of 23kDa proteins. The concentration of putative ovotransferrin (85 kDa was not different between young and adult parrots. Plasma protein gel electrophoresis patterns in Red-tailed Amazon parrots are similar between young and adult animals, but specific protein bands differ in their absolute concentrations. This finding should be taken into consideration when clinical pathology data are analysed.

  16. Proteins specified by herpes simplex virus. IX. Contiguity of host and viral proteins in the plasma membrane of infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, J W; Roizman, B

    1973-05-01

    Artificial mixtures of plasma membrane vesicles produced by microcavitation from infected and uninfected cells band at the same density on isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose density gradient. However, after reaction with antiviral antibody, the density of the infected cell plasma membrane vesicles increases, and the infected and uninfected cell membranes are quantitatively separable on isopycnic centrifugation. Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from cells doubly labeled before and after infection with radioactive amino acids and reacted with antibody banded at a high density. Polyacrylamide gel electropherograms show that the vesicles reacted with antibody consist of both host- and virus-specific membrane proteins. Microcavitation does not disrupt viral envelopes since infectivity is not affected by this procedure. We conclude that viral and cellular proteins in the plasma membrane preparations are contiguous.

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of total proteins in blood plasma: a comparative study among dye-binding methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dimas Augusto Morozin Zaia; Fábio Rangel Marques; Cássia Thaïs Bussamra Vieira Zaia

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study between the biuret method (standard method for total proteins) and spectrophotometric methods using dyes (Bradford, 3',3",5',5"-tetrabromophenolphthalein ethyl ester-TBPEE, and erythrosin-B) was carried out for the determination of total proteins in blood plasma from rats. Bradford method showed the highest sensitivity for proteins and biuret method showed the lowest. For all the methods, the absorbance for different proteins (BSA, casein, and egg albumin) was measured and...

  18. Filtration as the main transport mechanism of protein exchange between plasma and the peritoneal cavity in hepatic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Lassen, N A; Parving, H H

    1980-01-01

    to plasma protein flux averaged 0.4% of the intravascular protein mass per hour. The results point to filtration (convective flux) as the main transport mechanism responsible for protein passage into the peritoneal cavity as well as for the protein passage (lymphatic drainage) back into the plasma. Pressure...

  19. Molecular characterization of aquaporin 1 and aquaporin 3 from the gills of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, and changes in their branchial mRNA expression levels and protein abundance during three phases of aestivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You R. Chng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available African lungfishes can undergo long periods of aestivation on land during drought. During aestivation, lungfishes are confronted with desiccation and dehydration, and their gills become non-functional and covered with a thick layer of dried mucus. Aquaporins (Aqps are a superfamily of integral membrane proteins which generally facilitate the permeation of water through plasma membranes. This study aimed to obtain the complete cDNA coding sequences of aqp1 and aqp3 from the gills of Protopterus annectens, and to determine their branchial mRNA and protein expression levels during the induction, maintenance and arousal phases of aestivation. Dendrogramic analyses of the deduced Aqp1 and Aqp3 amino acid sequences of P. annectens revealed their close relationships with those of Latimeria chalumnae and tetrapods. During the induction phase, there were significant decreases in the transcript levels of aqp1 and aqp3 in the gills of P. annectens, but the branchial Aqp1 and Aqp3 protein abundance remained unchanged. As changes in transcription may precede changes in translation, this could be regarded as an adaptive response to decrease the protein abundance of Aqp1 and Aqp3 in the subsequent maintenance phase of aestivation. As expected, the branchial transcript levels and protein abundance of aqp1/Aqp1 and aqp3/Aqp3 were significantly down-regulated during the maintenance phase, probably attributable to the shutdown of branchial functions and the cessation of volume regulation of branchial epithelial cells. Additionally, these changes could reduce the loss of water through branchial epithelial surfaces, supplementing the anti-desiccating property of the dried mucus. Upon arousal, it was essential for the lungfish to restore branchial functions. Indeed, the protein abundance of Aqp1 recovered partially, with complete recovery of mRNA expression level and protein abundance of Aqp3, in the gills of P. annectens. These results provide insights into how P

  20. Plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 is a marker for joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, T; Buus, A; Stengaard-Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) level in plasma is described as a marker for joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: MCP-1 in plasma and synovial fluid (SF) was quantified by ELISA in 36 RA patients with synovitis of the knee at Day 1 and 30. Disease activity...... was assessed by the swollen joint count, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI), global assessment, pain on visual analog scale, Health Assessment Questionnaire, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP). RESULTS: By linear regression analysis plasma MCP-1 levels correlated significantly...

  1. [Correlation analysis between abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA and its correlation with clinical outcome and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yan-qing; Liu, Xiao-jing; Wang, Yan; Ge, Fei-jiao; Zhao, Chuan-hua; Fu, Ya-li; Lin, Li; Xu, Jian-ming

    2013-09-01

    the traditional method for detection of K-ras mutation in tumor tissues. The abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA is an independent prognostic factor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  2. MAMP (microbe-associated molecular pattern)-induced changes in plasma membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlíková, Hana; Solanský, Martin; Hrdinová, Vendula; Šedo, Ondrej; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Hejátko, Jan; Lochman, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Plant plasma membrane associated proteins play significant roles in Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern (MAMP) mediated defence responses including signal transduction, membrane transport or energetic metabolism. To elucidate the dynamics of proteins associated with plasma membrane in response to cryptogein, a well-known MAMP of defence reaction secreted by the oomycete Phytophthora cryptogea, 2D-Blue Native/SDS gel electrophoresis of plasma membrane fractions was employed. This approach revealed 21 up- or down-regulated protein spots of which 15 were successfully identified as proteins related to transport through plasma membrane, vesicle trafficking, and metabolic enzymes including cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme and glutamine synthetase. Observed changes in proteins were also confirmed on transcriptional level by qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, a significantly decreased accumulation of transcripts observed after employment of a mutant variant of cryptogein Leu41Phe, exhibiting a conspicuous defect in induction of resistance, sustains the contribution of identified proteins in cryptogein-triggered cellular responses. Our data provide further evidence for dynamic MAMP-induced changes in plasma membrane associated proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary whey protein influences plasma satiety-related hormones and plasma amino acids in normal-weight adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungchunlam, S M S; Henare, S J; Ganesh, S; Moughan, P J

    2015-02-01

    A distinct suppressive effect of a whey protein (including glycomacropeptide)-enriched preload drink on subsequent food intake in comparison with a maltodextrin carbohydrate-enriched preload was demonstrated in an earlier companion study with the same female subjects; however, the potential mediators underlying the effect are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate how the ingestion of a whey protein-enriched preload beverage affected postprandial plasma concentrations of several satiety-related gastrointestinal hormones and metabolites in comparison with a maltodextrin carbohydrate-enriched preload. Eighteen normal-weight women were studied in a single-blind, randomized block design. Blood samples were collected at various time intervals for 120 min after consumption of a test drink (300 ml, ~1300 kJ) enriched (45 g) with either maltodextrin carbohydrate or whey protein containing naturally present glycomacropeptide. Plasma-active ghrelin concentrations decreased after both maltodextrin carbohydrate- and whey protein-enriched test drinks (Pprotein-enriched beverage led to increased plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK) at 60 and 75 min (Pprotein compared with maltodextrin carbohydrate ingestion (Pprotein.

  4. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with ({sup 15}NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaud, Saula Goulart; Oliveira, Admar Costa de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Estudos Agricolas. Dept. de Planejamento Alimentar e Nutricao; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: admarco@fea.unicamp.br

    2002-12-01

    Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15 N, using nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Pirata 1) with 1.394 atoms % 15 N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L{sup -1} NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 +- 0.011; 1.403 +- 0.012; 1.399 +- 0.007 and 1.399 +- 0.028 atoms % of 15 N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05). However, a difference was found (P < 0.05) between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 +- 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L 1 NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions. (author)

  5. Effects of plant proteins on postprandial, free plasma amino acid concentrations in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial patterns in plasma free amino acid concentrations were investigated in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed either a fish meal based diet (FM) or a diet (VEG) where 59% of fish meal protein (corresponding to 46% of total dietary protein) was replaced by a matrix of plant...... proteins from wheat, peas, field beans, sunflower and soybean. Blood samples were obtained from the caudal vein of 7 fish in each dietary treatment group prior to feeding, as well as: 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after feeding (sampling 7 new fish at each time point), and plasma amino acid...... in fish fed the VEG diet compared to those fed the FM diet. Essential and non-essential amino acids furthermore appeared more or less synchronously in the plasma in fish fed the FM diet, while the appearance was less synchronised in fish fed the VEG diet. Differences in plasma concentrations between...

  6. Metaproteomics of marine viral concentrates reveals key viral populations and abundant periplasmic proteins in the oligotrophic deep chlorophyll maximum of the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhang-Xian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Ling-Fen; Dai, Min-Han; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2017-09-19

    Viral concentrates (VCs), containing bioinformative DNA and proteins, have been used to study viral diversity, viral metagenomics and virus-host interactions in natural ecosystems. Besides viruses, VCs also contain many noncellular biological components including diverse functional proteins. Here, we used a shotgun proteomic approach to characterize the proteins of VCs collected from the oligotrophic deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) of the South China Sea. Proteins of viruses infecting picophytoplankton, that is, cyanobacteria and prasinophytes, and heterotrophic bacterioplankton, such as SAR11 and SAR116, dominated the viral proteome. Almost no proteins from RNA viruses or known gene transfer agents were detected, suggesting that they were not abundant at the sampling site. Remarkably, nonviral proteins made up about two thirds of VC proteins, including overwhelmingly abundant periplasmic transporters for nutrient acquisition and proteins for diverse cellular processes, that is, translation, energy metabolism and one carbon metabolism. Interestingly, three 56 kDa selenium-binding proteins putatively involved in peroxide reduction from gammaproteobacteria were abundant in the VCs, suggesting active removal of peroxide compounds at DCM. Our study demonstrated that metaproteomics provides a valuable avenue to explore the diversity and structure of the viral community and also the pivotal biological functions affiliated with microbes in the natural environment. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues...... in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine...

  8. Clozapine Impairs Insulin Action by Up-Regulating Akt Phosphorylation and Ped/Pea-15 Protein Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panariello, Fabio; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Cassese, Angela; Giacco, Ferdinando; Botta, Ginevra; Barbagallo, Alessia PM; Muscettola, Giovanni; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence indicates that atypical antipsychotics impair glucose metabolism. We investigated whether clozapine may directly affect insulin action by analyzing insulin signaling in vitro and in vivo. Clozapine reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in PC12 and in L6 cells, representative models of neuron and skeletal muscle, respectively. Consistently, clozapine reduced insulin effect on insulin receptor (IR) by 40% and on IR substrate-1 (IRS1) tyrosine phosphorylation by 60%. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was also reduced by about 40%. Moreover, insulin-dependent phosphorylation of protein kinase C-ζ (PKC-ζ) was completely blunted in clozapine-treated cells. Interestingly, clozapine treatment was accompanied by an insulin-independent increase of Akt phosphorylation, with no change of IR, IRS1, and PKC-ζ basal phosphorylation. The cellular abundance of Ped/Pea-15, an Akt substrate and inducer of insulin resistance, was also increased following clozapine exposure, both in the absence and in the presence of cyclohexymide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar as in cellular models, in the caudate–putamen and in the tibialis muscle of clozapine-treated C57/BL/KsJ mice, Akt phosphorylation and Ped/Pea-15 protein levels were increased and PKC-ζ phosphorylation was decreased. Thus, in these experimental models, clozapine deranged Akt function and up-regulated Ped/Pea-15, thereby inhibiting insulin stimulation of PKC-ζ and of glucose uptake. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1485–1492, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21618539

  9. Lateral Organization of Influenza Virus Proteins in the Budozone Region of the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, George P; Lamb, Robert A

    2017-05-01

    Influenza virus assembles and buds at the plasma membrane of virus-infected cells. The viral proteins assemble at the same site on the plasma membrane for budding to occur. This involves a complex web of interactions among viral proteins. Some proteins, like hemagglutinin (HA), NA, and M2, are integral membrane proteins. M1 is peripherally membrane associated, whereas NP associates with viral RNA to form an RNP complex that associates with the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, HA and NP have been shown to be concentrated in cholesterol-rich membrane raft domains, whereas M2, although containing a cholesterol binding motif, is not raft associated. Here we identify viral proteins in planar sheets of plasma membrane using immunogold staining. The distribution of these proteins was examined individually and pairwise by using the Ripley K function, a type of nearest-neighbor analysis. Individually, HA, NA, M1, M2, and NP were shown to self-associate in or on the plasma membrane. HA and M2 are strongly coclustered in the plasma membrane; however, in the case of NA and M2, clustering depends upon the expression system used. Despite both proteins being raft resident, HA and NA occupy distinct but adjacent membrane domains. M2 and M1 strongly cocluster, but the association of M1 with HA or NA is dependent upon the means of expression. The presence of HA and NP at the site of budding depends upon the coexpression of other viral proteins. Similarly, M2 and NP occupy separate compartments, but an association can be bridged by the coexpression of M1.IMPORTANCE The complement of influenza virus proteins necessary for the budding of progeny virions needs to accumulate at budozones. This is complicated by HA and NA residing in lipid raft-like domains, whereas M2, although an integral membrane protein, is not raft associated. Other necessary protein components such as M1 and NP are peripherally associated with the membrane. Our data define spatial relationships

  10. A method for studies on interactions between a gold-based drug and plasma proteins based on capillary electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    An analytical method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection was developed for studies on the interaction of gold-containing drugs and plasma proteins using auranofin as example. A detection limit of 18 ng/mL of auranofin...... corresponding to 5.2 ng/mL Au and a precision of 1.5 % were obtained. Kinetic studies of the interaction between auranofin and protein were performed by incubation in aqueous solutions as well as 20 % human plasma at 37 °C. The reaction of auranofin with human serum albumin (HSA) and plasma proceeded fast; 50...... was the major auranofin-interacting protein in plasma. The CE-ICP-MS method is proposed as a novel approach for kinetic studies of the interactions between gold-based drugs and plasma proteins. Graphical Abstract Development of a CE-ICP-MS based method allows for studies on interaction of the gold containing...

  11. A comprehensive analysis of the Streptococcus pyogenes and human plasma protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Kristoffer; Karlsson, Christofer; Linder, Adam; Malmström, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe and invasive disease associated with high mortality rates. The bacterium interacts with several human blood plasma proteins and clarifying these interactions and their biological consequences will help to explain the progression from mild to severe infections. In this study, we used a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) based techniques to comprehensively quantify the components of the S. pyogenes-plasma protein interaction network. From an initial list of 181 interacting human plasma proteins defined using liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS analysis we further subdivided the interacting protein list using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) depending on the level of enrichment and protein concentration on the bacterial surface. The combination of MS methods revealed several previously characterized interactions between the S. pyogenes surface and human plasma along with many more, so far uncharacterised, possible plasma protein interactions with S. pyogenes. In follow-up experiments, the combination of MS techniques was applied to study differences in protein binding to a S. pyogenes wild type strain and an isogenic mutant lacking several important virulence factors, and a unique pair of invasive and non-invasive S. pyogenes isolates from the same patient. Comparing the plasma protein-binding properties of the wild type and the mutant and the invasive and non-invasive S. pyogenes bacteria revealed considerable differences, underlining the significance of these protein interactions. The results also demonstrate the power of the developed mass spectrometry method to investigate host-microbial relationships with a large proteomics depth and high quantitative accuracy.

  12. HK2 Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells Synthesize and Secrete Plasma Proteins Predominantly Through the Apical Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2017-04-01

    Renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTECs) are known to reabsorb salts and small plasma proteins filtered through Bowman's capsule. Following acute kidney injury, PTECs assume some characteristics of hepatocytes in producing various plasma proteins. We now demonstrate that even at a resting state, a PTEC cell line, HK2 expresses mRNAs for and synthesizes and secretes plasma proteins in a complex with complement C3, an α2 -macroglobulin family chaperone, including albumin, transferrin, α1 -antitrypsin, α1 -antichymotrypsin, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, C1-inhibitor, secreted phosphoprotein-24, and insulin-like growth factor-1. When grown on transwell inserts, HK2 cells predominantly secrete (∼90%) plasma proteins into the apical side and a smaller fraction into the basolateral side as determined by ELISA assays. When cultured in the presence of exogenous cytokines such as IL1β, IL6, TNFα, BMP2, or TGFβ1, HK2 cell mRNA expressions for plasma proteins were variably affected whereas basolateral secretions were elevated to or in excess of those of the apical level. In addition, HK2 cells produce proTGFβ1 with its intact N-terminal latency associated peptide and latent-TGF-β-binding proteins. The complex cannot be dissociated under conditions of SDS, heating, and electrophoresis. Moreover, HK2 cells maintain their ability to quickly uptake exogenously added serum proteins from the culture medium, as if they are recognized differently by the endocytic receptors. These results provide new insight into the hepatization of PTECs. In addition to their unique uptake of plasma proteins and salts from the filtrate, they are a source of urinary proteins under normal conditions as wells as in chronic and acute kidney diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 924-933, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Isolation and characterization of gelatin-binding proteins from goat seminal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazure Claude

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A family of proteins designated BSP-A1, BSP-A2, BSP-A3 and BSP-30 kDa (collectively called BSP proteins for Bovine Seminal Plasma proteins constitute the major protein fraction in the bull seminal plasma. These proteins interact with choline phospholipids on the sperm surface and play a role in the membrane stabilization (decapacitation and destabilization (capacitation process. Homologous proteins have been isolated from boar and stallion seminal plasma. In the current study we report the isolation and preliminary characterization of homologous proteins from goat seminal plasma. Frozen semen (-80°C was thawed and centrifuged to remove sperm. The proteins in the supernatant were precipitated by the addition of cold ethanol. The precipitates were dissolved in ammonium bicarbonate and lyophilised. The lyophilised proteins were dissolved in phosphate buffer and loaded onto a gelatin-agarose column, which was previously equilibrated with the same buffer. The column was successively washed with phosphate buffer, with phosphate buffer saline and with 0.5 M urea in phosphate buffer saline to remove unadsorbed proteins, and the adsorbed proteins were eluted with 5 M urea in phosphate buffer saline. Analysis of pooled, dialysed and lyophilised gelatin-agarose adsorbed protein fraction by SDS-PAGE indicated the presence of four protein bands that were designated GSP-14 kDa, GSP-15 kDa, GSP-20 kDa and GSP-22 kDa (GSP, Goat Seminal Plasma proteins. Heparin-affinity chromatography was then used for the separation of GSP-20 and -22 kDa from GSP-14 and -15 kDa. Finally, HPLC separation permitted further isolation of each one from the other. Amino acid sequence analysis of these proteins indicated that they are homologous to BSP proteins. In addition, these BSP homologs bind to hen's egg-yolk low-density lipoproteins. These results together with our previous data indicate that BSP family proteins are ubiquitous in mammalian seminal plasma, exist in

  14. A continuous displacement immunoassay for human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, D; Pelsers, MMAL; Korf, J; Hermens, WT; Glatz, JFC

    2004-01-01

    Human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) is suggested as an early plasma marker of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and several studies have proved that, for early diagnosis of AMI, FABP performs better than myoglobin, which is a more often used early marker protein. Because serial

  15. Adsorption of plasma proteins : adsorption behaviour on apolar surfaces and effect on colloid stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Albert

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis the adsorption of some plasma proteins (human albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (HFb)) on non polar surfaces is studied, together with the influence of these proteins on the stability of polystyrene latices. The aim of these investigations is a better understanding of the processes

  16. NKCC1 and NHE1 are abundantly expressed in the basolateral plasma membrane of secretory coil cells in rat, mouse, and human sweat glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejsum, Lene Niemann; Prætorius, Jeppe; Nielsen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    1 (NHE1) protein has been localized to both the duct and secretory coil of human sweat duct; however, the NHE1 abundance in the duct was not compared with that in the secretory coil. The aim of this study was to test whether mRNA encoding NKCC1, NKCC2, and Na(+)-coupled acid-base transporters...... and the corresponding proteins are expressed in rodent sweat glands and, if expressed, to determine the cellular and subcellular localization in rat, mouse, and human eccrine sweat glands. NKCC1 mRNA was demonstrated in rat palmar tissue, including sweat glands, using RT-PCR, whereas NKCC2 mRNA was absent. Also, NHE1 m...... palmar skin by immunoblotting, whereas NKCC2, NHE2, and NHE3 proteins were not detected. Immunohistochemistry was performed using sections from rat, mouse, and human palmar tissue. Immunoperoxidase labeling revealed abundant expression of NKCC1 and NHE1 in the basolateral domain of secretory coils of rat...

  17. Trace Elements (Zn & Cu) And Plasma Proteins Status In Mauritian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During pregnancy there is usually a fluctuation in the levels of trace elements in the body. The level of copper for example may rise whilst that of zinc may fall. Plasma zinc and copper levels were measured in pregnant and non-pregnant women (mean age 25±6 and 23±5 years respectively). A commercially available kit ...

  18. Plasma Renin Activity in Children with Protein Energy Malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma renin activity was measured by bio-assay in. 100 children with ... Before starting treatment, a venous blood sample is taken for routine analysis from .... elimination. The renin-angiotensin system opposes salt and water elimination by direct action on the kidney" and also by releasing vasopressin"·31 and aldosterone.

  19. Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shih, M.D.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Hsing, Y.I.C.

    2008-01-01

    During the late maturation stage of seed development, water content decreases greatly. One of the most striking characteristics of mature orthodox seeds is their ability to withstand severe desiccation. Mechanisms of plant drought/desiccation tolerance have been studied by numerous groups, and a

  20. Competitive Adsorption of Three Human Plasma Proteins onto Sulfhydryl-to-sulfonate Gradient Surfaces†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong-Xue; Hlady, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Competitive adsorption of three human plasma proteins: albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (Fgn), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) from their ternary solution mixtures onto a sulfhydryl-to-sulfonate gradient surface was investigated using spatially-resolved total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and autoradiography. The concentration of each protein in the ternary solution mixture was kept at an equivalent of 1/100 of its physiological concentration in blood plasma. The three proteins displayed different adsorption and desorption characteristics. Each protein adsorbed less to the sulfonate region than to the sulfhydryl region of the gradient. The adsorption-desorption kinetics revealed large differences in the adsorption and desorption rates of three proteins. By fitting the experimental data to a simple model of competitive protein adsorption, the affinity of each protein to the surface at the gradient center position was ranked as: Fgn > HSA ≫ IgG. Competitive exchange of adsorbed proteins was related to the magnitude of desorption rate constants. Such competitive adsorption of the three major human plasma proteins illustrates the complex dynamics of blood proteins – biomaterials interactions. PMID:22279244

  1. Proteomic Characterization of Pig Sperm Anterior Head Plasma Membrane Reveals Roles of Acrosomal Proteins in ZP3 Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmanas, Kessiri; Kruevaisayawan, Hathairat; Saewu, Arpornrad; Sugeng, Clarissa; Fernandes, Jason; Souda, Puneet; Angel, Jonathan B; Faull, Kym F; Aitken, R John; Whitelegge, Julian; Hardy, Daniel; Berger, Trish; Baker, Mark A; Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj

    2015-02-01

    The sperm anterior head plasma membrane (APM) is the site where sperm first bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). This binding reaches the maximum following the sperm capacitation process. To gain a better understanding of the sperm-ZP binding mechanisms, we compared protein profiles obtained from mass spectrometry of APM vesicles isolated from non-capacitated and capacitated sperm. The results revealed that ZP-binding proteins were the most abundant group of proteins, with a number of them showing increased levels in capacitated sperm. Blue native gel electrophoresis and far-western blotting revealed presence of high molecular weight (HMW) protein complexes in APM vesicles of both non-capacitated and capacitated sperm, but the complexes (∼750-1300 kDa) from capacitated sperm possessed much higher binding capacity to pig ZP3 glycoprotein. Proteomic analyses indicated that a number of proteins known for their acrosome localization, including zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP, were components of capacitated APM HMW complexes, with zonadhesin being the most enriched protein. Our immunofluorescence results further demonstrated that a fraction of these acrosomal proteins was transported to the surface of live acrosome-intact sperm during capacitation. Co-immunoprecipitation indicated that zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP interacted with each other and they may traffic as a complex from the acrosome to the sperm surface. Finally, the significance of zonadhesin in the binding of APM HMW complexes to pig ZP3 was demonstrated; the binding ability was decreased following treatment of the complexes with anti-zonadhesin antibody. Our results suggested that acrosomal proteins, especially zonadhesin, played roles in the initial sperm-ZP binding during capacitation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Pathogen inactivation in fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: effects on plasma proteins and coagulation factor VII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojković, Zoran; Antić, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) activated by ultraviolet (UV) light, produces active oxygen which damages cell membrane and prevents replication of the carrier of diseases (viruses, bacteria, protozoa) in all blood products. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the process of photo inactivation in pathogens using riboflavin and UV rays on the concentration of coagulation factor VIII:C (FVIII:C) and proteins in plasma that were treated before freezing. The examination included 20 units of plasma, separated from whole blood donated by voluntary blood donors around 6 hours from the moment of collection. The units were pooled and separated in to two groups: one consisted of 10 control units and the other of 10 experimental units. Experimental units of the plasma were treated by riboflavin (35 mL) and UV rays (6.24 J/mL, 265-370 nm) on Mirasol aparature (Caridian BCT Biotechnologies, USA) in approximate duration of 6 minutes. Furthermore, 35 mL of saline solution was added to the control plasma. One sample for examining was taken from the control plasma (KG) and two residual were taken from experimental plasma after the addition of riboflavin either before (EG1) or post illumination (EG2). Results. Comparing the mean values of FVIII:C (%) we noticed statistically significantly higher level in the EG1 group than in the EG2 group (65.00 +/- 4.52 vs. 63.20 +/- 4.73; t = 4.323, p = 0.002), while between the KG and experimental groups (EG1 and EG2) there was no statistically significant difference in the concentration of FVIII:C. There was a statistically significant decrease of albumin concentration (g/L) in the EG2 group comparing to the KG (33.35 +/- 0.94 vs. 31.94 +/- 0.84; t = 3.534, p = 0.002), but there was no mentioned difference in albumin concentration between the KG and the EG1, so as between the EG1 and the EG2. Plasma inactivated by riboflavin and UV rays (Mirasol PRT system, Caridian BCT, U.S.A.) keeps all the characteristics of conventional plasma

  3. Pathogen inactivation in fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: Effects on plasma proteins and coagulation factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojković Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Riboflavin (vitamin B2 activated by ultraviolet (UV light, produces active oxygen which damages cell membrane and prevents replication of the carrier of diseases (viruses, bacteria, protozoa in all blood products. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the process of photo inactivation in pathogens using riboflavin and UV rays on the concentration of coagulation factor VIII:C (FVIII:C and proteins in plasma that were treated before freezing. Methods. The examination included 20 units of plasma, separated from whole blood donated by voluntary blood donors around 6 hours from the moment of collection. The units were pooled and separated in to two groups: one consisted of 10 control units and the other of 10 experimental units. Experimental units of the plasma were treated by riboflavin (35 mL and UV rays (6.24 J/mL, 265-370 nm on Mirasol aparature (Caridian BCT Biotechnologies, USA in approximate duration of 6 minutes. Furthermore, 35 mL of saline solution was added to the control plasma. One sample for examining was taken from the control plasma (KG and two residual were taken from experimental plasma after the addition of riboflavin either before (EG1 or post illumination (EG2. Results. Comparing the mean values of FVIII:C (% we noticed statistically significantly higher level in the EG1 group than in the EG2 group (65.00 ± 4.52 vs 63.20 ± 4.73; t = 4.323, p = 0.002, while between the KG and experimental groups (EG1 and EG2 there was no statistically significant difference in the concentration of FVIII:C. There was a statistically significant decrease of albumin concentration (g/L in the EG2 group comparing to the KG (33.35 ± 0.94 vs 31.94 ± 0.84; t = 3.534, p = 0.002, but there was no mentioned difference in albumin concentration between the KG and the EG1, so as between the EG1 and the EG2. Conclusion. Plasma inactivated by riboflavin and UV rays (Mirasol PRT sistem, Caridian BCT, USA keeps all the

  4. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Leduc, A.; Barbeau, J.; Saoudi, B.; Yahia, L'H.; DeCrescenzo, G.

    2006-08-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  5. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C [Laboratoire d' Innovation et d' Analyse de Bioperformance (LIAB), Institut de Genie Biomedical, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada); Leduc, A [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Faculte de Medecine Dentaire, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Barbeau, J [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Faculte de Medecine Dentaire, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saoudi, B [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Yahia, L' H [Laboratoire d' Innovation et d' Analyse de Bioperformance (LIAB), Institut de Genie Biomedical, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada); Crescenzo, G De [Groupe Bio-P2, Departement de Genie Chimique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2006-08-21

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  6. Competitive Adsorption of Plasma Proteins Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Sommerfeld, Sven D; Brás, M Manuela; Migonney, Véronique; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that get adsorbed onto the surfaces of biomaterials immediately upon their implantation mediate the interactions between the material and the environment. This process, in which proteins in a complex mixture compete for adsorption sites on the surface, is determined by the physicochemical interactions at the interface. Competitive adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (Col I), sequentially and from mixtures, was investigated so as to understand the performances of different surfaces used in biomedical applications. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation was used to monitor the adsorption of these proteins onto two materials used in functional bone replacement, a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and Ti6Al4V physisorbed with poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) [poly(NaSS)], and three controls, gold, poly(desaminotyrosyltyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) [poly(DTEc)], and polystyrene (PS). In experiments with individual proteins, the adsorption was the highest with Fn and Col I and the least with BSA. Also, protein adsorption was the highest on poly(NaSS) and Ti6Al4V and the least on poly(DTEc). In sequential adsorption experiments, protein exchange was observed in BSA + Fn, Fn + Col I, and BSA + Col I sequences but not in Fn + BSA and Col I + BSA because of the lower affinity of BSA to surfaces relative to Fn and Col I. Protein adsorption was the highest with Col I + Fn on hydrophobic surfaces. In experiments with protein mixtures, with BSA & Fn, Fn appears to be preferentially adsorbed; with Fn & Col I, both proteins were adsorbed, probably as multilayers; and with Col I & BSA, the total amount of protein was the highest, greater than that in sequential and individual adsorption of the two proteins, probably because of the formation of BSA and Col I complexes. Protein conformational changes induced by the adsorbing surfaces, protein-protein interactions, and affinities of proteins appear to be the important factors that

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  8. Proteomic identification of novel differentiation plasma protein markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia.In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF. Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis.Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia.This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers.

  9. Accumulation kinetics of drugs with nonlinear plasma protein and tissue binding characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, P J; Slattery, J T; Gibaldi, M; Levy, G

    1979-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study, by digital computer stimulation, the accumulation kinetics of drugs which exhibit concentration-dependent binding to tissues and either linear (constant free fraction) or concentration-dependent (increasing free action with increasing drug concentration) binding to plasma proteins. It was assumed that elimination rate is proportional to free drug concentration in plasma and that there occurs instantaneous equilibration of drug between vascular and nonvascular spaces. Nonlinear binding can yield, under certain conditions, apparently biexponential plasma concentration-time curves which may be misinterpreted as being representative of a linear and biexponential system. Such misinterpretation would cause the following errors in the prediction of drug accumulation and elimination kinetics during and after constant-rate infusion: (a) the time required to reach steady state may be overestimated, and (b) the prominence of the apparent distribution phase after cessation of infusion may be underestimated. Drugs with linear and nonlinear plasma protein binding characteristics differ with respect to the relaionship between infusion rate and steady-state concentration. This relationship is linear when plasma protein binding is linear. Steady-state concentration increases less than proportionally with increasing infusion rate if plasma protein binding is drug concentration dependent.

  10. Inactivation of AIDS-causing retroviruses by the manufacturing procedures for human plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfenhaus, J; Gregersen, J P

    1988-04-01

    Human retroviruses causing AIDS (HIV) may occur in human plasma. Since HIV contaminated plasma cannot be completely excluded by testing for anti-HIV, AIDS safety of human plasma products can only be achieved by introducing HIV inactivating and/or eliminating methods into the manufacturing procedure. Here we review a number of methods used when manufacturing plasma derivatives at Behringwerke. These methods were previously developed either to produce a protein of required purity or to manufacture hepatitis safe products. Methods used to produce purer proteins are ethanol fractionation, pepsin treatment, affinity chromatography or various protein precipitation procedures. The method developed at Behringwerke for inactivating infectious viruses in plasma protein preparations not destroying the biological activities of the human protein is pasteurization, i.e. 10 h heat treatment of the aqueous protein solution at 60 degrees C. To investigate the HIV inactivating efficiency of the methods mentioned above, aliquots of an infectious HIV type 1 concentrate were added to a protein preparation, the resulting HIV spiked preparation treated according to the method to be studied and the amount of infectious HIV in this preparation determined before and after treatment. By all methods reported on here the HIV type 1 isolate was completely inactivated resulting in high inactivation factors. In addition, the heat stability of HIV type 2 was tested in aqueous solution at 60 degrees C proving that both HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates are of comparably low heat stability under these conditions. From the results discussed here it can be concluded that all commercial human protein products of Behringwerke derived from either human plasma or placenta do not contain any infectious retrovirus causing AIDS and thus have a high margin of safety regarding the transmission of AIDS.

  11. Plasma Renin Activity in Children with Protein Energy Malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    than in those who survived. Increased renin activity probably contributes to the retention of water characteris- tic of protein energy malnutrition. 5. Afr. Med. J., 48, 499 (1974). Oedema and a low mass for age are the two cardinal features of protein energy malnutrition (kwashiorkor).' In kwashiorkor, there is a failure to balance ...

  12. Acyl homoserine lactone changes the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids associated with stationary phase in Salmonella Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Felipe Alves; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Carrijo, Lanna Clícia; Bento, Cláudia Braga Pereira; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell-cell communication mechanism mediated by signaling molecules known as autoinducers (AIs) that lead to differential gene expression. Salmonella is unable to synthesize the AI-1 acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), but is able to recognize AHLs produced by other microorganisms through SdiA protein. Our study aimed to evaluate the influence of AI-1 on the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids of Salmonella Enteritidis. The presence of N-dodecyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) did not interfere on the growth or the total amount of extracted proteins of Salmonella. However, the abundance of the proteins PheT, HtpG, PtsI, Adi, TalB, PmgI (or GpmI), Eno, and PykF enhanced while the abundance of the proteins RplB, RplE, RpsB, Tsf, OmpA, OmpC, OmpD, and GapA decreased when Salmonella Enteritidis was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of C12-HSL. Additionally, the bacterium produced less succinic, lactic, and acetic acids in the presence of C12-HSL. However, the concentration of extracellular formic acid reached 20.46 mM after 24 h and was not detected when the growth was in the absence of AI-1. Considering the cultivation period for protein extraction, their abundance, process and function, as well as the levels of organic acids, we observed in cells cultivated in presence of C12-HSL a correlation with what is described in the literature as entry into the stationary phase of growth, mainly related to nitrogen and amino acid starvation and acid stress. Further studies are needed in order to determine the specific role of the differentially abundant proteins and extracellular organic acids secreted by Salmonella in the presence of quorum sensing signaling molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Weak acid-concentration Atot and dissociation constant Ka of plasma proteins in racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfli, H R; Misiaszek, S; Lumsden, J H; Carlson, G P; Heigenhauser, G J

    1999-07-01

    The plasma proteins are a significant contributor to the total weak acid concentration as a net anionic charge. Due to potential species difference, species-specific values must be confirmed for the weak acid anionic concentrations of proteins (Atot) and the effective dissociation constant for plasma weak acids (Ka). We studied the net anion load Atot of equine plasma protein in 10 clinically healthy mature Standardbred horses. A multi-step titration procedure, using a tonometer covering a titration range of PCO2 from 25 to 145 mmHg at 37 degrees C, was applied on the plasma of these 10 horses. Blood gases (pH, PCO2) and electrolytes required to calculate the strong ion difference ([SID] = [(Na(+) + K(+) + Ca(2+) + Mg(2+))-(Cl(-) + Lac(-) + PO4(2-))]) were simultaneously measured over a physiological pH range from 6.90-7.55. A nonlinear regression iteration to determine Atot and Ka was performed using polygonal regression curve fitting applied to the electrical neutrality equation of the physico-chemical system. The average anion-load Atot for plasma protein of 10 Standardbred horses was 14.89 +/- 0.8 mEq/l plasma and Ka was 2.11 +/- 0.50 x 10(-7) Eq/l (pKa = 6.67). The derived conversion factor (iterated Atot concentration/average plasma protein concentration) for calculation of Atot in plasma is 0.21 mEq/g protein (protein-unit: g/l). This value compares closely with the 0.24 mEq/g protein determined by titration of Van Slyke et al. (1928) and 0.22 mEq/g protein recently published by Constable (1997) for horse plasma. The Ka value compares closely with the value experimentally determined by Constable in 1997 (2.22 x 10(7) Eq/l). Linear regression of a set of experimental data from 5 Thoroughbred horses on a treadmill exercise test, showed excellent correlation with the regression lines not different from identity for the calculated and measured variables pH, HCO3 and SID. Knowledge of Atot and Ka for the horse is useful especially in exercise studies and in

  14. Expression Profiles of 12 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Genes from Tamarix hispida in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqiu Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12 were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work.

  15. Modular assembly of synthetic proteins that span the plasma membrane in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qudrat, Anam; Truong, Kevin

    2016-12-09

    To achieve synthetic control over how a cell responds to other cells or the extracellular environment, it is important to reliably engineer proteins that can traffic and span the plasma membrane. Using a modular approach to assemble proteins, we identified the minimum necessary components required to engineer such membrane-spanning proteins with predictable orientation in mammalian cells. While a transmembrane domain (TM) fused to the N-terminus of a protein is sufficient to traffic it to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an additional signal peptidase cleavage site downstream of this TM enhanced sorting out of the ER. Next, a second TM in the synthetic protein helped anchor and accumulate the membrane-spanning protein on the plasma membrane. The orientation of the components of the synthetic protein were determined through measuring intracellular Ca2+ signaling using the R-GECO biosensor and through measuring extracellular quenching of yellow fluorescent protein variants by saturating acidic and salt conditions. This work forms the basis of engineering novel proteins that span the plasma membrane to potentially control intracellular responses to extracellular conditions.

  16. Effect of experimentally increased protein supply to postpartum dairy cows on plasma protein synthesis, rumen tissue proliferation, and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M; Røntved, C M; Theil, P K; Khatun, M; Lauridsen, C; Kristensen, N B

    2017-05-01

    The effect of experimentally increasing the postpartum protein supply on plasma protein synthesis, rumen tissue proliferation, and immune homeostasis was studied using 8 periparturient Holstein cows in a complete randomized design. At calving, cows were assigned to abomasal infusion of water (CTRL) or casein (CAS) in addition to a lactation diet. Casein infusion was gradually decreased from 696 ± 1 g/d at +2 d relative to calving (DRTC) to 212 ± 10 g/d at +29 DRTC to avoid excessive supply. Synthesis rate of plasma proteins was measured at -14, +4, +15, and +29 DRTC by measuring [C]Phe isotopic enrichment in arterial plasma free Phe, total plasma proteins, and albumin after 3, 5, and 7 h of jugular ring[C]Phe infusion. Plasma volume was determined at +4 and +29 DRTC by dilution of a [I]BSA dose. Synthesis rate of tissue protein in biopsied rumen papillae was determined by measuring [C]Phe isotopic enrichment, and mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by real-time qPCR. Total and differential leukocyte counts were performed and immune responsiveness of monocytes was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor ɑ (TNFɑ) concentration on ex vivo whole blood stimulation with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and responsiveness of T-lymphocytes by interferon γ (IFNγ) concentration on stimulation with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin β (SEB). Further, ELISA plasma concentrations of IgM, IgA, and IgG were determined. The DRTC affected the majority of investigated parameters as expected. The CAS treatment increased milk protein yield (P = 0.04), and tended to lower TNFɑ (P = 0.06), and lowered IFNγ (P = 0.03) responsiveness per monocyte and lymphocyte, respectively, compared with CTRL. Further, fractional synthesis rate of albumin was greater at +4 DRTC for CAS compared with CTRL but did not differ by +29 DRTC (interaction: P = 0.01). In rumen papillae, synthesis rate of tissue protein was greater for CAS compared with CTRL (P < 0.01) and mRNA expression

  17. Liver plasma membranes: an effective method to analyze membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Liang, Songping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of plasma membrane proteins make them difficult to analyze. The protocols given here are the efficient isolation/digestion procedures for liver plasma membrane proteomic analysis. Both protocol for the isolation of plasma membranes and protocol for the in-gel digestion of gel-embedded plasma membrane proteins are presented. The later method allows the use of a high detergent concentration to achieve efficient solubilization of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins while avoiding interference with the subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis.

  18. Identification of an albumin-like protein in plasma of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua and its biomarker potential for PAH contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karianne Skogland Enerstvedt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased research efforts are currently focusing on Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua and its significance for monitoring the contaminant situation in marine environments. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are well known toxic and carcinogenic compounds, thus continuous monitoring is required to ensure ecosystem sustainability and human food safety. A sensitive biomarker of PAH exposure in humans is the detection of PAH metabolites bound to albumin in blood. The potential of a similar PAH-albumin biomarker in Atlantic cod was therefore investigated by a desktop bioinformatic study followed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of plasma from 16 fish. For the first time, an albumin-like protein in plasma of Atlantic cod is described, and the biomarker potential based on PAH-albumin adduct detection is discussed. Due to the detected low abundance of the albumin-like protein, it was found unlikely to be applicable as a new biomarker tool for evaluation of PAH exposure.

  19. Identification of an albumin-like protein in plasma of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and its biomarker potential for PAH contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enerstvedt, Karianne Skogland; Sydnes, Magne O; Pampanin, Daniela M

    2017-08-01

    Increased research efforts are currently focusing on Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and its significance for monitoring the contaminant situation in marine environments. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are well known toxic and carcinogenic compounds, thus continuous monitoring is required to ensure ecosystem sustainability and human food safety. A sensitive biomarker of PAH exposure in humans is the detection of PAH metabolites bound to albumin in blood. The potential of a similar PAH-albumin biomarker in Atlantic cod was therefore investigated by a desktop bioinformatic study followed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of plasma from 16 fish. For the first time, an albumin-like protein in plasma of Atlantic cod is described, and the biomarker potential based on PAH-albumin adduct detection is discussed. Due to the detected low abundance of the albumin-like protein, it was found unlikely to be applicable as a new biomarker tool for evaluation of PAH exposure.

  20. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-06

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics.

  1. A systematic analysis of eluted fraction of plasma post immunoaffinity depletion: implications in biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Plasma is the most easily accessible source for biomarker discovery in clinical proteomics. However, identifying potential biomarkers from plasma is a challenge given the large dynamic range of proteins. The potential biomarkers in plasma are generally present at very low abundance levels and hence identification of these low abundance proteins necessitates the depletion of highly abundant proteins. Sample pre-fractionation using immuno-depletion of high abundance proteins using multi-affinity removal system (MARS has been a popular method to deplete multiple high abundance proteins. However, depletion of these abundant proteins can result in concomitant removal of low abundant proteins. Although there are some reports suggesting the removal of non-targeted proteins, the predominant view is that number of such proteins is small. In this study, we identified proteins that are removed along with the targeted high abundant proteins. Three plasma samples were depleted using each of the three MARS (Hu-6, Hu-14 and Proteoprep 20 cartridges. The affinity bound fractions were subjected to gelC-MS using an LTQ-Orbitrap instrument. Using four database search algorithms including MassWiz (developed in house, we selected the peptides identified at <1% FDR. Peptides identified by at least two algorithms were selected for protein identification. After this rigorous bioinformatics analysis, we identified 101 proteins with high confidence. Thus, we believe that for biomarker discovery and proper quantitation of proteins, it might be better to study both bound and depleted fractions from any MARS depleted plasma sample.

  2. Increased Depth and Breadth of Plasma Protein Quantitation via Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography/Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry with Labeled Peptide Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Absolute quantitative strategies are emerging as a powerful and preferable means of deriving concentrations in biological samples for systems biology applications. Method development is driven by the need to establish new-and validate current-protein biomarkers of high-to-low abundance for clinical utility. In this chapter, we describe a methodology involving two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), operated under alkaline and acidic pH conditions, combined with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-mass spectrometry (MS) (also called selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS) and a complex mixture of stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to quantify a broad and diverse panel of 253 proteins in human blood plasma. The quantitation range spans 8 orders of magnitude-from 15 mg/mL (for vitamin D-binding protein) to 450 pg/mL (for protein S100-B)-and includes 31 low-abundance proteins (defined as being proteins for higher sample throughput. Also detailed here is the application of our recently developed software tool-Qualis-SIS-for protein quantitation (via regression analysis of standard curves) and quality assessment of the resulting data. Overall, this chapter provides the blueprint for the replication of this quantitative proteomic method by proteomic scientists of all skill levels.

  3. Genomic variants at the PINK1 locus are associated with transcript abundance and plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations in European whites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franks, P.W.; Scheele, C.; Loos, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    .013] but not in nonobese (n=103) (OR=1.20; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.76; P=0.34) individuals. In the British cohort, several PINK1 SNPs were associated with plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. Nominal genotype associations were also observed for fasting glucose, 2-h glucose, and maximal oxygen consumption, although...... these were not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing. In primary adipocytes, Pink1 knockdown affected fatty acid binding protein 4 (Fabp4) expression, indicating that PINK1 may influence substrate metabolism. We demonstrate that PINK1 polymorphisms are associated with PINK1...

  4. Protein relative abundance patterns associated with sucrose-induced dysbiosis are conserved across taxonomically diverse oral microcosm biofilm models of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudney, Joel D; Jagtap, Pratik D; Reilly, Cavan S; Chen, Ruoqiong; Markowski, Todd W; Higgins, LeeAnn; Johnson, James E; Griffin, Timothy J

    2015-12-19

    The etiology of dental caries is multifactorial, but frequent consumption of free sugars, notably sucrose, appears to be a major factor driving the supragingival microbiota in the direction of dysbiosis. Recent 16S rRNA-based studies indicated that caries-associated communities were less diverse than healthy supragingival plaque but still displayed considerable taxonomic diversity between individuals. Metagenomic studies likewise have found that healthy oral sites from different people were broadly similar with respect to gene function, even though there was an extensive individual variation in their taxonomic profiles. That pattern may also extend to dysbiotic communities. In that case, shifts in community-wide protein relative abundance might provide better biomarkers of dysbiosis that can be achieved through taxonomy alone. In this study, we used a paired oral microcosm biofilm model of dental caries to investigate differences in community composition and protein relative abundance in the presence and absence of sucrose. This approach provided large quantities of protein, which facilitated deep metaproteomic analysis. Community composition was evaluated using 16S rRNA sequencing and metaproteomic approaches. Although taxonomic diversity was reduced by sucrose pulsing, considerable inter-subject variation in community composition remained. By contrast, functional analysis using the SEED ontology found that sucrose induced changes in protein relative abundance patterns for pathways involving glycolysis, lactate production, aciduricity, and ammonia/glutamate metabolism that were conserved across taxonomically diverse dysbiotic oral microcosm biofilm communities. Our findings support the concept of using function-based changes in protein relative abundance as indicators of dysbiosis. Our microcosm model cannot replicate all aspects of the oral environment, but the deep level of metaproteomic analysis it allows makes it suitable for discovering which proteins are

  5. Fabrication of diverse pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica for selective removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins from biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Lan, Jingfeng; Li, Huihui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2017-01-01

    In proteomic studies, poor detection of low abundant proteins is a major problem due to the presence of highly abundant proteins. Therefore, the specific removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins prior to analysis is necessary. In response to this problem, a series of pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica materials composed of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid units were designed and synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. These functional mesoporous silica materials were characterized and their ability for adsorption and separation of proteins was evaluated. Possessing a pH-sensitive feature, the synthesized functional materials showed selective adsorption of some proteins in aqueous or buffer solutions at certain pH values. The specific removal of a particular protein from a mixed protein solution was subsequently studied. The analytical results confirmed that all the target proteins (bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, and lysozyme) can be removed by the proposed materials from a five-protein mixture in a single operation. Finally, the practical application of this approach was also evaluated by the selective removal of certain proteins from real biological samples. The results revealed that the maximum removal efficiencies of ovalbumin and lysozyme from egg white sample were obtained as 99% and 92%, respectively, while the maximum removal efficiency of human serum albumin from human serum sample was about 80% by the proposed method. It suggested that this treatment process reduced the complexity of real biological samples and facilitated the identification of hidden proteins in chromatograms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of occupational lead exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Słowińska-Łożyńska, Ludmiła; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Wielkoszyński, Tomasz; Birkner, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of occupational lead (Pb) exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity in workers. The examined group included 283 healthy male employees of manufacturing facilities using zinc and Pb. The mean blood concentrations of Pb and zinc protoporphyrin as well as the mean urine δ-aminolevulinic acid levels were used as markers of exposure for the examined group. Taking into account the obtained mean values of blood lead level, the examined group was divided into three subgroups. When comparing the control group with the subgroups, Pb exposure markers were significantly elevated in all the three subgroups. Concentrations of conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyl groups were also significantly increased. Conversely, the levels of total protein and protein sulfhydryls were significantly decreased in the subgroups compared with the controls. The plasma viscosity was significantly elevated in the subgroups. A dose-response between Pb levels and plasma viscosity was not observed. Pb supposedly elevates MDA and CD in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, occupational Pb exposure induces oxidative stress that results in lipid and protein damage. Moreover, Pb-induced oxidative stress is likely the primary factor that elevates plasma viscosity, despite decreased protein levels. © The Author(s) 2012.

  7. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and the vulnerable plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Camilla H B; Vestergaard, Kirstine R; Schou, Morten; Teisner, Børge; Goetze, Jens P; Iversen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) has been examined for its relation to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the vulnerable plaque. This review summarizes the current knowledge of plasma PAPP-A in relation to nonpregnant individuals focusing on patients with ACS, discusses its use as a possible biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis in ACS, briefly describes the challenges in different assay technologies and describes the effect of heparin administration on PAPP-A concentrations in plasma.

  8. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected 131I-albumin in the plasma pool. From 30 min to 90 min after the injection the return rate was zero, i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied, muscle and subcutaneous fat, is very...... passive flux is proportional to the concentration, and since the interstitial albumin concentration is about half the plasma concentration, then also diffusion and/or pinocytosis of albumin from the plasma is negligible in the resting normal human. We suggest that filtration through large leaks...... is the main mechanism for transendothelial protein transport....

  9. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1978-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected I-albumin to the plasma pool. From 30 min. to 90 min. after the injection the return rate was zero i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied viz.muscle and subcutaneous fat is very....... As passive flux is proportional to the concentration and the interstitial albumin comcentration is about half the plasma concentration then also diffusion and or pinocytosis from the plasma of albumin is negligble in the resting normal man. We suggest filtration through big leaks as the main mechanism...... for transendothelial protein transport....

  10. Optimization of hydrolysis conditions for bovine plasma protein using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Eun-Young; Go, Gwang-Woong; Kim, Gap-Don; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish optimal conditions for the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Response surface methodology was used to model and optimize responses [degree of hydrolysis (DH), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and Fe(2+)-chelating activity]. Hydrolysis conditions, such as hydrolysis temperature (46.6-63.4 °C), hydrolysis time (98-502 min), and hydrolysis pH (6.32-9.68) were selected as the main processing conditions in the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Optimal conditions for maximum DH (%), DPPH radical-scavenging activity (%) and Fe(2+)-chelating activity (%) of the hydrolyzed bovine plasma protein, were respectively established. We discovered the following three conditions for optimal hydrolysis of bovine plasma: pH of 7.82-8.32, temperature of 54.1 °C, and time of 338.4-398.4 min. We consequently succeeded in hydrolyzing bovine plasma protein under these conditions and confirmed the various desirable properties of optimal hydrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of total protein in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernvann, A; Gonzales, J; Diemert, M C; Galli, J

    1987-06-01

    Methodological problems are encountered in determinating human seminal protein content since results are influenced especially by techniques which are used, and by modifications due to liquefaction process. In order to test these two points, three methods (Folin, Biuret and Meulemans's reactions) were applied to the same seminal samples and results were compared. The differences seem principally due to the high level of glycoproteins. To determine the modifications of total protein content with time after semen collection, each sample was separated in aliquot fractions and proteolysis was blocked at different times for each fraction. There is an increase of the protein concentration during the first fifteen minutes that follows semen collection. The cause of this phenomenon is discussed.

  12. Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein A2 in Hemodialysis Patients: Significance for Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Kalousová; Sylvie Dusilová-Sulková; Aleš A. Kuběna; Oskar Zakiyanov; Kateřina Levová; Markéta Bocková; Erika Gedeonová; Xue Chadtová Song; Maria Laura Ermini; Tomáš Špringer; Jiří Homola; Vladimír Tesař; Tomáš Zima

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is associated with adverse outcome of long-term hemodialysis patients (HD). The aim of the study was to test whether its homolog pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) can be detected in serum of HD patients and to define its significance. Methods: The studied group consisted of 102 long-term HD patients and 25 healthy controls. HD patients were prospectively followed up for five years (2009-2014). PAPP-A2 was measured by su...

  13. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.

    2004-01-01

    conventional cleanroom photolithography and lift-off. Single cell arrays showed sharp contrast in cell adhesion between the untreated glass surface and the ppCrown layer. Similarly, proteins adsorbed selectively to untreated glass but not to ppCrown. The simplicity of the liftoff technique and the sturdiness...... cells ( HeLa) and fluorescence labeled proteins (isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, i.e. FITC-BSA). The PEO-like coatings were fabricated by plasma polymerization of 12-crown-4 (ppCrown) with plasma polymerized hexene (ppHexene) as adhesion layer. The coatings were micro patterned using...

  14. Hair protein and amino acid 13C and 15N abundances take more than 4 weeks to clearly prove influences of animal protein intake in young women with a habitual daily protein consumption of more than 1 g per kg body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzke, Klaus J; Lemke, Susen

    2009-08-30

    A high protein or meat intake might be a risk factor for metabolic disorders. Stable isotopic abundances (SIA) of hair can be used as biomarkers for animal protein intake due to characteristic isotopic patterns of food proteins. We investigated if an additional meat intake (M, 200 g pork fillet/day) or an omission of meat and meat products (NOM) can influence the natural (15)N and (13)C SIA within 4 weeks in hair and plasma of young women. The daily protein intake (means +/- SD) was 1.40 +/- 0.29, 2.25 +/- 0.35, and 1.15 +/- 0.26 g/kg at baseline, during M, and during NOM, respectively. At baseline the animal protein intake correlated with bulk SIA of hair ((15)N: R(2) = 0.416; (13)C: R(2) = 0.664; n = 14). However, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analyses have not shown that hair and plasma SIA were changed significantly after M or NOM. Possible reasons were discussed. Urinary SIA were significantly lower after M than after NOM ((15)N: p = 0.039; (13)C: p = 0.006) and close to those of pork fillet. Characteristic patterns of SIA were measured in individual amino acids (AA) by gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The results confirmed considerable differences in SIA between AA (delta(15)N, up to 22 per thousand; delta(13)C, up to 31 per thousand). Plots of (15)N versus (13)C abundances in hair revealed characteristic differences between indispensable and dispensable AA. The intervention-dependent changes of AA-specific SIA were not as clear as expected. Although the AA-specific SIA may reveal more detailed characteristics of physiological conditions, further methodological research is required. We suggest that the SIA of leucine can be potential markers of protein intake. The reliability of SIA as biomarkers of protein intake still have to be tested in longer lasting intervention studies in humans. The results may have implications in the assessment for possible benefits and risks of protein consumption. 2009 John Wiley

  15. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Selected Nutritional Indices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Caesarean Section (CS) is a major surgical procedure, often performed when a vaginal delivery is considered unsafe. Objective: This study was carried out to understand the interaction between acute phase proteins and nutritional factors consequent to caesarean section. The knowledge of this interaction is ...

  16. Competitive adsorption of plasma proteins at solid—liquid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, H.G.W.; Breemhaar, W.; Smolders, C.A.; Feijen, Jan

    1986-01-01

    The competitive adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA), human immuno-γ-globulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFb) onto polystyrene (PS) at 20° C and a pH of 7.35 (phosphate-buffered saline) was studied. Protein adsorption was studied using enzyme immunoassay. The results obtained with the

  17. Adsorption of proteins from plasma at polyester non-wovens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, A.J.A.; Klomp, A.J.A.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Mol, J.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Feijen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Polyester non-wovens in filters for the removal of leukocytes from platelet concentrates (PCs) must be platelet compatible. In PC filtration, the adsorption of proteins at the plasma–non-woven interface can be of great importance with respect to the yield of platelets. Unmodified and radio frequency

  18. Improved detection specificity for plasma proteins by targeting cysteine-containing peptides with photo-SRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Girod, Marion; Simon, Romain; Jeudy, Jérémy; Chirot, Fabien; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2013-03-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has emerged as an alternative to immunoassays for protein quantification owing to faster development time and higher multiplexing capability. However, the SRM strategy is faced with the high complexity of peptide mixtures after trypsin digestion of whole plasma or the cellular proteome that most of the time causes contamination, irremediably, by interfering compounds in the transition channels monitored. This problem becomes increasingly acute when the targeted protein is present at a low concentration. In this work, the merit of laser-induced photo-dissociation in the visible region at 473 nm implemented in an hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer (photo-SRM) was evaluated for detection specificity of cysteine-containing peptides in a group of plasma proteins after tagging with a dabcyl chromophore. Compared with conventional SRM, photo-SRM chromatograms have improved detection specificity for most of peptides monitored. Comparison of the signals obtained for the best proteotypic peptides in SRM mode and those recorded by photo-SRM of cysteine-containing peptides for the same proteins reveals either increased (up to 10-fold) or similar signal to photo-SRM detection. Finally, photo-SRM has extended response linearity across a calibration plot obtained by diluting human plasma in rat plasma, down to the lowest concentrations. Hence, photo-SRM may advantageously complement conventional SRM in assay of proteins in complex biological matrices.

  19. The effect of polycarboxylate shell of magnetite nanoparticles on protein corona formation in blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekeres, Márta, E-mail: szekeres@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary, 1 Aradi vt, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Tóth, Ildikó Y. [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary, 1 Aradi vt, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Turcu, R. [National Institute R& D for Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca 400293 (Romania); Tombácz, Etelka [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary, 1 Aradi vt, 6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2017-04-01

    The development of protein corona around nanoparticles upon administration to the human body is responsible in a large part for their biodistribution, cell-internalization and toxicity or biocompatibility. We studied the influence of the chemical composition of polyelectrolyte shells (citric acid (CA) and poly(acrylic-co-maleic acid) (PAM)) of core-shell magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) on the evolution of protein corona in human plasma (HP). The aggregation state and zeta potential of the particles were measured in the range of HP concentration between 1 and 80 (v/v)% 3 min and 20 h after dispersing the particles in HP diluted with Tris buffered saline. Naked MNPs aggregated in HP solution, but the carboxylated MNPs became stabilized colloidally at higher plasma concentrations. Significant differences were observed at low plasma concentration. CA@MNPs aggregated instantly while the hydrodynamic diameter of PAM@MNP increased only slightly at 1–3 v/v % HP concentrations. The observed differences in protein corona formation can be explained by the differences in the steric effects of the polycarboxylate shells. It is interesting that relatively small but systematic changes in zeta potential alter the aggregation state significantly. - Highlights: • Human plasma protein corona cannot stabilize naked and citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles. • Polycarboxylic acid (PAM) coated MNPs are well stabilized with HP protein corona. • Stability pattern of naked, CA and PAM-coated MNPs is not predicted by zeta potential.

  20. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, İlyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring's plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring's plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development.

  1. Highly abundant defense proteins in human sweat as revealed by targeted proteomics and label-free quantification mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csősz, É; Emri, G; Kalló, G; Tsaprailis, G; Tőzsér, J

    2015-10-01

    The healthy human skin with its effective antimicrobial defense system forms an efficient barrier against invading pathogens. There is evidence suggesting that the composition of this chemical barrier varies between diseases, making the easily collected sweat an ideal candidate for biomarker discoveries. Our aim was to provide information about the normal composition of the sweat, and to study the chemical barrier found at the surface of skin. Sweat samples from healthy individuals were collected during sauna bathing, and the global protein panel was analysed by label-free mass spectrometry. SRM-based targeted proteomic methods were designed and stable isotope labelled reference peptides were used for method validation. Ninety-five sweat proteins were identified, 20 of them were novel proteins. It was shown that dermcidin is the most abundant sweat protein, and along with apolipoprotein D, clusterin, prolactin-inducible protein and serum albumin, they make up 91% of secreted sweat proteins. The roles of these highly abundant proteins were reviewed; all of which have protective functions, highlighting the importance of sweat glands in composing the first line of innate immune defense system, and maintaining the epidermal barrier integrity. Our findings with regard to the proteins forming the chemical barrier of the skin as determined by label-free quantification and targeted proteomics methods are in accordance with previous studies, and can be further used as a starting point for non-invasive sweat biomarker research. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Deep Coverage Proteomics Identifies More Low-Abundance Missing Proteins in Human Testis Tissue with Q-Exactive HF Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Luo, Weijia; Wu, Feilin; Peng, Xuehui; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Manli; Zhao, Yan; Su, Na; Qi, YingZi; Chen, Lingsheng; Zhang, Yangjun; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping

    2016-11-04

    Since 2012, missing proteins (MPs) investigation has been one of the critical missions of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) through various biochemical strategies. On the basis of our previous testis MPs study, faster scanning and higher resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomics might be conducive to MPs exploration, especially for low-abundance proteins. In this study, Q-Exactive HF (HF) was used to survey proteins from the same testis tissues separated by two separating methods (tricine- and glycine-SDS-PAGE), as previously described. A total of 8526 proteins were identified, of which more low-abundance proteins were uniquely detected in HF data but not in our previous LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Velos) reanalysis data. Further transcriptomics analysis showed that these uniquely identified proteins by HF also had lower expression at the mRNA level. Of the 81 total identified MPs, 74 and 39 proteins were listed as MPs in HF and Velos data sets, respectively. Among the above MPs, 47 proteins (43 neXtProt PE2 and 4 PE3) were ranked as confirmed MPs after verifying with the stringent spectra match and isobaric and single amino acid variants filtering. Functional investigation of these 47 MPs revealed that 11 MPs were testis-specific proteins and 7 MPs were involved in spermatogenesis process. Therefore, we concluded that higher scanning speed and resolution of HF might be factors for improving the low-abundance MP identification in future C-HPP studies. All mass-spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004092.

  3. Determinations of rare earth element abundance and U-Pb age of zircons using multispot laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takaomi D; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Kon, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new calibration technique for multielement determination and U-Pb dating of zircon samples using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with galvanometric optics. With the galvanometric optics, laser ablation of two or more sample materials could be achieved in very short time intervals (~10 ms). The resulting sample aerosols released from different ablation pits or different solid samples were mixed and homogenized within the sample cell and then transported into the ICP ion source. Multiple spot laser ablation enables spiking of analytes or internal standard elements directly into the solid samples, and therefore the standard addition calibration method can be applied for the determination of trace elements in solid samples. In this study, we have measured the rare earth element (REE) abundances of two zircon samples (Nancy 91500 and Prešovice) based on the standard addition technique, using a direct spiking of analytes through a multispot laser ablation of the glass standard material (NIST SRM612). The resulting REE abundance data show good agreement with previously reported values within analytical uncertainties achieved in this study (10% for most elements). Our experiments demonstrated that nonspectroscopic interferences on 14 REEs could be significantly reduced by the standard addition technique employed here. Another advantage of galvanometric devices is the accumulation of sample aerosol released from multiple spots. In this study we have measured the U-Pb age of a zircon sample (LMR) using an accumulation of sample aerosols released from 10 separate ablation pits of low diameters (~8 μm). The resulting (238)U-(206)Pb age data for the LMR zircons was 369 ± 64 Ma, which is in good agreement with previously reported age data (367.6 ± 1.5 Ma). (1) The data obtained here clearly demonstrate that the multiple spot laser ablation-ICPMS technique can become a powerful approach for elemental and isotopic

  4. Resolving mixed mechanisms of protein subdiffusion at the T cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Yonatan; Sherman, Eilon

    2017-06-01

    The plasma membrane is a complex medium where transmembrane proteins diffuse and interact to facilitate cell function. Membrane protein mobility is affected by multiple mechanisms, including crowding, trapping, medium elasticity and structure, thus limiting our ability to distinguish them in intact cells. Here we characterize the mobility and organization of a short transmembrane protein at the plasma membrane of live T cells, using single particle tracking and photoactivated-localization microscopy. Protein mobility is highly heterogeneous, subdiffusive and ergodic-like. Using mobility characteristics, we segment individual trajectories into subpopulations with distinct Gaussian step-size distributions. Particles of low-to-medium mobility consist of clusters, diffusing in a viscoelastic and fractal-like medium and are enriched at the centre of the cell footprint. Particles of high mobility undergo weak confinement and are more evenly distributed. This study presents a methodological approach to resolve simultaneous mixed subdiffusion mechanisms acting on polydispersed samples and complex media such as cell membranes.

  5. Numerical calculation on a two-step subdiffusion behavior of lateral protein movement in plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Tomonari; Okumoto, Atsushi; Goto, Hitoshi; Sekino, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    A two-step subdiffusion behavior of lateral movement of transmembrane proteins in plasma membranes has been observed by using single-molecule experiments. A nested double-compartment model where large compartments are divided into several smaller ones has been proposed in order to explain this observation. These compartments are considered to be delimited by membrane-skeleton "fences" and membrane-protein "pickets" bound to the fences. We perform numerical simulations of a master equation using a simple two-dimensional lattice model to investigate the heterogeneous diffusion dynamics behavior of transmembrane proteins within plasma membranes. We show that the experimentally observed two-step subdiffusion process can be described using fence and picket models combined with decreased local diffusivity of transmembrane proteins in the vicinity of the pickets. This allows us to explain the two-step subdiffusion behavior without explicitly introducing nested double compartments.

  6. Fish protein hydrolysate elevates plasma bile acids and reduces visceral adipose tissue mass in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Madsen, Lise; Hao, Qin

    2009-01-01

    Conjugation of bile acids (BAs) to the amino acids taurine or glycine increases their solubility and promotes liver BA secretion. Supplementing diets with taurine or glycine modulates BA metabolism and enhances fecal BA excretion in rats. However, it is still unclear whether dietary proteins....../retroperitoneal adipose tissues of rats fed saithe FPH. Our results provide the first evidence that dietary protein sources with different amino acid compositions can modulate the level of plasma bile acids and our data suggest potential novel mechanisms by which dietary protein sources can affect energy metabolism....... varying in taurine and glycine contents alter BA metabolism, and thereby modulate the recently discovered systemic effects of BAs. Here we show that rats fed a diet containing saithe fish protein hydrolysate (saithe FPH), rich in taurine and glycine, for 26 days had markedly elevated fasting plasma BA...

  7. Role of egg sulfolipidimmobilizing protein 1 on mouse sperm-egg plasma membrane binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnonkitpanit, V; White, D; Suwajanakorn, S; Kan, F W; Namking, M; Wells, G; Kamolvarin, N; Tanphaichitr, N

    1999-09-01

    We have shown that sperm sulfolipidimmobilizing protein 1 (SLIP1, molecular mass of 68 kDa), a sulfogalactosylglycerolipid (SGG)-binding protein, is significant in sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction. The objective of this study was to localize SLIP1 on the egg and determine its role in gamete interaction. Immunofluorescence and immunoprotein A gold electron microscopy localized SLIP1 to the egg plasma membrane. In vitro gamete binding, using zona-free eggs preincubated with antiSLIP1 Fab before coincubation with sperm, showed a significant, dose-dependent decrease in sperm-egg plasma membrane binding. Similar results were obtained when affinity-purified antiSLIP1 IgG was used for egg pretreatment. The significance of egg SLIP1 in sperm-egg plasma membrane binding was further demonstrated by a decrease (36-52%) in in vitro fertilization when zona-intact eggs were pretreated with antiSLIP1 IgG. Since SLIP1 has been shown to bind SGG in vitro, we investigated the possibility that sperm SGG may participate in sperm-egg plasma membrane binding through egg SLIP1. Pretreatment of sperm with antiSGG Fab prior to coincubation with zona-free eggs resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in sperm-egg plasma membrane binding. Collectively, these findings strongly suggest a role for egg SLIP1 in sperm-egg plasma membrane interaction, which may be through its binding to sperm SGG.

  8. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor Trk...

  9. D-fructose-binding proteins in bull seminal plasma: Isolation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liberda, J.; Kraus, Marek; Ryšlavá, H.; Vlasáková, M.; Jonáková, Věra; Tichá, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2001), s. 113-119 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/99/0357; GA ČR GV524/96/K162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : bull seminal plasma * non-heparin-binding and heparin-binding proteins * D-fructose-binding proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  10. Measurement of the distribution of indium-111 on human plasma proteins using immunoprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiblen, B.J.; Melaragno, A.J.; Catsimpoolas, N.; Valeri, C.R. (Boston Univ., MA (USA). School of Medicine)

    1983-03-11

    The distribution of radioactivity on plasma proteins labeled by addition of (/sup 111/In)oxine to citrated plasma was investigated. Analyses of plasma proteins separated on Sephadex G-200 columns showed that 23-36% of the /sup 111/In was associated with proteins with molecular weight greater than 200,000 daltons and the remaining /sup 111/In was associated with proteins with molecular weight less than 100,000 daltons, presumably transferrin. Affinity chromatography experiments showed that less than 2% of the radioactivity was associated with albumin. Further identification of the labeled proteins and quantitation of associated radioactivity was performed by precipitating specific proteins with antibodies. These studies showed that the /sup 111/In was distributed on transferrin (54-76%), fibrinogen (11-24%), IgM (8-20%), C3 (10-21%), and haptoglobin (3-8%). /sup 111/In associated with fibrinogen, IgM, and haptoglobin was overestimated in some experiments due to binding of /sup 111/In-labeled C3 to the antigen-antibody precipitates.

  11. Affinity proteomic profiling of plasma for proteins associated to area-based mammographic breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byström, Sanna; Eklund, Martin; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Fredolini, Claudia; Eriksson, Mikael; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Schwenk, Jochen M; Gabrielson, Marike

    2018-02-14

    Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but molecular understanding of how breast density relates to cancer risk is less complete. Studies of proteins in blood plasma, possibly associated with mammographic density, are well-suited as these allow large-scale analyses and might shed light on the association between breast cancer and breast density. Plasma samples from 1329 women in the Swedish KARMA project, without prior history of breast cancer, were profiled with antibody suspension bead array (SBA) assays. Two sample sets comprising 729 and 600 women were screened by two different SBAs targeting a total number of 357 proteins. Protein targets were selected through searching the literature, for either being related to breast cancer or for being linked to the extracellular matrix. Association between proteins and absolute area-based breast density (AD) was assessed by quantile regression, adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Plasma profiling revealed linear association between 20 proteins and AD, concordant in the two sets of samples (p density and processes of tissue homeostasis, DNA repair, cancer development and/or progression in breast cancer. Further validation and follow-up studies of the shortlisted protein candidates in independent cohorts will be needed to infer their role in breast density and its progression in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  12. Higher-order oligomerization targets plasma membrane proteins and HIV gag to exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted organelles that have the same topology as the cell and bud outward (outward is defined as away from the cytoplasm from endosome membranes or endosome-like domains of plasma membrane. Here we describe an exosomal protein-sorting pathway in Jurkat T cells that selects cargo proteins on the basis of both higher-order oligomerization (the oligomerization of oligomers and plasma membrane association, acts on proteins seemingly without regard to their function, sequence, topology, or mechanism of membrane association, and appears to operate independently of class E vacuolar protein-sorting (VPS function. We also show that higher-order oligomerization is sufficient to target plasma membrane proteins to HIV virus-like particles, that diverse Gag proteins possess exosomal-sorting information, and that higher-order oligomerization is a primary determinant of HIV Gag budding/exosomal sorting. In addition, we provide evidence that both the HIV late domain and class E VPS function promote HIV budding by unexpectedly complex, seemingly indirect mechanisms. These results support the hypothesis that HIV and other retroviruses are generated by a normal, nonviral pathway of exosome biogenesis.

  13. Heparin-binding proteins of human seminal plasma: purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Kashav, Tara; Singh, Tej P; Yadav, Savita

    2008-12-01

    Human seminal plasma (HuSP) contains several proteins that bind heparin and related glycosaminoglycans. Heparin binding proteins (HBPs) from seminal plasma have been shown to participate in modulation of capacitation or acrosome reaction and thus have been correlated with fertility in some species. However, these have not been studied in detail in human. The objective of this study was to purify major HBPs from HuSP in order to characterize these proteins. HBPs were isolated by affinity-chromatography on Heparin-Sepharose column, purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and Size-exclusion chromatography and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Identification of HBPs was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Here we report the purification and identification of seven HBPs in seminal fluid. The major HBPs are lactoferrin and its fragments, semenogelin I fragments, semenogelin II, prostate specific antigen, homolog of bovine seminal plasma-proteins (BSP), zinc finger protein (Znf 169) and fibronectin fragments. In this study we are reporting for the first time the purification and identification of BSP-homolog and Znf 169 from HuSP and classified them as HBPs. Here we report the purification of seven clinically important proteins from human seminal fluid through heparin affinity chromatography and RP-HPLC, in limited steps with higher yield. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A cell-free assay to determine the stoichiometry of plasma membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Cesar; Vivar, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Plasma membrane receptors, transporters, and ion channel molecules are often found as oligomeric structures that participate in signaling cascades essential for cell survival. Different states of protein oligomerization may play a role in functional control and allosteric regulation. Stochastic GFP-photobleaching (SGP) has emerged as an affordable and simple method to determine the stoichiometry of proteins at the plasma membrane. This non-invasive optical approach can be useful for total internal reflection of fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), where signal-to-noise ratio is very high at the plasma membrane. Here, we report an alternative methodology implemented on a standard laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). The simplicity of our method will allow for its implementation in any epifluorescence microscope of choice.

  15. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojadzsieva, M.; Kocsar, L. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)); Kremmer, T. (Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic steroids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline.

  16. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins

  17. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, PM; Le Saux, A; Lee, CM

    2007-01-01

    in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose...

  18. PREGNANCY-ASSOCIATED PLASMA PROTEIN-A2 (PAPP-A2) POLYNUCLEOTIDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2), its nucleotide and amino acid sequences antisense molecules to the nucleotide sequences which encode PAPP-A2, expression vectors for the production of purified PAPP-A2, antibodies capable of binding specifically...

  19. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  20. Assessment of the effect of plasma total protein and albumin levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty adult malaria patients were involved in the study. Plasma total protein and albumin levels of the patients were determined before and after treatment with 25mg Choroquine base per kilogram body weight (C25). Clinical and parasitological evaluations were performed. The pretreatment as well as post treatment levels ...

  1. Charge modification of plasma and milk proteins results in antiviral active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P J; Harmsen, M C; Kuipers, M E; Van Dijk, A A; Van Der Strate, B W; Van Berkel, P H; Nuijens, J H; Smit, C; Witvrouw, M; De Clercq, E; de Béthune, M P; Pauwels, R; Meijer, D K

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that acylated plasma and milk proteins with increased negative charge, derived from various animal and human sources, are potent anti-HIV compounds. The antiviral effects seemed to correlate positively with the number of negative charges introduced into the various

  2. The Ubiquitous Distribution of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins across Cell Compartments in Arabidopsis Offers Tailored Protection against Abiotic Stress[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candat, Adrien; Paszkiewicz, Gaël; Neveu, Martine; Gautier, Romain; Logan, David C.; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic, mostly intrinsically disordered proteins, which play major roles in desiccation tolerance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, 51 genes encoding LEA proteins clustered into nine families have been inventoried. To increase our understanding of the yet enigmatic functions of these gene families, we report the subcellular location of each protein. Experimental data highlight the limits of in silico predictions for analysis of subcellular localization. Thirty-six LEA proteins localized to the cytosol, with most being able to diffuse into the nucleus. Three proteins were exclusively localized in plastids or mitochondria, while two others were found dually targeted to these organelles. Targeting cleavage sites could be determined for five of these proteins. Three proteins were found to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) residents, two were vacuolar, and two were secreted. A single protein was identified in pexophagosomes. While most LEA protein families have a unique subcellular localization, members of the LEA_4 family are widely distributed (cytosol, mitochondria, plastid, ER, and pexophagosome) but share the presence of the class A α-helix motif. They are thus expected to establish interactions with various cellular membranes under stress conditions. The broad subcellular distribution of LEA proteins highlights the requirement for each cellular compartment to be provided with protective mechanisms to cope with desiccation or cold stress. PMID:25005920

  3. Human umbilical cord plasma proteins revitalize hippocampal function in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Joseph M.; Mosher, Kira I.; Abbey, Rachelle J.; McBride, Alisha A.; James, Michelle L.; Berdnik, Daniela; Shen, Jadon C.; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin S.; Tingle, Martha; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Angst, Martin S.; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Ageing drives changes in neuronal and cognitive function, the decline of which is a major feature of many neurological disorders. The hippocampus, a brain region subserving roles of spatial and episodic memory and learning, is sensitive to the detrimental effects of ageing at morphological and molecular levels. With advancing age, synapses in various hippocampal subfields exhibit impaired long-term potentiation1, an electrophysiological correlate of learning and memory. At the molecular level, immediate early genes are among the synaptic plasticity genes that are both induced by long-term potentiation2, 3, 4 and downregulated in the aged brain5, 6, 7, 8. In addition to revitalizing other aged tissues9, 10, 11, 12, 13, exposure to factors in young blood counteracts age-related changes in these central nervous system parameters14, 15, 16, although the identities of specific cognition-promoting factors or whether such activity exists in human plasma remains unknown17. We hypothesized that plasma of an early developmental stage, namely umbilical cord plasma, provides a reservoir of such plasticity-promoting proteins. Here we show that human cord plasma treatment revitalizes the hippocampus and improves cognitive function in aged mice. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2), a blood-borne factor enriched in human cord plasma, young mouse plasma, and young mouse hippocampi, appears in the brain after systemic administration and increases synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent cognition in aged mice. Depletion experiments in aged mice revealed TIMP2 to be necessary for the cognitive benefits conferred by cord plasma. We find that systemic pools of TIMP2 are necessary for spatial memory in young mice, while treatment of brain slices with TIMP2 antibody prevents long-term potentiation, arguing for previously unknown roles for TIMP2 in normal hippocampal function. Our findings reveal that human cord plasma contains plasticity-enhancing proteins of high

  4. Human umbilical cord plasma proteins revitalize hippocampal function in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Abbey, Rachelle J; McBride, Alisha A; James, Michelle L; Berdnik, Daniela; Shen, Jadon C; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin S; Tingle, Martha; Hinkson, Izumi V; Angst, Martin S; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2017-04-27

    Ageing drives changes in neuronal and cognitive function, the decline of which is a major feature of many neurological disorders. The hippocampus, a brain region subserving roles of spatial and episodic memory and learning, is sensitive to the detrimental effects of ageing at morphological and molecular levels. With advancing age, synapses in various hippocampal subfields exhibit impaired long-term potentiation, an electrophysiological correlate of learning and memory. At the molecular level, immediate early genes are among the synaptic plasticity genes that are both induced by long-term potentiation and downregulated in the aged brain. In addition to revitalizing other aged tissues, exposure to factors in young blood counteracts age-related changes in these central nervous system parameters, although the identities of specific cognition-promoting factors or whether such activity exists in human plasma remains unknown. We hypothesized that plasma of an early developmental stage, namely umbilical cord plasma, provides a reservoir of such plasticity-promoting proteins. Here we show that human cord plasma treatment revitalizes the hippocampus and improves cognitive function in aged mice. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2), a blood-borne factor enriched in human cord plasma, young mouse plasma, and young mouse hippocampi, appears in the brain after systemic administration and increases synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent cognition in aged mice. Depletion experiments in aged mice revealed TIMP2 to be necessary for the cognitive benefits conferred by cord plasma. We find that systemic pools of TIMP2 are necessary for spatial memory in young mice, while treatment of brain slices with TIMP2 antibody prevents long-term potentiation, arguing for previously unknown roles for TIMP2 in normal hippocampal function. Our findings reveal that human cord plasma contains plasticity-enhancing proteins of high translational value for targeting ageing- or disease

  5. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, a marker for outcome in patients suspected for acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper K; Dalsgaard, Morten; Teisner, Ane S

    2010-01-01

    To examine if pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in patients with chest pain, could identify patients at risk for death or myocardial infarction.......To examine if pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in patients with chest pain, could identify patients at risk for death or myocardial infarction....

  6. Influence of hemodilution of plasma proteins on erythrocyte aggregability : An in vivo study in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Graaff, R; de Hoog, E; Veeger, NJGM; Panday, G; Boonstra, PW; van Oeveren, W

    2005-01-01

    Erythrocyte aggregation is known to be affected by a number of factors including the concentration of various plasma proteins. This study was performed to examine the in vivo effect of hemodilution of plasma proteins on erythrocyte aggregation in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)

  7. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable ro...

  8. Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is not a marker of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Teisner, Ane; Dalager, Soren

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) was present in the vulnerable plaque, and if not, to find alternative hypothesis for the release of PAPP-A.......To investigate if pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) was present in the vulnerable plaque, and if not, to find alternative hypothesis for the release of PAPP-A....

  9. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Hender; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles (NPs). The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  10. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This "protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains...... in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range...... of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a "receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET...

  11. Fe-nitrilotriacetic acid--binding proteins associated with rat liver plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisani, D; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1996-10-01

    The uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron by hepatocytes is known to occur and may contribute to the deposition of iron and resulting injury during hemochromatosis. To examine the proteins that may function in the transport of nontransferrin-bound iron, the properties of FeNTA-binding to rat liver basolateral plasma membranes were characterized. The binding of 55FeNTA to purified liver basolateral plasma membranes was measured using a simple centrifugation assay. The binding activity could be solubilized with 0.1% octylglucoside; apparent molecular weight Mapp approximately 210 kd for the binding complex was determined by gel filtration chromatography. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to further purify binding protein(s) from rat liver plasma membranes and at least six polypeptides were identified by silver staining. If associated in a stoichiometric complex, the molecular mass of these proteins would predict a size of approximately 227 kd in fairly close agreement with the gel filtration experiments. The characterization of FeNTA-binding proteins associated with basolateral membranes is the first step towards understanding elements responsible for the uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron by the liver.

  12. An early nodulin-like protein accumulates in the sieve element plasma membrane of Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Junaid A.; Wang, Qi; Sjölund, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    ) tissue cultures, recognizes an antigen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve element differentiation. The identity of the RS6 antigen...... from the precursor protein, resulting in a mature peptide of approximately 15 kD that is attached to the sieve element plasma membrane via a carboxy-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor. Many of the Arabidopsis ENOD-like proteins accumulate in gametophytic tissues, whereas in both......Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cell complex have essential roles in the physiological functioning of the phloem. The monoclonal antibody line RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from California shield leaf (Streptanthus tortuosus; Brassicaceae...

  13. Prediction of colorectal cancer diagnosis based on circulating plasma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surinova, Silvia; Choi, Meena; Tao, Sha; Schüffler, Peter J; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Vysloužil, Kamil; Khoylou, Marta; Srovnal, Josef; Liu, Yansheng; Matondo, Mariette; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Weisser, Hendrik; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hajdúch, Marián; Brenner, Hermann; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer with blood-based markers is a critical clinical need. Here we describe a phased mass spectrometry-based approach for the discovery, screening, and validation of circulating protein biomarkers with diagnostic value. Initially, we profiled human primary tumor tissue epithelia and characterized about 300 secreted and cell surface candidate glycoproteins. These candidates were then screened in patient systemic circulation to identify detectable candidates in blood plasma. An 88-plex targeting method was established to systematically monitor these proteins in two large and independent cohorts of plasma samples, which generated quantitative clinical datasets at an unprecedented scale. The data were deployed to develop and evaluate a five-protein biomarker signature for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:26253081

  14. Targeted quantitation of CVD-linked plasma proteins for biomarker verification and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Byrns, Simon; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-12-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Judicious monitoring of common risk factors has been unable to control this global epidemic, necessitating novel biomarkers for improved screening and earlier disease detection and management. Although numerous plasma proteins have been associated with CVD, only a few of these potential biomarkers have been validated for clinical use. Here we review the quantitative proteomic methods used to verify and validate new biomarker candidates in human plasma. These methods center on a bottom-up approach involving multiple or selected reaction monitoring, for targeted detection, with stable isotope-labeled standards, for peptide normalization. Also included are a discussion of future strategies for improved CVD protein biomarker verification and validation, recommendations for method translation to the clinic, and future projections for protein biomarker research.

  15. Stimulated synthesis of plasma protein species in Q fever and endotoxemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picking, W.D.; Ershadi, M.; Hackstadt, T.; Paretsky, D.

    1987-05-01

    Q fever stimulates hepatic transcription and translation. Products of stimulated transcription have been identified, but not of translation. Protein (Pr) synthesis and rPr S6 phosphorylation correlated. The authors now report stimulated synthesis of plasma Pr species in early febrile responses to Q fever and Coxiella burnetii lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Guinea pigs received 400 g LPS intraperitoneally and 7 hr later 250 Ci L-(TVS)met, then sacrificed 3 hr later. Plasma Pr sp act (cpm/mg Pr) increased 2.3X over controls (N). Exptl plasma Pr PAGE autorads showed intensified Pr bands at M/sub r/ 55K. Guinea pigs infected with C. burnetii (Inf) received 400 Ci (TVS)met 84 hr p.i. and were sacrificed 3 hr later. Inf plasma Pr 1D-PAGE showed bands at 55K similar to that found with LPS, with lower albumin concn. Coomassie stain and autorads of 2-D PAGEs showed intensified or new acidic peptide species in Inf plasma. PAGE autorads in vitro translations using liver mRNA and ribosomes showed major species in Inf systems at 49K (4+) and 62K (2+) compared to N. The data indicate acute phase protein induction by LPS or rickettsial infection.

  16. Plasma volume and intravascular protein masses in trained boys and fit young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, G; Röcker, L

    1977-12-01

    Plasma volumes and intravascular protein masses were measured in eight well-trained boys (VO2 max = 59.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg body wt) aged 13-15 yr and compared with two groups of adult athletes aged 17-20 yr (VO2 max = 61.8 +/- 3.4 ml/kg body wt) and 24-30 yr (VO2 max = 63.3 +/- 4.1 ml/kg body wt), respectively. The trained boys had larger plasma volumes and increased intravascular masses of albumin and hepatogenic globulins as compared with values available for children with normal physical activity. There was no significant difference between the boys and the adults concerning maximal oxygen uptake, plasma volume, albumin, immunoglobins, and haptoglobin, when allowance was made for differences in body dimensions; probably due to the young age, however, the boys had considerably higher relative alpha2-macroglobulin and transferrin masses. Endurance training apparently elicits the same response of the plasma protein system regardless of age, at least after pubertal age has been attained. The overall effect of these changes implies an increase of the water binding capacity of the plasma

  17. Plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations and follicular dynamics in ewes fed proteins of different degradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bianchi Lazarin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of overfeeding with protein of different degradability on body condition, plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations, ovulation number and follicular dynamics were assessed in Santa Ines ewes. Twelve ewes were assigned to a randomized block design according to body weight and received overfeeding with soybean meal or with corn gluten meal or maintenance diet for 28 days before ovulation and during the next estrous cycle. Blood samples were taken on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the beginning of treatments for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and on days 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 into the estrous cycle for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone. Follicular dynamics was monitored daily by ultrasound during one estrous cycle. Dry matter and crude protein intake, weight gain, plasma urea nitrogen concentration before ovulation, number of ovulations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 1st and of the 2nd waves and the growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave were higher in the ewes that received overfeeding. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave was higher in the ewes fed maintenance diet. The back fat thickness, plasma urea nitrogen before ovulation and progesterone concentrations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 2nd wave and growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave were higher in ewes that received overfeeding with soybean meal. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave was higher in ewes that received overfeeding with corn gluten meal. Overfeeding with protein-rich feeds may increase the ovulation number and with soybean meal, it may be effective in increasing plasma progesterone concentration in ewes.

  18. [Nutritional characteristics of a cookie formulated with bovine blood plasma as a main source of protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez Salas, E; Benitez Payares, B; Méndez Gil, N; Rangel Matos, L; Medrano, I; Venencia, I; Izquierdo, P; Romero, R; Castejón, H V

    1998-09-01

    The nutritional characteristics of a cookie formulated with bovine plasma as main protein source was evaluated. Bovine plasma was mixed with wheat flour, sugar or salt, condiments and vegetable oil. The mix was placed in trays and baking at 120 degrees C during 1 hour. Moisture, fat, protein, carbohydrate, metabolizable energy, ash, iron, essential amino acids, essential fatty acids, apparent digestibility, protein efficiency ratio, acceptability and tolerance of the final product were determined. Results indicated that 100 g of the cookie have 5 g of moisture, 16 g of fat, 16 g of protein, 61.4 g of carbohydrate, 408.2 Kcal of metabolizable energy, 1.59 g of ash, 1.9 mg of iron and 6.59 g of essential amino acids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are in higher amount than saturated fatty acids. Results also indicated that 100 g of cookie provide at least 20% of the daily energy requirements, 24% of the iron and between 30 to 50% of the daily protein requirements for children at school age. Its digestibility and PER, tested in rats, were of 88.4% and 2.32 respectively. Acceptability and tolerance, both tested in children, were 97% and 100% respectively. The protein cookie could be included as a protein and energy supply in school meals.

  19. Enhancement in recovery of drugs with high protein binding efficiency from human plasma using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Aniruddha; Desai, Rucha P; Ramchand, C N

    2017-09-05

    In this paper, we propose an alternate method for bioanalytical extraction of drugs from human plasma samples using bare magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for deproteination of biological samples that further assist in extraction of plasma bound drugs for bioanalytical studies. The method uses basic solvents (ethanol, methanol, etc.) rather than the expensive and toxic solvents. The MNPs provide several advantages like avoiding the use of centrifuge machine, and making extraction time effective. The average time involved for the sample preparation is around 30-40min. The developed method was examined for seven different drugs having moderate (40-70%) to high (>80%) plasma protein binding efficiency. The present study focuses on the principle of magnetic nanoparticle based extraction of drug that binds with the plasma protein. In calcitriol (protein binding efficiency >99%), it was observed that the drug extraction efficiency could be enhanced by 16% using the present method. However, we assume that still there is a scope for improving the extraction efficiency by optimizing proper solvent for the specific drug. The use of magnetic nanoparticles makes the extraction cost effective and quick with improved efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comparison of Blood Factor XII Autoactivation in Buffer, Protein Cocktail, Serum, and Plasma Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Avantika; Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Pitakjakpipop, Harit; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of blood plasma coagulation in vitro by contact with material surfaces is demonstrably dependent on plasma-volume-to-activator-surface-area ratio. The only plausible explanation consistent with current understanding of coagulation-cascade biochemistry is that procoagulant stimulus arising from the activation complex of the intrinsic pathway is dependent on activator surface area. And yet, it is herein shown that activation of the blood zymogen factor XII (Hageman factor, FXII) dissolved in buffer, protein cocktail, heat-denatured serum, and FXI deficient plasma does not exhibit activator surface-area dependence. Instead, a highly-variable burst of procoagulant-enzyme yield is measured that exhibits no measurable kinetics, sensitivity to mixing, or solution-temperature dependence. Thus, FXII activation in both buffer and protein-containing solutions does not exhibit characteristics of a biochemical reaction but rather appears to be a “mechanochemical” reaction induced by FXII molecule interactions with hydrophilic activator particles that do not formally adsorb blood proteins from solution. Results of this study strongly suggest that activator surface-area dependence observed in contact activation of plasma coagulation does not solely arise at the FXII activation step of the intrinsic pathway. PMID:23117212

  1. A comparison of blood factor XII autoactivation in buffer, protein cocktail, serum, and plasma solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Avantika; Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Pitakjakpipop, Harit; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Vogler, Erwin A

    2013-01-01

    Activation of blood plasma coagulation in vitro by contact with material surfaces is demonstrably dependent on plasma-volume-to-activator-surface-area ratio. The only plausible explanation consistent with current understanding of coagulation-cascade biochemistry is that procoagulant stimulus arising from the activation complex of the intrinsic pathway is dependent on activator surface area. And yet, it is herein shown that activation of the blood zymogen factor XII (Hageman factor, FXII) dissolved in buffer, protein cocktail, heat-denatured serum, and FXI deficient plasma does not exhibit activator surface-area dependence. Instead, a highly-variable burst of procoagulant-enzyme yield is measured that exhibits no measurable kinetics, sensitivity to mixing, or solution-temperature dependence. Thus, FXII activation in both buffer and protein-containing solutions does not exhibit characteristics of a biochemical reaction but rather appears to be a "mechanochemical" reaction induced by FXII molecule interactions with hydrophilic activator particles that do not formally adsorb blood proteins from solution. Results of this study strongly suggest that activator surface-area dependence observed in contact activation of plasma coagulation does not solely arise at the FXII activation step of the intrinsic pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma Protein Profiles Differ Between Women Diagnosed with Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN 1 and 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E. Partridge

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of precancerous cells in the cervix and their clinical management is the main purpose of cervical cancer prevention and treatment programs. Cytological findings or testing for high risk (HR-human papillomavirus (HPV are inadequately sensitive for use in triage of women at high risk for cervical cancer. The current study is an exploratory study to identify candidate surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI time of flight (TOF mass spectrometry (MS protein profiles in plasma that may distinguish cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3 from CIN 1 among women infected with HR-HPV. We evaluated the SELDI-TOF-MS plasma protein profiles of HR-HPV positive 32 women with CIN 3 (cases and 28 women with CIN1 (controls. Case-control status was kept blinded and triplicates of each sample and quality control plasma samples were randomized and after robotic sample preparations were run on WCX2 chips. After alignment of mass/charge (m-z values, an iterative method was used to develop a classifier on a training data set that had 28 cases and 22 controls. The classifier developed was used to classify the subjects in a test data set that has six cases and six controls. The classifier separated the cases from controls in the test set with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity suggesting the possibility of using plasma SELDI protein profiles to identify women who are likely to have CIN 3 lesions.

  3. The impact of plasma protein binding on the renal transport of organic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Daniel A J; Perry, Jennifer L; Simon, John D; Pritchard, John B

    2006-01-01

    Drugs and xenobiotics bind to plasma proteins with varying degrees of affinity, and the amount of binding has a direct effect on free drug concentration and subsequent pharmacokinetics. Multiple active and facilitative transport systems regulate the excretion of anionic compounds from the blood in excretory and barrier tissues. Assumptions are made about in vivo substrate affinity and route of elimination based on data from plasma protein-free in vitro assays, particularly following expression of cloned transporters. Ochratoxin A (OTA), a fungal mycotoxin, is a high-affinity substrate for several renal secretory organic anion transporters (OATs), and literature suggests that this elimination pathway is the route of entry leading to proximal tubule-targeted toxicity. However, OTA is known to bind to several plasma proteins with a high affinity, particularly serum albumin, which may impact elimination. In this study, we have systematically examined the handling of OTA and other organic anions, estrone sulfate (ES) and methotrexate (MTX), by OATs in the presence of serum albumin. Increasing concentrations of albumin markedly reduced uptake of OTA by both Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing OATs 1, 3, and 4 and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1. For all transporters tested, virtually all mediated OTA uptake was eliminated by an albumin concentration equivalent to 10% of that present in the blood plasma. Thus, OTA uptake is dependent on the free substrate concentration and severely limited by binding to human serum albumin. MTX and ES uptake were likewise dependent on free concentration.

  4. Identification of calcium-binding proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Anne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The precise composition of the human sperm plasma membrane, the molecular interactions that define domain specific functions, and the regulation of membrane associated proteins during the capacitation process, still remain to be fully understood. Here, we investigated the repertoire of calcium-regulated proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane. Methods Surface specific radioiodination was combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, a 45Ca-overlay assay, computer assisted image analysis and mass spectrometry to identify calcium-binding proteins exposed on the human sperm surface. Results Nine acidic 45Ca-binding sperm proteins were excised from stained preparative 2D gels and identified by mass spectrometry. Five of the calcium binding proteins; HSPA2 (HSP70-1, HSPA5 (Bip, HYOU1 (ORP150, serum amyloid P-component (SAP and protein kinase C substrate 80K-H (80K-H were found to be accessible to Iodo-Bead catalyzed 125I-labelling on the surface of intact human sperm. Agglutination and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that SAP is situated on the plasma membrane of intact, motile sperm as well as permeabilized cells. Western blot analysis showed increased phosphorylation of human sperm 80K-H protein following in vitro capacitation. This is the first demonstration of the 80K-H protein in a mammalian sperm. Conclusion The presence of SAP on the surface of mature sperm implies that SAP has a physiological role in reproduction, which is thought to be in the removal of spermatozoa from the female genital tract via phagocytosis. Since 80K-H is a Ca2+-sensor recently implicated in the regulation of both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel activities, its detection in sperm represents the first direct signaling link between PKC and store-operated calcium channels identified in human sperm.

  5. DNA–protein π-interactions in nature: abundance, structure, composition and strength of contacts between aromatic amino acids and DNA nucleobases or deoxyribose sugar

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Katie A.; Kellie, Jennifer L.; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2014-01-01

    Four hundred twenty-eight high-resolution DNA–protein complexes were chosen for a bioinformatics study. Although 164 crystal structures (38% of those searched) contained no interactions, 574 discrete π–contacts between the aromatic amino acids and the DNA nucleobases or deoxyribose were identified using strict criteria, including visual inspection. The abundance and structure of the interactions were determined by unequivocally classifying the contacts as either π–π stacking, π–π T-shaped or ...

  6. The cell-based L-glutathione protection assays to study endocytosis and recycling of plasma membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihil, Kristine M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2013-12-13

    Membrane trafficking involves transport of proteins from the plasma membrane to the cell interior (i.e. endocytosis) followed by trafficking to lysosomes for degradation or to the plasma membrane for recycling. The cell based L-glutathione protection assays can be used to study endocytosis and recycling of protein receptors, channels, transporters, and adhesion molecules localized at the cell surface. The endocytic assay requires labeling of cell surface proteins with a cell membrane impermeable biotin containing a disulfide bond and the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester at 4 ºC - a temperature at which membrane trafficking does not occur. Endocytosis of biotinylated plasma membrane proteins is induced by incubation at 37 ºC. Next, the temperature is decreased again to 4 ºC to stop endocytic trafficking and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins that have remained at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione. At this point, only proteins that were endocytosed remain protected from L-glutathione and thus remain biotinylated. After cell lysis, biotinylated proteins are isolated with streptavidin agarose, eluted from agarose, and the biotinylated protein of interest is detected by western blotting. During the recycling assay, after biotinylation cells are incubated at 37 °C to load endocytic vesicles with biotinylated proteins and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins remaining at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione at 4 ºC as in the endocytic assay. Next, cells are incubated again at 37 °C to allow biotinylated proteins from endocytic vesicles to recycle to the plasma membrane. Cells are then incubated at 4 ºC, and the disulfide bond in biotin attached to proteins that recycled to the plasma membranes is reduced with L-glutathione. The biotinylated proteins protected from L-glutathione are those that did not recycle to the plasma membrane.

  7. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wu

    Full Text Available Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs, mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin, exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  8. Ovulation-inducing factor: a protein component of llama seminal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanca Wilfredo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we documented the presence of ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in the seminal plasma of llamas and alpacas. The purpose of the study was to define the biochemical characteristics of the molecule(s in seminal plasma responsible for inducing ovulation. Methods In Experiment 1, llama seminal plasma was centrifuged using filtration devices with nominal molecular mass cut-offs of 30, 10 and 5 kDa. Female llamas (n = 9 per group were treated i.m. with whole seminal plasma (positive control, phosphate-buffered saline (negative control, or the fraction of seminal plasma equal or higher than 30 kDa, 10 to 30 kDa, 5 to 10 kDa, or Results In Experiment 1, all llamas in the equal or higher than 30 kDa and positive control groups ovulated (9/9 in each, but none ovulated in the other groups (P Conclusions We conclude that ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in llama seminal plasma is a protein molecule that is resistant to heat and enzymatic digestion with proteinase K, and has a molecular mass of approximately equal or higher than 30 kDa.

  9. New insights into the distribution, protein abundance and subcellular localisation of the endogenous peroxisomal biogenesis proteins PEX3 and PEX19 in different organs and cell types of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Claudia; Chen, Jiangping; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Bonilla-Martinez, Rocio; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles mainly involved in ROS and lipid metabolism. Their abundance, protein composition and metabolic function vary depending on the cell type and adjust to different intracellular and environmental factors such as oxidative stress or nutrition. The biogenesis and proliferation of these important organelles are regulated by proteins belonging to the peroxin (PEX) family. PEX3, an integral peroxisomal membrane protein, and the cytosolic shuttling receptor PEX19 are thought to be responsible for the early steps of peroxisome biogenesis and assembly of their matrix protein import machinery. Recently, both peroxins were suggested to be also involved in the autophagy of peroxisomes (pexophagy). Despite the fact that distribution and intracellular abundance of these proteins might regulate the turnover of the peroxisomal compartment in a cell type-specific manner, a comprehensive analysis of the endogenous PEX3 and PEX19 distribution in different organs is still missing. In this study, we have therefore generated antibodies against endogenous mouse PEX3 and PEX19 and analysed their abundance and subcellular localisation in various mouse organs, tissues and cell types and compared it to the one of three commonly used peroxisomal markers (PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase). Our results revealed that the abundance of PEX3, PEX19, PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase strongly varies in the analysed organs and cell types, suggesting that peroxisome abundance, biogenesis and matrix protein import are independently regulated. We further found that in some organs, such as heart and skeletal muscle, the majority of the shuttling receptor PEX19 is bound to the peroxisomal membrane and that a strong variability exists in the cell type-specific ratio of cytosol- and peroxisome-associated PEX19. In conclusion, our results indicate that peroxisomes in various cell types are heterogeneous with regards to their matrix, membrane and biogenesis proteins.

  10. Analysis for plasma protein biomarkers following an accidental human exposure to sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Richard; Capacio, Benedict R; Korte, William D; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Barr, John R

    2008-01-01

    Following an accidental human exposure to a vesicating agent, plasma samples were analyzed for specific biomarkers of sulfur mustard. One individual suffered chemical burns over 6.5% of the body surface area and required hospitalization; the second individual developed a single, small blister. Plasma specimens from both individuals were examined using two different assays. The first assay targeted sulfur mustard adducts to cysteine-34 of albumin using affinity chromatography, enzyme digestion, and analysis of the alkylated peptide fragment using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The second assay targeted alkylation sites of glutamic and aspartic acids of plasma proteins. Following precipitation of plasma proteins, the sulfur mustard adducts were cleaved from the protein using base, derivatized, and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Samples obtained over a 42-day period from the individual requiring hospitalization produced positive results for sulfur mustard adducts using both assays. Observed levels of the sulfur mustard biomarker decreased by approximately 75% between days 2 and 42 for both assays. Samples obtained over a six-day period from the individual with a single, small blister produced positive results for the albumin adduct assay. Observed levels were much lower than levels from the hospitalized patient. Blood samples from suspected human exposures to sulfur mustard have only rarely been made available for analysis by sensitive and specific laboratory assays. The data presented here add significantly to the small database of information that currently exists on human biomarkers of sulfur mustard exposure, linking a well-documented exposure event with levels of plasma protein adducts.

  11. Effects of dietary nitrogen concentration on messenger RNA expression and protein abundance of urea transporter-B and aquaporins in ruminal papillae from lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2011-01-01

    lactating dairy cows. Ruminal papillae were harvested from cows fed low N (12.9% crude protein) and high N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design with 21-d periods. The mRNA expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and protein abundance by immunoblotting. The m......RNA expression of UT-B was not affected by dietary treatment, whereas mRNA expression of AQP3, 7, and 10 were greater in the high N compared with the low N fed cows. Using peptide-derived rabbit antibodies to cow AQP3, 7, and 8, immunoblotting revealed bands of approximately 27, 27, and 24 kDa in ruminal...... papillae, respectively. A peptide-derived chicken antibody to cow UT-B detected a band of approximately 30 to 32 kDa in ruminal papillae. The abundance of UT-B and AQP3 and 7 were not affected by dietary treatment. In contrast, the abundance of AQP8 was greater in high N compared with low N diets...

  12. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Weber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples.

  13. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Triton X-114 cloud point extraction to subfractionate blood plasma proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune

    2015-01-01

    A simple and reproducible procedure for enrichment of a plasma protein subfraction suitable for two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) was developed, using a Triton X-114-based cloud point extraction (CPE). Appropriate conditions for such a CPE procedure were found by SDS......-PAGE to be a plasma protein concentration of about 10mg/ml in 3% (w/v) Triton X-114. 2DE of proteins obtained by CPE of 400μl of human plasma revealed about 200 spots constituting a spot pattern very different from the pattern of total plasma. The CPE procedure only had a limited contribution to the technical...... variation. Identification of about 60 spots, representing only 22 proteins, revealed that several proteins in the obtained subfraction were present in more isoforms or modifications. Among these were apolipoproteins (A-1, D, E, L1, and M), haptoglobin-related protein, phosphatidylcholine...

  15. Triton X-114 cloud point extraction to subfractionate blood plasma proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune

    2015-09-15

    A simple and reproducible procedure for enrichment of a plasma protein subfraction suitable for two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) was developed, using a Triton X-114-based cloud point extraction (CPE). Appropriate conditions for such a CPE procedure were found by SDS-PAGE to be a plasma protein concentration of about 10mg/ml in 3% (w/v) Triton X-114. 2DE of proteins obtained by CPE of 400 μl of human plasma revealed about 200 spots constituting a spot pattern very different from the pattern of total plasma. The CPE procedure only had a limited contribution to the technical variation. Identification of about 60 spots, representing only 22 proteins, revealed that several proteins in the obtained subfraction were present in more isoforms or modifications. Among these were apolipoproteins (A-1, D, E, L1, and M), haptoglobin-related protein, phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase, serum amyloid A, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1, which are proteins of a hydrophobic nature, as in plasma they relate to lipoprotein particles. Thus, Triton X-114-based CPE is a simple plasma prefractionation tool, attractive for detailed 2DE studies of hydrophobic plasma proteins and their isoforms or modifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced recognition of plasma proteins in a non-native state by complement C3b. A possible clearance mechanism for damaged proteins in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Kew, Richard R

    2015-03-01

    Complement C3 is a key fluid-phase protein of the immune system that covalently tags pathogenic cells and molecules for subsequent clearance. Previously, we reported that complement activation results in the formation of multiple C3b:plasma protein complexes in serum. However, it is not known if C3b attaches to any plasma protein in close proximity or preferentially binds damaged proteins. The objective of this study was to determine if C3b couples to plasma proteins in a non-native state and if this could be a potential mechanism to detect and clear damaged proteins from the blood. Using a purified in vitro system with alternative pathway proteins C3, factors B and D it was observed that guanidinium-HCl denaturation of three purified plasma proteins (albumin, alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor, vitamin D binding protein) greatly increased their capacity to form covalent complexes with C3b. However, native vitamin D binding protein, covalently attached to C3b, still retained the ability to bind its natural ligand G-actin, indicating that C3b links to plasma proteins in their native configuration but denaturation substantially increases this interaction. Serum complement activation generated a large number of C3b:plasma protein complexes that bound red blood cell membranes, suggesting a CR1-mediated clearance mechanism. Thermally denatured (60°C) serum activated the alternative pathway when added to fresh serum as evidenced by factor B cleavage and iC3b generation, but this heat-treated serum could not generate the pro-inflammatory peptide C5a. These results show that C3 recognizes and tags damaged plasma proteins for subsequent removal from the blood without triggering proinflammatory functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Purification and in vitro Chaperone Activity of a Class I Small Heat-Shock Protein Abundant in Recalcitrant Chestnut Seeds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carmen Collada; Luis Gomez; Rosa Casado; Cipriano Aragoncillo

    1997-01-01

    .... This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources...

  18. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant-microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eLeborgne-Castel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e. the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters.

  19. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL) 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC) adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and flotillin-1 (FLOT1), were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa) and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle). Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary hEEC and ECC-1 whilst

  20. Apolipoprotein A-I binds to a family of bovine seminal plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, P; Marcel, Y L; Uma, J; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Chapdelaine, A

    1989-10-05

    Bovine seminal plasma contains four similar acidic proteins, previously designated as BSP (bovine seminal plasma)-A1, BSP-A2, BSP-A3, and BSP-30-kDa, that when added to pituitary cell cultures result in the immediate secretion of gonadotropins (follitropin and lutropin). However, when calf or horse serum was included in the culture medium the secretion of gonadotropins was completely prevented. This effect was seen at levels up to 200 micrograms of BSP protein/ml while the presence of more than 200 micrograms of BSP protein/ml in the serum medium continued to release gonadotropins. This could be explained by the presence in the sera of a binding factor to the BSP proteins which prevents their action. This binding factor has been detected in all the sera tested, including human serum, in dot-blot experiments using 125I-labeled BSP-A1, -A2, -A3, or -30-kDa protein. Thus, it was of interest to isolate this binding factor from human serum by affinity chromatography on a column of BSP-A1/-A2-agarose. The purified binding factor was then identified as apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) by the following criteria: (a) it has a molecular mass of 27,000 daltons, (b) the amino acid composition is similar to apoA-I, (c) the first 25 residues at the amino-terminal end of this binding factor are identical to apoA-I, and (d) the binding factor cross-reacts in the radioimmunoassay of apoA-I. Furthermore, BSP proteins also bind to purified plasma apoA-I and apoA-I associated with high density lipoprotein. ApoA-I is the major protein of plasma high density lipoprotein and plays an important role in lipid transport and metabolism. Thus, the binding of bovine seminal plasma proteins to apoA-I suggests some physiological significance in lipoprotein function or vice versa.

  1. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2 and flotillin-1 (FLOT1, were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle. Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary h

  2. Arabidopsis protein kinase PKS5 inhibits the plasma membrane H+ -ATPase by preventing interaction with 14-3-3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Guo, Yan; Cuin, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    that an Arabidopsis thaliana Ser/Thr protein kinase, PKS5, is a negative regulator of the plasma membrane proton pump (PM Hþ-ATPase). Loss-of-function pks5 mutant plants are more tolerant of high external pH due to extrusion of protons to the extracellular space. PKS5 phosphorylates the PM Hþ-ATPase AHA2 at a novel...... site, Ser-931, in the C-terminal regulatory domain. Phosphorylation at this site inhibits interaction between the PM Hþ-ATPase and an activating 14-3-3 protein in a yeast expression system. We show that PKS5 interacts with the calcium binding protein SCaBP1 and that high external pH can trigger...... an increase in the concentration of cytosolic-free calcium. These results suggest that PKS5 is part of a calcium-signaling pathway mediating PM Hþ-ATPase regulation....

  3. Effects of experimentally increased protein supply to postpartum dairy cows on plasma protein synthesis, rumen tissue proliferation, and immune homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Røntved, Christine Maria; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2017-01-01

    The effect of experimentally increasing the postpartum protein supply on plasma protein synthesis, rumen tissue proliferation, and immune homeostasis was studied using 8 periparturient Holstein cows in a complete randomized design. At calving, cows were assigned to abomasal infusion of water (CTRL......]Phe isotopic enrichment, and mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by real-time qPCR. Total and differential leukocyte counts were performed and immune responsiveness of monocytes was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor ɑ (TNFɑ) concentration on ex vivo whole blood stimulation with Escherichia coli...... supply seem to enhance vital body functions as interpreted from increased liver synthesis of albumin, increased rumen papillae proliferation, and stabilized the ex vivo inflammatory responsiveness of leukocytes. Further studies are needed to enlighten the importance of increased postpartum protein supply...

  4. Systematic study of plasma and serum proteins in the pig; Etude systematique des proteines plasmatiques et seriques du porc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daburon, F.; Nizza, P.; Hatchikian, C.; Schmidt, J.-P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (France)

    1966-07-01

    This work has been carried out in the framework of the determination of the physiological constants of a normal pig. The aim was to study the serum and plasma proteins of this animal species, the ultimate object being to discover whether the qualitative and quantitative changes in these proteins can make a significant contribution to the establishment of a biological dosimetry for irradiated pigs. The serum and plasma from a normal pig were analyzed first by various simple electrophoretic methods and then by immuno-electrophoresis. As a result of the particular characteristics of pig serum we have gradually been led to make numerous modifications to the techniques used for human serums or for those of small laboratory animals. Much careful work and patience were required in order to obtain reproducible results. (authors) [French] Ce travail se situe dans le cadre de la determination des constantes physiologiques du porc normal. il s'agissait de proceder a l'etude des proteines seriques et plasmatiques de cette espece animale, le but ulterieur etant de savoir si les modifications qualitatives et quantitatives de ces proteines pourront representer une contribution valable a l'etablissement d'une dosimetrie biologique chez le porc irradie. Le serum et le plasma du porc normal ont ete analyses d'abord par diverses methodes electrophoretiques simples puis par immunoelectrophorese. Les caracteristiques particulieres du serum de porc nous ont conduits a apporter progressivement de nombreuses modifications aux techniques utilisees pour des serums humains ou de petits animaux de laboratoire. L'obtention de resultats reproductible a exige beaucoup de patience et de minutie. (auteurs)

  5. Purification, structural and biophysical characterisation of the major seminal plasma protein from Texel rams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela Condessa, Manoel Augusto Klempovus; Pimentel, Arethusa Lobo; Vicente Seixas, Flávio Augusto; Martinez, Antonio Campanha

    2017-11-04

    Spermadhesins are a group of low molecular weight proteins present in seminal plasma. In Texel rams, they represent more than 70% of the seminal plasma proteins. Although their functions have not yet been fully clarified, there is much discussion about the role of these proteins in maintaining sperm viability during and after the semen freezing process. This work sought to isolate the major component of the seminal plasma from rams of the Texel breed (O. aries SPD2) and to evaluate its structural and biophysical characteristics in order to better understand its role in spermatic viability. The protein was isolated by centrifugation and ion exchange chromatography and its biophysical properties were evaluated by circular dichroism spectrometry. Molecular dynamics simulations of the modelled protein compared to the homologous bovine protein were also carried out. The results showed that O. aries SPD2 has a transition temperature (Tm) of 65 °C and a ΔHm of 322.5 kJ mol-1, similar to the results for other spermadhesins described in the literature. The estimated composition of the secondary structure elements for the native protein is in agreement with that observed for the theoretical model. Its structural characteristics were preserved in simulations at temperatures of 27 °C and 40 °C, as was the case for bull spermadhesin. Taken together, these results suggest that the major component of the spermadhesins of Texel rams (O. aries SPD2) may play an important role in maintaining the viability of spermatozoa in fresh semen as well as after thawing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative stability of canine and feline hemostatic proteins in freeze-thaw-cycled fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, Page E; Beal, Matthew W; Jutkowitz, L Ari; Hauptman, Joe G; Brooks, Marjory B; Hale, Anne S; Parr, Alice

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the stability of canine and feline hemostatic proteins in freeze-thaw-cycled (FTC) fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Prospective study. Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Nine blood donor dogs and 10 blood donor cats. Whole blood was collected and separated into packed RBC and plasma units according to standard methods. Each unit of plasma was divided into 2 equal aliquots and frozen (-41 °C). One aliquot from each donor (FTC) was then thawed and then refrozen (-41 °C) until time of analysis. The second aliquot (nonfreeze-thaw-cycled; NFTC) remained frozen until time of analysis. The hemostatic proteins assessed included coagulation factors, anticoagulant factors (antithrombin and Protein C), and adhesive proteins (fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor). The coagulant activities of factors II, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were measured in modified one-stage activated partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time assays. Antithrombin and Protein C activities were measured in chromogenic substrate assays. Clottable fibrinogen was measured via the Clauss method, and von Willebrand Factor concentration (vWF:Ag) was measured in an ELISA. A paired t-test was utilized to identify differences in factor activity or concentration between FTC FFP and NFTC FFP. No clinically or statistically significant differences (all P>0.05) were identified between FTC FFP and NFTC FFP. Refreezing FFP within 1 hour of initial thawing appeared to have no deleterious effects on the hemostatic protein activity or content of that unit. Transfusion of FTC FFP is expected to provide the recipient with comparable replacement of hemostatic proteins as FFP that has remained frozen. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2010.

  7. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is related to insulin resistance : impaired acute lowering by insulin in obese Type II diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) have important functions in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We determined the association of plasma CETP and PLTP activities (measured with exogenous' substrate assays) with insulin resistance, plasma

  9. Molecular characterization of three Rhesus glycoproteins from the gills of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, and effects of aestivation on their mRNA expression levels and protein abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You R Chng

    Full Text Available African lungfishes are ammonotelic in water. They can aestivate for long periods on land during drought. During aestivation, the gills are covered with dried mucus and ammonia excretion ceases. In fishes, ammonia excretion through the gills involves Rhesus glycoproteins (RhGP/Rhgp. This study aimed to obtain the complete cDNA coding sequences of rhgp from the gills of Protopterus annectens, and to determine their branchial mRNA and protein expression levels during the induction, maintenance and arousal phases of aestivation. Three isoforms of rhgp (rhag, rhbg and rhcg were obtained in the gills of P. annectens. Their complete cDNA coding sequences ranged between 1311 and 1398 bp, coding for 436 to 465 amino acids with estimated molecular masses between 46.8 and 50.9 kDa. Dendrogramic analyses indicated that Rhag was grouped closer to fishes, while Rhbg and Rhcg were grouped closer to tetrapods. During the induction phase, the protein abundance of Rhag, but not its transcript level, was down-regulated in the gills, suggesting that there could be a decrease in the release of ammonia from the erythrocytes to the plasma. Furthermore, the branchial transcript levels of rhbg and rhcg decreased significantly, in preparation for the subsequent shutdown of gill functions. During the maintenance phase, the branchial expression levels of rhag/Rhag, rhbg/Rhbg and rhcg/Rhcg decreased significantly, indicating that their transcription and translation were down-regulated. This could be part of an overall mechanism to shut down branchial functions and save metabolic energy used for transcription and translation. It could also be regarded as an adaptive response to stop ammonia excretion. During the arousal phase, it is essential for the lungfish to regain the ability to excrete ammonia. Indeed, the protein abundance of Rhag, Rhbg and Rhcg recovered to the corresponding control levels after 1 day or 3 days of recovery from 6 months of aestivation.

  10. Influence of particle shape on plasma protein adsorption and macrophage uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansch, M; Jindal, A B; Sharmila, B Majee; Samad, A; Devarajan, P V; Müller, R H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasma protein adsorption behavior onto different LIPOMER nanoparticles, especially looking for the first time, if the particle shape affects the protein adsorption pattern. The potential in vivo fate is discussed and compared with previous in vivo animal studies. The two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) was used for identification of adsorbed plasma proteins. Qualitative similar patterns were obtained from the protein adsorption analysis and four apolipoproteins with considerable quantitative differences were identified. Besides the quantitative differences in the adsorbed apolipoproteins, in vitro uptake in the human macrophage cell line U-937 of histocytic lymphoma organ revealed significantly lower uptake of the irregular glycerol monostearate LIPOMER nanoparticles. Therefore, protein adsorption does not seem to play a role in the splenotropic behavior in the sense, that adsorption of opsonins, especially spleen-specific opsonins are required for the uptake. The splenotropic uptake might be favored because all LIPOMER nanoparticles did not adsorb opsonins at all, mediating competitive uptake by liver macrophages. Differences in the in vivo uptake by the spleen were attributed to differences in particle shape with potential super position effect by the quantitative differences in the adsorbed proteins.

  11. Level of nitrated proteins in the plasma, platelets and liver of patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie-Jeyachristy, Sam; Geetha, Arumugam; Surendran, Rajagopal; Sundaram, Arunachalam; Lavanya, Krishnagopal; Kumar, Subburayan Jeevan; Prakash, Sarangapani Arul

    2009-01-01

    Over-expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) formation are associated with the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. NO-related stress alters the functions of biomolecules, especially proteins, probably as a result of nitration. The aim of this study was to assess the level of protein nitration and its correlation with the severity of the disease. Liver cirrhosis patients with different grades of severity (grades A, B, and C according to the Child-Pugh classification) were enrolled in this study. Nitroprotein content, arginine, citrulline, NO in terms of total nitrite, nitrosothiol (RSNO) and protein carbonyls were measured in blood. Immunohistochemical detection of nitroprotein was carried out in liver sections of cirrhosis patients. A significant elevation in the levels of serum and platelet arginine, arginase, citrulline, plasma, and platelet nitroproteins, RSNO, total nitrite, protein carbonyls and also a significant amount of nitrated proteins by immunohistochemical detection in tissue were observed in cirrhosis patients. The alterations were highly significant in grade C patients with bleeding complications when compared to those of grade B and A patients. In platelets, both cytosolic and cytoskeletal proteins were found to be nitrated significantly. The level of nitrite seems to have positive correlation with the level of nitroproteins in different grades of cirrhosis. The level of nitroproteins in plasma, platelets and liver tissue can be correlated with the severity of liver cirrhosis.

  12. Identification and quantification of differentially expressed proteins in plasma of spinocerebellar ataxia type 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Vishnu; Srivastava, Achal K; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2012-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 12 (SCA12) is a unique dominant type of ataxia characterized by early and prominent action tremors, memory deficit, neuropathy, dysarthria, etc. The expansion of DNA triplet (CAG) repeats in 5'UTR of PPP2R2B gene appears to be the cause for the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorder, SCA12. The objective of the current study was to identify the aberrantly expressed plasma proteins for their potential application in therapy or diagnosis/prognosis of SCA12. Sixty-two clinically suspected patients were assessed using International Co-operative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and genetic confirmation was done using PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Twenty patients who were genetically confirmed were included in the study. 2D-DIGE analyses of plasma proteins of SCA12 patients revealed 14 differentially expressed protein spots, which were confirmed as nine proteins by LC-MS/MS. The 6 downregulated and 3 upregulated proteins are known to have physiological role in transport (thyroxin and retinol to brain), lipid metabolism, memory, scavenging of free haemoglobin, etc. Altered expression of some of the proteins of interest, transthyretin, haptaglobin, apolipoprotein C-II, apolipoprotein C-III are indicative of clinical manifestations such as neuropathy, cognitive impairment and altered lipid metabolism in SCA12. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasma proteins in a standardised skin mini-erosion (II: effects of extraction pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Terence J

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A standardised suction technique has been used to sample plasma proteins in dermal interstitial fluid (IF serially for 5 to 6 days from a suction-induced skin mini-erosion. Increased protein concentrations ascribed to inflammation have been shown from day 1 onward. In this study, we assessed the effect of two different extraction pressures on IF sample composition. Methods Total protein concentration and the concentrations of insulin, prealbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgG and alpha-2-macroglobulin were assessed daily in healthy volunteers. Samples were extracted at 50 mmHg and 200 mmHg below the atmospheric. Results At 0 h after forming the erosion, mean total IF protein content (relative to plasma was lower in the samples extracted at -200 mmHg than at -50 mmHg (26 +/-13% (SD vs 48 +/-9.8%; p Conclusions Samples of IF extracted at 0 h at -200 mmHg contained lower protein concentrations, indicating an increased water fraction and an intact sieve function of the vascular wall. The difference in protein concentration extracted at higher and lower pressure from 24 h onward was less pronounced. Lower pressure should be used to sample substances of greater molecular size.

  14. A gestational high protein diet affects the abundance of muscle transcripts related to cell cycle regulation throughout development in porcine progeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In various animal models pregnancy diets have been shown to affect offspring phenotype. Indeed, the underlying programming of development is associated with modulations in birth weight, body composition, and continual diet-dependent modifications of offspring metabolism until adulthood, producing the hypothesis that the offspring's transcriptome is permanently altered depending on maternal diet. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess alterations of the offspring's transcriptome due to gestational protein supply, German Landrace sows were fed isoenergetic diets containing protein levels of either 30% (high protein--HP or 12% (adequate protein--AP throughout their pregnancy. Offspring muscle tissue (M. longissimus dorsi was collected at 94 days post conception (dpc, and 1, 28, and 188 days post natum (dpn for use with Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Arrays and subsequent statistical and Ingenuity pathway analyses. Numerous transcripts were found to have altered abundance at 94 dpc and 1 dpn; at 28 dpn no transcripts were altered, and at 188 dpn only a few transcripts showed a different abundance between diet groups. However, when assessing transcriptional changes across developmental time points, marked differences were obvious among the dietary groups. Depending on the gestational dietary exposure, short- and long-term effects were observed for mRNA expression of genes related to cell cycle regulation, energy metabolism, growth factor signaling pathways, and nucleic acid metabolism. In particular, the abundance of transcripts related to cell cycle remained divergent among the groups during development. CONCLUSION: Expression analysis indicates that maternal protein supply induced programming of the offspring's genome; early postnatal compensation of the slight growth retardation obvious at birth in HP piglets resulted, as did a permanently different developmental alteration and responsiveness to the common environment of the

  15. Plasma retinol-binding protein in human uterine cervical dysplasias and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Basu, J; Romney, S L

    1989-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of retinol-binding protein (RBP) were measured in a cross-sectional study of asymptomatic normal menstruating women (n = 94) who obtained Pap smears and participated in a double-blinded nutritional survey. Controls (n = 45) were women with negative cervical cytology, normal colposcopy and no known gynecologic pathology or dysfunction. Cases (n = 49) were subjects with abnormal cytology and colposcopically directed biopsy that established cervical epithelial dysplasias histopathologically in the previous 12-month period. In addition, 8 women with cancer of the cervix were also investigated. The mean plasma concentration of RBP was significantly lower in cases than in controls (p less than 0.001). In normal females, the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle was increased. This increase was absent in the plasma of patients with cervical dysplasias (p less than 0.05). The data direct attention to a possible etiologic association between RBP in human cervical epithelial abnormalities and cancer.

  16. Undetectable pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A in antenatal serum Down's syndrome screening: a case of assay interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C; Hambridge, K; Petchey, M; Martin, J A; Spencer, K

    2015-09-01

    Serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is measured in Down's syndrome screening, routinely offered to women in pregnancy. We present the case of an undetectable pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A concentration on the PerkinElmer AutoDELFIA system where immunoassay interference was suspected. Investigations performed, including dilution and recovery studies and antibody-blocking tube incubations, all yielded serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A concentrations of <25 mU/L. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was also undetectable on two alternative pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A assays. An experimental manual Delfia procedure suggested the site of interference was between the secondary antibody and the pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A molecule. This case of negative interference in the PerkinElmer pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A assay produced a falsely high Down's syndrome risk that might have led to an unnecessary invasive procedure with the potential for fetal loss. This highlights the need for Down's syndrome screening laboratories to be vigilant to immunoassay interference due to the significant impact of the results on patient decision outcome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Whey protein delays gastric emptying and suppresses plasma fatty acids and their metabolites compared to casein, gluten, and fish protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan; Schou, Simon S; Holmer-Jensen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Whey protein has been demonstrated to improve fasting lipid and insulin response in overweight and obese individuals. To establish new hypotheses for this effect and to investigate the impact of stomach emptying, we compared plasma profiles after intake of whey isolate (WI), casein, gluten (GLU...... studies, the WI meal caused a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to the other test meals. The WI meal also caused elevated levels of a number of amino acids, possibly stimulating insulin release leading to reduced plasma glucose. The WI meal also caused decreased levels of a number of fatty acids......, while the GLU meal caused elevated levels of a number of unidentified hydroxy fatty acids and dicarboxylic fatty acids. Also reported are a number of markers of fish intake unique to the COD meal....

  18. Stoichiometry, Absolute Abundance, and Localization of Proteins in the Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Insoluble Fraction Determined Using a QconCAT Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelder, Sacha K; Benito de Moya, Celia; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; de Koning, Leo J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G

    2018-01-04

    Spores of Bacillus cereus pose a threat to food safety due to their high resistance to the heat or acid treatments commonly used to make food microbiologically safe. Spores may survive these treatments and later resume growth either on foodstuffs or, after ingestion, upon entering the gut they are capable of producing toxins, which cause either vomiting or diarrhea. The outer layers of the spore, the spore coat and exosporium, consist primarily of proteins that may serve as potential biomarkers for detection. The major morphogenetic protein CotE is important for correct assembly and attachment of the outermost layer, the exosporium, and by extension retention of many proteins. However, characterization of the proteins affected by deletion of CotE has been limited to electrophoretic patterns. Here we report the effect of CotE deletion on the insoluble fraction of the spore proteome through liquid chromatography-Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS/MS) analysis. A total of 560 proteins have been identified in both mutant and wild-type spore coat isolates. A further 163 proteins were identified exclusively in wild-type spore isolates indicating that they are dependent on CotE for their association with the spore. Several of these are newly confirmed as associated with the exosporium, namely BC_2569 (BclF), BC_3345, BC_2427, BC_2878, BC_0666, BC_2984, BC_3481, and BC_2570. A total of 153 proteins were only identified in ΔCotE spore isolates. This was observed for proteins that are known or likely to be interacting with or are encased by CotE. Crucial spore proteins were quantified using a QconCAT reference standard, the first time this was used in a biochemically heterogeneous system. This allowed us to determine the absolute abundance of 21 proteins, which spanned across three orders of magnitude and together covered 5.66% ± 0.51 of the total spore weight. Applying the QconCAT methodology to the ΔCotE mutant allowed us to quantify 4.13% ± 0.14 of

  19. Seminal plasma proteins of adult boars and correlations with sperm parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cadavid, Verónica; Martins, Jorge A M; Moreno, Frederico B; Andrade, Tiago S; Santos, Antonio C L; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Moura, Arlindo A

    2014-09-15

    The present study was conducted to identify the major seminal plasma protein profile of boars and its associations with semen criteria. Semen samples were collected from 12 adult boars and subjected to evaluation of sperm parameters (motility, morphology, vitality, and percent of cells with intact acrosome). Seminal plasma was obtained by centrifugation, analyzed by two-dimensional SDS-PAGE, and proteins identified by mass spectrometry (electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight). We tested regression models using spot intensities related to the same proteins as independent variables and semen parameters as dependent variables (P ≤ 0.05). One hundred twelve spots were identified in the boar seminal plasma gels, equivalent to 39 different proteins. Spermadhesin porcine seminal protein (PSP)-I and PSP-II, as well as spermadhesins AQN-1, AQN-3 and AWN-1 represented 45.2 ± 8% of the total intensity of all spots. Other proteins expressed in the boar seminal plasma included albumin, complement proteins (complement factor H precursor, complement C3 precursor and adipsin/complement factor D), immunoglobulins (IgG heavy chain precursor, IgG delta heavy chain membrane bound form, IgG gamma-chain, Ig lambda chain V-C region PLC3, and CH4 and secreted domains of swine IgM), IgG-binding proteins, epididymal-specific lipocalin 5, epididymal secretory protein E1 precursor, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase precursor, transferrin, lactotransferrin and fibronectin type 1 (FN1). On the basis of the regression analysis, the percentage of sperm with midpiece defects was related to the amount of CH4 and secreted domains of swine IgM and FN1 (r² = 0.58, P = 0.006), IgG-binding protein (r² = 0.41, P = 0.024), complement factor H precursor (r² = 0.61, P = 0.014) and lactadherin (r² = 0.45, P = 0.033). The percentage of sperm with tail defects was also related to CH4 and secreted domains of swine IgM and FN1 (r² = 0.40, P = 0.034), IgG-binding protein (r² = 0

  20. Human uremic plasma increases microvascular permeability to water and proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Steven J; Tomson, Charles R V; Bates, David O

    2002-04-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease is significantly higher in patients with long-term uremia than in otherwise healthy adults. This is true even before patients proceed to dialysis, but the reason why cardiovascular risk is increased is unknown. Transvascular transport of lipids and other macromolecules in both large vessels and the microcirculation has been implicated in generation of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with long-term uremia have circulating factors that promote increased vascular permeability, we measured the effect of perfusing microvessels with uremic plasma in a non-mammalian model of vascular permeability measurement. Perfusion of frog mesenteric microvessels with dialyzed normal plasma did not result in an increase in either hydraulic conductivity (Lp, permeability of the vessel wall to water) or oncotic reflection coefficient (sigma, permeability to macromolecules, particularly proteins). Perfusion with dialyzed uremic plasma resulted in a very significant increase in vascular permeability to both water (Lp increased 8.8-fold from 4.1 to 36.4 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) cm H2O(-1)) and proteins (sigma reduced from 0.93 to 0.53). These results suggest that one or more circulating macromolecules in uremic plasma are able to increase transvascular solute and fluid flux, and may underlie the increased cardiovascular risk found in these patients.

  1. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  2. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  3. Galectin-3 binding protein in human preterm infant umbilical cord plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C; Bode, L; Kim, J

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-3 binding protein (Gal3BP) is a glycoprotein isolated in colostrum that may be an immunologically active component with effects on the neonatal immune system. This compound has been found in the blood of term newborn infants, but has not been studied in preterm infants. Compare umbilical cord plasma Gal3BP concentration between preterm and term infants. Observational study of mother-infant pairs consented at UCSD Medical Center comparing umbilical cord plasma Gal3BP concentration in preterm and term infants. Umbilical cord plasma was collected at birth and stored at -80°C before Gal3BP analysis by ELISA. This study was powered to evaluate differences in preterm and term infant Gal3BP concentration. The secondary aim was to determine the effect of maternal and infant clinical factors on Gal3BP concentration. A total of 64 preterm and 30 term umbilical cord plasma samples were analyzed. By univariate analysis, Gal3BP concentration was elevated in the setting of prematurity, maternal diabetes, antenatal steroid exposure, and increasing maternal parity (p <  0.05); and decreased in chorioamnionitis (p = 0.03). Using a multiple linear regression model prematurity, chorioamnionitis and maternal diabetes remained significant. Umbilical cord plasma Gal3BP concentration is elevated in prematurity. This may reflect inflammatory states in infant and mother, but further study is warranted.

  4. Hemostatic properties and protein expression profile of therapeutic apheresis plasma treated with amotosalen and ultraviolet A for pathogen inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmann, Philippe; Hechler, Béatrice; Chafey, Philippe; Ravanat, Catherine; Isola, Hervé; Wiesel, Marie-Louise; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Gachet, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The INTERCEPT Blood System (IBS) using amotosalen-HCl and ultraviolet (UV)A inactivates a large spectrum of microbial pathogens and white blood cells in therapeutic plasma. Our aim was to evaluate to what extent IBS modifies the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin and induces qualitative or quantitative modifications of plasma proteins. Plasma units from four donors were collected by apheresis. Samples were taken before (control [CTRL]) and after IBS treatment and stored at -80°C until use. The activities of plasma coagulation factors and inhibitors and the thrombin generation potential were determined using assays measuring clotting times and the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT), respectively. The proteomic profile of plasma proteins was examined using a two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) method. Nearly all of the procoagulant and antithrombotic factors tested retained at least 78% of their initial pre-IBS activity. Only FVII and FVIII displayed a lower level of conservation (67%), which nevertheless remained within the reference range for conventional plasma coagulation factors. The thrombin generation profile of plasma was conserved after IBS treatment. Among the 1331 protein spots revealed by 2D-DIGE analysis, only four were differentially expressed in IBS plasma compared to CTRL plasma and two were identified by mass spectrometric analysis as transthyretin and apolipoprotein A1. The IBS technique for plasma moderately decreases the activities of plasma coagulation factors and antithrombotic proteins, with no impact on the thrombin generation potential of plasma and very limited modifications of the proteomic profile. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Fluorescence Enhancement of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Protein A Caused by Affinity Binding with Immunoglobulin G in Bovine Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sakai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled protein A (FITC-protein A caused by the binding with immunoglobulin G (IgG in bovine plasma was studied. FITC-protein A was immobilized onto a glass surface by covalent bonds. An increase in fluorescence intensity was dependent on IgG concentration ranging from 20 to 78 μg/mL in both phosphate buffer saline and bovine plasma. This method requires no separation procedure, and the reaction time is less than 15 min. A fluorescence enhancement assay by the affinity binding of fluorescence-labeled reagent is thus available for the rapid determination of biomolecules in plasma.

  6. Analysis of protein profiles in diabetic rat blood plasma that induced by alloxan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Abdulgani, Nurlita; Setiyawan, Hengki; Trisnawati, Indah; Ashuri, Nova Maulidina; Sa'adah, Noor Nailis

    2017-06-01

    Proteomics is the study to identify the proteins involved in physiological metabolic pathway. The protein profiles of blood plasma from alloxan-induced diabetic rats has investigated using Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Data were analyzed descriptively based on variations of the type and intensity of the protein. There were identified the similarity of protein variant between diabetic and control rats included ankyrin (200kDa), IgG (150kDa), nephrin (136 kDa), IDE (112 kDA), albumin (66 kDa), prealbumin (55 kDA), CICP (43 kDa), ApoA-V (39 kDa), GAPDH (35 kDa), C-RP (27,1 kDa), leptin (16 kDa) and apelin (13 kDa). However, the apelin profile at diabetic rats shows the higher intensity than control.

  7. Plasma membrane localization of Ras requires class C Vps proteins and functional mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Deschenes, Robert J

    2006-04-01

    Ras proteins are synthesized as cytosolic precursors, but then undergo posttranslational lipid addition, membrane association, and subcellular targeting to the plasma membrane. Although the enzymes responsible for farnesyl and palmitoyl lipid addition have been described, the mechanism by which these modifications contribute to the subcellular localization of Ras is not known. Following addition of the farnesyl group, Ras associates with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where palmitoylation occurs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The subsequent translocation of Ras from the ER to the plasma membrane does not require the classical secretory pathway or a functional Golgi apparatus. Vesicular and nonvesicular transport pathways for Ras proteins have been proposed, but the pathway is not known. Here we describe a genetic screen designed to identify mutants defective in Ras trafficking in S. cerevisiae. The screen implicates, for the first time, the class C VPS complex in Ras trafficking. Vps proteins are best characterized for their role in endosome and vacuole membrane fusion. However, the role of the class C Vps complex in Ras trafficking is distinct from its role in endosome and vacuole vesicle fusion, as a mitochondrial involvement was uncovered. Disruption of class C VPS genes results in mitochondrial defects and an accumulation of Ras proteins on mitochondrial membranes. Ras also fractionates with mitochondria in wild-type cells, where it is detected on the outer mitochondrial membrane by virtue of its sensitivity to protease treatment. These results point to a previously uncharacterized role of mitochondria in the subcellular trafficking of Ras proteins.

  8. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of polycarboxylate shell of magnetite nanoparticles on protein corona formation in blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, Márta; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Turcu, R.; Tombácz, Etelka

    2017-04-01

    The development of protein corona around nanoparticles upon administration to the human body is responsible in a large part for their biodistribution, cell-internalization and toxicity or biocompatibility. We studied the influence of the chemical composition of polyelectrolyte shells (citric acid (CA) and poly(acrylic-co-maleic acid) (PAM)) of core-shell magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) on the evolution of protein corona in human plasma (HP). The aggregation state and zeta potential of the particles were measured in the range of HP concentration between 1 and 80 (v/v)% 3 min and 20 h after dispersing the particles in HP diluted with Tris buffered saline. Naked MNPs aggregated in HP solution, but the carboxylated MNPs became stabilized colloidally at higher plasma concentrations. Significant differences were observed at low plasma concentration. CA@MNPs aggregated instantly while the hydrodynamic diameter of PAM@MNP increased only slightly at 1-3 v/v % HP concentrations. The observed differences in protein corona formation can be explained by the differences in the steric effects of the polycarboxylate shells. It is interesting that relatively small but systematic changes in zeta potential alter the aggregation state significantly.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, Excretion and Plasma Protein Binding Studies of Wogonin in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Talbi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wogonin is a natural anticancer candidate. The purpose of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution, excretion and plasma protein binding of wogonin in Sprague—Dawley rats. A rapid, sensitive, and specific LC-MS/MS method has been developed for the determination of wogonin in different rat biological samples. After i.v. dosing of wogonin at different levels (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg the elimination half-life was approximately 14 min, the AUC0-∞ increased in a dose disproportional manner from 112.13 mg/L·min for 10 mg/kg to 758.19 mg/L·min for 40 mg/kg, indicating a non linear pharmacokinetic profile. After i.g. dosing at 100 mg/kg, plasma levels of wogonin peaked at 28 min with a Cmax value of 300 ng/mL and a very low oral bioavailability (1.10%. Following i.v. single dose (20 mg/kg, wogonin was detected in all examined tissues (including testis with the highest levels in kidney and liver. Approximately 21% of the administered dose was excreted as unchanged drug (mainly via non-biliairy fecal route (16.33%. Equilibrium dialysis was used to evaluate plasma protein binding of wogonin at three concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 2 µg/mL. Results indicated a very high protein binding degree (over 90%, reducing substantially the free fraction of the compound.

  11. Probing plasma membrane microdomains in cowpea protoplasts using lipidated GFP-fusion proteins and multimode FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, J.E.M.; van Munster, E.B.; Vischer, N.O.; Gadella, T.

    2004-01-01

    Multimode fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was applied to study the plasma membrane organization using different lipidated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins co-expressed in cowpea protoplasts. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to the hyper variable region

  12. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Impact of an ionic liquid on protein thermodynamics in the presence of cold atmospheric plasma and gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Kim, Minsup; Choi, Eun Ha; Cho, Art E; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2017-09-27

    Cold atmospheric plasma and gamma rays are known to have anticancer properties, even though their specific mechanisms and roles as co-solvents during their action are still not clearly understood. Despite the use of gamma rays in cancer therapy, they have oncogenic potential, whereas this has not been observed for plasma treatment (to date). To gain a better understanding, we studied the action of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma and gamma rays on the myoglobin protein. We analyzed the secondary structure and thermodynamic properties of myoglobin after both treatments. In addition, in the last few years, ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) have revealed their important role in protein folding as co-solvents. In this work, we treated the protein with ammonium ILs such as triethylammonium methanesulfonate (TEMS) and tetrabutylammonium methanesulfonate (TBMS) and later treated this IL-protein solution with DBD plasma and gamma rays. In this study, we show the chemical and thermal denaturation of the protein after plasma and gamma treatments in the presence and absence of ILs using circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, we also show the influence of plasma and gamma rays on the secondary structure of myoglobin in the absence and presence of ILs or ILs + urea using CD. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to gain deeper insight into how the ILs behave to protect the protein against the hydrogen peroxide generated by the DBD plasma and gamma rays.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of total proteins in blood plasma: a comparative study among dye-binding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Augusto Morozin Zaia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between the biuret method (standard method for total proteins and spectrophotometric methods using dyes (Bradford, 3',3",5',5"-tetrabromophenolphthalein ethyl ester-TBPEE, and erythrosin-B was carried out for the determination of total proteins in blood plasma from rats. Bradford method showed the highest sensitivity for proteins and biuret method showed the lowest. For all the methods, the absorbance for different proteins (BSA, casein, and egg albumin was measured and Bradford method showed the lowest variation of absorbance. The concentration of total protein obtained by using Bradford method was not statistically different (p>0.05 from concentration of total protein obtained by the biuret method. But in regard to erythrosin-B and TBPEE methods the concentrations of total protein were statistically different (pA determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo é importante em diversas áreas de pesquisa. Um estudo comparativo entre o método de biureto (método padrão para proteínas totais e diversos métodos que utilizam corantes (Bradford, tetrabromofenolftaleína etil éster-TBPEE, e eritrosina-B foi realizado para a determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo de ratos. O método de Bradford mostrou a maior sensibilidade para proteínas e o de biureto a menor. Para todos os métodos, as absorbâncias para diferentes proteínas (BSA, caseína, e ovoalbumina foram medidas e o método de Bradford mostrou a menor variação da absorbância. Utilizando o método de Bradford a concentração de proteínas totais obtida não foi estatisticamente diferente (p>0.05 daquela obtida pelo método do biureto. Porém, para os métodos da eritrosina-B e TBPEE as concentrações de proteínas totais foram estatisticamente diferentes (p<0.05 da obtida pelo método de biureto. Portanto o método de Bradford pode ser utilizado no lugar do método de biureto para a determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo.

  15. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  16. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2013-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix protein, fibulin-1, was recently found in higher concentrations in the arterial wall and in plasma in patients with long duration type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, plasma fibulin-1 independently predicted total mortality and was associated with pulse pressure, an indirect measure of arterial...... stiffness. Whether plasma fibulin-1 is associated with arterial stiffness at earlier phases of type 2 diabetes has not been determined....

  17. Competitive binding to plasma thyroid hormone transport proteins and thyroid disruption by phenylbutazone used as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayrard, Véronique; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Viguié, Catherine; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2011-11-01

    A model of thyroidectomized sheep intravenously supplemented with thyroid hormone (TH) was developed to mimic endogenous TH exposure and to analyze the impact on plasma TH homeostasis of xenobiotic interference with TH binding to plasma proteins. TH was displaced from plasma protein binding sites by using phenylbutazone (PBZ) as a test xenobiotic, to compare the effect of PBZ on steady state free and total plasma TH concentrations between the in vivo situation and an in vitro system. While PBZ increased free TH in vitro, PBZ administration in vivo produced an immediate reduction in both total and free plasma TH. The decrease in the total TH was consistent with a PBZ-induced displacement of TH from its plasma binding proteins, leading to an increase in total TH plasma clearance. However, this reduction in total TH was not expected to be accompanied by a parallel decrease in free plasma TH since the free TH is determined by the clearance of the free plasma TH. This suggested that PBZ may also have interfered with the clearance mechanisms of free TH. It can be concluded that our thyroidectomized sheep model enables a dual action of a xenobiotic on plasma TH to be distinguished, namely a displacement of TH from its binding proteins leading to a decrease in the total plasma concentration, which is not relevant to thyroid function versus an interference with the intrinsic TH clearance leading to a change in the free plasma TH, which has a major impact in terms of thyroid disruption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. TRH receptor mobility in the plasma membrane is strongly affected by agonist binding and by interaction with some cognate signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcova, Radka; Melkes, Barbora; Novotny, Jiri

    2017-11-14

    Extensive research has been dedicated to elucidating the mechanisms of signal transduction through different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, relatively little is known about the regulation of receptor movement within the cell membrane upon ligand binding. In this study we focused our attention on the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor that typically couples to Gq/11 proteins. We monitored receptor diffusion in the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells stably expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged TRH receptor (TRHR-YFP) by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). FRAP analysis indicated that the lateral movement of the TRH receptor was markedly reduced upon TRH binding as the value of its diffusion coefficient fell down by 55%. This effect was prevented by the addition of the TRH receptor antagonist midazolam. We also found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of Gq/11α, Gβ, β-arrestin2 and phospholipase Cβ1, but not of Giα1, β-arrestin1 or G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of TRHR-YFP diffusion, indicating the involvement of the former proteins in the regulation of TRH receptor behavior. The observed partial reduction of the TRHR-YFP mobile fraction caused by down-regulation of Giα1 and β-arrestin1 suggests that these proteins may also play distinct roles in THR receptor-mediated signaling. These results demonstrate for the first time that not only agonist binding but also abundance of some signaling proteins may strongly affect TRH receptor dynamics in the plasma membrane.

  19. The dynamic changes of the plasma membrane proteins and the protective roles of nitric oxide in rice subjected to heavy metal cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eYang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The heavy metal cadmium is a common environmental contaminant in soils and has adverse effects on crop growth and development. The signaling processes in plants that initiate cellular responses to environmental stress have been shown to be located in the plasma membrane (PM. A better understanding of the PM proteome in response to environmental stress might provide new insights for improving stress-tolerant crops. Nitric oxide (NO is reported to be involved in the plant response to cadmium (Cd stress. To further investigate how NO modulates protein changes in the plasma membrane during Cd stress, a quantitative proteomics approach based on isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ was used to identify differentially regulated proteins from the rice plasma membrane after Cd or Cd and NO treatment. Sixty-six differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, many function as transporters, ATPases, kinases, metabolic enzymes, phosphatases and phospholipases. Among these, the abundance of phospholipase D (PLD was altered substantially after the treatment of both Cd and Cd and NO. Transient expression of the PLD fused with green fluorescent peptide (GFP in rice protoplasts showed that the Cd and NO treatment promoted the accumulation of PLD in the plasma membrane. Addition of NO also enhanced Cd-induced PLD activity and the accumulation of phosphatidic acid (PA produced through PLD activity. Meanwhile, NO elevated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and caused the accumulation of glutathione both which function to reduce Cd-induced H2O2 accumulation. Taken together, we suggest that NO signaling is associated with the accumulation of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione and PA which increases cadmium tolerance in rice via the antioxidant defense system.

  20. Platelet-rich plasma modulates the secretion of inflammatory/angiogenic proteins by inflamed tenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andia, Isabel; Rubio-Azpeitia, Eva; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-05-01

    Platelet-rich plasma therapies for tendinopathy appear to provide moderate pain reduction. However, the biological mechanisms behind the observed clinical effects remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to explore whether platelet-rich plasma modifies the inflammatory/angiogenic status of already inflamed tenocytes by examining (1) gene expression; (2) modulation of chemokine and interleukin secretion; and (3) differences between healthy and tendinopathic tenocytes. Cells from both healthy and tendinopathic tendons were exposed to interleukin (IL)-1ß and after treated with platelet-rich plasma. Modifications in the expression of selected genes were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and changes in secretion of angiogenic/inflammatory molecules by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Platelet-rich plasma-induced changes in tendinopathic cells were compared with normal after normalizing platelet-rich plasma data against IL-1ß status in each specific sample. In IL-1ß-exposed cells, platelet-rich plasma downregulates expression of IL-6/CXCL-6 (mean, 0.015; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.005-0.025; p = 0.026), IL-6R (mean, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.27-0.95; p = 0.029), and IL-8/CXCL-8 (mean, 0.02; 95% CI, 0.007-0.023; p = 0.026). Secretion of IL-6/CXCL6, 0.35 (95% CI, 0.3-0.4; p = 0.002), IL-8/CXCL8, 0.55 (95% CI, 0.5-0.7; p = 0.01), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2, 0.40 (95% CI, 0.2-0.6; p = 0.001) was reduced by platelet-rich plasma, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor increased by twofold, (95% CI, 1.7-2.3; p plasma induces an immunomodulatory and proangiogenic phenotype consistent with healing mechanisms with few differences between tendinopathic and normal cells. Platelet-rich plasma injections in pathological and nearby tissue might help to recover tendon homeostasis.

  1. Correlation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A gene with carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiming; Cui, Min; Yin, Zegang; Li, Rui; Zhu, Jie; Zhou, Huadong

    2015-06-30

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is abundantly expressed in carotid plaques. This study investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAPP-A and the presence of carotid plaques. A total of 408 patients with carotid plaques and 493 controls were included in the study. All subjects were Southern Chinese Han. Carotid plaques were analyzed by computer tomography angiography. PAPP-A SNPs were identified by ligase detection reaction-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The PAPP-A genotypes rs3747823, rs7020782, and rs13290387 were analyzed. The rs7020782 C allele genotype correlated with an increased risk of developing carotid plaques under the dominant, recessive, and additive models (adjusted odds ratios: 2.60, 2.36, and 3.48, respectively; P ≤ 0.001). Only C allele-carrying genotypes correlated with a significantly increased risk of carotid plaque based on studies stratified by age and sex under the dominant model. rs7020782 remained significantly associated with the risk of carotid plaque calcification after adjusting for age and potential confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.89; 95 % confidence interval, 1.17-3.08; P = 0.010). This study found, for the first time, that the A˃C variation of rs7020782 might be an independent risk factor for carotid plaque development and calcification. The determination of such genotypes could provide a new tool for identifying individuals at high risk for carotid atherosclerosis.

  2. Seminal plasma proteins interacting with sperm surface revert capacitation indicators in frozen-thawed ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Alba; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Cano, Adriana; Hozbor, Federico; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Cesari, Andreína

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of interacting seminal plasma proteins (iSPP) obtained by AV or EE on frozen-thawed ram sperm in order to test the hypothesis whether this fraction could be sufficient to emulate the effect of complete seminal plasma (SP). Additionally, we evaluated whether these proteins have a differential effect between spermatozoa from high and low fertility rams and between breeding and non-breeding seasons. We assessed sperm motility, quality parameters (intracellular reactive oxygen species, membrane fluidity, plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial activity) and capacitation status. The main findings from this work were: i) iSPP had no effect on sperm motility, whereas SP (AV or EE) addition produced the highest values of total motility (74.13±2.99 and 72.27±2.99 for AV and EE, respectively) and progressive motility (64.97±2.64 and 63.73±2.64 for AV and EE, respectively); ii) iSPP had no effect on sperm quality parameters (p>0.05), but whole SP improved all parameters evaluated. Moreover, SP collected by AV yielded significantly higher viability (44.60±2.87) and sperm with stable plasma membrane (44.56±2.49) comparing with the addition of SP collected by EE (35.80±2.47 and 36.67±1.71, respectively); iii) iSPP and SP collected by EE, but not by AV, reverted molecular signals of capacitation as protein tyrosine phosphorylation caused by freezing temperatures; iv) there were no effects of fertility or season in sperm quality parameters evaluated. This study demonstrated that, although the iSPP have a clear decapacitating effect, including the ability to revert cryo-capacitation indicators, they are not sufficient to emulate the effects of complete SP regarding sperm functional parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients - C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Li; Wu, Ao; Zhang, Yujiao; Jia, Xiaofang; Yin, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, and rapid progression of hepatic and immunodeficiency diseases has been observed in coinfected individuals. Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). Low abundance proteins enriched using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) kits and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The differential proteins were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) database. A total of 41 differential proteins were found in HIV/HBV coinfected patients as compared to HIV mono-infected patients with or without HAART treatment, including 7 common HBV-regulated proteins. The proteins involved in complement and coagulation pathways were significantly enriched, including plasma kallikrein (KLK) and complement component C9 (C9). C9 and KLK were verified to be down-regulated in HIV/HBV coinfected patients through ELISA analysis. The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Computational and statistical analyses of amino acid usage and physico-chemical properties of the twelve late embryogenesis abundant protein classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Jaspard

    Full Text Available Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins (LEAPs are ubiquitous proteins expected to play major roles in desiccation tolerance. Little is known about their structure - function relationships because of the scarcity of 3-D structures for LEAPs. The previous building of LEAPdb, a database dedicated to LEAPs from plants and other organisms, led to the classification of 710 LEAPs into 12 non-overlapping classes with distinct properties. Using this resource, numerous physico-chemical properties of LEAPs and amino acid usage by LEAPs have been computed and statistically analyzed, revealing distinctive features for each class. This unprecedented analysis allowed a rigorous characterization of the 12 LEAP classes, which differed also in multiple structural and physico-chemical features. Although most LEAPs can be predicted as intrinsically disordered proteins, the analysis indicates that LEAP class 7 (PF03168 and probably LEAP class 11 (PF04927 are natively folded proteins. This study thus provides a detailed description of the structural properties of this protein family opening the path toward further LEAP structure - function analysis. Finally, since each LEAP class can be clearly characterized by a unique set of physico-chemical properties, this will allow development of software to predict proteins as LEAPs.

  5. Plasma concentrations of extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 are related to cardiovascular risk markers in chronic kidney disease and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Sidelmann, Johannes J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibulin-1 is one of a few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Plasma fibulin-1 was determined in subjects with chronic...

  6. Novel interactions of domain III from the envelope glycoprotein of dengue 2 virus with human plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Vivian; Ramos, Yassel; Yero, Alexis; Pupo, Dianne; Martín, Dayron; Toledo, Patricia; Fleitas, Noralvis; Gallien, Sebastien; Martín, Alejandro M; Márquez, Gabriel J; Pérez-Riverol, Yasset; Sarría, Mónica; Guirola, Osmany; González, Luis J; Domon, Bruno; Chinea, Glay

    2016-01-10

    Blood cells and plasma are important media for the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4) spreading into an infected person. Thus, interactions with human plasma proteins are expected to be decisive in the course of the viral infection. Affinity purification followed by MS analysis (AP/MS) was used to isolate and identify plasma-derived proteins capable to interact with a recombinant protein comprising the domain III of the envelope protein of DENV2 (DIIIE2). The elution of the AP potently inhibits DENV2 infection. Twenty-nine proteins were identified using a label-free approach as specifically captured by DIIIE2. Of these, a direct interaction with C reactive protein, thrombin and Inter-alpha-inhibitor complexes was confirmed by ELISA. Results provide further evidence of a significant representation of proteins from complement and coagulation cascades on DENV2 interactome in human plasma and stand out the domain III of the viral envelope protein as participant on these interactions. A functional clustering analysis highlights the presence of three structural motifs among putative DIIIE2-binding proteins: hydroxylation and EGF-like calcium-binding- and Gla domains. Early cycles of dengue virus replication take place in human blood cells. Thus, the characterization of the interactome of dengue virus proteins in human plasma can lead to the identification of pivotal interactions for the infection that can eventually constitute the target for the development of methods to control dengue virus-caused disease. In this work we identified 29 proteins from human plasma that potentially interact with the envelope protein of dengue 2 virus either directly or through co-complex formation. C reactive protein, thrombin and Inter-alpha-inhibitor complexes were validated as interactors of the domain III of the envelope protein of dengue 2. Results highlight the presence of three structural motifs among putative DIIIE2-binding proteins: hydroxylation and EGF-like calcium

  7. Maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A levels in hyperemesis gravidarum: a prospective case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, B S; Energin, H; Yildiz, Y; Unlu, E; Yapar Eyi, E G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate if maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A levels are affected in hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). A prospective case control study was conducted in 169 HG cases who had one or more antepartum hospitilization for HG. The control pregnancies were 132 and were selected randomly among all women who had first trimester prenatal screening in antenatal outpatient clinic between 2011 and 2012. Maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A levels were significantly higher in hyperemesis gravidarum group compared with control group (p = 0.002 p pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was 0.88. Maternal serum free beta-human chorionic gonadotropin values were not different between two groups (p > 0.05). Increased pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A levels associated with HG, even after excluding potential cofounders.

  8. EVALUATION OF A WASTEWATER DISCHARGE USING VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION AND PLASMA PROTEIN LEVELS IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver vitellogenin gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein presence, indicators of exposure of fish to estrogens, were measured in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) caged at two locations in a constructed wetland below a sewage treatment plant effluent outfall in...

  9. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  10. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  11. Multiplexed MRM-based assays for the quantitation of proteins in mouse plasma and heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Michaud, Sarah A; Jardim, Armando; Sinclair, Nicholas J; Zhang, Suping; Mohammed, Yassene; Palmer, Andrea L; Hardie, Darryl B; Yang, Juncong; LeBlanc, Andre M; Borchers, Christoph H

    2017-04-01

    The mouse is the most commonly used laboratory animal, with more than 14 million mice being used for research each year in North America alone. The number and diversity of mouse models is increasing rapidly through genetic engineering strategies, but detailed characterization of these models is still challenging because most phenotypic information is derived from time-consuming histological and biochemical analyses. To expand the biochemists' toolkit, we generated a set of targeted proteomic assays for mouse plasma and heart tissue, utilizing bottom-up LC/MRM-MS with isotope-labeled peptides as internal standards. Protein quantitation was performed using reverse standard curves, with LC-MS platform and curve performance evaluated by quality control standards. The assays comprising the final panel (101 peptides for 81 proteins in plasma; 227 peptides for 159 proteins in heart tissue) have been rigorously developed under a fit-for-purpose approach and utilize stable-isotope labeled peptides for every analyte to provide high-quality, precise relative quantitation. In addition, the peptides have been tested to be interference-free and the assay is highly multiplexed, with reproducibly determined protein concentrations spanning >4 orders of magnitude. The developed assays have been used in a small pilot study to demonstrate their application to molecular phenotyping or biomarker discovery/verification studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemoselective small molecules that covalently modify one lysine in a non-enzyme protein in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Connelly, Stephen; Reixach, Natàlia; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-02-19

    A small molecule that could bind selectively to and then react chemoselectively with a non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid, such as blood, could have numerous practical applications. Herein, we report a family of designed stilbenes that selectively and covalently modify the prominent plasma protein transthyretin in preference to more than 4,000 other human plasma proteins. They react chemoselectively with only one of eight lysine {epsilon}-amino groups within transthyretin. The crystal structure confirms the expected binding orientation of the stilbene substructure and the anticipated conjugating amide bond. These covalent transthyretin kinetic stabilizers exhibit superior amyloid inhibition potency compared to their noncovalent counterparts, and they prevent cytotoxicity associated with amyloidogenesis. Though there are a few prodrugs that, upon metabolic activation, react with a cysteine residue inactivating a specific non-enzyme, we are unaware of designed small molecules that react with one lysine {epsilon}-amine within a specific non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid.

  13. Plasma mutant α-galactosidase A protein and globotriaosylsphingosine level in Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tsukimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (GLA and accumulation of glycolipids, and various GLA gene mutations lead to a wide range of clinical phenotypes from the classic form to the later-onset one. To investigate the biochemical heterogeneity and elucidate the basis of the disease using available clinical samples, we measured GLA activity, GLA protein and accumulated globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-Gb3, a biomarker of this disease, in plasma samples from Fabry patients. The analysis revealed that both the enzyme activity and the protein level were apparently decreased, and the enzyme activity was well correlated with the protein level in many Fabry patients. In these cases, a defect of biosynthesis or excessive degradation of mutant GLAs should be involved in the pathogenesis, and the residual protein level would determine the accumulation of Lyso-Gb3 and the severity of the disease. However, there are some exceptional cases, i.e., ones harboring p.C142Y, p.R112H and p.M296I, who exhibit a considerable amount of GLA protein. Especially, a subset of Fabry patients with p.R112H or p.M296I has been attracted interest because the patients exhibit almost normal plasma Lyso-Gb3 concentration. Structural analysis revealed that C142Y causes a structural change at the entrance of the active site. It will lead to a complete enzyme activity deficiency, resulting in a high level of plasma Lyso-Gb3 and the classic Fabry disease. On the other hand, it is thought that R112H causes a relatively large structural change on the molecular surface, and M296I a small one in a restricted region from the core to the surface, both the structural changes being far from the active site. These changes will cause not only partial degradation but also degeneration of the mutant GLA proteins, and the degenerated enzymes exhibiting small and residual activity remain and probably facilitate degradation of Lyso-Gb3

  14. Adsorption of proteins out of plasma onto glass from a separated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, C; Depaola, N; Konath, S; Vroman, L; Leonard, E F

    1994-01-01

    Perturbations in the adsorption of plasma proteins caused by flow separation were studied quantitatively. An instrument was constructed that causes flow to separate over approximately half the width of a standard microscope slide and the pattern of protein deposition in and near the separated flow was observed by staining the slide with black iron oxide. The slide was mounted at the edge of a Couette flow field established between two concentric cylinders, the outer of which was rotating. The slide was located on the stationary, inner cylinder just downstream of a rectangular bar that causes the flow to separate. After exposure to dilute plasma injected upstream of the bar, the slide was removed and stained with oxide suspension. The resulting, visible pattern was scanned through a video camera and analyzed to yield relative values of stain density that could be quantified. The oxide patterns suggest that proteins were deposited onto the slide less rapidly in and just downstream of the separated flow region than farther downstream. At a shear rate of 6.61 s-1, corresponding to a velocity of 1.32 cm s-1 0.2 cm above the point of flow separation, overall amounts of adsorbed proteins increased with exposure time in the range 3-30 min with the exception of a period from 10 to 11 min when all data show a temporary decrease. In calibration experiments, oxide failed to adhere to slides exposed to purified albumin but adhered copiously to slides exposed to purified fibrinogen. These results suggest that the oxide patterns following plasma exposure are attributable primarily to fibrinogen and that the temporary decrease in the separated flow experiments is attributable to the displacement of fibrinogen by a less stainable protein, conjecturally high molecular weight kininogen and factor XII. This study yields quantitative information confirming earlier findings that were less controlled and non-quantitative. It confirms the hypothesis that the sequence of protein deposition

  15. Why mammals more susceptible to the hepatotoxic microcystins than fish: evidences from plasma and albumin protein binding through equilibrium dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liang, Gaodao; Wu, Laiyan; Tuo, Xun; Wang, Wenjing; Chen, Jun; Xie, Ping

    2013-08-01

    To elucidate the interspecies variation of susceptibility to microcystins (MCs), fresh plasma and purified albumin from six kinds of mammals and fish were used in toxins-substances binding test. Protein contents in the test plasma were analyzed and the binding characteristics to MCs were compared. Two kinds of widely observed MCs, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and microcystin-RR (MC-RR) were tested and data were collected through the method of equilibrium dialysis. It was found that total plasma protein and albumin content in mammals were nearly two times and four times higher than that in fish, respectively. In the test range of 0-100 μg/mL, binding rates of fish plasma to MCs were considered significant lower (p mammals. And human plasma demonstrated the highest binding rate in mammals. In all the test species, plasma protein binding rates of MC-RR were significantly higher than MC-LR (p 0.05). From the view of protein binding, it is concluded that both the variation of plasma protein composition and albumin binding characteristic could influence the existing form of MCs in circulation, change MCs utilization, alter MCs half-life and further contribute to the difference of susceptibility between mammals and fish.

  16. Proteomic Characterization of Differential Abundant Proteins Accumulated between Lower and Upper Epidermises of Fleshy Scales in Onion (Allium cepa L. Bulbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Wu

    Full Text Available The onion (Allium cepa L. is widely planted worldwide as a valuable vegetable crop. The scales of an onion bulb are a modified type of leaf. The one-layer-cell epidermis of onion scales is commonly used as a model experimental material in botany and molecular biology. The lower epidermis (LE and upper epidermis (UE of onion scales display obvious differences in microscopic structure, cell differentiation and pigment synthesis; however, associated proteomic differences are unclear. LE and UE can be easily sampled as single-layer-cell tissues for comparative proteomic analysis. In this study, a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS was applied to compare LE and UE of fleshy scales from yellow and red onions. We identified 47 differential abundant protein spots (representing 31 unique proteins between LE and UE in red and yellow onions. These proteins are mainly involved in pigment synthesis, stress response, and cell division. Particularly, the differentially accumulated chalcone-flavanone isomerase and flavone O-methyltransferase 1-like in LE may result in the differences in the onion scale color between red and yellow onions. Moreover, stress-related proteins abundantly accumulated in both LE and UE. In addition, the differential accumulation of UDP-arabinopyranose mutase 1-like protein and β-1,3-glucanase in the LE may be related to the different cell sizes between LE and UE of the two types of onion. The data derived from this study provides new insight into the differences in differentiation and developmental processes between onion epidermises. This study may also make a contribution to onion breeding, such as improving resistances and changing colors.

  17. Proteomic Characterization of Differential Abundant Proteins Accumulated between Lower and Upper Epidermises of Fleshy Scales in Onion (Allium cepa L.) Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si; Ning, Fen; Wu, Xiaolin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is widely planted worldwide as a valuable vegetable crop. The scales of an onion bulb are a modified type of leaf. The one-layer-cell epidermis of onion scales is commonly used as a model experimental material in botany and molecular biology. The lower epidermis (LE) and upper epidermis (UE) of onion scales display obvious differences in microscopic structure, cell differentiation and pigment synthesis; however, associated proteomic differences are unclear. LE and UE can be easily sampled as single-layer-cell tissues for comparative proteomic analysis. In this study, a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to compare LE and UE of fleshy scales from yellow and red onions. We identified 47 differential abundant protein spots (representing 31 unique proteins) between LE and UE in red and yellow onions. These proteins are mainly involved in pigment synthesis, stress response, and cell division. Particularly, the differentially accumulated chalcone-flavanone isomerase and flavone O-methyltransferase 1-like in LE may result in the differences in the onion scale color between red and yellow onions. Moreover, stress-related proteins abundantly accumulated in both LE and UE. In addition, the differential accumulation of UDP-arabinopyranose mutase 1-like protein and β-1,3-glucanase in the LE may be related to the different cell sizes between LE and UE of the two types of onion. The data derived from this study provides new insight into the differences in differentiation and developmental processes between onion epidermises. This study may also make a contribution to onion breeding, such as improving resistances and changing colors.

  18. Establishment of reference intervals for plasma protein electrophoresis in Indo-Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas

    OpenAIRE

    Flint, Mark; Matthews, Beren J.; Limpus, Colin J.; Paul C. Mills

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and haematological parameters are increasingly used to diagnose disease in green sea turtles. Specific clinical pathology tools, such as plasma protein electrophoresis analysis, are now being used more frequently to improve our ability to diagnose disease in the live animal. Plasma protein reference intervals were calculated from 55 clinically healthy green sea turtles using pulsed field electrophoresis to determine pre-albumin, albumin, ?-, ?- and ?-globulin concentrations. The e...

  19. A pilot study evaluating protein abundance in pressure ulcer fluid from people with and without spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsberg, Laura E; Wyffels, Jennifer T; Ogrin, Rajna; Craven, B Catharine; Houghton, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether the biochemistry of chronic pressure ulcers differs between patients with and without chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) through measurement and comparison of the concentration of wound fluid inflammatory mediators, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, and proteases. Survey. Tertiary spinal cord rehabilitation center and skilled nursing facilities. Twenty-nine subjects with SCI and nine subjects without SCI (>18 years) with at least one chronic pressure ulcer Stage II, III, or IV were enrolled. Total protein and 22 target analyte concentrations including inflammatory mediators, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, and proteases were quantified in the wound fluid and blood serum samples. Blood samples were tested for complete blood count, albumin, hemoglobin A1c, total iron binding capacity, iron, percent (%) saturation, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Wound fluid concentrations were significantly different between subjects with SCI and subjects without SCI for total protein concentration and nine analytes, MMP-9, S100A12, S100A8, S100A9, FGF2, IL-1b, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TGF-b1. Subjects without SCI had higher values for all significantly different analytes measured in wound fluid except FGF2, TGF-b1, and wound fluid total protein. Subject-matched circulating levels of analytes and the standardized local concentration of the same proteins in the wound fluid were weakly or not correlated. The biochemical profile of chronic pressure ulcers is different between SCI and non-SCI populations. These differences should be considered when selecting treatment options. Systemic blood serum properties may not represent the local wound environment.

  20. PLASMA PROTEIN ELECTROPHORESIS AND SELECT ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS IN HEALTHY BONNETHEAD SHARKS (SPHYRNA TIBURO) UNDER MANAGED CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Michael W; Field, Cara L; Clauss, Tonya M; Arheart, Kristopher L; Cray, Carolyn

    2016-12-01

    Preventative health care of elasmobranchs is an important but understudied field of aquatic veterinary medicine. Evaluation of inflammation through the acute phase response is a valuable tool in health assessments. To better assess the health of bonnethead sharks ( Sphyrna tiburo ) under managed care, normal reference intervals of protein electrophoresis (EPH) and the acute phase proteins, C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin (HP), were established. Blood was collected from wild caught, captive raised bonnethead sharks housed at public aquaria. Lithium heparinized plasma was either submitted fresh or stored at -80°C prior to submission. Electrophoresis identified protein fractions with migration characteristics similar to other animals with albumin, α-1 globulin, α-2 globulin, β globulin, and γ globulin. These fractions were classified as fractions 1-5 as fractional contents are unknown in this species. Commercial reagents for CRP and HP were validated for use in bonnethead sharks. Reference intervals were established using the robust method recommended by the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology for the calculation of 90% reference intervals. Once established, the diagnostic and clinical applicability of these reference intervals was used to assess blood from individuals with known infectious diseases that resulted in systemic inflammation and eventual death. Unhealthy bonnethead sharks had significantly decreased fraction 2, fraction 3, and fraction 3:4 ratio and significantly increased fraction 5, CRP, and HP. These findings advance our understanding of elasmobranch acute phase inflammatory response and health and aid clinicians in the diagnosis of inflammatory disease in bonnethead sharks.

  1. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  2. Key Questions and Answers about Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five years after it was identified as a circulating protein derived from the placenta but of unknown function, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) was discovered to be a novel zinc metalloproteinase expressed by a variety of cell types. Great progress has been made in understanding the biology of PAPP-A and its regulation during recent years, especially in regard to physiological and pathophysiological inflammatory injury responses. But much remains to be learned about this complex protein and its potential clinical implications outside of pregnancy. In this article we address some of the outstanding questions about PAPP-A, in particular about its newly emerging role in the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system. PMID:22463950

  3. Variation of Blood Plasma Gamma-Glutamyltransferase and Total Protein Concentrations in Holstein Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Găvan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the changes of blood plasma Gamma-glutamiltranferase (GGT and total protein concentrations during the growth of Holstein calves. Blood samples were collected from 20 calves divided in two groups (group 1 from 1 to 3 month of age and group 2 from over 3 months to 5 months of age. Mean value of GGT in group 1 was 32.2 IU/L and 27.2 IU/L in group 2. Mean value of total protein was 7.14 g/dl in group 1 and 6.92 g/dl in group 2. The slight changes in concentrations of GGT and total protein may be related to maturity of organs initiation of specific enzymatic activities or simply physiological adaptation of calves to the new environment.

  4. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids, and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desikan, Rahul S; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; McEvoy, Linda K; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S; Brewer, James B; Hess, Christopher P; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L; van der Lee, Sven J; Psaty, Bruce M; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R; Sando, Sigrid B; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2015-06-09

    Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD), inflammation, and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Using summary statistics (P values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of >200 000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides, and high- and low-density lipoprotein levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD single-nucleotide polymorphisms for different levels of association with C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride single-nucleotide polymorphisms using a false discovery rate threshold protein, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci, including 2 genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for AD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Site-specific O-Glycosylation Analysis of Human Blood Plasma Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marcus; Marx, Kristina; Reichl, Udo; Wuhrer, Manfred; Rapp, Erdmann

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific glycosylation analysis is key to investigate structure-function relationships of glycoproteins, e.g. in the context of antigenicity and disease progression. The analysis, though, is quite challenging and time consuming, in particular for O-glycosylated proteins. In consequence, despite their clinical and biopharmaceutical importance, many human blood plasma glycoproteins have not been characterized comprehensively with respect to their O-glycosylation. Here, we report on the site-specific O-glycosylation analysis of human blood plasma glycoproteins. To this end pooled human blood plasma of healthy donors was proteolytically digested using a broad-specific enzyme (Proteinase K), followed by a precipitation step, as well as a glycopeptide enrichment and fractionation step via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, the latter being optimized for intact O-glycopeptides carrying short mucin-type core-1 and -2 O-glycans, which represent the vast majority of O-glycans on human blood plasma proteins. Enriched O-glycopeptide fractions were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in positive-ion mode. Peptide identity and glycan composition were derived from low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragment spectra acquired in multistage mode. To pinpoint the O-glycosylation sites glycopeptides were fragmented using electron transfer dissociation. Spectra were annotated by database searches as well as manually. Overall, 31 O-glycosylation sites and regions belonging to 22 proteins were identified, the majority being acute-phase proteins. Strikingly, also 11 novel O-glycosylation sites and regions were identified. In total 23 O-glycosylation sites could be pinpointed. Interestingly, the use of Proteinase K proved to be particularly beneficial in this context. The identified O-glycan compositions most probably correspond to mono- and disialylated core-1

  6. Interaction of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein with plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ePrchal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Budding is the final step of the late phase of retroviral life cycle. It begins with the interaction of Gag precursor with plasma membrane through its N-terminal domain, the matrix protein. However, single generas of Retroviridae family differ in the way how they interact with plasma membrane. While in case of lentiviruses (e.g. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV the structural polyprotein precursor Gag interacts with cellular membrane prior to the assembly, betaretroviruses (Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV first assemble their virus-like particles in the pericentriolar region of the infected cell and therefore, already assembled particles interact with the membrane. Although both these types of retroviruses use similar mechanism of the interaction of Gag with the membrane, the difference in the site of assembly leads to some differences in the mechanism of the interaction. Here we describe the interaction of M-PMV matrix protein with plasma membrane with emphasis on the structural aspects of the interaction with single phospholipids.

  7. Evaluation of Tc-99m (V DMSA Binding to Human Plasma Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Fang Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As a critical step toward elucidating the mechanism of localization of Tc-99m (V dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, we investigated its binding and transport in blood in comparison with Ga-67 citrate. The studies were performed in vitro by incubating Tc-99m (V DMSA with blood (one sample at 4°C and another at 37°C to assess its binding to plasma proteins using ulrrafilrration, dialysis, electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography and affinity chromatography A parallel experiment for determining the blood binding of Ga-67 citrate was performed using the same procedures. Using ulrrafilrration, dialysis, electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography, labeled plasma samples showed that protein binding for Tc-99m (V DMSA was 45-54% at 37°C and 73-80% at 4°C. The figures for Ga-67 citrate were 43-53% at 37°C and 75-81% at 4°C. Electrophoresis showed that Tc-99m (V DMSA was mostly bound to plasma albumin (36.05 + 2.48% at 37°C and 60.04 + 1.87% at 4°C, and that the proportion of Ga-67 radioactivity associated with β-globulin was 34.23 + 1.37% at 37°C and 55.71 + 3.69% at 4°C. In affinity chromatography experiments, Tc-99m (V DMSA did not bind to transferrin, unlike Ga-67 citrate. This study demonstrates that, at the radiopharmaceutical tracer level, most Tc-99m (V DMSA in blood is protein-bound, primarily to albumin, but not to transferrin. In contrast, Ga-67 citrate was bound primarily to transferrin. The knowledge that albumin is the main transport protein of Tc-99m (V DMSA may contribute to a better understanding of its biodistribution and pharmacokinetics.

  8. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Antarctic Krill Reduced Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Increased Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO and Carnitine Levels in Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Bjørndal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Seafood is assumed to be beneficial for cardiovascular health, mainly based on plasma lipid lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, other plasma risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease are less studied. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC from Antarctic krill on one-carbon metabolism and production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed isoenergetic control, 6%, or 11% PPC diets for four weeks. Rats fed PPC had reduced total homocysteine plasma level and increased levels of choline, dimethylglycine and cysteine, whereas the plasma level of methionine was unchanged compared to control. PPC feeding increased the plasma level of TMAO, carnitine, its precursors trimethyllysine and γ-butyrobetaine. There was a close correlation between plasma TMAO and carnitine, trimethyllysine, and γ-butyrobetaine, but not between TMAO and choline. The present data suggest that PPC has a homocysteine lowering effect and is associated with altered plasma concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. Moreover, the present study reveals a non-obligatory role of gut microbiota in the increased plasma TMAO level as it can be explained by the PPC’s content of TMAO. The increased level of carnitine and carnitine precursors is interpreted to reflect increased carnitine biosynthesis.

  9. Evaluation of Plasma Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Total Serum Protein Concentration in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.N.V.S., Satish; B., Maharudrappa; K.M., Prashant; Hugar, Deepa; Allad, Umesh; Prabhu, Prasanth S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder with a multifactorial etiology. Malnutrition is a major problem for the inhabitants of most countries where OSMF is prevalent. Recently, a new direction in the etiopathogenesis was provided by the identification of fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) in the plasma of OSMF patients. Aims and Objectives: To assess the role of FDP in the etiology of OSMF and to correlate with the nutritional status by evaluating the total serum protein level. The study also determines to evaluate the correlation between the levels of plasma FDP with respect to the staging and grading of OSMF. Correlation between the levels of Total Serum Protein (TSP) with respect to the staging and grading of OSMF was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 cases clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as oral submucous fibrosis. The FDP levels were assessed using both qualitative and semi quantitative method as supplied by ‘Tulip Diagnostics (P) Ltd. Total Serum Protein (TSP) estimation was done by Biuret method using Liquixx Protein kit by Erba, Manheim. Results: The study indicates that in qualitative assessment of FDP only 14 subjects showed the presence of FDP levels>200ng/ml. In semiquantitative assessment there is no significant association between varying clinical stages and histopathological grades and FDP levels. Total serum Protein level showed a marginal increase in all subjects. The study revealed a positive correlation between FDP and TSP in all OSMF subjects. Conclusion: A larger sample size which would be a better representation of the population and the use of different methods which have higher sensitivities and specificities to evaluate FDP level and detailed fractional analysis of protein along with immunoglobulin profiling would facilitate in attaining more conclusive results. PMID:24995245

  10. Specific protein content of pools of plasma for fractionation from different sources: impact of frequency of donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, R; Baurin, S; Timmerman, D; Branckaert, T; Strengers, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Plasma pools for the production of human plasma medicinal products are distinguished according to the collection method (recovered or apheresis plasma) and the donor remuneration status. National regulations and the physical status of the donor determine the donation frequency and plasma volume per session. Relevant protein contents of different types of pools have not fully been compared. Materials and Methods We compared the levels of total protein, 15 main relevant plasma protein markers, and anti-B19 and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae IgG in single-type pools of donations from different countries (Belgium, Finland, France, the Netherlands, Germany, United States). Both recovered plasma from non-remunerated donors and apheresis plasma from remunerated and non-remunerated donors were studied. Results Pools from paid US high-frequency, high-volume plasmapheresis donors showed significantly lower total protein (−9%), albumin (−15%), total IgG (−24%), IgM (−28%), hemopexin (−11%) and retinol-binding protein (−10%) but higher C1-inhibitor, pre-albumin and C-reactive protein contents than pools from unpaid European Union (EU) or US whole-blood or plasmapheresis donors. In contrast to pools from compensated EU plasmapheresis donors, pools from unpaid whole-blood or plasmapheresis donors showed no significant differences, whatever the collection method or country. Reductions in specific protein contents correlated well with protein half-life. Conclusion These results should be taken into account with regard to donor health management and protein recovery. PMID:20840337

  11. Foetal life protein provision of mink (Neovison vison) changes the relative mRNA abundance of some hepatic enzymes regulating fat metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, Connie Frank; Casañas, Maria Arantzazu Aguinaga; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2014-01-01

    The nutrient provision to pregnant females has high impact on the growth and metabolism of their offspring. The objective was to investigate if the expression of hepatic enzymes regulating the fat metabolism was affected in foetuses and adult female mink born by dams fed either a low or an adequate level of protein during late gestation. The relative abundances of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) mRNA were determined by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in the livers of F₀- and F₁-generation dams and in F₁-generation foetuses. Low protein provision during foetal life resulted in a lower expression of FAS in foetal liver but a tendency towards increased expression in the liver of adult dams. There was a tendency towards an effect of life stage of the animal on the expression of ACC resulting in a higher expression among F₁ foetuses exposed to low protein during foetal life than F₀ dams fed a low protein diet during late gestation. The expression of CPT1 was significantly lower among dams exposed to low protein provision during foetal life than controls, possibly indicating a lower rate of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Further investigations are needed to clarify the consequences of these changes for the fat metabolism.

  12. Plasma protein biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma in HCV-infected alcoholic patients with cirrhosis.

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    Gustavo Ferrín

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common and lethal cancers in the world, with limited options for treatment unless timely diagnosed. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and persistent heavy alcohol consumption are independent risk factors for HCC development, which may induce a specific protein expression pattern different from those caused separately. The aim of the study was to identify protein biomarkers for the detection of HCC in HCV-infected alcoholic patients with cirrhosis in order to improve survival. We compared protein expression profiles of plasma samples from 52 HCV-infected alcoholic patients with and without HCC, using 2-D DIGE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The 2-D DIGE results were analyzed statistically using Decyder software, and verified by western-blot and ELISA. In plasma samples from HCV-infected alcoholic patients, we found significantly differential expression profiles of carboxypeptidase-N, ceruloplasmin (CP, complement component 4a (C4a, fibrinogen-alpha (FGA, immunoglobulin mu chain C region, serum albumin, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1. Deregulation of plasma/serum levels of the identified proteins was associated to HCV, ethanol consumption, and/or HCC progression. In the validation through ELISA, C4a serum concentration was increased in HCC patients (2.4±1 ng/mg vs 1.8±0.6 ng/mg; p = 0.029, being the only independent predictor of HCC in the multivariate analysis (OR = 2.15; p = 0.015, with an AUROC = 0.70. The combination of C4a, FGA, CP and PON1 improved slightly the predictive ability of C4a alone (AUROC 0.81. In conclusion, we identified proteins related to acute-phase response, oxidative stress, or immune response, whose differential expression in plasma may be attributed to the presence of HCC. Among them, C4a, and its combination with CP, FGA and PON1, could be considered as potentially reliable biomarkers for the detection of HCC in HCV-infected alcoholic

  13. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

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    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  14. Decreased Bacterial Attachment and Protein Adsorption to Coatings Produced by Low Enegy Plasma Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.E.; Kingshott, Peter; Benter, M.

    adsorption and bacteria attachment/colonization. This is emphasized by the fact that long dwelling urinary catheters, which is a typical silicone medical device, causes 5% per day incidence of urinary tract infection [1,2]. A demand therefore exists for surface modifications providing the silicone material......Introduction Silicone rubber is among the most biocompatible materials available, exhibiting low levels of extractables, absence of plasticizers and additives and fairly low activation of blood thrombogenesis components. However untreated silicone rubber does not efficiently resist protein...... and Methods: Coatings: Plasma polymerized poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PP-PVP), poly(2-methoxyethyl methacrylate) (PPPMEA) or an inorganic oxide (10) coating were applied onto medical grade silicon rubber sheets (Silopren LSR 2050, Momentive Performance Materials Inc.). Plasma polymerization chamber...

  15. Dataset of liver proteins of eu- and hypothyroid rats affected in abundance by any of three factors: in vivo exposure to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, thyroid status, gender differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Miller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Male Wistar rats with different thyroid status (eu-, hypothyroid were exposed to 0, 3 or 30 mg/kg body weight of the flame retardant HBCD for 7 days and obtained data compared with a previous study in females, “Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats” (Miller et al., 2016 [1]. Specifically, proteomic investigation of liver protein patterns obtained by 2D-DIGE was performed and differences between animals groups recorded, based on the factors exposure, thyroid status and gender. All proteins with significantly changed abundance in any of these comparisons were identified by mass spectrometry. General, hormone and proteomic data of both the present and the previous studies are discussed in Miller et al. (2016 [1] and in "Gender specific differences in the liver proteome of rats exposed to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD" Miller et al. (2016 [2].

  16. Fibrinolytic proteins in human bile accelerate lysis of plasma clots and induce breakdown of fibrin sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Elizabeth A; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Verkade, Henkjan J; de Boer, Marieke T; Porte, Robert J; Lisman, Ton

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effect of human bile on the stability of plasma clots and of fibrin sealants. Fibrin sealants are extensively used in liver surgery, for example, during liver resections. Although these sealants have been developed to induce hemostasis, in practice these products are actually mainly used to seal dissected bile ducts to prevent postsurgical bile leakage. We performed in vitro assays in which clotting and lysis of human plasma clots or fibrin sealants was studied in presence or absence of human bile. Addition of bile to human plasma resulted in a dose-dependent increase in clotting time, and a dose-dependent decrease in clot lysis time. Bile also accelerated lysis of in vitro clotted fibrin sealants. Immunodepletion of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) resulted in partial depletion of the lysis promoting activity of bile. Immunodepletion of both tPA and lysine-binding proteins from bile fully abolished the lytic activity, suggesting that tPA and plasminogen present in human bile are responsible for the lysis-promoting effect. Surprisingly, addition of high dose plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) to bile did not attenuate the lytic activity toward fibrin sealants, which suggested that tPA in a biliary environment may be unsusceptible to PAI-1 inhibition. Indeed, bile acids were shown to prevent tPA from interacting with PAI-1, although preformed complexes were not destabilized upon addition of bile acids. These combined results suggest that the presence of tPA and other fibrinolytic proteins in human bile results in lysis of plasma clots or fibrin sealants, which potentially could affect the efficacy of the latter products.

  17. Ageing and smoking contribute to plasma surfactant proteins and protease imbalance with correlations to airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Nobuhisa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of young people start smoking at an age of 13-15, which means that serious smoking-evoked changes may have been occurred by their twenties. Surfactant proteins (SP and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs have been linked to cigarette smoke induced lung remodelling and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the level of these proteins has not been examined during ageing or in young individuals with short smoking histories. Methods Plasma levels of SP-A, SP-D, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 were measured by EIA/ELISA from young (18-23 years non-smoking controls (YNS (n = 36, smokers (YS (n = 51, middle aged/elderly (37-77 years non-smoking controls (ONS (n = 40, smokers (OS (n = 64 (FEV1/FVC >0.7 in all subjects and patients with COPD (n = 44, 35-79 years. Results Plasma levels of SP-A increased with age and in the older group in relation to smoking and COPD. Plasma SP-D and MMP-9 levels did not change with age but were elevated in OS and COPD as compared to ONS. The TIMP-1 level declined with age but increased in chronic smokers when compared to ONS. The clearest correlations could be detected between plasma SP-A vs. age, pack years and FEV1/FVC. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis revealed SP-A to be the best marker for discriminating between patients with COPD and the controls (area under ROC curve of 0.842; 95% confidence interval, 0.785-0.899; p Conclusions Age has a significant contribution to potential markers related to smoking and COPD; SP-A seems to be the best factor in differentiating COPD from the controls.

  18. Selective conversion of plasma glucose into CO2 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the measurement of C-13 abundance by isotope ratio mass spectrometry : proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rembacz, Krzysztof P.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Stellaard, Frans

    2007-01-01

    To study carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption, time-dependent C-13 enrichment in plasma glucose is measured after oral administration of naturally occurring C-13-enriched carbohydrates. The isotope enrichment of the administered carbohydrate is low (APE <0.1%) and plasma C-13 glucose

  19. Association of Plasma Heat Shock Protein 70, Interleukin 6, and Creatine Kinase Concentrations in a Healthy, Young Adult Population

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    Carmen Contreras-Sesvold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of baseline plasma concentrations of creatine kinase (CK, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 have been reported. We report categorical associations which may influence these protein levels. Methods. Blood was harvested for DNA and plasma protein analysis from 567 adults. Mean protein levels of CK, HSP70, and IL-6 were compared by sex, ethnicity, genetic variants—CKMM Nco1 (rs1803285, HSPA1B +A1538G (rs1061581, and IL6 G-174C (rs1800795—self-reported history of exercise, oral contraceptive use, and dietary supplement use. Results. SNP major allele frequencies for CKMM, HSPA1B, and IL6 were 70% A, 57% A, and 60%. Mean CK statistically differed by sex, ethnicity, oral contraceptives, and caffeine. Plasma HSP70 differed by caffeine and protein. Mean IL-6 concentration differed by sex, ethnicity, and genotype. Plasma IL-6 was significantly lower (29% in males (1.92 ± 0.08 pg/mL and higher (29% among African Americans (2.85 ± 0.50 pg/mL relative to the others. IL6 G-174C GG genotype (2.23 ± 0.14 pg/mL was 19% greater than CG or CC genotypes. Conclusion. Differences in baseline CK and IL-6 plasma protein concentrations are associated with genetics, sex, ethnicity, and the use of oral contraceptives, caffeine, and protein supplements in this young and athletic population.

  20. Acute and chronic effects of a 24-hour intravenous triglyceride emulsion challenge on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase, phospholipid transfer protein, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in remodeling of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. We examined the effect of a large, 24 h intravenous fat load on plasma

  1. Multidimensional profiling of plasma lipoproteins by size exclusion chromatography followed by reverse-phase protein arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernick, Gregor; Obermüller, Stefan; Mangold, Cyrill; Magg, Christine; Matile, Hugues; Gutmann, Oliver; von der Mark, Elisabeth; Handschin, Corinne; Maugeais, Cyrille; Niesor, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of lipoproteins and the association of proteins with various particles are of much interest in the context of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe a technique for the multidimensional analysis of lipoproteins and their associated apolipoproteins. Plasma is separated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and fractions are analyzed by reverse-phase arrays. SEC fractions are spotted on nitrocellulose slides and incubated with different antibodies against individual apolipoproteins or antibodies against various apolipoproteins. In this way, tens of analytes can be measured simultaneously in 100 μl of plasma from a single SEC separation. This methodology is particularly suited to simultaneous analysis of multiple proteins that may change their distribution to lipoproteins or alter their conformation, depending on factors that influence circulating lipoprotein size or composition. We observed changes in the distribution of exchangeable apolipoproteins following addition of recombinant apolipoproteins or interaction with exogenous compounds. While the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-dependent formation of pre-β-HDL was inhibited by the CETP inhibitors torcetrapib and anacetrapib, it was not reduced by the CETP modulator dalcetrapib. This finding was elucidated using this technique. PMID:21971713

  2. Flow induced dispersion analysis rapidly quantifies proteins in human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Andersen, Nina Z; Østergaard, Jesper; Zhuang, Guisheng; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Jensen, Henrik

    2015-07-07

    Rapid and sensitive quantification of protein based biomarkers and drugs is a substantial challenge in diagnostics and biopharmaceutical drug development. Current technologies, such as ELISA, are characterized by being slow (hours), requiring relatively large amounts of sample and being subject to cumbersome and expensive assay development. In this work a new approach for quantification based on changes in diffusivity is presented. The apparent diffusivity of an indicator molecule interacting with the protein of interest is determined by Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in a hydrodynamic flow system. In the presence of the analyte the apparent diffusivity of the indicator changes due to complexation. This change in diffusivity is used to quantify the analyte. This approach, termed Flow Induced Dispersion Analysis (FIDA), is characterized by being fast (minutes), selective (quantification is possible in a blood plasma matrix), fully automated, and being subject to a simple assay development. FIDA is demonstrated for quantification of the protein Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in human plasma as well as for quantification of an antibody against HSA. The sensitivity of the FIDA assay depends on the indicator-analyte dissociation constant which in favourable cases is in the sub-nanomolar to picomolar range for antibody-antigen interactions.

  3. Plasma lactate, GH and GH-binding protein levels in exercise following BCAA supplementation in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palo, E F; Gatti, R; Cappellin, E; Schiraldi, C; De Palo, C B; Spinella, P

    2001-01-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) stimulate protein synthesis, and growth hormone (GH) is a mediator in this process. A pre-exercise BCAA ingestion increases muscle BCAA uptake and use. Therefore after one month of chronic BCAA treatment (0.2 gkg(-1) of body weight), the effects of a pre-exercise oral supplementation of BCAA (9.64 g) on the plasma lactate (La) were examined in triathletes, before and after 60 min of physical exercise (75% of VO2 max). The plasma levels of GH (pGH) and of growth hormone binding protein (pGHBP) were also studied. The end-exercise La of each athlete was higher than basal. Furthermore, after the chronic BCAA treatment, these end-exercise levels were lower than before this treatment (8.6+/-0.8 mmol L(-1) after vs 12.8+/-1.0 mmol L(-1) before treatment; p BCAA chronic treatment, this end-exercise pGHBP was 738+/-85 pmol L(-1) before vs 1691+/-555 pmol L(-1) after. pGH/pGHBP ratio was unchanged in each athlete and between the groups, but a tendency to increase was observed at end-exercise. The lower La at the end of an intense muscular exercise may reflect an improvement of BCAA use, due to the BCAA chronic treatment. The chronic BCAA effects on pGH and pGHBP might suggest an improvement of muscle activity through protein synthesis.

  4. Assessment of C-reactive Proteins, Cytokines, and Plasma Protein Levels in Hypertensive Patients with Apical Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmi, N; Galhotra, Vineet; Goel, Pallavi; Rajguru, Jagadish P; Jha, Satyendra K; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-06-01

    Chronic apical periodontitis (CAP) manifests mostly as periapical radiolucency. Various inflammatory mediators play a significant role in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis. In acute inflammatory conditions, C-reactive proteins (CRP) and fibrinogen show a rise in their concentrations. In chronic diseases with high inflammatory components, an increased prevalence of hypertension has been observed. Hence, we assessed the association of CAP and plasma levels of various inflammatory markers (CRP, interleukin 6 [IL-6], and fibrinogen) in severely hypertensive patients. This study was conducted in the conservative wing of the institute and included assessment of 250 hypertensive patients with apical periodontitis. With the help of periapical radiographs and clinical examination, the assessment of following parameters was done: Amount of teeth present, visible plaque index, periodontal pocket probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, presence/absence of carious lesions, which included assessment of caries in crown portion, in the root portion, and residual tooth roots (RR), presence of CAP from each patient; 8 mm of venous blood was collected in the morning for the assessment of plasma levels of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen levels. Immediate collection and processing of the samples were done in the hospital laboratory. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Out of 250, 155 patients were females. Mean plasma levels of CRP observed in our study were 0.8 mg/dL. Mean plasma levels of IL-6 and fibrinogen were found to be 3.3 and 337.1 mg/dL respectively. A significant correlation was observed while comparing mean body mass index (BMI), RR, and CAP in hypertensive patients. While comparing the mean plasma IL-6 levels, mean BMI, and CAP in the patients, significant results were obtained. Significant correlation was observed while comparing the mean BMI and CAP in hypertensive patients. Systemic levels of CRP

  5. Effects of Calorie Restriction and Fiber Type on Glucose Uptake and Abundance of Electron Transport Chain and Oxidative Phosphorylation Proteins in Single Fibers from Old Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Yu, Carmen S; Verkerke, Anthony R P; Cartee, Gregory D

    2017-11-09

    Calorie restriction (CR; reducing calorie intake by ~40% below ad libitum) can increase glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated muscle. Because skeletal muscle is comprised of multiple, heterogeneous fiber types, our primary aim was to determine the effects of CR (initiated at 14 weeks old) and fiber type on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by single fibers of diverse fiber types in 23-26-month-old rats. Isolated epitrochlearis muscles from AL and CR rats were incubated with [3H]-2-deoxyglucose ± insulin. Glucose uptake and fiber type were determined for single fibers dissected from the muscles. We also determined CR-effects on abundance of several key metabolic proteins in single fibers. CR resulted in: (a) significantly (p glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated type I, IIA, IIB, IIBX, and IIX fibers; (b) significantly (p glucose uptake in each fiber type of rat skeletal muscle in the absence of upregulation of the abundance of hexokinase II or key mitochondrial ETC and OxPhos proteins. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The abundant class III chitinase homolog in young developing banana fruits behaves as a transient vegetative storage protein and most probably serves as an important supply of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Swennen, Rony L; Van Damme, Els J M

    2002-10-01

    Analyses of the protein content and composition revealed dramatic changes in gene expression during in situ banana (Musa spp.) fruit formation/ripening. The total banana protein content rapidly increases during the first 60 to 70 d, but remains constant for the rest of fruit formation/ripening. During the phase of rapid protein accumulation, an inactive homolog of class III chitinases accounts for up to 40% (w/v) of the total protein. Concomitant with the arrest of net protein accumulation, the chitinase-related protein (CRP) progressively decreases and several novel proteins appear in the electropherograms. Hence, CRP behaves as a fruit-specific vegetative storage protein that accumulates during early fruit formation and serves as a source of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. Analyses of individual proteins revealed that a thaumatin-like protein, a beta-1,3-glucanase, a class I chitinase, and a mannose-binding lectin are the most abundant ripening-associated proteins. Because during the ripening of prematurely harvested bananas, similar changes take place as in the in situ ripening bananas, CRP present in immature fruits is a sufficient source of amino acids for a quasi-normal synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. However, it is evident that the conversion of CRP in ripening-associated proteins takes place at an accelerated rate, especially when climacteric ripening is induced by ethylene. The present report also includes a discussion of the accumulation of the major banana allergens and the identification of suitable promoters for the production of vaccines in transgenic bananas.

  7. Comparative analysis of different label-free mass spectrometry based protein abundance estimates and their correlation with RNA-Seq gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Kang; Fermin, Damian; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2012-04-06

    An increasing number of studies involve integrative analysis of gene and protein expression data taking advantage of new technologies such as next-generation transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and highly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Thus, it becomes interesting to revisit the correlative analysis of gene and protein expression data using more recently generated data sets. Furthermore, within the proteomics community there is a substantial interest in comparing the performance of different label-free quantitative proteomic strategies. Gene expression data can be used as an indirect benchmark for such protein-level comparisons. In this work we use publicly available mouse data to perform a joint analysis of genomic and proteomic data obtained on the same organism. First, we perform a comparative analysis of different label-free protein quantification methods (intensity based and spectral count based and using various associated data normalization steps) using several software tools on the proteomic side. Similarly, we perform correlative analysis of gene expression data derived using microarray and RNA-Seq methods on the genomic side. We also investigate the correlation between gene and p